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Library 

of  the 

University  of  Toronto 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2012  with  funding  from 

University  of  Toronto 


http://archive.org/details/stationeryoffice1919toro 


"PEACE  AND  THE  NEW  BUSINESS  ERA" 


9/ 


AND 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted   to   the   Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,  and  for  thirty-three  years  the  recognized  authority  for  those  interests. 


vol.  xxxv. 


PUBLICATION      OFFICE:      TORONTO,     JANUARY,      1919 


A 


WAN 


A  Profitable  Investment  for  1919 


MADE    IN    ALL    STYLES    AND    SIZES    AND 
FITTED  WITH  THE  SMOOTHEST  GOLD  NIB 

Discounts  and  terms  on  request 

MABIE,    TODD    &    CO. 

473  College  St.  Toronto 


No.  1 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


To  Every  Canadian 

Dealer 

Things  worth  while  are  worth  working  for.  The  coming 
of  Peace  offers  unequalled  opportunities  for  business  in  all 
lines.  If  we  all  WISH  hard  enough  and  WORK  hard  enough 
1919  is  sure  to  bring  true  our  wish  for  you  of 

A  PROSPEROUS  NEW  YEAR 

We  thank  you  for  the  support  you  have  given  us  in  the  past. 
We  have  tried  to  deserve  it.  We  hope  to  continue  to  deserve 
it  in  the  future.    If  we  fail  in  any  instance,  let's  talk  it  over. 

SERVICE 

Our  business  is  to  PLEASE.  We  market  ALL  of  our  product 
through  you — we  do  not  sell  consumers.  To  PLEASE  we 
must  SERVE.  In  order  to  Serve  we  have  during  the  year 
added  to  our  floor  space  and  our  equipment,  increased  our 
working  force,  and  have  brought  out  a  number  of  new  items. 
So  that  we  start  the  new  year  in  better  condition  to  give  you 
service  than  ever  before. 

FOR   1919 

We  plan  to  make  additional  improvements  and  to  add  other 
new  items,  as  are  justified  by  your  requirements.  In  fact, 
several  new  items  will  be  announced  in  the  near  future. 
Watch  for  them. 

FINALLY  and  AGAIN 
A  PROSPEROUS  NEW  YEAR 

StfSP'G       MADE      IN      CANADA,       ANDJMADE      RIGHT       St^W^C 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Limited 

S39-543  King  St.  W.  Toronto,  Canada 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Judicious    Buying 


an 


d   tin 


Readjustment  Period 


The  Quality  of  the  Goods  you  handle  during  the  coming  time 
of  Reconstruction  will  determine  almost  entirely  the  extent  of 
your  Business  Success. 

Canada  s    Premier   Line 

of 

Blank  Books   ancl   Loose  Lear 
Specialties 

is  the  very  best  line  for  you  to  carry  at  any  time,  but  particu- 
larly during  the  coming  months,  when  Quality  will  count 
more  than  ever  in  the  estimation  of  careful  business  people. 

School  Exercise,  Practice  and  Scribbling  Books,  Envelopes, 
Typewriter  Papers,  Writing  Tablets  and  other  Stationery 
Lines  made  at  the  Dawson  Works  are  deservedly  known  as 
"Canada's  Premier  Line." 

Let  us  show  you  what  Dawson  Quality  means. 


The  Line  of  Unexcelled  jgm^&v^'  The  House  of  Superior 

Value  ^^$MmMli/Mx? /  Service 


LIMITED 

Montreal  Toronto 


li  OOKSKLLER      AND      STATIC  NKI! 


Here    is    an    advertise- 
ment   directed    at    the 
soldier   boys   and    their 
ends.    That  is  nearly 
■•ryhody    these    day*. 

This  advertise 
merit  pushes  th 
sale  of  Bicycles  jo 
the  thousands  o 
H  u  i  e  t  e  v  e  n  i  n 
games   at    home. 


peai 


ing  Card  advertisements  are  reaching 
readers.  Here  are  two  ivhich  will  ap- 
ry    much    larger  size    than    here   shotvv. 


The  Bars  Have  Been  Lifted! 


By  the  happy  outcome  of  the  war  all  sentiment  against  gayety  and  good  times 
has  been  ended.  Already  thousands  of  card  clubs  are  resuming  their  before-the- 
war  activity.    And  they  will  play  as  before  with 

BICYCLE  ™G 


AND 


CARDS 

PLAYING 
CARDS 


Demand  for  the  Congress  Brand  for  play, 
gifts  and  prizes  is  rapidly  on  the  rise. 

But  while  there  is  now  no  prejudice  against 
any  amusement  the  economic  pressure  that 
forces  the  selection  of  inexpensive  recrea- 
tion is  as  great  as  ever.  Living  costs  as 
much,  taxes  are  as  high,  there  are  as  many 
demands  upon  the  pocketbook  as  before. 

And  card  playing  remains  as  ever  the 
leader  among  home  amusements — for  the 


quiet  evenings — now  so  common — when 
there  is  nothing  much  doing. 

All  the  advantages  that,  before  the  war 
was  over,  were  making  this  the  greatest  of 
all  seasons  for  card  sales,  still  exist — and 
organized  play  by  card  clubs  is  picking  up. 

Be  sure  of  your  stock.  Have  a  variety  of 
backs  of  both  brands.  And  cash  in  on  our 
national  advertising  by  using  strong  win- 
dow displays. 


Send  now  for  price-list  and  sample  backs. 


THE  U.S.  PLAYING  CARD  COMPANY 


DEPARTMENT  4 


CINCINNATI,  U.S.A. 


WINDSOR,  ONT. 


BOOKS  E  I-  L  E  }l     A  N  1 )     S  T  A  T  I  ( )  N  E  li 


"STICK"  With  Us 

In  1919 

And  please  place  your  order  for 
Spring  delivery  now  for 

Glucine 

The  Original  Liquid  Paste 

It  never  dries  up. 

Never  goes  stale. 

Is  always  sweet  and  clean. 

Is  economical. 

Is  a  good  adhesive. 

Keep   a   pot   of  Glucine    in    use   on    your   own   counters 
and  desks — and  see  how  your  customers  will  fall  for  it. 


2V2  oz.  size  retails  for  15  cts. 
5  oz.    (with  Cap  and  Brush) 

Retails  for  25  cents. 
10  oz.  (with  Cap  and  Bi-ush) 

Retails  for  50  cents. 
30  oz.  for  refilling,  retails  for 
90  cents. 


Order   in    gross   lots   and   get 
the  good  profit. 


LYONS  BANK  WAX 

Lyons  Parcel  Wax 

is  the  highest  grade  obtainable  in  England. 


MANUFACTURED    BY 


Lyons   Ink   Limited,   Manchester,   Eng. 

CANADIAN    AGENTS: 

MENZIES  &  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Manufacturers'  Agents  Importers  Fancy  Goods  and  Toys 

Importers  Blotting  Paper  Publishers  and  Importers  of 

and  Fine  Stationery  Christmas  Cards 

439    King    Street  West,   Toronto,   Ont. 


liOOKSELLER      AND     STATION  E  It 


AROAVAC 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 

AN  outstanding  authority  in  financial  circles  in  the 
United  States  a  few  days  ago  predicted  that  the 
next  five  years  in  that  country  would  be  prosperous 
to  an  abundant  degree. 


RAW  material  will,  therefore,  be  eagerly  sought  for 
and  will  be  high  in  price.     We  cannot  hope  it  will 
be  as  easily  obtained  as  in  the  pre-war  days.     De- 
pleted stocks  will  be  built  up  only  slowly. 

ON  the  other  hand,  the  great  demand  for  supplies 
for  specific  war  work  is  falling  away  and  more 
goods  are  being  released  for  commercial  use. 
Several  manufacturers  have  assured  us  that  this  consid- 
eration, with  the  increased  efficiency  they  have  had  to 
develop,  will  allow  them  to  fill  orders  more  promptly, 
and  we  anticipate  being  in  a  position  to  fulfill  our  desire 
to  carry  sufficient  stock  to  make  prompt  shipments,  and 
we  are  promised  quicker  delivery  of  orders  placed  with 
the  factories. 


WE  do  not  believe  prices  can  fall  for  many  months, 
and  look  for  continued  activity  in  Canadian  busi- 
ness, caused  partly  by  the  enormous  amount  ot 
public  and  other  work  that  will  be  commenced  at  once, 
besides  the  corresponding  reflection  of  active  business  in 
the  United  States. 


c 


ANADIANS  should  have  no  misgivings  and  must 
courageously  combat  the  tendency  to  "wait  to  see 
what  will  happen." 


ONLY  in  this  way  can  we  all  be  true  to  the  men  who 
are  returning  in  rapidly  increasing  numbers  every 
day,  looking  for  their  rightful  place  in  affairs  which 
they  have  so  dearly  earned. 


We  sell  to  the  trade  only,  representing  the  manufac- 
turers named  below.  Our  stationery  salesmen  will 
carry  Christmas  Cards,  Albums  and  Bibles. 


Kim  Bros.,  Ltd. 

A.  J.  Holman  Co. 

Joseph  Dixon  Crucible  Co. 

American  Vulcanized  Fibre  Co. 

Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co. 

Thaddeus   Davids  Ink  Co.,  Inc. 

Erie  Art  Metal  Co. 


C.  Howard  Hunt  Pen  Co. 
Ideal   Specialties   Mfg.  Co. 
Sengbusch    Self-Closing    Inkstand 

Co. 
I .   Smigel. 
Standard  Crayon  Mfg.  Co. 


Easthampton  Rubber  Thread   Co.      Trussell  Mfg.  Co. 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Ltd. 


Representatives  for  Canada  and 
Newfoundland 

468  King  St.  West,  TORONTO 


i'.OOKSELLER      AND      STATION  Ell 


Express  Your  Opinion ! 

Your  opinion  on  office  equipment  is  respected — you  occupy  almost 
the  position  of  an  expert  on  such  matters. 

Therefore,  when  a  customer  asks  for  an  inkstand,  or  a  device  for  moist- 
ening gummed  labels,  stamps,  etc.,   speak  out  and  say  what  you  think. 
Your  customer  will   appreciate  your  recommendations,   and  the  practical, 
oney-saving  pointers  you  give  will  bind  your  trade  more  closely  to  you. 


SENGBUSCH 
INK  STAND 


For  the  pen-and-ink  user  nothing  excells  the  Sengbusch 
Inkstand.  It  is  handsome  in  appearance — easy  to  use 
— and  practical  from  every  standpoint. 


It  saves  75  per  cent,  in  ink,  because  it  prevents  all  evaporation.  The 
pen-dip  is  natural  and  easy— nothing  to  spurt  or  spatter.  It  prevents 
overloaded  pens,  and  consequent  blots.  It  is  put  up  singly  in  four 
designs,  and  also  with  bases  of  plain  or  cut  glass,  oak  and  mahogany, 
at  prices  to  fit  every  pocket-book. 

Whenever  you  sell  a  Sengbusch  you  make  a  friend. 


No.    431.       Oa"k    or    Mahogany    Base 

with     No.     57     Cut    Glass    Inkstand. 

For    single    desk,    as    shown. 


No.    151.      Oak    or    Mahogany    Base,    with    two    No.    56 

Inkstands,     and    a     Sponge    Cup.       The    complete    line 

includes    112    different    designs    and    sizes. 


Sectional  view  of  Sengbusch 
Self-Closing  Inkstand.  The 
float  in  center  closes  the 
opening  as  soon  as  pen  is 
withdna'wn.  Pen  can  be 
dipped  only  a  certain  depth 
till  bottom  of  float  touches 
bottom  of  well.  Fresh  ink 
from  bottom  of  well  always 
fed  to  pen.  Nothing  to  cor- 
rode  or   wear   out. 


The  IDEAL 

SANITARY 

MOISTENER 


No  office — large  or  small — is 
completely  equipped  without  a 
moisteuer — and  the  Ideal  is  all 
its  name  implies.  For  m  listen- 
ing gummed  labels,  stamps,  en- 
velope flaps,  sealing  tape,  etc., 
it  is  unexcelled.  Made  of  beautiful  white  porcelain, 
with  nickel  plated  brass  bearings.  Noiseless.  Revolves 
easily,  assuring  plenty  of  moisture  on  top  of  barrel. 
Nothing  td  wear  out  or  get  gummed  up.  The  perfect, 
sanitary,  elegant  moisteuer.  Sells  readily  wherever 
quality  i-  appreciated. 


The    Finishing   Touch 

On  many  desks  will  be  found  an  ink- 
well— often  a  Sengbusch — without  any 
base.  A  base — either  pressed  or  cut 
gla.-rs — will  put  the  finishing  touch  no 
that  desk,  both  for  appearance  and 
utility.  Seng- 
busch bases  are 
of  clear,  smooth 
flint  glass,  and 
adapted  to  either 
square  or  round 
inkwells.  A  dis- 
play of  such  base? 
always  results  in 
sales — and  pleased 
customers.  Put 
them  out  where 
they  can  be  seen 
and  watch  them 
sell  themselves. 


No.  232.  In  Pressed 
Glass,  either  squar-* 
or    round    hole    (3") 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Ltd. 


Representatives  for  Canada  and  Newfoundland 

468  King  St,  West,  Toronto,  Canada 


BOOKS  !•:  LLEE      A  N  D      S  T  A  T  1  ( )  X  E  R 


A  NATIONAL 

For  Every  Branch  of 
Business 


GENERAL  facts,  details  in  item,  com- 
prehensive surveys,  concise  reports 
— your  customers  want  to  get  at 
them  all  with  the  greatest  possible 
economy  of  time,  labor  and  cost.  The 
National  Line  of  Blank  Books  anticipates 
every  one  of  these  recording  require- 
ments and  the  wide  range  of  styles  and 
prices  makes  it  possible  for  each  cus- 
tomer to  select  the  particular  book  that 
best  suits  his  purpose  and  his  pocket 
book.  Every  book  is  the  best  that 
scientific  planning  and  construction,  and 
first  quality  materials  and  workmanship 
can  make  it. 

Are  you  in  the  habit  of  passing  along 
:his  important  information  to  your  trade? 
Their  complete  satisfaction  with  every 
National  purchase  makes  their  repeat 
orders  frequent,  automatic — and  very 
profitable  for  you. 


Yorkshire   Toploc  Post  Binder 

National  Blank  Book  Company 

HOLYOKE,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


The  Profit  Is  For  You 


COMPETITION  has  no  terrors  for  the 
stationer  who  carries  and  features 
Dominion  Blank  Books.  He  is 
assured  of  high  quality,  wide  range  of 
styles  and  prices,  and  prompt  service — 
and  his  customers  are  quick  to  realize 
and  appreciate  these  points.  The  Do- 
minion Loose  Leaf  Line  includes  a  com- 
plete selection  of  all  the  latest  and  most 
approved  accounting  devices,  with  their 
supplementary  Transfer  and  Storage 
Binders,  Ring  Books,  Price  Books,  Memos 
and  all  the  various  other  special-purpose 
books  required.  In  design,  finish,  ma- 
terials and  general  durability,  Dominion 
Books  are  superior.  Dominion  Bound 
Books  are  of  equally  high  quality,  and 
are  also  offered  in  a  splendid  range  of 
styles  and  prices. 

As  we  sell  only  thru  dealers,  every  cent 
of  the  excellent  profit  on  the  Dominion 
line  goes  to  you.  Build  a  permanent 
and  profitable  trade  on  the  Dominion 
Line  of  Blank  Books. 


Dominion  Blank  Book  Co. 

Limited 

BERTHIERVILLE,  P.Q. 


IMKiKS  E  L  L  ]•:  R       VXD      s  T  A  T  1 0  X  K  K 


The  Clique 

THE 

ANTIQUARIAN  BOOKSELLER'S 

WEEKLY 

Established   1890 


"TTHE  CLIQUE"  is  the  RECOGNIZED 
1  AND  ONLY  ORGAN  of  the  British 
Antiquarian  Book  Trade.  It  contains  the 
Want  Liste  of  every  firm  of  repute  in  the 
Empire  and  those  of  the  best  abroad. 

About  5.500  Books  are  advertisea  for 
EVERY  WEEK,  so  any  LIVE  BOOK- 
SELLER can  make  a  year's  subscription  out 
of  the  FIRST  NUMBER  he  receives. 

Supplied  to  BOOKSELLERS  ONLY. 
$1  per  annum,  post  free. 

Now  is  the  time  for  the  up-to-date  dealer 
in  old  I  looks  to  subscribe  to  this  old-stablished 
money  maker — Britain's  "unique  journal.'' 

Specimen  free  on  receipt  of  Trade  Card. 

< >verseas  Depf. 

The    Clique    Limited 

Kew  Gardens,  London,  England 


Pen  Department 


r60«?\ 

^YeArJ)    The  most  for 

the  least  outlay. 
Esterbrook  Counter  Dis- 
play  Case   makes   your 
peri    business  profitable 
and  satisfactory. 
Write   for   information. 


Esterbrook  Pen  Mfg.  Co. 

18-70  Cooper  St., 

CAMDEN,  N.J. 

Canadian  Agents: 

BROWN  BROS.  LIMITED 

Toronto,  Canada 


Esterbrook  Pens 


Display  Cane's  Pencils  like  this 
and  they'll  sell  themselves 

The  accompanying  cut  can  only  give  you  a 
faint  idea  of  the  attractive  appearance  of 
this  counter  display. 

The  way  it  shows  the  pencils  will  keep  them 
selling  without  any  effort  on  your  part. 

Each  stand  contains  half  a  gross — tipped 
and  finished  in  six  different  colors,  one-half 
of  which  sticks  up. 

Your  wholesaler  can  send  you  one.  It  costs 
you  $2.40,  and  the  pencils  retail  at  5c  each. 

Remember:  Cane's  Pencils  are  entirely 
Canadian-made  and  are  just  as  good  as 
the  best  imported. 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Company 

Newmarket,  Ontario 


CANE'S  SS^ 


T„fyx^f>r- 

&&Wm.  <£«.  '*0.~»  <8>.  a&T     7bw*»»  kit 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATION  Ki; 


B&P 

Hercules 


^» 


Price  Book  Covers 

Are  All  That  The  Name  Implies 
EXCEPTIONALLY    STRONG 

Bound  in  very  flexible  Levant 
Grain,  Fabri-Hide,  the  most  dur- 
able artificial  leather  that  can  be 
produced. 

Experts  have  judged  it  to  be  real 
Cowhide  at  sight. 


In  view  of  the  present  high  cost 
of  good  leathers,  the  Hercules 
supplies  a  demand,  that  is  per- 
sistent at  this  time,  for  good  wear- 
ing Loose  Leaf  Price  Books  at 
moderate  prices. 

If  properly  displayed,  Hercules 
Price  Books  will  be  one  of  the 
most  profitable  lines  for  the  pro- 
gressive Stationer.  Made  in  all 
the  Standard  Price  Book  sizes  in 
Yi-'m.  and  i-in.  capacities.  For 
sizes,  prices,  etc.,  see  page  No.  44, 
Dealer's  Net  Price  List. 

Boorum  &  Pease 
Loose  Leaf  Book  Co. 

Hudson  Ave.  and  Front  St.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Salesrooms: 

109-111    Leonard   Street  Republic  Building 

New  York  Chicago.    111. 

Old     South     Building  4000    Laclede   Avenue 

Boston,    Mass.  St.    Louis,   Mo. 


GOLD  MEDAL  CRAYONS 

FOR    EVERY    USE 

are  considered  without  equal  and  endorsed 
by  teachers,  mechanics,  artists  and  office 
workers. 

All  of  the  Gold  Medal  Crayons  are  products 
of  quality,   and   sure   sellers   everywhere. 


E,GMTwi/CoiORS 

SCHOOL'  ^CRAYONS 


i|£*TI0MAl.  COLOBJ!' 


pg^gjPl 


TRADL 


The  ideal  drawing  crayon  for  school  and 
home  use.  Put  up  in  boxes  of  6  to  24 
colors.      Also   gift  boxes. 


Made  in  three  grades,  and  packed  in  a 
variety  of  assortments.  The  box  pictured 
contains  six  sticks  and  is  very  popular  with 
kiddies. 

Send  for  catalog  and  price  list  of 
entire  line 

BINNEY  &  SMITH  CO. 

81|Fulton  Street         -         New  York 


10 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


Swans  down   Linen 

i  As  to  QUALITY 
A  Dependable  Line    Satisfaction  to  the  Consumer 

( Quick  Returns  to  the  Stationer 

The  Sale  for  this  commodity  has  been  one  of  ever  increasing  volume 

from  year  to  year. 

Neat   COVER   Design 

Good  quality  Linen  Stock  at  a  Medium  Price.     Sold  most 
everywhere.    Better  try  a  Sample  Order 


Tablets,  Papeteries,  Note  Paper 
and  Envelopes 

Our  Salesmen  are  starting  shortly  with   Lines  for  the  Holiday  Season. 

Don't  overlood  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.  1919  Line  of  HIGH  CLASS 

PAPETERIES.   Entirely  new  designs  and    features. 

They  will  bear  investigation. 

INCLUDED  IN  LINES  CARRIED  WILL  BE  THE  FOLLOWING: 

Christmas  Cards  Tally  Cards  Photo  Albums 

Seals  and  Tags  Dance  Programmes  Crepe  Paper  and  Ribbon  Crepe 

Post  Cards  Calendar  Pads,  etc.  Ribbonzene 

Holly  Boxes  Tinsel  Cord 

Hinaki  Rope  Candles 


Decorations 
Tinsel 


THE  COPP,  CLARK  CO.,  LTD. 

517  WELLINGTON  STREET  WEST,  TORONTO 


11 


BOO  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      A  N  I)      S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  R 


2^ 


gmmgrnBgra™ 


$mnoftlrclfBcje^5 


WATERSTON'S 


"BEE" 


BRAND 


MARK 


SEALING 


Established 
1752 


"  Banker's 
opecie 


is  the  banker's  favorite 
quality.  It  is  a  thorough- 
ly   reliable    wax,    posses- 
sing a  brilliancy  of  colour, 
combined  with  the  great- 
adhesiveness,    and   ha< 
>ing    sold    at    a  -  moderate 


n'MUn-VlflKK 


f^jfrRRlSTONROAD 

'    EDINBU 


jjSt,  Bride  Street- Ludcate  Circus-       l-^-- 

Mjoo  London  ECKk 


SUNDAY  TALKS  WITH  BOYS 
AND  GIRLS 

Forty   Addresses  to   Young   People.      By   G.    E.   MORGAN, 

M.A.      With    foreword    -,y    Rev.    J.    Stuart    Holden,    M.A.. 

_,  D-D-     Cloth.   2s.   6d.   net.   plus    Is.    War   Charge. 

"These  Talks  are  capital,   and  should  prove  of  the  greatest 

issistanee  to   mothers  and   Sunday-school  teachers."'      Literary 

World. 

"This    volume    is    full    of    helpful    Bible   teaching.      It   goes 
straight  to   the   point  as   to   the   need   of   conversion,   and   the 
only  way  of  salvation   through  a  crucified  and   risen  Saviour." 
Friends'   Witness. 

"Parents,  preachers  and  teachers  will  be  particularly  glad 
to  welcome  and  use  this  work."  Evangelical  Christian 
( Toronto). 

VISIONS  AND  PROPHECIES  OF 
ZECHARIAH 

An  Exposition.  By  DAVID  BARON,  with  Foreword  by 
Prebendary  H.  E.  Fox.  Cloth  Boards,  10s.  6d.  net. 
"It  is  a  quarry  from  which  godly  ministers  can  dig  mate- 
rial for  most  profitable  sermons,  and  yet  it  is  written  with 
-uch  transparent  clearness  and  simplicity  that  any  Christian 
if  ordinary  intelligence  can  read  it  with  profit."  Watchword 
ind   Truth. 

"This  is  a  splendid  book,  a  magnificent  exposition  of  the 
visions  and  prophecies  of  Zechariah.  It  is  the  very  period 
when  such  a  volume  should  have  been  written,  and  just  the 
precise  time  when  it  should  go  forth  freely  to  the  people  of 
God.     .  .     We    never   really   knew    how    much    there    is   in 

these  marvellous  visions  and  prophecies  until  we  followed  this 
lelightful    interpretation    of    them."      Springing    Well. 

THE  LORD'S  PRAYER 

An    Interpretation    Critical    and    Expository.      By   JAMES 

W.    THIRTLE,    LL.D.,    D.D.      Large  8vo.      Cloth   gilt,   oe. 

net,    plus    Is.   6d.    War   Charge. 

Rev.    Professor    Griffith    Thomas,    in    the    "Sunday    School 

limes"    (Philadelphia!,    says:    "The   best  book   on   the   Lord's 

Prayer   is   the  most   recent    work    on   the  subject — "The   Lord's 

flayer:   An   Interpretation.'  by   Dr.  J.   W.  Thirtle." 

RULING  LINES  OF 

PROGRESSIVE  REVELATION 

By    REV.    W.    GRAHAM    SCROGGIE.     Cloth.   9s.   6d.    net, 

plus  Is.  War  Charge. 
The  title  of  this  book  best  indicates  itfl  standpoint  and 
;cope.  It  assumes  that  the  Bible  is  a  Divine  Revelation,  an 
inveiling  of  God  to  man  as  Creator  and  Redeemer.  Fur- 
hermore,  that  that  Revelation  is  Progressive,  that  through- 
jut  the  ages  more  light  was  given  as  man  was  able  to  bear 
it.  Yet.  further,  this  book  endeavours  to  show  that,  whereas 
he  whole  of  Divine  Revelation  is  progressive,  there  are  cer- 
:ain  Ruling  Lines  of  teaching  which  give  tone  and  colour 
to  all  the  rest,  and  which  constitute  the  substance  of  Re- 
vealed   Truth. 

The    two   following  are   new   volumes   in   Morgan   A  Scoff's 
Series  of  "  Stories  of  High  Purpose  ".* — 

TERRIE'S  MOORLAND  HOME 

A   Story    for    Girls.      By    AMY    LE    FEUVRE,    Author   of 

"Dudley      Napier's      Daughters,"      etc.        With      Coloured 

Frontispiece    and    Jacket.       Cloth     boards.       4s.    6d.    net, 

plus  Is.  6d.  War  Charge. 

A   new   volume   by    Amy    Le    Feuvre   is   always   hailed   with 

delight.      For  brightness,    realism,   and   excellence  of  tone  her 

stories    are    known    and    appreciated    the    world    over.      This 

latest   work   from   her   pen    is    in   every   sense   as   excellent  as 

any    that    has    preceded    it,    and    will    doubtless    meet    with    a 

hearty    welcome    from    those    who   desire    for    their   daughters 

literature  of  an   ennobling  and  character-building  quality. 

UNDER  COLIGNY'S  BANNER 

A  Story  of  Huguenot  France.  By  ALBERT  LEE. 
F.R.G.S.,  Author  of  "At  His  Country's  Call,"  "The 
Call  of  the  Night  Rider,"  etc.  Cloth  boards.  4e.  €d. 
net,  plus  Is.  6d.  War  Charge. 
A  thrilling  historical  tale  of  the  days  of  the  Huguenots,  full 
of   moving   and   exciting   incident. 


MORGAN  &  SCOTT,  LTD. 

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Big  Opportunities  for  Spring 


See  what  splendid  opportunities  for  big  Spring  selling  lie  in  the 
books  here  listed.     You  know  what  to  do. 

By  COLONEL  JOHN  McCRAE 

IN  FLANDERS'  FIELDS 

The  collected  verse  of  the  now  world-famous  soldier-author,   with  a 
splendid  biography.     $1.25. 

By  HON.  HENRI  S.  BELAND,  M.P. 

MY  THREE  YEARS  IN  A  GERMAN  PRISON 

Here  is  a  find,  surely.    A  book  everyone  will  be  talking  about  and  buy- 
ing.    Ready  early  in  the  spring.     $1.50. 

BY  THE  AUTHOR  OF  "DERE  MABLE" 

THAFS  ME  ALL  OVER,  MABLE 

Here  is  the  "Dere  Mable"  fever  again.   More  letters  just  as  funny,  car- 
rying "Bill's"  war  experiences  a  stage  farther.    75c. 


By  Arthur  Mee,  author  of  "The  Parasite" 
Who  Giveth  Us  the  Victory 

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By  H.  C.  Witwer,  author  of  "From  Base- 
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A  Smile  a  Minute 

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with  its  attractive  touch  of  philosophy. 
$1.35   net 

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Blue  Aloes 

Another  of  those  strong  African  stories 
which  Mrs.  Stocklev's  readers  revel  in. 
$1.50 

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The  Diamond  Pin 

A  detective  story  of  a  new  type.  .  .  .  $1.35 

By   author   of  "The    Four   Horsemen    of 

the  Apocalypse." 

The  Cabin 

This   new   book   by   V.   Blasco   Ibanez   is 

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The  Texan 

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Fire  of  Green  Boughs 

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Rickard $1.50 

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Fragments  From  France 
Good-selling     bound     volume    of    all    the 
"Fragments."   $2.00 


WILLIAM  BRIGGS,  Publisher 

TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


The  Value  of  the  Business  Press 

to  Business  Men 


"Business  men  do  not  realize  the  value  which  trade  journals  and 
technical  magazines  may  have  for  them  in  increasing  the  effici- 
ency of  their  factories  and  in  giving  them  a  broad  and  compre- 
hensive view  of  their  business. 

"Our  foreign  competitors  read  almost  every  article  published 
upon  their  business  with  great  care  and  thoroughness.  Many  of 
them  have  duplicate  copies  of  their  favorite  trade  paper  sent  to 
their  homes  so  that  they  may  read  them  away  from  the  business 
without  being  disturbed.  Many  foreign  manufacturers  contribute 
articles  to  these  journals  on  phases  of  the  business  with  which  they 
are  most  familiar.  Such  articles  are  bound  to  be  helpful  and 
have  a  constructive  effect. 

"Our  trade  journals  and  technical  papers  are  the  best  in  the 
world,  and  they  should  be  supported  and  encouraged  by  our  busi- 
ness men. 

"Copies  should  be  placed  where  employees  can  see  them  and  they 
should  be  urged  to  read  and  study  them. 

"These  papers  are  preaching  the  gospel  of  sound  business  on 
practical  lines  and  are  helpful  not  only  to  business  but  to  the 
country  as  a  whole. 

"//  the  suggestions  made  by  them  in  the  past  had  been  followed 
by  our  business  men  it  would  not  be  necessary  at  this  time  to 
point  out  some  of  the  fundamental  weaknesses  in  American 
business." 


Edward  N.  Hurley,  formerly  Chair- 
man of  the  Federal  Trade  Commission, 
in    "The    Awakening   of    Business." 


The  following  is  list  of  the  MacLean  publications.  Every  publi- 
cation is  a  leader  in  its  field.  Write  us  for  any  information  you 
may  desire  with  regard  to  the  field  covered,  advertising  rates,  etc. 

TRADE  NEWSPAPERS 

Hardware  and  Metal  Canadian  Grocer  Dry   Goods  Review 

Men's  Wear  Review  Bookseller  and  Stationer        Sanitary  Engineer 

TECHNICAL  PAPERS 

Canadian  Machinery  Canadian   Foundryman  Marine  Engineering 

Power  House  Printer  and  Publisher 

MAGAZINES 

MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  FARMERS'  MAGAZINE 

Financial  Post — Weekly  Commercial  Newspaper 

The  MacLean  Publishing  Company,  Limited 

153  University  Avenue,  Toronto  Southam  Bldg.,  128  Bleury  Street,  Montreal 

1207  Union  Trust  Bldg.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 


17 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


How  the  Trade  Paper 
Brings  Business 


IMDAG\TO  ITALIAN  O 


i 


StHOm  •  T«rtn» 


ATVlttPORTAZIONE  *TyE£f>0RTAZIONE.J&. 

7.T.                        TORINO          Wovenber  5th. 

1916. 

noMtxrnc 

VIA  GIOVANNI    PPaTi,  3 

{it   tfMMl   -•11,    ifcpQHI 

VIA  CERNAIA, 

mu  m  answw  I  TOTII 

via  STAMPATORi  «n|oio 

ft.  ■    C    Cm.  »•  .«>■ 

The  l.C.  Gilbert-Menxies  Co.  ltd., 
6               439  King  St.  7., 
Toronto. 

VtA    ROOt 

—  Dear  Sirs:  - 

yt^kr 


IH 


if  II 


flu 


le  feel  obliged   for   the  nane   of  your    esteemed 
firm  to   the   "BOOKS  Till  TO  &  STAT10BEP"  and   from  an  advertlee- 
oent  contained  therein  we  learn  that  yon  are  manufAOtnrers 
of  Toys,     lie  are  especially  interested  in  yonr   "Gilbert 
Machine  Gun"   of  which  we  oottld  no   donbt  plaoe  a  consider- 
able quantity   in  this  Country.     We  have  also  our  seats   in 
many  foreign  Countries  along  the  Medlteranean  Sea  and  we 
are  disposed  to   sell  your  products   also   in  these  Countries. 

Therefore  we  shall  he  very   glad   if  you  will 
kindly  suhnit  us   your  Catalogue  with  prioelist  and  to   send 
us   if  possible  a  sample. 

Considering  the  time  we  are  running  we  believe 
your  Toy  articles  are  very  handsome  Imas  Olfts  for  the 
coning  season  and  something  that  will  be  entirely   In  harmony 
with  the  spirit  and  patriotism  of  the   children.     We  would 
extrenely  appreciate  it   if  we  had  sone   of  your  toy  guns   In 
our  stores  during  Tjnaa  and  Hew  Year,    and  would  weloome  It 
very  muoh   If  you  could  maJte  us  a  small  trial  shipment. 

Please  let  us  hear  from  you  at   an  early  date 
and  we  recommend  you  to  send  us   your  entire  catalogue,   so 
we   can  choose   such  artioles   that  will  mostly   interest  us 
:n  future. 

Meanwhile  we  are,    dear  Sire, 

Yours  very   truly. 


-**^:%iM> 


Manufacturers  of  Stationery,  Toys  and 
kindred  lines  will  be  impressed  with 
this  instance  of  results  obtained  from 
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BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER. 


18 


BOOKSKLLER      AND      STATIONER 


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79    Spadina    Ave.,    Toronto 


A  popular 

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THE 

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Made  from  fine  steel  and  made 
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find  our  prices  are  right. 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


J.  M.  Dent  &  Son,  Limited 


27  Melinda  St. 


TORONTO 


New  Books  Just  Published 

The  White  Island.     Bv  Michael 

Wood $1.50 

Author  of  The  Willow  Weaver 

A  story  of  unusual  and  arresting 
quality.  There  is  real  comfort  and 
mental  retirement  in  this  book. 

The  Little  Daughter  of  Jerusa- 
lem.     By   Miriam   Harry       -     2.00 

Translated  from  the  French  by 

Phoebe  Allen 
A   remarkable  book   about  Jerusa- 
lem.    A  clear  picture  of  everyday  life 
in  the  Holy  Land. 
The     Four     Horsemen     of     the 

Apocalypse         .'_■_-      1.90 
54th  Edition. 

By  Vicente  Blasco  Ibanez. 
Is  recognized  as  the  biggest  seller 
of  the  year,  and  we  are  confident  the 
sale  is  only  just  beginning  of  this  truly 
wonderful  book. 

J.  M.  DENT  &  SON,  LIMITED 

Publishers  of  Everyman's  and  Wayfarer's  Library 


TERRY'S  "avecta" 

pen  rule  or  pencil  clip 
For  After  War  Trade 

A  real  good  profit  bringer,  that  will  pay 
you  well.  Why  not  put  your  orders 
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livery when  peace  comes  again  ? 

HERBERT  TERRY  &  SONS,    LTD. 

The  Spring  and  Presswork  Specialists 
REDDITCH,  ENG. 


Sergt-Major  Wm.  R.  Jones,  No.  59,  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Dra- 
goons (a  Volunteer  from  the  States,  a  member  of  the  First  Canadian 
Expedition,  and  still  carrying  on)  has  written  a  book,  truthfully  and 
interestingly,  giving  a  story  of  three  and  one  half  years'  experience  in 
the  World  War,  entitled — 


"FIGHTING  THE  HUN  FROM  SADDLE  AND  TRENCH" 

Full  of  vivid  descriptions  of  engagements  and  the  life  of  the  fighting  soldier  in  saddle  and  trench.    The 
natural    and   ready   wit   of   the    author   displayed    throughout   the   book,   adds   to   its   interest   and   offsets 
to  a  great  extent  some  of  the  horrors  detailed.     Illustrated. 
On   sale   after   January   15th.     Booksellers,   order   at  once  from  your  regular  source  of  supply. 


AIKEN  BOOK  COMPANY,  Publishers 


Albany,  N.Y. 


19 


I'.OOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


William  Sinclair  &  Sons 


(Stationers) 


Limited 


Makers  of 

Account  and 
Memorandum  Books 
Pocket  Books 
Writing  Pads 
School  Stationery 

Main  Office   and  Factory: 

ALBERT    WORKS 

Otley.    Yorks.    England 

LONDON:     22.  In  Lane.  Paternoster  Rew.  E.C.  4 


CICO  for  Short 

CICO  is  the  short  word  for  Ad- 
hesion. 

CICO  is  the  short  way  to  do  past- 
ing that  is  to  last  long. 

CICO  in  short  is  short  paste  stocks 
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TECHNICAL  BOOKS 

which  please  everybody 

We  have  a  line  of  popular  price 
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work,  instruments,  models,  X- 
rays,  and  wireless.  You  ought 
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Canadians  in  England  are  buy- 
ing them. 

Complete  list  mailed  with  pleasure 


PERCIVAL  MARSHALL  &  CO. 

66   Farringdon   Street 
LONDON  ENGLAND 


The 
Financial  Post 

This  is  a  business  man's  paper.  It  is  of  in- 
terest to  every  man  who  has  money  invested 
either  in  his  own  business  or  in  bonds  and 
securities  of  various  kinds.  It  is  published 
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able form. 

Wholesale  and  retail  merchants  find  it 
valuable  because  they  are  interested  in 
market  tendencies  and  market  factors,  not 
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AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 
JANUARY,   1919 


No.  1 


IN  THIS  ISSUE 

There's  Big  Business  Ahead  of  Canada. 
A  Survey  of  the  Present  Situation. 
Enormously  Increased  Book  Costs. 
What  Some  Leading  Retailers  Say. 
Canada's  Progress  in  Toy  Making. 
No  Ground  for  Fear  as  to  Coming  Days. 
Increasing  Business  by  Special  Sales. 
Confidential  Talks  With  Young  Salesmen. 
Best  Selling  Books  of  the  Month. 
Importance  of  Carrying  Goods  in  Stock. 
Need  For  Accurate  Stocktaking. 
New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated. 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

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23 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 

The  J£ING  BOOK 


fct 


INDUSTRY  and  HUMANITY" 

By  Hon.  W.  L.  Mackenzie  King 

Former  Canadian  Minister  of  Labor 

—a  $3.00  book  that  you  can  sell 
as   readily  as  a  popular  novel 

WHY? 

||  It  is  the  most  important  book  of  the  day. 

lj  It  is  pre-eminently  the  book  of  the  Reconstruction  Period. 

If  It  presents  practical  plans  for  best  meeting  the  New  Era. 

If  This  volume  mirrors  a  life-work  of  investigation  and  study  by  the 
author. 

U  It  vitally  affects  the  interests  of  all  workers. 

If  Just  as  vitally  does  it  concern  all  employers  of  labor. 

If  It  shows  the  way  to  permanent  Industrial  Peace  for  Labor  and  Capital. 

11  It  is  the  forerunner  of  an  industrial  revolution  of  vast  proportions  to 
come  by  evolutionary  methods. 

U  As  a  study  of  the  greatest  question  the  world  is  facing  to-day,  this 
book  will  appeal  to  all  Educators,  Preachers,  Social  Workers,  Legis- 
lators, Students  of  Political  Economy  and  all  Patriots. 

H  Leading  Toronto  Booksellers  sold  out  their  original  supplies  within 
a  week  of  publication  and  re-ordered  in  larger  quantities. 

If  Principles  set  forth  in  this  work  were  adopted  at  the  Important 
Chambers  of  Commerce  Reconstruction  Conference  at  Atlantic  City  in 
December,  attended  by  representatives  from  all  parts  of  the  U.S.  and 
Canada. 


BOOKSELLERS: 

A  REAL  OPPORTUNITY  FOR  YOU. 

WHAT  ARE  YOU  GOING  TO  DO  ABOUT  IT 


? 


Thomas  Allen 

Publisher 
215-219  Victoria  St.  Toronto 


24 


There's  Big  Business  Ahead  of  Canada 


CANADA  is  glad  that  the  war  is  over. 
War  business  was  good.  But  back  of  it  all 
there  was  a  feeling  in  the  heart  of  every  man  worthy 
of  the  name  that  there  was  something  undesirable 
about  the  business.  It  meant  employment — it 
meant  dollars — it  meant  big  money — it  also  meant 
death,  mutilation,  suffering  and  heartbreaks. 

Industrial  Canada  longed  for  the  day  when  the 
word  "war-trade"  should  be  removed.  It  meant 
less  business,  some  disorganization,  some  loss.  But 
away  and  above  that  it  meant  the  removal  of  that 
nightmare  that  had  haunted  Canadian  firesides  for 
endless  months — the  casualty  list. 

So  when  you  are  minded  to  mourn  the 
loss  of  war  orders,  put  the  hvo  things  in  the 
scales,  stand  back  and  look  at  them.  There 
they  tilt,  dollars  on  one  end  of  the  beam,  lots 
of  them — on  the  other  our  own  men  and  boys, 
our  sons,  brothers,  fathers  and  friends.  It 
doesn't  take  long  to  decide,  does  it?  We  glad- 
ly reach  out  the  hand,  and,  brushing  the 
dollars  aside,  welcome  back  the  civilian  sol- 
diers to  our  midst. 

Canada's  war  achievement  in  the  turning  out 
of  shells,  fuses,  airplanes,  ships,  and  all  manner  of 
munitions  and  supplies,  has  been  remarkable. 

When  Canada  turned  to  shells  the  impression 
seemed  to  be  that  a  few  tinkers  had  gone  crazy. 

The  number  of  people  who  accepted  it  as  a  fact 
that  Canada  could  solve  the  problem,  reach  capacity 
production  and  keep  the  product  to  the  high  stan- 
dard necessary,  were  few  and  scattered. 

The  pioneers  soon  proved  that  it  could  be  done. 
The  circle  of  shell  plants  widened,  and  it  became 
an  accepted  fact  that  the  Canadian  shell  shop  was 
a  great,  big,  strong  link  in  the  Allied  chain  that  was 
going  to  put  an  end  to  Kaiserism. 
And  now  for  the  future? 

Don't  make  the  serious  error  of  thinking 
that  recovery  is  the  work  of  a  day  or  a  month. 
Along  with  the  rest  of  the  world,  Canada  has  been 
war-sick.  The  doctors  in  charge,  Foch,  Haig,  etc., 
have  announced  that  the  patient  is  going  to  recover. 
Canada  is  recovering,  and  her  tremendous  resources, 
her  financial  position,  her  broad  acres,  her  powers 
of  construction,  and  the  initiative  and  determination 
of  her  own  people  will  work  wonders. 

There  is.  perhaps,  a  tendency  to  hold  back  in 
some  cases,  to  see  what  is  going  to  happen,  to  watch 
what  the  other  fellow  intends  to  develop.  When 
you  find  a  lot  of  men  holding  back  it's  an  easy 
matter  for  one  courageous  chap  to  step  out  and  take 
a  lead  that  it's  mighty  hard  to  take  away  from  him 
afterward. 

Tf  you've    made  money  during   the  war 


period,  remember  that  it  was  from  an  ab- 
normal cause.  Remember  that  your  money  wa* 
modi:  while  others  were  getting  shot  and  shot 
at.  Remember  that  there  is  a  responsibility 
on  your  shoulders  that  you,  dare  not  discount, 
and  a  burden  for  your  back  that  you  dare  not 
shift. 

There  is  big  business  on  ahead.  And  it  is  for 
him  who  prepares  for  it.  This  preparation  calls  for 
study,  for  investment,  for  patience.  You  owe  it  to 
the  man  who  shouldered  a  gun  and  went  away  to 
fight  your  battles  to  see  to  it  that  he  has  a  decent 
place  to  live  in  when  he  comes  back.  Don't  let  him 
return  to  the  place  that  urged  or  forced  his  enlist- 
ment, and  cheered  his  departure,  only  to  find  that 
it's  a  barren  and  a  jobless  land. 

Be  os  liberal  and  brave  with  your  dollars 
as  you  expected  him  to  be  with  his  life  and 
limb. 

Canada  is  a  great  country — a  wonderful  place. 
It  needs  sane  and  careful  development.  It  needs 
to  be  turned  into  a  good  place  for  the  man  who 
wants  to  do  an  honest  day's  work  and  into  a  mighty 
pool  place  for  the  man  who  wants  to  loaf  or  camp 
on  the  necks  of  his  fellows. 

There's  a  big  gap  between  the  farming  interests 
and  those  of  the  manufacturers.  There  are  men 
abroad,  who  for  purposes  of  political  expediency, 
are  making  it  their  business  to  dig  trenches  and 
build  barriers  between  these  two  great  interests. 
They  do  not  want  the  farmers  to  understand  or 
appreciate  the  problem  of  the  manufacturer,  nor  do 
they  desire  the  manufacturer  to  be  in  a  position  to 
become  familiar  with  the  business  side  of  farming. 
The  longer  the  farmers  and  manufacturers  fight 
each  other,  tlie  better  pleased  will  be  the  political 
pirate. 

There  is  room  in  Canada  for  farmers  and  manu- 
facturers. They  are  both  here  now  and  they  are 
going  to  be  here  in  large  numbers  in  years  to  come. 
Their  best  interests  are  going  to  be  served  by  a 
mutual  understanding  and  a  cessation  of  small 
squabbling  for  political  purposes. 

Canada  is  going  ahead.  Canada  is  not  going  to 
the  bow-wows.  Make  that  your  starting  point.  If 
you've  got  any  doubt  on  your  mental  slate,  reach 
over  and  dip  your  rag  into  the  big  pond  of  optimism 
and  get  that  slate  right. 

Cet  your  eye  on  the  big  business  of  the  future. 
It's  there  just  as  sure  as  Tuesday  follows  close  on 
the  heels  of  Monday.  But  it's  for  the  man  who  is 
brave  enough  to  go  out  and  get  it.  There's  not  much 
brought  in  these  days  to  the  doorstep  of  the  man 
who  shivers  at  problems  that  to  bigger  men  look  like 
golden  opportunities. 


25 


A  SURVEY  OF  THE  PRESENT  SITUATION 

What  Has  the  Immediate  Future  in  Store  For  the  Book  and  Stationery  Business? 


This  Peace  Number  of  the  trade  newspaper,  with  i 
flux  and  the  problems  business  men  arc  about  to  face  in 
one  of  extraordinary  interest  and  outstanding  importanc 
trade,  manufacturing,  wholesale  and  retail,  whir],  form  i 
tion  and  the  prospects  for  the  coming  days,  arc  marked  b 
the  whole  tone  is  such  as  to  engender  a  strong  feeling  of  c 
ing  near,  of  the  high  degree  of  prosperity  that  has  been  s 
Canada  in  the  year  that  has  just  closed.  The  dissemvn 
throughout  the  country  canrtot  fail  to  prove  a  source  of  i 
might  possibly  arise  as  to  what  the  post-war  days  have  in 
ana-see"  attitude. —  The  Editor. 


is  significant  contents  dealing  with  the  present  state  of 
the  readjustment  period  following  the  end  of  the  war,  is 
The  messages  from  representative  members  of  the 
he  symposium  constituting  a  survey  of  the  present  eitua- 
1/  a  nnifnrm  spirit  of  optimism  and  faith  in  Canada,  and 
onfidence  in  the  outlook  for  a  continuation  in  the  corh- 
o  marked  in  the  book  and  stationery  business  throughout 
ation  of  the  sentiments  of  these  significant  messages 
aspiration  that  will  lend  to  dispel  all  misgivings  which 
store,  and  to  substitute  a  "be-up-and-doing"  for  a  "wait- 


's ew   Six-Story   Plant  Spells  This 
Firm's  Confidence 

Perhaps  the  best  indication  I  can  give 
to  show  our  firm's  confidence  in  the 
future  of  the  stationery  trade  in  Canada 
is  to  mention  that  operations  are  to  be- 
gin very  shortly  for  the  erection  of  a 
new  six-story  addition  to  the  Copp- 
Clark  Co.'s  present  manufacturing  plant 
adjoining  the  warehouse,  and  that  this 
will  mean  not  only  extensions  of  the  dif- 
ferent departments  already  in  operation, 
but  that  certain  new  stationery  lines  will 
be   manufactured. 

Looking   to    the    year   ahead    of   us  no 

THE    COPP,  CLARK 


let-up  in  the  fine  business  we  have  ex- 
perienced in  the  trade  during  the  past 
few  years  seems  to  confront  us  and  I 
look  for  a  comparatively  rapid  read- 
justment of  the  industrial  world  froir 
war  to  peace.  My  views  coincide  with 
those  of  the  economists  who  believe  this 
country  to  be  facing  the  period  of  ex- 
traordinary prosperity  following  the 
war.  Prosperity  for  general  business  in- 
variably means  good  business  for  the 
stationery  trade,  so  I  am  not  worrying 
in  the  least  over  the  problems  of  re- 
construction; there  are  none,  as  far  as 
'  e  are  concerned." 

CO.,  LIMITED 


l^P&tstyi/ 


cx^4 


Thinks   Big    Business    Will    Be    Done 

Even  though  there  may  be  a  short 
time  of  reflection  upon  the  part  of  some, 
Ernest  Dawson,  of  the  wholesale  manu- 
facturing stationery  firm  of  W.  V.  Daw 
son,  Ltd.,  is  of  the  opinion  that  business 
conditions  are  likely  to  remain  solid.  Mr. 
Dawson  is  not  given  to  inflated  optim- 
ism at  this  time,  but  he  does  feel  that 
a  lot  of  business  is  going  to  be  done 
and  has  grood  support  for  his  outlook. 

In  the  first  place  the  sale  of  goods 
of  their  manufacture  had  been  large  in 
November,  and  it  was  early  in  that 
month  that  the  armistice  was  declared. 
In  some  respects  the  business  had  con- 
tinued so  heavy  that  the  staffs  had  to 
work  overtime  to  execute  orders.  The 
sale  of  some  lines  had  continued  very 
large.  Even  at  the  present  time  it  was 
probable  that  increased  accommodation 
would  have  to  be  provided. 

Export    Will    Develop 

One  feature  of  the  continued  business 
that  is  looked  for  will  result  from  in- 
creased export  demand.  Enquiries  have 
been  coming  to  hand  and  facts  go  to 
show  that  there  is  an  actual  scarcity 
abroad  of  various  lines  of  paper.  In 
some  parts  of  Europe  the  market  is 
severely  bare  of  supplies  and  so  soon  as 
transportation  can  be  secured  conven- 
iently, Mr.  Dawson  believes  that  a  very 


Manager.   Stationery    Dept. 

considerable  volume  of  trade  will  do 
forthcoming.  This  would,  indeed,  be  suf- 
fi-i^nt  to  offset  any  temporary  cessation 
of  demand  at  home.  But  he  does  not 
anticipate  that  there  will  be  any  marked 
decrease  in  business  here.  Papers  aie 
scarce,  and  have  been  for  a  lon<?  time, 
so  that  supplies  have  not  accumulated. 
What  of   Prices? 

Asked  as  to  the  price  outlook,  Mr 
Dawson  stated  that  he  did  not  expect 
there  would  be  any  change  to  speak  of 
at  "present.  Deliveries  from  the  mills 
could  not  be  made  in  anything  like  the 
■  uant;ties  that  manufacturers  required. 
One  lar^re  producer  with  a  capacity  of 
one  hundred  and  fifty  tons  per  day  had 
said  that  he  would  not  worry  about  the 
sale  of  his  paper,  and  this  man  was 
making  a  good  deal  of  the  ordinary 
grades.  There  was  so  insistent  a  de- 
mand from  many  different  sources  that 
prices  were  very  unlikely  to  be  greatly 
modified,  if  at  all,  for  some  time. 

That  there  seemed  to  be  a  reasonably 
good  spirit  among  the  retailers  was 
voiced  by  Mr.  Dawson.  Orders  had  been 
received  right  along  and  these,  with  the 
possibilities  of  greater  business  expan 
sion  abroad,  would  make  for  a  brigiit 
future.  Good,  straightforward,  and 
sound  business  policy  would  carry  the 
trade  through  in  a  satisfactory  manner. 
26 


"It's    Up   to   the   Individual."   Says   Thos 
E.   Menzies 

439   King  St.   West,  Toronto. 
Editor,   Bookseller  and   Stationer: 

In  response  to  your  request  for  a  let- 
ter on  "The  Coming  Days,"  my  reply  is, 
"Let  'em  come." 

Personally  I  am  not  reading  the  news- 
papers or  bank  presidents'  addresses  to 
ascertain  the  prospects  of  trade. 

I  know  from  the  unmistakable  signs 
all  around  us  that  we  have  to  prepare 
for  the  biggest  and  most  prosperous 
year  in  the  history  of  Canadian  trade. 
and  I  am  laying  my  plans  accordingly, 

During  the  time  I  hive  been  engaged 
in  this  business,  running  now  within  n 
year  of  two  decades,  I  have  come  into 
contact  personally  with  the  stationers 
and  fancy  goods  dealers  from  coast  to 
coast,  to  a  greater  extent  than  most.  I 
have  learned  in  that  time  to  appreciate 
the  pluck,  perseverance  and  enterprise 
of  the  men  and  women  engaged  in  our 
trade.  With  this  in  mind,  I  have  nc 
misgiving-s  but  that  a  lar2:e  percentage 
will  realize  the  promise  of  that  prosp- 
perity  which  the  "after-the-war"  period 
will  produce. 

The  qua'ities  th->t  wrung;  prosperity 
from  the  war  conditions,  when  applied  to 
the  conditions  of  the  reconstruction 
period,  will  produce  a  greater  and  more 
secure  prosperity  than  our  trade  has 
ever  known. 

In  my  humble  opinion  it  behooves  the 
merchant  to  make  so  much  of  the  ex- 
centional  onportunities  of  1919  and  1920 
that  he  will  have  a  surplus  piled  up  for 
all  eventualities  of  the  aftermath. 

The  whole  problem  is  up  to  the  in- 
dividual. Mav  we  a'l  prove  equal  to  the 
task  of  making  the  coming  year  more 
prosperous  than  any  that  has  gone  be- 
fore. 

MENZIES    &    CO.,    LIMITED, 


\krf^ 


President. 

Shortage    o"    Labor    Handicapped 
Production 

Editor,  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER 

Newmarket,  Dec.  28,  1918. 

As    to   the    general    trade   of    1918   as 

compared   with   previous   years   we   have 

been  so  short-handed  in  our  general  line1; 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATION  E R 


that  we  have  not  been  able  to  do  as  great 
a  volume  of  business  as  we  have  in  other 
years,  although  on  account  of  increased 
■cost  and  consequently  increased  selling 
price,  the  value  in  dollars  and  cents  is 
much  greater.  A  good  many  of  our  em- 
ployees enlisted,  and  being  specially 
trained  men,  the  most  of  them  having 
been  with  us  during  nearly  all  of  their 
working  lives,  we  have  found  it  impos- 
sible to  replace  them,  but  with  their  re- 
turn we  look  forward  to  an  increased 
output,  and  as  to  the  coming  year  we 
cannot  but  feel  that  it  will  show  satis- 
factory results,  if  the  general  situation 
is  properly  handled  by  manufacturers, 
merchants  and  consumers. 

Owing  to  the  lessened  production  of 
all  articles  that  did  not  directly  contri- 
bute to  the  war,  the  majority  of  ordinary 
commodities  are  short  on  the  market, 
and  these  commodities  that  are  short  will 
have  to  be  gradually  replaced  until 
stocks  are  back  where  they  were  and  in 
normal  condition.  The  present  high  cost 
of  manufacture,  owing  to  high  cost  of 
labor  ?s  well  as  inefficiency  of  labor 
which  has  had  to  be  substituted  for  more 
skilled  lribor,  in  many  instances  called  to 
war,  will  undoubtedly  continue  for  some 
time  and  a  great  many  people  believe 
prices  will  never  go  back  to  the  point 
where  they  were  before  the  war,  and  this 
will  app'v  to  wa?es  as  well  as  the  cost  of 
manufacturing  and  otherwise  oroducing 
goods.  We  do  not  look  on  the  future  in 
any  other  than  an  optimistic  way,  with 
a  willingness  to  do  our  duty. 
WILLIAM    CANE    &    SON    CO.,    LTD., 


SOME     SOUND     ARGUMENTS     FOR 
TRADE  OPTIMISM 

Optimism  regarding  the  general  busi- 
ness situation  and  the  outlook  is  ex- 
pressed in  a  statement  issued  by  Frank 
Mutton,  vice-president  and  general  man- 
ager of  the  International  Business  Ma- 
chines Co.,  Toronto,  in  which  he  points 
out  that  throughout  the  country  there 
is  a  shortage  of  necessities  and  a  great 
shortage  of  comforts  and  luxuries.  This 
he  believes  will  mean  a  demand  for  the 
products  of  the  nation's  factories  which 
will  absorb  available  labor.  Following 
are  some  points  which  Mr.  Mutton  em- 
phasizes as  indicating  why  good  times 
should  continue: 

Our  Government  have  to  the  credit  of 
our  army  overseas  some  sixteen  million 
dollars  of  deferred  pay;  further,  the 
Government  will  pay  over  three  hundred 
thousand  men  three  months'  extra  pay 
when  they  are  discharged,  amounting  to 
over  forty-five  million  dollars. 

Soldiers'  dependents  are  to  get  three 
months'  special  allowance,  which  will 
amount  to  over  thirty-three  million  dol- 
lars, and  aside  from  this,  each  soldier 
will  be  g-iven  $35.00  for  a  suit  of  clothes, 
which  amounts  to  another  ten  million, 
"five  hundred  thousand  dollars. 


These  items  mentioned  alone,  total 
nearly  one  hundred  and  five  million  dol- 
lars, all  of  which  will  be  spent  in  Canada. 
Had  it  ever  occurred  to  you  there  is  not 
enough  suit  cloth  in  the  country  at  pres- 
ent to  make  sufficient  civilian  clothes 
to  supply  our  soldiers  if  they  were  home, 
to  say  nothing  of  underwear  and  all  the 
other  accessories? 

The  railroads,  the  street*  railways,  in 
fact  every  public  utility  are  run  down 
to  the  heel  in  their  equipment,  which 
will  also  mean  a  tremendous  demand  to 
fill  their  requirements.  The  municipali- 
ties throughout  the  country  have  had  all 
their  local  improvement  work  held  up  for 
over  three  years,  which  will  mean  a  fur- 
ther demand. 

It  will  not  be  lon«'  before  Canada,  for 
the  size  of  its  population,  will  be  amonsi 
the  leading  nations  of  the  world  in  ex- 
port trade,  and  from  other  countries  will 
come  to  us  as  many  orders  as  we  are 
physically  able  to  take  care  of,  which 
will  be  an  important  factor  in  the 
greater  development  of  our  manufactur- 
ing and  needs  for  labor. 


"Period  of  More  Profitable  Business  Is 
Coming,"  Says  Barkerding 
Dealing  with  question  of  increased 
prices  of  standard  goods  in  the  commer- 
cial world  through  the  exigencies  of  con- 
ditions resulting  from  the  war,  and  dis- 
cussing the  question  of  whether  the 
higher  prices  would  be  maintained  in  the 
post  bellum  period,  and  whether  bene- 
fits would  accrue  from  the  continuance 
of  these  higher  prices,  A.  H.  Barkerding. 
vice-president  and  general  manager  of 
the  firm  of  Mittag  &  Volger,  of  Pari: 
Ridge,  New  Jersey,  had  some  interesting- 
things  to  say.  He  said  he  thought  it 
could  be  shown  that  there  were  many 
articles  on  the  market  which  in  the  past 
have  been  sold  at  too  low  prices,  on  ac- 
count principally  of  severe  competition, 
which  has  resulted  in  price-cutting. 
"The  war,"  he  continued,  "has  compelled 
an  increase  in  the  selling  prices  of  such 
goods,  and  I  think  it  can  be  readily  de- 
termined that  the  prices  of  such  goods 
will  never  again  go  to  the  low  levels  that 
prevailed  previously.  There  are  many 
things  in  common  use  and  of  an  estim- 
able value,  but  are  not  regarded  so  for 
the  simple  reason  that  we  accept  con- 
veniences so  readily.  We  take  them,  in 
fact,  as  a  matter  of  course,  scarcely  ever 
giving  any  thought  to  the  inventive 
genius  that  has  made  possible  the  use  of 
these  things.  We  are  surrounded  by 
wonderful  inventions  that  only  a  few 
years  ago  would  have  been  thought  im- 
possible. Yet  we  use  them  every  day  as 
a  mattter  of  course,  and  perhaps  never 
give  any  thought  to  the  inconveniences 
that  we  would  suffer  without  them. 

"I  am  particularly  impressed  with  this 
idea  from  the  standpoint  of  my  own 
business,  that  of  manufacturing  type- 
writer ribbons  and  carbon  papers.  I  am 
compelled  to  realize  the  immense  im- 
portance of  these  two  apparently  simple 
articles,  yet  the  most  indispensable  in 
the  efficient  conduct  of  business.  But 
yet,  how  little  importance  we  attach  to 
27 


them,  regarding  them  in  the  light  of  be- 
ing very  common  material.  But  stop  to 
think  a  moment,  how  would  it  be  possi- 
ble to  conduct  the  business  of  the  coun- 
try generally  without  the  use  of  writing 
machines  ?  To  use  a  writing  machine 
you  must  have  the  typewriter  ribbon;  to 
make  duplicate  copies  on  this  machine 
you  must  have  carbon  paper,  but  in  the 
past  there  has  been  no  standard  of  value 
attached  to  these  goods.  But  the  war  is 
changing  all  of  that;  therefore,  I  cite 
this  particular  industry  as  an  example. 
It  will  mean  that  after  the  war  these 
goods  will  assume  the  place  that  they 
should.  They  will  have  acquired  a 
standard  of  value.  In  other  words,  the 
present  increased  prices  at  which  these 
goods  must  be  sold  will  have  helped 
stabilize  them. 

"In  future  a  person  purchasing  a  type- 
writer ribbon  and  paying  a  dollar  for  it, 
or  a  box  of  carbon  at  $3.00,  $3.50  or 
$4.00,  will  recognize  that  he  is  getting 
value  received  and  that  the  wonderful 
service  that  these  articles  afford  is  in 
excess  of  the  amount  paid  for  them. 

"This  illustration  will  also  aptly  apply 
to  many  other  goods,  because  it  is  not- 
ably true  that  we  prize  much  more 
highly  those  things  for  which  we  have 
paid  a  good  price  than  something  that  is 
cheap.  This  stabilizing  of  values  will 
also  be  of  immense  benefit  to  the  manu- 
facturers. This  will  enable  them  to  make 
a  margin  of  profit  that  will  put  their 
business  on  a  sound  basis  and  then  in 
turn  will  prove  a  great  benefit  to  em- 
ployees, because  it  is  true  that  when  a 
concern  is  prosperous  they  are  disposed 
to  be  far  more  liberal,  even  to  the  extent 
of  sharing  a  certain  percentage  of  the 
profits  or  the  giving  of  substantial 
bonuses,  and  co-operation  of  that  kind 
will  undoubtedly  be  demanded  in  the  re- 
adjustment of  matters  when  the  war  is 
over.  We  should  now  begin  to  devote 
thon"ht  and  attention  to  matters  of  this 
kind,  and  in  that  way  prepare  ourselves 
to  meet  the  unusual  conditions  that  will 
certainly  confront  us  during  the  recon- 
struction period.  But  it  is  my  belief  that 
this  period  will  be  followed  by  an  era  of 
better  times  and  better  conditions  than 
ever  existed  before  in  the  history  of  our 
country." 


Montreal  House  Expanding 

Montreal,  Dec.  28,  1918. 
Editor,    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER. 

Dear  Sir, — 

I  am  in  receipt  of  your  post  card  of 
lecent  date  asking  for  a  message  for 
your  publication  of  the  January  issue  of 
the  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER, 
and  will  say  that  my  Christmas  trade 
was  better  for  1918  than  any  previous 
year. 

I  am  one  of  those  who  look  for  a  con- 
tinuance of  good  business  during  the 
adjustment  period  following  peace,  and 
believe  that  after  this  adjustment  has 
taken  place  business  the  world  over  will 
be  as  good,  or  even  better  than  it  was 
before   the   war. 


HOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


To  give  you  an  idea  just  how  I  feel 
about  it  I  will  say  that  I  am  organizing 
a  limited  liability  company  called  the 
"International  Export  —  Import  Com- 
pany, Limited,"  and  at  the  present  time 
am  corresponding  with  the  different 
countries  with  the  idea  of  trading  with 
them  as  soon  as  they  are  in  a  position  to 
handle  business  following  the  adjust- 
ment period. 

I  received  two  enquiries  through  my 
advertisement  in  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER,  one  from  Australia,  and 
one  from  Italy,  for  Violaphone  gold  point 
phonograph  needles,  one  of  the  enquiries 
asking  for  quotations  on  an  order  of 
approximately  $50,000  and  the  other  a 
substantial    order. 

I  might  state  that  as  soon  as  I  am  pre- 
pared to  do  business  under  the  company 
name  you  will   hear  from   me. 


^y^^^u^^ 


Sees  a  Vigorous  Revival  in  General   Ad- 
vertising 

539-543  King  West,  Toronto. 

Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

You  ask  us  to  give  you  a  statement  as 
to  the  outlook  for  the  coming  readjust 
ment  period. 

From  our  viewpoint  prospects  were 
never  brighter.  Business  has  been  good 
for  the  past  year,  but  no  one  bought 
for  future  requirements;  as  a  result, 
stocks  are  below  normal.  Christmas 
trade  is  reported  heavy,  which  will  fur- 
ther reduce  goods  on  the  shelves  of 
dealers. 

The  same  condition  exists  with  the 
manufacturer.  Material  has  been  so 
hard  to  secure,  and  labor  so  scarce,  that 
few  have  been  able  to  fill  orders  com- 
plete or  to  build  up  stocks.  In  fact 
most  of  us  are  starting  the  new  year 
with  many  unfilled  orders  for  staple 
goods  on  hand.  This  applies  to  manu- 
facturers and  wholesalers  in  practically 
all  lines. 

The  raw  material  situation  is  about 
the  same.  There  is  an  actual  shortage 
of  almost  all  kinds  of  material,  which, 
coupled  up  with  the  low  stocks  and  un- 


filled orders,  is  going  to  make  for  busy 
factories  for  months.  Besides,  our 
factories  are  better  equipped  and  better 
trained  than  before  the  war,  so  are  able 
to  reach  out  after  export  business  as 
well. 

What  does  all  this  mean  to  the  retail 
stationer  ?  The  change  from  one  class 
of  product  to  another  which  many  of  our 
factories  are  making  means  new  ledgers, 
new  stationery,  new  office  equipment  of 
all  kinds,  and  a  most  vigorous  revival 
of  advertising — which  means  more  print- 
ing, more  stationery,  etc. 

The  change  from  khaki  to  mufti  means 
an  unusual  demand  for  memo  books, 
ring  books,  leather  goods,  etc.,  for  it  is 
the  young  man  who  buys  this  class  of 
goods. 

The  return  of  the  students  to  college 
and  university  means  a  big  demand  for 
school   supplies,  note  books,  etc. 

Canada  stands  to-day  before  the  world 
as  a  country,  not  a  colony.  A  country 
that  has  proven  its  importance,  its 
ability,  its  resources.  Where  we  were 
known  as  a  country  of  ice  and  snow, 
Indian  and  Esquimaux,  we  are  now 
known  for  our  undeveloped  resources — 
for  the  richness  of  our  soil,  forests  and 
mines,  and  as  the  country  of  unlimited 
possibilities.  This  means  unusual  at- 
tractions to  the  better  class  of  immi- 
grants, and  speaks  for  a  rapid  increase 
in  population. 

This  is  only  a  short  resume  of  condi- 
tions as  we  see  them,  and  only  a  few  of 
the  reasons  why  we  are  so  sure  of  pros- 
perity for  the  whole  Dominion. 

The  wise  stationer  is  the  one  who 
takes  proper  notice  of  these  conditions 
and  prepares  his  stock  and  organizes  his 
selling  force  to  get  after  his  share  of  the 
good  things  to  come. 

LUCKETT   LOOSE   LEAF  LIMITED, 


President. 


A  Year  of  Opportunity 

William  E.  Coutts  is  among  the  men 
of  the  trade  who  look  for  even  better 
things  in  1919  than  were  realized  in  the 


banner  year  that  has  just  closed;  and  is 
making  his  plans  accordingly.  The  al- 
most absolute  depletion  of  stocks 
through  the  country  so  far  as  greeting 
cards  are  concerned,  he  considered,  could 
r.ot  fail  to  produce  business  for  the  com- 
ing year  in  greater  proportions  than 
ever  before,  and  the  retailers  would 
have  the  advantage  of  beginning  with 
absolutely  fresh  stock;  consequently 
theirs  would  be  a  rare  opportunity  for 
an  exceptionally  advantageous  year  in 
this  department  of  their  business. 


1919  To  Be  Banner  Year 

Toronto,  Ont. 
Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

1918  Christmas  trade  was  the  test 
in  our  16  years'  experience.  We  look 
forward  with  every  confidence  to  1919 
being  at  least  as  good,  and  possibly  a 
better  year. 

Readjustment  and  reconstruction  will 
provide  ample  and  remunerative  employ- 
ment for  every  worker  in  Canada.  The 
products  of  the  farms,  mines,  forests, 
fisheries  and  factories  of  Canada  are  all 
needed,  and  needed  in  increasing  quan- 
tities, and  from  this  increased  trade 
prosperity  is  bound  to  result.  All  oirr 
preparations  are  made  with  the  full  ex- 
pectation that  1919  will  be  a  banner  year 
for  business. 
THE   PUGH    SPECIALTY    CO.,    LTD., 


V& 


• 


President. 


HALIFAX  TRADE  NEWS 

Retail  Christmas  trade  irt  the  book 
business  has  been  exceptionally  good  in 
Halifax,  particularly  with  the  newer 
novels,  of  which  one  firm  sold  out  their 
entire  stock.  ■ 

T.  C.  Allen  &  Co.  completely  sold  out 
of  fountain  pens  during  the  holiday  sea- 
son and  did  not  have  enough,  to  supply 
the  demand,  although  their  stock  was 
larger  than  usual. 

George  Davidson,  who  has  been  con- 
nected with  A.  &  W.  MacKinlay,  whole- 
sale stationers,  Halifax,  N,S.,  died  on 
Dec.  26th.  Mr.  Davidson  was  one  of  the 
best  known  stationers  in  the  Maritime 
Provinces  and  had  been  forty  years  with 
MacKinlays. 


In  Next  Month's  Issue  Further  Letters 
and  Interviews  Dealing  With  the  1919 
Outlook  for  the  Book  Trade  in  Canada 
Will  Be  a  Special  Feature. 


28 


WHAT  SOME  LEADING  RETAILERS  SAY 

Unprecedentedly  Good  Holiday  Trade — No  Place  in  Canada  For  Pessimists — Avoid 

Carelessness — Watch  Prices 


Expresses  Appreciation 

Editor,    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER. 

We  gladly  avail  ourselves  of  your 
offer  to  give  a  message  for  publication 
in    the  January  issue. 

First. — We  desire  to  congratulate  you 
on  the  up-to-dateness  of  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER  during  the  year.  We 
scan  its  pages  every  month  with  keen 
interest  and  much  profit  to  ourselves. 

Secondly. — We  desire  to  convey  good 
wishes  to  the  Canadian  wholesale  book- 
sellers and  stationers  who  have  given 
us  such  good  service  during  a  very  try- 
ing year. 

Thirdly.  —  Notwithstanding  the  ter- 
rible epidemic  which  hit  all  the  retaii 
trade  very  severely,  our  year's  turn- 
over compares  favorably  with  previous 
years  and  we  are  among  those  who  look 
for  good  business  in  1919.  There  is  al- 
ways business  for  those  who  hustle  for 
it  and  we  are  going  to  "hustle." 
Yours  very  truly, 
RUSSELL  LANG  &  CO.,  LTD. 


Must  Watch  Prices 

Ottawa,  Dec.  28,  1918. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER. 
Weli,  yes,  we  certainly  did  a  very 
fine'business  this  Xmas  time,  by  far  the 
largest  we  ever  had.  We  don't  see  why- 
business  should  not  be  good  in  the  com- 
ing months;  a  large  section  of  the  people 
have  money — either  made  it  or  saved  it, 
and  the  returning  men  are  to  have  six 
months'  pay  from  the  time  they  land 
home.  This  should  help  all  round  to 
keep  any  distress  away  until  the  factor- 
ies have  readjusted  themselves  to  the 
times.  Then  look  how  short  we  all  are 
of  merchandise,  and  have  been  so  for 
months.  From  what  the  manufacturers 
tell  us,  they  are  all  waiting  for  more 
help  to  get  actual  orders  filled,  to  say 
nothing  of  a  reserve.  The  hardest  job 
for  the  retailer  in  the  immediate  future 
will  be  to  watch  prices.  Travellers  will 
b.e  coming  round  shortly  selling  for  next 
fall,  by  which  time  the  present  high 
prices  should  be  down  somewhat.  As 
manufacturers  will  naturally  quote  prices 
on  present  cost  of  goods  we  retailer.; 
will   need   to  be   careful. 

THOBURN    &    ABBOTT. 


Kitchener   is   Prosperous 

"Away  ahead  of  any  previous  year,  ' 
is  how  J.  C.  Jaimet.  of  Kitchener,  sums 
up  the  Christmas  trade  just  concluded, 
and  the  same  was  true  of  the  whole 
year  as  compared  with  records  of  pre- 
ceding years  since  the  Jaimet  store  was 
established  nine  years  ago.  The  in- 
creases were  great  in  both  book  and 
stationery  lines,  and  a  particularly  fine 
trade  was  done  in  leather  goods  lines. 

The  prosperous  year  which  the  numer- 


ous factories  in  this  manufacturing  city 
'nave  had,  assures  a  continuance  of  good 
trading,  which  is  further  accentuated 
by  big  extensions  to  established  fac- 
tories which  are  definitely  planned,  as 
well  as  entirely  new  manufacturing 
plants.  For  instance,  the  Kaufman 
Rubber  Co.  are  to  enter  the  automobile 
tire  manufacturing  field  and  are  fitting 
up  a  big  new  factory;  and  the  Dominion 
Tire  Company's  $500,000  plant  is  to  be 
practically  doubled  in  size  and  capacity. 


Avoid  Carelessness 

Stratford,  Dec.   26,   1918. 
The   Editor,   Bookseller  and   Stationer: 

With  reference  and  replying  to  your 
communication,  we  are  pleased  to  be 
able  to  tell  you  that  our  Christmas  busi- 
ness just  concluded  exceeds  both  our  ex- 
pectations and  those  of  many  years  pre- 
vious. 

We  certainly  think  that  the  book- 
selling and  stationery  business  will  have 
very  favorable  times  in  the  readjustment 
period  following  the  conclusion  of  peace, 
but  this  does  not  mean  that  any  care- 
lessness must  enter  into  our  methods. 

PATTERSON'S  BOOK   STORK 


No  Place  for  Pessimists 

Paris,  Ont. 

Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

Our  Christmas  trade  for  1918  was 
about  forty  per  cent,  better  than  any- 
other  year  since  our  business  was  first 
established  over  thirty  years  airo,  and 
the  year  1918  was  by  far  the  best  in  ou; 
history.  As  for  the  future,  our  opinion 
is,  that  after  the  peace  terms  have  been 
finally  settled  and  readjustment  effected 
Canada  will  have  a  wonderful  period  of 
prosperity.  Now  is  the  time  for  action 
and  encouragement.  There  is  no  place 
in   Canada  for  the  pessimist. 

J.  H.  FISHER  &   SON. 


Exceeded   Expectations 

Oshawa,  Ont. 
Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

We  found  Christmas  trade,  and  trade 
in  general,  exceeded  our  expectations. 
With  regard  to  prospects  for  1919,  I 
think  that  trade  will  be  as  good,  or  even 
better  than  during  the  war  years,  but 
would  not  advise  any  one  to  stock  up 
heavily,  but  to  go  along-  carefully.  In 
fact  I  can  see  nothing  but  brighter  uv<\ 
better  prospects  in  Canada  for  a  lew 
years  yet. 

THOS.  HENDERSON 


No  Fear  as  to  Future 

Port  Hope,  Ont. 
Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

Business  has  been  very  pood  during 
the  present  month,  much  better  than  in 
many  former  years.  We  see  no  -eason 
to  fear  as  to  the  future. 

W.  WILLIAMSON  &  SON 


Best  in  Twenty-Five  Years 

Guelp'h,  Ont.,  Dec.  23,  1918 

Editor,    Bookseller  and    Stationer: 

The  December  business  has  been  far 
beyond  my  expectations  and  greater  than 
any  month  in  twenty-five  years;  in  fact 
it  is  the  first  time  we  have  not  had  some 
lines  that  were  slow  and  draggy  in  their 
sale,  making-  us  do  some  special  adver- 
tising to  help  them  along.  If  anything, 
we  have  almost  a  shortage  of  some  goods 
that  would  be  saleable  if  in  stick.  In  en- 
close my  ads.  for  the  21st  inst.  to  show 
our  satisfaction  with  conditions.  As  for 
the  future  I  am  too  much  of  an  optimist 
concerning  Canada's  greatness  to  think 
that  there  will  be  any  heavy  depression 
in  business  now  the  war  is  over;  possibly 
in  a  year  the  change  of  manufacturing 
conditions  might  cause  a  slight  depres- 
sion, but  I  do  not  think  it  will  ever  be 
sufficient  to  upset  the  retail  trade  to  any 
extent  that  would  be  called  alarming. 
C.  L.  NELLES. 


All   Records  Eclipsed 

Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

Christmas  trade  has  been  enormous, 
beating  all  former  years.  Our  increase 
for  December  (holiday  trade)  over  1917 
will  be  over  50  per  cent.;  over  1916,  77 
per  cent.;  over  1915,  109  per  cent.,  and 
over  1914,  130  per  cent. 

Our  increase  for  the  year  will  be  over 
20  per  cent,  ahead  of  that  of  1917,  and 
128  per  cent,  over  1914. 

Our  business  on  the  Saturday  before 
Christmas  ran  over  four  figures,  with 
2.538  cash  sales,  which  we  believe  for 
a  city  of  20,000  is  a  record  that  will  not 
be  beaten   in  the  whole  Dominion. 

With  reference  to  the  outlook  for  the 
coming  year,  we  believe  it  will  be  better 
than  ever  before  in  the  history  of  the 
Dominion.  With  the  wiping  off  of  the 
IVz  per  cent,  war  duty  and  a  large  re- 
duction in  the  tariff  which  is  bound  to 
come,  the  time  having  passed  when  the 
manufacturers  will  be  able  to  hold  the 
strings  of  Government  at  Ottawa,  sta- 
tioners can  look  forward  to  much  larger 
profits  than  for  the  past  four  years. 

With  the  changes  we  contemplate 
miking  in  the  business  here  after  the 
New  Year,  we  confidently  look  for  an  in- 
crease of  at  least  50  per  cent,  for  the 
year  1919.  and  would  ask  that  you  make 
a  note  of  this  in  your  diary  for  Decem- 
ber. 1919.  so  that  when  you  send  out 
your  similar  enquiry  re  the  business  of 
that  year  as  compared  with  this,  you 
may  see  just  how  much  we  are  out  in 
our  reckoning. 

The  College  Book  Store. 
J.  NASH. 


Good   Business   Ahead 

Frederick  W.  Goodchild,  publisher,  To- 
ronto, speaking  to  BOOKSELLER  & 
STATIONER  of  the  coming  year's  pros- 
pects for  the  book  trade,  considered  that 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


1919  would  see  a  far  greater  demand 
than  ever  before  for  technical  and  busi- 
ness books,  one  circumstance  strongly 
tending  to  bring  this  about  being  the 
marked  inclination  on  the  part  of  soldiers 
to  take  up  courses  of  reading  and  study 
to  fit  themselves  for  better  positions 
•when  they  return  to  civil  life  than  they 
held  lefore  joining  the  colors. 

Mr.  Goodchild  predicted  also  that  there 
would  be  a  better  demand  than  ever  for 
reprint  novels,  and  altogether  he  saw 
good  business  ahead  for  the  Canadian 
book   trade. 


Look  For  Good  Book  Year 
W.  A.  Gardner,  sales  manager  of  J. 
MI  Dent  &  Sons,  looks  forward  to  a  good 
year  in  the  book  trade  in  Canada  and 
that  the  house  he  represents  backs  up  his 
views  is  shown  by  the  aggressive  man- 
ner in   which   the   sales  department  has 


been  organized  for  the  coming  year  with 
the  appointment  of  Frank  Matthews  as 
representative  in  the  far  West  with 
show  rooms  at  Calgary;  Albert  Victor, 
middle  West,  with  show  rooms  at  Win- 
nipeg; Duncan  T.  Hargraves,  in  the 
East,  with  show  roms  in  Montreal;  while 
J.  G.  Gulliford  will  cover  the  Province 
of  Ontario  for  the  head  office  in  Toronto. 


The  Spirit  of  the  West 

Editor,    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER: 

We  are  pleased  to  report  that  in  spite 
of  the  "flu"  epidemic  and  general  un- 
settled conditions  of  business  we  have 
had  much  the  best  Xmas  business  in  our 
history.  Sales  of  books  and  gramophones 
were  particularly  good,  though  sales  of 
practically  all  lines  we  carry  were  very 
good. 


As  this  is  an  agricultural  district,  and 
the  farmer  is  assured  of  high  prices  for 
all  he  produces  for  some  years  to  come, 
we  feel  confident  that  business  condi- 
tions will  be  very  good  in  this  district 
and  throughout  Alberta  and  the  West 
generally,  for  some  years  to  come. 

We  have  unbounded  faith  in  the  future 
of  this  Western  country  of  ours,  and 
expect  great  development  in  the  course 
of  the  next  decade.  We  feel  sure  that 
the  merchant  who  keeps  pace  with  the 
times  will  share  in  the  general  prosper- 
ity. 

Wishing  you  the  Compliments  of  the 
Season,   we  are 

Yours  very  truly, 

THE    GAETZ-CORNETT    DRUG 
AND  BOOK  COMPANY, 

Red  Deer,  Alta. 


Canada's  Progress  in  the  Making  of  Toys 


WHAT     OF     YOUR     TOY     TRADE? 

Members  of  the  trade  are  invited  to  write 
the  editor  telling  of  Canadian-made  lines 
with  which  they  have  had  (rood  success  and 
wherein  Canadian  manufacturers  fall 
short.  obliging  them  to  purchase  toys  and 
dolls    imported    from    the    U.    S.    or   abroad. 


»w 


r£.  are  getting  toys  from  the 
United  States  and  from  Japan," 
said  the  head  of  the  Holland 
Co.,  of  Montreal,  in  a  recent  interview, 
"but  I  am  pleased  to  state  that  we  are 
making  great  headway  in  Canada  in  the 
manufacture  of  toys.  The  dolls  come 
from  the  States  and  Japan,  but  we  are 
dressing  them  locally,  and  dressing  them 
well.  We  have  dolls  dressed  in  every 
particular  with  everything  complete  as 
in  life.  These  are  much  admired.  Do 
you  notice  that  the  Japanese  doll  shows 
a  hint  of  the  East  in  the  formation  of 
the  eyes?  It  is  faint,  but  the  im- 
memorial East  is  there.  They  .will  get 
out  of  that,  and,  in  fact,  the  Japanese 
are  greatly  improved  as  toymakers,  so 
they  are  in  the  States,  and  so  are  we  here 
in  the  Dominion.  We  have  toys  whicn 
are  taking  on  form  and  a  certain  degree 
of  complexity,  made  in  Canada.  We 
have,  for  instance,  beautiful  toy  tables 
and  chairs  in  white  enamel — the  best 
we  ever  had." 

Mr.  Holland  said  that  the  firm  liked 
to  encourage  the  sale  of  useful  toys — 
toys  of  an  educative  character,  but  the  v 
had  many  that  were  highly  ornamental 
at  the  same  time. 

"Toys  made  by  the  soldiers  are  more 
or  less  transitory  in  character,  but  there 
is  no  reason  wiry  we  in  Canada  could 
not  make  as  o-ood  toys  as  were  ever  made 
in  Germany." 

Mr.  Holland  said  that  the  toys  made 
both  in  the  States  and  Canada  were  quite 
insufficient  in  quantity  this  year,  owing 
to  so  nrmv  men  being  taken  for  the  war 
and  the  difficulty  of  getting  steel.     The 


Interesting  Comments  by  the  Head  of  a  Big  Retail  Store  in  Mont- 
real—Believes in  Encouraging  the  Making  of  Useful  Toys 


demand  was  very  large  for  toys  of  ail 
descriptions.  The  dolls  were  great  fa- 
vorites, but  the  whizzing  airplane,  the 
racing  engine,  that  sort  of  toy  enchained 
the  regard  of  the  small  boy. 

The  Year's  Showing 

The  total  value  of  toys  made  in  Can- 
ada in  1918  is  estimated  at  $800,000— 
about  double  that  of  1917.  This  output 
was  from  thirty-five  concerns  making 
toys.  Six  of  these  concerns  began  toy 
making   in    1918. 

The  industry  has  been  confronted  with 
many  difficulties  in  its  comparatively 
brief  existence.  In  some  other  toy- 
producing  countries,  such  as  Great  Bri- 
tain or  Germany,  the  manufacture  of 
dolls,  for  example,  is  greatly  simplified 
by  parts  being  secured  from  makers  who 
specialize  in  a  single  phase  of  the  in 
dustry.  Doll-makers  have  been  assem- 
blers rather  than  manufacturers.  By- 
such  specialization  enlarged  volume  of 
production  is  possible,  thus  reuuc'iig 
costs.  Such  developments  have  not  been 
entered  upon  fully  in  Canada  yet.  Eyes 
for  dolls,  for  instance,  are  not  made 
in  the  Dominion,  but  have  to  be  secured 
from  outside.  Bisque  sand  has  been  dis- 
covered recently  in  Hastings  county,  and 
bisque  dolls'  heads  are  now  being  manu- 
factured that  are  stated  to  be  of  fine 
quality.  Similarly  hair  and  other  parts 
are  now  produced  within  the  country. 

The  manufacture  of  wooden  toys  has 
ben  a  field  in  which  Canadians  have  ex- 
celled. Various  types  of  wheeled  toys 
have  been  made,  with  considerable  suc- 
cess. White  enamelled  wooden  toys  are 
turned  out  in  fairly  large  number,  com- 
prising doll  carriages,  beds,  etc.  Mech- 
anical toys  of  improved  workmanship 
are  being  produced.  Steel  construction 
toys  are  being  made  in  larger  quantities 

30 


and  in  more  varieties  than  was  the 
case  a  year  ago.  Fibre  dolls,  made  of 
wood  pulp,  are  proving  to  be  quite 
attractive. 

Most  of  the  toys  sold  in  Canada  are  of 
U.S.  manufacture.  The  import  figures  tor 
1918  are  not  available,  but  in  1917  over 
$600,000  came  from  across  the  border, 
while  Great  Britain  sent  in  around  $100,- 
000  worth  and  Japan  about  $80,000 
worth.  The  latter  country  has  been  ex- 
porting increasing  quantities  of  toys  to 
Canada  each  year  during  the  war,  and 
the  1918  figures  can  be  depended  upon 
to  show  another  substantial  increase. 

One  estimate  has  it  that  about  one- 
third  of  the  toys  now  being  sold  in  Can- 
ada are  the  products  of  Canadian  toy 
makers.  With  the  amelioration  of  man- 
ufacturing difficulties,  the  coming  year 
should  be  able  to  attain  a  still  greater 
r.:easure    of   success. 


A  new  edition  of  W.  H.  Moore's  not- 
able Canadian  book,  "The  Clash,"  has 
been  brought  out. 


Mary  Webb's  "Gone  to  Earth"  is  a 
new  novel  that  is  being  well  received  in 
Canada. 


"Pathetic  Snobs,"  by  Dolf  Wyllarde, 
deals  with  the  changing  views  and  activi- 
ties of  women  as  influenced  by  the  war. 


Amos  R.  Wells,  the  well-known  editor 
of  "The  Christian  Endeavor  World,"  has 
compiled  "A  Cyclopedia  of  Twentieth 
Century  Illustrations."  Dr.  Wells'  work- 
contains  more  than  nine  hundred  of  these 
absolutely  fresh  illustrations  pithily  and 
brightly  written,  specially  adapted  for 
the  use  of  preachers,  teachers,  Y.M.C.A. 
workers,  or  speakers  in  almost  any  field. 


Editorial  Chronicle  and  Comment 


THE  1919  OUTLOOK 

AS  regards  the  immediate  future  of  the  book  and 
stationery  business,  our  feeling  is  one  of  un- 
alloyed confidence.  We  are  now  passing  through 
a  period  of  transition,  during  which  those  who 
have  been  engaged  in  the  war  industries  or  taking 
an  actual  part  in  the  war  have  to  readjust  them- 
-elves  and  settle  down  to  peace  occupations;  but 
(lie  demand  for  labor  in  every  direction  is  so  press- 
ing that  this  condition  of  affairs  does  not  appear 
to  us  to  threaten  any  extended  period  of  unemploy- 
ment. Stocks  in  practically  every  industry  are  at 
a  low  ebb  and  it  is  likely  to  be  some  time  before 
they  can  be  brought  back  to  their  pre-war  condition. 
Till  this  has  been  done  there  will  be  work  for  all 
who  are  willing  to  work,  and  at  good  wages.  We. 
therefore,  foresee  no  diminution  in  the  purchasing 
power  of  the  public  and  consequently  look  for  a 
period  of  general  prosperity  in  which  the  book  and 
stationery  stores  will  fully  share.  Different  aspects 
of  this  same  subject  are  dealt  with  in  letters  and 
interviews  which  appear  in  this  issue.  It  will  well 
repay  every  member  of  the  trade  to  read  all  of 
these,  and  if  any  new  points  suggest  themselves, 
the  Editor  would  like  to  hear  of  them  for  use  in 
the  next  or  subsequent   issues. 


THE  BIGGER  DA  VS  AHEM) 

NOT  only  are  there  good  days  ahead  of  the  retail 
trade  of  Canada,  having  in  mind  the  probable 
continuance  of  general  prosperity  in  the  post  bellum 
period,  but  there  arc  some  guiding  facts  which  go 
to  conclusively  prove  that  the  stationery  business 
is  going  to  benefit  in  a  very  special  measure. 

There  are  several  developments  contributing  to 
this  outcome.  First,  we  would  refer  to  the  general 
tendency  toward  higher  prices.  This  has  accus- 
fcomed  people  to  expect  to  pay  more  for  everything 
they  buy.  and  thus  the  stationery  trade  has  been 
afforded  a  much-needed  opportunity  to  definitely 
break  away  from  hard-and-fast  price  standards,  as 
for  instance,  in  the  case  of  such  ordinary  items  of 
the  stationery  stock  as  paper  and  envelopes. 

Another  circumstance  is  a  decided  trend  toward 
demanding  the  better  grades  of  correspondence 
papers,  rather  than  the  very  cheapest  lines  which 
had  been  considered  all-sufficient  by  many  station- 
ers, especially  in  the  smaller  towns. 


Everywhere  now.  stationers  are  finding  that  they 
can  sell  the  higher  grades — papers  retailing  at  price- 
actually  double  the  prices  that  they  were  prone 
to  deem  prohibitive  in  t lie  pre-war  days. 

This  awakening  has  been  two-fold,  in  that  be- 
sides influencing  the  purchasing  public  it  has  had 
a  beneficial  retroactive  effect  of  bringing  the  re- 
tailers themselves  to  a  realization  of  the  fact  that 
they  can  readily  -ell  the  higher  grades  of  such  goods. 
The  same  principle  obtains  as  affecting,  in  different 
measures,  the  other  classes  of  merchandise  going 
to  make  up  the  average  stationer's  stock,  and  con- 
sequent the  stationer  has  become  a  better  merchant 
and  the  stationery  trade  a  business  of  greater  possi- 
bilities. 

It  must  he  kept  in  mind,  however,  that  this  new 
order  of  condition-  has  it>  problems  as  well  as  Hi. 
advantage.-,  and  one  essential  fact  that  looms  large 
is  that  there  will  be  a-  greater  necessity  than  ever 
for  genuine  merchandising  ability.  The  little  fel- 
low content  with  a  hole-in-the-wall  stock  of  a-little- 
of-everything  along  the  line  of  stationery,  maga- 
zine-, cigars  and  tobacco — you  know  the  class  of 
-lore  we  mean — will  be  able  to  carry  on  in  about 
the  same  old  non-progressive  manner;  but  the  book 
and  stationery  -tore  that  is  to  keep  up  with  the 
march  of  the  times  i-  going  to  need  the  guiding 
hand  of  a  merchant  who  is  more  capable,  and  who 
possesses  a  wider  vision  than  sufficed  in  the  small 
d;:ys  of  -mailer  business  before  the  war. 


31 


EXIT  TRASHY  TOYS 

>TpllK  day-  of  the  trashy  and  easily  destructible 
A  toy-  that  were  so  common,  and  the  cause  of  so 
much  annoyance  and  trade  losses  in  the  days  hefoi 
the  war.  are  done.  This  result  is  a  final  justifies 
tion  of  the  attitude  of  those  retail  stationers  who. 
years  ago,  decided  to  exclude  this  class  of  merchan- 
dise from  their  stores.  But  a  new  era  in  the  toy 
trade  has  dawned  since  the  momentous  days  of  1914. 
and  the  toy  stock  of  to-day  is  most  substantial  in 
comparison.  Not  only  that,  but  the  development 
of  the  "constructional"  idea  in  toy  making  has 
sounded  a  distinct  educational  note,  and  the  result 
is  a  stock-in-trade  that  is  infinitely  more  valuable, 
possessing  proportionately  greater  possibilities  for 
profitable  trading.     Along  with  this  improvement  in 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


lhe  toy  trade,  has  been  manifested  a  similar  advance 
ii  the  potentialities  of  the  doll  trade. 

The  whole  effect  is  such  a  revolution  in  the 
nature  of  this  trade,  that  those  stationers  who  in 
the  past,  with  justification,  dropped  toys  altogether, 
will  ze  well  advised,  providing  the  nature  of  their 
business  at  present  permits,  to  again  take  up  the 
toy  business. 

They  will  find  that,  with  ready  selling  items 
running  up  in  many  instances  to  $25  retail  and 
over,  they  will  be  most  effectually  complimenting 
tin1  stationery  business  proper,  which  is  cardinally 
lucking  in  what  would  seem  to  be  the  proper  pro- 
portion of  higher  priced  goods. 


CHANCE  FOR  EXPORTERS 

THE  date  for  the  great  fair  at  Bordeaux,  France, 
has  been  set  for  May  16  to  31,  and  a  special 
invitation  to  participate  is  extended  to  Canadian 
firms..  All  exporters  and  manufacturers  who  are 
interested  in  expanding  their  trade  not  only  in 
Prance,  but  in  French  colonial  territories,  should 
find  this  big  commercial  fair  an  excellent  oppor- 
tunity to  get  in  touch  with  buyers.  The  Canadian 
<  Jovernment  is  securing  a  number  of  spaces  which 
will  be  at  the  disposal  of  manufacturers.  It  is 
stated  that  prospects  are  for  better  shipping  condi- 
tions in  the  spring  than  have  obtained  for  three 
years.  Reconstruction  material.-  arc  not  likely,  it 
is  stated,  to  prove  a  business-gettiiig  ljlu..  What 
France  needs  for  reconstructing  its  damaged  in- 
dustries in  the  north  and  east  are,  first,  labor:  second, 
credit;  third,  raw  materials  to  keep  French  indus- 
tries going;  fourth,  such  special  equipment  for  iron 
and  coal  mines,  steelworks,  textile  mills,  and  other 
industrial  establishments  as  France  itself  is  not  in 
position  to  make  in  sufficient  quantity  at  this  time; 
fifth',  ships." 

There   is,   obviously,   no   need   of  exhibiting   or 
calline  attention  to  raw  materials. 


GERMANY'S  LATEST  PLAN 

WHILE  no  attempts  have  as  yet  been  reported 
since  the  signing  of  the  armistice  to  unload  <  Ger- 
man made  goods  in  Canada,  it  is  regarded  as  quite 
likely  that  sonic  cleverly  disguised  plans  for  doing 
this  are  under  way.  It  is  believed  that  German 
agents  are  still  very  busy  across  the  line  and  the 
American  Defense  Society  has  issued  the  following: 
"The  subtle  agents  of  Germany  are  here  to  place 
German  goods  on  the  market  and  ultimately  un- 
dersell our  own  manufacturers.  We  have  fought 
Germany  on  land  and  sea  and  now  have  to  fight 
ner  at  home.  The  cheap  goods  from  Germany  are 
made  at  slaves'  wages.  AVe  must  protect  our  own 
industries  in  order  to  give  employment  to  our  re- 


turning soldiers."  Backing  up  this  line  of  action 
several  thousand  stores,  among  them  some  of  the 
largest  in  the  States,  are  displaying  signs  which 
read  "No  German  Made  Goods  Sold  Here."  In 
New  York  city  alone,  these  signs  are  prominent  in 
over  700  stores.  There  have  been  many  rumors  that 
<  rerman  firms  were  not  prepared  to  give  up  their 
foreign  trade  and  would  resort  to  every  sort  of 
scheme  to  unload  their  goods.  It  might  be  good 
policy  for  Canadian  retailers  to  keep  a  weather  eye 
open  for  German  made  goods. 


TAKING  PERSONAL  STOCK 

IN  the  next  couple  of  weeks  many  stationer  mer- 
chants all  over  Canada  will  be  taking  stock.  In 
doing  this  every  merchant  should  not  fail  to  take 
stock  of  himself,  his  assistants,  his  store  organization 
and  his  store  methods.  Some  proprietors  have  found 
on  looking  into  the  matter  that  they  are  neglecting 
executive  work  which  needs  their  urgent  and  per- 
sonal attention  to  take  care  of  work  that  could  be 
done  just  as  well  by  cheaper  help.  Others  have 
found  that  other  methods  than  those  they  were 
using  are  being  applied  by  leading  firms  to  boost 
«ales.  Others  have  discovered  opportunities  for  de- 
veloping side  lines  which  have  turned  out  to  be  most 
profitable  business  builders.  All  these  things  are 
worth  looking  into.  Are  you  a  better  or  more 
efficient  merchant  than  you  were  a  year  ago?  Are 
you  keeping  as  closely  in  touch  with  your  com- 
munity and  its  needs  as  you  should?  Can  your 
.-tore  methods  or  the  methods  in  any  department 
be  improved?  Stock  taking  of  this  kind  will  often 
reveal  points  where  improvements  can  be  made  that 
will  make  for  increased  business  efficiencv. 


WILL  THIS  BECOME  GENERAL' 

A  STEP  that  will  be  watched  by  retailers  with 
special  interest  was  taken  this  month  by  one  of 
the  greatest  mail  order  houses  in  the  Dominion. 
The  firm  announced  that  from  now  on  its  employees 
are  to  have  every  Saturday  afternoon  off  and  during 
the  months  of  July  and  August  all  day  Saturday. 
This  may  seem  a  radical  step  to  take  but  it  is  one 
that  may  be  followed  before  many  years  by  many 
other  firms,  especially  those  employing  large  num- 
1  it-  of  sales  people.  It  is  stated  by  many  manu- 
facturers who  allowed  employees  afternoons  off  last 
-ummer  on  condition  that  the  time  be  spent  in  war 
gardens,  that  the  factory  output  did  not  decrease 
but  showed  a  substantial  increase.  There  is  a  gen- 
eral tendency  on  the  part  of  large  employers  of 
help  to  better  conditions  and  shorter  working  hours 
is  one  of  the  ways  in  which  they  are  watching  re- 
sults with  keen  interest. 


32 


NO  GROUND  FOR  FEAR  IN  COMING  DAYS 

Continued    Sound    Business    Conditions,    Ready  Markets  and  Sustained  Prices  Are 

Ahead  of  the  Trade  in  Canada 


THE  important  question  of  the 
hour  for  the  bookselling  and 
stationery  trade,  and  in  fact  for 
all  trades,  is,  "What  is  business  going 
to  be  like  for  the  next  year  or  two?" 
Everyone  is  convinced  that  ultimately 
Canada  will  experience  a  recurrence  of 
her  old-time  pre-war  prosperity,  but 
what  is  to  happen  during  the  transitional 
period?  Will  that  transitional  period 
be  long  or  short?  Will  it  be  a  matter 
of  weeks  before  our  industiial  workers 
can  settle  down  to  their  peace-time 
avocations  or  will  it  be  a  matter  of 
years?  Have  our  industrial  leaders 
made  their  preparation  for  peace  with 
sufficient  foresight  to  obviate  any 
general  dislocation  of  trade  and  com- 
merce during  the  time  necessary  for 
conditions  to  readjust  themselves  ? 

Upon  the  answers  to  these  questions 
depends  the  outlook  for  trade  in  general 
for  the  next  year  or  two. 

Ask  the  opinion  of  every  business  man 
you  meet  and  you  will  find  the  matter 
is  regarded  in  two  totally  different 
lights.  The  majority  will  tell  you  peace 
has  not  come  upon  us  suddenly  out  of 
the  blue  as  did  the  war  in  August,  1914, 
that  although  there  will  naturally  be 
some  slight  dislocation  of  business,  the 
demand  for  labor  of  every  kind,  both 
skilled  and  unskilled,  is  so  great  that 
v/ork  can  be  found  for  every  one.  That 
our  industries  which  have  been  short- 
handed  for  the  past  two  years  will  quick- 
ly absorb  all  labor  thrown  upon  the  mar- 
ket "oy  the  cessation  of  munition  work, 
;>nd  still  leave  a  large  void  -which  wi'l 
not  be  more  than  filled  bv  the  men  re- 
turning from  the  front.  They  point  to 
the  fact  that  before  the  war,  with  every 
factory  and  retail  store  filled  with  re- 
serve stocks  which  have  been  drawn  up- 
on and  exhausted  in  the  last  four  years, 
there  was  even  then  enough  work  for 
■■'V.  How  much  more,  then,  they  ask,  is 
there  likely  to  be  work  for  everyone  now 
that  those  stocks  are  depleted  and  have 
to  be  replenished. 

New   for  the  Pessimist 

Thus  the  optimist.  Now  for  the  pessi- 
mist, the  man  who  knows  not  the  use 
of  rose-colored  spectacles,  but  looks  at 
things  from  the  darker  side.  He  can 
foresee  only  calamity.  What  is  to  be- 
come, he  asks,  of  the  thousands  of  muni- 
tion workers  who  are  now  to  be  thrown 
out  of  work,  after  earning  more  than  they 
have  ever  earned  in  their  lives  before? 
What  is  to  become  of  our  half  a  million 
soldiers?  Where  are  they  to  find  work? 
For  every  joh  that  is  vacant  will  there 
not  be  scores  of  applicants?  This  will 
bring  wages  down  and  impair  the  buying' 
power  of  the  public  and  thus  business 
will  suffer  generally. 

Now.  which  of  these  two  will  come 
out  on  tot)  as  the  wise  nrophet?  Frank- 
ly, the  writer  is  inclined  to  plump  for  the 
optimist.     His  arguments  appear  to  ret 


upon  a  sound  basis,  whereas  the  fears 
of  the  pessimist  appear  to  be  needlessly 
exaggerated.  In  the  first  place  it  will 
probably  be  a  year  or  two  before  all  our 
boys  return,  and  it  has  been  ascertained 
that  when  they  do,  about  40  per  cent,  of 
them  have  expressed  a  wish  to  go  in 
for  farming.  These  men  will  add  to  the 
productive  power  of  the  country  and  will 
also  form  a  substantial  addition  to  the 
purchasing  community. 

No  doubt  as  regards  wages,  those  who 
have  been  occupied  in  the  munition 
plants  will  have  to  be  content  with  a 
more  modest  remuneration,  but  this  will 
not  be  an  unmixed  evil.  There  is  no 
doubt  that  the  high  wages  which  have 
been  paid  in  this  line  have  been  beyond 
the  intrinsic  value  of  the  services  render- 
ed, and  have  also  tended  to  render  labor 
difficult  to  secure  for  other  industries, 
so  that  a  return  to  normal  conditions 
will  benefit  industry  in  general. 

This,  you  will  say,  is  all  very  interest- 
ing, but  it  does  not  help  us  by  telling  us 
what  conditions  are  going  to  be  like  in 
our  own  trade— the  book  and  stationery 
business.  Have  we  pood  times  ahead, 
or  will  trade  be  slow  ? 

Well,  the  book  and  stationery  busine-s 
depends  pretty  much  upon  the  genera, 
prosperity  of  the  country.  If  trade 
generally  throughout  the  country  is 
good  people  have  money  to  spend  on 
books,  on  stationery,  on  magazines,  and 
the  hundred  and  one  other  items  that  eo 
io  make  up  the  stationer's  stock-in-trade. 
And  if  the  countrv  as  a  whole  is  pros- 
perous the  bookseller  and  stationer  is 
going  to  share  in  that  prosperity. 

Some  business  men.  including  retail 
stationers,  were  stricken  with  cold  feet 
the  other  day  in  the  midst  of  the  general 
rejoicin"  over  the  signing  of  the  armis- 
tice which  practically  ended  the  war. 
They  stopped  waving  their  hats  and 
shouting  and  began  to  wonder,  fearfully 
and  with  bated  breath,  what  was  going 
to  happen  to  them.  They  recalled  read- 
ing and  talking  of  the  vast  readjustment 
to  peace  conditions  which  must  take 
r'ace,  and  leaned  to  the  prompt  con- 
clusion that  this  readjustment  would  hit 
them  squarely  between  the  eyes,  in  a 
business  way;  and,  conseciuentlv  and 
r>aturally,  from  this  conclusion  thev  de- 
cided that  they  had  better  draw  in  their 
horns,  retire  into  their  holes,  and  other- 
wise aret  ready  for  trouble. 

Fortunately  the  average  stationer  is 
not  widely  extended  in  the  matter  of 
orders  for  goods — not  widely  enough 
most  of  the  time.  He  is  a  careful,  not 
to  say  a  stingy,  buyer,  and  does  not  put 
himself  in  a  position,  as  a  rule,  to  get 
caught  in  the  sort  of  thing  which  greets 
the.  speculator  who  bought  on  a  high 
market  and  has  to  sell  on  a  falling-  mar- 
ket. But,  at  the  same  time,  the  fact 
that  hundreds  of  stationery  items  are 
made  of  paper,  a  commodity  which  has 
33 


had  its  ups  and  downs  during  the  past 
year  or  so,  and  that  prices  have  been 
high,  served  as  sufficient  basis  for  some 
of  this  panicky  feeling  on  the  part  of 
many  retail   stationers. 

Fortunately,  however,  most  of  the 
irade  are  level-headed  citizens,  who  re- 
fuse to  permit  themselves  to  be  stam- 
peded, even  by  their  own  fears.  They 
realize  that  while  changes  will  un- 
doubtedly occur  incident  to  the  change 
from  a  peace  to  a  war  basis,  these 
changes  will  for  the  most  part  be  slow, 
and  carried  out  in  such  a  manner  as  not 
to  injure  business;  and  it  is  the  opinion 
of  some  rather  far-sighted  stationers, 
moreover,  that  the  process  will  be  com- 
plete! with  the  minimum  of  damage  and 
the  maximum  of  good  to  them,  the  re- 
tail stationers,  as  compared  with  some 
lines  of  business. 

Post  Card  Prospects 

Picture  postcards  is  one  line  to  which, 
in  the  near  future,  it  should  pay  the  re- 
t.iiler  to  devote  special  attention.  A 
L.rge  number  of  our  returning;  soldiers 
are  bringing  back  with  them  wives  from 
Uie  Old  Country,  and  they  will  un- 
doubtedly be  eager  to  send  their  rela- 
tives pictures  of  their  newly-adopted 
country.  This  desire  may  be  catered  to 
with  profitable  results  by  every  retailer 
in  the  trade.  It  is  of  course  a  line  which 
must  be  fostered  and  developed,  but  it 
;s  one  which,  if  properly  looked  after, 
offers    attractive    possibilities. 

It  should  not  be  overlooked  that,  with 
the  return  of  peace,  competition  in  every 
line  of  business  will  become  keener. 
During  the  past  year  or  two  the  shortage 
of  labor  and  of  raw  material  has  result- 
ed in  such  a  scarcity  of  goods  of  all 
kinds  that  the  element  of  competition 
which  ordinarily  enters  into  business 
transactions  has  been  to  all  practical 
extents  and  purposes  eliminated.  The 
average  purchaser  has  become  accustom- 
•*!  to  take  what  he  could  get  and  be  e;lad 
he  could  get  it.  He  has  been  far  from 
exacting  in  his  demands. 

Take  leather  for  instance,  to  mention 
only  one  item.  The  abnormal  demands 
of  the  Allied  armies  were  just  berin- 
i.ing  to  affect  the  supolv  of  all  articles 
made  from  this  material  and  the  short- 
age promised  to  become  verv  fcute  in 
the  near  future.  The  end  of  the  war 
will  change  all  this,  and  with  production 
pt.  a  high  point  and  the  war  demand 
eliminated,  depleted  stocks  will  soon  be 
replenished  and  competition  will  once 
more  become  a  potent  factor  in  retail 
1  usiness. 

It  is  a  factor,  however,  which  the  live 
letailer  will  regard  without  apprehen- 
sion. He  will  prefer  trade  conditions 
under  which  he  can  get  amole  supplies 
at  reasonable  prices  to  that  state  of 
i.ffair*  in  which  he  has  to  nay  a  hieh 
price  for  evervthing.  and  ev»"  at  that 
(Continued  on  page  34) 


INCREASING  BUSINESS  THROUGH  SPECIAL  SALES 

Breaking  the  Routine  of  Regular  Business  by  Means  of  "Special  Sales"  is  Found  to 
be  Good  Merchandising— How  Several  Philadelphia  Stationers 

Conduct  Their  Sales 

By  ROBERT  F.   SLADE,  in  "Geyer's   Stationer"        ' 


EVERY  stationer,  no  matter  how 
email  or  how  large  his  establish- 
ment may  be,  can  conduct  special 
sales  of  various  stationery  goods  with 
successful  results.  It  is  all  in  holding  the 
sales  during  the  proper  seasons  of  the 
year,  and  in  offering  things  which  are 
in  particular  demand  in  the  neighborhood 
where  the  store  is  located.  After  a  care- 
ful study  of  the  stock  in  the  store,  and 
the  local  conditions  of  the  neighborhood, 
thp  sntioner  can  easily  plan  a  special 
sale  which  will  be  the  means  of  attract- 
in"-   many   new   customers 

Suppose,  for  example,  that  the  sta- 
tionery store  is  situated  in  or  near  the 
business  district  of  a  city  in  this  in- 
stance the  special  sales  should  consist 
of  stationery  goods  which  are  of  use  to 
the  average  business  house.  Specialties 
such  as  blank  books,  ledgers,  loose  leaf 
forms,  waste  baskets,  manifold  paper, 
carbon  paper,  etc.,  are  just  the  correct 
lines  to  boom  in  this  section  of  the  town. 
There  is  a  great  variety  of  other  station- 
ery goods  which  can  be  featured  in  the 
stationery  store  located  in  the  business 
district.  We  mention  merely  a  few 
things  by  way  of  suggestion. 

To  make  a  special  sale  of  unusual  at- 
traction, the  stationer  should  arrange  an 
exclusive  window  display  of  the  line  be- 
ing advertised,  and  the  sale  should  be  in 
progress  for  only  a  limited  period.  Con- 
sider blank  books  as  a  good  "special" 
which  can  be  "pushed"  during  any  sea- 
son of  the  year.  Fix  up  a  handsome 
display  of  the  blank  books  in  the  bulk 
window.  In  back  of  the  exhibit  have  a 
spacious   sign  reading: 

SPECIAL  SALE  OF  BLANK  BOOKS 

All  Prices  Reduced  for 
Two  Weeks  Only. 

All  Sizes.         All  Styles.         Every  Book 
is  of  the   Best  Quality.     Buy  Now! 

In  addition  to  having  the  show  window 
exclusively  trimmed  with  the  blank 
books,  have  also  in  the  front  part  of  the 
store  one  or  more  tables  stocked  with  an 
assortment  of  the  books.  Neatly  hand- 
lettered  signs,  worded  to  suit  the  occa- 
sion, and  suspended  above  the  tables, 
help  in  directing  the  visitor's  attention 
to  the  special  sale.  If  there  are  a  few 
shop-worn  or  slightly  imperfect  blank 
books  in  the  stock,  place  them  on  a 
smaller  table  and  offer  them  at  reduced 
prices  with  a  sign  reading,  "Slightly 
Shop-worn  Blank  Books  at  About  Hair 
Usual  Prices.  Your  Opportunity  to  Save 
Money." 

One  of  the  Philadelphia  staioners  re- 
cently held  a  "Combination  Sale"  of  car- 
bon paper  and  manifold  paper  which 
terminated     successfully.     One     hundred 


sheets  of  the  carbon  paper  and  five  hun- 
dred sheets  of  the  manifold  paper  were 
offered  together  at  a  reduced  figure,  and 
the  offer  stood  only  during  the  month  in 
which  sales  were  being  advertised.  Lamb 
Brothers,  Philadelphia,  have  special  sales 
of  various  lines  during  all  months  of  the 
year.  One  of  their  recent  specials  was 
a  dozen  lead  pencils,  reduced  in  price 
for  a  limited  time.  The  main  show  win- 
dow was  fixed  up  with  the  pencils  ar- 
ranged in  interesting  order.  Many 
people  came  from  a  distance  to  take  ad- 
vantage of  the  offer.  The  Lamb  store 
is  located  in  one  of  the  liveliest  business 
sections  of  the  Quaker  City.  Crowds  of 
people  are  constantly  passing  the  place 
and  the  special  sales  always  attract  a 
large  number  of  buyers. 

The  proprietor  of  a  medium-size  sta- 
tionery store  which  is  located  near  a 
residential  section  of  the  city,  is  taking 
advantage  of  the  special  sale  idea  with 
profitable  returns.  One  recent  special 
sale  was  toilet  paper,  offered  either  six 
rolls  or  a  dozen  rolls,  at  slightly  re- 
duced prices.  It  was  surprising  to  see 
the  many  people  who  came  to  buy  the 
paper.  It  is  a  fact  that  many  of  the 
patrons  bought  other  stationery  goods  in 
addition  to  the  toilet  paper.  This  is  one 
strong  selling  point  of  any  special  sale. 
Many  extra  sales  of  different  things  are 
made  along  with  the  special. 

The  William  H.  Hoskins  Co.,  Phila- 
delphia, one  of  the  largest  stationery 
firms  in  the  country,  usually  hold  a 
special  sale  of  commercial  stationery 
during  the  month  of  August.  Leather 
goods  are  featured  in  another  special 
sale.  Still  another  special  sale  is  made 
up  of  office  furniture.  All  of  these  sales 
have  been  successful,  and  they  have  been 
the  means  of  winning  a  great  deal  of 
new  business  for  the  Hoskins  store. 

During  certain  seasons  of  the  year  the 
William  Mann  Co.,  also  of  Philadelphia, 
offer  their  trade-marked  manifold  paper 
at  tempting  prices.  This  paper  is  adver- 
tised in  the  daily  newspapers,  and  while 
the  advertisements  are  appearing  the 
Mann  Co.'s  show  windows  are  trimmed 
with  exhibits  of  the  paper.  The  Mann 
Co.  have  held  special  sales  of  various 
kinds  of  stationery  goods,  such  as  trans- 
fer cases  in  both  steel  and  wood;  foun- 
tain pens,  loose  leaf  outfits,  etc.  This  is 
strictly  a  commercial  stationery  house 
and  only  the  highest  grade  of  product  is 
carried 

It  would  be  an  exce'lent  plan  for  the 
average  stationer  to  have  a  special  sale 
of  some  kind  every  month  of  the  year. 
The  public  is  always  interested  in  any- 
unusual  sale  where  there  is  an  opportun- 
ity to  save  a  few  pennies.  One  reason 
34 


why  the  great  department  stores  have 
been  so  successful  is  because  of  the 
special  sales  which  are  conducted  so  fre- 
quently. Now  when  the  stationer  an- 
nounces a  special  sale  (no  matter  what 
class  of  stationery  is  involved),  the  pub- 
lic's attention  is  directed  to  the  sta- 
tioner's store  in  a  particular  way.  There 
is  no  more  powerful  advertisement  foi 
any  retail  store  than  a  "live"  special  sale 
with  a  few  real  bargains.  New  patrons 
are  attracted  to  the  place.  They  come 
to  buy  the  "special,"  but  in  glancing 
around  the  store  they  see  other  desirable 
articles  which  are  "just  what  they  had 
been  looking  for." 

So  why  not  a  special  sale  of  home 
stationery  for  the  month  of  January;  a 
special  sale  of  novelties  and  fancy  goods 
for  February;  some  other  line  for  March, 
and  so  on?  Try  out  the  idea,  Mr.  Sta- 
tioner. 


NO  GROUND  FOR  FEAR  IN  COMING 
DAYS 

Continued    from    page    33 

has  a  difficulty  in  securing  what  he  re- 
quires.  Competition  has  been  described 
as  the  soul  of  trade,  and  no  dealer 
worthy  of  the  name  will  fear  its  effect 
on  his  sales. 

To  sum  up  it  may  be  said  that  if  we 
are  prepared  to  face  the  new  conditions 
squarely,  the  future  is  full  of  hope;  there 
need  be  no  dismal  forebodings  nor  criti- 
<  il  situations.  Notwithstanding  the  dis- 
location of  business  which  may  he  oc- 
casioned in  the  transition  from  the  con- 
ditions of  war  to  those  of  peace,  there 
is  a  bright  future  ahead  with  plenty  of 
\>ork  for  all.  This  means  that  the  pub- 
lic generally  will  have  the  means  to  buy 
what  they  want  and  the  retailer  can 
therefore  look  ahead  with  every  feeling 
of  confidence. 


It  is  better  for  you  to  have  one  good 
trade-winning  idea  a  week  and  put  it 
into  practical  use  than  to  have  a  dozen 
every  day  that  are  never  put  into  action. 


The  only  kind  of  advertising  that  does 
not  pay  is  that  which  is  improperly  done. 
Good  advertising  is  an  investment  that 
returns  a  profit.    It  is  never  an  expense. 


The  best  goods  are  the  cheapest  in  the 
long  run.  There  is  now  more  competi- 
tion in  qualitv  thnn  there  is  in  price.  It 
will  pay  you  to  sell  the  better  grades  of 
merchandise. 


E.     M.    TROWERN 


Trade   Regulation 

by  Order-in-Council 

Must  Be  Abolished 


By   E.   M.  TROWERN,   Ottawa 

Secretary  Dominion  Board 
The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Canada 


IN  view  of  the  fact  that  the  Govern- 
ment Order-in-Council  No.  2461, 
which  was  passed  on  October  8th, 
1918,  and  which  amended  a  similar 
Order-in-Council  No.  2777,  passed  on  the 
10th  and  20th  November,  1916,  relates  to 
the  operations  of  the  retail  trade 
throughout  Canada,  as  well  as  to  manu- 
facturers and  wholesalers,  it  will,  no 
doubt,  be  of  interest  to  the  trade  and 
to  the  public  to  know  some  of  the  salient 
points  of  the  said  order,  together  with 
some  comments  upon  the  same. 

The  above  Order,  as  far  as  necessaries 
of  life  are  concerned,  repeals  section  498 
of  the  Criminal  Code,  which  was  placed 
upon  the  Dominion  Statutes  some  years 
ago  by  the  members  of  the  Commons 
and  the  Senate,  and  which  has  always 
contained  some  very  contentious  and 
complicated  clauses.  It,  however,  con- 
tained some  safeguarding  clauses  which 
have  been  entirely  brushed  aside  in  tlic 
new  Order-in-Council,  and  new  clauses 
have  been  introduced  that  are  not  only 
absolutely  unfair,  but  which  are  also 
unworkable. 

On  the  face  of  the  Order-in-Council,  it 
can  be  seen  at  a  glance  that  those  who 
conceived  the  idea  had  very  little,  if  any, 
knowledge  of  the  many  great  commer- 
cial problems  that  those  who  have  been, 
or  are,  practically  engaged  in  trade, 
are   familiar  with. 

The  objects  to  be  reached  by  the 
Order  are,  therefore,  dense  and  clouded, 
and  the  lesral  drafting  is  fully  in  keep- 
ing with  the  objects.  It  would  be  im- 
possible for  anv-lay  mind  to  take  up  the 
Order  and  explain  it  clause  by  clause,  as 
the  objects  sought  are  surrounded  by  so 
many  exemptions  and  contradictions 
that  if  by  any  chance  its  operations 
should  entangle  any  person  or  company, 
and  they  should  find  themselves  before 
the  Supreme  Court,  the  Judges  could 
never  give  a  clear  ruling  on  the  Order, 
but  they  would  be  compelled,  if  they  did 
not  dismiss  the  case,  to  base  their  judg- 
ment on  the  evidence  in  the  case  pre- 
sented to  them,  rather  than  on  the  Order 
itself,   rs   we   are   quite   certain   that   its 


complications  and  contradictions  woultl 
confuse  and  mystify  even  that  learned 
body. 

The  Order  starts  out  in  the  usual  way 
and  defines  the  meaning  of  the  words 
"Council,"  "Minister,"  "Necessary  of 
Life,"  "Municipality"  and  "Person."  Its 
operations  are  placed  under  the  Minister 
of  Labor,  but  for  what  reason  it  does 
not  explain.  It  then  sets  forth  some 
outwardly  very  drastic  clauses,  which, 
to  the  uninitiated,  would  look  as  though 
those  who  drafted  it  were  so  thoroughly 
in  earnest  to  trap  all  evil  doers,  and  pro- 
tect the  "general  public" — whatever  that 
may  mean — that  the  drafters  were  in- 
spired with  the  highest  of  motives  for 
the  public  weal.  To  those  who  have  not 
had  an  opportunity  of  reading  these 
famous  clauses,  which  also  appeared 
only  in  somewhat  modified  form  in  the 
old  Act,  we  take  the  liberty  of  quoting 
them: — 

(1)  No  person  shall  conspire,  com- 
bine, agree,  or  arrange  with  any  other 
person — 

(a)  to  limit  the  facilities  for  trans- 
porting, producing,  manufacturing,  sup- 
ply;ng,  storing  or  dealing  in  any  neces- 
sary of  life,  or 

(b)  to  restrain  or  injure  trade  or  com- 
merce in  relation  to  any  necessary  of 
life;  or 

(c)  to  prevent,  limit  or  lessen  the 
manufacture  or  production  of  any  neces- 
sary of  life,  or  to  enhance  or  maintain 
the  price  thereof;  or 

(d)  to  prevent  or  lessen  competition 
in  the  production,  manufacture,  pur- 
chase, barter,  sale,  transportation,  in- 
surance or  supply  of  any  necessary  of 
life. 

If  these  were  the  only  clauses  in  the 
famous  Order,  we  might  well  stop  and 
ask  ourselves,  "What  is  there  left  for  us 
to  do?  How  can  we  do  any  business  of 
any  kind  without  'agreeing,'  'limiting,' 
and,  if  necessary,  'enhancing,'  'arrang- 
ing,' 'maintaining,'  'preventing,'  'deal- 
ing,' etc.?" 

35 


To  Satisfy  Public  Demand 

On  the  face  of  it,  it  certainly  looks 
like  a  very  serious  undertaking  by  those 
who  framed  it  up,  but  upon  close  obser- 
vation it  is  the  most  beautifully  camou- 
flaged piece  of  legislation  that  has  ever 
been  handed  out  to  the  public,  and  we 
will  not  be  at  all  surprised  if  those  who 
are  capable  of  exhibiting  it  in  its  true 
light  before  the  Senate  and  the  House  of 
Commons,  will  present  it  effectively 
when  the  proper  time  comes,  and,  if  they 
do,  it  will  certainly  make  an  interesting 
subject.  Any  legislation  that  is  framed 
up  to  attempt  to  satisfy  what  is  often 
termed  the  "public  demand,"  but  which 
is  really  done  for  the  purpose  of  "vote 
catching,"  usually  ends  in  disaster  to 
those  who  framed  it  up,  as  well  as  to 
those   to    whom   it   was   made   to   apply. 

It  requires  no  great  commercial  ability 
to  understand  that  the  foundation  for 
the  price  of  all  articles  that  are  manu- 
factured or  produced  is  based  on  the 
value  of  labor.  Capital  is  merely  "ac- 
cumulated industry"  or  the  tools  which 
labor  uses.  If  the  price  of  labor  goes 
up  raw  material  must  go  up,  and  if  raw 
material  and  labor  advance  the  article 
produced  must  advance,  and  the  result 
is  that  the  manufacturer  must  charge 
more,  and  consequently  the  wholesaler 
and  the  retailer  must  charge  more,  all 
of  which  must  come  out  of  the  con- 
sumer in  the  end.  It  must  always  be 
remembered  that  the  service  rendered 
by  the  distributor,  either  retail  or  whole- 
sale, is  as  equally  necessary  and  valu- 
able as  the  service  rendered  by  the  labor- 
ing man  or  the  manufacturer  or  pro- 
ducer. Notwithstanding  these  simple 
facts,  those  wh.o  framed  this  famous 
Order  allowed  the  following  clause, 
which  was  put  in  the  old  Act  possibly 
for  political  purposes,  to  remain  in  the 
Order: 

"(2)  Nothing  in  this  section  shall  be 
construed  to  apply  to  combinations  of 
workmen,  or  employees  for  their  own 
reasonable  protection  as  such  workmen 
0"   employees." 


15  0  0  K S  E  L  L  E  R      A  ND     STATIONER 


Class  Legislation 

The  reason  for  its  insertion  is  self- 
evident,  but  its  justification  cannot  pos- 
sibly be  defended  by  any  person  whose 
intentions  were  fair  and  honest,  and  we 
feel  quite  sure  that  there  is  not  one 
labor  union  in  Canada,  or  an  officer  of 
a  labor  union  in  Canada,  who  would  de- 
fend class  legislation  of  this  character. 
There  is  no  doubt  whatever  that  the 
officers  of  the  labor  unions  could  see  the 
absurdity  of  the  whole  measure,  and  they 
asked  to  be  left  out  of  it,  as  they  knew 
that  it  would  only  cause  trouble  and 
confusion.  We  compliment  them  upon 
their  ability  to  escape  from  the  entangle- 
ments into  which  they  would  have  be- 
come involved  had  they  been  made  a 
party  to  legislation  of  this  character. 

In  simple  English,  it  means  that  work- 
men of  all  sorts  are  allowed  to  meet, 
agree,  combine,  conspire  or  arrange 
among  themselves  or  with  any  other  per- 
son or  corporation  to  increase  prices,  or 
strike  or  demand  anything  they  want, 
but  if  those  who  manufacture  or  dis- 
tribute their  product  do  the  same  thing 
they  can  be  fined  "not  exceeding  five 
thousand  dollars,"  or  be  imprisoned  for 
a  term  "not  exceeding  two  years."  And 
all  this  is  done  in  Canada,  the  land  of 
the  brave  and  the  free. 

Still   Further  Exemption 

Not  being  satisfied  to  exempt  work- 
men or  combinations  of  workmen,  the 
frarners  of  this  wonderful  piece  of  legis- 
lation finally  discovered  that  there  was 
another  important  class  in  the  commun- 
ity which  is  just  beginning  to  make  it- 
self felt — the  farmers  and  the  gardeners 
— and  after  inserting  clause  (2),  which 
reads  as  follows: 

"(2)  Every  person  who  holds  or  offers 
for  sale;  or  sells  or  provides  or  furnishes 
for  consumption  at  a  price,  whether 
upon  the  premises  which  he  occupies  or 
not,  any  necessary  of  life,  shall  sell  it  or 
provide  or  furnish  the  same  for  con- 
sumption as  aforesaid,  at  a  price  not 
higher  than  is  reasonable  and  just,"  they 
then  insert  the  following: 

"(3)  Provided,  however,  that  this  sec- 
tion shall  not  apply  or  extend  to  any 
accumulating  or  withholding  by  any 
farmer,  gardener,  or  other  person,  of 
the  products  of  any  farm,  garden,  or 
other  land  cultivated  by  him." 
Remember,  these  two  clauses  do  not  ap- 
pear in  the  old  Act,  as  the  only  exemp 
tions  in  the  o'd  Act  are  given  to  labor 
unions,  and  this  Order  is  supposed  to 
eive  those  who  administer  the  Act  wider 
powers  during  the  war  so  that  they  can 
protect  the  public  more  fully  than  they 
were  protected. 

Only   Retailers,  Wholesalers  and   Manu- 
facturers Affected 

Having,  therefore,  exempted  the  work- 
ing men  and  labor  unions,  and  the  farm- 
ers and  market  gardeners  —  the  only 
persons  to  whom  it  applies  are  the  re- 
tai'ers.  the  wholesalers  and  the  manu- 
facturers. It  could  not  have  been  in- 
tended for  the  professional  classes,  as 
the  medical  men  held  a  meeting  a  few 
months  ago  and  they  combined  and 
agreed    among    themselves    to    increase 


their  professional  fees,  and  by  unanim- 
ous consent  they  did  so,  notwithstand- 
ing that  their  class  is  not  mentioned  as 
one  that  is  exempted. 

As  another  example,  the  legal  pro- 
fession of  Ontario,  through  their  Asso- 
ciation, waited  upon  the  Premier  of  that 
province,  the  Honorable  W.  H.  Hearst, 
according  to  the  press  reports,  and 
stated  that  they  were  unanimously 
agreed  among  themselves  that  they  were 
underpaid  and  that  they  required  more 
money.  Their  request  was  considered 
and  the  Government  of  the  Province  of 
Ontario,  mark  you,  consented  to  their 
demands,  and  up  went  their  prices 
twenty  per  cent.,  notwithstanding  th:.- 
famous  Order. 

A  short  time  ago  the  newspapers 
throughout  Canada,  with  few  exceptions, 
found  that  they  were  losing  money. 
They  met  and  considered  their  troubles, 
and  they  ended  them  very  rapidly  by 
increasing  the  price  of  their  papers  one 
hundred  per  cent.,  and  some  two  hundred 
per  cent.  We  have  heard  of  no  prosecu- 
tions, nor  are  we  likely  to. 

The  doctors,,  the  lawyers,  the  news- 
paper proprietors,  the  farmers,  the 
gardeners  and  the  working  men  are 
exempt  from  the  law,  but  if  the  retail 
merchant  is  suspected  of  even  discussing 
the  advisability  of  getting  more  than 
cost  for  selling  milk,  bread,  butter  or 
other  perishable  necessities,  as  well  as 
gasoline,  he  is  pounced  upon  and  drag- 
ged before  a  special  "Fair  Price  Com- 
mittee," who  are  not  required  to  have 
any  special  knowledge  whatever  of  the 
retail  trade,  or  the  many  difficulties  that 
surround  every  retail  merchant  in  Can- 
ada at  the  present  time. 

The  Fair  Price  Committee 
The  "Fair  Price  Committee"  consists 
of  two  or  more  officers  of  the  munici- 
pality, and  they  are  to  be  appointed  by 
the  municipal  council.  Their  names 
must  be  submitted  to  the  Minister  of 
Labor.  The  Council  must  then  instruct 
them  as  to  what  articles  they  want  the 
said  Committee  to  investigate,  and  this 
implies  that  the  said  municipal  council 
must  have  evidence  beforehand  as  to  the 
reason  why  any  retail  merchant  or  other 
person  should  be  brought  up  and  ordered 
to  be   publicly  examined. 

In  our  opinion,  we  consider  that  in 
order  to  be  perfectly  fair  the  municipal 
council  of  any  municipality  should  be 
prepared  to  not  only  pay  the  expenses  of 
all  those  whom  they  order  up  for  ex- 
amination, but  in  the  event  of  any 
charge  being  made  against  a  retail 
merchant  and  it  proves  to  be  false,  the 
said  council  should  be  prepared  to  re- 
imburse the  retail  merchant  for  not  only 
the  loss  of  his  time,  but  also  for  the  loss 
and  injury  to  his  reputation.  No  pro- 
provision  is  made  for  this  in  the  case 
of  a  retail  merchant,  notwithstanding 
that  other  classes  have  been  exempted. 

Only  Retailer  Cannot  Escape 

The  camouflage,  however,  is  not  yet 
complete.  If  the  "Fair  Price  Commit- 
tee" suspects  that  any  manufacturer  has 
raised  the  price  of  his  commodities 
throus-h  combination  with  his  fellow 
manufacturers,  or  otherwise,  and  he 
36 


happens  to  live  outside  of  the  munici 
pality  in  which  the  "Fair  Price  Commit- 
tee" have  jurisdiction,  the  manufacturer 
cannot  be  compelled  to  appear  and  give 
evidence.  Wholesale  grocers  and  whole- 
sale produce  merchants  living  outside 
of  the  municipality  are  also  beyond  the 
control  of  the  "Fair  Price  Committee," 
but  retail  merchants  cannot  escape. 

Can  anyone  consider  legislation  of 
this  discriminatory  character  either  wise 
or  fair,  and  is  it  not  a  sad  reflection  upon 
the  ability  of  Canadians,  who  should  be 
anxious  to  show  to  the  world  the  wis- 
dom of  the  legislation  they  enact?  It 
is  quite  true  that  legislation  of  the  above 
character  might  appear  upon  the  Statute 
Books  of  the  United  States,  or  in  some 
foreign  countries,  but  that  is  no  reason 
why  it  should  appear  upon  the  Statute 
Books,  or  in  Orders-in-Council,  in  Can- 
ada, and  we  sincerely  hope  that  it  will 
soon  be  removed,  as  it  is  certainly  un- 
worthy of  having  a  place  on  the  records 
of  the  Dominion. 

Not  content  with  amending  the  old 
Act,  Section  498,  but  whether  designedly 
or  not,  the  following  words  have  been 
inserted  into  this  famous  Order,  "or 
maintain  the  price  thereof." 

Attacks    Resale  Price 

In  simple  English,  this  means  that  no 
manufacturer  can  now  sell  his  goods  on 
the  price  maintenance  or  resale  plan; 
if  so,  he  will  immediately  come  under 
the  provisions  of  this  Order  and  be  liable 
to  the  penalties  attached.  This  provi- 
sion will  affect  all  manufacturers  of 
cereals,  patent  medicines,  musical  in- 
struments, automobiles,  fountain  pens, 
watches,  and  a  host  of  manufacturers  in 
hundreds  of  other  lines  of  trade,  and 
the  result  will  be,  when  the  true  mean- 
ing of  this  amendment  is  made  known, 
that  the  commercial  classes  of  Canada 
will  arise  in  their  might  and  demand 
that  this  Order-in-Council  and  all  simi- 
lar class  legislation  be  removed  en- 
tirely. 

No    Prussianism    in    Canada 

We  all  rejoice  exceedingly  that  we 
have  succeeded  in  securing  a  glorious 
victory  by  defeating  the  Germans,  and 
thus  destroying  "Prussianism"  in  Eur- 
ope. We  must  now  watch  very  care- 
fully that  Germany's  vicious  doctrines 
do  not  creep  into  the  Government  or  into 
the  commercial  life  of  Canada.  Our 
boast  is  that  our  courts  in  Canada  are 
above  suspicion,  and  for  this  we  all  re- 
joice, because  we  know  that  the  poorest 
citizens,  when  the  evidence  is  presented, 
have  the  same  equal  chance  as  those  of 
the  greatest  wealth.  The  people,  how- 
ever, make  the  laws;  the  duty  of  the 
courts  is  to  administer  them.  Let  us 
make  laws  that  are  worthy  and  sane, 
and  which  will  not  reflect  upon  the  good 
judgment  of  the  people  of  Canada,  and 
which  do  not  discriminate  as  between 
one   class   and   another. 

What  are  the  powers  under  this  fam- 
ous Order?  Can  the  Minister  of  Labo-. 
the  municipal  committee,  the  "Fair  Price 
Committee"  or  the  Canada  Food  Board, 
order  that  retail  merchants  shall  cease 
doing  business,  or  do  business  at  a  loss, 
Continued    on   na  -e   37 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATION!'.  1! 


WILL  BUILD  SIX-STOREY  FACTORY 
ADDITION 

Existing  Departments  to   be  Extended   and   New   Stationery 
Lines  Will  be  Manufactured 


It  is  only  a  few  years  since  that  pro- 
gressive and  long-established  manufac- 
turing wholesale  stationery  house,  the 
Copp,  Clark  Co.,  of  Toronto,  put  up  their 
fine  new  warehouse  at  Portland  and 
Wellington  Streets,  adjoining  the  firm's 
manufacturing  plant,  and  now  comes  the 
announcement  that  within  a  few  months 
the  first  sod  is  to  be  turned  for  the  erec- 
tion of  a  six-storey  addition  to  their 
works.  This  will  not  only  mean  increas- 
ing the  capacity  of  the  several  manufac- 


turing departments  that  already  exist, 
but  new  stationery  lines  are  to  be  made 
contributing  valuable  additions  to  made- 
in-Canada  goods.  This  fact  in  itself  will 
be  welcome  news  to  the  stationers  of 
Canada,  who  will  welcome  all  such  indi- 
cations of  native  Canadian  development. 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  is 
not  as  yet  at  liberty  to  disclose  the  exact 
nature  of  the  new  lines  that  are  to  be 
made    in    this    new    plant. 


LEAVES  FROM  THE 
OTHER  FELLOW'S  BOOK 


FORT-HOLE  IN  WINDOW 

By  fastening  black  paper  to  the  glas.^ 
of  a  display  window,  with  cut-out  circles 
resembling  a  ship's  portholes,  a  Chicago 
window  decorator  recently  succeeded  in 
attracting  considerable  attention. 

The  mysterious  appearance  of  the 
window  was  sufficient  to  arouse  the  cur- 
iosity of  the  average  person.  Almost 
every  one,  in  fact,  who  got  a  look  at 
the  curious  window  went  over  to  peek 
through  the  holes  and  see  what  was  in- 
side. As  a  freak  display  it  succeeded  in 
impressing  the  public  with  the  articles 
shown. 

WATERPROOFING  BLUE  PRINTS 

People  who  use  blue  prints  frequently 
have  to  carry  them  in  places  where  they 
are  liable  to  get  wet  and  thus  be  spoiled. 
When  you  sell  blue  print  paper  hand 
the  customer  this  recipe  for  waterproof- 
in"-  blue  prints:  Immerse  pieces  of  ab- 
sorbent cloth  a  foot  square  or  more  in 
paraffin  until  saturated;  after  being 
cooled  spread  a  saturated  cloth  on  a 
smooth  surface,  and  on  it  place  the  dry- 
print  with  a  second  waxed  cloth  on  top, 
then  iron  with  a  moderately  hot  flat  iron. 
The  paper  absorbs  the  paraffin  and  thus 
becomes  waterproof.  This  will  be  valu- 
able information  for  your  customers  who 
use  blue  prints.  Incidentally  it  may  be 
stated  that  notes  or  dimensions  may  be 
written  on  blue  prints  by  using  a  pen 
dipped  in  saleratus  water,  or  a  cloth 
spturated  with  this  solution  may  be 
rubbed  on  the  blue  print  and  the  print- 
ing or  writing  done  with  an  ordinary 
pencil  on  the  resulting  white  spot. 

USING    LETTERING    INK 

Stationers    can   render    a   real    service 
to  their  customers  who  use  lettering  pens 


in  their  work  by  suggesting  that  they 
take  an  empty  drawing  ink  bottle  and 
fill  it  with  cement  up  to  the  bottom  of 
the  neck,  leaving  only  the  space  in  the 
neck  of  the  bottle  for  the  ink.  Thus 
the  pen  will  be  dipped  only  a  certain 
distance,  and  smearing  of  the  holder 
will  be  avoided,  preventing  an  annoy- 
ance which  is  quite  prevalent  with  peo- 
ple using-  lettering  ink  which  is  much 
thicker  than  ordinary  writing  ink.  The 
capacity  is,  of  course,  much  restricted, 
but  it  will  he  enough  for  ordinary  work 
as  lettering  does  not  require  much  ink. 
The  stopper,  of  course,  should  be  cut  so 
as  to  leave  the  maximum  amount  of 
neck  space  for  the  ink.  Incidentally  the 
bottie.  with  the  weight  given  by  the 
cement,  will  make  an  effective  paper 
weight.  This  suggestion  was  gleanecl 
from  an  issue  of  "Popular  Mechanic's 
Year  Book,"  beina;  contributed  to  that 
publication  by  J.  O'Brien,  of  Buffalo, 
N.Y. 


TRADE    REGULATIONS    BY    ORDER- 
1N-COUNCIL  MUST  BE  ABOLISHED 

Continued  from  page  36 

or  do  the  findings  of  these  various  bodies 
have  to  go  before  the  Attorney-General 
of  the  Province  first  before  any  drastic 
action  is  taken?  On  this  subject  this 
famous  Order  leaves  us  in  doubt,  and  no 
one  seems  capable  of  explaining  its  mys- 
terious meaning.  Is  it  reasonable  to 
expect  that  intelligent  business  men  will 
remain  under  legislation  of  this  char- 
acter very  long  without  making  a  vigor- 
ous protest?  We  know  that  they  have 
urotested,  and  we  shall  keep  on  pro- 
testing as  an  Association  of  Retail  Mer- 
chants, and  we  will  make  every  effort  in 
37 


our  power  to  have  it  abolished.  The  old 
Act,  section  498,  of  the  Criminal  Code, 
was  an  unnecessary  and  complicate  1 
piece  of  meddlesome  legislation,  but 
when  it  is  camouflaged  by  an  Order- 
in-Council,  in  our  opinion,  it  become^ 
ridiculous. 

It  must  be  made  quite  clear  that  those 
who  have  their  money  invested  in  re- 
tail stores  and  stocks,  and  in  wholesale 
premises,  and  in  manufacturing  plants 
in  Canada  are  among  the  best  citizen-, 
and  friends  that  Canada  possesses.  They 
are  helping  to  extend  its  trade  and  com- 
merce, and  building  up  the  cities,  towns 
and  villages  of  Canada,  and  they  con- 
tribute more  largely  than  any  other  class 
toward  business  profit  taxes,  and  all 
other  taxes,  and  contributions,  that  are 
required,  and  they  should,  at  least,  be 
consulted  before  drastic  and  unworkable 
Orders-in-Council  of  the  above  character 
are  placed  on  the  Statute  Books. 

In  reviewing  this  Order-in-Council,  it 
may  appear  to  some  that  the  comments 
made  upon  it  are  too  drastic  and  too 
.severe,  but  experience  has  taught  us 
that  if  we  require  reforms  in  any  move- 
ment, or  amendments  to  any  Act,  that 
the  case  must  be  stated  as  it  exists, 
without  fear  and  without  favor. 


BACK    FROM   RUHLEBEN 

Hugh  Young,  after  four  years'  ex- 
perience in  the  civilian  detention  camp 
at  Ruhleben,  Germany,  got  back  to 
Canada  in  time  to  have  his  Christmas 
dinner  at  his  home  in  Toronto.  Mr. 
Young  preferred  not  to  talk  for  publica- 
tion regarding  his  experiences  in  Hun- 
iand  as  the  ground  had  already  been 
amply  covered  by  others.  Mr.  Young, 
upon  arrival,  showed  indication  of  the 
fact  that  the  Ruhleben  prison  camp  fare 
was  not  inclined  to  produce  obesity,  but 
after  less  than  a  week's  experience  of 
home  cooking  he  already  showed  evi- 
dences of  a  rapid  return  to  the  appear- 
ance of  good  health  customary  to  him 
in  the  days  before  he  made  his  fateful 
trip  to  Germany  in  1914. 

Mr.  Young's  return  to  the  Copp, 
Clark  Company  is  at  an  opportune  time, 
in  that  it  antedates  by  only  a  short  time 
the  date  of  a  big  expansion  in  that  con- 
cern which  will  soon  take  effect. 

H.  L.  Thompson,  president  of  the  Copp, 
Clark  Co.,  leaves  shortly  to  take  a  well- 
earned  rest.  It  is  interesting  to  record 
that  it  is  now  more  than  52  years  since 
Mr.  Thompson,  as  an  office  boy,  entered 
the  employ  of  this  premier  house,  of 
which  he  is  the  head. 


J.  C.  Jaimet,  of  Kitchener,  was  a 
buyer  in  the  Toronto  wholesale  houses 
in  Christmas  week,  his  purchases  being 
in  keeping  with  his  expectation  of  a 
continuation  of  good  business  in  the 
coming  days. 


Adopt  a  policy  which  is  in  tune  with 
the  spirit  of  the  times  and  let  your  ad- 
vertising reflect  that  policy  to  the  people 
of  your  community. 


I 


NEWS  OF  THE  TRADE 


IlilllliilllllllllllilllllllllllilllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllTMl 


THE  LATE   F.  W.  TREBILCOCK 

Peterboro's  first  victim  of  the  influ- 
enza epidemic  was  Frederick  William 
Trebilcock,  of  the  local  firm  of  Trebil- 
cock  Brothers,  booksellers  and  stationers, 
whose  death  was  briefly  recorded  in  the 
November  issue.  It  is  no  exaggeration 
to  say  that  Peterborough  has  seldom 
been  so  profoundly  affected  by  the  loss 
of  any  of  its  citizens  as  it  was  by  the 
untimely  death  of  Mr.  Trebilcock.  Com- 
ing to  Peterboro  in  1910,  he  and  his 
brother,  Paul  Trebilcock,  bought  the  long 
established  business  of  A.  H.  Stratton  & 
Company. 

They  developed  a  jobbing  trade  in  wall 
paper  and  stationery  throughout  Eastern 
Ontario.  This  latter  enterprise  was 
largely  the  work  of  Mr.  Fred  Trebilcock, 
who  spent  several  months  every  sum- 
mer covering  an  extensive  area  in  the 
east  end  of  the  province,  cultivating  and 
accomplishing  a  trade  that  had  grown  to 
surprising  proportions  during  the  past 
year. 

The  deceased  was  the  second  son  of 
Mr.  Paul  Trebilcock  of  Bowmanville,  one 
of  the  oldest  and  most  widely  known 
booksellers  and  stationers  in  the  pro- 
vince. It  is  a  matter  of  family  tradition 
and  pride  that  the  Trebilcock  name  has 
been  linked  with  the  stationery  business 
for  more  than  one  hundred  years.  Fred 
Trebilcock  was  the  grandson  of  the  late 
Paul  Trebilcock,  who,  in  the  pioneer  days 
of  Ontario,  was  a  stationer  and  book- 
seller at  Cobourg,  and  may  be  remem- 
bered by  the  older  members  of  the  trade. 

The  late  Fred  Trebilcock  was  one  of 
the  most  prominent  Masons  in  Eastern 
Ontario.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Royal 
Arthur  Lodge  of  Peterboro,  and  also  of 
the  Chapter  Preceptory  and  Shrine.  Not 
only  was  his  death  keenly  felt  by  thu 
fraternity  in  Peterboro,  but  by  the  entire 
community.  The  universality  of  the 
esteem  in  which  he  was  held  by  his  fel- 
low-citizens was  illustrated  by  a  splendid 
tribute  to  his  life  and  character  in  the 
monthly  publication  of  the  Peterboro 
Council  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  Mr. 
Trebilcock  will  not  soon  be  forgotten, 
and  in  his  death  the  trade  has  lost  a 
representative  whom  it  may  always  re- 
member with  pride. 

HEAD  OF   BLACK IE'S  PASSES 

The  death  occurred  at  Dunmorag, 
Dowmhi'l  Gardens,  Glasgow,  on  Novem- 
ber 17,  of  John  Alexander  Blackie,  chair- 
man of  the  well-known  publishing  house 
of  Blackie  &  Sons,  Ltd.  He  was  68  years 
of  age. 


TRADE   NEWS 

Efforts  are  being  made  to  reorganize 
the  North  Bay  Toy  Co.  and  have  the 
factory  resume   operations. 

Colwell's  Bookstore,  Wallaceburg,  Ont., 
had  a  half  page  Christmas  trade  adver- 
tisement in  the  Wallaceburg  "News."  It 
featured  toys,  books,  Christmas  cards, 
fancy  stationery  and  fancy  china. 

Baillee  &  Co.,  of  the  Norfolk  Book- 
store, Simcoe,  Ont.,  conducted  a  big  sale 
prior  to  removal  to  new  premises.  The 
firm  has  occupied  the  old  store  on  Nor- 
folk street  for  the   past   thirteen   years. 

Clasp  Envelope  Company,  of  New 
York,  has  been  incorporated  with  a  capi- 
tal stock  of  $10,000.  N.  W.  Eisenberg, 
A.  W.  Levey.  A.  M.  Wattenberg,  1,584 
East  12th  Street,  Brooklyn,  are  the  in- 
corporators. 

The  drug  and  stationery  business  of 
the  late  C.  R.  Smith,  at  Thorold,  Ont., 
has  been  purchased  by  L.  H.  Neil,  of 
Toronto,  formerly  of  New  Liskeard, 
where  he  was  for  a  term  chairman  of  the 
Public  Library. 

Charles  M.  Passmore  has  resigned  the 
management  of  Boosey  &  Co.'s  Toronto 
branch  to  give  his  whole  attention  to  the 
St.  Clair  Music  House,  recently  estab- 
lished by  him  at  the  corner  of  Yonge 
street  and  St.  Clair  Ave. 

E.  D.  Twite,  formerly  with  the  Carter's 
Ink  Co.  in  Canada,  has  assumed  the 
management  of  the  Montreal,  Can., 
office  of  the  Empire  Typewriter  Co. 
Mr.  Twite  recently  returned  from  a  b 
ness  trip  to  England. 

H.  G.  Popham  has  withdrawn  from 
Holmes  &  Popham.  of  London.  Ont.,  the 
business  being  carried  on  by  Mr.  Holmes. 
Mr.  Popham  has  been  appointed  Cana- 
ci'-m  traveling  representative  for  the 
E-ton.  Crane  &  Pike  Co..  succeeding  Mr. 
Palmer. 

A   NEW  CONCERN 

E.  A.  Crippen,  manufacturers'  agent, 
succeeds  the  Monarch  Paper  Co.,  79 
Spadina  Ave.,  carrying  on  the  business 
of  mnrketing  adding  machine  rolls  of 
Canadian  manufacture.  Mr.  Crippen 
;<lso  represents  the  Sutherland  Paper 
Co.,  of  Kalamazoo,  Michigan,  makers  of 
vegetable  parchment. 

DEATH  OF  A.  W.  IVES 

The  death  occurred  in  England  of  A. 
W.  Ives,  who  so  ably  represented  J.  M. 
Dent  &  Sons  on  the  road  in  Canada, 
before  going  overseas  with  Canadian 
troops  a  few  months  ago.  Shortly  after 
38 


reaching  England  he  was  seized  with  an 
illness  that  resulted  fatally. 

He  is  survived  by  Mrs.  Ives  and  one 
child  and  they  have  the  deep  sympathy 
of   the    members   of   the   trade. 

WHY  CASES  WERE  DROPPED 

One  of  the  reasons  for  the  abandon- 
ment of  the  practice  of  pen  manufactur- 
ers furnishing  pen  assortments  in  coun- 
ter display  cases  was  recorded  in 
"Printers'  Ink."  An  interview  with  "the 
man  who  brought  about  the  agreement 
of  the  pen  manufacturers"  said:  "The 
man  who  goes  into  a  store  bent  upon 
the  purchase  of  pens  will  obtain  what 
he  has  come  for,  no  matter  if  the  clerk 
has  to  fish  them  out  from  under  the 
counter.  On  the  other  hand,  we  do  not 
feel  that  in  the  present  emergency  in 
the  nation's  affairs  we  should  worry  if 
there  is  nothing  to  incite  to  purchase  the 
casual  passerby  who  is  not  a  premeditat 
ed  buyer  and  possibly  does  not  really 
need  the  article." 

RUBBER  BAND  RESTRICTIONS 

The  U.  S.  War  Industries  Board  has 
restricted  the  manufacture  of  rubber 
bands  to  fifty  per  cent,  of  the  previous 
year's  production,  and  limits  production 
to  gary  bands  only.  Assortments  and 
gross  packages  are  to  be  discontinued, 
and  bands  are  to  be  sold  by  weight  only. 
The  following  sizes  shall  be  standard: 
No.  8,  1-16  x  %  in.;  No.  10,  1-16  x  1*4 
in.;  No.  12,  1-16  x  1%  in.;  No.  14,  1-16 
x  2  inches;  No.  16,  1-16  x  2V2  in.;  No. 
30,  !/«  x  2  in.;  No.  32,  %  x  3  in.;  No.  64. 
V*  x  3V2  in.  (0000- V4).  The  National 
Catalogue  Commission  of  the  National 
Association  of  Stationers  and  Manufac- 
turers has  made  recommendations  for 
resale  prices  on  rubber  bands  made  un- 
der the  new  regulations. — "Office  Ap- 
pliances." 

IRELAND  AND  ALLAN 

A  new  firm  of  booksellers  and  sta- 
tiontrs  in  Vancouver,  B.C.,  is  Ireland  and 
Allan,  Mr.  Ireland  announcing  that  he 
has  taken  into  partnership  J.  K.  Allan 
late  of  G.  S.  Forsyth  &  Co.,  and  the 
Thomson  Stationery  Co.  Mr.  Allan,  who 
is  favorably  known  to  the  book-loving 
public  of  Vancouver,  previous  to  going 
to  that  city  was  for  many  years  with 
leading  book  and  publishing  houses  in 
Glasgow. 

The  Ireland  &  Allan  store  is  at  649 
Granville  street. 


I500KSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


Current  Events  in  Photograph 


THE  GREAT  DAM  AT  BASSANO,  ALBERTA 

Water  sufficient  to  irrigate  440,000  acres  is  diverted  by  the  dam,  which  is  one  of  the 
largest  of  its  kind  in  the  world.  The  concrete  structure  is  720  feet  long  and  it  raises  the 
level  of  the  Bow  River  by  46  feet.  The  dam  is  part  of  the  system  which  supplies  water 
for  what  is  known  as  the  eastern  section  of  the  territory  to  be  irrigated.  The  outlay  in 
connection  with  this  has  totalled  about  $8,000,000,  and  there  are  about  2,500  miles  of  dis- 
tributing ditches  which  take  the  water  to  all  parts  of  the  country. 


Current  Events  in  Photograph 

BLINDED    SOLDIERS 

GETTING  BACK 

TO  WORK 

The  photo  shows  how 
broom-making  is  car- 
ried on  at  the  Men's 
Industrial  School,  Cana- 
dian National  Institute 
for  the  Blind,  King  St. 
west,  Toronto.  Thirteen 
men  are  being  taught 
this  work  at  the  school, 
and  the  Institute  finds 
employment  for  them 
after  they  have  become 
sufficiently  pro  ficient. 
The  man  in  the  centre 
of  the  group  of  three 
has  been  blind  since  he 
was  three  years  old. 
One  of  the  things  which 
strikes  visitors  to  the 
Institute  is  the  cheer- 
fulness of  the  blind 
workers  at  all  times. 


39 


iiOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


Saving  Waste  Paper  Profitable 

Market  Conditions  and  Matter  of  Saving  Are  Queried— The 

Element  of  Fire  Risk— What  To-day's  Prices  Show— How 

Dealers  Clubbing  Together  May  Help 


AN  inquiry    coming    to    hand     this 
week   re   waste  paper,  will  be   of 
interest    to    more    than    the    indi- 
vidual   merchant    who   puts   forth 
the  queries.     There  have  been  two  ques- 
tions asked  which  read  as  follows: 
1. — How    will    the    market   for    waste 

paper  be  in  the  future? 
2. — Will  the  price  be  worth  the  trouble 
of  saving  it? 

Question  No.  2  and  Fire  Risk 

First  of  all  it  might  be  well  to  touch 
on  one  phase  of  the  situation  which 
should  not  be  overlooked.  It  will  prob- 
ably help  answer  question  No.  2,  that 
is  the  question  of  fire  risk.  Baled  waste 
paper  will  not  burn — it  may  ignite  and 
smoulder  away  slightly,  but  it  is  really 
in  such  shape  when  baled  that  it  does 
not  burn  easily.  This  should  mean  the 
elimination  of  one  item  of  fire  risk- 
loose  paper  lying  around  and  ready  to 
spring  into  flames  from  the  spark  of  a 
match  carelessly  discarded. 

There  is  another  point.  The  dealer 
has  to  get  rid  of  his  waste  paper  under 
any  consideration,  and  -probably  burning 
is  the  method  adopted.  This  means  labor 
and  careful  watching — the  baling  and 
shipping  of  waste  paper  will  not  involve 
any  more,  if  as  much,  labor. 

What  To-Day's   Prices   Show 

And  now  the  actual  question — will 
the  price  be  worth  the  trouble  of  saving 
it?  The  trouble  end  of  the  question  is 
probably  covered  in  the  paragraph 
above.  The  price  to-day  is  $10  per  ton 
f.o.b.  Toronto.  The  price  has  been 
higher  and  it  has  been  lower,  the  law  of 
supply  and  demand  covering  the  opera- 
tions of  the  market  on  waste  paper  as 
in  every  other  marketable  commodity. 

What  Net  Returns  to  Expect 

Taking  $10  as  the  f.o.b.  Toronto  price 
then,  and  estimating  freights  from  Port 
Hope,  a  point  60  miles  away,  and  Tren- 


ton, a  point  100  miles  away.  Carload 
late  from  Port  Hope  is  11  Vzc  per  100 
pounds  on  waste  paper,  or  $2.25  per  ton. 
From  Trenton  the  rate  is  14M>c  per 
100  pounds,  or  $2.85  per  ton.  That  means 
'o  the  dealer  selling  $7.75  net  per 
tons  from  a  point  60  miles  away,  or 
$7.15  net  per  ton  from  a  point  100  miles 
away.  A  minimum  carload  is  24,000 
pounds. 

How  Dealers  Clubbing  Together  May 
Help 
You  may  say  that  you  are  attempting 
the  impossible  to  fill  a  car.  Get  to- 
gether with  eight  or  ten  of  your  fellow 
merchants,  hardware,  dry  goods,  men's 
wear,  or  stationers.  If  each  one  save  a 
ton  in  two  months'  time  that  would 
mean  six  carloads  a  year  for  a  net  re- 
turn to  the  merchants  of  from  $85  to  $93 
per  carload — really  found  money.  There 
are  few  grocers  who  make  much  on 
sugar.  There  are  few  booksellers 
who  make  much  on  school  books — 
why  then  not  make  a  little  on  waste 
paper?  Cut  down  your  overhead,  elimin- 
ate the  little  leaks  which  mean  the  dif- 
ference between  a  really  profitable  busi- 
ness and  one  which  is  just  making  a 
living  for  the  merchant. 
Waste  Paper  Subject  to  Market  Condi- 
tions 
The  first  question,  "How  will  the  mar- 
ket for  waste  paper  be  in  the  future?" 
may  be  answered  briefly  by  saying  that 
this  commodity  is  marketable  the  same 
as  any  other,  and  as  such  is  subject  to 
market  conditions — in  other  words,  sup- 
ply and  demand.  Figures  show  that  best 
marketing  periods  are  from  March  to 
June,  and  September  to  December,  these 
being  periods  on  which  greatest  activity 
is  shown  in  nearly  every  line  of  business. 
It  would  appear  reasonable  to  expect 
that  the  market  for  waste  paper  will 
prove  quite  satisfactory  and  worth  the 
small  amount  of  time  involved  in  baling 
and  shipping. 


ADVANTAGES  OF  BALING  WASTE 

PAPER 

Occupies  Little  Space — Can  Be  Stored  in  Waiting  for  Rise  in 
Waste  Paper  Market — Loose  Waste  Paper  a  Bad  Risk 


AT  the  present  time  the  waste  paper 
market  is  considerably  lower  than 
it  was  two  or  three  months  ago. 
A  declining  market  is,  however,  no  rea- 
son for  waste  paper  being  a  loss.  Waste 
paper  stored  in  bags  will  fill  up  the 
average  allotted  space  in  a  very  short 
time,  but  those  who  have  used  balers 
have  found  out  that  they  can  store  vastly 
more  when  it  is  baled  than  when  left  in 
bags      Twenty  bags   will   accumulate   in 


about  six  weeks  in  many  medium  stores, 
but  the  space  which  those  bags  occupy 
would  scarcely  be  filled  by  baled  paper 
in  less  than  a  year. 

In  addition  to  the  smaller  space  re- 
quired for  waste  paper  when  it  is  baled, 
there  is  the  fact  that  there  is  a  differ- 
ence of  between  $2.00  and  $3.00  a  ton 
in  the  prices  of  baled  and  loose  paper. 
It  is  an  easy  matter  for  the  merchant 
to  store  his  baled  paper  in  the  case  of 
40 


falling  markets  and  hold  it  until  the 
market  is  better.  Good  prices  are  pre- 
dicted by  waste  paper  dealers  to  reach  a 
high   level  again  by  March. 

Loose  waste  paper  is,  as  every  mer- 
chant knows,  a  bad  stock  when  fire  in- 
surance is  wanted  and  makes  the  fire 
risk  all  the  greater.  If  he  keeps  his  paper 
baled,  however,  it  is  inclined  to  be  a  pro- 
tection rather  than  a  risk.  It  would  take 
a  fire  a  long  time  to  penetrate  a  large 
bundle  of  paper  which  has  been  baled. 
Baled  paper,  too,  is  cleaner  than  the 
loose  waste  paper  which  gathers  in  bags, 
a  further  point  in  favor  of  the  neater 
way  of  collecting  it. 


TRAVELLERS  MEET 

Members  of  the  Dominion  Commercial 
Travellers'  Association  gathered  at  the 
Windsor  Hotel,  Montreal,  for  their  an- 
nual meeting  on  Saturday  night,  Decem- 
ber 21,  under  the  presidency  of  Romeo 
Brosseau.  The  reports  submitted  show- 
ed an  increase  in  membership,  the  num- 
ber at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  being 
8,536,  the  highest  figure  in  the  history 
of  the  organization.  Against  this,  how- 
ever, there  was  a  record  list  of  deaths 
which  was  attributed  to  the  recent  epi- 
demic of  influenza.  This  had  resulted 
in  death  claims  amounting  to  $96,575. 

It  was  stated  by  the  president  in  his 
address  that  268  of  their  members  had 
joined  the  colors,  of  whom -30  had  been 
killed  or  died  in  action.  A  '  sum  of 
$3,000  was  voted  to  cover  the  annual 
dues  of  all  members  who  were  serving 
with  the  forces.- 

It's  better  and  easier  to  turn  one  dollar 
twelve  times  annually  than  to  turn 
twelve  dollars  once  a  year. 

It's  easier  and  more  profitable  to  plan 
for  and  effect  quick  turnovers  than  to 
borrow  and  pay  for  money  to  carry  bL' 
stocks. 

A  dollar  invested  in  merchandise  earns 
money  only  when  the  merchandise  is  sold 
— and  when  the  money  is  in  the  cash 
register! 

Regardless  of  how  cheap  or  attractive 
it  may  be.  do  not  buy  merchandise  unless 
you  feel  with  all  possible  certainty  that 
you  know  where  and  how  you  can  sell  it. 


YOU  AND  THE  BOSS 

Of  course  the  Boss  has  many 
failings.  But  credit  him  with  do- 
ing his  best.     He  hired  you. 

You  may  be  the  whole  show.  But 
who  guarantees  the  "gate." 

There's  just  one  man  can  kee*p 
raising  your  pay.  Look  him  square 
in  the  eyes  and  ask  him  about  it 
— when  you  shave. 

Whose  job  are  you  after — the 
man  ahead  of  you  or  the  one  be- 
hind?    Look  out — You  may  get  it. 

You're  always  in  business  for 
yourself.  It  might  pay  you  to 
give  the  Boss  a  bargain  now  and 
then. 


CONFIDENTIAL  TALKS  WITH  YOUNG  SALESMEN 


By  "THE  JUNIOR  PARTNER. 


AS  in  the  general  field  of  commer- 
cial activity,  so  in  the  book  and 
stationery  business,  the  most  suc- 
cessful men  are  those  who  possess  in- 
itiative. They  do  not  depend  wholly 
upon  other  people  or  follow  the  trodden 
path  of  custom.  So  it  is  with  the  clerk 
in   the  book  and  stationery  store. 

This  quality  of  make-up  which  served 
to  make  successful  such  men  as  James 
J.  Hill  would  seemingly  not  apply  to 
the  clerk  behind  the  counter.  Such 
is  not  the  case.  The  valuable  clerk  is 
the  one  who  is  able  to  take  the  lead 
and  is  able  to  bring  forth  new  plans  and 
methods  that  will  in  any  way  help  in 
the  extension  of  the  business  in  which  he 
is  employed.  We  can  not  all  expect  to 
develop  and  put  into  practice  big  iaeas 
like  those  which  Hill,  or  the  inventive 
brain  of  Edison,  conceived,  but  in  our 
daily  work,  we  need  not  be  content  with 
things  as  they  now  are  and  at  all  times 
may  put  forth  some  extra  effort  to  im- 
prove the  business  with  which  we  are 
connected. 

You  have  seen  the  clerk  without  any 
initiative,  who,  even  after  several  years' 
experience,  is  still  unable  to  stand  upon 
his  own  resources.  He  depends  upon  the 
boss  for  direction  in  regard  to  his  work, 
follows  the  same  line  as  others  before 
him  and  is  seemingly  content  to  do  so. 
If  there  is  a  display  to  make,  a  window 
to  dress,  or  any  other  similar  task  to 
perform,  this  clerk  has  to  go  to  the 
bobs  for  directions.  T.hen  if  the  proprie- 
tor suggests  that  he  put  in  a  window 
display  of  a  certain  line,  he  must  need 
ask  many  questions  regarding  it,  insteaa 
of  using  his  own  brains  to  think  out 
some  method  of  doing  it,  making  him- 
self more  valuable  to  his  employer.  At 
the  bottom  of  this  defect  is  apparently 
lack  of  ambition  on  the  part  of  the 
clerk.  Many  of  the  men  who  hold  im- 
portant positions  possess  no  more 
brains  than  others  lower  down.  But 
what  they  do  possess  is  a  much  larger 
proportion   of   ambition. 

Seek  and  Ye  Shall  Find 

Not  many  years  ago  a  young  man 
having  outgrown  the  possibilities  of  his 
home  town,  a  village  of  some  1,000  pop- 
ulation, where  he  had  been  employed  in 
a  small  store,  decided  that  he  would 
go  to  a  nearby  town  of  some  4,000  in- 
habitants, where  some  relatives  resided 
and  where  more  scope  would  be  pre- 
sented for  his  pent  up  ambition.  His 
ability  to  act  on  his  own  resources  was 
demonstrated  from  the  first.  When  he 
first  struck  the  town  instead  of  waiting 
for  his  relatives  to  offer  suggestions  for 
the  delivery  of  his  effects,  as  many 
others  as  young  as  he  would  have  done, 
he  at  once  made  those  arrangements 
himself.  He  did  not  wait  around  for 
something  to  turn  up  but  went  out  after 
it  himself  and   within   24  hours  had   se- 


"The  Junior  Partner"  makes  his  bow  to  the 
readers  of  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 
this  month  and  his  mission  is  to  conduct  this 
department  for  the  benefit  of  the  booksellers  and 
stationers,  by  addressing  his  monthly  messages  to 
the  clerks,  especially  those  who  are  young  in  the 
business ;  the  boys,  and  the  girls,  too,  for  that 
matter,  who  are  beginning  at  the  lower  rungs 
of  the  lsdder  of  success.  "The  Junior  Partner" 
itmembers  his  own  early  days  as  an  apprentice 
in  a  retail  store  and  especially  what  Interesting 
events  were  the  periodical  visits  of  those  of  the 
traveling  salesmen  whom  he  regarded  as  favorites. 
One  in  particular  rose  to  a  high  place  in  the 
appreciation  in  the  mind  of  the  young  appren- 
tice because  of  the  uniformly  courteous  greeting 
this  traveler  had  for  him.  When  he  shook  hands 
with  the  boss  and  the  assistants,  he  never  failed 
to  similarly  greet  this  apprentice,  and  his  fav- 
orite greeting  was  "Well,  how's  the  junior  part- 
ner to-day?"  The  foregoing  is  related  just  to 
let  the  readers  know  the  inspiration  that  influ- 
enced "The  Junior  Partner"  in  the  choice  of  his 
nom    de    plume. 


cured    a    position    as    junior    clerk    in    a 
book  store. 

From  the  first  his  ability  to  plan 
methods  to  help  in  the  business  was 
shown  and  it  was  not  long  before  the 
proprietor  began  to  recognize  it.  In- 
stead of  waiting  for  the  boss  to  tell  him 
to  fix  the  shelves  or  change  a  counter 
display,  he  always  kept  them  in  first 
class  shape.  It  was  not  necessary  to  be 
continually  telling  him  to  keep  the  coun- 
ter or  floor  clean,  to  put  books  back 
in  their  proper  places  after  waiting  on 
a  customer,  or  to  keep  the  display  of 
magazines  well  arranged,  with  the  latest 
arrivals  promptly  hung  outside  the 
store.  This  clerk  conceived  a  good  plan 
for  increasing  the  sale  of  the  weekly- 
periodical  that  was  the  most  popular 
seller.  Fifty  copies  were  supplied  by 
the  news  company  at  that  time,  and 
he  put  a  stool  outside  the  store  and 
piled  the  fiftv  copies  on  it  with  a  strik- 
ing card  advising  people  that  the  issue 
had  just  arrived.  The  fifty  copies  dis- 
appeared within  two  days,  and  more  had 
to  be  ordered.  Within  a  month  bv  this 
one  method  the  standing  order  for  that 
periodical  had  to  be  more  than  doubled. 
He  was  for  this  reason  more  valuable 
to  his  employer  and  was  accordingly  re- 
warded by  beine  triven  charge  of  one  of 
the   display   windows. 

A   Productive    Clerk 

Here  the  same  spirit  was  shown.  He 
did  not  trim  the  window  and  leave  It 
until  the  boss  had  to  tell  him  to  change 
it,  for  he  realized  the  importance  of  this 
medium  in  selling  goods  and  kept  it  in 
first-class  shape  all  the  tim-1  Nor  w°« 
he  content  with  arranging  displays  in 
the  same  manner  as  had  been  followed 
for  years  past.  He  continually  was 
bringing  forth  some  new  method  of 
showing  goods,  and  his  original  and 
out-of-the-ordinary  methods  attracted 
public  attention.  He  recognized  the  im- 
portance of  a  good  window  trim,  of  a 
new  idea,  and  promptly  put  these  into 
effect. 

Opportunities  are  presented  to  mos' 
41 


clerks  but  not  all  take,  advantage  of 
them.  The  clerk  should  remember  that 
he  who  can  conceive  new  ideas  antl 
carry  them  out  is  a  much  better  and 
more  valuable  clerk  than  he  who  is  con- 
tent to  drift  along  in  the  same  manner 
as  others. 

Duties  of  the   Clerk 

The  clerk  owes  it  to  his  employer  and 
to  himself  to  endeavor  by  every  means 
in  his  power  to  improve  his  knowledge 
of  the  trade  in  which  he  is  engaged.  It 
is  not  sufficient  to  know  the  stock  in 
the  store.  The  clerk  who  is  going  to 
make  a  success  of  his  work  is  the  one 
who  studies  the  business  .  from  every 
standpoint,  who  is  anxious  to  assimilate 
new  ideas,  who  considers  methods  of 
salesmanship  and  endeavors  to  find 
ways  of  reading  and  satisfying  his  cus- 
tomers. He  should  not  make  it  his  sole 
ambition  to  sell  goods,  but  should  strive 
to  satisfy  the  customers  as  well  so  that 
the  trade  of  that  particular  person  will 
be  placed  with  the  same'  store  in  future. 
To  be  of  real  value  to  his  employer,  a 
clerk  must  know  something  of  the  art 
of  effective  display,  so  that  the  store 
will  be  kept  bright  and  pleasing  to  cus- 
tomers. In  fact,  there  is  no  branch  of 
the  trade  that  the  salesman  should  not 
keep  in  touch  with,  in  his  efforts  to  im- 
prove his  own  insight  into  profitable 
and    progressive    business    methods. 

This  can  be  done  by  observation  and 
by  reading.  "When  I  was  a  clerk  my 
employer  kept  telling  me  that  I  should 
never  fail  to  read  the  trade  paper  care- 
fully and  digest  mentally  everything  in 
it,"  remarked  an  Ottawa  merchant  the 
other  dav.  "I  was  brought  up  on 
BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER,  so  to 
speak,  and  to  what  I  saw  there,  I  at- 
tribute a  great  deal  of  the  success  that 
has  come  to  me  since  I  started  out  in 
business  for  myself.  I  still  watch  it 
closely." 

Undoubtedly  a  great  deal  of  useful  in- 
formation can  be  obtained  by  paying 
close  attention  to  the  ideas  of  other  men 
as  reflected  in  t^e  trrde  io'iurel.  The 
clerk  who  is  anxious  to  make  something 
of  himself  should  not  neglect  this  ready- 
source  of  information  relating  to  all 
branches  of  the  book  and  stationery 
business. 


A  CHANCE  TO  LIVE 

Zoe  Beckley's  remarkaHe  book,  "A 
Chance  to  Live,"  is  the  story  of  a  girl 
who  was  born  and  brought  up  in  a  New 
York  tenement  house  district.  There  is 
a  foreword  by  Kathleen  Norris. 


Advertising  is  a  business  vitalizer. 
You  cannot  attract  new  customers  to 
your  store  nor  get  all  the  trade  of  oM 
customers  without  advertising. 


STORE  FOUNDER  INSISTED  ON  PLAIN  CARDS 

Could  Not  Read  the  Small  Lettering  and  Decided  to  Have  Bold  Type — Uniform  Style 
of  Letter  and  Numeral  Gradually  Adopted — Illustrations 

Show  This  Style 

One   of  a   series  by   R.   T.   D.   EDWARDS 


THE  system  used  in  one  of  Can- 
ada's big  stores  for  putting  show- 
cards  on  their  goods  is  a  very 
interesting  one  indeed  and  is  sure  to  be 
beneficial  to  the  smaller  merchant. 

We  will  first  state  how  this  store 
came  to  adopt  its  present  system  of 
plainly-printed  uniform  style  show  cards. 

The  founder  of  it  was  one  day  view- 
ing their  show  windows.  On  one  neatly- 
trimmed  merchandise  display  was  a 
show  card  neatly  lettered  with  small 
type.  The  man's  eyesight  being  slightly 
defective  he  could  not  make  out  what 
was  printed  on  the  card.  The  result 
was  that  an  order  was  passed  that  all 
cards,  whether   in   the  show  windows  or 


leach  "fciir  Dollars 
"b  Have  More  §nts 

Buyfcur 
Writing  Paper 
&  Envelopes 

*  in 

Pound  Pack^jes 


for  interior  use,  must  be  lettered  with  a 
bold  type  so  that  all  customers  might 
!>e  able  to  read  them  easily. 

Uniform  Style  Adopted 

A  system  was  gradually  worked  out 
and  the  result  was  that  a  uniform  type 
of  letter  and  numeral  was  adopted— -a 
style  that  was  applicable  to  hand  or 
machine  printing. 

The  style  adopted  was  a  square-faced 
Gothic,  a  style  which  the  cardwriter 
could  form  by  using  the  brush  stroke 
method  (we  might  say  here  that  the 
brush  stroke  method  of  forming  letters 
is  the  only  way  to  turn  out  show  cards 


quickly,  and  it  is  being  taught  and  used 
by  all  the  foremost  schools  and  card- 
writers).  The  next  thing  to  standardize 
in  this  store  was  the  sizes  of  the  cards. 
Each  card  had  to  have  a  ruled  border. 
Then  a  range  of  prices  was  selected, 
suitable  to  the  prices  of  the  merchandise 
in  the  various  departments,  from  one 
cent  upwards  and  many  of  each  price 
and   size  were  printed. 

A  large  sliding  door  cabinet  was  built 
v\  ith  shelving  suitable  to  the  various 
card  sizes.  The  cards  were  placed  in  it 
in  numeral  order  on  their  edges,  this 
making  it  easy  to  obtain  the  desired 
price  card.  Sale  cards,  Friday  bargain 
cards,  "As  Advertised"  cards,  etc.,  were 
all  arranged  in  this  manner. 

One  great  feature  in  this  company's 
system  of  show  carding  the  store  is  a 
hard  and  fast  rule  that  all  cards  be- 
longing to  a  sale  or  season  of  the  year 
must  be  taken  down  on  a  given  night 
and  replaced  by  the  uniform  white  card 
vith  black  printing.  For  instance,  the 
day  following  Christmas  all  cards  with 
Christmas  desiens  are  to  be  discarded 
or  at  the  end  of  the  semi-annual  sale  all 
s;ile  cards  must  be  dispensed  with  on  a 
given  date.  This  system  can  be  worked 
out  in  the  small  store  just  the  same. 
Don't  allow  Christmas  cards  to  remain 
up  after  Christmas.  It  looks  just  as 
bad  on  the  part  of  the  store  management 
as  if  "Friday  Bargain"  cards  were  left 
up  on    Saturday. 

This  "big  store"  example  is  not  given 
as  one  to  be  followed  minutely  by  the 
;;mall  store  cardwriter,  but  many  things 
can  be  gleaned  from  it  that  will  be  very 
helpful.  For  instance,  many  cards  can 
be    worked    up    ahead    of   time;    borders 


POSITION  WANTED 

I   want   a   place    in    your   store. 

I  will  be  one  of  your  greatest  workers. 

I  will  get  new  business  for  you  every- 
day. 

I  will   always   be   on   the  job. 

I  will    be    on    hand    before    the    store 
opens  in  the  morning. 

I  will  stay  and  work  for  you  after  all 
others  have  gone. 

I  will    always    be    enthusiastic    about 
you. 

I  will    tell    everybody    about    you    and 
your  merchandise. 

I  will    increase    your    efficiency    many 
times. 

I  won't  ask  you  for  a  cent  of  salary. 

I  am     absolutely     necessary     to    your 
business. 

I  am  the  WINDOW  CARD. 
42 


can  be  ruled,  standard  prices  can  be 
made  up  by  hand  and  filed  away  foi 
busy  seasons.  The  style  of  letter  can 
be  made  uniform  whether  a  heavy 
"Gothic"  or  a  neat  "Roman"  be  used. 
The  color  and  sizes  of  the  card  should 
be  standardized.  This  rule  of  course- 
would  vary  for  special  sale  purposes  or 
at   "opening"   times. 

Samples  of  This  Store's  Cards 

The  two  styles  of  show  cards  demon- 
strated give  a  fair  idea  of  the  class  of 
work  used  in  the  windows  of  the  big 
store  above  mentioned.  They  are  good 
readable  cards.  The  type  is  plain,  the 
layout  neat  and  not  elaborate,  yet  when 


This  is 
TransterTime 

■Ulisisvyt]crctobu/ 

Transferases, 
riles,BlankBooks 

$>  all  kinds  of    . 
Office  Supplies 

^ -— —  ... 


you  see  either  of  these  styles  used  in  a 
couple  of  dozen  windows  all  at  one  time 
the  effect  is  good.  This  same  form  of 
lettering  has  been  used  for  years  and 
in  all  probability  will  be  used  for  years 
to  come.  It  is  a  part  of  the  policy  of 
the   store. 

The  cards  are  white  with  black  letters. 
The  underlining  is  red.  The  shading  on 
the  one  card  can  be  done  in  any  shade 
to  suit  the  window  trim. 


Take    your     discounts     wherever    and 
whenever  possible! 


AN  EPOCHAL  BOOK 

UNFORTUNATELY  it  is  only  too 
true  that  even  books  of  mediocre 
worth  and  importance  frequently 
receive  such  unbounded  words  of  praise, 
by  way  of  exploitation,  that  even  when 
a  new  volume  comes  along  that  actually 
towers  over  most  other  books  in  the 
height  of  its  achievement,  the  praise 
meted  out  to  it  by  reviewers  is  likely 
to  be  discounted  by  booksellers  rather 
than  taken  at  par.  It  would  be  unfor- 
tunate, indeed,  were  any  bookseller  to 
so  receive  the  current  reviews  and  dis- 
cussions about  the  Hon.  Mackenzie 
King's  work  "Industry  and  Humanity," 
the  coming  of  which  was  previously  re- 
corded in  BOOKSELLER  AND  STA- 
TIONER. 

A  copy  of  the  work  has  just  come  from 
Thomas  Allen,  the  publisher,  and  book- 
sellers will  be  well  advised  to  them- 
selves read  this  book.  It  is  one  that  will 
afford  them  a  wonderful  scope  for  exer- 
cising their  whole  ability  as  booksellers, 
for  not  only  is  it  a  timely  study  in  the 
principles  of  Reconstruction,  so  funda- 
mentally up  for  consideration  by  the 
world  to-day,  but  it  is  a  book  that  every 
teacher,  every  preacher,  every  student 
of  the  social  and  industrial  progress  of 
our  people '  and  of  the  world,  can  read 
and  study  with  profit  in  his  efforts  to 
get  a  fuller  grasp  of  the  essentials  in 
the  relationship  of  individual  industrial 
effort  and  the  community  as  a  whole. 

This  is  a  book  that  is  bound  to  exeit 
an  important  influence  in  educational 
institutions,  and  a  significant  circum- 
stance, indicating  its  international  in- 
fluence, is  that  at  the  Reconstruction 
Congress  held  at  Atlantic  City  in  Decem- 
ber, attended  by  representatives  of 
bodies  such  as  Chambers  of  Commerce, 
Boards  of  Trade,  etc.,  of  the  U.S.  and 
Canada,  important  principles  laid  down 
hi  "Industry  and  Humanity"  were  adopt- 
ed as  provisions  for  best  meeting  the 
conditions  we  are  facing  in  the  post  hel- 
ium  period. 

One  of  these  principles  is  the  right  of 
t^e  individual  worker  to  be  represented 
in  the  general  policy  of  the  industrial 
concern   with   which   he   is   identified. 

This  Mr.  King  characterizes  as  "a  sys- 
tem of  responsible  self-government  in 
Industry."  The  investment  of  life  by 
the  individual  must  be  made  to  count  to 
the  fullest  possible  degree.  The  realiza- 
tion of  this  end  involves  revolution,  and 
the  general  olan  at  which  Mr.  King  aims 
is  to  brine;  this  revolution  about  by  evo- 
lutionary methods. 


Discussing  the  interest  of  the  com- 
munity in  the  health  of  its  workers,  Mr. 
King  emphasizes  the  need  of  a  guarantee 
of  leisure,  recreation,  education  and  sub- 
sistence. A  step  toward  bringing  this 
about  was  the  establishment,  in  the  gov- 
ernments of  different  countries,  of  de- 
partments of  labor. 

BEST  NOVEL  SELECTIONS 

The  literary  editor  of  "The  Mail  and 
Empire"  essays  to  review  the  book  pub- 
lishing season  somewhat  in  the  manner 
of  the  dramatic  critic  in  a  summing  up 
of  best  plays  of  a  season.  His  idea 
was  to  select  the  ten  best  novels,  but  he 
reduced  this  to  nine,  saying  that  he 
found  so  many  claimants  for  the  tenth 
position  that  he  found  it  impossible  to 
decide.  The  first  nine,  ranking  in  the 
order  named,  are  given  as  follows: 

1.  "The  Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apo- 
calypse."    By  Blasco  Ibanez. 

2.  "Aliens."     By   William   McFee. 

3.  "Foe-Farrell."      By    Quiller-Couch. 

4.  "Nocturne."     By  Frank  Swinnerton. 

5.  "The  Green  Mirror."  By  Hugh 
Walpole. 

6.  "Towards  Morning."  Bv  I.  A.  R. 
Wylie. 

7.  "The  Tree  of  Heaven."  By  May 
Sinclair. 

8.  "Joan  and  Peter,"  by  H.  G.  Wells. 

9.  "The  Rough  Road."  By  W.  J. 
Locke. 


BEST    SELLING    BOOKS    IN    CANADA 

Fiction 

A   Daughter  of  the  Land Porter  120 

The    Cow    Puncher Stead  102 

loan   and    Peter    Wells     96 

Four      Horsemen      of     the      Apocalypse 

Iba'nez     80 

The    Rough    Road     Locke     80 

Golden     Bough     Gibbe     48 

War   Books 

Dere    Mable    Streeter  160 

A    Minstrel   in    France Lauder  96 

Love   of   an    Unknown    Soldier.  .  .Anon.  90 

Winged    Warfare    Bishop  70 

Canadian    Poems     of     the    Great    War 

Garvin  40 

Drums    Afar    Gibbon  22 


"PASSED  BY  THE  CENSOR" 

The  Canadian  censor's  attention  was 
brought  to  Marjorie  Benton  Cooke's  new 
novel,  "The  Clutch  of  Circumstance," 
published  by  McClelland  and  Stewart, 
but  he  decided  that  there  was  no  objec- 
tion to  its  circulation.  In  the  story 
Roberta  Trask,  as  Lady  Bobs,  the  wife 
of  a  British  cabinent  minister,  becomes 
involved  in  a  tragedy  which  astounds 
England  and  the  Allies  and  it  turns  out 
that  she  is  acting  in  collusion  with  Ger- 
man agents.  To  say  that  the  book  is  of 
sensational  interest  is  drawing  it  mild. 
Events  crowd  upon  each  other  with 
breathless  tension  until  the  final  expo- 
sure of  the  international  plotting. 


H.  Gregory  McGill  has  compiled  a  new 
procedure  book  entitled  "How  to  Con- 
duct Public  Meetings  in  Canada,"  with 
the  sub-title  "Where  to  Find  the  Rules." 


Alfred     Goi  don's     "Vimy     Ridge     and 
Other  Poems"  is  a  volume  of  merit  and 
a  genuine  contribution  to  Canadian  poc; 
'tal  literature. 


HOW  BOOKSELLERS  CAN  "START 
SOMETHING!" 

Spring  a  Discussion  in  the  Community  on  the  Relative  Merits 

of  Modern  English,  U.S.  and  Canadian  Poetry — It 

Will  Help  to  Sell  Such  Books 


CLEMENT  Shorter,  the  famous 
critic,  thinks  that  American  poetry 
of  the  present  day  is  better  than 
English  and  does  not  hesitate  to  say  so 
in  the  London  "Sphere."  John  Gould 
Fletcher,  author  of  "Irradiations"  and 
"Goblins  and  Pagodas,"  is  the  American 
poet  he  singles  out  for  especial  praise. 
He  says  of  Fletcher:  "He  is  a  poet  who 
marks  an  epoch  in  the  literature  of  the 
English-speaking  world."  Now,  every- 
body isn't  going  to  agree  with  that  view. 
Booksellers  will  appreciate  that  conten- 
tions such  as  these  arouse  discussions 
that  can  easily  become  good  advertise- 
ments for  volumes  of  modern  poetry,  and 
they  should  also  throw  the  Canadian  hat 
43  "> 


into  the  ring.  Where  does  Canadian 
poetry  of  to-day  stand  in  comparison 
with  the  products  of  the  singers  of  Eng- 
land and  the  United  States  ?  Book- 
sellers will  find  that  their  local  news- 
papers will  be  glad  to  get  matter  for 
their  papers  taking  up  discussions  such 
as  these,  and  when  the  subject  is  get- 
ting such  attention  the  bookseller  can 
use  space  in  the  paper,  either  in  the  way 
of  advertisements  in  the  "local"  columns 
or  in  display  space.  At  the  same  time 
volumes  of  poetry,  especially  featuring 
the  works  of  Canadian  poets,  should  be 
displayed  in  the  store  windows  and  in- 
side the  bookshop. 


I500KSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


THE   DOMINANCE   OF   BRITISH 
LABOR 

It  is  rarely  that  a  book  dealing  with 
politics  or  economics  enters  the  "Best 
seller"  class,  but  Arthur  Henderson's 
"The  Aims  of  Labor"  enjoys  the  distinc- 
tion of  a  third  printing  within  a  short 
time  since  publication.  The  personality 
of  the  author,  the  coming-of-age  of  the 
Labor  party  in  England,  the  intense  in- 
terest in  the  disturbed  state  of  Ameri- 
can labor,  and  the  British  elections, 
combine  to  explain  the  demand. 

POLITICAL  RECONSTRUCTION 

A  timely  book  to  be  brought  out  at 
once  is  Norman  Angell's  "The  Britisii 
Revolution  and  the  American  Democ- 
racy." This  fully  explains  the  Britisii 
political  system  under  which  the  Labor 
party  has  grown  to  its  present  remark- 
ab'e  power.  It  tells  what  the  various 
factions  among  workers  are  striving  for 
and  it  shows  how  the  experience  of  Eng- 
land may  be  applied  to  the  American 
po'itiral  problems  that  are  now  taking 
form  and  will  demand  solution.  Further- 
more, it  deals  with  the  question  of  free 
speech,  conscription  of  life,  of  consci- 
ence and  of  wealth. 

"BIRTH"  BY  ZONA  GALE 

"With  her  fresh  novel,  Birth,  Zona 
Gale,  as  one  might  say,  arrives,"  writes 
the  editor  of  The  New  York  "World"  of 
this   recently   issued   book. 

"This  is  not  to  assume  that  Miss  Gale 
reaches  here  the  ultimate  desire  of  her 
heart  in  fine  story  telling,  but  she  takes 
herself  forward  a  long  step  beyond  any 
previous  achievements;  far  beyond  the 
sympathetic  agreeableness  of  her  widely 
known  folk  stories  of  'Friendship  Vil- 
lage.' " 

TARKINGTONS  WORKS 

The  widely  diversified  public  which 
follows  the  books  of  Booth  Tarkington 
with  such  eager  interest,  whether  they 
be  humorous  accounts  of  Penrod's  adven 
tures  or  serious  sociological  novels,  or 
such  blend  of  humor,  pathos,  sociology 
and  realism  as  his  new  novel,  "The 
Magnificent  Ambersons,"  will  unite  in 
interest  over  the  announcement  of  the 
publication  of  a  collected  and  auto- 
graphed edition  of  Mr.  Tarkington's 
books.  The  edition  is  limited  to  565  sets 
of  twelve  volumes  each.  Each  set  is 
numbered  and  registered,  and  the  first 
volume  of  each  set  is  autographed  per- 
sonally by  the  author.  A  few  of  the  sets 
have  been  set  aside  for  special  binding. 

SEAMAN  SI 

Pitching  hay  down  in  Pickle  Center. 
Iowa,  was  pretty  tame  work  for  Seaman 
Si.  He  yearned  for  the  romance  of  the 
rolling  wave  and  he  found  it  at  the 
Great  Lakes  Naval  Training  Station. 
Seaman  Si's  adventures  as  a  "gob"  in 
the  navy  and  on  the  high  seas  are  full 
of  fun  and  trouble,  as  shown  in  a  series 
of  amusing  cartoons  by  Perce  Pe;rce, 
the  Amer'cn  sai'or-caHoonist.  fovmer'y 
on  the  art  staff  of  the  Chicago  "Herald," 
who  enlisted  in  the  navy  three  days  after 
the  United  States  ('eclared  war. 


PROPOSED  NEW  LIBRARIES 

A  movement  is  on  foot  to  provide  a 
Public  Library  at  Lethbridge,  Alta.  It 
is  proposed  to  make  this  take  the  place 
of  a  monument  to  the  Lethbridge  men 
who  fell  in  battle. 

Welland,  Ontario,  is  agitating  for  a 
Carnegie  Public  Library.  The  Wellanci 
"Telegraph"  had  the  following  in  a  re- 
cent issue:  "The  Dominion  Govern- 
ment, the  Provincial  Government,  the 
municipalities,  firms  and  private  persons 
will  do  everything  possible  in  1919  to 
provide  an  outlet  for  labor.  With  the 
return  of  thousands  of  men  from  over- 
seas, and  with  the  release  of  thousands 
of  munition  workers,  the  necessity  for  a 
big  programme  of  private  and  public- 
undertakings  to  provide  a  market  for 
labor  is  apparent. 

Now  then,  here  is  a  suggestion: — 

Why  not  build  a  Carnegie  library  m 
Welland   next   year? 

The  Carnegie  endowment  has  $50,000 
or  $75,000  ready  and  waiting  for  WeK- 
and.  All  the  city  needs  to  do  is  to  ask 
for  it. 

JOHN  MASEFIELD 

The  poems  and  plays  of  John  Mase- 
field  have  been  brought  together  and 
published  in  two  volumes;  one  of  plays 
and  one  of  poems.  They  include  all  of 
Mr.  Masefield's  writings  in  these  tw( 
fields;  those  poems  and  plays  which  have 
been  generally  available,  as  well  as 
those  issued  in  limited  form  only  and 
soon  out  of  print. 

THE  YOUNG  DIANA 

One  of  the  latest  arrivals  in  1918  \\  s 
"The  Young  Diana."'  by  Marie  Corelli, 
her  first  novel  in  four  years.  The  Cana- 
!i->n  edition  is  published  by  Briggs. 

This  is  a  delightful  tale  of  the  re- 
juvenation of  a  lady  of  mature  years 
through  the  wonders  of  modern  science, 
in  which  the  obviously  impossible  is 
made  both  credible  and  delightful. 

THE  ANCHOR 

"The  Anchor,"  a  love  story  by  M.  T. 
H.  Sadler,  comes  from  Constable's,  Lon- 
don. It  is  a  clever,  intensely  human 
novel,  and  the  author  sees  the  London 
of  to-day  as  Dickens  would  see  it  were 
he  alive.  The  author  is  rich  in  his  de- 
scriptive powers  and  has  the  life-gTving 
touch  in  his  portraiture. 

CANADIAN  BOOKS  DE  LUXE 

It  is  interesting  to  record  that  there 
are  in  preparation  two  new  volumes  in 
keeping  with  Archie  Bell's  magnificent 
volume,  "Sunset  Canada:  British  Co- 
lumbia and  Bevond."  The  titles  of  the 
new  books  will  be,  "Central  Canada: 
Ontario,  Manitoba  and  the  Great  Plains," 
"Sunrise  Canada:  Quebec  and  the  Lower 
Provinces."  Later  another  vol'ime  deal- 
in?  with  the  G  eat  Lakes  will  be  pub- 
lished. These  are  volumes  in  the  "See 
America  First"  series,  each  being  bound 
in  silk  cloth  and  having  numerous  full- 
color  and  duogravure  illustrations. 
44 


THE  CHATTERBOX 

The  latest  issue  of  "The  Chattel  box" 
annual,  published  by  the  Page  Co.,  Bos- 
ton, is  dated  1919.  There  is  a  pub- 
lisher's note  to  the  effect  that  the  pre- 
sent volume  has  been  delayed  by  war 
conditions  and  for  that  reason  it  was 
decided  to  have  no  issues  bearing  1918. 
Subsequent  issues  will  appear  annually 
in  October. 

This  deservedly  popular  annual  has 
won  a  strong  place  in  many  thousands 
of  homes,  and  rwany  of  the  children  who 
greeted  its  first  appearance  in  1879  now 
buy  the  good  old  "Chatterbox"  for  their 
own  boys  and  girls. 

The  new  issue  is  profusely  illustrated 
and  replete,  with  stories  and  other  con- 
tents that  make  it  as  good  as,  if  not 
better  than  any  of  its  predecessors. 

CANADIAN   WONDER  TALES 

Cyrus  Macmillan  has  brought  together 
a  collection  of  some  of  the  most  interest- 
ing and  suggestive  of  Canadian  folk 
tales.  The  stories  have  been  rewritten 
and  put  into  new  dress,  but  there  is  no 
claim  to  originality.  These  tales  are 
well  known  to  the  folk  of  the  region  and 
are  told  again  and  again  by  candle  and 
firelight,  in  camps  and  upon  the  sea. 
Many  of  them  are  still  believed  and  held 
in  reveience  by  the  Canadian  Indians. 
Mr.  Macmillan  has  culled  from  a  larger 
collection  to  give  the  general  public  an 
insight  into  the  quaint  and  primitive 
conditions  that  still  exist  in  many  parts 
of  the  country.  The  text  h"s  32  illus- 
trations in  color  by  Geo.ge  Sherineham. 
The   title   is  "Canadian   Wonder  Tales." 

COTTON 

"Cotton, '  by  George  Bigwood,  comes 
from  Constable's  of  London,  being  one 
volume  of  a  series  dealing  with  staple 
trades  and  industries,  designed  to  con- 
vey a  full  knowledge  of  the  raw  mater- 
ials and  manufactured  products  that  are 
of  such  vast  importance  to  the  life  of  the 
people  as  a  whole.  To  indicate,  for 
booksellers,  the  nature  of  this  work,  the 
chapter  headings  are  given  herewith: 
History  of  the  Cotton  Plant;  The  De- 
velopment of  Spinning;  The  Cotton 
Fields:  Triumph  of  Mechanical  Inven- 
tion; Cotton  Growing  under  the  British 
Flag;  Classification  of  the  World's  Crop; 
Modern  Spinning  and  Weaving;  "Whce 
Merchants  Most  do  Congregate";  Gamb- 
ling in  Cotton:  Cotton  Fabrics:  An  Art 
Manufacture;  Cotton  Organizations  and 
Strikes;  A  General  Utilitv  Plant;  Cotton 
"Futu-es";  Soinr'les  and  Loom<;  The 
Cotton  Trade  in  War  Time. 

FOR   WOMEN'S  MEETINGS 

Lydia  M.  Parsons,  lecturer  to  Women's 
Institutes,  has  compiled  and  the  Mac- 
millans  have  published  "Mrs.  Parson's 
Manual  for  Women's  Meetings,"  which 
provides  women  with  a  course  of  instruc- 
tions for  conduct  at  any  meeting.  This 
manual  is  just  as  useful  for  the  ordinary 
member  as  for  the  official. 


Gilbert    Canaan's    "Pink    Roses''    is    a 
story  of  London  in  war  tim^. 


[i  0  0  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      AND     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  It 


THREE  TIMES  AND  OUT 

PRIVATE  Simmons,  the  hero  of 
Nellie  McClung's  new  book,  "Three 
Times  and  Out,"  is  now  lecturing 
for  the  Chautauqua.  The  story  of  escape, 
which  entailed  so  much  danger  and  so 
much  bravery  on  his  part,  is  exciting 
vivid  interest  among  the  audiences  he 
addresses.  His  story,  written  by  Nellie 
McClung  in  her  unusually  virile  style, 
was  published  in  December  by  Tho» 
Allen.  Mrs.  McClung  writes  of  her  hero 
thus:  "Mr.  Simmons  is  getting  along 
well  with  his  Chautauqua  work.  The 
ticket  holders  are  sometimes  asked  to 
vote  on  the  most  popular  feature  of  the 
Chautauqua.  Mr.  Simmons'  name  has 
stood  first  each   time." 

The  book  tells  how  Private  Simmons 
tried  unsuccessfully  on  two  occasions  to 
escape  from  his  German  prison,  how  he 
was  brought  back  and  punished,  and  how 
in  the  third  attempt,  after  almost  in- 
credible perils  and  hardships,  he  suc- 
ceeded. 

Here  is  a  book  that  once  again  bears 
out  the  contention  that  truth  sometimes 
exceeds  fiction  in  the  depiction  of  thrill- 
ing: adventures. 

Following  are  extracts  from  the  sig- 
nificant concluding  chapter  of  this  boorc: 
"The  people  at  home  are  interested 
and  speculative  as  to  the  returned  sol- 
diers' point  of  view.  Personally,  I  be- 
lieve that  as  the  soldiers  went  away  with 
diversity  of  opinions,  so  will  they  come 
home,  though  in  a  less  degree.  There 
will  be  a  tendency  to  fusion  in  some  re- 
spects. One  will  be  in  the  matter  of 
co-operation;  the  civilian's  ideas  are  gen- 
erally those  of  the  individual — he  braTs 
about  his  rights  and  resents  any  restric- 
tion  of  them.  He  is  strong  on  grand  old 
traditions,  and  rejoices-  in  any  special 
privileges  which  ,have  come  to  him. 

"The  soldier  learns  to  share  his  com- 
forts with  the  man  next  him;  in  the 
army  each  man  depends  on  the  other — 
and  cannot  do  without  him;  there  is  no 
competition  there,  but  only  co-operation. 
If  loss  comes  to  one  man,  or  misfor- 
tune, it  affects  the  others.  If  one  man 
is  poorly  trained,  or  uncontrolled,  or 
foolish,    all    suffer.      If    a    badly    trained 


bomber  loses  his  head,  pulls  the  pin  of 
his  bomb,  and  lets  it  drop  instead  of 
throwing  it,  the  whole  platoon  is  en- 
dangered. In  this  way  the  soldier  un- 
consciously absorbs  some  of  the  princi- 
ples of,  and  can  understand  the  reason 
for  discipline,  and  acquires  a  wholesome 
respect  for  the  man  who  knows  his  job. 
"He  sees  the  reason  for  stringent  or- 
ders in  regard  to  health  and  sanitation. 
He  does  not  like  to  get  into  a  dirty  bath 
himself,  and  so  he  leaves  it  clean  for 
the  next  man.  In  other  words,  the  sol- 
dier, consciously  or  unconsciously,  has 
learned  that  he  is  a  part  of  a  great  mass 
of  people,  and  that  his  own  safety,  both 
commercially  and  socially,  depends  on 
the  proper  disciplining  of  the  whole 
people. 

"The  returned  soldier  will  take  kindly 
to  projects  which  tend  to  a  better  equal- 
ization of  duties,  responsibilities,  and 
pleasures.  He  will  be  a  great  sticker  for 
this;  if  he  has  to  work,  everyone  else 
must  work  too.  He  will  be  hard  against 
special  privileges.  He  will  be  strong  in 
his  insistence  that  our  natural  resources 
be  nationalized.  He  will  iro  after  all 
lines  of  industry  now  in  the  hands  of 
large  corporations,  and  insist  on  national 
supervision,  if  not  actual   ownership. 

"In  religion,  he  will  not  care  anything 
•  bout  fo"m.  Denominizationalism  will 
bore  him,  but  the  vital  element  of  re- 
ligion, brotherly  love  and  helping  the 
other  fellow,  will  attract  him,  wherever 
he  finds  it.  He  knows  that  religion — 
he  believes  in  it. 

"The  political  parties  will  never  be 
able  to  catch  him  with  their  worn-out 
phrases.  Politicians  had  better  begin  to 
remodel  their  speeches.  The  iniquities 
of  the  other  party  will  not  do.  There 
must  be  a  breaking-out  of  new  roads- 
old  things  have  passed  away! 

"The  returned  man  will  claim,  above 
rill  things,  honest  dealing  and  for  this 
reason  the  tricky  politicians  who  put  it 
over  in  the  pre-war  days  will  not  have 
so  easv  a  time.  "Guff"  will  not  be  weM 
received.  The  leaders  on  the  battlefie'.d 
have  been  men  who  could  look  death  in 
the  fa-e  without  flinching,  so  the  politi- 
cal   leaders    at    home    must    be    men    of 


heroism,  who  will  travel  the  path  of 
righteousness,  even  though  they  see  it 
leads  by  the  way  of  the  Cross! 

"There  is  a  hard  road  ahead  of  us,  a 
hard,  steep  road  of  sacrifice,  and  in  it  we 
must,  as  a  nation,  travel,  although  our 
feet  are  heavy  and  our  eyes  are  dim. 
The  war  must  be  won;  human  liberty  is 
worth  the  price — whatever  the  price  may 
oe! 

"We  do  not  travel  as  those  who  have 
no  hope,  for  we  know,  though  we  cannot 
see  it,  that  at  the  top  of  the  mountain 
the  sun  is  shining  on  a  cleaner,  fairer, 
better  world." 


5,000  FACTS  ABOUT  CANADA 

The  1919  edition  of  the  popular  Statis- 
tical Cyclopedia  of  Canada  is  now  out 
and  reflects  great  credit  on  its  compiler. 
Frank  Yeigh,  who  has  again  produced  a 
most  valuable  publication  and  one  that 
advertises  Canada  most  effectively.  A 
special  feature  of  the  present  issue  is 
the  chapter  on  Canadian  War  Facts,  now 
complete.  The  booklet  is  a  revelation  of 
the  growth  and  wealth  of  the  Dominion, 
despite  the  war.  The  publishers  are  the 
Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co.,  588 
Huron   street,  Toronto. 


BRIEF  BOOK  NOTES 

"The  Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apoca- 
lypse" has  run  into  over  fifty  editions  in 
the  U.S.  Its  appreciation  by  Canadian 
leaders  has  been  somewhat  slower,  but 
in  recent  week.s  it  has  been  coming  on 
with  a  rush  over  here  as  well. 

"The  Shipbuilding  Industry,"  by  Roy 
W.  Kelly  and  F.  J.  Allen,  is  a  volume 
that  has  special  significance  at  the  pre- 
sent time,  in  view  of  the  elaborate  pro- 
gramme of  the  Dominion  Government 
for  the  building  of  a  Canadian  merchant 
marine. 

No  more  genuine  tribute  to  Dorothy 
Canfield's  "Home  Fires  in  France," 
could  be  made  than  the  decision  by  the 
authorities  of  the  French  Government 
High  Schools  to  include  one  of  the 
sketches  into  a  volume  of  selections  of 
modern  prose  to  be  used  in  those  schools 


1919  BRINGS  ENORMOUSLY  INCREASED  BOOK  COSTS 

Staple  Books  in  General  Will  Cost  Fully  25  '<  More — Reprint  Novels  and  New  Fiction 

Will  Also  Take  Sharp  Advance 


THE  most  important  developmen: 
in  the  book  trade  at  the  beginning 
of  the  new  year  is  the  decidedly 
sharp  increase  in  book  prices  indicated 
by  quotations  sent  out  by  the  chief  book 
publishing  houses  of  the  United  States. 
In  view  of  the  interwoven  inteiests  of 
the  Canadian  book  trade  with  that  of  the 
United  States  as  resoects  a  most  exten- 
sive proportion  of  both  staple  books  and 
new  publications,  these  actions  in  the 
chief  publishing  centres  of  the  United 
States  will  affect  the  Canadian  book 
trade  as  thev  do  the  booksellers  through- 


out the  United  States.  Not  only 
does  this  entirely  kill  all  chances  for 
leduced  prices  which  some  members 
of  the  trade  had  anticipated  as  a 
post-war  probability,  but  it  is  certain 
that  this  year  is  going  to  see  the  greatest 
increase  in  book  prices  that  we  have  wit- 
nessed in  any  year  since  the  beginning 
of  the  war. 

Staple  books  will  go  up  at  least  25<# 
on  the  average.  Reprint  novels  will  have 
to  sell  at  75c  and  new  fiction  will  also 
take  a  sharp  advance,  the  $1.25  novel  of 
standard  size  disappearing  altogether. 
45 


The  cost  of  labor  in  book  publishing 
has  advanced  at  greater  rate  than  ever 
before  in  the  past  year  and  strikes  still 
in  force  in  New  York  cannot  but  result 
in  still  further  increases  in  wages.  All 
commodities  entering  into  book-making 
have  soared  in  price,  some  as  much  as 
four-fold  since  a  year  ago. 

As  to  English  book  prices  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  has  re- 
peatedly of  late  indicated  the  upward 
tendency  of  costs  and  there  is  no  indi- 
cation of  any  abatement  o^  this  trend 
of  prices. 


I 


LITERATURE  OF  THE  WAR 


SECRETARY  OF  WAR  BAKER  ON 
"THE  FRUITS  OF  VICTORY" 

Secretary  of  War  Baker  of  the  U.  S. 
in  his  introduction  to  "Our  Cities 
Awake,"  by  Morris  Llewellyn  Cooke, 
says  in  part:  "What  are  we  going  to  do 
with  the  fruits  of  victory  when  we  have 
won  them  ?  Civilized  men  take  fruits 
from  victory;  savages  take  spoils.  The 
important  question,  therefore,  is  how  we 
shall  use  most  wisely  the  vindicated  jus- 
tice and  the  re-established  opportunity 
which  this  war  is  to  bring.  .  .  .  It  is  in 
the  light  of  reflections  of  this  sort  that 
books  like  Mr.  Cooke's  are  timely  and 
important.  We  may  not  have  time 
enough  now  to  remake  our  cities — but  we 
can  stow  away  in  the  back  of  our  mind.> 
the  picture  of  a  better  city  and  therefore 
a  better  home,  and  we  can  now  resolve 
that  when  our  energies  are  liberated 
from  this  great  and  absorbing  struggle 
we  will  turn  enough  of  them  upon  the 
problems  which  the  city  presents  to 
make,  correspondingly,  a  gathering  of 
fruits  there. 

BRYCE'S  NEW  BOOK 

"Essays  and  Addresses  in  War  Time"  is 
the  title  of  a  new  volume  by  the  Hon- 
orable Viscount  Bryce.  It  presents  three 
essays  written  in  the  first  two  years  of 
the  war,  to  explain  to  neutral  nations 
the  aims  and  justify  the  action  of  Great 
Britain.  These  are  followed  by  three 
addresses  of  a  non-political  character, 
treating  of  war  in  general,  its  causes  and 
some  of  its  phenomena,  its  social  effects, 
its  relations  to  human  progress.  The 
seventh  essay  examines  the  history  and 
the  meaning  of  what  is  called  the  prin- 
ciple of  nationality.  The  final  article 
deals  with  the  idea  or  plan  of  a  league 
of  nations  to  enforce  peace. 

THE  RECKONING 

Hard  upon  the  end  of  hostilities  in 
Europe  comes  "The  Reckoning,"  by 
James  M.  Beck,  being  a  discussion  on  the 
moral  aspects  of  the  peace  problem,  and 
of  retributive  justice  as  an  indispensable- 
element.  The  author  is  well  known  not 
only  as  a  distinguished  jurist,  but  as  a 
publicist  whose  views  are  entitled  to 
thoughtful  consideration.  His  previous 
books — "The  Evidence  in  the  Case"  and 
"The  War  and  Humanity" — have  been 
translated  into  many  languages,  and 
}-;>'e  been  accepted  on  both  sides  of  the 
Atlantic  as  contributions  of  the  highest 
authority  to  a  study  of  the  causes  of  the 
war. 

In  "The  Reckoning,"  Mr.  Beck  dis- 
cusses   the    problems    of    peace,    particu- 


larly in  their  ethical  aspect.  He  makes 
a  forcible  plea  for  retributive  justice, 
and  argues  that  the  Prussian  Empire  of 
Bismarck  should  be  destroyed  by  the 
elimination  of  Prussia.  He  discusses  in 
detail  the  fourteen  terms  of  peace  pro- 
posed in  January  last  by  President  Wil- 
son (terms  which  have  since,  in  part  at 
least,  been  modified),  and  in  a  careful 
analysis  he  presents  certain  difficulties 
in  the  way  of  the  scheme  for  the  pro- 
posed League  of  Nations. 

THE  NELSON  TOUCH 

From  John  Murray,  of  London,  comes 
"The  Nelson  Touch,"  by  Walter  Jerrold, 
a  volume  of  90  pages,  which  presents 
brief,  pointed,  and  character-revealing 
things  said  or  things  written  by  Lord 
Nelson  from  his  early  boyhood  to  his 
death;  and  shows  that  the  "Nelson 
Touch"  may  be  interpreted  in  relation  to 
the  whole  battle  of  life  as  well  as  in  re- 
lation to  a  naval  battle.  It  reveals,  in 
his  own  words,  the  great  seaman  as  a 
man  of  thought  as  well  as  of  action,  and 
gifted  with  a  rare  power  of  simple  self- 
expression. 

THE  "IRISH  QUESTION" 

"Ireland,"  by  Francis  Hackett,  an 
editor  of  the  New  Republic,  is  not  alone 
an  informative  study  of  the  Irish  situa- 
tion and  the  causes  responsible  for  it;  a 
further  value  lies  in  the  fact  that  it  vir- 
tually includes  all  of  those  ouestion? 
that  vex  statesmen  who  would  do  justice 
to  the  smaller  nations.  Mr.  Hackett's 
attitude  is  quite  impartial  and  he  criti- 
cises Irish  and  English  alike  for  then- 
share  in  bringing  about  what  seems  to 
be  an  impasse,  but  which  is  really  onlv  a 
tangle  that  demands  vision  and  skill  in 
readjustment.  A  second  edition  contain- 
ing a  newly  prepared  index  is  in 
nress.  This  is  a  book  which  will  sell 
readily  if  booksellers  will  brine:  it  to  the 
fore,  and  this  applies  to  all  books  dealing 
with  controversial  subjects  now  filling  a 
big  place  in  the  public  mind. 

STALKY  AND  BEETLE 

Rudvard  Kipling's  American  publish- 
ers, who  have  recently  brought  out  his 
"The  Eyes  of  Asia"  (being  the  letters  of 
a  wounded  East  Indian  officer  to  his 
people  at  home),  have  just  discovered 
throueh  a  disclosure  from  Hayden 
Church  of  London,  the  identity  of 
"Stalkv"  of  school  boy  storv  fame  U 
appears  that  General  Alex.  Dunstervilie 
of  the  British  Army,  who  not  long  ago 
captured  the  fabulously  rich  oil  fields  of 
Baku,  is  none  other  than  the  redoubtable 
46 


"Stalky."  Here  is  another  confirmation 
of  the  saying  that  "the  child  is  the 
father  of  the  man."  The  General  was 
"Stalky,"  Kipling  himself  was  "Beetle," 
and  they  became  as  they  have  ever  since 
remained,  the  closest  of  friends.  It  would 
be  interesting  to  know  how  much  of  his 
literary  background  the  grown-up  "Bee- 
tle" has  gotten  from  the  grown-up 
"Stalky." 

MY  FLAG  AND  MY  BOY 

From  the  Page  Co.,  of  Boston,  comes 
"My  Flag  and  My  Boy,"  by  Lieut. 
William  H.  Barter,  a  volume  of  poems 
upon  subjects  connected  with  the  war. 
Some  of  them  are  inspiring  and  patriotic 
and  others  are  humorous.  The  volume 
is  copiously  illustrated. 

A  sad  circumstance  in  connection  with 
its  publication  is  that  Lieut.  Barter, 
within  a  few  days  after  reading  the 
proof  sheets  of  his  book,  while  returning 
to  Boston  from  addressing  a  patriotic 
meeting  in  a  neighboring  city,  met  with 
;n  automobile  accident,  which  resulted 
in  his  death  the  following  day. 

REVEALS  GERMAN  MIND 

"Three  Years  of  World  Revolution,' 
is  the  title  of  a  book  by  Paul  Lensch,  a 
member  of  the  Reichstag,  which  has  been 
published  by  Constable's  of  London. 

Lensch  is  a  leader  of  German  Social- 
ists, and  this  book  tells  how  he  sees  the 
i-sues  of  the  Great  War.  It  is  valuable 
;'s  a  mirror  of  the  German  mind,  and 
primarily  this  is  the  reason  for  publish- 
ing the  English  translation. 

AN  AMERICAN  GIRL  IN  GERMANY 

"With  Old  Glory  in  Berlin,"  by  Jose- 
phine Therese,  is  the  title  of  a  new  book 
published  by  The  Page  Co.,  of  Boston. 
It  tells  of  the  experiences  of  an  Ameri- 
can girl,  her  trials  when  virtually  a 
captive  in  Hunland.  and  of  her  final 
escape  from  the  minions  of  the  Kaiser. 
She  went  to  Germany  in  1916  as  a  stu- 
dent of  the  opera,  and  it  was  eight 
months  after  the  United  States  had  en- 
tered the  war  that  she  made  her  escape. 
A  publisher's  note  explains  that  for  ob- 
vious reasons  the  author  used  an  as- 
-•i^ed  name  rather  than  her  own  in  re- 
lating her   story. 

THE  WAR  EAGLE 

W.  J.  Dawson's  "The  War  Eagle"  is  a 
war  book  of  great  interest,  presenting 
interesting  facts  about  the  first  year  of 
effort  by  the  American  Republic  in  fi?ht- 
ir.g  the  German  menace. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


KRITAIN  AND  AMERICA 

"British  American  Discords  and  Con- 
cords" is  the  title  of  a  timely  little  vol- 
ume compiled  by  the  "History  Circle" 
and  published  by  Futnam's.  This  book 
summarizes  the  relations  between  Great 
Britain  and  America  during  the  three 
centuries  which  have  elapsed  since  Eng- 
lishmen first  settled  on  the  American 
continent.  The  statements  in  the  text 
may 'be  accepted  as  trustworthy,  and  will 
prove  extremely  interesting  to  the  gen- 
eral reader.  Compiled  by  many  workers 
from  the  best  sources,  it  is  commended 
by  recognized  historical  authorities. 

Among  the  interesting  facts  presented 
is  one  that  is  not  widely  known,  this  be 
ing  the  fact  that  what  became  known  as 
the  Monroe  Doctrine  had  its  origin  in 
suggestions  from  George  Canning, 
British  Secretary  for  Foreign  Affairs  in 
1823. 

"THE  SPRINGTIDE  OF  LIFE" 

Lovers  of  the  beautiful  in  art  and 
poetry  will  be  delighted  with  Edmund 
Gosse's  collection  of  Swinburne's  poems 
of  childhood,  "The  Springtide  of  Life." 
It  had  been  the  poet's  intention  to  gather 
these  himself,  but  as  the  work  had  not 
been  done  before  his  death,  Mr.  Gosse 
carried  it  out  in  accordance  with  the  in- 
tentions expressed  by  the  poet.  The  il- 
lustrations by  Arthur  Rackham,  are  in 
exquisite  harmony  with  the  poet's  idea. 

EVERYMAN'S  LAND 

The  latest  book  by  C.  N.  and  A.  M. 
Williamson  is  "Everyman's  Land,"  a 
romance  of  travel  which  weaves  itself  in 
and  out  among  the  cities  and  towns  of 
France,  which  the  war,  while  reducing 
many  of  them  to  ruins,  has  made  famil- 
iar to  every  American.  "Everyman's 
Land"  is,  of  course,  France,  and  the  book 
is  thus  dedicated:  "To  All  Soldiers  Who 
Have  Fought  or  Fight  For  Everyman's 
Land  and  Everyman's  Right,  and  to 
Those  Who  Love  France." 

IN  LONDON  WITH  LUCAS 

E.  V.  Lucas*  book,  "A  Wanderer  in 
London,"  is  an  intensely  interesting 
volume.  Wandering  with  Mr.  Lucas 
through  London's  art  galleries,  music 
halls,  splendid  squares,  or  by  the  Thames 
where  smoky  tug  boats  puff  their  way 
beneath  Westminster's  towers,  will  make 
you  long  for  even  the  smallest  attic 
anion?  the  famous  chimney-pots,  just  to 
be  in  London  town.  The  book  is  full  of 
sketches  and  reproductions  of  famous 
paintings. 

ZOE  BECKLEY  MADE  GOOD 

To  show  what  a  trained  newspaper  re- 
porter can  do  from  force  of  habit,  the 
following  will  illustrate:  Zoe  Beckley 
was  a  feature  writer  on  one  of  the  big 
New  York  papers,  accustomed  at  a  word 
from  the  editor  to  go  out  and  get  up  a 
story  on  a  baby  show,  a  factory  fire,  a 
dressmaker's  convention,  an  interview 
with  a  famous  chef,  a  political  meeting, 
or  any  one  of  the  thousand  and  one  oc- 
currences of  a  great  city.  But  trained 
as  she  was  in  the  unusual,  she  received 


a  shock  one  day,  when  the  editor  came 
to  her  and  casually  said,  "I  want  you  to 
go  out  and  live  in  the  tenements  for  a 
couple  of  weeks,  and  then  write  us  an 
80,000  word  novel.  Before  you  begin 
your  work,  study  some  of  those  who 
have  made  a  success  in  this  type  of  fic- 
tion." That  was  all.  When  Miss  Beck- 
ley  got  over  her  astonishment,  like  a 
good  newspaper  woman  she  went  and  did 
as  she  was  told.  The  resu't  is  "A  Chance 
to  Live,"  which,  following  its  serial  pub- 
lication,  is   now    issued   as   a   book. 

PATHFINDERS  OF  THE  WEST 

Agnes  C.  Laut's  "Pathfinders  of  the 
West"  is  a  book  of  Canadian  signifi- 
cance, in  that  the  great  Canadian  west- 
land  is  dealt  with  in  a  manner  which 
makes  it  a  valuable  contribution  to  his- 
torical literature.  It  deals  with  great 
discoveries  and  while  true,  it  reads  like 
fiction. 

A  FINE  BOOK  FOR  BOYS 

"The  Boys'  Own  Book  of  Great  Inven- 
tions" is  the  telling  title  of  a  volume  by 
F.  L.  Darrow,  among  the  publications  in 
December.  It  is  a  practical  volume 
and  one  that  will  set  the  wits  of  man> 
a  boy  to  work.  Not  only  does  Mr.  Dar- 
row describe,  in  a  fashion  likely  to  in- 
terest youth,  the  great  inventions  of 
mankind,  but  he  applies  the  principles 
underlying  them  to  simple  apparatus 
which  the  boy  can  construct  for  himself 
The  aeroplane,  the  balloon,  the  various 
kinds  of  engines,  the  telephone,  the  tele- 
graph, the  telescope,  all  of  these  and 
dozens  of  others  come  in  for  considera- 
tion. 

STORY  HOUR  FAVORITES 

Wilhelmina  Harper,  children's  li- 
brarian at  the  Queensboro  Public 
Library,  New  York,  has  had  remarkable 
success  in  conducting  a  story-hour  for 
children,  and  the  outcome  of  her  experi- 
ence is  her  book  entitled  "Story  Hour 
Favorites,"  gathering  together  nineteen 
of  the  best  stories  for  children  of  all 
ages.  These  include  masterpieces  by 
Joel  Chandler  Harris,  Eugene  Field, 
Selma  Lagerlof,  Oscar  Wilde,  Katherine 
Pyle,  etc. 

Booksellers  will  readily  appreciate  the 
suggestive  value  of  this  information  for 
promoting  sales  of  this  book  in  their 
stores. 

FOR  LITTLE  GIRLS 

"A  Little  Sewing  Book  for  a  Little 
Girl."  by  Louise  Frances  Cornell,  in  the 
Ideal  Series  for  girls,  is  written  in  story 
form  to  encourage  little  girls  in  the  use- 
ful and  beautiful  art  of  the  needle,  and 
contains  many  illustrations  which  will 
rid  them  in  learning  t'ie  various  stitches. 

FORTHCOMING 

Among  the  new  novels  to  come  this 
year  are  "The  Soul  of  Ann  Rutledge," 
by  Bernie  Babcock;  "The  Diamond  Pin," 
by  Carolyn  Wells;  and  "The  Red  Signal," 
by  Grace  Livingston  Hill  Lutz. 


LITTLE   COUSIN    SERIES 

A  new  volume  in  the  Page  Company's 
"Little  Cousin"  series  is  "Our  Little 
Celtic  Cousin  of  Long  Ago,"  by  Evaleen 
Stein.  It  is  a  story  of  Ferdiad,  a  story 
of  a  Boy  of  Ireland  in  the  time  of  Brian 
Boru.  The  book  harks  back  to  the  time 
when  the  Celtic  people  held  sway  over 
an  empire  spreading  over  a  large  part 
of  Europe,  and  is  a  most  interesting  ex- 
position of  the  early  history  of  the  Celtic 
race — particularly  the  Irish — told  for  the 
edification  of  young  readers. 

TEACHING   PATRIOTISM 

The  Page  Co.,  of  Boston,  have  just 
published  a  creditable  book  entitled 
"Teaching  the  Child  Patriotism,"  by  Kate 
Upson  Clark.  It  is,  of  course,  a  book 
with  a  distinct  U.  S.  flavor,  but  by  sub- 
stituting Canadian  for  U.  S.  symbols  of 
nationality,  it  can  be  made  the  basis  of 
the  efficient  training  of  Canadian  chil- 
dren in  the  significance  of  patriotism. 
Among  the  chapters'  headings  some  of 
the  more  significant  ones  are  "Sacrific- 
ing for  Patriotism,"  "Patriotism  and 
Health,"  "Personal  Responsibility  in 
Politics." 

NEW  BUSINESS  BOOKS 

"Training  for  a  Salesman,"  by  William 
Maxwell;  "Training  for  the  Street  Rail- 
way Business,"  by  C.  B.  Fairchild,  Jr., 
are  important  business  books  announced 
for  early  publication. 

NEW  NOVEL  BY  PARKER 

"Wild  Youth,"  by  Sir  Gilbert  Parker, 
is  an  interesting  announcement  for  1919. 


LISTS  RECEIVED 

From  the  National  Blank  Book  Co., 
Holyoke,  comes  a  retail  price  list  of 
blank  books  numerically  arranged.  It  is 
a  book  of  96  pa<?es.  The  index,  repeated 
in  red  letters  throughout  the  book,  en- 
hances the  value  of  the  list  for  ready 
reference. 


GROWTH  OF  TOY  TRADE  IN  JAPAN 

Much  progress  has  been  made  in 
Japan's  toy  trade  in  recent  years.  In 
1915  the  export  amounted  to  4,533,000 
yen;  in  1916  to  7,640,000  yen,  and  in  1917 
to  8,409,000  yen,  including  2,430,000  yen, 
and  3,790,000  representing  the  export 
to  the  United  States  in  1916  and  1917. 

The  increase  of  the  figures  in  1917,  in 
spite  of  the  British  ban  on  imports,  was 
attributed  to  the  increase  of  the  impor- 
tation into  the  United  States,  which 
showed  over  40  per  cent,  of  Japan's  ex- 
ports to  that  country. 

Chile,  Argentina  and  Mexico  are  con- 
sidered promising  markets  for  the  trade 
in  the  future.  Last  year  large  demands 
came  from  these  countries,  but  only  a 
portion  were  answered  because  of  the 
scarcity  of  cargo  space.  Yet  the  export 
to  these  countries  amounted  to  300,000 
ven  during  the  year.  The  export  to 
these  countries,  it  is  hoped,  will  be 
brought  annually  to  1.000  000  yan  in 
\alue. 


3  Equipments 


Business  Systems 


! 


IMPORTANCE  OF  CARRYING  THE  GOODS  IN  STOCK 

Some  Good  Advice  to  Retail  Stationers,  With  Special  Reference  to  Loose  Leaf  Goods 


WHILE  it  is  an  essential  fact  that 
salespersons  should  be  well  in- 
formed about  the  goods  they  sell 
and  the  uses  for  which  they  are  intend- 
ed, this  should  not  be  a  deterrent  for 
the  stationer  in  his  relationship  to  the 
question  of  installing  a  properly  stocked 
loose-leaf  department  in  his  store. 
Loose-leaf,  naturally,  is  a  more  compli- 
cated line  than  picture  postcards  and 
there  is  a  corresponding  difference  in 
the  possibilities  for  developing  business. 
The  necessary  study  of  the  loose-leaf  line 
is  well  worth  the  stationer's  while.  He 
should  learn  the  probable  needs  of  pros- 
pective customers  and  be  able  to  show 
them  how  to  meet  their  needs  with  loose- 
leaf  specialties.  The  sales  force 
should   be   trained  along  that   line. 

With  the  great  demand  for  loose-leaf 
goods,  and  the  rapid  progress  that  has 
been  made  toward  the  standardization  of 
sizes,  grades  and  styles  the  dealer 
should  plan  to  carry  more  complete 
stocks  and  not  put  so  much  dependence 
upon  the  catalogue  for  making  sales. 
"We  can  order  this  for  you  from  the 
factory"  never  can  have  the  selling 
punch  that  taking;  the  goods  from  the 
showcase  or  shelf  and  placing  them  in 
front  of  the   customer   possesses. 

Further,  your  having  the  goods — the 
complete  line — in  stock,  impresses  the 
customer  that  you  have  confidence  in 
such  goods — that  they  must  be  good, 
and  afford  satisfaction. 

And  this  impression  extends  to  your- 
self and  to  your  store,  as  well  as  to  the 
goods. 

Many  immediate  sales  are  lost  through 
not  having  the  goods  in  stock — but  the 
damage  to  future  business  is  far  great- 
er. You  know  how  it  is  yourself;  some 
time  or  another  you  have  been  in  need 
of  some  commodity  and  have  gone  to 
a  store  which  by  all  powers  of  reason- 
ing should  have  been  able  to  hand  out 
the  goods — they  didn't  have  them  in 
stock. 

The  next  time  you  had  a  similar  need 
you  automatically  passed  up  this  store 
to  pro  to  the  one  which  supplied  your 
wants,  and  quite  possibly  you  have  ad- 
vised friends  of  yours  to  avoid  this  first 


store    because    they    didn't   carry    a    full 
line. 

A  reputation  grows — either  for  or 
against  a  store — and  the  store  that  has 
the   goods  gets  the  business. 

You  carry  a  full  line  of  the  less  ex- 
pensive goods,  but  do  not  stock  any  of 
the  higher  priced  ones.  Now  there  are 
in  every  town  customers  for  the  best 
the  market  affords,  and  if,  perchance, 
any  of  these  happen  in  on  you,  and  you 
can  only  show  him  a  catalogue  descrip- 
tion, and  tell  him  that  "you  can  get  it 
for  him  in  a  few  days" — bang  goes  the 
impression  to  his  brain  that  you  do  not 
cater  to  the  highest  class  of  trade  and 
he   is   lost. 

There  are  certainly  some  good  points 
here.  Why  not  give  them  a  few 
moments'  consideration?  It  is  a  fact, 
revealed  by  the  sales  records  of  many 
stationers,  that  their  sales  of  loose-leaf 
goods  are  now  running  well  ahead  of 
blank  books  and  yet  how  many  station- 
ery stores  are  there  where  the  invest- 
ment in  loose-leaf  stock  will  amount  to 
one-half  that  of  the  blank  book  line? 

Why  is  this?  Is  it  because  dealers  do 
not  have  confidence  in  loose-leaf  or  be- 
cause they  have  just  gotten  into  the 
habit  of  considering  loose-leaf  a  spcial- 
.  tv  line  which  they  nre  not  expected  by 
their   customers   to   have   in   stock? 

Whatever  the  reason,  it  is  an  undisput- 
ed fact  that  stationers  are  losing  bus- 
iness and  profits  because  of  their  neg- 
lect to  carry  adequate  stocks. 

Such  merchandise  as  ledger  outfits. 
Rnd  the  indexes  and  leaves  for  them, 
ring  books  and  ring  book  supplies,  sec- 
tional and  solid  post  binders  and  sheet 
holders,  minute  books,  columnar  forms, 
order  blanks,  inventory  and  purchase 
order  forms  are  now  standard  stock 
lines  needed  by  every  well  equipped 
stationery  store. 

The  dealer  can  stock  these  lines  com- 
plete and  be  practically  certain  that  he 
can  turn  them  at  least  four  times  a 
year. 

There   never    was   a   better   time   than 
rigTit    now    to    give    some    serious    con- 
sideration  to  this  matter.     Why  not  go 
'      ~48 


over  your  stock  and  check  it  up  with 
some  general  catalogue?  See  how 
many  items  you  have  regular  calls  foi 
and  do  not  carry  in  stock.  The  result 
will  surprise  you  and  it  is  a  pretty  safe 
bet  that  you  will  give  some  loose-leaf 
house  a  nice  fat  order  that  they  will 
appreciate  and  that  will  be  the  fore- 
runner of  many  repeat  orders  constant- 
ly   increasing    in   volume. 

KEEPING  THE  DECKS  CLEAR 

The  executive  of  a  large  Boston  store, 
as  described  by  "System,"  keeps  the 
uoper  right  hind  drawer  of  his  desk- 
clear  of  all  papers.  When  a  caller 
breaks  in  on  his  work  the  executive 
sweeps  all  his  active  papers  on  the  desk 
top  into  the  drawer.  This  enables  him 
to  concentrate  on  the  visitor's  interview 
instead  of  allowing  his  thoughts  to  drift 
to  some  of  the  papers  before  him.  II 
also  spares  the  visitor  the  temptation 
of  reading,  or  trying  to  read,  papers 
which  would  otherwise  be  open  before 
him  on  the  desk. 

LOOSE-LEAF  WEEK 

In  the  United  States  the  second  week 
in  January  is  being  observed  as  "Loose- 
Leaf  Week"  in  the  stationery  stores. 
Loose-leaf  windows  and  newspaper  ad- 
vertisements are  the  order  of  the  day. 
These  loose-leaf  weeks  have  become 
regular  semi-annual  events  across  the 
border,  and  this  trade  practice  has  so 
much  in  its  favor  that  it  ought  to  be 
adopted  in  Canada  as  well.  This  will. 
no  doubt,  be  a  development  of  the 
action  that  is  about  to  be  taken  toward 
the  formation  of  a  trade  association  in 
Canada  to  take  in  both  manufacturers 
and  retailers  of  stationery,  this  organ- 
ization to  be  on  the  same  plan  as  the 
National  Association  of  Stationers  and 
Manufacturers,  which  has  accomplished 
so  many  reforms  in  the  stationery  trade 
in  the  United  States. 

TURNING  TYPEWRITER   RIBBONS 

It  has  been  discovered  that  by  turn- 
ing typewriter  ribbons  after  the  avernge 
six  weeks'  use  that  one  side  affords,  the 
life  of  the  ribbon  will  be  practically 
doubled. 


I'.OOKSELLER      AND,     STATIONER 


McLOUGHLIN  BROS. 

INCORPORATED 

Established  1828 


The  McLoughlin  line  of  Juvenile  Books,  Games, 
Blocks  and  Novelties  is  recognized  the  country 
over  as  foremost  from  standpoints  of  art,  litera- 
ture, binding  and  manufacture.  McLoughlin 
lines,  besides  amusing,  store  the  young  mind 
with  valuable  and  useful  knowledge.  They  are 
leaders  the  year  around,  because  they  are  most 
attractive,  simple,  interesting,  educational,  and 
reasonably  priced.  They  are  produced  by  a 
century-old  organization,  which  combines 
experience,  efficiency,  and  enormous  production 
to  give  your  customers  exactly  what  they  want 
at  popular  prices  and  furnish  you  with  a  day-in 
and  day-out  source  of  substantial  profit.  Come 
to  see  our  display. 

McLoughlin  Bros. 

890  Broadway  at  19th  St.,   New  York 


49 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


A  SIGNIFICANT  TRIBUTE 

When  a  novelist  of  the  standing  of  H. 
G.  Wells  says  this  of  Frank  Swinnerton's 
"Nocturne,"  it  strikes  the  writer  that 
the  tribute  should  carry  a  distinct  mes- 
age  to  the  bookseller  as  such: 

"This  is  a  book  that  will  not  die.  It 
is  perfect,  authentic,  alive.  Whether  a 
large  immediate  popularity  will  fall  to 
it  I  cannot  say,  but  certainly  the  dis- 
criminating will  find  it  and  keep  it  alive. 
If  Mr.  Swinnerton  were  never  to  write 
another  word  I  think  he  might  count  on 
this  much  of  his  work  living,  as  much 
as  the  work  of  Mary  Austen,  W.  H. 
Hudson  and  Stephen  Crane  will  live, 
when  many  of  the  more  portentous  re- 
putations of  to-day  may  have  served 
their  purpose  in  the  world  and  become 
no  mere  than   fading  names." 


Points  Out  Dangers 

Of  Misrepresentation 

In  retail  advertising,  declares  a  bul- 
letin issued  by  the  National  Vigilance 
Committee  of  the  Associated  Adver- 
tising Clubs  of  the  World,  great  harm 
has  been  done  by  the  loose  use  of  the 
word  "value." 

Inasmuch  as  nearly  all  of  the  states 
now  have  truth-in-advertising  laws  and 
in  further  consideration  of  the  fact  that 
courts  have  held  that  value  is  not  a 
mere  matter  of  opinion,  but  is  a  state- 
ment of  fact,  a  Pacific  Coast  carpet 
sweeper  case  which  the  vigilance  com- 
mittee recently  investigated  will  be  of 
especial  interest. 

Would   Be   Harmful 

The  advertiser,  a  department  store, 
announced  that  the  sweeper  which  it  de- 
clared was  of  "3.50  value,"  was  on 
special  sale  at  98  cents.  It  did  not 
profess  that  it  was  discontinuing  the 
line,  or  that  the  goods  were  damaged. 
In  the  absence  of  any  stated  reason  for 
such  a  cut  in  price,  the  local  vigilance 
committee  concluded  that  most  people 
would  not  believe  such  a  statement  and 
that,  therefore,  the  advertisement  would 
be  hurtful,  even  if  true,  and  the  com- 
mittee doubted  very  much  that  it  was 
true. 

Investigation  showed  that  it  was  not 
ii  $3.50  value,  although  an  excellent 
value  at  98  cents,  which  was  below  cost, 
apparently.  However,  the  committee 
had  in  mind  a  Federal  court  ruling  that 
an  untruthful  statement  constituted  a 
law  violation  even  though  the  purchaser 
did  get  good  value  for  his  money,  and 
the  advertiser  was  warned  against  a  re- 
petition of  the  error. 

For    "Special"    Sales 

Carrying  the  investigation  further,  the 
National  Vigilance  Committee  learned 
that  the  sweeper  advertised  is  made 
for  use  of  stores,  and  especially  de- 
partment stores  for  "special  sale"  pur- 
poses, and  the  matter  has  been  called  to 
the  attention  of  local  advertising  club 
committees  in  other  communities,  who 
are  also  on  the  lookout  for  law  violations 
in  connection  with  it. 

There  is  no  objection  on  the  part  of 
the  vigilance  committee  to  the  practice 


of  buying  articles  for  special  sale  pur- 
poses, of  course,  so  long  as  the  store 
tells  the  truth  about  the  merchandise, 
but  stores  are  warned  and,  when  neces- 
sary, their  owners  are  prosecuted  for 
untruthful    statements   about  values. 

For  Better  Business 

The  members  of  the  retail  depart- 
ment of  the  Associated  Advertising- 
Clubs  have  adopted  a  standard  practice 
in  relation  to  such  statements  which  is 
interesting  because  the  members  of  the 
department  framed  this  declaration  both 
with  the  thought  that  adherence  to  it 
would  avoid  possible  law  violations  and 
would,  at  the  same  time,  result  in  ad- 
\ertising  of  a  confidence-building,  as 
against  a  confidence-destroying  type. 

These  retailers  have  pledged  them- 
selves not  to  compare  an  advertised 
price  with  a  "former"  or  "usual"  value 
unless  they  refer  to  the  price  obtained 
in  their  own  store  during  the  current 
season  for  identical  goods,  and  many  of 
them  go  a  step  further  and  do  not  use 
;;  statement  concerning  a  former  value 
unless  there  was  a  sufficient  quantity- 
sold  at  that  value  to  establish  the  price 
very  definitely. 

Never   Use  Them 

It  is  largely  because  of  the  danger  of 
over-statement  in  such  advertising  that 
a  number  of  important  stores  in  the 
United  States  have  entirely  stopped  us- 
ing   comparative    prices,    never    stating 


what  the  former  value  or  former  price 
of  an  article  was.  They  announce  that 
the  value  is  special,  and  they  usually  call 
attention  to  the  reason — that  the  goods 
are  slightly  soiled,  the  line  is  to  be  dis- 
continued, it  is  near  the  end  of  the 
season,  or  some  other  reason,  that  will 
make  the  customer  understand  why  spe- 
cial values  might  be  expected. 

They  have  found  that  such  advertise- 
ments pull  more  business  for  each  dollar 
invested  than  the  old  type  of  compara- 
tive price  advertising,  which  made  so 
many  people  doubt  the  word  of  the  ad- 
vertiser. 

Mr.  Walsh,  manager  of  T.  C.  Allen  & 
Co.'s  bookstore,  Halifax,  took  ill  after 
the  Christmas  holidays.  The  travelling 
book  men  will  be  pleased  to  know  that 
he   is   recovering. 

James  C.  Murrie,  of  George  J.  Mc- 
Leod,  Ltd.,  has  the  sympathy  of  the 
members  of  the  book  trade  in  the  loss 
of  his  young  son,  whose  death  took  place 
on  Sunday,  Jan.  5,  as  the  result  of  an 
attack  of  influenza. 

John  McClelland,  of  McClelland  & 
Goodchild,  has  just  returned  from  a  trip 
to  England.  While  there  he  concluded 
arrangements  whereby  McClelland  & 
Stewart  take  over  the  line  of  Cassell  & 
Co.,  in  Canada.  Similar  arrangements 
were  made  with  the  Ronald  Press  Com- 
pany, of  New  York,  publishers  of  busi- 
ness books. 


Every  Indication  That  Banks  Look  For 
Business  to  Remain  Good 


BECAUSE  Canadians  as  a  whole  are 
a  thrifty,  hardworking  people, 
producers  in  the  real  sense  of 
the  word,  the  Dominion  is  in  excellent 
shape  to  meet  the  problems  of  the  re- 
construction period.  Comparatively  little 
commercial  disturbance  is  anticipated. 
Canada  is  strong  financially,  and  is  pre- 
pared to  take  care  not  only  of  all  her 
own  needs,  but  to  help  supply  the  world 
shortage.  Canadians  will  not,  in  doing 
this,  become  any  less  prosperous,  in  fact, 
the  indications  are  that  the  producers, 
especially  the  farmers,  will  find  a  ready 
market  for  everything.  This  will  help 
to  keep  everything  on  a  sound  basis. 

The  banks  it  is  stated  are  confident 
that  business  conditions  in  Canada  wiil 
remain  satisfactory.  There  are  no  in- 
dications of  any  unusual  tightening  up 
of  credit  and  while  there  has  been  some 
inflation  due  largely  to  war  conditions, 
everything  is  sound.  The  banks'  attitude 
is  of  especial  importance  to  manufac- 
turers and  retailers.  Bank  credit  when 
granted  by  commercial  institutions  upon 
the  strength  of,  or  for  the  purpose  of, 
liquidating  commercial  transactions  of 
early  maturities,  serves  as  a  means  of 
facilitating  the  flow  of  commodities  from 
producer  to  consumer  and  the  return  of 
purchasing  power  from  the  consumer 
to  the  producer  through  the  various 
channels  of  circulation. 

This  process  enables  goods  to  act  as 
50 


a  means  of  purchase  and  payment  for 
other  goods,  and  when  the  maturity  of 
the  average  loan  granted  (or  "credit' 
allowed)  is  no  longer  than  that  of  the 
productive  processes  in  which  the  com- 
munity is  engaged,  the  effect  of  it  .s 
only  that  of  facilitating  and  promoting 
production  and  distribution.  When  the 
loans  granted  or  credit  extended  by  the 
banks  are  in  excess  of  the  normal  vaiue 
of  the  goods  offered  for  exchange,  there 
is  brought  into  existence  an  additional 
or  surplus  volume  of  purchasing  power 
which  has  the  same  effect  upon  the  prices 
of  commodities  as  does  a  corresponding 
addition  to  the  money  supply,  inasmuch 
as  it  may  be  offered  for  commodities  and 
may  thus  create  a  demand  for  them. 
Credit  expansion  becomes  inflation  when 
the  increase  of  prices  it  produces  brings 
no  commensurate  or  offsetting  increase 
of  production. 

The  reason  why  the  public,  and  espe- 
cially the  banking  community,  looks  with 
so  much  interest  to  the  reserves  of  the 
banks  is  understood  when  the  nature  of 
credit  inflation  is  carefully  considered. 
Ordinary  extension  of  credit  made  for 
the  purpose  of  facilitating  the  exchange 
and  circulation  of  goods  require  little  or 
no  addition  to  the  reserve  funds  of  the 
banks,  because  the  credits  thus  granted 
in  the  main  offset  and  cancel  one  another, 
leaving  an  unimportant  margin  to  be  re- 
deemed in  cash. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONEB 


WELDON  ROBERTS 

•  RUBBER     ERASERS  • 


All  over  the  world  WELDON  ROBERTS  erasers  are  esteemed  because  of  their  unrivalled 
quality.  To  introduce  them  to  a  customer  i<  to  earn  his  thanks  and  future  trade.  To 
know   them  is  to  want  them   always.     Samples   free   to  stationers  anywhere. 

WORLD'S   QUALITY   STANDARD.     88  STYLES 


WELDON  ROBERTS  RUBBER  Co. NEWARK,  N.J.  U.S.A 


THE  McKINLEY  EDITION  OF 
TEN  CENT  MUSIC 

will   always   hold    first    place    as  an   Edition   of 
Standard.  Classic  and  Teaching  Music 

as  an  established  demand  for  this  line  of  Music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Student 
and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself  to  thousands  of  dealers  to  be 
the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  department. 
Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  150  per  cent-  to  the  dealer. 
The  McKinley  Edition  (Revised  for  Canadian 
Trade)  conforms  in  every  detail  with  Canadian 
copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealer's 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  samples  and  particulars  to-day. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  CO. 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 
in  the   Woild 

CHICAGO:  1501-15  EAST  FIFTY-FIFTH  ST. 

NEW  YORK  CITY:  145  W.  45th  STREET 


THE •  INK  -FOR -ALL- PEOPLES 


Tho* 


Stock  up  now.  Be  ready  for  demand  sure  to 
follow  our  advertising  which  is  now  appearing 
in  leading  financial  papers  and  magazines. 
Put  up  in  three  sizes  and  colors.  Blue  Black, 
Red  and  Green,     '/i   pint;  pint  and  quarts. 

Write  for  prices  and  discounts. 
ROYAL  INK  COMPANY 

II  COLBORNE  ST.   TORONTO.   CANADA 


Lippincott's 

Handbooks  and  Manuals 

In  Stock 


School  and  Home  Gardening  -  $1.35 
By  Kary  C.  Davis 

Training  the  Little  Homemaker  1.00 
By  Mabel  Louise  Keech 

Home  Labor-Saving  Devices  -     1.00 
By  Rhea  Clarke  Scott 

Clothing  for  Women     -     -     -     2.00 
By  Laura  I.  Baldt 

Successful  Canning  and  Pre- 
serving      -       -       -       -       -     2  00 
By  Ola  Powell 


Liberal  discount  to  the  trade. 

The  Geo.  M.  Hendry  Co.,  Ltd. 

Toronto 


XF  YOU  WANT  SOME- 
THING AND  DON'T 
KNOW  WHERE  TO  GET 
IT— WRITE  US— WELL 
TELL  YOU. 

BOOKSELLER  AND   STATIONER 

Special  Service   Department 


51 


New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated 


SOME  NEW  BAGS 

Beaded  bags  are  quite  the  mode  for 
the  exclusive  trade.  They  are  fashion- 
able in  all  sizes,  but  possibly  those  in- 
clined to  be  oval  in  shape  or  else  on  the 
.square  order  are  favored  oftenest.  One 
new  style  called  the  "miser"  bag  is  on 
the  market.  It  is  really  two  bags  made 
in  one  piece,  the  middle  of  which  forms 
the  handle,  while  either  end,  tasseled, 
forms  a  bag;  there  are  two  slides  which 
hold  the  openings  in  place.  The  bag  is 
made  of  either  silk  or  velvet,  beaded. 
Another  clever  bag  has  just  been  de- 
signed in  New  York.  It  is  the  "acorn" 
bag,  which  name  describes  it  well.  The 
lid  has  a  soft  ribbon  handle  which  passes 
through  the  centre  of  it;  in  this  way  the 
lid  does  not  separate  entirely  from  the 
lower  part  of  the  bag,  though  it  may  be 
removed  at  a  distance,  which  gives  free- 
dom for  delving  into  the  bag. 

Cretonne  bags  are  carried  more  now 
by  shoppers,  while  the  beautiful  silk, 
satin  and  velvet  ones  are  preserved  for 
the  one  purpose  of  being  responsible  for 
the  whereabouts  of  Milady's  knitting  and 
yarns.  Celluloid  clasp  handles  are  used 
for  the  majority  of  the  more  expensive 
bags  and  a  plain,  bright  colored  satin 
lining  gives  a  really  elite  appearance 
to  whatever  is  used  for  the  outside. 
Rich  brocades  and  velvets  still  hold  the 
premier  place  for  that  part  of  the  bag, 
however. 

NEW  SELF-INKING  PAD 

A  new  self-inking  stamp  pad  intro- 
duced by  Stewart  &  Co.,  N.Y.,  has  guides 
to  confine  ink  to  stamp  and  pad.  It  is 
of  extra  heavy  construction  but  is  eas.s 
to  operate. 

NEW      IDEA      FOR      WIRE     LETTER 
TRAYS 

A  new  wire  letter  tray  introduced  by 
the  Peerless  Wire  Goods  Co.,  of  Chicago, 
can  be  built  up  to  any  desired  number 
of  sections  by  means  of  a  simple  ar- 
rangement of  parts. 

ARCH  FILE  WITH   PERFORATOR 

A  file  combining  perforator  and  arch 
has  been  devised  by  Frank  A.  Weeks 
Manufacturing  Company,  93  John  Street, 
New  York,  N.Y.  The  perforator  lies 
above  the  arch,  and  makes  it  possible  to 
use  the  arch  and  perforator  in  combina- 
tion. The  centres  on  the  arch  and  per- 
forator correspond  with  the  Shannon  file 
standard. 

ROLL  OF  HONOR  RECORD 

An  honor  roll,  with  the  individual 
names  etched  in  metal  and  mounted  on 
a  beveled  mahogany  panel,  is  produced 
by  the  Strongheart  Company,  1510  South 
Wabash  Avenue,  Chicago.  A  heading 
plate,  "Our  Roll  of  Honor."  16  x  614  in., 
forms  the  head  of  the  roll,  and  the  in- 
dividual name  plates  are  suspended  from 
it. 


NEW  CHALK   BOX 

A  three  stick  box  of 
white  and  colored  chalk 
crayons  called  "Little 
Folks,"  is  the  latest  in- 
troduction by  Binney  & 
Smith  Co.,  of  New 
York.  This  box  is  a 
one  cent  retail  item 
and  a  good  indication 
of  its  appearance  is 
conveyed  by  the  illus- 
tration  herewith. 


FOLDS  ENVELOPES 

A  new  British  machine  is  the  "Carmic" 
adjustable  envelope  and  bag  folding  ma- 
chine made  by  Peter  Carmichael  &  Co., 
-1  Car  St.,  Limehouse,  London,  E.  14. 
All  classes  of  paper  can  be  folded  and 
made  into  envelopes  on  this  machine, 
which  is  easily  interchangeable  from  one 
size    to    another    and    from    envelope    to 


bag  shape.  Capacity  is  28,000  to  32,000 
a  day  and  it  does  not  require  special  skill 
to  operate.  Only  a  nominal  amount  of 
motive  power  is  required  to  operate  the 
machine. 

"KUMBAK" 

A  new  emblem  of  good  luck  which  is 
meeting  with  some  attention  is  called 
"Kumbak."  It  is  a  quaint  figure  made 
of  a  composition  with  wire  reinforce- 
ment, originally  designed  to  insure  the 
safe  return  of  the  boys  from  "over 
there."  It  is  used  for  mantel  or  desk 
ornament  or  for  book-ends. 

NEW  TINTED  PAPERS 

The  Copp  Clark  Co.  have  placed  on 
the  market  a  new  line  of  papeteries 
called  the  "Westlake,"  in  tinted  linen 
paper  with  gold  border  in  blue,  mauve, 
dove  grey  and  white.  There  are  two 
sizes:  regular  correspondence  size  and 
Norfolk  size  with  long  narrow  envelope, 
6%  x  J'.. 

Papeteries  with  tinted  paper  and  gold 
border  are  quite  the  vogue  now  and  are 
having  a   ready  sale. 


AUTHORITATIVE  FASHIONS  IN   BAGS 

Fancy  bags  "a  la  mode"  as  shown  by  Lord  &  Taylor.  New  York.  In  the  upper  left  corner  is 
a  mode',  of  navy  silk  mo:re  bound  with  scold  braid  and  finished  with  a  loop  and  clasp  of  the 
material.  Below  is  a  taupe  chiffon  velvet  model  stencilled  in  shades  of  old  rose,  blue  and  yellow 
and  lir.ed  with  Frenen  blue  satin.  In  the  centre  is  a  golden  brown  satin  bag  with  medallion  of 
black  and  gold  thread:  the  loop  handle  with  side  clasn  is  a  new  touch.  The  upper  right  bag  is  of 
navy  silk  moire  lined  with  satin  of  brown,  red  and  gold  in  Persian  design.  Note  the  9-inch 
measure  on  the  bag-top.  In  the  lower  right  corner  is  a  snappy  little  black  patent  leather  bag 
with  yarn  pattern  in  rose,  blue  or  black  embroidered  on  the  side  and  black  yarn  forms  an  edge: 
black   enamelled   heads   are  effective   handles. 


52 


^.  .   *** 


B  0  0  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      A  N  D     S  T  A  T  I  ( )  N  E  R 


To  the  Booksellers  of  Canada  who  have  made  191 8  a 
year   of   such   great    achievement   with   our   publications 

GREETING! 

This  year  our  efforts  will  be  to  make  1919  your  biggest 
year  and  to  that  end  we  have  extended  our  line  by  the 
addition  of  the  publications  of 

Cassell  &  Co.  of  London 

and 

The  Ronald  Press  of  New  York 

Making  our  line  the  most  complete  in  Canada 


Cassell  &  Co.'s  

Publications 

Comprise  a  range  of  wonderful  possibilities  at  medium  prices.  Best 
selling  staple  volumes  in  Gardening  Books,  Dictionaries,  Technical 
Books,  Standard  Titles,  and  Juvenile  Books,  including  the  King  of 
all  Annuals 


CHUMS 


The    Ronald   Press  Publications 

BOOKS    FOR    BETTER    BUSINESS 

Dealing  with  : 

Accounting         Advertising  Laws  of  Business         Retailing 

And  other  volumes  on  Vital  Commercial  Topics 

THE   HIGHEST   GRADE    OF   BUSINESS   BOOKS 
TO   BE   PROCURED 


McClelland  &  stew  art 

PUBLISHERS        -:-        TORONTO 


53 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling- 
Dealers  :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


"DEXTER 


r  > 


cutting      when    desired 


The       highest 
grade      hand 
feed       Pencil 
Sharpener 
made     or    pos- 
sible to  make. 
Equipped    with 
POINT      AD- 
JUSTER 
which    SAVES 
THE    PENCIL 
produces 
point 
blunt    to 
stopping 
produced. 


SHARPENS  ANY  SIZE  PENCIL 


Send  for  Price  List,  it  will  PAY  You 


AUTOMATIC  PENCIL  SHARP.  CO. 

1521  Garland  B.,    Chicago 

Canadian  Representatives 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co. 

468  King  St.  West  Toronto  Ont. 


15? 


V10LAFH0NE 


PHONOGRAPH  NEEDLES)]! 

|  EACH  NEEDLE  WILL  PLAY  10  RECORD! 


tlkCH  NEEDLEWIUPLAY  IO  RECORDS      1 


Retail  price  per  package  of  60  boxes  $9.00 
Dealers  price  $5.85. 

Send  $5.85  for  a  Sample  Package  to-day 

H.  A.  BEMISTER 

10  Victoria    Street  Montreal 


••AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA9* 


'The  Guarantee  of  Quality" 


ULTON 


Self-Inking 


5  Stamp  Pads 


< 
< 

^    Elizabeth, 


Line  Daters 
Numberers 
Sign  Markers 
Rubber  Type 
Printing 
Outfits 


Manufactured  by 

FULTON  SPECIALTY  CO. 


New  Jersey 


••YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY** 


NEW  GOODS 

DESCRIBED  AND  ILLUSTRATED 

NEW  TAPE  MOISTENER 

A  new  tape  moistener  has  been  put 
on  the  market  by  the  Standard  Paper 
Co.,  52  Vanderbilt  Avenue,  New  York. 
The  device  is  put  out  under  the  name 
of  the  Ryco  Moistener.  It  retails  at  $5. 
The  device  is  substantial  and  attractive 
in  appearance  and  is  easily  operated. 
The  series  of  rollers  place  just  the  cor- 
rect amount  of  moisture  on  the  tape  to 
insure  rapid  and  permanent  sealing.  The 
tape  for  this  machine  is  made  of  high 
quality  kraft  or  manila,  several  colors 
being  carried  in  stock.  Rolls  are  800  or 
250  feet. 


NEW  INDEX  CARD  SYSTEM 

A  new  index  card  system  has  just 
been  introduced  by  the  Best  Index  Card 
Co.,  21  Park  Row,  New  York.  The 
equipment  is  such  that  the  cards  spread 
automatically,  thus  showing  about 
twenty  cards  at  one  time.  The  cards 
can  be  used  in  existing  equipment,  and 
the  "spreading"  feature  remains  whether 
used  in  or  out  of  drawer. 

When  in  drawer,  by  pulling  the  guide 
cards  apart  by  their  tabs,  the  cards  be- 
tween will  spread,  exposing  to  view  the 
names  written  at  the  top.  When  out  of 
drawer,  by  holding  the  cards  between 
the  thumb  and  forefinger  at  the  extreme 
bottom,   they   will   likewise   spread. 

Visibility  with  these  cards  is  always 
possible — whether  in  an  active  card 
drawer,  a  transfer  case,  or  the  hand. 
One  or  two  cards  are  visible  while  sta- 
tionary, and  three  or  more  by  expansion 
as  explained. 

It  is  a  great  convenience  and  time- 
saver  to  be  able  to  take  a  number  of 
"ards  from  the  pocket,  hold  at  the  bot- 
tom, and  see  at  once  the  card  desired- 
diving  visibility  at  all  times,  without 
special  fixtures — as  compared  with  the 
old  way  of  fingering  each  card. 

C^rds  may  be  subdivided  as  desired 
by  the  use  of  guide  cards,  so  as  to  make 
it  possible  to  locate  any  name  instantly 
with  one  turn  onl>\ 

Space  is  economized  by  using  right 
and  left  hand  tabs,  or  by  writing  name 
on  front  and  b^ck  of  tab,  thereby  making 
the  tab  interchangeable — and  the  card 
may  then  be  placed  wherever  desired. 
Under  this  plan  no  more  space  is  con- 
sumed than  by  ordinary  cards  of  the 
-a me   thickness. 


Pugh  Specialty  Co.,  Limited 

38-42  Clifford  Street 
TORONTO  -  CANADA 

Manufacturers  and  Manufacturers' 

Agents. 
French    Ivory    (Made    in    Canada). 
Photo       Frames,      Boxes,      Toilet 
Articles   and   Novelties. 
Booklets,  Post   Cards,   etc.,  for  all 
seasons   and   occasions. 
Toy  Books. 

Pennants    and     Textile    Novelties, 
Active   Service    Banners. 
Welcome      Home       Banners       and 
Pennants,    Victory    Pennants    and 
Celebration  lines. 
Purses,  Wallets   and   School    Bags. 
Souvenir   Novelties. 
If    you     don't    get    our     catalogue 
regularly,  send  us  your  name. 
It's   well   worth   having. 


THE  STANDARD 

Memorandum 

Calendar 


The   best   ami   most    popular 
mi     tin-    market. 

Highly  finished  black  Japan 
■lickel  arches)  wi  h 
pad.  Also  comes  in  brass 
(brush  polish  finish)  bra.ss 
arches.  Liberal  discounts  to 
-;t  :i turners. 


Write  for   Prices,   etc. 


EDWARD  KIMPTON  CO. 

Wholesale  Stationers 
60  John  St.  -  New  York 

Artists' 
Material 

Drawing  Material 

Mfrs  since  1854  of  high 
grade  Artists'  and  School 
Oil  and  Water  Colors, 
Canvases,  Brushes, Wood- 
enware  Outfits,  Drawing  Tables.  Boards, 
m  Filing  Cabinets. 

Catalogue  and  sample  books  on  request 

F.  WEBER  &  CO. 

Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Branches : 
St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Baltimore.Md. 


54 


BOOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling — 
Dealers :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


Known  and  sold  wherever  Rubber 
Stamps  are  used 

B.  G.  Volger  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

Passaic,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 

Oar  Specialty: 

STAMPING  INKS  OF  ALL  KINDS 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 
Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE  IS 

$5.00  Per  Month 

1       on  Yearly  Contract 
Single   Insertion    $7 
A  Good  Live  Page — High 
•    value  in  publicity  at 
minimum   cost 


MXmrtiftftJFSffiffirWrW^ffiW 


Your    Sales    Increase 

when  you  adopt  our 
Sample-Set  Advertising 

for  more  business  on 
Typewriter  Ribbons  and  Carbons 
It  is   a   direct-to-user  adver- 
tising which  brings  the  pros- 
pect right  to  your  store. 
The  Caribonum  Policy 
is      "  Quality      First "      and 
stationers  can  therefore  rely 
on   a   line   of  goods   of   such 
standard     quality     and     uni- 
formity   as    puts    them    in    a 
position    to    permanently    re- 
tain the  trade  of  every  cus- 
tomer   who     once     uses     the 
goods. 

Gice  Us  A  Trial. 

CARIBONUM  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

54  Wellington  Street  East,  Toronto 


INSTRUMENT  HOLDER 

A  new  attachment,  designed  for  the 
convenience  of  members  of  orchestras 
and  other  musicians,  is  an  instrument 
holder  which  fastens  to  the  standard  of 
a  music  rack.  It  consists  of  a  main  arm 
that  projects  horizontally  at  one  side 
of  the  upright,  and  a  cross  arm  provided 
with  two  or  more  adjustable  brackets, 
on  which  a  horn  or  other  instrument  can 
be  placed  when  not  in  use. 


NEW  TOYS 

In  after-the-war  readiness,  J.  G. 
Brenner  &  Co.,  the  Manchester  toy 
makers,  have  begun  the  making  of  a 
number  of  entirely  new  toys,  including 
new  toy  cranes  with  self-gripping  hooks, 
and  a  toy  telephone,  described  as  "the 
real  thing,"  to  retail  at  a  shilling  in 
England. 


The  illustration  herewith  shows  desk  basket  trays 
of  a  more  substantial  type  than  those  made  of 
wire.  These  are  obtainable  in  tiers  of  two  bas- 
kets   and   more   as    well    as    in    the    form   of   single 

baskets. 


SPEEDS  UP  BOOKKEEPING 

The  Stationers'  Loose  Leaf  Co.,  of 
Milwaukee,  and  New  York  City,  have 
put  on  the  market  the  Faultless  Steel 
Box  Tray  for  use  with  bookkeeping  ma- 
chines. This  tray,  with  posting  unit 
sorter,  speeds  up  posting  with  minimum 
labor.  The  vertical  position  of  the 
sheets  allows  the  bookkeeper  to  quickly 
put  his  hand  on  accounts  to  be  posted. 


A  NEW  WALKING  DOLL 

A  new  unbreakable  doll  which  walks, 
kneels  and  dances  has  been  placed  upon 
the  market  by  an  American  inventor. 
This  doll  is  twenty-six  inches  high  and 
can  be  operated  by  any  small  child.  One 
of  the  features  of  this  toy  is  that  there 
is  practically  nothing  to  get  out  of  or- 
der as  it  does  not  contain  mechanism  of 
any  kind. 


Dexter's 

STAR 

MANIFOLD 

LINEN 


With  unlimited  uses.  Star  Manifold 
Linen  is  a  stock  that  practically  every 
customer  you  have  could  use, — par- 
ticularly for  foreign  letters.  Attrac- 
tive, strong,  durable  and  beautifully 
finished;  suitable  for  pen  as  well  as 
typewriter.  For  all  kinds  of  office 
systems,  Star  Manifold  is  a  recog- 
nized   business    necessity. 

Send    for    samples    and    prices. 

C.H.  Dexter  &  Sons,  Inc. 

Windsor  Locks,   Connecticut 


FOUNTAIN   PENS 
GRAVITY  STYLOS 
INK  PENCILS 

We     offer     the     trade     new 
ideas        in        merchandise 
with    a    guarantee    that 
our    goods    are     right. 
PARAMOUNT 
SELF-FILLER 
PEN 
A  n      excellent 
pen,         splen- 


Gravrty 

Stylo 

Pen 

With 
a    new 
and   exclu- 
s  i  v  e    self- 
fi'ing   device. 
Three  styles  to 
retail     at     $1.50 
S1.7S    and    $2.50 
Prompt     Deliveries 
Assured. 

Farrell  &  Hosinger 

Company 
LARRY    J.  FARRELL 

GEORGE  N.  HOSINGER 
Manufacturers  of 
FOUNTAIN,  STYLO- 
GRAPHIC  AND  GOLD  PENS 
Canadian   Representative  Wanted 
63-65   Irving   St..   Jersey   City,    N.J. 


didly      made. 

th?t    retails 

at       $2.50. 

a  1  lowing 

a    liberal 
margin 
of 

[>!'  ifif 


55 


B  O  O  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      AND     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  R 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling — 
Dealers :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


INKSTANDS 

OF     ALL     STYLES 


The  F-B  Loose  Leaf  Holder 


The  Famous  Health  and  Sex  Books 


Manufactured  by 


Frank   A.   Weeks 
Mfg.   Co. 

93  John  St..  NEW  YORK  CITY.   N.Y. 
Canadian  Jobbers    handle  our  lines. 


Pat.  May  13,    1913 

The       most       demanded       and       cheat" 
transfer   hinder.      Adjustable   to   size  of 
paper      and      distance       hetween      punch 
holes.      Exchangeable    posts.      Wholesale. 
*2.10    per    do/.en.      Send    for    particulars. 

ROCKHILL  &  VIETOR 

Sole  Agents,  Dept.  F.B,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 
Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 

Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE  IS 

$5.00  Per  Month 

on  Yearly   Contract 

Single    Insertion    $7 

A    Good    Live    Page — High 

value    in    publicity   at 

minimum    cost 


Sexual  Knowledge  for  Women 
Seiual  Knowledge  for  M~n 


Her  Sev  and  Love  Life 
i  ...ipotence  -     - 

Sexual  Problems  -     - 


Stories  of  Love  and  Life 
Uncontrolled  Breeding  - 
Never  Told  Tales  -  - 
litation  of  Offspring   - 


Tliw  ii'lvn  n  -rim  lit  appear*  leffularjj  bn  ftfftG 
Lean's  Magazine,  Everywoman's  world  an/1 
Partners'  Magazine,  thus  <  ,  ,.  [ffmarKJB  by 
tlm  i > 1 1 1 > •  i •  ,ii  the  bookstorea.  Von  should 
liavi     ill.'-,     bookfl    in    rtnrli  I         that 

will    rewult. 


"Games  that  Amuse' 

Wanted  a  company  to  take 
over  the  Canadian  patents  of 
the  Liberty  Games  Company 
on  a  royalty  basis,  or  can 
buy  outright.  Products  in- 
clude : — 

Liberty  Checker  Board 
Liberty  Chess  Board 
Who? 
Tinkles 

To  those  interested  address 

The  Liberty  Games  Co. 

2149  N.  Vanpelt  St. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


56 


Every  merchant  needs  the  protection  a  complete 
N.C.R.  System  will  give  him 


Peace  is  bringing  increased  competition     2.  They  will  prevent  the  mistakes  and 
in  your  business.  disputes  which  cause  loss  of  trade. 


You  must  meet  that  competition.  You 
cannot  afford  to  run  the  risk  o*  losing 
a  single  cent  of  profit. 

A  modern  National  Cash  Register  and 
an  N.C.R.  Credit  File  will  enable  von 
to  get  all  your  profits  on  every  trans- 
action in  your  store. 

Because — 

1.  They  will  make  it  possible  for  you  to 
run  your  store  with  the  least  expense. 


3.  They  will  enable  you  to  give  cus- 
tomers the  quick,  satisfactory  service 
which  wins  new  trade. 

4.  They  will  give  you  the  accurate 
records  which  you  need  to  control  your 
business. 

5.  They  will  protect  your  money,  your 
clerks,  your  customers,  and  yourself. 


The  National   Cash   Register  Company,  Limited,  of  Canada.  Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all   the  principal  cities  of  the  world. 

57 


>  /  l  .'    IV  r»  Vj    Ij  Ij  Cj  XX  lY  XX   Lt         O    1   A    1    1  U  W   L  ft     , 


British  Goods  Are  Standards  of  Value 


Charles  W.  Baker 

Buying  Agent 

General  Merchandise  and 
Products  of  Great  Britain. 
M  a  n  u  facturers'  invoices 
forwarded  to  Buyers. 
A  live  buying  agent  on  the 
spot  will  save  you  money 
and  look  after  your  deliv- 
eries. 

Selling    Commissions    un- 
dertaken. 
References  on  application. 

24  Silk  Street  &  42-46  Whitecross  St., 
London   E.C.  1.,  England 

Cables  : 
Telereka.  London.     Code:   A. B.C.  5th 
Phones : 
693  Central.    2107  City.     2615   Dalston 

SCHOOL  AND  OFFICE 
REQUISITES 

GEO.    WRIGHT  & 
CO.,   Headquarters 
for   S  t  a  t  i  o  ners' 
Sundries.  The  "Re- 
quisite House,"  92. 
Clerkenwell    Road. 
London,     E.  C.     1. 
Contractors  to  the 
Home    and    Colon- 
ial     Governments, 
thu   London   Coun- 
ty     Council,      etc. 
Manufacturers'     to 
the  Wholesale  and 
Export       Trade. 
Drawing     Instruments, 
"     Nature    Study     Box. 
Piling    Apparatus.    Ink- 
Cases.      Cash      Boxes, 


For  Blackboards 
"Wright's 
Dustless"  Chalk 

Scholastic :      Rules. 

WriKht's     "Blackine 

etc.      Commercial  : 

stands,      Stationery 

Wru?ht's    Pencil-pointed    Pens,    and    General 

Office    Sundries.     Fancy:    Tourists'    Writing 

Cases,    Penholders,    and    Games,    etc. 

But  we  cannot  execute  your  orders  till 
after  the  war.  when  we  will  also  be  open 
for  good  representatives  to  work  all  prin- 
cipal   towns. 


AFTERTHEWAR 

I  shall  welcome  orders  or  en- 
quiries for  my  British-made 
Carded  Goods,  Writing  and 
Drawing  Sets,  Stationers'  Sun- 
dries, etc. 

At  present  my  output  is 
absorbed  for  Government 
orders,  Orders  of  National 
Importance,  and  for  old- 
standing  Clients  of  the 
British    Wholesale    Trade. 


Illustrated  Hat  on  requeat 

H.  A.  COOMBS'S  CARDED  GOODS 

10  Farrinjdon  Avenue,  London,  E.C.  4.,  Enij. 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 

Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE   IS 

£1  Os.  7d.  Per  Month 


on   Yearly   Contract 

Single  Insertion   £1  8s  lid 

A    Good    Live   Page— High 

value    in    publicity    at 

minimum  cost 


r^trwrrWt7Wtrwr^t)^rrwri^r^riwr*irrsxir/s 


For  All  British 

Fancy  Leather 

Goods 

Fancy   Jewellery,    Photo 
Frames,  Etc. 


Write: 

S.  P.  COOPER 

Central  Agency 

36    Camomile  St.,   London,  E.C.   3. 
England 


Before  placing  your  orders,  apply  to  us  for 
samples  and  quotations  We  are  paper  ma  kers 
and  whole-ale  and  export   paper  merchants. 


Registered 


Trade  Mark 


W.  V.   BOWATER  &   SONS,  LIMITED 

159  Queen  Victoria  St.,  London,  E.C.  4,En«r. 
Cables:  " Sparteolun"  London. 


58 


B  0  OKSELLER      A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  R 


The  rapid  sales  oj 

STANDARD  BRAND 
BLOTTINGS 

is  the  very  best  proof  of  the  absolute 
reliability   of  this   quality   blotting  paper. 

Particular  people  show  their  preference  for 
Standard  Brand  Blottings  by  coming  back 
for  further  supplies  after  a  first  purchase. 

You    ought     to     feature    this    quick-seller. 
Other  worth-while  lines  are: 
"Sterling,"  "Curi-Curl."  "Prismatic,"  "Royal 
Worcester"  and   "Defender"   (enameled). 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co, 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request. 


Canadian  Factory   and  Office*    at 

9-11-13  Davenport  Road        -       Toronto 


WINNING  THE  BUYER'S  FAVOR 

npHE  best  possible  buyer  is  not  made  an  actual  buyer  at  a  single  step  It  is 
A  one  thing  to  win  the  buyer's  favor  for  an  article  and  another  to  make 
adjustments  incident  to  closing  the  sale.  Winning  the  buyer's  favor  is  the 
work  of  trade  paper  advertising.  Under  ordinary  conditions  it  should  not  be 
expected  to  do  more. 


GETTHEBEST!  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THE  EATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee,  Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 


Housatonic 


59 


liiidKS  K  L  L  E  V,      AND     8  T  A  T I  0  N  E  K 


tf  The  Davis  Novelty  Co.  ^ 

Registered 


Regi 

Leather  Goods  and  Novelties 
BILLFOLDS   A  SPECIALTY 


*v 


212-214   Mappin   Building 

MONTREAL 
Phone    Uptown    398 


A 


Manufacturers  of 
DIE-STAMPED 

CHRISTMAS  CARDS 

A  Five  and  Ten  Cent  Line 
AND 

PRIVATE  CHRISTMAS 
GREETING  CARDS 

329  Craig  Street  West,  MONTREAL 


Crucible  Pens 

BRITISH 

25  VARIETIES. 
Send  for  price  list 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co., 

Limited 
TORONTO         -         CANADA 


B.   CAIRNS 

Manufacturer  of 

Rubber  and  Metal  Stamps, 

Brass  Signs,  Seals,  Stencils, 

Burning  Brands,  Memorial   Plates. 

77  Queen  St.  East 

Tel.  Main  3760  TORONTO 

Your  advertisement  here 

will  be  read  by 

Booksellers  and  Stationers 

throughout  Canada. 


ART    SUPPLIES. 

Artists'    Supply    Co..    77    York    St.,    Toronto. 

A.    Ramsay   &    Son    Co..   Montreal. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co.,    Limited,    215    Victoria    St., 

Toronto. 

BLACKBOARDS    (Slate   and   Hyloplate) 
Ceo.  M.   Hendry   &   Co.,   215   Victoria    St.,   Toronto. 

BLANK    BOOKS. 

Boorum    &    Pease   Co..    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,    Gillies    &   Co..   Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Dominion    Blank    Book    Co.,    Berthierville,    Que. 
National    Blank    Book    Co.,    Holyoke,    Mass. 
The   Copp,    Clark    Co..  Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter.   Toronto. 

BLOTTING    PAPERS. 

The    Albemarle    Paper   Co.,    Richmond.    Va. 
Eaton-Dikeman   Co.,   Lee,   Mass. 
Richmond    Paper   Mfg.    Co.,    Richmond,    Va. 
Standard   Paper  Mfg.   Co.,   Richmond,    Va. 

CODE    BOOKS. 

The     American     Code    Co.,     83     Nassau     St.,     New 

York. 
John    W.    Hartfield.   N.Y.    Produce    Exchange.    N.Y. 

CRAYONS. 

Binncy    &    Smith,    New   York. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W.. 
Toronto. 

EYELETTING   MACHINES. 
Elbe    File   and    Binder   Co..   New   York,    NY. 

ENVELOPES. 

Brown  Bros.,  Limited,  Toronto. 
Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Copp.    Clark    Co.,   Toronto. 

W.   V.   Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal.   Toronto.    Win- 
nipeg. 
Menzies   &   Co.,    Limited,   Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter.   Toronto. 

ERASERS. 

St.    Mungo    Mfg.    Co.,    Glasgow.    Scotland 
Weldon    Roberts    Rubber   Co.,    Newark,    N.J. 

FANCY    PAPERS,    TISSUES    AND    BOXES. 

Dennison    Mfg.    Co.,    Boston. 

Menzies   &  Co.,  Toronto. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co.,     468     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 

FOUNTAIN    PENS. 
Modern    Pen    Co..    New    York. 
Mabie.   Todd    &    Co..    473    College    Ct..   Toronto. 
A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co.      468     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
Paul    E.    Wirt    Co.,    Brown    Bros..    Ltd..    Toronto. 

Canadian    Agents. 

INKS,  MUCILAGE   AND   GUMS. 

Chas.    M.    Higgins    &    Co.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

The  Carter's   Ink   Co.,   Montreal. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited.      Montreal,      Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Reliance    Ink    Co..    Winnipeg.    Man. 
Royal    Ink    Co.,    53    Yonge    St.,    Toronto. 
S.    S.    Stafford    Co.,    Toronto. 
"Glucine,"    Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited.    439    King    St. 

W..    Toronto. 

INDELIBLE   INK. 

Carter's    Ink    Co.,    Montreal. 

Payson's    Indelible   Ink. 

S.    S.    Stafford    Co.,    Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
The   Sengbusch    Co.,   Milwaukee. 

KINDERGARTEN    MATERIALS. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co.,    Limited.    215    Victoria    St.. 
Toronto. 

LEAD    AND   COPYING    PENCILS. 

American    Pencil   Co.,  New  York. 
Wm.    Cane   &    Sons,   Newmarket.    Ont. 
A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co.,     468     King     St.     W.. 
Toronto. 


Hegone  Studio 

37-39  East  28th  Street 

New  York  City 

The  Atelier  of  Exquisite  hand  decorated 
Boxes  and  Lamp  Shades  for  Manufac- 
turers and  the  Trade.  Canadian  trade 
solicited. 

A  visit  to  our  Studios  will  convince  you 
that  our  work  is  original  and  of  the 
highest     quality. 


WATERSTON'S 


BEE" 


BRAND 


SEALING  WAX 


factory: 
VVaniston  Works,  Kdinburgh,  Scotland 


Waste  Paper  Balers 

The  "CLIMAX" 

Steel  Fireproof  Baler 

turns  your  waste  into 
profit. 

Made  in  12  sizes. 

Send  for  Catalogue. 

CLIMAX  BALER  CO. 

HAMILTON.   ONT. 


SELL 


MACLEAN'S 


The  Magazine  for  Canadians 


20c  A  COPY 


60 


15  ( )  ( )  K  S  K  LLER      AND     S  T  A  TI  ( )  X  E  R 


School  Rulers 

NEW  LINE  NOW  READY 

New  Shapes  and    Right    Prices. 
Send  for  samples  and  quotations. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

CANISTEO,  N.Y. 

W.  S.  TUTTLE.  Manager 
Commercial  Ruler  Department 


G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West,  Toronto 

Manufacturer  and  Importer 

Pictures,  Frames,  Mirrors,  Statuary  —  every, 
thine  in  Picture  Framing  outfits.  $150.00 
will  start  you  in  a  profitable  line  of  business. 
Crayon  and  Water  Color  Portrait  Enlarge- 
ments. Send  your  pictures  to  me.  I  will 
frame  them  at  low  prices.  I  manufacture 
.100  different  pieces  of  beautiful  French  bronze 
finished  s'atues.  $75.00  will  make  a  beauti- 
ful  display. 


MAPS 

We  can  supply  the  trade  with  anything  of 
the  map  line  as  well  as  undertake  any  kind  in 
Map-Making.  Road  Maps,  Motor  Guides, 
Commercial  Maps,  Atlases. 

The  Scarborough  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited 

36  James  St.  N.,  Hamilton,   Ont. 


William  Sinclair 
&  Sons,  (Stationers) 

LIMITED 
Otley  Yorks  England 

Manufacturers  of  Cheap  Stationery 


GILT  EDGE  AND 
BORDERED  CARDS 

Gold,  Silver,  and  Colored  Borders,  Be- 
velled and  Deckle  Edged  Cards  for  every 
kind  of  work.  Gilding,  Bevelling  and 
Bordering  to  the  trade. 

Send  for  Price  List 

JOHN  BRADFORD 

Card  Manufacturer 
70  LOMBARD  STREET  TORONTO 


LOOSE    LEAF    BOOKS,    BINDERS   AND 
HOLDERS. 

The   Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Boorum   &    Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn. 

Buntin,    Gillies    &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp.   Clark   Co..  Toronto. 
Luckett    Loose    Leaf,    Limited,    215    Victoria    St., 

Toronto. 
National    Blank    Book    Co.,    Holyoke,    Mass. 
Rockhill  &  Vietor,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York  City. 
Warwick   Bros.    &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Stationers'    Loose    Leaf   Co.,    203    Broadway,    N.Y., 

and    Milwaukee,    Wis. 

LEATHER  AND  FANCY  GOODS. 

Brown   Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

MAPS   AND   GLOBES 
Rand.   McNally    &    Co..    Chicago. 
The   Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
Geo.  M.  Hendry   Co.,   215   Victoria  St.,  Toronto. 
The   Scarborough    Co.    of   Canada.    Hamilton.    Ont. 

PAPER    BALERS 
Climax    Baler    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
PAPER   FASTENERS. 
Ideal   Specialties   Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St.,    New 

York    City. 
O.    K.    Manufacturing    Co.,    Syracuse,    N.Y. 

PAPER    MAKERS 
Bowater    &     Sons,     Limited.     W.     V.,     159     Queen 
Victoria    St.,     London,     E.C. 

PAPETERIES   AND   WRITING   PAPERS. 

The    Copp    Clark    Co.,    Toronto. 

Buntin.    Gillies    &    Co..    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Clark    Eros.    &    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

W.   V.   Dawson,   Limited.   Montreal.   Toronto,    Win- 
nipeg. 

The  Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter,   Toronto. 
PLAYING   CARDS. 

Goodall's   English    Playing   Cards,    A.   O.   Hurst.   32 
Front   St.   W..   Toronto. 

U.   8.   Playing  Card  Co.,   Windsor,   Ont. 

POST  CARDS,  GREETING  CARDS,  ETC. 

A.    O.    Hurst,    Canadian    representative.    32    Front 
St.    W.,    Toronto. 

Menzies   &    Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 

Philip    G.    Hunt    &    Co..    332    Balham    High    Rd.. 
London,    Eng. 

Pugh    Specialty   Co.,   38-42   Clifford   St..   Toronto. 

Valentine   &   Sons   Publishing   Co..   Toronto. 

RUBBER    STAMPS,    STENCILS,    ETC. 

Bernard    Cairns.    77    Queen    St.    W„    Toronto. 
Fulton    Specialty    Co.,    Elizabeth.    N.J. 

SCIENCE    APPARATUS 

Geo.   M.   Hendry   &   Co..   215   Victoria   St.,   Toronto. 

SCHOOL   SUPPLIES. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co..    Limited,    215    Victoria    St.. 
Toronto. 

SCHOOL   AND   OFFICE   RULERS. 

The    Up-to-Date    Co.,    Canisteo,    N.Y. 

SHEET  MUSIC. 

McKinley  Music  Co.,   1501-15   East  Fifty-Fifth   St., 
Chicago. 

STANDARD    COMMERCIAL    PUBLICATIONS. 

Morton,   Phillips  &   Co.,  Montreal. 

STATIONERS'   SUNDRIES. 
rown   Bros.,   Ltd.,   Wholesale  Stationers,    Toronto. 
luntin,  "Gillies   &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
The    Copp,    Clark    Co.,    Wholesale    Stationers,    To- 
ronto. 
Clark   Bros.   &   Co.,   Ltd.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
W.   V.   Dawson,   Limited,   Montreal,   Toronto,   Win- 
nipeg. 
Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,  Toronto. 

STEEL    WRITING    PENS. 

John    Heath,    8    St.    Bride    St.,    E.C,    London. 
Hinks,   Wells   &   Co.,   Birmingham,  Eng. 
Esterbrook    Pen    Co.,    Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto, 
Canadian   Representatives. 


ELBE  FILE   &   BINDER   CO. 


97  Reade  Street 


New  York 


McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper- Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montrea 


TICKET   and  CONDUC 
TOR  PUNCHES 

the  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Co. 

HAMILTON.  OHIO.  U.S.A. 


For  the  Returned  Soldier 

Service  Chevrons  to 
wear  on  his  civilian 
clothes.  Gold  Plated, 
$2.50  doz.  Sterling  Sil- 
ver, $3.75  doz. 


Actual  Size 


THE       TORONTO 

TROPHY-CRAFT 


I7IO   DOVAL  DANK  BUILDING 
KINO  AND  YONGE  STREETS 

.    TORONTO    . 


Desk  PadsS^CIoth  Covered  Cabinets 


L.  Hoffman,  45  Lafayette  St.,  N.Y.C. 


61 


B  ()()  KSKLLER      AND     STATIONER 


BOOK  BUYERS'  GUIDE 


CODE  WILL  FORM 

Simple,  clear  and  concise 
Ready-made  Will. 

Price  $1.80  per   dozen. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited 

517  Wellington  St.  West        -         Toronto 


SELF  AND  SEX  SERIES 

Keep    these   books    in    eight.     They    are    steacl> 
sellers  because  93  out  of  every  100  who  pass  your 
store    are    prospective    customers. 
Four    Hooks   to  Men:—  . 

What  a  Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know. 

Whall   a  Young  Man  Ought  to  Know. 

What    a    Young    Husband    Ought    to  Know. 

What  a   Man   of  46   Ought   to   Know. 
Four   Hooks   to   Women:— 

What   a    Young    Girl    Ought    to    Know. 

What  a   Young   Woman   Ought   to   Know. 

What    a    Young    Wife   Ought    to    Know. 

What   a    Woman   of  45  Ought    to    Know. 
$1.00    Each. 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS.    Publisher.    Toronto 


WILLS 

of  the 

Law  of  Succession  after  Death 

Written  by  Walter  E.  Lear,  Barrister-at-Law, 
in  plain,  simple  language  and  intended  to  be 
used  by  the  general  public.  It  contains  concise 
statement  of  the  Law  of  Wills  in  force  in  all 
the  Provinces  of  Canada,  and  Forms  of  Wills 
and  Codicils.  Printed  in  large  type.  This  is 
a  book  that  should  be  read  by  every  person 
before  making  a  will.  Agents  wanted.  Price, 
$1,  in  cloth  binding.  Liberal  discount  to  the 
trade.  Law  Books,  Limited.  162  Bay  St., 
Toronto. 


w 


LANGUAGES 

ORLD-ROMIC  SYSTEM,  MASTERKEY 
to  All  Languages.  Six  Textbooks,  $1.44. 
French  Pronunciation-Chart,  37c  :  Spanish,  37c. 
Aviation  Dictionary.  $1.50.  French-English 
Aviation  Dictionary.  Glc.  Languages,  143 
West   47th.   New   York. 


Your  Ad  in  a 

Buyers'  Guide 

Space 

2|4  in.  by  V/2  in. 

for  $3  a  month  on 
yearly  contract 


DIRECTORY   OF   PUBLISHERS. 
FICTION. 

Thomas  Allen.   215   Victoria   St.,   Toronto.   Ont. 
William    Briggs,    Queen    and    John    Sts.,    Toronto, 

Ont. 
Cassell   &   Co..   55   Bay   St.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
Copp,   Clark   Co.,   517    Wellington   St.   W.,   Toronto, 

Ont. 
J.  M.  Dent  &   Sons,   27  Melinda  St.,  Toronto.  Ont. 
S.  B.   Gundy,  25  Richmond  St.  W.,  Toronto,   Ont. 
Hodder   &    Stoughton,    25    Dundas   St.   E.,   Toronto, 

Ont. 
Thomas   Langton,   23  Scott  St.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Macmillan   Co.   of   Canada,   70   Bond    St.,    Toronto, 

Ont. 
McClelland,    Goodchild    &    Stewart.    266    King    St. 

W..    Toronto,    Ont. 
Geo.  J.  McLeod,   Ltd.,   266  King  St.   W.,  Toronto. 

Ont. 
Musson  Book   Co..  25  Dundas  St.  E..  Toronto.  Ont. 
Thomas    Nelson    &    Sons.    77    Wellington    St.    W., 

Toronto,    Ont. 

BUSINESS    BOOKS. 

Frederick  D.   Goodchild.  266   King  St.   W.,  Toronto. 
Musson   Book   Co.,  25  Dundas  St.  E.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Wycil    &   Co.,   85   Fulton   St..   New   York    City. 
Law   Books,   Ltd.,   15   Bay  St..  Toronto. 

CODE   BOOKS  AND  CONVERSION   TABLES 
John   W.   Hartfield,   N.Y.,   Produce   Exchange.   New 

York. 

PERIODICALS. 
MacLean's  Magazine,  143  University  Ave.,  Toronto 
Imperial    News    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Montreal    and 

Winnipeg. 
Gordon   &   Gotch.    136   Bay   St..   Toronto,   Ont.,   and 

l.">    St.    Bride   St.,    London,   E.C. 
American   News   Co.,   Toronto   and   Hamilton,   Ont. 
American   News   Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 
American   News  Co.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 


Classified  Advertising 


pAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK  SUPPLIED 
by  all  wholesale  drug  houses  in  the  Do- 
minion. The  best  seller.  Established  over 
eighty  years.  Ask  for  counter  display  stand 
which  greatly  increases  the  sale  of  ink.  Re- 
ceived  highest  award  at  many   Expositions. 

LET   US   HELP   YOU 

CECURE  DESIRABLE  MERCHANDISE  AT 
the  right  price.  If  you  desire  to  save  time 
and  money  on  your  buying  you  must  be  re- 
presented in  New  York.  A  great  amount  of 
service  at  a  very  small  cost.  Better  write  us 
to-day.  Associated  Buyers,  309  Broadway. 
New  York.   N.Y. 

OFFICE  SUPPLIES 
A  JAX     PATENT     FILE     WRAPPERS— FOR 
legal   papers,   specifications,   contracts,  etc., 
sample    with    prices    on    request.      Desaulniers, 
Moline.     Illinois. 


BOOKS  WANTED 

"Darkness  and  Dawn,"  by  George  Allan  Eng- 
land. "This  is  For  You."  by  W.  L.  Lord 
(Revell)— The  Gaetz-Cornett  Drug  &  Book 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Red  Deer,  Alta. 

FOR  SALE 
pOR  SALE— FLOURISHING,  OLD-ESTAB- 
flshed  book  and  stationery  business  in 
British  Columbia.  Edison  and  Kodak  agencies. 
Toys,  fancy  goods,  etc.  Capital  required 
$10,000.      Box    983,    Bookseller    and    Stationer. 

ARE  YOU  A  SALESMAN? 
V\/E  HAVE  OUR  CANADIAN  TERRITORY 
*"  open  for  a  salesma'n  who  knows  the  Sta- 
tionery. Gift  and  Art  Store.  Department  Store. 
Book  Store,  etc.,  trade.  We  manufacture  an 
exceptionally  high  grade  line  of  Engraved 
Greeting  Card?  at  popular  prices.  All  cor- 
respondence considered  confidential.  No 
objection  if  carried  with  a  non-conflicting 
line.  The  Boston  Ltne.  178  Congress  St., 
Boston,   Mass. 


Otto  Sauer  Series 

French,  Spanish 
and    Italian    Grammars 

MADE   IN   THE   U.8.A. 
Grammar  Separate,  $1.00 

Grammar  with  Key   $1.25 

WYCIL  &  COMPANY 

85  Fulton   Street.   New  York  City 

Liberal  Discounts  to  the  Trade 


SEXUAL   KNOWLEDGE 

Sex  Hygiene,  by  the  World's  Highest  Author- 
ity—Winfield  Scott  Hall,  M.D.,  Ph.D.,  assisted 
by  Jeanette   Winter  Hall. 

RELIABLE  —  SCIENTIFIC  —  CORRECT 
Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Man  Should 
Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Woman 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Husband 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Wife 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Father 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Mother 
Should    Have.  Cloth  lllu.trated.  $  1.25 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stew  art,  ltd. 

266  King  Street  West  Toronto,  Canada 


Who  Pays  for  the  Advertising? 

"VyilO  pays  for  the  advertis- 
ing ?    ' 

The  consu  nif.r,  of  course. 
He  pays  for  even/  expense  of 
putting  the  goods  into  his  hands 
'■ — including  selling  cost.  This 
and  production  cost  are  both  so 
reduced,  by  successful  advertis- 
ing that  he  pays  LESS  for  the 
same  goods,  just  because  they 
are  well  advertised.  You  ride 
cheaper  on  an  excursion  train 
than  if  you  hired  a  private  car 
— even  a  cattle  car.  And  you 
don't  ask  "Who  pays  the  fare?" 
—The  Optimist 


Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

All    good    titles   and   full 

of  colour. 

Full  list  on  application. 

2  Amen  Corner        London,  E.C.  4 

ENGLAND 


62 


BOOKSELLER      A  N  D     STATIONER 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgi 


ns 


Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
{   Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the   finest  and   best  Inks  and   Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  tbe  ready- 
money  kind  wbo  know  what  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches : 
Chicago.   London 


271   Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN,  N.Y. 


"WORLD"   Blotting 
Speaks : 

"lam    'WORLD'    Blotting.  I  cover  the  earth. 

"Princes  and  potentates,  the  weu'lthy  and  powerful,  the 
great  of  every  clime,  use  me  every  day.  I  lie  on  the  desk 
when  the  fate  of  men  and  of  nations  is  being  decided.  The 
treaties  that  from  this  scourge  of  war  will  bring  peace 
and  happiness  to  lands  now  devastated  will  be  negotiated 
in  my  presence  and  bear  my  final  imprint. 

"The  captain  of  industry  and  the  private  in  the  ranks 
of  trade  depend  on  my  help.  Weighed  in  any  balances,  I 
am  not  found  wanting.  No  huma'n  emotion  is  expressed  in 
writing  without  my  sanction.  Sympathy,  encouragement, 
affection,  I  make  clear,  vital  and  permanent  every  day.  I 
live  my  life  under  the  eyes  of  all  sorts  and  conditions  of 
men.  They  can  not  escape,  if  they  would,  the  messefee  I 
convey. 

"May  I  not  bear  your  message  and  your  customers'  to 
those   busy   toilers   who   are  my    constant   friends?" 

MAKERS: 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

RICHMOND,  VA„  U.S.A. 


ADVERTISING    INDEX 


Aiken  Book   Co 19 

Albermarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co 63 

Allen,    Thos 24 

American  Lead  Pencil  Co 

Inside  front  cover 
Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co..     54 

r 

Baker,  Chas.  W 58 

Bemister,  H.  A 54 

Binney  &  Smith  Co 10 

Boorum  &  Pease    10 

Bowater  &  Co.,  Ltd 58 

Bradford,  John    61 

British  Drawing  Ink  &  Adhesive 

Mfg.  Co 14 

Briggs,   Wm 16-62 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co Back  cover 

Cairns,  Bernard    60 

Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co... 

Inside  back  cover 

Cane  &  Sons,  Limited,  Wm 9 

Caribonum  Co.,  Ltd 55 

Carmichael  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Peter   .  .  14 

Carter's  Ink  Co 20 

Climax  Baler  Co 60 

Clique,  Ltd.,  The 9 

Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd 11-60-62 

Coombs,  R.  A 58 

Cooper,   S.   P 58 

Coutts,   W.    E 15 

Crippen,  E.  A 19 

Davis  Noveltv  Co 60 

Dawson,  Ltd.,  W.  V 3 

Dexter  &  Sons,  Inc.,  C.  H 55 

Dent  &  Sons,  J.  M 19 

Dominion  Blank  Book  Co 8 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co 

Inside  back  cover 


Eaton-Dikeman  Co 59 

Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co 61 

Esterbrook  Pen  Manfg.  Co 9 

Farrell  &  Hosinger  Co 55 

Financial  Post  of  Canada   20 

Fulton  Specialty  Co 54 

Gale  &   Polden    62 

Goodchild,  Fred.  D 56 

Heath,  John,  &  Sons  64 

Hegone    Studios    60 

Henry  Co.,  Ltd.,  Geo.  M 51 

Higgins  &  Co.,  Chas.  M 63 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co 19 

Hilton  &  Co.,  W.  H 14 

Hoffman,    L 61 

Hurst,   Aubrey   0 1 


Imperial  News  Co.,  Ltd. 
Irish,  G.  L 


22 
61 


Jewel  Pen   Co.,  Ltd.,  The    1 

Kimpton   Co.,   Edward    54 

Languages    62 

Law  Books,   Ltd 62 

Liberty  Games  Co 55 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf  Co.,  Ltd.   ...  2 

Mabie,  Tod  &  Co Front  cover 

MacDougall  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  A.  R.. . .    6-7 

MacLean's     21-60 

McClelland,  Goodchild  &  Stewart, 

Ltd 53-62 

McFarlane,  Son  &  Hodgson,  Ltd.     61 

McKinley  Music  Co 51 

McCready   Publishing  Co 64 

Marshall,  Percival.  &  Co 20 

63 


Moore  Push  Pin  Co 64 

Menzies  &  Co.,  Ltd 5 

Meyers,  Fred  J.,  Mfg.  Co 61 

Mittag  &  Volger,  Inc 

Inside  back  cover 

Morgan  &  Scott,  Ltd 12 

National   Blank   Book  Co 58 

National  Cash  Register  Co 57 

O.K.  Mfg.  Co 64 

Packard  Bros 64 

PhHco  Publishing  Co 13 

Pugh  Specialty  Co.,  Ltd 54 

Ramsay  &  Son  Co.,  A 64 

Reliance   Ink   Co 64 

Rockhill  &  Vietor 56 

Royal  Ink  Co 51 

Scarborough  Co.  of  Canada    ....  61 

Sinclair  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Wm 20-61 

Sindicato  Italiano 18 

Stafford,   S.   S.,   Inc 59 

Standard   Paper  Mfg.  Co 59 

Terry  &  Sons,  Herbert 19 

Toronto  Trophy  Craft  Co 61 

Up-to-date  Advertising  Co 61 

U.S.   Playing   Card   Co 4 

Volger  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc.,  B.  S 55 

Waterston  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Geo.   .  .  12-60 

Weber  &   Co.,  F 54 

Weeks  Mfg.  Co.,  Frank   56 

Weldon  Roberts  Rubber  Co 51 

Woolnough,  Draper  &  Co.,  Ltd...  13 

Wright  &  Co.,  George   13-58 

Wycil   &   Co 62 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


THE  WASHBURNE         O  ,  H 
PAPER    FASTENERS 


""RIESTJtK:L£SSSmsa 


THE     SANtTARr 
OK  ERASER 


THE  SQUARE  DEAL  WINS:  WE  KNOW 

IT.  YOU'LL  GET  IT 
FROM  US;  AND  YOU  WILL  KNOW  IT  EVERY 
TLY.E  YOU  BUY  AND  SELL  PRODUCTS  OF 
OUR  MANUFACTURE. 

IT  IS  QUALITY  THAT  COUNTS.  IT  IS 
OUR  RULE  TO  GIVE  STANDARD  RELIABLE 
GOODS  OF  OUR  MAKE  AT  LOW,  FAIR, 
SQUARE  PRICES,  AND  TO  STAND  BACK  OF 
EVERYTHING  WE  MAKE.  WE  WANT  YOUR 
TRADE  —  ORDER  FROM  YOUR  JOBBER,  OR  DIRECT. 


S 


THEO.K.MANUFACTURINGCO. 

SYRACUSE,  N.V.,    U.S.A. 


HOLD  THE  LINE 


(Registered) 


Lo  n  do  n  (  Eng.  ) 
Export  Agency, 
8  St.  Bride  St., 
LONDON,  E.C. 


Here's  the  line  to  hold — 
John  Heath's  Telephone 
Pen.  You  will  not  hold  it 
long  because  it  sells  so 
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THE    NEW    YORK    TIMES 

Sunday,   December   15,    1918 

Baker  Wants  Letters  to  Soldiers  to 
Keep  Up  Army  Morale  Abroad 

In  a  recent  letter  to  Raymond  B.  Fosdick,  head  of 
the  Commission  on  Training-  Camp  Activities,  Secre- 
tary of  War  Baker  said: 

"The  eyes  of  the  world  are  upon  our  soldiers  over- 
seas to-day  not  more  for  what  they  have  done  than 
for  what  they  are  now  called  upon  to  do.  Before  them 
lie  the  tasks  of  helping;  to  rehabilitate  the  devas- 
tated lands  of  France  and  Belgium,  and  of  making 
sure  tjiat  the  victory  in  which  they  have  so  glori- 
ously shared  shall  be  a  permanent  one. 

"This  means  that  we  may  not  expect  soon  to  have 
them  all  with  us  here.— They  need  our  help  and  en- 
couragement now  perhaps  more  than  at  any  other 
time  since  they  left  home  in  order  that  they  may 
be  inspired  and  strengthened  to  maintain  that 
fineness  of  character,  manner,  and  conduct  which  has 
earned  for  them  such  universal  respect. 

"I  believe  that  among  all  the  influences  which  may  be 
focused  upon  this  object,  the  strongest  and  most 
far-reaching  is  that  which  emanates  from  home  let- 
ters, and  I  therefore  urge  the  mothers,  fathers,  wives 
and  sisters  of  our  soldiers  overseas  to  express  them- 
selves earnestly  in  their  letters  as  their  share  in 
seeing  that  the  high  standards  which  America  repre- 
sents both  here  and  abroad  shall  be  constantly 
upheld." 

Reproduced    for    the    attention 
of  dealers  in  stationery  by  the 

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1918-1919 


We  desire  to  thank  our 
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The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted  to  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
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vol.  xxxv. 


PUBLICATION      OFFICE:      TORONTO,      FEBRUARY,      1919 


No.  2 


LOTUS  LAWN  STATIONERY 

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With  the  passing  of  the  war  cloud  gayety  and  good  times 
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ROBINSON    REMINDER    Natio?nallL™dTtised 

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1 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


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SHIP  BUILDING  INDUSTRY, 

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DR.  IN  THE  WAR, 

VOID  OF  WAR, 

CROSS  OF  FIRE, 

THREE  TIMES  AND  OUT, 

SONGS  OF  MEN, 

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Introduction     by     Henry   Cabot  Lodge  5.00 


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Common  Cause 

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THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher,  215  Victoria  St.,  Toronto 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


HISTORY  OF  THE 

WORLD  WAR 


By  Francis  A.  March 


Canada's  Part  in  the  War 

By    Lt!-Col.  George  Gallie  Nasmith,  C.M.G.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,  D.Sc. 

Extract  from  Author's  Foreword 

TWO  ideals  have  been  before  us  in  the 
preparation  of  this  necessary  work. 
These  are  simplicity  and  thoroughness. 
It  is  of  no  avail  to  describe  the  greatest  of 
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is  that  official  documents,  prepared  in  many 
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gone  into  war  making,  into  the  regeneration 
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H  Written  frankly  from  the  viewpoint  of  the 
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Price 

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Commander  of  the  Canadian  Expedition-  V  ■?      /^       l\l at 

arv    Forces  <J)J  .Z  D      1  V  d 


THE  JOHN  C.  WINSTON  COMPANY,  PHILADELPHIA 

THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher,  TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


AN 


ew  Ura 


A  new  era  has  opened  in  the  book  trade.  With  Govern- 
mental restrictions  abolished  and  people  everywhere 
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Mich   a.-   we  have 


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A   Daughter  of  Two  Worlds 

The  story  of  fascinating  Jennie  Malone,  her  rise 
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Contributions     of 
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the      British      Empire     to 


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net.     Ready  in  March. 

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The  Old   Gray   Homestead 

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HON.  W.  L.  MACKENZIE  KING 

Industry  and  Humanity 
Special  Edition.  $2  oo        $3.00    net 


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THOMAS  ALLEN,  TORONTO 

CANADIAN  REPRESENTATIVE 


44 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Special 

Announcement 

To  the  Trade 

For  the  convenience  of  the  Canadian 
Booksellers  we  have  arranged  with 

THOMAS  ALLEN,   TORONTO, 

to  stock  our 
POCKET   MAPS,   JUVENILES,   ETC. 


EVERYBODY  KNOWS 

the  great  success  we  have  had  with 
special  books  like 

"Real  Mother  Goose"  and 
"Peter  Patter" 

This  year  we  will  have  something  still 
better,  of  which  you  will  be  advised 
in  due  time. 


RAND,   McNALLY   &  CO., 

536  South  Clark  St.,  Chicago 


The 

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In  Canada 

Mr.  Thomas  Allen  and  his  repre- 
sentatives will  take  pleasure  in 
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take  better  care  of  our  Canadian 
orders  than  ever  before,  and  wish 
to  thank  the  trade  in  Canada  for 
their  generous  support  in  1918, 
which  was  almost  double  any  pre- 
vious year. 

M.  A.  Donohue  &  Co.,  Chicago 

Represented  in  Canada  by 

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WHO 
CARES? 

By  COSMO  HAMILTON 
Author  of  "The  Blindness  of  Virtue" 

A  story  of  adolescence,  of  a  boy 
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By  WILLIAM  JOHNSTON 
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thralling   than    "The    House    of 
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duces some  of  the  ingenious 
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plotters    and    de- 
scribes the  clever 
ways     in     which 
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ed. 


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BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


SIX  BEST  SELLERS  FOR    FEBRUARY 


./ 


■& 


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•/ 


J? 


From  "THE  LIVEST  BOOK  LIST  IN  CANADA 


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To  McClelland  &  stewart,  limited,  publishers,  Toronto 

opie?  The  Sky  Pilot  in  No  Man's  Land,  by  Ralph   Connor    •  ■  ■$1-^  ^f* 

The  Curious  Quest,  by  E.  P.  Oppenheim,    author   of   "The    Zeppelin's    Passenger    .  .    1.50 

The   Roll   Call,  by  Arnold   Bennett,  author    of   "The    Pretty    Lady"    1.60 

Shops    and    Houses,   by   Frank    Swinnerton,  author  of  "Nocturne"    1-50 

The   Man   Nobody  Knew,  by   Holworthy  Hall,  author  of  "Henry  of  Navarre"   1.50 

Dr    Paul,   by    Ethel    Penman    Hope,   author  of  "A    Hillside    Christmas"    1.50 


Dealer. 


Address. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


McClelland 


and 


john  McClelland 


Stewart 

Limited 

Publishers 

Toronto 


"  The  Livest  Book 
List  in  Canada  ' ' 


GEORGE  STEWARf 


A  DEVELOPMENT  of  major  im- 
portance this  year  is  the  merg- 
ing of  the  Canadian  business  of  the 
House  of  Cassell  with  McClelland  & 
Stewart,  Limited. 

In  addition  to  our  other  extensive 
lines  of  books  our  travelers  are  now 
showing  all  the  publications  of  the 
HOUSE  OF  CASSELL. 

POPULAR  FICTION 
Standard  Titles 
Dictionaries 
Gardening  Books 
Technical  Books 
Children's  Books 
"Chums"  and  other  Annuals 


ON  March  15  we  will  remove  to 
larger  quarters  at  215-219  Vic- 
toria St.,  where  we  will  have  two 
large  floors,  giving  us  more  than 
double  our  present  space.  We  will 
fit  up  a  fine  suite  of  sample  rooms, 
enabling  the  trade  to  make  purchases 
there  under  most  advantageous  cir- 
cumstances. 

We  heartily  invite  the  trade  to  visit 
us  there  and  make  our  new  house 
;heir  headquarters  when  in  Toronto. 


a 


GIVE  THEM  ORDERS  and  KEEP  THEM  SMILING" 


WM    J.  BRADY,  Sales  Manage, 


EDWARD  J.  BOYD 


CHAS.  J.  CRANFIELD 


JOSEPH  H.  JEFFERIES 


NORMAN  B.   KNOWLES 


B  0  O  KS E  L  L E R      AND     S  T  A  T I 0 N  E  R 


* 

• 


Some  of  our  Leaders  ! 
for  Spring 

Look  Them   Over! 


MOON  OF 
ISRAEL 

By  H.  Rider 
Haggard. 

Another  of  this 
author's  colorful 
and  generally 
a  p  p  ealing  pic- 
tures of  life  in 
ancient  Egypt  at 
the  throne  of  the 
Pharaohs.  The 
book  has  a 
strong  love  in- 
terest. $1.50  net. 


3haJb^^ 


GIKA 


MY  THREE  YEARS  IN  A  GERMAN 
PRISON 

By  Hon.  Henri  S.  Beland,  M.P.  The 
story  of  Dr.  Beland's  experiences  as 
told  by  the  newspapers  at  the  time  of 
his  return  to  Canada  several  months 
ago,  created  very  general  interest.  That 
only  touched  on  his  experiences.  Here 
they  are  in  detail  from  his  own  hand, 
retailing  the  events  of  his  incarceration 
and  his  thrilling  experiences  in  Ger- 
man prisons.  This  is  a  book  not  for 
present  reading  alone  but  should  have 
a  historical  value  in  your  customers' 
libraries $1.50 


IN  FLANDERS'  FIELDS 

The  collected  verse  of  the  late  Lt.-Col.  John  McCrae.  This, 
with  a  biography  written  by  an  intimate  friend,  make  up  a 
book  which  is  certain  to  be  in  general  demand  this  spring. 
Hundreds  of  people,  as  you  know,  have  been  asking  when 
it  would    be    ready $1.50 

WHO  GIVETH   US  THE  VICTORY 

By  Arthur  Mee.  The  author  believes  that  God  is  intervening 
to  deliver  Europe,  and  his  forty  chapters  carry  out  this  idea. 
His  name  means  a  good  deal  to  Canadian  readers $1.35 

A  SMILE  A   MINUTE 

By  H.  C.  Witwer.  Here  is  something  you  can  sell  to  every 
purchaser  of  "From  Baseball  to  Boches" — a  sequel  to  that 
book,  with  the  same  breezy,  rollicking  material  from  Ed. 
Haimon  to  his  chum  at  home $1.50 

CAP'N    JONAH'S   FORTUNE 

By  James  A.  Cooper.  Another  characteristic  Cape  Cod  story 
full  of  wholesome  humor,  quaint  love-making,  and  a  thrilling 
rescue  in  a  blizzard $1.50  Net 


THAT'S  ME  ALL  OVER,  MABLE 

By  E.  Streeter.  Yes!  Just  what  it  is — a  sequel 
to  "Dere  Mabel,"  carrying  on  "Bill's"  experi- 
ences further  through  the  training  camps,  and 
across  the  Atlantic.  Just  as  funny  in  story  and 
picture  as  "Dere  Mable,"  and  also  likely  to  have 
a  record-breaking  sale.    75c. 


SIR  ISUMBRAS  AT  THE 
FORD 

By  D.  K.  Broster.  This  story,  by 
the  author  of  "The  Vision 
Splendid,"  is  built  around  the 
expedition  which  in  1795  left 
Southampton,  England,  to  fight 
in  France.  It  is  the  finest  type 
of  romance,  and  is  compared  by 
capable  American  critics  to 
S.  R.  Crockett's  best.  It  should 
be  a  first-class  general  seller. 
$1.25. 

DERE  BILL 

M  a  b  1  e  '  s  love 
1  e  1 1  e  r  s  to  her 
rookie  —  the 
other  side  of  the 
"  Dere  Mable  " 
question.  By 
Florence  Eliza- 
beth Summers. 
75c. 


Mable's  Love  Letters  to 
Her  Rookie. 

HORENCE  ELIZABETH   SUMMERS 


WILLIAM  BRIGGS,  Publisher 

TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


THE 

COPP, 

CLARK 

CO-, 

LIMITED 


ANNUAL 
EXHIBITION 

OF 
HOLIDAY 

LINES 


On  the  Fifth  Floor  of  Our 

Warehouse  at  Wellington  and  Portland  Sts. 

Beginning  March  10th 

Come  and  see  this  splendid  exhibition  of  books,  novelties  and 
holiday  trade  specialties  for  merchants  in  the  Book  and  Stationery 
and  Fancy  Goods  Business. 

The  dealer  who  fails  to  attend  this  exhibition  will  miss  an  excep- 
tional opportunity  to  buy  some  of  the  best  selling  holiday  lines 
ever  shown  in  Canada. 

The  travelers  will,  of  course,  show  these  goods  on  the  road,  but  the 
trade  can  buy  under  more  advantageous  circumstances  because  of  the 
far  greater  space  available  for  systematic  display  than  is  possible  in 
even  the  most  spacious  hotel  sample  rooms. 

See  Next  Two  Pages  for  Particulars. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited 

517  WELLINGTON   ST.  W.,  TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


We  Specialize  in 

BOOKS  FOR  CHILDREN 

Paper  Toy  Books  Picture  Board  Books  The  Famous  Oz  Books 

Linen  Toy  Books  Painting  Books  Animal  Story  Books 

Boys'  and  Girls'  Books  Illustrated  in  Color. 

CHILDHOOD'S  BIG  BOOK— IS  AN  OZ  BOOK 

New  Title  For  1919     "  THE  MAGIC  OF  OZ  "     Ready  July  1 
Uniform  with  the  15  other  Titles,  $1.50  a  copy 

This  year  we  offer  the  trade,  as  exclusive  Canadian  agents,  the  best  all-round 
line  of  Boys'  and  Girls'  Story  Books.  They  are  published  by  the  Penn  Pub- 
lishing Co.,  of  Philadelphia.  Also  the  best  line  of  Dialogue  and  Recitation 
Books. 

Books  illustrated  in  color,  "Treasure  Island,"  etc.  Good  list  of  titles.  Large 
volumes,  $2.50,  $2.00,  $1.50;  smaller  volumes,  50c  and  75c.  Also  Boy  Scout 
Books. 

MODERN  STANDARD  AUTHORS 

The  Works  of 
Sir  Gilbert  Parker  John  Galsworthy 

Henry  Van  Dyke  J.  M.  Barrie 

R.  L.  Stevenson  Alfred  Noyes 

A.  C.  Benson  G.  Bernard  Shaw 

And  other  Famous  Authors  and  Poets. 


New  Fiction 

This  season  a  Big  Leader  will 
be  a  new  novel  by 

SIR  GILBERT  PARKER. 
There  are  also  New  Books  by 

TEMPLE  BAILEY, 

Author  of  "Contrary  Mary," 

and 

J.  J.  BELL, 

Author  of  "Wee  McGregor." 


Reprints 


A  larger  and   better  list  than 

ever. 

Notable    Authors    represented 

in  C.  C.  Co.  Reprints  are: 

Sir  Gilbert  Parker 

Ethel  M.  Dell 

Edna  Ferber 

Gertrude  Atherton 

Frank  L.  Packard 


SR 


THE  COPP,  CLARK  COMPANY,  Limited 

517  Wellington  Street  W.  PUBLISHERS  TORONTO 


10 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


FOR  1919 


THE   NEW 
GREETING   CARDS 

The  extensive  ra'nge  of  greeting  cards  to  retail  at 
5c  each  which  we  are  showing  this  year  is  going 
to  create  a  sensation  in  the  trade  by  reason  of 
their  extraordinary  value,  and  all  the  other  lines 
comprising  varied  assortments  of  10,  16,  20,  25. 
35  and  50c  retail  items  are  of  similar  high  value. 
We  offer  again  these  ever-popular  series  : 

PATRICIAN,     ARTISTIC,     MATCHLESS, 
IMPERIAL  and  NAPCO. 

POSTCARDS 

Our  showing  of  picture  postcards  includes  the 
high-grade  lines  which  the  trade  has  each  year 
been  purchasing  so  largely  from  us  and  the  1919 
designs  in  Christmas  and  New  Year's  postcards 
as  well  as  those  for  all  other  special  occasions 
and  every-day  trade,  will  please  the  trade  mightily 
and  help  them  to  put  more  "pep"  into  the  post- 
card business  this   year. 

SOME  NOVELTIES 

Here  is  a  list  of  good  things  that  are  going  to  be 
good  tonics  for  profitable  holiday  business  this 
year: 


NEW  PAPETERIES 
FOR  1919 
HOLIDAY  TRADE 

All  previous  efforts  have 
been  eclipsed  in  the  great 
new  line  of  Holiday  Pape- 
teries  with  which  we  go 
to  the  Canadian  stationers 
this  year.  All  our  popu- 
lar selling  papers — Oopp's 
Kid  Finish,  Fine  Linen. 
Swansdown,  Silk  -  Velvet, 
etc.,  are  represented  in  the 
exclusive  range  of  hoxes. 
comprising  many  novelties 
and  packaues  of  surpris- 
ing beauty  and  unexcelled 
value. 

You    Must    Have   the 

C.C.Co.'s  Holiday  Papeter- 

ies  this  Year! 


Friendship  Calendars— A  line  of  calendar  mounts 
with  different-sized  openings  to  accommodate 
the  different  standard  sizes  of  amateur  photo- 
graphs. 

Photo  Frames — A  great  range  at  popular  prices 
and  an  extraordinarily  attractive  new  line  of 
high  grade,  hand-carved  wood  frames  in  dif- 
ferent sizes.  These  latter  will  retail  at  from 
$3  up  and  will  fill  a  need  for  a  better  grade 
of  these  goods  which  has  long  been  felt  in  the 
trade. 

Pictures — In  this  year's  offerings  are  a  big  range 
of  popular  humorous  prints — the  kind  that  sell 
on  sight — they  will  prove  a  great  livening  influ- 
ence in  the  picture  trade  this  year.  Other  spe- 
cialties    include: 

Educational    Boards,    Drawing    Slates. 
Kindergarten    Sets. 

Hinoka  rope,  tri-color  ribbon  crepe,  aiso  plain   red 
and    green    ribbon    crepe. 

Fancy    decorated    paper,     ribbonzene.    tinsel    cord, 
tinsel    garlands    and    tinsel    Christmas    tree    orna- 
ments,   candles   and   candle-holders. 
Christmas    tags    and    seals,    also    place    cards,    tally 
cards,   etc.,  and 

POST     CARD      ALBUMS— wide      in      variety     and 
big    in    value. 


SEE  OUR   GREAT  VALUES  IN  CALENDARS 


A  Most  Comprehensive  Range 


^AP^ 


The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Limited 


THE   HOUSE   OF   SERVICE 


11 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


The  best  store  improvement  you  can  make 


The  best  store  improvement  you  can 
make  to-day  is  to  install  a  modern 
National  Cash  Register  —  because  it 
will  build  up  and  systematize  your 
business. 

A  modern  National  Cash  Register 
will  raise  the  tone  of  your  store,  make 
your  clerks  more  efficient,  and  put  you 
in  the  class  of  up-to-date  merchants. 

It  will  enable  you  to  save  expense  in 
running  your  store,  and  thus  release 
money  for  other  purposes. 

It  will  make  possible  quick,  accurate 
service    to   customers  —  the    greatest 


inducement  that  any  merchant  can 
offer  to  get  and  hold  trade. 

It  will  give  you  unequaled  protection, 
that  will  check  every  cent  of  your 
profits  into  the  bank. 

It  will  give  you  information  that  will 
enable  you  to  control  your  business. 

A  modern  National  Cash  Register  is 
a  store  improvement  that  will  quickly 
pay  for  itself  out  of  what  it  saves. 

In  the  face  of  increased  competition 
you  cannot  afford  to  postpone  making 
this  improvement. 


The  National  Cash  Register  Company,  of  Canada,  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all  the  principal  cities  of  the  world 

12 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


This  Attractive  Panel    $1.00. 
For  Your  Window  to  Make  Trade  For   You. 

Esterbrook  Pens  in  Esterbrook  Counter  Display  Cases  bring  many  people  into  a  store  whose  needs  fur  many 
other  things  than  pens  can  be  supplied  by   you.  • 

The   Esterbrook    Counter   Display   Cases   enable  the   pen  purchaser   to   make  an   easy   and   quick    selection. 

We  have  a  limited  supply  of  these  attractive  Window  Display  Panels  and  will  send  one  for  $1.00  to  a  dealer 
whose  window  space  is  sufficient  to  make  a  proper  display.  If  the  dealer  will  use  the  panels  for  a  week  and  then  fold 
and  store,   he  can  use  the  same  panel  every  couple  of  months   for  a    long   time. 

If   you    use   Esterbrook's    Window    Display,    you    attract  attention    to    your   store. 

Write    for    a    photo    of   one   of   our   suggestions    for   an   attractive   window   trim.      It 
you   whenever   you   use   the   Esterbrook    Window    Display. 

The  Esterbrook  Counter  Display  Cases  tie  up  less  money    in    stock,    offer    a    complete 
space.     Make   it  easy   to  sell. 

Write    us    to-day   for   further  particulars.      Tell   us    the  size   of   your   window. 

Esterbrook  Pen  Mfg.  Co.,  1 8-70  Cooper  St.,  Camden,  N.J. 


will    be   a    profitable    week    for 
line,    save    counter    and    shelf 


" Easiest  to  sttaw lr       " Easiest  to  seil ! " 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


fThe  Sales  Curve 


Miniature  repro- 
ductions of  ad- 
vert ise  m  e  n  t  3 
appearing  in  cur- 
ren  t     niagazines. 


w:i 


w   !tS  fun  just  t<5'  Watch 

Ddd  and  Uncle  John  ^^. 
.    ^?  Play  Can!* 

W 

3fe^  „,hi,„rf  l,Ct..n,n,   fed  "Tw 

£  ,  uyibtiniq.wkalcjr.1.  « 

h.l(..h,m,olh,r.kqui<:kly  ^ 

in  Bil  ^%* 

0T  Pltvini        ,        ■    |i     '■  .  'S^^ 

,-  -5 


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in  hi*  bu.in... 
n.Mng   (  .r.N   | - 

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,.,  ....   ..,1.1.       Th,.   tn.n.nj  ,• 

d^ily  benefit  in  btwinctt  Mid  Htul 


\ 


AND 


Still  goes  up* 

THERE  are  weeks  and  months  of  snow  and  ice 
and  cold,  drizzling  rain  ahead — evenings  when 
it  is  the  greatest  comfort  to  stay  quietly  at 
home  and  play  cards.  Throughout  the  winter  card 
sales  have  run  steadily  at  the  highest  level  we  have 
ever  known. 

And  the  curve  that  charts  the  sales  of 

BICYCLES0 

PLATING 
CARDS 

is  still  going  up. 

As  usual  the  biggest  gains  have  gone  to  the  livest 
dealers— or  at  least  the  ones  that  are  most  alive  to 
the  possibilities  for  profit  in  playing  cards;  if  they 
are  given  a  little  attention,  and  merchandized  a  bit. 

Bicycle  and  Congress  playing  cards  are  being  more 
heavily  advertised  right  now  than  they  ever  have 
been.  And  many  of  our  dealers  tell  us — better  adver- 
tised. The  copy  is  human,  suggestive,  homy— bound 
to  tell  heavily  in  popularizing  card  sales  at  home. 

Everybody  has  known  Bicycle  and  Congress  play- 
ing cards  for  years,  and  asked  for  them  or  at  least 
accepted  them  without  question. 

All  that  is  necessary  to  get  your  full  share  of  the 
good  playing  card  business  that  is  adding  to  dealers' 
profits  everywhere  is  to  stcck  the  cards — preferably 
all  the  popular  backs — ar.d  display  them.  Let  peo- 
ple know  you  have  what  they  want. 

Send  now  for  price  list  and  sample  backs. 

The  U.  S.  Playing  Card  Company 

CINCINNATI,  U.  S.  A.  WINDSOR,  CANADA 

Department    4 


14 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


Appealing  to  Business  Men 


You  have  gentlemen  customers  who  are  careful  and 
discriminating  in  their  selection  of  personal  sta- 
tionery. They  want  a  Note  Paper  that  suggests 
social  standing  and  is  distinctly  masculine. 

To  these  men  nothing  will  give  better  satisfaction  than  a 
High  Grade  Bond — and  there  is  no  better  bond  than 


urn  langw 

Facsimile  of  Watermark. 

Most  Business  Men  are  well  acquainted  with  Canada*  beat  bond 
paper — use  it  for  their  commercial  stationery — and  would  he  pleased 
to  see  it  on  display  in  your  store  in  note  paper  and  envelopes. 

Superfine  Linen  Record  note  paper  in  Commercial  size  with  Baronial  Enve- 
lopes to  match  is  put  up  expressly  for  men.  It  is  also  made  in-Octavo  and 
Empress  size — both  white  and  azure. 

GRAND  PRIX,   PARIS,    1900 

Ask  your  wholesaler  to-day  for  prices  and  at  the  same  time  enquire  about 
Holland  Parchment.     Note  paper  and   envelopes. 


The  Rolland  Paper  Co.,  Limited 

General  omces :        High -Grade  Paper  Makers  Mid.  at 

142  St.  Paul  St.  West  ~.  ^  QQO  St'  Jerome<  pQ  '  and 

MONTREAL  MllCe     1  OoZ  Mont  Rolland,  P.O. 


15 


BOOKSELLER      A.\D      STATIONER 


Valentines  Series 

POST  rtgSfa  CARD3 


kTHROUGHOUT, 


3RtX> 


Our  Travellers  Cover  Canada 

Wait  for  Them! 


1919 


CHIEF  LINES 

Toy  Books  Postcards 

Juvenile  Books  Calendars 

Book  Toys  Children's  Blocks 

Book  Novelties  Games 

Christmas  Booklets  Dominoes 

New  Year  Booklets  Chess  and  Checkers 

Tags  and  Seals  Christmas  Bells 
Tinsel  Cord  and  Ribbonzene 

Valentine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co.,  Limited 

Toronto  Winnipeg 


16 


BOOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


"yOU     take     no     chances     when    you 
1  carry     a       full     line     of     VENUS 
Pencils    because   they    already   are 
the    largest    selling    quality    pen- 
cils   in    the   world. 

Their    immense    popularity    is 
due  to  just  one  thing — they 
represent     PENCIL     PER- 
FECTION   for    any    pur- 
pose    and      the     public 
knows   it. 


American  Lead 
Pencil  Co. 

220  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York 

A I  so    Clapton,     London, 
Eng. 


r> 


% 


¥ 


The  Value  Of 
Your    Judgment 

When  your  opinion  is  asked 
about  Crayons,  you  can  go 
the  limit  in  urging  the  use  of 
the  Gold  Medal  brands. 

They  are  best  in  quality  and 
will  find  ready  sale  on  that 
merit  alone.  Your  judgment 
can  never  be  questioned 
when  you  recommend  this 
line — 60  items  at  your  dis- 
posal. 


rRAYpLA, 


Eight  WtfTjg J Color  s 

schooKl^rayons 

vf0^UriON>L  coio5y°RKJ 


/■*-    ■  ■  .      ■■-  ■--     "  .  .  ■>tS.->v/£-/yrs 


The  most  popular  of  all 
school  crayons.  Packed  6  to 
24  colors  in  a  box.  In  bulk 
and  solid  colors  for  refills. 

White  and  Colored  Chalk 

Made  in  three  grades,  all 
brilliant  colors.  Write  for  a 
sample  of  "Little  Folks" 
package  of  chalk,  containing 
three  sticks  of  white  or 
colors. 

Catalog    and    price 

list    of    entire    line 

sent   on    request. 


BINNEY   & 

81  Fulton  St. 


SMITH    CO. 

New  York 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


B&P 

Hercules 
Price  Book   Covers 

Are  All  That  The  Name  Implies 
EXCEPTIONALLY  STRONG 


Bound  in  very  flexible  Levant 
Grain,  Fabri-Hide,  the  most  dur- 
able artificial  leather  that  can  be 
produced. 

Experts  have  judged  it  to  be  real 
Cowhide  at  sight. 


In  view  of  the  present  high  cost 
of  good  leathers,  the  Hercules 
supplies  a  demand,  that  is  per- 
sistent at  this  time,  for  good  wear- 
ing Loose  Leaf  Price  Books  at 
moderate  prices. 

If  properly  displayed,  Hercules 
Price  Books  will  be  one  of  the 
most  profitable  lines  for  the  pro- 
gressive Stationer.  Made  in  all 
the  Standard  Price  Book  sizes  in 
j^-in.  and  i-in.  capacities.  For 
sizes,  prices,  etc.,  see  page  No.  44, 
Dealer's  Net  Price  List. 

Boorum  &  Pease 
Loose  Leaf  Book  Co. 

Hudson  Ave.  and  Front  St.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Salesrooms : 
109-111   Leonard  Street,  Republic  Building:, 

New  York  Chicago,  111. 

Old    South    Building-  4000    Laclede   Avenue 

Boston,  Mass.  St.  Louis,  Mo. 


The 

Four 

Leading 

Lines  in 

Letter 

Files 


Spring 
Quick 


THE  "REGENT"  LEVER  FILE 
Packs  Flat. 


ROTAX 

Clip 

KISMET 

Binder 
FALINGE      Flat 

File 

REGENT     Lever 
File 

(Packs  Flat) 

Specially 

Designed   for 

EXPORT 


Manufactured  by 


W.  H.  HILTON  &  CO. 

VEROTAX  WORKS,  ROCHDALE,  England 

Catalogues  and  Smo1e»  on  application. 


&& 


£yer  on  fh"e  a /erf /or 
new  arfisfic  fafenf  we  ask  designers 
fo  safimif  desidns  and  ideas /or 
Hhgraved '6/msfmas  (/reefing Cards  *S 

We  wiffpay  i/ieirprice/orafl '  destfns 
accepitxf  and  /n  addd/bn  w/f/ipve 

F/vMwmSoF*5oo.oo 

fer  //ip  best  five  designs,  asfeffows; 
/s'rf}okes/oO,  2^/20,3^/00,4^7^5^50. 

yin  imparf/af.Hvff/cnown  conimiffcej/iomfftf/i/y/am- 
j/mrwi/h  /// is  work,  wi/f  mafic  //tea  wants  fymay/. 

We  a  re  in  ffte  mar/frf  foo,ffir  c/ewr,  dndf.wnfy 
//u moro/fs  ideas  /or  Man's  ranr/s-a/so  c/cvcrsen- 
fwienfs  ofabotff /oar fines /or^ncmfCVffisfnias 
use.  fifty  deafer  m  {Jirfs/mas 'cards  niff advise  die 
arfis/  a6otd  b"esf sef/ccs.  We  so/d  over  /  000,  con 
cards  0r6.oo/?cr//t/ndrrdw/io/esa/e)from  one 
desidn  ///a/ was  a  war-seffer  fn  ourf.O/fl//nc, 

TO  T-/YE  771ADE 

Our  r</res/n'n<$  up/o/Ae-minn/e  /.O/Oi/'ne/s 
abou/readyand fw// 'be  d/sp/ayed fry  our  /m  ve/- 
indsnfesmen  on  and a/7rr/*'prua/y/'>t  We  wish 
fo  o/i/rarficufar a//ennon  /o.andnat'eyou  stv, 
some  o/~me  dest/tns  done  6y  our  new  process, 

'ttqi/a~- finf?1  sn/> '3r"> 'fcaud/uf. 

I  style  0/ en<fravin<(- 


18 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


"Jewel"  No.  lOO 


Safety  Fountain  Pen 


Fitted  with  14k. 
Gold  Nib 


12)6 

Mounted  2  Bands  17/6 


Patented  in  All  Countries 


Advantages 


Large  Ink  Capacity. 

Strength. 

Perfect  Flow,  always  ready  for  use. 

Can  be  carried   in  any  position. 

Fitted  with  Cold  Nib    to  suit  any  hand. 


Sole  Makers: 


Recorder "    Stylographic    Pen 

10/- 


Best  Workmanship  and   Finish. 
Can   be  carried   in  any  position. 


JEWEL  PEN  COMPANY  LTD.,  76  Newgate  St.,  LONDON,  E.C.I,  England 


3^gS3SSOaS^IMIMlM[MSSSCT^I^ 


A  good  blotting 

that  gives  you  a  good  profit 

CLIMAX 

Just  such  a  blotting  as  you  can  confidently  recommend  to  every 
customer  appreciating  good  value  at  a  moderate  price. 

Climax  corresponds  in  every  essential  to  the  requirements  of 
critical  office  men.  Smooth,  Absorbent,  Long  Wearing — the 
kind  of  blotting  that  they  come  in  again  for. 

Leading  Canadian  paper  dealers  handle  Climax  Blotting.  A 
trial  supply  will  show  you  how  it  sells. 


MADE  BY 


RICHMOND  PAPER  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

RICHMOND,  VIRGINIA,  U.S.A. 


19 


B  O 0  K  S  E  L  L  K  R      AND     S  T  A  TIONER 


Display  Cane's  Pencils  like  this 
and  they'll  sell  themselves 

The  accompanying  cut  can  only  give  you  a 
faint  idea  of  the  attractive  appearance  of 
this  counter  display. 


The  way  it  shows  the  pencils  will  keep  them 
selling  without  any  effort  on  your  part. 

Each  stand  contains  half  a  gross — tipped 
and  finished  in  six  different  colors,  one-half 
of  which  sticks  up. 

Your  wholesaler  can  send  you  one.  It  costs 
you  $2.40,  and  the  pencils  retail  at  5c  each. 

Remember:  Cane's  Pencils  are  entirely 

Canadian-made  and  are  just  as  good  as 

the  best  imported. 


The  Wm,  Cane  &  Sons  Company 


Newmarket,    Ontario 


CUSTOMERS 


Why  not  make  every  one  of  your  occasional 
purchasers   a   regular  customer? 
It    is    being    done     throughout     the    country 
every   day   by   stationers   who   sell 


Gi 


ranes 


(The    correct   writing   paper) 

whose  enviable  prestige  is  constantly  im- 
pressed upon  the  minds  of  users  of  fine  sta- 
tionery through  the  effective  use  of  the  best 
National  advertising  mediums  available. 
It  requires  but  a  single  purchase  of  this 
exceptional  writing  paper  to  transform  your 
patron's  most  sanguine  expectation  into  a 
satisfied  realization. 


Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

Pittsfield,  Massachusetts 


William  Sinclair  &  Sons 

(Stationers)  Limited 

Makers   of 

Account  and 
Memorandum  Books 
Pocket  Books 
Writing  Pads 
School  Stationery 

Main   Office   and  Factory: 

ALBERT    WORKS 

Otley,   Yorks,    England 

LONDON:— 22,  Ivy  Lane.  Paternoster  Rew.  E.C.  4 


20 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


AUTOMATIC 

COMBINED  ADJUSTABLE 

ENVELOPE  AND  BAG 

FOLDING  MACHINE 


The  "CARMIC 


JJ   BRITISH 
MADE 


1.  TWO  machines  in  ONE. 

2.  ANY  size  envelope  or  bag  can  be  folded  upon 
the   "CARMIC"   within   the   specified   range   of 
each  machine,  which  is  practically  unlimited. 
The  change  from  one  size  to  another  being  car- 
ried out  in  about  one  hour. 

The  change  from  envelope  to  bag  shape  being 
carried  out  in  about  half  an  hour.    NO  change 
of  box  is  necessary. 
All  classes  of  paper  can  be  folded. 
Output  of  machines  from  28,000  to  32,000  per 
day. 

Does   not  require   special   skill   to   operate. 
Very    little    motive    power    is    needed    to    drive 
machine. 

Best  material  and  workmanship   throughout. 
Machine  does  not  gum  the  sealing  flap. 
Space  required  for  machine  and  operator,  6  feet 
by  5  feet. 
Machines  supplied  ready  for  working. 

Instruction  for  changing  and  adjusting  sent  with  all 
machines. 


3. 


5. 
6. 

7. 


9. 
10. 
11. 

12. 


All  enquiries  should  be  accompanied  with  patterns 
and  particulars  of  range  (largest  and  smallest)  re- 
quired. 

Also  makers  of  Envelope  Gumming  MacHines 
(Power  and  Hand.) 

Prices  and  full  particulars  to  be  obtained  from  the  makers 

PETER  CARMICHAEL  &  CO.,  Limited 

4  Carr  Street,  Limehouse 
LONDON,  E.  14  ENGLAND 


BRITISH 

Drawing    Inks 

MANUFACTURED  IN  19  COLORS 


Made 


TRADE  MARK 


FOR 

Draughtsmen 

Engineers 

Architects 

Artists 

Schools 

etc.,  etc. 
Used  in  all 
Government 

Works, 
Naval  and 

Military 

The 


f  *naT  drawing  i* 


British  Drawing  Ink  &  Adhesive  Mfg.  Co. 


31  Great  Ormond  Street 


LONDON,  W.C.I. 


PICTURE  POSTCARDS 

A   unique  collection  to  suit  all  tastes 

Birthdays     Easters     Comics      Heather     Relatives 

Xmas  and  New  Year     Studies     Greetings 

Lovers     Lucky  Black   Cats 

St.  Patrick's  Dav 


Specialty:  Local  View  Printing  from 
customers'  originals. 


New  Collection  of 

CHRISTMAS  FOLDING  CARDS 

SI. 00  to  $7.00  per  gross. 

now  ready  ^WONDERFUL  VALUE!!! 


Writing   Pads  Dressed  and  Undressed  Dolls 

Condolence  Cards  Cabinets 

Birthday  Folding  Cards 


Terms:     Goods  shipped  through  London   Houses 

or  cash  with  order,   otherwise  write  for  address 

of  our  nearest  Agent. 


The 

"PHILCO" 


Holborn    Place 


wsoe 


PUBLISHING 
Co 


J      London,  W.C.I.  Eng. 


Cable  Addr*»«:     "  Philcoco,"  London 


21 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


The  wonderful 


y   Paper  Fasteners 
k     Erasers  and 
Lines     Letter  Openers 


The  constantly  increasing  demand  for  these  products  prompts  our  suggesting  that  dealers  anticipate  their  requirements  well 
in  advance.     This  will  enable  you  to  render  the  best  service  to  yr>ur  customers  by  having,  in  stock,  what  they  want  —  always. 
0  KT^I  —   Write  for  our  Latest  Prices  and  Literature  — 

THE  0.  K.  MANUFACTURING  CO.,  SYRACUSE,  N.  Y.,  U.S.A. 


TERRY  Savecta 

pen  rule  or  pencil  clip 

Order  NOW— for  Peace  Delivery 

To  ensure  early  supplies  of  this  fine 
seller  and  profit  maker — an  early 
order  is  advised. 

It  saves  loss  of  pen,  pencil  or  rule. 


10c. 
Line 


HERBERT  TERRY    &   SONS 

LIMITED 

The  Spring  and  Presswork.  Specialists 

REDDITCH.  ENG. 


THE  •  INK  •  FOR  -ALL*  PEOPLES 


TnoH; 


Stock  up  now.  Be  ready  for  demand  sure  to 
follow  our  advertising  which  is  now  appearing 
in  leading  financial  papers  and  magazines. 
Put  up  in  three  sizes  and  colors.  Blue  Black, 
Red  and  Green,     '/i   pint;  pint  and  quarts. 

Write  for  prices  and  discounts. 


ROYAL  INK  COMPANY 

II  COLBORNE  ST.    TORONTO.    CANADA 


Make  Your  Show  Windows  Pay  Your  Rent 

Many  S*l«  m  m*de  on  the  Sidewtlk 

Window  Display  Fixtures 

A  Wonderful  te\  of  Patented  Inltrchantfcflfale  Window  LVpby  Faluiw 
dilpbyin*  Bonkv  Stationery,  Office  Suppl.c,  and  Sundnci.  Set  will  five  10 
-Ht  Good  Service  in  effective  trade  pulling  window  Ifirm 

up  wiih  the  lull 

Made  o\  O.ik.  eillicr  Golden.  Antique  or  Weathered  Finish  Set  i 
i  Hjrdwood  Htncrd  Lid  Storoftc  Chen,  a  «ood  p|j«  lo  keep  ll 
.1.. .  ■- ii.„..  ,,.  .1,,,... .,..(.  >.i  >.i>  •»  .tuiu  iiu 


c  arc  only  a  very  few  of  rhc  design*  llu 
t  t.undredi  of  tfandard  hxture*  can  be  Kl 


can  be 

P 

pul  up 


e  ihouwndi  of  I 


n  J.»,ly  | 


Set  h 
Set  h 


lnttrchangtaliie  Yotmitl  For  Large  Store  Windows.    »38.SO 
„fl,  SO  Jmerchrmficible  Younits  For  Small  Store  Windows.    $23.10 
SlocA  carried  In  Hamilton,  Out     O'dn  direct  or  thru  your  lobber      Send  lot  catalog      Patented  and  mad*  in  Canada. 

The  Oscar  Onken  Co.    2650  Fourth  Street    Cincinnati.  Ohio,  U.  S.  A. 

Fixtures   Set   Up   Without   the    Aid   of   a  Tool. 


A  popular 

quick   selling  pen  : 

THE 

"ROB  ROY" 


Made  from  fine  steel  and  made 
in  one  of  Birmingham'!  best 
equipped  factories,  this  dandy 
writing  pen  will  proTe  a  might; 
fine  seller  for  every   lire  dealer. 


Be  sure  to  see  samples  before  you  order  your  new  stock.   You'll 
find  our  prices  are  right 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


Save   Your   Energy 

when  clerks  are  scarce  and  every  moment 
counts.  You  should  help  them  to  serve  your 
patrons  quickly  by  placing  this  Cabinet  on 
your    counter. 

This  Style  L  Cabinet 

oi  MOORE 
PUSH  PINS 

sells  twice  as  much  with 
half  the  effort.  Get  one  to- 
day from  your  Jobber  or 
Direct. 

Cost      -      -      -      $12.50 
Sells     -     -     -     -      18.75 
Will     more     than     double 
your   sales. 

MOORE    PUSH    PIN  CO. 

113  Berkley  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


THE  SHINER 

OR  BLACK  EYE  JOKE. 

SMS 


V  :". 


DRIBBLE  GLASS 


LOADED  CIGARETTES 


PRICE.  PER  80X       25  CENTS 


MR.   MERCHANT- 
PUT  IN  A  FUN  COUNTER 

Make  your  store  the  talk  of  the  town 
by  getting  in  a  line  of  Adams  Joker's 
Novelties,  Magic  and  Puzzles. 
Our  line  consists  of  over  a  hundred 
items  for  all  kinds  of  FUN  and  EN- 
TERTAINMENT. They  make  a'  fine  display,  are  fast,  live 
sellers  and  pay  you  a  PROFIT  OVER  150  PER  CENT. 
Now— after  the  holidays— when  toy  stocks  move  slowly,  they 
will  sell  exceptionally  fast.  Write  for  our  funny  cartoon 
catalog   and   our   proposition   to   dealers. 


S.  S.  ADAMS   CO. 


PLAINFIELD,  N.J. 


22 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


"WORLD"   Blotting 
Speaks : 

"Jam    'WORLD'    Blotting.  I  cover  the  earth. 

"Princes  and  potentates,  the  weu'lthy  and  powerful,  the 
great  of  every  clime,  use  me  every  day.  I  lie  on  the  desk 
when  the  fate  of  men  and  of  nations  is  being  decided.  The 
treaties  that  from  this  scourge  of  war  will  bring  peace 
and  happiness  to  lands  now  devastated  will  be  negotiated 
in  my  presence  and  bear  my  final  imprint. 

"The  captain  of  industry  and  the  private  in  the  ranks 
of  trade  depend  on  my  help.  Weighed  in  any  balances,  I 
am  not  found  wanting.  No  humta'n  emotion  is  expressed  in 
writing  without  my  sanction.  Sympathy,  encouragement, 
affection,  I  make  clear,  vital  and  permanent  every  day.  I 
live  my  life  under  the  eyes  of  all  sorts  and  conditions  of 
men.  They  can  not  escape,  if  they  would,  the  messelge  I 
convey. 

"May  I  not  bear  your  message  and  your  customers'  to 
those   busy   toilers   who  are  my   constant  friends  ?" 

MAKERS: 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

RICHMOND,  VA.,  U.S.A. 


CICO  for  Short 

CICO  is  the  short  word  for  Ad- 
hesion. 

CICO  is  the  short  way  to  do  past- 
ing that  is  to  last  long. 

CICO  in  short  is  short  paste  stocks 
and  long  paste  profits. 

CICO  is  the 
short  cut  to  sell- 
ing your  trade  the 
full  line  of  Carter 
Quality  Products. 

Made   in    Canada 

THE 

CARTER'S  INK 

COMPANY 

Mt.  Royal  Avenue  and  Drolet 
Street,  Montreal,  Que. 


There  are  more  expensive   Pens. 
There  are  no  better  Pens. 
And — 


(^p&U&hs  MM^CAy^A^ 


"A.A."  FOUNTAIN    PENS 

A  source  of  constant  profit. 

There's  an  "A. A."  Pen  to  suit  the  mostjfastidious  customer. 
The  ease  and  convenience  with  which  they  can  be  filled — 
the  satisfaction  which  they  render — the  guarantee  under 
which  they  are  sold  and  the  margin  of  profit  to  dealers 
are  some  of  the  reasons  why  you  should  carry  this 

Profitable  "A.A."  Line. 

Write  to  your  local  jobber  or  to  us  for  price*,  catalogue 
and    trade    discounts   on    this    profitable    line. 

MODERN  PEN  COMPANY 

New  York  City 


Make  Your  News  Stand 
Pay  More  Money 

IT  CAN  BE  DONE.  "Blake's  Handy  News  Stand  Record" 
does  the  trick.  It  shows  when  magazines  are  due,  date  re- 
ceived, and  time-limits  for  returns.  It  keeps  an  accurate 
check  on  all  copies  received  and  sold,  and  will  show  errors 
in  credit  memos  for  returns.  It  keeps  tab  on  re-orders, 
regulates  standing  orders,  and  will  keep  you  posted  in 
cutting  down  or  increasing  same.  It  is  a  daily  reminder 
to  hold  or  deliver  magazines  for  customers.  It  stops  the 
money-leaks.  It  is  the  easy  and  profitable  way  to  run 
your  News  Stand. 

The  continued  use  of  this  Record  for  ten  years  proves  its 
merits  and  success.  Hundreds  of  live,  resourceful  dealers 
everywhere  are  using  it.  Your  competitors  are  getting 
their  business  on  a  basis  of  sound  efficiency  and  are 
MAKING  MORE  MONEY  by  its  use  -and  that  is  exactly 
what  it  will  do  for  YOU! 

The  Record  only  costs  $4.50  complete-  but  in  reality  it 
won't  cost  you  anything,  for  it  will  save  for  you  within  a 
few  days  more  than  you  paid  for  it.  If  you  want  to  know 
what  other  keen-brained  dealers  say  about  it;  if  you  want 
proof  and  facts,  and  all  particulars,  then  SEND  THE 
COUPON  and  I'll  give  them  to  you  quick.  Mail  the 
coupon    to-day — NOW. 


ARTHUR  J.  BLAKE,  Marshall,  Texas. 

Please  send  full  particulars  and  a  free  sample  sheet  of 
"Blake's  Handy  News  Stand  Record."  This  request  does 
not  place  me  under  any  obligation  to  buy. 

Name     • 

Street  Address   

City  and  State 


23 


BOOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


ARO-.HAC 

Li  NE.S 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


linn 


GUARANTEED 

for  5  Years 

BECAUSE  of  the  hard,  tough  ma- 
terial used  in  their  construction,  a 
life   of    five    Near-    is    guaranteed. 
They  do  not  break,  split  or  crack  like 
wood    or    wicker:    nor   do    they    dent, 
rust  or  corrode  like  metal. 

VUL-COT 

Waste  Baskets 

Si<h>s  and  bottoms  being  solid,  scraps 
of  paper  cannot  sift  out  and  litter  up 

the  floor.  Color-  are  neutral  and  har- 
monize  nicely   with   surroundings. 

Vul-Cot  baskets  are  good-looking,  san- 
itary and  economical — a  big  value  any 
way   you    look   at    them. 

Get  our  in  a-  reduced  price  list 


Strong 
Smooth 
Long -Wearing 
Leads 


PIXONS 


'the  master  drawind  pencil 


> . .  i, 


Sold  by  progressive  deal- 
ers because  "the  master 
drawing  pencil"  means 
quick  turnover,  good  pro- 
fits and  because  it  creates 
prestige  for  their  stores. 


Also  Dixon's  pencils 
—  Sovereign  for  Canadian 
trade  erasers ,  pen- 
holders, lumber  crayons, 
etc. 


Representatives  for  Canada  and  Newfoundland 

A.  R.  MacDOUGALL  &  CO.,  LTD.,  468  King  St^W.,  TORONTO 


'  tell  III  1 1:1 1 1  till  1 1 1 1 1 1  MINI  I.I  1 1 1 1  LI  I II 1 1 1  llliHIIIIlllililllllllllllilllilM  I  1 1 II I  I.I  III  I  FT 

24 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


No.  1 


We  told  you  last  month  that  there  were  new  items  com- 
ing.    Here  is  the  first  one. 

NEW  LEDGERS 

IN  THREE  BINDINGS 

A  new  improved  metal.  Lighter — more  compact — 
stronger.  ALL  STEEL  construction.  Operates  by 
right  and  left  screw  principles.    Guaranteed. 

NEAT— SIMPLE— SERVICEABLE 

Style  ASL — Bound  Red  Cross  Grain  Cowhide  back 
and  corners.     Imported  English  Corduroy  sides. 

Style  RGL — Bound  Red  Cross  Grain  Sterluck  back 
and  corners.     Corduroy  sides. 

Style  ECL — Bound  Heavy  Slate  Blue  Canvas.  Red 
Cowhide  corners. 

stock  sizes 

American  standards — 8%xio}i;  gYixii7/?,;  ii^xuj^. 
Canadian  standards — 8T/2  xn;  9x11;  iixil 

CAPACITIES 

\l/i   expanding  to  3  ;  2   expanding  to  4 ";  3   expanding 

to  sK". 

We  have  a  full  stock  of  metals  for  the  above  sizes  and 
can  make  prompt  deliveries.  Other  sizes  can  be  fur- 
nished. 

Prices  most  favorable.  If  you  haven't  received  our  new 
price  list  covering  these  items,  write  us. 

SLUCKETT'S     #■*  ^     LUCK£TT-S     f^ 

^rhnG  Sterling 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Limited 

539-543  King  St.  W.  Toronto 


25 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


"This  Way  Out" 

The  author  of  that  side-splitting  comedy,  "Nothing  But 
the  Truth,"  is  writing  for  MACLEAN'S  Magazine.  A 
sparkling  serial,  "THE  TRANSFORMATION," 

By  Frederic  S.  I  sham 

Begins  in 

MARCH 

MACLEAN'S. 

X'CANADA'S    NATIONAL  MAGAZINE 

This  and  other  features  will  result  in  huge  news-stand 
sales. 

J.  VERNON  McKENZIE  tells  of  the  terror,  of  "Raiding  the  Rhineland"  by 
night.     GEORGE  PEARSON'S  "Returned  Soldier  Problem"  grips. 

These  are  some  of  the  reason?  why  the  MACLEAN'S  news-stand  sale 
has  shown 

4000%  Increase  in  Four  Years! 

And  this  is  nothing  but  the  truth!  MACLEAN'S  in   the  new  size  is 

Last    month    one    Western    City  making  a  bigger  hit  than  ever.   Why 

wholesaler  wired  a  three-figure  sup-  not?     with     such     contributors     as 

plementary  order,  but  we  were  sold  0i  .  ,T.     ,      0     .,,        Ar 

out  and  couldn't  fill  it.     This  same  Stringer,      Ward     Smith,      Munro, 

city  has  now  increased  its  order  80  Fraser,    Onoto    Watanna    and    Mc- 

per  cent,    over   last   month.  Kishnie. 


DISPLAY 

MACLEAN'S  for  MARCH 


NATIONAL 
VIVID 
A  SELLER 


One   newsdealer   who   made   an   especially   attractive   display   la-4    month 
sold  out  that  same  day. 

We're  helping  YOU  to  help  US,  by  spending  thousands  of  dollars  to  ad- 
vertise MACLEAN'S  right  across  Canada.     It's  National-vivid-a  seller. 

If  your  wholesaler  can't  supply  you,  write  direct  to  Circulation  Manager, 
C.  W.  Buchanan,  143-153  University  Avenue,  Toronto. 


2& 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Travellers' 

Number 


^x 


Next 
Month 


Let's  All  Get 
Behind  it  and 
Make  it  a  Winner 


Do  you  fully  appreciate  what  a  great  aid  to  successful 
retailing  the  man  on  the  road  affords  every  retail  merchant? 

This  Travellers'  Number  is  going  to  play  up  this  subject 
in  a  very  special  way. 

Vitally  interesting  to  every  retail  bookseller  and  stationer 
in  Canada  will  be  this  issue.  Incidentally  it  will  afford 
wholesalers  a  most  advantageous  opportunity  for  advertis- 
ing that  will  build  up  trade. 

Rates — Full  page,  $45;  half  page,  $25;  quarter  page,  $15. 
(The  lower  contract  rates  will,  of  course,  apply  to  regular 
advertisers). 


BOOKSELLER   and    STATIONER 

143-153  UNIVERSITY  AVENUE  TORONTO,  CANADA 


27 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


THE  McKINLEY  EDITION  OF 
TEN  CENT  MUSIC 

will   always  hold    first    place    as  an  Edition  of 
Standard,  Classic  and  Teaching  Music 

as  an  established  demand  for  this  line  of  Music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Student 
and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself  to  thousands  of  dealers  to  be 
the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  department. 
Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  150  per  cent,  to  the  dealer. 
The  McKinley  Edition  (Revised  for  Canadian 
Trade)  conforms  in  every  detail  with  Canadian 
copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealer's 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  samples  and  particulars  to-day. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  CO. 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 
in  the    World 

CHICAGO:  1501-15  EAST  FIFTY-FIFTH  ST. 

NEW  YORK  CITY:  145  W.  45th  STREET 


J.  M.  Dent  &  Son,  Limited 


27  Melinda  St. 


TORONTO 


New  Publications 

The   Shadow  of  the  Cathedral    $1.90 

By  Vicente  Blasco   Ibanez,  author  of  '"The 

Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apocalypse."  New 
American    edition. 

The    Red   Cow    $1.50 

By  the  well-known  Canadian  author,  Peter 
McArthur.     Ready  February  14. 

"His  Grace  of   Grub  Street"    $2.00 

By  G.  V.  McFadden.  A  splendid  old-time 
novel. 

Poland,   Past  and   Present    $1.50 

By  J.  H.  Harley,  M.A.  Some  new  and  vital 
details  of  the  recent  history  of  this  un- 
fortunate country  are  conveyed  in  this 
vividly  interesting:  volume. 

Children's  Picture  Books 

We  have  a  wonderful  selection  of  Books 
suitable  for  children  of  all  ages,  to  retail 
from  10  cents  to  $3.00  each.  Many  of  these 
books  are  beautifully  illustrated  in  colors. 
Among  them  are  Fairy  Tales,  Nature  Stor- 
ies, and  books  of  an  educational  value. 
Send  for  $10  sample  parcel. 

J.  M.  DENT  &  SON,  LIMITED 

Publishers  of  Everyman's  and  Wayfarer's  Library 


TECHNICAL  BOOKS 

which  please  everybody 

We  have  a  line  of  popular  price 
technical  handbooks  which 
look  well,  read  well,  and  sell 
well.  The  subjects  include 
steam  engines,  gas  and  oil  en- 
gines, dynamos,  motors,  elec- 
trical apparatus,  tools,  lathe 
work,  instruments,  models,  X- 
rays,  and  wireless.  You  ought 
to  stock  them;  your  customers 
will  like  them. 

Canadians  in  England  are  buy- 
ing them. 

Complete  list  mailed  with  pleasure 


PERCIVAL    MARSHALL  &  CO. 

66  Farringdon  Street 
LONDON  ::  ENGLAND 


The  rapid  sales  of 

STANDARD  BRAND 
BLOTTINGS 

is  the  very  best  proof  of  the  absolute 
reliability   of  this   quality   blotting   paper. 

Particular  people  show  their  preference  for 
Standard  Brand  Blottings  by  coming  back 
for  further  supplies  after  a  first  purchase. 

You    ought     to     feature    this    quick-seller. 
Other  worth-while  lines  are: 
"Sterling,"  "Curi-Curl."  "Prismatic,"  "Royal 
Worcester"  and  "Defender"   (enameled). 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 


28 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Announcing  An  Addition 

We  beg  to  inform  our  Customers  that  the  following  have 
been  added  to  our  List  of  American  Magazines  that  we  can 
supply: 

PHYSICAL  CULTURE      ) 

REVIEW  OF  REVIEWS        Fully  Returnable 

SPORTING  NEWS,  Wkly.  J 

(The  Best  Baseball   Paper) 

ETUDE 


.  Non-Returnable 
McCLURES  ' 

All  the  best  American  Magazines  we  can  supply  on  terms  no 
other  Agency  can  or  will  quote. 

Send  us  your  order.     We  will  give  you  service. 

Write  for  Price  List 

THE  IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY,  Limited 

WINNIPEG,  MAN. 


Book  and  Stationery  Store  For  Sale 

O'Gorman's  Bookstore,  Pembroke,  Ont.  Established  19 
years.  Situated  in  centre  of  town.  Low  rental,  stock 
well  assorted  and  in  good  order. 

Stock  of  Books,  Stationery,  etc.     -     $4,500.00 
Fixtures  (up-to  date)       -     -     -     -        1,500.00 

$6,000.00 

The  undersigned  will  receive  tenders  for  same  up  to 
March  1st,  1919. 

The  lowest  tender  not  necessarily  accepted.  For  further 
information  write  M.  E.  O'Gorman,  Pembroke,  Ont. 


29 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


A  NATIONAL 

For  Every  Branch  of 
Business 


GENERAL  facts,  details  in  item,  com- 
prehensive surveys,  concise  reports 
— your  customers  want  to  get  at 
them  all  with  the  greatest  possible 
economy  of  time,  labor  and  cost.  The 
National  Line  of  Blank  Books  anticipate 
every  one  of  these  recording  require- 
ments and  the  wide  range  of  styles  and 
prices  makes  it  possible  for  each  cus- 
tomer to  select  the  particular  book  that 
best  suits  his  purpose  and  his  pocket 
book.  Every  book  is  the  best  that 
scientific  planning  and  construction,  and 
first  quality  materials  and  workmanship 
can  make  it. 

Are  you  in  the  habit  of  passing,  along 
this  important  information  to  your 
trade?  Their  complete  satisfaction 
with  every  National  purchase  makes 
their  repeat  orders  frequent,  automatic 
— and  very  profitable  for  you. 


Yorkshire   Toploc  Post  Binder 

Bound    Books   and    Loose    Leaf 
Devices 

National  Blank  Book  Company 

HOLYOKE,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


Your  Choice  of  Bound  or 
Loose  Leaf  Books 

FOR  your  customer 
who  still  prefers  the 
bound  book,  the  Domin- 
ion Line  offers  Account 
Books  in  a  most  satisfac- 
tory variety  o  f  styles, 
sizes,  rulings  and  uses. 

Loose  Leaf  devices  in  very  com- 
plete and  up-to-date  numbers 
are  also  included  in  the  Domin- 
ion line. 

Dominion  Blank  Books  are 
sold  only  through  dealers.  We 
can  also  assure  you  prompt 
delivery. 

A  permanent  and  profitable 
trade  can  be  founded  on 
Dominion  Blank  Book*.  May 
we  send  you  a  catalog  and 
quotations  on  your  present 
requirements? 

Dominion  Blank  Book  Co. 

Limited 

BERTHIERVILLE,  P.Q. 


30 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 
Vol.   XXXV.  FEBRUARY.  1919  No.  2 

IN  THIS  ISSUE 

Marketing  a  Product  Successfully. 
More  About  1919  Trade  Outlook. 
Commissions  or  Bonuses  for  Retail  Salesmen. 
Helping  the  Retailer  With  Sales  Plans. 
Short  Talks  With  Young  Salesmen. 
Valentines  and  Other  Season  Goods. 
Trade  Should  Visit  Spring  Trade  Shows. 
Why  Book  Prices  Have  Increased. 
Selling  Digest  of  Timely  Books. 
Best  Selling  Books  of  the  Month. 
Monthly  Record  of  New  Books. 
Practical  Show  Card  Suggestions. 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President  H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President 

H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager  T.  B.  COSTAIN,  General  Managing  Editor. 

Publishers  of  Hardware  and  Metal,  The  Financial  Post,  MacLean's  Magazine  Farmer's  Magazine 
Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and  Publisher,  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House,  The  Sanitary  Engineer 
Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine   Engineering   of   Canada. 

Cable    Address :    Macpubco,    Toronto ;    Atabek,    London,    Eng. 

.    ,  :i-i  ESTABLISHED    1887 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

FINDLAY  I.  WEAVER,   Manager 
CHIEF   OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal,    Southam    Building,    128   Bleury    Street;  Telephone  Main   1004.     Toronto,   143-153  University  Ave 

Telephone    Main    7324 ;    Winnipeg,    1207    Union    Trust  Building,    Telephone   Main    3449. 
GREAT   BRITAIN — LONDON,    The   MacLean    Company   of   Great  Britain,   Limited,  88  Fleet  Street,   E.C.,   E.  J    Dodd 

Director.     Telephone  Central   12960.     Cable  Address :  Atabek,    London,   England. 
UNITED    STATES— New    York,    A.    R.    Lowe,    Room    620,    111    Broadway,    N.Y.,    Telephone   Rector   8971-   Boston     C 

L.    Morton,    Room    733.    Old   South   Building,    Telephone   Main    1204.      A.    H.    Byrne,    Room    900,    Lytto'n    Bide  '   14 

E.    Jackson    Street,    Chicago:    telephone   Harrison    1147. 
SUBSCRIPTION    PRICE— Canada.   Great   Britain,   South   Africa    and    the    West    Indies,    $1.00    a    year-   United    State. 

$1.50    a    year:    other    countries,    $2.00   a    year;    Single   Copies.     10    cents.       Invariably     in     advance. 


31 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


A   GOOD   DIRECTORY 

FOR   BUYING 


Lead  Pencils 

We  represent 

The  Standard  Pencil  Co.,  St.  Louis,  specializing  on  a  high-grade 

5c  Pencil.    Special  Jobbers'  Proposition  for  Canada. 

We  are  agents  for 
Ajax  Eyelet  Fastener 
Samson  Eyelet  Tool 
Thumb  Tacks 
Eyelet  Pliers 


FULD'S 

The    Original 
Patented 

OUIJA 
BOARD 


Seccotine 


In   Stock 

LARGE  SIZE 

15x22 

OUIJA 
BOARD 

$18.00  Dozen 


Representing 
McCaw,  Stevenson  and  Orr,  Belfast,  Ireland. 

Glucine  and  Sealing  Wax 

We  represent  Lyons  Ink,  Ltd.,  Manchester. 

New  Era  Check  Writer 


Toy  Books 

Dean's  Rag  Books — and  other  British  Toy  and  Painting  Books 

and  Sets. 

Modelling  Clay  t?i±ys«, 

.    We  represent 
Modellitt  Mfg.  Co.,  Bristol,  Eng. 

Christmas  Cards  and  Calendars 

And  Xmas  Dressing 

We  represent 

E.  W.  Savory,  Ltd.,  Bristol— Real  Photogravure  Process 

View  Books  and  Post  Cards 

Vandyck  Printers,  Ltd.,  Bristol— Real  Photogravure  Process 

Blotting  Paper 

British  and  American  Mills 
Write  for  Prices  or  Information— TO-DAY. 

Menzies  &  Company,  Limited 

439  King  St.  W.  Toronto 


r,2 


Marketing  a  Product  Successfully 


1-^HE  success  attained  by  some  manufacturers 
in  putting  their  goods  on  the  market  and 
acquiring  for  them  a  national  reputation  has 
been  little  short  of  phenomenal,  particularly  when 
the  methods  of  some  of  them  are  thoroughly 
analyzed.  Most  of  these  successes  have  been  se- 
cured by  the  expenditure  of  tremendous  amounts 
of  money  for  advertising.  Whether  or  not  the 
same  results  could  have  been  secured  at  a  lesser 
cost  is  a  subject  for  fruitful  discussion. 

The  question  as  to  whether  a  larger  output  and 
a  more  decided  success  at  less  cost  could  not  have 
been  made  by  a  closer  co-operation  between 
manufacturer  and  retailer  is  one  that  is  now  occu- 
pying more  than  ever  the  minds  of  manufacturers, 
particularly  those  having  a  new  product  which 
they  are  desirous  of  featuring. 

The  method  generally  adopted  in  the  past  by  a 
manufacturer  having  a  meritorious  product  and 
desiring  to  make  it  nationally  known  is  first  to 
decide  upon  a  suitable  name,  and  then  if  he  has 
sufficient  capital  to  hie  himself  to  some  well  known 
advertising  agency  and  go  over  with  them  his 
plans  for  its  distribution  and  sale. 

Naturally  the  first  question  decided  upon  is  how 
much  money  is  to  be  appropriated.  After  that  is 
decided  it  is  up  to  the  advertising  man  to  lay  out  a 
campaign  specifying  the  various  ways  in  which  the 
money  is  to  be  spent.  He  lays  out  a  schedule  of 
the  various  amounts  to  be  expended  in  advertis- 
ing, including  street  car,  billboard,  newspaper  and 
general  magazines  to  the  full  amount  of  the  ad- 
vertising. In  very  rare  cases  is  the  retail  mer- 
chant, the  man  who  has  to  sell  the  merchandise, 
considered  in  the  general  plan,  the  argument  be- 
ing that  as  so  many  thousands  of  dollars  are  to  be 
expended  for  general  advertising  a  demand  will 
be  created  sufficiently  strong  to  actually  compel 
him  to  handle  the  merchandise  "willy  nilly." 

When  laying  out  a  campaign  few  advertising 
agents  realize  that  retailers  as  a  rule  pay  but 
little  attention  from  a  business  standpoint  to  the 
advertising  which  appears  in  dailies,  national 
magazines,  etc.,  the  principal  reason  for  which 
being  that  practically  every  business  to-day  has 
its  own  trade  journal.  The  retailer  usually  sub- 
scribes for  such  journals  as  are  published  in  the 
interests  of  his  particular  line  of  business  and 
looks  to  them  for  the  news  of  new  and  meritorious 
articles.  He  knows  that  the  publishers  of  these 
mediums  practically  spare  no  expense  in  furnish- 
ing their  subscribers  with  information  along  the 
lines  vital    to  the  success  of  their  business. 

The  trade  journal  is  usually  looked  upon  by  the 
retailer  as  a  mentor  and  guide  in  the  conduct  of 
his  business.  If  the  manufacturer  would  instruct 
his  advertising  agent  to  advertise  direct  through 
the  trade  paper  to  the  retailers  who  will  act  as 


distributors  of  his  goods,  allowing  him  to  use  his 
own  good  judgment  as  to  the  selection  of  the 
mediums,  an  opportunity  would  be  found  to  con- 
vince the  retailer  that  his  article  was  a  first-class 
one,  and  secure  a  co-operaticn  in  the  marketing 
of  it  that  would  be  of  immense  value  to  both 
parties. 

The  first  news  of  the  introduction  of  a  new  pro- 
duct should  not  come  to  the  retailer  through  the 
medium  of  a  possible  customer  inquiring  for  it. 
The  dealer  should  know  something  about  it  be- 
forehand, the  news  of  the  intended  plan  of  cam- 
paign should  be  announced  to  him  first,  so  that 
he  may  have  at  least  a  small  quantity  of  the  mer- 
chandise on  hand  when  it  is  first  called  for. 

Where  a  retailer  is  selling  an  article  of  a  similar 
character  upon  which  he  is  making  a  satisfactory 
profit  and  satisfying  his  customers'  at  the  same 
time,  he  very  often  naturally  resents  the  appear- 
ance of  a  newcomer.  The  manufacturer  must 
realize  that  the  retailer  is  going  to  look  at  the  new 
product  from  the  profit  side,  as  well  as  from  the 
actual  merit  of  the  article.  By  national  advertis- 
ing without  the  co-operation  of  the  retailer  a  spirit 
of  antagonism  is  created,  instead  of  a  spirit  of 
friendliness  and  co-operation,  which  should  be  the 
first  aim  of  the  manufacturer  to  secure. 

A  most  important  point  frequently  overlooked 
by  manufacturers  of  trade-marked  articles  is  that 
outside  of  the  big  cities  the  local  retail  merchants, 
the  ones  who  sell  reliable  goods  and  stand  high 
in  their  community,  have  a  wonderful  influence 
over  their  customers,  and  in  most  instances  their 
bare  word  is  sufficient  to  condemn  a  practically 
unknown  product.  On  the  other  hand  their  com- 
mendation is  all  that  is  necessary  to  effect  a  sale. 
When  manufacturers  realize  that  the  success  of 
the  distribution  of  their  product  largely  rests  with 
the  retailers'  cordial  acceptance  of  their  merchan- 
dise, and  they  act  accordingly,  then  judicious  ad- 
vertising will  produce  far  better  results  than  is 
frequently  the  case. 

To  sum  it  all  up :  A  manufacturer  makes  a  new 
and  meritorious  article.  He  places  it  on  the  mar- 
ket and  advertises  it  liberally.  He  believes  in  it 
and  hopes  for  success.  There  are,  however,  sev- 
eral conditions  which  are  absolutely  necessary  to 
accomplish  it.  First  the  quality  of  the  article 
itself;  second,  the  manner  in  which  it  is  put  up  for 
retailing,  and  third,  the  most  important  of  all,  the 
proper  advertising  of  it.  To  be  successful  the  ad- 
vertising must  include  the  retailer  just  as  much  as 
it  includes  the  consumer,  for  after  all  retailers  are 
consumers  in  a  large  way.  It  is  not  enough  to 
acquaint  the  public  with  the  merits  of  an  article ; 
the  retailer  must  also  be  informed.  This  is  the 
plan  which  has  been  adopted  by  practically  all 
the  manufacturers  of  specialties  which  have  had 
large  and  conspicuous  successes. 


33 


Editorial   Chronicle  and  Comment 


CHANCES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN 

ENDLESS  opportunity  for  advancement  has  been 
one  of  the  results  of  the  war  for  the  young 
men  and  women  in  business  life  in  Canada.  As  a 
result  of  the  general  speeding  up  which  was  caused 
by  the  acute  shortage  of  help  Canadians  as  a  nation 
are  working  harder  and  faster  than  ever  before.  In 
spite  of  all  this  activity  many  firms  have  been  finding 
it  impossible  to  handle  all  the  work  they  have  on 
hand.  In  order  to  keep  everything  moving  and 
'"carry  on"  to  the  best  of  their  ability  many  firms 
have  given  youths  who  only  a  short  time,  ago  were 
the  rawest  apprentices  all  kinds  of  responsibilities. 
Many  young  men  to-day  are  handling  jobs  which 
formerly  were  reserved  for  veterans.  The  value  of 
training  was  never  perhap-  more  forcibly  emphasized 
in  the  history  of  the  Dominion  than  since  the  war 
started.  The  young  men  upon  whom  responsibility 
was  thrown  realized  at  once  that  one  of  the  quickest 
ways  of  rising  to  the  occasion  and  making  good  was 
to  read  the  best  books  and  magazines  published  in 
connection  with  their  particular  line  of  work.  The 
value  of  the  technical  books  and  magazines  has  been 
demonstrated  in  thousands  of  ca-es  by  the  progress 
they  have  enabled  ambitious  young  men  to  make. 
These  young  men  have  been  making  good  because 
they  concentrated  with  all  their  energies  upon  the 
tasks  in  band  and  many  of  them  have  advanced  more 
in  the  past  four  years  than  they  would  under  or- 
dinary circumstances  in  ten.  They  have  taken  and 
are  still  taking  advantage  of  every  opportunity  to 
forge  ahead.  Many  of  them  in  the  next  few  years 
will  take  leading  places  in  the  commercial  life  of 
Canada  and  they  owe  their  chances  for  rapid  de- 
velopment to  the  war. 


THE  RETAILERS-  SATISFACTORY  POSIT  10  ;< 

AFTER  four  years  of  war  and  all  the  hardships 
that  war  conditions  entailed,  the  retail  merchant 
is '"in  the  most  satisfactory  position  that  he  has  ever 
been.  Henry  Detchon,  secretary  of  the  Credit  Men's 
Association,  in  a  recent  address  stated  that  the  Asso- 
ciation had  reports,  complete  in  every  detail,  on 
every  retail  merchant  in  Canada.  These  records 
show  every  amount  that  is  owing,  every  amount 
that  is  overdue  and  how  payments  are  being  met, 
and  Mr.  Detchon  states  that  there  never  was  a  time 
when  conditions  were  so  favorable. 

"A  great  many  merchants,"  he  stated,  ''who  three 
or  four  years  ago  found  it  necessary  to  take  long 
credit   terms,  are  now   taking  their  cash   discounts. 


When   a   merchant   gets   into   that  position,  he  can 
assuredly  be  assigned  to  the  prosperous  class." 


PRACTICAL  EDUCATION 

EXTENSION  of  industrial  and  technical  educa- 
tion and  the  getting  away  to  a  great  extent  of 
a  lot  of  the  more  or  less  useless  things  at  present 
in  the  curriculum,  seems  to  be  the  policy  which 
Hon.  Dr.  Cody,  Minister  of  Education,  is  adopting. 
From  the  standpoint  of  business  men  and  manufac- 
turers, this  is  a  move  in  the  right  direction.  One  of 
the  great  complaints  of  commercial  men  in  connec- 
tion with  modern  schools  was  that  the  product  they 
turned  out  was  not  fitted  to  take  its  place  in  the 
stores,  the  factories  or  the  warehouses  and  do  the 
work  competently.  A  great  deal  of  extra  training 
was  nearly  always  necessary.  Hon.  Dr.  Cody  La 
planning)  it  is  stated,  as  a.  start  of  his  new  policy, 
to  establish  industrial  and  technical  schools  in  the 
Brant  ford,  St.  Catharines,  Welland,  Thorold  dis- 
tricts, where  a  great  deal  of  manufacturing  is  done. 
Other  schools,  it  is  expected,  will  be  opened  later. 
Hon.  Dr.  Cody  has  stated  that  if  the  Dominion 
Government  will  do  for  technical  and  industrial 
education  what  it  has  done  for  agriculture  great 
advances  can  be  attained,  and  many  men  who  might. 
be  a  drag  on  the  community  will  become  an  asset. 


ON  BEING  A  BOOKSELLER 

THE  business  of  being  a  bookseller  is,  or  should 
be.  not  only  a  source  of  keen  satisfaction,  but  one 
that  carries  with  it  a  consciousness  of  high  respon- 
sibility. The  bookseller  should  be  jealous  of  his 
reputation  as  a  capable  member  of  his  trade,  or 
shall  we  say  his  profession,  and  if,  combined  with 
this,  he  is  a  really  able  and  an  ambitious  man  of 
business,  his  lot  will  be  an  enviable  one  indeed, 
because  he  will  derive  from  his  vocation  a  sense  of 
true  happiness  and  at  the  same  time  lay  by  a  suffi- 
cient competence  for  the  evening  of  life. 

We  recall  an  interesting  conversation  we  had  on 
one  occasion  with  a  bookseller  who  expressed,  in 
what  seemed  to  be  rather  remarkable  terms,  his  gen- 
eral aim  in  establishing  the  bookstore  he  had  but 
recently  opened  in  one  of  the  larger  cities.  It  was 
not  only  to  build  up  a  successful  business — one 
from  which  he  would  realize  goodly  pecuniary  bene- 
fits— but  to  make  that  bookstore  one  of  such  a  stand- 
ing that,  besides  becoming  a  leading  concern  of  its 
kind,  it  would  develop  into  an  institution  that  would 
engender  in  the  community  a  special  degree  of  civic 


34 


P»  ( )  OKS  E  L  L  E  R     AND     S  T  A  T  I  0  NER 


pride,  and  become  for  him  the  material  evidence  of 
a  life-work  that  would  ever  be  a  credit  to  him,  and 
stand  as  a  lasting  memorial  of  a  distinctly  worth- 
while career. 

Now,  to  have  an  ambition  like  that  may  sound 
rather  too  altruistic  for  some  readers  of  Bookseller 
and  Stationer/'  but  the  more  they  allow  their 
minds  to  dwell  on  it,  the  more  strongly  will  this  idea 
appeal  to  them. 

Such  thoughts  will  lead  booksellers  to  take  a 
greater  pride  in  the  vocation  in  which  they  are  en- 
gaged and  the  greater  will  be  the  degree  of  genuine 
satisfaction  they  take  in  being  booksellers. 

Without  saying  anything  disparaging  about  any 
of  the  other  branches  of  retail  trade,  there  is,  beyond 
all  question,  a  very  special  reason  for  a  bookseller 
who  is  really  worthy  of  that  term,  to  be  proud  of 
the  particular  commercial  role  for  which  he  is  cast. 
There  are  a  goodly  number  of  .stores  which  ap- 
proximate to  this  ideal,  but  on  the  other  hand,  there 
are  too  many  alleged  bookseller-  who  do  not  really 
love  good  books  for  their  actual  worth  and  what 
they  represent  in  life  as  a  cultural  influence,  bin 
who.  on  the  contrary,  arc  interested  solely  in  the 
financial  aspect  of  books,  as  merchandise  from  the 
selling  of  which  they  may  amass  profits  as  they 
would  in  selling  fish,  buttons  or  cod  liver  oil. 

If  booksellers  will  but  get  the  proper  perspective 
they  will  not  only  quit  saying  that  the  book  business 
is  not  a  profitable  one,  but  the  interest  they  will 
arouse  in  themselves  by  taking  a  real  joy  in  the 
-elling  of  hooks  will  inspire  in  them  such  enthus- 
iasm that  new  avenues  for  selling  more  and  more 
books  will  continually  suggest  them.-elves,  and,  na- 
turally, if  the  bookseller  himself  appreciably  im- 
proves his  bookselling  capacity,  in  like  mariner  will 
all  his  assistants  become  more  efficient. 


NEW  BANKRUPTCY  ACT 

WHILE  no  action  has  as  yet  been  taken  by  the 
committee  which  was  named  to  work  out  the 
details  of  a  Bankruptcy  Act  that  will  be  less  cum- 
bersome than  the  legislation  that  is  at  present  in 
effect,  it  is  expected  that  a  meeting  will  be  held 
shortly  and  that  recommendations  will  be  made  to 
be  presented  at  the  next  session  of  Parliament.  The 
question  is  one  that  is  of  much  importance,  both  to 
manufacturers  and  jobbers  and  the  whole  trade  who 
have  been  greatly  inconvenienced  by  the  lengthy 
process  of  the  law  as  it  now  stands.  Considerable 
expense  is  attached  to  the  present  methods  and  it 
is  expected  that  a  quick  working  act  that  will  re- 
duce expenses  to  a  minimum  will  be  suggested. 


WANTS  A   CENSOR  OF  BOOKS 

AN  editorial  in  the  Ontario  Reformer,  Oshawa, 
Out.,  advocate-  the  appointment  of  a  book  cen- 
sor— on  the  hypothesis  that  there  is  even  more  reason 
for  this  than  for  a  censor  of  moving  pictures.  The 
editorial  says  in  part  :■ — 

"Germany  has  shown  us  what  it  means  to  have 
her  educationalist.-  writing  and  teaching  false  ideals. 
Unless  there  is  some  check  put  upon  the  large  class 
of  writers  who  cater  almost  exclusively  to  the  sen- 
sual sentiment,  a  harvest  of  immorality  must  re- 
sult. A  large  percentage  of  the  cheaper  books  are 
saturated  with  it.  Tf  books  can  only  be  made  cheaply 
by  putting  such  stuff  in  them,  it  would  be  a  thou- 
sand times  better  if  there  were  no  cheap  hooks,  as 
we  believe  the  future  will  amply  demonstrate." 


ON  THE  WRONG  SCENT 

THE   retailer  who  spends  a  great   proportion  of 
his  time  in  such  hair-splitting  as  searching  out 
by  correspondence  and  other  time-consuming  meth- 
ods how  he  may  save  a  few  cents  on  a  purchase  of  an 
individual    item   that   may    perhaps   represent    but 
a  very  small  amount  in  total  sales  during  the  year, 
is  on  the  wrong  scent!     His  time  would  be  far  bet- 
ter occupied  in  keeping  feelers  out  and  maintaining 
a  receptive  mood  toward  propositions  to  make  more 
money.     As  an  example,  let  us  consider  books.     In- 
stead of  allowing  his  mind  to  dwell  in  a  pessimistic 
manner   on   the   propable   total   disappearance   this 
year  of  the  $1.25  novel  and  a  relatively  greater  pro- 
portion of  novels  published  at  $1.50  and  higher,  his 
attention  should  be  fixed  in   an  enquiring  manner 
as  to  the  selling  potentialities  of  the  new  novels  that 
will  appear  in  the  ensuing  publishing  season.  That  is 
a  bigger  consideration  in  the  measure  of  his  pros- 
pective success,  than  the  influence  of  prices  at  which 
the  new  novels  are  to  be  sold  at. 


WHO  WILL  REPLACE  LLELP? 

THE   fact   that  aliens  are  leaving  Canada  at  the 
rate  of  about  10,000  a  month  i>  causing  many 
manufacturers  and  other-  to  wonder  where  they  arl 
going  to  get  the  help  that  they  need  for  business  that 
i<  not  only  in  sight,  but  future  business.    Steamship 
authorities  state  that  every  boat  leaving  for  Europe 
is  packed  to  capacity  with  foreigners  who  are  going 
home  to  see  relatives  they  have  not  been  able  to  get 
to  for  four  years.     On  many  of  the  steamship  lines 
it  is  stated  that  all  accommodation  is  booked  for 
weeks  ahead.     This  situation  is  already  making  it- 
self felt  in  many  factories,  especially  across  the  line 
where  aliens  do  a  large  part  of  certain  types  of  labor. 
It  is  argued  that  the  help  from  munitions  plants  and 
the  soldiers  coming  home  will  fill  all  vacancies.     It 
would  appear  according  to  those  who  are  in  closest 
touch  with  the  situation  that  there  will  be  plenty  of 
work  at  good  wages  for  everyone  in  Canada  who 
wants  to  work.     The  exodus  of  aliens,  it  is  stated,  is 
steadily  increasing.       Thousands  of  Russians  who 
were  unable  to  secure  passage  to  Europe  via  Montreal 
or  New  York  owing  to  tbe  rush  of  bookings  are 
going  home  the  long  way,  via  Yokahama  and  Vladi- 
vostok.    The  majority  of  these  men  worked  in  steel 
or  rolling  mills  and  on  account  of  their  strength 
were  especially  in  demand.     Just  who  is  going  te 
replace  them  is  a  problem  that  has  got  some  manu- 
facturers guessing. 
35 


Commissions  or  Bonuses  on  Sales 


COMMISSION    OR    BONUS? 

Have  you  adopted  the  plan  of  paying  a  com- 
missio'n  or  bonus  to  assistants  to  accelerate  their 
sales?  •  If  so,  write  the  editor  setting  forth  how 
the  pla'n  has  worked  out  in  your  store,  or  at  least 
join  in  the  discussion  on  this  subject  which  is 
Hegun  in  this  issue.  Let  us  have  something  from 
\ou  for  the  March   issue. — The  Editor. 


Representative  Canadian  Booksellers  and  Stationers  Discuss 

This  Live  Question — Some  Ideas  of  Great  Value  to 

Retailers  Are  Thus  Brought  Out 


D 


0  you  pay  a  commission  or 
bonus  to  your  clerks  on  their 
sales? 

Have  you  adopted  any  other  method 
encouraging  competition  among  the 
clerks'  to   encourage   greater   sales? 

Any  comments  on  this  subject  on  your 
part  will  be  greatly  appreciated  as  a 
help  in  the  preparation  of  an  article  for 
an  earlv  issue  of  BOOKSELLER  &  STA- 
TIONER." 

The  foregoing  questions  were  sent  out 
to  a  number  of  Canadian  retail  book- 
seller^ and  stationers,  and  brought  some 
most  interesting  replies,  which  appear 
in  connection  with  this  article. 

Should  extra  commissions  or  bonuses 
be  paid  to  the  sales  force  above  regular 
salaries?  Does  this  scheme  work  out 
to  the  benefit  of  the  proprietor  of  the 
store,  and  which  particular  method  of 
this  general  nature  is  preferable? 

These  questions  are  vitally  interest- 
ing to  every  retailer,  and  a  frank  and 
full  discussion  of  them  in  the  pages  of 
ROOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  can- 
not fail  to  be  productive  of  a  great  de- 
cree of  benefit  to  the  trade.  The  sug- 
gestion of  F.  E.  Osborne  of  Calgary,  in 
his  letter,  that  stationers  throughout  the 
Dominion  should  contribute  their  best 
thought  on  this  question  to  this  discus- 
sion in.  the  trade  paper,  is  a  good  one 
and  it  is  earnestlv  to  be  hoped  that  such 
contributions  will  be  forthcoming.  In 
this  connection  the  older  and  more  ex- 
perienced members  of  the  trade  should 
feel  a  special  degree  of  responsibility. 
Thev  can  do  much  to  guide  the  footsteps 
of  the  beginners  and  younger  men  of  the 
trade.  Co-operation  such  as  this  cannot 
be  other  than  mutually  beneficial,  em- 
bracing all  members  of  the  Canadian 
book  and  stationery  trade.  Mr.  McRae, 
of  Prince  Rupert,  touches  upon  another 
good  point  in  the  work  which  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER,  in  the  ab- 
sence of  a  trade  association  in  Canada, 
is  thus  carrying:  on.  His  suggestion  that 
Canadian  stationers  should  organize,  is 
timely;  and  it  is  somewhat  of  a  coinci- 
dence that  steps  are  actually  at  this  time 
being  taken,  looking  toward  the  forma- 
tion of  a  local  association  of  Toronto 
stationers. 

Coming  back  from  this  digression  to 
bonus  would  be  increased  pro  rata  to  the 
a  nunVber  of  most  interesting  letters 
from   retailers  follow: 

Favors  Bonus  System 

Caleary,  Dec.  28,  1918. 
Editor,,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 
I  have  your  favor  of  the  14th  inst.  in- 
quiring as  to  whether  I  had  adopted  any 
bonus  or  commission  system   in  connec- 


tion with  my  staff.  In  reply  I  beg  to 
state  that  I  have  been  looking  for  a 
satisfactory  bonus  system  for  some  time 
and  have  endeavored  to  procure  books 
dealing  with  this  system  in  its  relations 
to  retail  business,  but  I  have  been  able 
to  find  very  little  on  the  subject.  My 
business  year  ends  Feb.  28th,  and  on 
Mar.  1st  last  I  informed  my  staff  that 
if  the  net  result  to  me  as  at  Feb.  28th, 
1919,  were  enual  to  the  net  result  as  at 
Feb.  28th,  1918,  I  would  pay  an  extra 
month's  salary  to  those  who  had  been  ir 
my  employ  for  the  year.  If  the  results 
were  better  than  the  preceding  year  the 
bonus  would  be  increase''  •>  "*■*»**»  *•*■«• 
increase  in  the  net  results,  and  if  the 
net  results  were  less  than  the  previous 
year  the  bonus  would  be  decreased  in 
the  same  way. 

I  am  aware  that  the  weakness  of  this 
arrangement  is  that  the  efforts  of  the 
staff  as  a  whole  are  pooled  instead  of 
each  individual  member  of  the  staff  be- 
ing treated  on  the  net  result  of  their 
own  work,  but  in  a  business  which  is 
not  thoroughly  departmentalized,  it  is 
very  difficult  to  get  at  the  exact  resu't 
of  any  person's  individual  work.  There 
is  also  the  executive  staff,  helpers,  jan- 
itor, buyers,  etc.,  to  consider,  and  thi3 
can  hardly  be  estimated  on  a  sales  basis 
only. 

I  believe  that  my  plan  is  a  good  one 
providing  one  has  a  carefully  selected 
conscientious  staff,  as  I  believe  I  have, 
and  while  the  best  results  will  not  be 
shown  the  ffrst  year,  I  believe  that  when 
the  staff  receive  their  bonus  in  March 
next  they  will  realize  to  a  fuller  extent 
how  their  individual  effort  might  have 
increased  or  decreased  their  amount  ac- 
cording as  to  how  they  succeeded  or 
failed  in  their  own  particular  work. 

I  am  glad  that  you  are  taking  up  this 
matter  and  hope  that  the  stationers  gen- 
erally throughout  Canada  will  contribute 
their  best  thought  on  the  matter,  so  that 
a  satisfactory  arrangement,  which  will 
recognize  faithful  service,  may  be  ar- 
rived at. 

With  kind  regards  and  best  wishes  for 
the  new  year,  I  am, 

Yours   ti-ulv, 

F.  E.  OSBORNE. 

Contests  Liven  Sales 

London,  Dec.  18,  1918. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 

We  pay  salaries  based  on  a  man;s 
earning  power  to  the  business,  whether 
sales  or  otherwise,  and  use  extreme 
frankness  in  advising  all  just  what  we 
feel  is  possible  and  what  is  secured. 

We  occasionally  "sweeten"  this  with 
a  contest  of  some  kind  for  a  short  time 
36 


only,  sometimes  on  a  special  line  of 
goods.  For  instance,  we  now  have  a  cash 
prize  for  from  the  15th  to  the  25th  of 
December,  based  as  follows:  We  take 
the  percentage  of  customers  sold  by  each 
man,  add  it  to  percentage  of  average 
sales  of  each  salesman  as  compared  with 
total  average  sale. 

The  price  is  small,  but  the  interest 
keen,  because  by  this  method  the  small- 
est clerk  selling  cards,  for  instance,  ow- 
ing to  the  number  of  customers  he  has, 
has  just  as  much  chance  to  win  as  the 
larger  average  sale.  For  instance,  this 
morning  our  entire  selling  force  of  ten 
are  all  with  a  mark  between  23  and  30. 
Yours  very  truly, 

J.  B.  HAY. 

Association   Needed 

Prince  Rupert,  B.C.,  Dec.  24,  19*8. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 

Replying  to  your  inquiry  of  the  14th 
instant. 

In  reply  would  say  that  we  do  not 
pay  clerks  a  commission  on  sales.  How- 
ever, we  believe  the  practice  is  right 
wherever  it  can  be  applied. 

Our  only  stimulus  to  increased  sales 
is  keeping  a  record  of  all  sales  by  each 
clerk  in  each  department.    This  is  good. 

We  are  glad  to  see  you  working  alon^ 
these  lines  in  the  absence  of  a  Dominion 
Stationers'  Association.  But  there  should 
be  an  organization  of  the  stationers  of 
Canada  for  the  study  of  this  and  sundry 
other  problems  that  we  are  all  inter- 
ested in.  It  will  come  some  day.  Why 
not  in  the  year  1919?  The  writer  would 
like  to  see  the  stationers  of  Toronto  take 
the  initiative  for  such  an  organization. 
Yours  truly, 
McRAE    BROS.,   LTD., 

D.  C.  McRAE. 

Would   Encourage  Clerks 

Windsor,  Ont.,  Dec.  28,  1918. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 

In  reply  to  your  enquiry  of  the  14th, 
I  have  never  paid  a  commission  or  bonus, 
but  have  several  times  thought  of  doing 
so,  but  did  not  carry  out  the  intention 
on  account  of  lack  of  information  as  to 
some  basis  to  work  upon. 

I  have  never  adopted  any  scheme  t} 
encourage  competition  among  the 
clerks,  but  my  cash  register  gives  me 
the  amount  of  each  clerk's  sales,  but  I 
do  not  give  them  any  information  as  to 
the  results. 

I  am  very  glad  you  are  preparing  an 
article  on  this  subject  as  I  intend  to 
adont  some  sort  of  scheme  to  encourage 
clerks  to  do  something  more  than  tie  up 
parcels  and  take  the  money. 
Yours   truly, 

C.  E.  COPELAND. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Stimulates  Sales 

Calgary,  Dec.  30,  1918. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 
Replying  to  yours  of  14th  inst.  regard- 
ing method  of  payment  of  clerks.     The 
writer  has  always  been  a   strong  advo- 
cate   of    paying    a    commission    on     the 
sales,    and     favors     paying     a    specified 
salary  with  a  1  per  cent,  or  2  per  cent, 
commission  on  sales,  as  we  believe  that 
this  stimulates   sales  to  a   great  extent. 
Yours   truly, 
D.  J.  YOUNG  &  CO.,  LTD. 
Per  D.  J.  YOUNG. 

Helps  Slow  and  New  Lines 
Among  the  replies  received  from  the 
editor's  queries  sent  out  on  this  subject 
was  one  from  Albert  Geen,  Belleville, 
Ont.  To  the  question  "Do  you  pay  a 
commission  or  bonus  to  your  clerks  on 
their  sales?"  he  replied: 

"Yes,  on  certain  goods  I  wish  to  push." 
"Have  you  adopted  any  other  method 
for  encouraging  competition   among  the 
clerks    to    encourage    greater    sales?" 

"Use  cash  register  showing  number 
of  sales  and  amount  of  sales." 

Mr.  Geen  further  stated  that  if  he 
realized  that  an  article  needed  clearing 
out  he  put  a  commission  on  it,  and  the 
same  method  was  adopted  in  the  case 
of  new  lines  he  wanted  pushed. 

A  representative  of  BOOKSELLER  &. 
STATIONER  had  an  interview  with  the 
manager  of  the  stationery  department 
in  one  of  the  large  Toronto  stores,  but 
he  preferred  that  his  identity  should  not 
be  disclosed.  As  to  paying  a  straight 
commission  on  sales,  he  said  he  had  tried 


this,  but  it  was  not  successful  for  the 
reason  that  the  salesmen  invariably 
pushed  the  newest  and  easiest  selling 
goods,  to  the  neglect  of  the  goods  that 
the  firm  was  most  anxious  to  have 
moved  out.  For  this  reason  the  plan  is 
being  dropped,  and  in  place  of  it  a  re- 
vised plan  is  being  put  into  force  where- 
by a  higher  commission  will  be  paid  tc 
salespersons  on  goods  that  have  been 
slow  movers.  This  will  encourage  extra 
efforts  on  their  part  to  sell  such  goods 
and  thus  a  great  step  will  be  taken  to- 
ward keeping  the  whole  stock  clean. 

Another  Toronto  store  with  four 
clerks  has  adopted  this  scheme:  Each 
clerk  has  a  stated  drawing  allowance, 
which  forms  part  of  the  general  plan  by 
which  each  one  gets  a  commission  of  8 
per  cent,  on  his  sales.  In  the  case  of  the 
clerk  supervising  the  window  trimming, 
which  naturally  takes  quite  a  proportion 
of  his  time,  a  special  additional  com- 
pensation has  been  worked  out.  In  this 
store  the  commissions  in  1918  naturally 
varied  in  the  case  of  the  different  sales- 
men, but  their  total  earnings  were  nearly 
$7,000  in  commission,  an  average  of 
about  $1,700  each.  The  weekly  drawing 
f'l^wance  is,  of  course,  included  in 
this  amount.  The  proprietor  has 
found  that  sales  have  shown  such  a 
marked  increase  that  it  would  be  bad 
business  for  him  to  drop  this  profitable 
arrangement.  It  is  a  good  step  in  the 
direction  of  trade  co-operation,  by  which 
the  employee  shares  in  the  growth  and 
expansion  of  the  business  with  which  he 
is   identified. 


UNFAIR  COMPETITION 

The  Bookseller  and  Stationer, 

Toronto,   Ontario. 
Gentlemen: — 

Why  do  the  makers  of  well-known  and 
reliable  fountain  pens  allow  their  sales- 
men to  sell  in  the  cities  to  druggists, 
leather  goods  stores  and  dry  goods 
people  ?  It  is  not  treating  the  stationers 
fairly.  In  some  cases  the  buyer  will 
purchase  his  pen  from  a  druggist,  and 
then  coolly  walk  into  a  stationery  store 
and  have  his  pen  filled  when  it  is  empty 
and  repeatedly  fill  it  again.  The  same 
thing  applies  to  papeteries.  Some  of 
the  travelling  salesmen  think  they  do 
well,  when  they  come  to  cities  like 
Halifax  and  St.  John  and  make  sales 
to  the  dry  goods  people,  druggists  and 
others,  who  have  no  connection  with  the 
stationery  trade,  and  they  don't  realize 
thev  are  likely  to  lose  the  stationers' 
trade. 

A   HALIFAX   STATIONER. 


L.  J.  M.  Plouffe,  of  Kenora,  has  been 
added  to  the  traveling  staff  of  Stedman 
Bros.,  Brantford.  He  will  cover  North- 
western Ontario,  Manitoba,  Saskatche- 
wan and  Alberta. 

In  view  of  his  approaching  marriage, 
the  staff  of  the  Beaverton  Toy  Co.,  Ltd., 
presented  James  C.  Smith,  general  su- 
perintendent of  the  company  with  a 
handsome  clock  as  a  token  of  their  es- 
teem. 


Current  Events  in  Photograph 


COMMERCIAL  FLYING 

The  public  is  just  be- 
ginning to  realize  the 
immense  possibilities  of 
c  o  m  m  ercial  aviation. 
The  war  gave  more  im- 
petus to  flying  than  it 
would  have  gained  under 
normal  conditions  i  n 
years.  Not  everyone 
knows  that  nearly  ten 
billions  of  dollars  are 
now  invested  by  the  vari- 
ous Governments  in  air 
craft  of  one  sort  and  an- 
other. It  is  not  planned 
to  let  this  huge  invest- 
ment lie  idle  just  because 
the  war  is  over  and  some 
of  the  huge  planes,  like 
the  one  in  the  picture,  are 
already  in  use  and  big 
developments  along  com- 
mercial lines  are  taking 
place.  The  direct  routes 
possible  by  air  and  the 
great  speed  the  planes 
can  make  will  take  many 
days  off  the  records  at- 
tainable even  by  the  fast- 
est trains. 


37 


Help  Retailers  With  Sales  Plans 


WANT    POSTAGE    REDUCED 

It  waa  decided  to  petition  the  authorities  at 
Ottawa  to  take  off  the  extra  one  cent  war  tax 
stamp  on  postcards',  in  keeping  with  the  decision 
in  the  United  States  to  abolish  war  tax  postage. 
In  the  United  Stafes  this  is  to  take  effect  July  1, 
next. 


Postcard  and  Greeting  Card  Association  Reach  This  Decision 

at  Annual  Meeting 


ONE  of  the  most  progressive  steps 
taken  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the 
Post  Card  and  Greeting  Card  As- 
sociation of  Canada,  held  in  Toronto  on 
Jan.  17,  was  the  decision  to  have  the 
memhers  bring  to  the  next  quarterly 
meeting  in  April  suggestions  for  work- 
ing out  definite  plans  for  helping  the 
retailers  to  sell  more  greeting  cards  and 
postcards,  and  incidentally  give  them 
practical  suggestions  along  the  line  of 
their  own  advertising,  as  well  as  window 
and  store  displays  of  these  goods  and 
show  card  ideas.  In  this  connection 
several  of  the  members  spoke  in  terms 
of  high  appreciation  of  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER,  and  emphasized  the 
value  of  the  trade  paper  for  dissemin- 
ating among  the  dealers  inspirational 
and  practical,  useful  matter  along  these 
lines. 

Want  Postage  Reduced 

On  motion  of  J.  W.  Dyas  and  J.  Bal- 
lentine,  it  was  decided  to  communicate 
with  the  Postmaster-General  with  the 
view  of  having  the  extra  cent  postage 
on  postcards  removed,  and  pointing  out 
that  this  action  is  being  taken  in  the 
United  States,  where  extra  war  postage 
will  be  abolished,  taking  effect  July  1 
next.  A  petition  will  be  prepared  to  be 
forwarded  to  the  authorities  at  Ottawa 
in  due  course. 

The  election  of  officers  resulted  in 
the  return  of  last  year's  officers  as  fol- 
lows:— 

President— T.    J.    Pugh. 

Vice-President — J.  W.  Dyas. 

Sec'y-Treasurer — W.    Banks. 

Asst.   Secretary — John   Morgan. 

Two  visitors  from  United  States  greet- 
ing card  publishing  houses  were  present, 
;:nd  were  able  to  offer  some  good  sugges- 
tions of  a  preliminary  nature  as  to  a 
course  to  pursue  in  arranging  to  extend 
active  help  to  the  retail  dealers  in  the 
way  of  practical  selling  suggestions  and 
services  which  the  association  may  ren- 
der by  joint  action,  and  they  told  of 
some  of  tire  results  that  had  been  ac- 
complished along  similar  lines  on  the 
part  of  trade  associations  in  the  United 
States. 

These  United  States  organizations  will 
be  communicated  with,  and  the  result 
will  doubtless  be  a  measure  of  co-opera- 
tion from  that  quarter  as  well.  This 
may  reasonably  be  anticipated  in  view  of 
the  very  great  proportion  of  greeting 
cards  and  postcards  made  by  United 
States,  concerns,  which  are  sold  each 
year  in  Canada. 

The  Association,  while  originally  or- 
ganized by  jobbing  concerns  with  in- 
terests   largely    linked    up    with    United 


States  and  British  producing  companies, 
is  by  no  means  unappreciative  of  the 
great  progress  that  has  been  made  by 
Canadian  publishers  of  greeting  cards; 
and  special  efforts  are  to  be  made  to  get 
every  Canadian  house  that  produces 
greeting  cards   into  the  Association. 

It  is  a  broad-spirited  organization,  re- 
cognizing the  necessarily  divergent  in- 
terests of  the  several  classes  of  con- 
cerns constituting  the  membership,  but 
keeping  in  mind  the  important  broader 
interests  that  are  common  to  all,  and 
the  great  need  there  is  for  united  action 
with  every  shoulder  to  the  wheel — so  as 
to  promote  with  the  greatest  possible 
efficiency  the  best  interests  of  the  greet- 
ing card  and  postcard  trade  of  Canada. 


THE   CHRISTMAS   CARD 

The  Christmas  card  is  the  legitimate 
descendant  of  the  "school  pieces"  or 
"Christmas  pieces"  which  were  popular 
from  the  beginning  to  the  middle  of  the 
Nineteenth  Century.  These  were  sheets 
of  writing  paper,  sometimes  surrounded 
with  those  hideous  and  elaborate  pen 
scrolls,  etc.,  so  unnaturally  dear  to  the 
hearts  of  writing  masters,  and  sometimes 
headed  with  copperplate  engravings, 
nlain  or  colored.  These  were  used  by 
schoolboys  at  the  approach  of  the  holi- 
days for  carefully-written  letters  exploit- 
ing the  progress  they  had  made  in  com- 
position and  chirography.  Charity  boys 
were  large  purchasers  of  these  pieces, 
says  one  writer,  and  at  Christmas  time 
used  to  take  them  around  their  Parish 


to  show,  and  at  the  same  time  solicit  a 
trifle. 

The  Christmas  card  proper  had  its 
tentative  origin  in  1846.  Joseph  Cundall, 
a  London  artist,  claims  to  have  issued 
the  first  in  that  year.  It  was  printed 
in  lithography,  colored  by  hand,  and  was 
of  the  usual  size  of  a  lady's  card. 

Not  until  1862,  however,  did  the  cus- 
tom obtain  any  foothold.  Then  experi- 
ments were  made  with  cards  of  the  size 
of  an  ordinary  carte  de  visite,  inscribed 
simply,  "A  Merry  Christmas,"  and  "A 
Happy  New  Year."  After  that  robins, 
holly  branches,  embossed  figures,  and 
landscapes  were  added. 

BARSE  &  HOPKINS  ABSORB  TWO 
CONCERNS 

Barse  &  Hopkins,  the  book  and  art 
publishers,  28  West  23rd  street,  announce 
the  purchase  of  the  H.  L.  Woehler  greet- 
ing card  business,  including  machinery, 
dies,  etc.,  and  also  that  of  the  United 
Art  Publishing  Co.,  New  York,  manufac- 
turers of  gift  cards,  seals,  tags  and  ac- 
cessories, thus  combining  with  their  art 
calendars  and  gift  books  a  most  thor- 
ough and  complete  line  for  holiday  and 
everyday  needs.  Joseph  Goldman,  of  the 
United  Art  Co.,  will  be  prominently  con- 
nected with  the  Barse  &  Hopkins  Co., 
and  will  call  upon  his  regular  trade  as 
usual,  as  will  Mr.  Silberstein,  of  the 
United.  H.  L.  Woehler  will  retire  to  a 
farm  of  72  acres,  known  as  the  Clover 
Leaf  Farm,  Little  Britain,  N.Y.,  near 
Newburgh.— "Geyer's    Stationer." 


LOOSE  LEAF  WEEK  BOOSTS  BUSINESS 

Fostered  by  the  Stationers'  Association  of  the  United  States — 
Prospects  of  Organization  of  Canadian  Stationers 


JANUARY  6th  to  11th  was  Loose 
Leak  Week  throughout  the  chief 
cities  of  the  United  States,  this 
idea  being  fostered  by  the  National  As- 
sociation of  Stationers.  To  show  Cana- 
dian stationers  the  benefit  of  such  con- 
certed action,  the  following  is  quoted 
from  the  Philadelphia  correspondence  of 
the  last  issue  of  the  American  Stationer: 
"All  along  the  central  business  dis- 
tricts, the  leading  stationers  of  the  city 
devoted  windows,  counters  and  shelves 
to  displaying  ledgers,  sales  books,  bin- 
ders and  forms  to  be  used  in  the  various 
professions.  Much  trade  came  to  dealers 
who  found  sales  booming  in  the  lines 
thus  advertised.  But  this  was  only  the 
outward  show;  really  as  effective,  per- 
haps even  more  telling  work  was  done 
38 


by  the  demonstrations  inside,  and  the 
publicity  given  through  various  chan- 
nels. But  best  of  all  was  the  personal 
campaigns  carried  on  by  the  loose  leaf 
salesmen,  who  during  the  week,  visited 
every  large  consumer  and  a  multitude  of 
small  ones,  to  carry  the  gospel  of  the 
labor  and  time  saving  of  the  manifold 
loose  leaf  devices  which  are  on  the  mar- 
ket to  supply  every  conceivable  need." 
Association  fer  Canada 
By  another  month  it  is  hoped  to  have 
something  definite  to  report  regarding 
the  new  movement  on  foot  to  organize 
the  stationers  of  Canada  into  an  associa- 
tion that  will  work  in  harmony  with  the 
efficient  stationers'  association  which 
ras  accomplished  so  much  for  the  trade 
r.cross  the  international  border. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATION  Kit 


!      LEAVES  FROM  THE 
I  OTHER  FELLOW'S  BOOK 


iiiihiiimiiHiiiMiiiimiiiiiui 


FALLACY  OF   CANCELLATIONS 

Stationers  who  may  be  thinking  of 
cancelling  their  orders  for  the  purpose 
of  securing  lower  prices  later  on,  should 
note  that  the  manufacturing  costs, 
which  control  prices,  are  showing  no 
signs  of  a  decline. 

To  cancel  now  means  simply  that  you 
will  have  to  re-order-  the  same  goods 
you  declined — with  a  loss  of  time  in  de- 
liveries, a  loss  of  faith  in  you  by  the 
manufacturer — and  you'll  be  extremely 
lucky  if  you  will  be  able  to  buy  the  same 
goods  at  the  former  prices.  It's  a  pretty 
yood  bet  that  you  will  not  only  pay  the 
original  price,  but  a  nice  little  premium 
in  addition  in  the  form  of  advanced  quo- 
tations on  many  lines. 

If  the  cancellation  bee  is  buzzing 
'round  you,  strafe  him  at  once.  It  will 
be  one  way  of  making  money,  for  the 
money  you  do  not  have  to  pay  as  a 
higher  price,  is  simply  so  much  money 
to  the  good. — "Geyer's   Stationer." 

CONDUCTED  PRIZE  CONTEST 

At  E.  H.  Bridger's  book,  stationeiy 
and  fancy  goods  store  there  were  live 
free  prizes  offered  to  lucky  customers 
du-ing  the  Christmas  season,  and  there 
was  much  ln-ciest  ';aken  in  ilie  'Oiitest, 
Kach  customer  was  given  a  receipt  with 
every  purchase  of  25  cents  or  more  and 
this  receipt  carried  a  number.  In  lib- 
vault  of  the  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce 
was  a  sealed  envelope  containing  the 
five  lucky  numbers  which  were  not 
known  to  anyone.  On  Christmas  Eve 
the  envelope  was  secured  from  the  bank 
and,  on  opening,  the  lucky  numbers  were 
found  to  be  188,  479,  236,  750  and  1053. 
The  first  prize  number  (188)  was  held 
by  Jimmy  Deacon,  who  accordingly  re- 
ceived the  handsome  rocking  horse  dis- 
played in  the  window.  Miss  Viola  Staaf 
won  the  second  prize  with  No.  479;  Herb. 
Ayotte  won  fourth  prize,  and  H.  Mc- 
Quarrie  got  the  fifth  prize.  The  third 
prize  was  won  by  236,  but  the  holder  of 
this  ticket  has  not  yet  come  forward.  If 
236  will  make  himself  or  herself  known 
and  produce  the  ticket  at  the  store  the 
prize  will  be  duly  awarded.  "Porcupine 
Advance"   (Timmins,  Ont.). 

GOOD  PUBL/CITY 

Berry's  Bookstore,  of  Vernon,  B.C., 
did  some  good  newspaper  advertising  in 
the  Christmas  season.  One  advertise- 
ment in  four  column  space,  twelve 
inches  deep,  had  an  attractive  design  at 
the  top  with  the  wording,  "The  Christ- 
mas Store,"  and  in  this  advertisement, 
among  the  lines  given  effective  promin- 
ence were  books,  fountain  pens,  toys, 
leather  woods.  French  ivory,  and  mani- 
cure sets,  smokers'  supplies,  safety 
razors  and  chocolates. 


Illl- 


WHEN  SUBSCRIPTIONS  EXPIRE 

A  Toronto  newsdealer  has  hit  upon  a 
good  plan  to  take  care  of  renewal  sub- 
scriptions to  magazines  and  newspapers. 
When  a  subscription  is  about  to  expire, 
a  notice  is  sent  to  the  subscriber,  and 
with  it  a  blank  form  to  be  filled  out, 
showing  magazines  taken  and  others 
wanted.  Space  is  left  for  name  and  ad- 
dress of  the  subscriber,  and  there  is  room 
of  ten  names  of  periodicals  under  each 
of  the  two  headings  mentioned.  In  pro- 
minent type  near  the  top  appears  the 
words:  "Use  this  blank  to  obtain  my 
special  clubbing  rates  on  your  own  list," 
and  dealer's  name  and  address  is  given 
at  the  bottom.  A  great  measure  of  re- 
newal business  and  new  subscriptions  re- 
sulted from  the  use  of  those  forms. 


RENEW  THROUGH  US 


\\fHEN  your  subscriptions  to 
**  magazines  or  newspapers 
expire,  let  us  have  your  re- 
newals. No  reliable  agency  will 
give  you  better  rates.  Thous- 
ands of  dollars  are  lost  annually 
by  giving  subscriptions  to  irre- 
sponsible canvassers." 

We  will  give   you  the  lowest 
rates  and   reliable  service. 


BLANK'S   BOOKSTORE 

BLANKTOWN 


Sutf^estion    for  Newspaper   Advertisement. 

MODES  OF  TESTING   INKS 

Attention  was  first  called  to  the 
bleaching  effect  of  air  and  light  on  writ- 
ing ink,  as  used  in  modern  times,  by  the 
fact  that  the  signature  on  certain  cer- 
tificates had  become  illegible  through 
the  fading  of  the  ink,  says  a  writer  in 
the  "Journal  of  the  Society  of  the  Chemi- 
cal Industry."  As  it  was  impracticable 
to  test  a  sample  of  ink  by  exposure  of 
writing  for  a  period  of  years,  it  was  con- 
sidered that  a  limited  application  of  hy- 
drogen peroxide  would  be  the  nearest 
chemical  equivalent  to  the  bleaching  ef- 
fect of  the  atmosphere.  Writing  done 
by  different  inks  was  exposed  to  light, 
the  paper  being  occasionally  moistened 
with  a  3  per  cent,  solution  of  hydrogen 
peroxide,  the  result  being  that  the  hand- 
writing gradually  became  invisible,  in 
some  cases  more  quickly  than  in  others. 
The  violet  ink  used  for  typewriters  was 
less  readily  acted  on,  but  was  quickly 
bleached  by  sulphurous  acid.  If  an  ink 
could  be  produced  possessing  the  desir- 
39 


able  properties  of  perfect  fluidity  and 
being  non-depositing,  and  at  the  same 
time  incapable  of  being  decolorized  by 
oxidizing  or  reducing  agents,  there 
would  be  good  reason  to  believe  that 
the  writing  done  by  such  an  ink  would 
be  practically  permanent.  In  the  mean- 
time, when  writing  is  of  an  important 
nature  and  is  desired  to  endure,  some 
form  of  carbon  ink  appears  to  be  the 
only  trustworthy  preparation. 


Who  Writes  Your 
Advertisements? 

Where  Circumstances  Favor,  the 

Merchant  Himself  Should  Do 

This  Work  Regularly 

DID  you  make  good  resolutions  at 
the  beginning  of  the  year?  If  you 
did,  keep  them!  Did  you  decide 
upon  more  active  advertising?  If  not, 
do   so   now. 

The  retail  merchant  often  finds  the 
advertising  problem  a  difficult  one.  He 
does  not  make  the  best  use  of  his  space 
and  consequently  does  not  get  the  best 
possible  results.  Too  many  advertise- 
ments are  written  along  the  old  lines, 
consisting  of  bombastic  statements  and 
obscure  generalities,  giving  no  prices  or 
definite  information  with  reference  to 
the  stock  carried.  While  it  is  true  that 
it  takes  brains  to  do  good  advertising, 
the  retailer  should  get  the  idea  out  of 
his  head  that  it  requires  a  set  of  brains 
of  a  rare  or  peculiarly  different  calibre 
than  possessed  by  the  average  business 
man.  On  the  contrary,  every  really  cap- 
able merchant  has  the  ability  to  prepare 
effective  advertisements  of  his  own  busi- 
ness, because  ability  to  do  that  is  de- 
pendent to  a  very  large  degree  upon  ex- 
pert knowledge  of  the  business  to  be  ad- 
vertised. The  more  proficient  his 
knowledge  of  his  business,  the  better 
will  be  the  advertisements  he  writes,  and 
he  should  be  wary  of  delegating  this 
important  duty  to  others  who  may  be 
less  able  than  himself  to  produce  ad- 
vertisements that  will  do  full  justice  to 
the  business. 


SHOULD  REQUIRE  DEPOSIT 

Christmas  cards  are  often  a  dead  loss 
to  the  stationer.  In  a  number  of  cases 
a  customer  will  come  into  the  shop  two 
months  before  Christmas,  order  cards  to 
be  printed  specially,  and  forget  all  about 
calling  or  paying  for  them.  The  sta- 
tioner, to  stop  this,  should  ask  the  cus- 
tomer for  at  least  a  deposit,  even  then 
it  is  not  satisfactory,  because  if  the 
customer  does  not  call  for  the  cards 
they   are   useless   to   any   one   else. 


From  the  Musson  Book  Co.  comes  an 
illustrated  circular  announcing  a  new 
series  in  book  form  of  "Bringing  Up 
Father,"  by  Geo.   McManus. 


Short  Talks  With  Young  Salesmen 

n&&  «kr°B.,id"S"S  :',:™e,  3t-     The  Second  of  a  Series  of  Confidential  Chats  With  Junior 


spiration    for   the   younger   assistants    in   the   book 
and    stationery    stores     these     articles    should    be 
closely   followed   by   the   store  proprietors   as   well. 
-  -Editor's   Note. 


Salesmen 

By  the  Junior  Partner 


"N 


OT  always  is  the  race  to  the 
swift,  and  the  battle  to  the 
strong." 

The  man  who  said,  centuries  ago,  that 
this  was  so,  had  no  idea  that  men  of 
the  twentieth  century  would  be  repeat- 
ing the  phrase  without  questioning  its 
applicability.  Undoubtedly  it  was  a  sage 
who  penned  those  lines,  but  it  was  a 
sage  who  lived  in  an  age  when  brawn 
counter!  for  more  than  brain,  and  brute 
strength  more  than  quick  wit.  Tact  was 
almost  unknown  and  was  possessed  only 
by  the  wise  leaders  of  the  nations.  Only 
the  mighty  thews  of  man,  and  his  rela- 
tive domination  over  other  men,  count- 
ed. True,  there  were  traders  in  those 
days,  but  they  were  generally  considered 
as  of  no  use  in  a  fight,  and  of  little 
worth  to  the  nation.  Despised,  they 
were,  to  be  explicit. 

Times  Have  Changed 

But  now  all  this  has  changed.  The 
things  that  counted  least  in  ye  olden 
days,  count  most  to-day.  Brain  domin 
ates  brawn,  and  wit  makes  of  brute 
strength  a  thing  to  be  laughed  at.  Tact 
holds  an  important  place  and  ability  in 
business  is  clearly  not  despised.  Old 
Mother  Earth  has  worked  many  changes. 

Surely  there  is  something  in  these 
things  which  a  clerk,  anxious  to  make 
his  way  in  his  calling,  can  turn  to  good 
account.  If  he  takes  thought  on  the 
matter  at  all,  there  must  be  enough  in 
that  review  of  changing  events  to  in 
duce  him  to  strive  anew  toward  greater 
things.  Even  if  he  is,  as  he  calls  it, 
"only  a  retail  clerk,"  what  of  that? 
Hundreds  and  thousands  of  other  men 
are  clerks,  too,  but  not  all  of  them  will 
remain  under  a  boss.  And  men  who 
were  clerks  have,  in  many  cases,  risen 
to  dizzy  heights  in  the  life  of  the  coun- 
try. 

Talking  It  Over 

Come,  let  us  talk  the  matter  over,  you 
clerks  who  have  gone  into  the  book  and 
stationery  business  as  a  definite  part  of 
your  life-work!  Let  us  see  if  we  cannot 
find  some  ladder  of  policy,  up  to  the 
rungs  of  which  you  may  mount,  if  you 
but  will,  steadily  higher  and  higher 
until  the  breezy,  roomy  plateau  of  suc- 
cess is  reached.  What  matters  it  if 
there  be  many  besides  yourself  who 
seek  the  same  plain?  Let  us  content 
ourselves  in  concluding  that  the  eye- 
sight and  foresight  of  hosts  of  these 
are  not  so  good  as  yours,  and  that  some 
will  lose  sight  of  the  path  ,no  matter 
how  straight  it  runs. 

The  Ladder 

When  a  young  man  goes  into  any  busi- 
ness, fresh    and    raw,  he    is    not  worth 


much  to  his  employer,  and  won't  be 
until  he  is  able  to  do  THINGS  FOR 
HIMSELF.  That  is  to  say,  the  Boss 
will  not  take  notice  of  him  until  he  sees 
him  doing  little  jobs  of  usefulness 
which  he  was  not  ordered  to  do.  When 
the  young  chap  begins  to  do  those 
things  and  shows  he  really  wants  to 
learn,  he  will  find  plenty  willing  and 
anxious  to  teach  him.  There  we  have 
the  first  step  on  the  ladder  accounted 
for. 

Gradually  the  things  that  seemed  so 
frightfully  hard  to  do  at  first,  become 
easy  with  continuous  doing,  and  the 
clerk  is  ready  for  something  else.  If  he 
is  a  good  boy,  he  will  want  that  some- 
thing to  be  useful.  The  Boss  tells  him 
to  study  the  stock,  and  gives  him  point- 
ers on  how  he  should  sell  goods.  He 
shows  him  by  word  of  mouth  and  prac- 
tical example  how  to  overcome  difficul- 
ties. It  takes  longer  to  conquer  this 
field,  but  when  it  is  accomplished,  an- 
other great  big  section  of  the  ladder  has 
been  traversed.  And  the  queer  thing 
about  it  all  is  that  the  work  instead  of 
becoming  irksome  and  heavy,  is  pleasant 
and  light.  The  clerk  KNOWS  things, 
understands  his  shelves,  and  his  eye  is 
ever  bright  with  interest.  He  is  achiev- 
ing  something  and   glories   in   it. 

What  Selling  Is 

Did  you  ever  stop  to  figure  out  the 
real  significance  of  the  word  "sell"? 
Does  it  mean  to  you  simply  placing  an 
article  before  a  customer  in  a  take-it  - 
or-leave-it  manner  without  saying  any- 
thing about  its  merits? 

This  is  not  selling.  Salesmanship  con- 
sists of  creating  interest  in  the  article 
that  is  for  sale,  of  showing  the  customer 
that  it  is  especially  adapted  to  his  needs, 
that  it  is  just  what  he  is  looking  for 
and  pointing  out  all  the  qualities  to  con- 
vince him  that  it  is.  Every  clerk  should 
consider  himself  a  salesman,  and  exert 
every  effort  to  prove  that  he  is.  Make 
successful  selling  your  end,  and  clerk- 
ing a  means  to  that  end. 

Sound  Advice 

Every  employee  should  be  made  to 
feel  that  he  is  an  understudy  of  the 
men  above  him,  and  that  whether  he 
takes  the  place  when  the  man  above 
him    is    promoted   depends   very    largely 


on  his  ability  to  fill  it.  He  certainly  is 
not  the  man  for  the  position  if  he  is 
one  who  is  continually  picking  flaws 
in  the  other  fellow's  work,  and  not  co- 
operating with  him  for  greater  results. 
Petty  jealousies  and  covert  attempts  to 
lessen  the  reputation  of  some  fellow 
employee  who  is  trying  to  push  ahead 
do  not  help  any  man  to  make  his  way. 
There  is  but  one  way  to  work,  and  that 
is  to  work  for  the  general  good  of  the 
business,  planning  and  bringing  about 
improvements  wherever  you  see  that 
they   can  be   made   to  advantage. 

The  minute  the  employee  gets  the 
idea  that  he  is  indispensable,  he  isn't. 

In  this  connection  it  is  appropriate  to 
quote  the  following  paragraphs  which 
appeared  recently  in  a  U.  S.  trade  paper: 

Don't    be    satisfied     with     taking     an. 
order  for  the  book  asked  for,  but  use  the 
opportunity   to    suggest    others    to    your 
customer. 

Every  attention  or  courtesy  that  you 
give  your  customer  makes  you  more 
popular  in  society  and  increases  your 
value  to  your  employer. 

Every  customer  that  you  make  for 
the  business  enhances  your  value  in  the 
business  world  and  means  doHars  to 
your   salary. 

If  you  want  to  get  a  boost  in  your 
salary  and  make  the  boss  sit  up  and 
take  notice  and  really  know  that  you 
are  about,  think  and  plan  how  to  keep 
the  cashier  from  falling  asleep  at  the 
switch  by  keeping  him  at  his  job  of 
piling  up  the  coin  in  the  cash  box. 

Every  customer  whose  appreciation 
you  gain  by  your  courtesy  and  sense 
makes  you  of  more  value  to  the  house. 

Read  the  book  reviews  in  the  daily 
papers  and  thus  get  pointers  on  the  do- 
ings in  the  book  world. 

Read  the  trade  papers  to  know  about 
the  new  books  and  the  doings  of  the 
trade. 

Do  a  little  more  than  is  expected  of 
you. 

It's  better  for  your  character  to  earn 
twice  the  salary  paid  you  than  to  re- 
ceive double  what  you   are   paid   to   do. 

Don't  envy  the  man  who  is  satisfied 
to  simply  draw  a  salary,  even  if  he  re- 
ceives more  in  his  pay  envelope  than 
you  do;  be  patient,  and  you  will  live  to 
see  his  wages  shrink  to  the  size  of  his 
real   worth. 


40 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


HOW  WAR  AFFECTED  IMMIGRATION 


The  decline  of  immigration,  due  to 
the  war,  is  shown  by  the  following 
figures: 


ing  March  31,  1918,  28,103  belonged  to 
the  farming  class,  14,010  were  general 
laborers,    10,885    were    mechanics,    3,031 


Total  immigration  to  Canada, 


year    ended  March  31,  1914 384,878 

1915  144,789 

1916  48,537 

"                 "         1917  75,374 

1918  79,074 


Of  the  75,374  immigrants  who  came 
to  Canada  in  the  fiscal  year  ending 
March  31,  1917,  61,389  were  from  the 
United  States.  Of  these,  20,822  belonged 
to  the  agricultural  class,  9,267  were 
general  laborers,  14,904  were  mechanics, 
2,632  were  clerks,  traders,  etc.,  828  were 
miners,  and  1,804  domestics.  Of  the 
71.314  immigrants  to  Canada  from  the 
United  States  during  the  fiscal  year  end- 


were    clerks,     traders,     etc.,     747     were 
miners,  and  1,733  were  domestics. 

In  the  coming  year  it  is  a  certainty 
that  a  big  increase  in  immigration  will 
be  shown,  and  in  another  year  the  pre- 
war figures  should  be  exceeded,  because 
Canada  in  the  war  years  has  been  adver- 
tised as  never  before,  and  more  than  in 
any  previous  time  is  the  Dominion  look- 
ed upon  as  the  land  of  promise. 


WILL  BE  GREAT  BOOST  TO  TRADE 

Returning  Canadian  Soldiers,  Many  With  Wives  They  Have 

Married  in  Britain  and  France — 100,000  New  Homes 

— What  Government  is  Doing 


REPATRIATION  and  employment 
of  returning  soldiers  is  a  question 
of  such  great  national  interest 
that  we  are  apt  to  lose  sight  of  its  trade 
significance,  but  the  effect  of  the  return- 
ing of  about  300,000  soldiers,  of  whom 
about  a  third  are  bringing  back  with 
them  British  and  French  wives  to  estab- 
lish new  homes  in  Canada,  cannot  fail 
to  prove  a  decided  trade  stimulus.  Of 
the  number  quoted,  a  certain  proportion 
have,  of  course,  already  come  back  to 
Canada. 

The  comprehensive  plans  of  the  Gov- 
ernment for  dealing  with  the  great  ques- 
tion of  repatriation  and  employment 
have  assumed  the  definite  form  of  a 
committee  of  the  Cabinet,  assisted  by 
what  is  practically  a  new  department  of 
the  Government,  established  to  handle 
these  problems,  a  co-ordinating  com- 
mittee composed  of  members  of  the  staff 
of  this  department  and  representatives 
from  the  other  Government  departments 
who  are  concerned,  and  advisory  com- 
mittees from  four  elements  of  the  com- 
munity who  are  directly  interested. 

Good  Progress  Made 

The  work  of  preparing  to  meet  the 
problems  is  now  being  carired  out.  The 
committee  of  the  Cabinet  consists  of  Sir 
James  Lougheed,  Minister  of  Soldiers' 
Civil  Re-establishment;  Hon.  N.  W. 
Rowell,  President  of  the  Privy  Council; 
Hon.  T.  A.  Crerar,  Minister  of  Agricul- 
ture; Hon.  G.  D.  Robertson,  Minister  of 
Labor;  Hon.  Arthur  Meighen,  Minister 
of  Interior,  and  Hon.  J.  A.  Calder, 
Minister  of  Immigration  and  Colon- 
ization, who  are  devoting  practi- 
cally their  entire  energies  to  the  con- 
sideration of  the  many  sides  of  the  ques- 
tions which  must  be  met.  Mr.  Calder  is 
chairman  of  the  committee. 


Mr.  H.  J.  Daly,  of  Toronto,  who  has 
been  appointed  Director  of  Repatriation 
and  Employment,  is  director  of  this 
work,  and  Mr.  Vincent  Massey,  late  sec- 
retary of  the  War  Committee  of  the 
Cabinet,  is  secretary.  The  staff,  made  up 
chiefly  of  returned  soldiers,  is  fully  or- 
ganized, and  work  is  actively  going  on 
in  the  offices  of  the  new  department  in 
the  Plaza  Building,  Ottawa.  The  co- 
ordinating committee  meets  almost  daily. 


BLANK  BOOK   BILL 

Wake!  for  the  Sun  has  busted  o'er  the 

hill 
And  struck  the  Topknot  of  yours  truly, 

Blank  Book  Bill, 
No  use  to  lie  abed,  the  Boss  would  Roar 
And  then  I'd  have  to  tap  Another  till. 

Hi!  Ho!  some  coffee  and  bit  of  Chow — 
I'm  off  to  take  the  good  old  Trolley  now. 
To  live    among    the    Ledgers    and     the 

Blanks 
And   kill   another    Day — don't    ask    me 

How. 

"A    bunch    of    orders,    Bill,    for    you    to 

munch — 
And    get    them    Out    before    you    go    to 

Lunch." 
This   stationery  game  means   Move  and 

not  stand  still, 
To-day's  a  Busy  day,  I  have  a  Hunch. 

"Where  are  the  Books  we  ordered  Yes- 
terday?" 

"How  do  I  know?  I  sent  them  on  their 
Way." 

These  phone  calls  get  me  Sore  at  times, 
yea   Bo, 

What  do  they  think — that  I'm  a  two- 
horse  Dray  ? 

41 


With  clips  and  pads  and  forms  my  head 

is  filled —  ; 

"Say,  was   this   Field   Book   order    ever 

billed?" 
With  sizes,  styles,  they'll  end  my  days, 
So  bury  me  in  Loose  Leaves  when   I'm 

killed. 

— From  "Business  Methods." 


Recent  Enquiries 


An  enquiry  from  Vancouver  re  Can- 
adian-made cash  boxes,  occasioned  the 
reply  that  there  was  no  record  in  the 
Service  Department  of  cash  boxes  being 
made  in  Canada.  The  correspondent 
was  furnished  with  a  list  of  British  and 
U.   S.   makers  of  this  line. 

CLOTHES  HANGERS 

Frank,  Alberta. — Please  tell  me  where 
I  can  procure  clothes  hangers  and  pants 
and  skirt  hangers  with  name  printed  on. 

Answer. — The  Taylor  Manufacturing 
Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

WASTE  PAPER  DEALERS 

Ravenna,  Ont. — Please  send  names 
and  addresses  of  waste  paper  dealers 
in   Toronto. 

Answer. — Names    were    forwarded. 

WASTE  PAPER 

Holland  Centre,  Ont. — Please  teli  me 
where  I  can  sell  waste  paper  and  old 
books   and   cardboard. 

Answer. — Names  of  dealers  were  sent. 

BOOKS  ON  WINDOW  DRESSING 

Can  you  give  me  the  names  of  some 
books  on  window  dressing,  their  cost 
and  where  they  can  be  procured? — R. 
Boivin,  St.  Roch,  Quebec. 

Answer. — The  following  are  some  use- 
ful books  on  window  trimming:  "One 
Hundred  Easy  Window  Trims" — $1.00. 
"Show  Window  Backgrounds"  (a  new 
book  on  the  subject)— $1.50.  "The  Art 
of  Decorating  Show  Windows  and  In 
teriors"— $3.50. 


A  TIP  TO  WHOLESALERS 

A  Montreal  stationer  in  a  letter  to 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 
urges  that  an  effort  be  made  to  have 
wholesale  concerns  advertising  in 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  put 
the  names  and  addresses  and  the  tele- 
phone numbers  of  their  Montreal  repre- 
sentatives in  their  advertisements.  The 
idea  has  much  to  commend  it,  and,  of 
course,  the  same  thing  would  apply  to 
representatives  in  the  other,  chief  cen- 
tres. 


Edmund  Candler,  late  official  British 
eye-witness  in  Mesopotamia,  has  two 
books  in  train  for  publication,  one  being 
"The  Long  Road  to  Bagdad,"  and  the 
ether,  "On  the  Edge  of  the  World,"  the 
first  of  which  will  appear  very  shortly, 
and  the  other  later  in  the  season. 


Valentines  and   Other  Season  Goods 


Incidental  with  the  special  references  to  Valen- 
tines there  are  good  tips  in  this  article  about 
Easter  cards,  cameras,  sporting  goods  and  other 
merchandise    having    special    selling    seasons. 

—  The   Editor. 


Some  Good  Advice  Regarding  Display  in  the  Show  Window 

and  Inside  the  Store 


VALENTINES  and  the  Easter  cards 
are  highly  seasonable  goods,  the 
trade  in  the  former  reaching  its 
climax  just  after  this  issue  of  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  reaches 
the  trade.  As  a  general  rule  "season- 
able goods"  is  a  term  which  is  not  so 
meaningful  in  the  stationery  trade  as  in 
the  dry  goods  business,  for  instance,  but 
there  are  times  of  the  year  when  certain 
goods  are  in  greater  demand  than  in 
other  months,  and  at  such  times  it  is 
well  to  feature  these  articles  by  window 
displays  and  good  interior  showings. 
Nicely  printed  cards  should  ajso  be  pre- 
pared to  emphasize  the  fact  that  special 
attention  is  being  given  the  goods  dis- 
played, and  good  newspaper  publicity 
linking  up  with  this  should  not  be 
neglected. 

Stationers  who  carry  a  miscellaneous 
stock  have  an  advantage  over  their  more 
restricted  competitors  in  that  they  have 
a  greater  variety  of  goods  to  display 
both  inside  their  stores  and  in  their  win- 
dows. By  a  judicious  use  of  the  latter 
much  business  is  brought  in,  as  passers- 
by  are  naturally  attracted  by  frequent 
displays  of  new, .goods.  In  the  Spring, 
wall  paper  trade  will  flourish,  and  so 
will  fishing  tackle.  Trade  in  cameras 
and  photographic  supplies  will  be  accel- 
erated with  the  arrival  of  Spring,  and 
besides  preparing  for  these,  such  lines  as 
baseball  supplies  and  other  seasonable 
sporting  goods  should  be  ordered  weil 
ahead,  so  as  to  adequately  provide  for 
making  this  year's  trade  in  these  goods 
highly  successful.  The  stationer  should 
study  his  calendar  in  its  relationship  to 
the  goods  he  sells  in  the  different 
months,  and  let  it  be  again  emphasized 
that  preparation,  in  buying  the  goods 
and  otherwise,  should  take  place  months 
ahead  of  the  actual  selling  season  for 
each  respective  line. 

Reverting  again  to  the  immediate  sea- 
son line — valentines — good  business  de- 
mands that  they  must  be  "closed  out" 
before  or  on  St.  Valentine's  Day.  Like 
similar  particular  occasion  merchandise, 
oersistent  pushing  is  the  biggest  feature 
in  the  successful  campaign.  Good  win- 
dow displays,  good  interior  trims  and  an 
intelligent  usage  of  the  store's  mailing 
list  is  the  winning  triangle.  In  planning 
a  good  Valentine  window  the  following 
suggestions  from  an  article  in  the  "Am- 
erican Stationer,"  can  be  employed  to 
good  advantage: 

The  Window  Trim 
Cut  a  large  heart  from  a  piece  of  stiff 
cardboard,  approximately  three  feet 
high  by  the  proper  proportionate  width. 
Cover  this  with  a  good  quality,  closely 
creped  paper,  keeping  the  pink  and  white 
color  scheme  throughout — these  'being 
the    most    generally    accepted    valentine 


colors.  This  heart  can  then  form  the 
centrepiece  of  the  window,  and  can 
easily  be  attached  to  the  rear  wall  of  the 
show  window  with  thumbtacks.  Some 
good  decorative  valentines  of  the  better 
class  can  then  be  attached  to  the  mon- 
ster heart  and  arranged  tastefully  in 
the  foreground  of  the  window.  The  win- 
dow floor  proper,  also,  should  be  cov- 
ered with  pink  and  white  paper.  Then 
from  the  large  heart  should  run  twisted 
strips  of  crepe  paper,  about  1%  inch 
width,  of  alternate  pink  and  white  color, 
terminating  in  a  pretty  valentine  in  the 
window  foreground.  This  gives  the  neces- 
sary attention-compelling  feature  and 
insures  the  eye  following  the  strips  to 
the  valentines.  A  good  background  can 
easily  be  made,  of  alternate  pink  and 
white  squares  of  tissue,  either  secured 
to  the  window  back  with  thumbtacks  or 
suspended  from  a  tightly  drawn  wire. 

A  well  lettered  sign  can  then  be  placed 
in  the  window.  For  this  purpose  is  sug- 
gested: 

YOUR  ST.  VALENTINE  GREET- 
ING SHOULD  EMBODY  DIGNITY, 
A  SINCERE  WISH  AND  A 
HAPPY  SENTIMENT. 


We  carry  nothing  but  the  best  in 
Valentines. 

Look  our  Valentines  over  and 
make  your  selections  at  your 
leisure. 

Inside    Display 

On  most  particular  occasions  like 
Valentine's  day,  the  seasonable  mer- 
chandise which  must  either  be  sold  out 
or  carried  over  for  a  year  should  have 
pretty  much  the  run  of  the  store.  Little 
temporary  exhibits  of  valentines  can  be 
created  here  and  there.  A  burlap  covered 
board  is  easily  set  up  and  valentines 
can  be  attractively  arranged  to  it  so 
they  rest  on  thumbtacks,  the  nails  of 
which  do  not  pierce  or  injure  the  val- 
entines. Importance  should  be  given  to 
the  manner  of  handling  valentines,  and 
clerks  should  be  cautioned  in  this  regard. 
The  cleanest  hands  sometimes  smudge 
a  highly  finished  valentine.  The  goods 
should  be  kept  in  boxes,  and  when  ex- 
hibited the  boxes  and  not  the  valentines 
handled.  A  smeared  valentine  not  only 
ruins  the  chance  for  an  immediate  sale, 
but  it  creates  an  unfortunate  impres- 
sion through  which  the  store  suffers. 


Last  Year's  Prices  Will  Prevail 

General   Attitude   of   Wallpaper   Trade    One    of   Confidence 

in  1919 


LAST  year's  prices  will  prevail  foi 
this  year,"  said  the  head  of  one 
of  the  leading  wallpaper  whole- 
sales, when  interviewed  by  a  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  represen- 
tative. "There  seems  to  be  no  indication 
of  a  change  one  way  or  the  other  for 
this  year,"  he  stated.  His  reasons  for 
this  view  were  in  the  first  place  the  un- 
settled state  of  labor,  and  in  the  second 
place  the  shortage  of  raw  material.  The 
matter  of  securing  pulp  for  paper-mak- 
ing is  in  an  acute  state  at  present,  and 
is  a  matter  of  concern  in  the  United 
States  as  well  as  in  Canada,  although 
they  seem  to  secure  a  large  supply  of 
our  Canadian  pulp  over  there.  There  is 
no  remedy  in  sight  at  present. 

The  dye  situation,  as  related  to  wall 
paper,  is  quite  satisfactory,  this  house 
finds.  Indeed,  it  never  was  very  trou- 
blesome, although  the  popular  idea  was 
pessimistic  in  that  regard.  Colors  are 
perhaps  more  in  evidence  in  the  new  de- 
signs being  developed  for  next  year  than 
in  the  past  few  seasons.  The  color  com- 
binations are  a  little  more  striking  and 

42 


more  attractive  than  they  were  even  be- 
fore the  war. 

Generally  speaking,  however,  there  is 
little  change  in  styles.  The  call  continues 
rather  strongly  for  tapestry  effects  and 
so  the  range  of  these  is  rather  exten- 
sive. These  papers  are  liked  especially 
for  halls  and  dining-rooms.  The  stripes 
with  cut-out  borders  are  very  popular 
for  bedrooms. 

There  is  a  feeling  that  the  general 
attitude  of  the  trade  is  one  which  means 
good  business  for  1919.  Merchants  seem 
to  be  putting  forth  better  and  more  de- 
finite efforts  to  forge  ahead  this  year, 
and  the  outlook  is  good. 

Chintz  wallpapers  are  proving  quite 
the  mode  for  rooms  which  formerly  de- 
pended upon  chintz  hangings  for  their 
color.  Now  that  so  many  people  are  us- 
ing plain  side  curtains  the  papers  which 
have  chintz  patterns  are  being  selected. 
Like  the  draperies,  these  designs  in 
paper  invariably  have  the  bird  motif. 
They  are  in  a  good  variety  of  design  and 
color   combinations. 


Tendencies  in  the  Construction  of  Toys 


YEAR-ROUND    TOY    TRADE 

The  toys  of  higher  grade  which  are  now  being 
made  so  extensively  are  hastening  the  time  that 
will  see  the  realization,  long  sought  for,  of  a  year- 
round  toy  trade.  Many  retailers  who  sell  toys 
are   now   organizing    their   business   on   this   basis. 

THE  season  that  has  just  passed 
has  been  a  prosperous  one  for  the 
retailers  of  toys  in  Canada. 
Parents  who  may  be  inclined  to  econo- 
mize as  far  as  they  themselves  are  con- 
cerned will  open  up  the  tightest  purse 
strings  to  bring  joy  to  the  hearts  of  the 
little  ones. 

City  stores  made  splendid  showings  of 
common  sense,  practical  toys;  many  of 
them  Canadian-built  and  all  of  them  of 
much  higher  grade,  both  in  durability 
and  educational  qualities  than  the  gim- 
crack  stuff  that  for  many  years  consti- 
tuted one  of  the  big  ends  of  the  exports 
of  Germany. 

Taking  into  consideration  this  change  I 
character  of  the  toy  department,  many 
merchants,  who  used  to  despise  the  old 
collection  of  breakable  mechanical  truck 
and  desired  to  shovel  them  out  of  the 
way  the  day  Christmas  was  over,  are 
now  considering  the  advisability  of  main- 
taining the  toy  department  the  year 
round.  To  such  the  following  article, 
by  W.  Barret  Hankins,  which  appeared 
in  "Toys  and  Novelties,"  will  be  of  con- 
siderable interest: 

Toys  are  mental  and  physical  food. 

As  dealers  to  the  community  we 
should  carry  toys  as  a  staple  and  assist 
RTOwn-ups  in  the  selection  of  toys  for 
the  best  interest  of  the  child,  to  promote: 

Constructiveness. 

Initiative. 

Mental  vision. 

Creativeness. 

Quick  mental   action. 

Bodily  strength. 

Quick  bodily  action. 

Self-control. 

Self-confidence. 

Comradeship. 

Discipline. 

Leadership. 

National  pride. 

There  is  no  better  time  than  right 
now  to  plan  for  an  all-year-round  toy 
department. 

Think  of  the  long  months  of  school 
work  ahead  of  our  children.  It  is  of 
gravest  importance  that  children  at  this 
time  should  be  thoroughly  imbued  with 
the  national  spirit.  The  seeds  of  na- 
tional loyalty  planted  in  the  hearts  and 
minds  of  our  children  to-day  will  give 
us  a  greater  America  to-morrow,  but  we 
must  avoid  depressing  or  alarming  the 
child,  which,  added  to  the  child's  schoo"; 
work,  would  be  tearing  down  faster  than 
we  can  build. 

Drums  and  guns,  swords,  horns, 
uniforms,  for  the  child,  were  never 
needed  more  than  they  are  to-day; 
books  and  games,  balls  and  bats, 
dolls  and  tea  sets,  skates,  scooters — 
and  all  the  other  toys — were  never 
needed  more  than  they  are  to-day. 
As  dealers  we  should  unite  in  a  cam- 
paign  of   education    directed    to    parents 


Welfare  of  the  Child  Mind  Being  Considered  More  and  More 

By  Toy  Makers 


showing  them  the  need  of  toys  for  their 
children.  I  give  you  in  this  article  sug- 
gestions that  serve  as  a  foundation  for 
such  a  campaign.  For  instance,  win- 
dows: 

Arrange  a  window  devoted  to  toys 
that  promote  constructiveness,  from  the 
smallest  set  of  blocks  meant  for  wee 
baby  hands,  to  the  elaborate  mechanical 
set  for  big  brother.  Have  a  big  doll  re- 
present the  baby  and  stand  a  figure  of  a 
boy  of  about  ten  or  twelve  years  of  age 
beside  something  that  is  built  out  of  a 
mechanical  construction  set.  Place  a 
card  bearing  the  following  .  educational 
text  in  the  window: 

Keep  abreast  of  your  child's  mental 
developments.     The  child's  mind  seeks 
to  create  and   construct.     We  have  a 
complete  line  of  toys  for  this  purpose. 
We  must  feed  the  child's  mind  as  we 
would  feed  the  child's  body.     We  are 
glad    to    talk    with    you    at    any    time 
about  the   proper  toys  for  your  child. 
according  to  the  age  of  the  child. 
Another  window  carrying  out  an  edu- 
cational  idea   would   be  figures   of  boys 
dressed    in    khaki    and    surrounded    with 
military  toys.     Have  the  figures  seated 
at  a  table  with  some  game  between  them, 
and   in   the   background   a   painted   scene 
of  some  timely  outdoor  sport.       Use   a 
display  card  having  the  following  word- 
ing: 

Patriotism,  our  nation's  best  asset. 
Let  our  children  become  inspired  with 
love  and  loyalty  for  our  country  in  the 
natural     way — mingle     it    with      their 
play,   let    it,    so    to    speak,  >  come    into 
their  hearts  and  minds  unconsciously, 
and  it  will  dwell  with  them  forever. 
Another  window  that  would  be  effec- 
tive  in   this   educational   work   would   be 
loys  and  girls  at  play  with  trains,  boats, 
small    motor     trucks     and      horse-drawn 
drays — all  typifying  commerce  and  busi- 
ness,   using    a    display    card    worded    as 
follows: 

Train    your  children   for   the   future 
greatness   of  America — let   your  boys 
and  girls  early  feel  the  thrill  of  pro- 
gress commercially.     Toys  will  inspire 
them   by   suggestion.     Let  them  have 
trains   and  boats,   trucks   and   wagons. 
Toys    serve    a    double    purpose — they 
amuse  and  educate.    -  Plan  your  pur- 
chase of  toys  to  fit  into  the  different 
stages    of    your    child's    advancement. 
Come  in  and  talk  the  matter  over  with 
us.     We  make  a  study  of  toys  in  their 
application   to   the    child-life. 
Take  a  photograph  of  each  window  and 
have    a    small    half-tone    made    of   same. 
Print   this   on   a   mailing   card,   using   as 
wording  for  the  card  the  same  text  as  is 
used  on  the  display  card  in  the  window. 
Mail    these    cards    to   a    select   list    of 
customers. 

For  your  mailing  list  do  not  neglect 
the  rural  homes.    Remember  the  farmei- 
43 


parent  has  a  double  problem.  Theirs  is 
not  only  the  proper  amusement  and 
education  for  their  children,  but  it  is 
also  one  of  keeping  the  growing  child 
on  the  farm. 

The  farmer  is  able  to  buy  toys,  and 
appealed  to  rightly  the  farmer-parent 
will  buy  toys.  In  interesting  the  farmer 
in  your  toy  department,  you  also  in- 
terest him  in  your  entire  store.  The 
same  educational  campaign  you  use  on 
your  city  trade  you  can  use  on  your 
farmer  trade  with  this  addition,  that 
you  can  talk  to  the  farmer-parent  abcfit 
the  thing  nearest  to  their  hearts — to 
keep  their  growing  boys  and  girls  from 
wishing  to  leave  the  farm. 

Bear  in  mind  also  that  the  Government 
is  soliciting  the  aid  of  housewives — 
mothers  are  asked  to  do  things  that  re- 
quire more  of  their  time  than  they  have 
ever  before  devoted  to  anything  other 
than  the  care  of  their  children;  and  now 
that  housewives  and  mothers  may  join 
in  and  do  their  bit  in  the  many  things 
that  are  needed,  there  should  be  a  means 
provided  for  helping  amuse  and  educate 
the  child  without  making  this  work  a 
tax  upon  the  mother.  Toys,  therefore, 
are  the  only  things  that  will  assist  in 
this  work,  and  for  this  alone  we  owe  it 
to  our  Government  to  stock  and  adver- 
tise toys. 


TOYS  MADE  BY  SOLDIERS 

Products  of  Canada's  Invalided  Veterans 

In  Great  Demand 

"We  are  much  ahead  of  the^reslj  of 
the  world  in  the  conduct  of  occupations," 
explained  Mr.  Burnett.  "In  England  a 
nurse  shoves  the  heel  of  a  sock  into  the 
hands  of  a  wounded  man  and  tells  him 
to  knit.  In  some  places  they  give  them 
embroidery,  but  we  go  easy  on  that. 
Imagine  a  man  making  a  doily;  he  might 
better  be  making  a  cigar  box.  We  want 
to  re-create  men,  not  make  nice,  ami- 
able old  ladies."  This  is  how  Norman 
Burnett  prefaced  his  account  to  a  To- 
ronto audience  of  how  Canada  was  at- 
tending to  the  work  of  providing  occu- 
pations for  invalided  soldiers.  Canada 
was  a  leader  in  this  respect.  The  sol- 
diers were  taught  to  weave  baskets, 
make  toys,  carve  wood,  and  work  with 
metal — the  work  with  brass  and  copper 
—noisy  though  it  is — proving  particu- 
larly soothing  to  patients  suffering  from 
shell-shock.         \>   \> 

Some  splendid  .samples  of  work  done 
by  the  men  were  exhibited.  One  particu- 
larly clever  piece  consisted  of  a  toy  man 
cut  out  of  wood  and  a  long  train  of 
wooden  animals  set  on  a  piece  of  lattice- 
work, which,  when  extended  to  its  full 
limit,  must  have  measured  nearly  20 
inches.  This  toy  was  the  product  of 
three  soldiers  in  the  hospital  at  London, 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Ont.,  one — an  amputation  case — having 
designed  it,..another— a  chair  patient- 
having  done*  the  cutting,  and  a  third— 
a. -bed.  patient-t-having  administered  the 
paint  Articles  constructed  by  the  men 
are  greatly  in  demand,  and  the  proceeds 
go  to  the  makers  after  allowance  is  maae 
for  cost  of  materials.  At  present,  Mr. 
Burnett  stated,  one  man  has  an  order 
for  300  napkin  rings. 

Much  attention  is  given  to  those  who 
have  lost  right  arms.  They  are  being 
taught  to  use  the  left,  and  some  of  the 
soldiers  have  learned  to  write  for  the 
first  time  during  their  confinement  in 
hospital. 


TRADE  SHOULD  VISIT  SPRING  SHOWS 

Holiday  Lines  Will  Again  be  on  Exhibition  in  Toronto  by  Some 
of  the  Principal  Houses— A  Boon  to  Buyers 


WANTS  BETTER  PACKING 

A  Montreal  correspondent,  signing  him-  ■ 
self  "Toy  Salesman,"  sends  in  the  follow- 
ing for  publication  in  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER,  in  which  he  ad- 
dresses some  pertinent  questions  to 
manufacturers  of  toys,  particularly  those 
of  the  "builder"  type: 

Why  not  pack  heavy  steel  toys  in 
wooden  boxes  instead  of  cheap  paste- 
board ? 

Long  before  I  sold  some  structural 
steel  toys,  the  boxes  were  ground  to  a 
pulp  and  the  parts  lost. 

A  good  article  poorly  dressed  is  not 
good    advertising. 

Why  not  number  the  parts,  and  have 
numbered  pegs  or  places  to  store  these 
parts?  Diagrams  would  call  for  parts 
by  number.  Parts  would  be  restored  to 
places  by  number. 

The  toy  would  be  educational  and 
habit  forming,  particularly  if  a  boy  ever 
went  into  a  machine  shop. 

It  would  be  a  better  seller  even  if  it 
cost  more. 

Some  manufacturers  pay  for  these 
ideas. 

"TOY  SALESMAN." 


VERY  shortly  the  big  houses  who 
conduct  spring  exhibitions  of  holi- 
day trade  specialties  will  again  be 
booking  orders  for  1919  autumn  and 
Christmas  business,  together  with  other 
special-occasion  goods,  and  in  this  con- 
nection an  important  place  is  occupied 
by  such  items  as  greeting  cards,  calen- 
dars, pictures  and  various  gift  novelties. 
When  the  retailer  takes  into  considera- 
tion the  very  great  increase  and  im- 
provement in  merchandise  of  this  class 
that  has  been  witnessed  in  the  past 
half  dozen  years  or  so,  it  must  appeal  to 
him  that  it  would  be  a  good  step  on  his 
part  to  give  this  whole  line  more  con- 
sideration, both  as  regards  the  extent 
of  his  buying  of  these  goods  and  the 
space  given  over  to  their  display  in  his 
store. 

In  the  case  of  greeting  cards,  particu- 
lars will  be  found  elsewhere  in  this  issue 
as  to  the  help  to  be  extended  by  the 
Postcard  and  Greeting  Card  Association 
in  the  way  of  suggestions  to  aid  the 
trade  to  sell  more  greeting  cards.  That 
Association  is  cognizant  of  the  value  of 
the  trade  paper  as  a  medium  for  pro- 
moting such  co-operation,  and  in  sub- 
sequent issues  of  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER  the  retailers  will  find  ideas 
set  forth  which  they  will  be  able  to  make 
the  vehicles  of  increasing  their  greeting 
card  sales  and  considerably  augmenting 
their  profits  from  this  branch  of  trade. 

Postcards  will,  of  course,  be  included 
in  the  programme,  and  if  the  Association 
succeeds  in  its  efforts  to  have  the  auth- 
orities at  Ottawa  remove  the  extra  lc 
war  tax,  a  good  boom  in  the  post  card 


trade  will  surely  come  this  year. 

Coming  back  again  to  the  subject  of 
the  spring  exhibition  of  holiday  goods 
by  Toronto  wholesalers,  those  retailers 
who  can  possibly  arrange  to  do  so  should 
be  in  attendance  so  as  to  see  the  new- 
goods  to  the  very  best  advantage. 

The  travelling  salesmen  will,  of 
course,  be  taking  the  samples  out  on  the 
road  visiting  the  trade  from  ocean  to 
ocean,  but  there  is  much  to  be  said  in 
favor  of  retailers  occasionally  getting 
entirely  away  from  their  stores.  Buy- 
ing trips  to  the  larger  distributing, 
centres  will  invariably  provide  new  ost- 
looks  and  new  ideas  for  the  observant 
merchant  and  even  though  the  days  thus 
spent  may  require  a  constant  attention 
to  the  business  of  buying,  so  as  to  ac- 
complish as  much  as  possible  in  the  com- 
paratively short  time  which  the  average 
merchant  will  feel  justified  in  spending 
away  from  his  business,  the  change 
from  the  routine  and  close  confinement 
which  is  the  lot  of  almost  every  retailer, 
cannot  fail  to  be  beneficial  to  him  in 
many  respects — having  in  mind  his  own 
physical  well-being  as  well  as  the  busi- 
ness itself. 

It  is  to  be  hoped,  therefore,  that  a 
record-breaking  number  of  merchants 
will  come  to  Toronto  in  the  latter  part 
of  March  and  in  April,  when  these  shows 
will  be  in  progress.  The  work  is  already 
proceeding  in  preparation  for  these  ex- 
hibitions of  holiday  goods,  and  in  the 
wholesale  houses  there  is  a  confident 
feeling  that  1919  is  going  to  prove  to  be 
another  bumper  year  for  business. 


False  Reports  Hurt^Trade  Interests 


There  is  no  truth  in  rumors  given  wide  publicity 
in  newspaner  articles  that  stationery  and  other 
paper  products  are  to  be  cheaper.  Writers  lacking 
practical  knowledge  create  misapprehension  and 
do  considerable   harm. 

IT  is  often  the  case  that  "special 
articles"  in  newspapers  present  as- 
sertions that  are  damaging  to  trade 
interests,  and  only  too  frequently  has 
the  book  and  stationery  trade  suffered 
in  this  way.  That  the  same  grievance 
is  extant  in  England  as  well  is  indicated 
by  the.  following,  under  the  heading  of 
"A  Timelv  Protest,"  from  the  last  issue 
of  the.  "Stationery  World"  of  England: 
A  Sunday  paper,  claiming  to  have  an 
enormous  circulation,  recently  published 
an  amateur  article  on  the  subject  of 
"Cheaper  Stationery."  The  head  of  one 
of  our  leading  stationery  houses  informs 
us  that  he  has  received  from  all  parts 
of  the  kingdom  spirited  comments  on 
this  article,  accompanied  by  indignant 
letters  regarding  the  "very  erroneous 
and  harmful  statements  the  article  con- 
tains." 

Last  year  and  the  year  before  we  pro- 


President  of  Stationers'  Association  in  Britain  Takes  News- 
•    paper  Writers  to  Task 


tested  against  damaging  articles  of  this 
kind  in  the  public  press,  the  articles  in 
1916  and  1917  beina:  of  a  most  injurious 
character,  and  professing  to  deal  with 
the  "passing  of  the  picture  postcard." 
The  so-called  facts  were  sheer  nonsense, 
as  results  have  proved.  Now  we  have  to 
deal  with  the  "tarradiddle"  regarding 
"Cheaper  Stationery." 

Mr.  Percy  Barrinerer,  as  president  of 
the  Stationers'  Association  of  the  United 
Kino-dom,  has  issued  a  timely  protest 
against  the  publication  in  a  widely-read 
newspaper  of  misleading  nonsense  cal- 
culated to  create  a  false  impression  and 
do  considerable  injury.  Mr.  Barringer 
points  out  that  there  is  not  one  word  of 
truth  in  the  article  referred  to,  and  adds: 
"So  far  from  stationery  being  200  per 
cent,  to  400  per  cent,  cheaper  (by  the 
way,  what  is  400  per  cent,  discount  of 
£1?)  than  it  was  before  the  armistice, 
44 


I  can  assure  you  that  there  is  no  ap- 
preciable difference  in  cost  at  all;  and  as 
I  presume  you  would  accept  the  Paper 
Controller  as  an  authority  on  this  point. 
I  would  refer  you  to  a  statement  issued 
by  him  during  the  last  few  days  to  the 
effect  that  'the  position  with  regard  to 
imports  of  paper  and  paper-making  ma- 
terials would  be  more  restricted  during 
the  next  three  months  than  at  any  other 
period  of  the  war.'  " 

It  is  quite  true  that  the  stationery 
trade  and  many  other  trades  have  had  to 
adapt  themselves  to  a  new  standard  of 
values,  and  although  many  of  the  prices 
asked  appear  high,  they  can  be  justified. 

It  is  very  regrettable  that  writers  who 
have  no  practical  knowledge  of  trade 
topics  should  concoct  articles  which  are 
calculated  to  create  misapprehension  and 
do  considerable  harm. 


NEWS  OF  THE  TRADE 


BACK  TO  THE  ROAD 

The  photograph  shown  on  this  page  is 
the  likeness  of  a  new  member  of  the 
sates  force  of  the  Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike 
Company.  His  name  is  Herbert  G. 
Popham,  popularly  known  as  "Pop,"  and 
he  will  take  care  of  the  Canadian  cus- 
tomers formerly  called  upon  by  Frank 
Palmer. 

Mr.  Popham's  former  business  experi- 
ence has  made  him  especially  well  fit- 
ted to  meet  the  requirements  of  his  new 
position.  He  has  formerly  been  asso- 
ciated with  Wm.  Collins  Sons  &  Co., 
publishers  and  general  stationery  manu- 
facturers of  Glasgow,  Scotland,  for 
whom    he   traveled   throughout   Scotland 


H.   G.   POPHAM 

and  England.  He  also  spent  four  years 
with  the  Thacker  Co.,  of  Bombay,  India, 
his  territory  extending  out  of  Bombay 
as  far  as  the  Khyber  Pass. 

About  nine  years  ago  he  came  to 
Canada,  and  since  that  time  has  been 
with  the  A.  R.  McDougal  Co.  and  Wm. 
E.  Coutts.  For  the  past  two  years,  how- 
ever, he  has  been  in  business  for  him- 
self as  the  junior  partner  in  the  firm 
of  Holmes  &  Popham,  at  London,  On- 
tario. 

*P6p"  had  been  so  long  on  the  road 
that  -he  could  not  contain  himself  within 
the  limited  radius  of  trade  activities 
afforded  by  even  so  fine  a  city  as  "The 
Forest  City." 


NEWS  FROM  THE  MARITIMES 

Halifax,  N.S.,  Jan.  17.— The  fall  and 
Xmas  season  in  the  Maritime  Provinces 
was  exceptionally  good,  particularly  in 
the  cities  of  St.  John  and  Halifax.  One 
large  Halifax  firm  of  booksellers  and 
stationers  was  completely  sold  out  of 
new  novels,  and  their  stock  of  fountain 
pens  and  papeteries  was  entirely  de- 
pleted. 

Although  there  were  a  large  number 
of  books  by  unknown  authors,  they  were 
readily  sought  for,  particularly  books 
pertaining  to  the  war. 

The  disastrous  fire,  which  occurred  in 
Halifax  in  January,  caused  a  loss  of 
about  $400,000  or  $500,000.  The  Pen 
Stationery  Co.,  owned  bv  L.  Connolly, 
lost  about  $5,000.  The  Office  Soecialty 
Co.   lost  between  $10,000  and  $12,000. 

"CONSIDERABLE    BUNK    THEREIN" 

At  the  meetins:  of  the  Alberta  Federa- 
tion of  Labor,  held  at  Medicine  Hat,  Jan. 
7,  one  of  the  delegates  expressed  his 
thought  that  when  the  federation  was 
dealing  with  the  Government  on  the 
question  of  new  school  text  book  con- 
tracts, they  should  also  protest  against 
the  alleged  erroneous  statistical  and 
other  matter  contained  in  text  books  of 
to-day.  He  said  the  people  wanted  to 
see  the  truth  in  plain  facts  embodied 
in  the  text  books,  and  argued  that  to-dav 
we  find  considerable  bunk  therein.  The 
resolution  was  almost  unanimously  adop- 
ted. 

This  Congress  started  on  its  way  an 
agitation  to  have  all  school  readers  and 
text  books  printed  in  the  province,  ways 
and  means  to  be  decided  upon  by  a  com- 
mission representative  of  the  Govern- 
ment, employing  printers  and  allied  print- 
ing trades  unions.  It  was  pointed  out 
that  in  the  United  States  in  certain 
states  this  policy  had  been  adopted  and 
had  given  highly  satisfactory  results. 

"THRIFT   MAGAZINE"  MAKES 
APPEARANCE 

The  first  number  of  the  "Thrift  Maga- 
zine," published  under  the  direction  of 
the  National  War  Savings  Committee, 
has  made  its  appearance.  It  is  edited  by 
Mr.  W.  J.  Dunlop,  B.A.,  director  of  the 
schools  section  of  the  W.S.S.  organiza- 
tion, who  is  also  editor  of  "The  School." 
The  especial  purpose  of  this  publication 
is  to  further  the  War  Savings  and  Thrift 
Stamps  movement  amon?  the  schools  of 
the  Dominion.  Ten  numbers  are  to  be 
published  by  June,  the  intention  being  to 
br:ng  them  out  at  fortnightly  intervals. 
45 


DEATH  OF  WM.  COLWELL 

William  Colwell,  the  proprietor  of 
Co'well's  bookstore  and  founder 'of  the 
Wallaceburg  "News,"  died  yesterday  at 
the  age  of  78  years.  He  had  been  ac- 
tive in  the  stationery  business  for  more 
thin  fifty  years,  first  at  Mitchell  and 
liter  here.  He  published  papers;  .at 
Mitchell,  West  Lome,  Leamington, 
Paris  and  Wallaceburg.  A  widow  and 
family  of  four  sons  and  five  daughters 
survive   him. — Wallaceburg   "New;s,". 


THE   LATE   WILLIAM    COLWELL 
Veteran   Canadian   Bookseller  and   Stationer 

YARMOUTH  IS  PROSPEROUS 

Messrs.  R.  H.  Davis  &  Co.,  manufac- 
turers of  paper  products,  essences,  etc., 
have  had  a  busy  year.  This  firm  has 
opened  a  branch  at  Sydney,  which  gives 
promise  of  being  a  profitable  venture. 
Anions:  the  retail  dealers  of  Yarmouth 
a  degree  of  prosperity  has  -prevailed 
with  only  one  failure  recorded  during 
the  year. — Yarmouth,  N.S.  "Light."     , 

BUYS  BUSINESS  BLOCK 

Gait,  Ont.,  Jan.  4. — An  important  real 
estate  '  transaction  has  just  been  com- 
pleted, whereby  Frank  H.  Chappie  be- 
comes the  owner  of  the  valuable  Main 
street  property  occupied  at  present  by 
the  Allan  &  McKenzie  hardware  firm. 
This  property  is  next  door  to  the  build- 
ing at  present  occupied  by  Chappie's 
Bookstore.  Mr.  Chappie  said  that  he 
had  made  no  definite  decision  as  to 
whether  he  would  continue  to  do  business 
at  bis  present  location  or  would  move 
into  his  newly  purchased  property. 
♦ 

Miss  E.  Brookbank  has  sold  her  book 
and  stationery  business  at  2455  Yongfc 
Street,  Toronto,  to  E.  M.  Cairnes. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


NEW  AGENCIES 

Frederick  D.  Goodchild  was  in  New- 
York  in  January,  where  he  concluded  ar- 
rangements for  representing  for  Canada 
the  publishing  house  of  James  Pott  & 
Co.,  who  are  specialists  in  Bibles,  mak- 
ing a  complete  range  from  pearl  type 
text  up  to  large  type  illustrated  editions 
and  comprising  teachers'  Bibles,  India 
paper  editions,  Boy  .Scout  and  Khaki 
testaments.  A  feature  of  these  Bibles 
is  the  patented  "Unbreakable  Back" 
binding.  Mr.  Goodchild  made  a  special 
arrangement  with  the  Fleury  H.  Revell 
Co.  for  selling  their  general  line,  and 
also  with  D.  Appleton  &  Co.  for  their 
general  list,  exclusive  of  editions  of 
novels  sold  outright  for  the  Canadian 
market  to  different  Canadian  publishers. 
Another  line  taken  on  was  the  series  of 
automobile  and  airplane  hand-books,  by 
Victor  Page,  in  association  with  other 
authors,  as  published  by  the  Automobile 
Publishing  Co.,  of  Pawtucket,  R.I.  Good- 
childs  will  also  sell  the  toy  book  line  of 
Samuel  Gabriel  &  Sons. 

NEW  MANUFACTURERS'  AGENCY 

J.  H.  Walker  has  opened  an  office  in 
the  Richmond  Building,  33  Richmond 
St.  West,  Toronto,  as  a  manufacturer's 
agent,  selling  stationery  lines.  He  will 
continue  to  carry  the  line  of  the  Luckett 
Loose  Leaf  Co.,  and  has  augmented  this 
by  the  addition  of  certain  lines  of  im- 
ported goods  not  made  in  Canada,  in- 
cluding the  Whiting  &  Cook  Co.,  of 
Holyoke,  Mass.,  extensive  manufacturers 
of  high  grade  correspondence  papers. 

Mr.  Walker  has  had  fifteen  years'  ex- 
perience in  the  trade,  having  for  a  num- 
of  years  been  on  the  road  for  the  United 
Typewriter  Co.,  and  having  been  latterly 
in  charge  of  their  Calgary  branch  before 
establishing  a  commercial  stationery 
business  in  that  city.  Since  1917  he  has 
been  on  the  road  for  the  Luckett  Loose 
Leaf  Co.,  up  to  the  time  of  opening  a 
manufacturers'  agency  business  as  al- 
ready recorded. 

AT  CITY  PRICES 

The  stopping  of  the  radial  car  service 
at  Burlington,  Ont.,  was  taken  advant- 
age of  by  Jocelyn's  book  store  in  that 
town  by  doing  some  good  newspaper  ad- 
vertising of  a  composite  nature,  covering 
various  lines  of  books  and  stationery, 
toys,  phonograph  records,  etc.;  a  six- 
inch  double  column  space  being  used 
with  good  effect.  A  line  prominently 
displayed  was,  "Everything  at  City 
Prices."  The  advisability  of  this  latter 
course  is  questionable  for  two  reasons. 
One  is  that  it  pre-supposes  that  prices 
are  lower  in  the  cities  than  in  the  towns. 
and  the  other  is  that  in  many  cases, 
goods  are  sold  in  the  stationery  stores  of 
small  towns  at  lower  prices  than  in  the 
cities. 

TWO  TYPES  OF   MERCHANTS 

Some  booksellers  have  allowed  their 
minds  to  dwell  altogether  too  much  on 
the  question  of  prices,  giving  this  so 
much  attention  that  it  has  impaired 
their  capacity  for  real  business-building. 
On  the  other  hand,  there  are  fortunately 


many  broader-minded  men  in  the  retail 
trade  who  are  more  anxious  about  the 
selling  quality  of  the  new  lines  offered 
for  the  coming  year's  business.  Thus, 
one  of  the  leading  booksellers  of  the 
country  recently  sought  information  as 
to  what  big  things  were  coming  in  the 
way  of  books,  and  learning  of  new  titles 
by  eminent  authors — books  that  would 
enable  any  energetic  bookseller  to  do  a 
good  grist  of  business — he  became  im- 
bued with  enthusiasm.  With  him  the 
question  of  whether  these  books  were  to 
be  $1.50  or  higher  was  a  secondary  con- 
sideration. 

That  is  the  proper  attitude  for  every 
retailer  to  assume.  There  is  no  ground 
whatever  for  any  assumption  that  books 
can  possibly  become  cheaper  this  year. 
On  the  contrary  they  will  cost  quite  de- 
cidedly more  than  ever  before,  and  the 
autumn  season  advice  from  New  York 
houses  indicates  that  the  $1.75  novel  will 
be  the  rule  rather  than  the  exception. 


TRADE  NEWS 

S.  Plastiff  succeeds  Elmer  E.  William- 
son in  the  stationery  business  and  is  n&w 
located  at  368  Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  one 
door  north  of  the  stand  which  Mr.  Wil- 
liamson occupied. 

T.  S.  Sinnott,  general  manager  of  the 
Imperial  News  Co.,  Ltd.,  has  received 
word  that  his  eldest  son,  after  serving 
three  and  a  half  years  in  France,  has 
arrived  in  London  on  leave. 

The  Imperial  News  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winni- 
peg, have  recently  added  several  other 
American  magazines  to  their  list,  includ- 
ing "Physical  Culture,"  "Review  of  Re- 
views," "Sporting  News,"  a  weekly, 
"Etude"  and  "McClure's." 

W.  C.  Bell,  Toronto,  who  represents 
several  English  book  publishing  houses, 
escaped  the  "flu"  until  the  latter  half 
of  January,  when  it  kept  him  confined  to 
the  house  for  about  two  weeks.  His 
friends  in  the  trade  were  glad  to  enjoy 
his  genial  greeting  when  he  was  able  to 
be  about  again. 

George  Smithers,  of  Macmillan's,  suf- 
fered a  severe  attack  of  influenza  in 
January,  but  is  about  again  and  expects 
to  hit  the  trail  for  the  West  very  short- 
ly. No  sooner  had  he  got  rid  of  the 
"fiu"  than  it  attacked  Hugh  Eayrs,  sales 
manager  at  Macmillan's,  and  he  is  still, 
unfortunately,  unable  to  be  out  of  doors. 

Walter  White,  who  has  for  several 
years  been  the  manager  of  the  Edin- 
burgh House  of  Oliphants,  Ltd.,  has 
been  made  a  director  of  the  firm.  He 
will  be  the  controller  of  their  binding 
works,  which  trade  under  the  name  of 
Anderson  &  Ferrier  at  29-37  St.  Mary 
street,  Edinburgh. 

The  Eversharp  Pencil  Co.,  of  Chicago, 
is  starting  the  year  with  a  wider  distri- 
bution of  pencils  among  stationers  thai) 
it  has  ever  before  possessed.  The  liberal 
advertising  of  the  company  to  assist  sta- 
tioners in  selling  the  pencils  has  proved 
very  beneficial.  During  the  holidays 
many  of  the  pencils  were  purchased  in 
stationery  stores  as  gifts. 
46 


NO  ILL  EFFECTS 

Bob  Stead,  of  the  advertising  fra- 
ternity, and  Robert  J.  C.  Stead,  author 
of  "The  Cow  Puncher,"  are  one  and  the 
same.  The  Welland  "Tribune"  recently 
took  "Bob"  to  task  for  pointing  out 
that  a  review  of  "The  Cow  Puncher" 
had  not  appeared,  although  a  copy  of 
the  novel  had  been  sent  to  that  paper. 
The  author's  reply  was  another  auto- 
graphed copy  of  the  book  with  this  re- 
mark on  the  fly-leaf:  "Here's  hoping 
you  will  find  time  between  chasing  ads 
to  read  this  epistle  and  suffer  no  ill 
effects.— Bob  Stead." 

Then  came  a  goodly  review  in  the 
"Tribune"  beginning  with,  "We  found 
time  to  read  the  first  chapter  and  took 
time  to  finish  the  whole  book  before 
laying  it  down.  There  were  no  ill  ef- 
fects." The  conclusion  of  the  notice 
was  as  follows:  "Having  read  'The 
Cow  Puncher,'  we  shall  be  able  to  'chase 
ads.'  with  a  better  spirit,  and,  we  trust, 
with   more  remunerative  results." 

BRITISH  INDUSTRIES  FAIR 

A  fair  confined  to  the  products  of 
British  manufacturers  will  be  held  in 
February  24  to  March  27  in  London, 
in  the  Pennington  Street  warehouse  of 
the  London  docks.  This  will  be  the 
fourth  fair  of  this  type,  and  only  bona 
fide  trade  buyers  will  be  admitted.  The 
trades  represented  will  be  stationery  and 
paper,  printing,  glass  and  pottery,  fancy 
goods  and  toys. 

APPOINTED  SALES  MANAGER 

William  Brady  has  just  been  appointed 
sales  manager  for  McClelland  and 
Stewart. 

CHANGES  AT  GAGE'S 

At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Board 
of  Directors  of  W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
Sir  William  Gage  resigned  the  presi- 
dency to  become  chairman  of  the  Board, 
and  W.  P.  Gundy  was  elected  president; 
H.  H.  Love,  vice-president;  A.  G.  Parker, 
secretary-treasurer,  and  H.  F.  B.  Kent, 
assistant  general  manager. 

Sir  William  Gage  has  resigned  the 
presidency  of  the  Kinleith  Paper  Mills, 
Ltd.,  becoming  chairman  of  the  Board 
of  Directors.  He  is  succeeded  as  presi- 
dent by  W.  P.  Gundy,  while  H.  F.  B. 
Kent  becomes  vice-president  and  man- 
aging director,  and  Geo.  Jefferson,  sec- 
retary-treasurer. 


RECORD  OF  BRITISH  NAVY 

"The  Record  of  the  British  Navy  in 
the  Great  War,"  by  Archibald  Hurd  and 
H.  H.  Bashford,  is  a  most  important  an- 
nouncement for  early  publication.  It  will 
provide  a  comprehensive  account  of  the 
battles  fought,  of  the  blockades,  and  the 
general  work  of  protection  of  the  Allied 
countries  afforded  during  the  four  years 
of  war  by  the  indomitable  British  Navy. 
Here  is  a  book  for  which  lists  for  ad- 
vance sales  might  well  be  opened  by 
booksellers. 


WANT    COPYRIGHT    PROTECTION 

A  movement  has  been  started  by  a 
number  of  lyric  writers  and  composers, 
who  have  organized  the  Authors'  and 
Composers'  Association  of  Canada,  to 
secure  the  passage  of  a  new  Copyright 
Act. 

Canada,  as  part  of  the  British  Domin- 
ions, was  bound  by  the  Berne  Convention 
of  1887,  but  when  this  was  revised  and 
enlarged  by  the  Berlin  Convention  of 
1908  it  was  arranged  that  the  Imperial 
Government  should  not  ratify  it  on  be- 
half of  a  self-governing  Dominion  until 
the  assent  of  the  latter  was  obtained. 
The  British  Parliament  then  passed  the 
British  Copyright  Act  of  1911,  but  this 
does  not  apply  to  Canada.  Hon.  Sydney 
Fisher  introduced  into  the  House  of 
Commons  that  year  a  bill  to  embody 
the  provisions  of  the  British  Act  of  1911, 
but  owing  to  the  change  of  Government 
it  was  never  passed. 

Our  copyright  laws  are  therefore  very 
much  out  of  date.  The  author  of  a 
Canadian  book  cannot  prevent  moving 
picture  companies  from  reproducing  his 
ideas  without  payment  of  royalty. 
Phonograph  companies  and  player  roll 
manufacturers  are  reproducing  songs  by 
Canadian  writers  without  the  payment 
of  any  royalty  whatever,  whereas  the 
American  Act  of  1909  calls  for  the  pay- 
ment of  2c  per  record  or  roll  to  the 
owner  of  the  copyright,  and  the  British 
Act  of  1911  the  payment  of  5  per  cent, 
of  the  retail  price.  Moreover,  the  United 
States  music  publishers  are  now  refus- 
ing to  consider  a  song  by  a  Canadian 
writer  on  account  of  the  fact  that  they 
cannot  collect  any  mechanical  royalties 
under  their  Copyright  Act,  because 
Canada,  of  course,  has  no  such  provision 
in  her  Act.  It  happens  that  most  of  the 
patriotic  songs  popular  during  the  war 
were  written  by  Canadians,  and  they  do 
not  altogether  subscribe  to  the  belief 
of  a  very  wise  man  "that  if  a  man  were 
permitted  to  make  all  the  ballads  he 
need  not  care  who  should  make  the  laws 
of  a  nation."  The  Association  feels  that 
the  Government  at  the  coming  session 
should  adopt  the  British  Copyright  Act 
of  1911  in  order  to  prevent  the  abuses 
under  which  they  suffer  and  to  counter- 
act conditions  which  tend  to  drive  Can- 
adian authors  and  composers  to  the 
United  States,  where  they  can  secure 
protection     for     their     work.— ' 


"Thy  Son  Liveth,"  a  book  of  consola- 
tion of  the  "Life  after  Death"  type,  is 
to  be  brought  out  in  a  Canadian  edition. 


Here  are  some  statistics  furnished  to 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  by 
Dr.  Locke,  secretary  of  the  Toronto 
Public  Library: 

Use  of  books  in  1918— College,  203,- 
946;  Reference,  166,974;  Dovercourt, 
139,256;  Riverdale,  125,996;  High  Park, 
96,350;  Beaches,  84,430;  Church,  84,108; 
Western,  59,856;  Yorkville,  56,128; 
Queen  &  Lisgar,  54,862;  Wychwood, 
54,367;  Earlscourt,  53,872;  Deer  Park, 
5i,976;  Northern,  29,955;  Eastern, 
16,341. 

Altogether  1,279,417  books  were  used. 
The  influenza  decreased  our  circulation 
by  100,000. 

Boys  and  girls  used  347,510  books, 
and  in  eight  children's  rooms  359,122 
children  were  present  during  the  year. 

The  Beaches  reports  1,000  more  of  fic- 
tion than  High  Park,  but  the  latter  re- 
ports 3,200  more  of  non-fiction  and 
^,000    more   children's   books. 

College  Street  should  be  the  great  fic- 
tion centre  for  it  gets  all  the  new  books, 
hut  fiction  returns  are  90,000,  while  the 
rest  of  the  books  show  113,000. 

Riverdale  and  Deer  Park  show  large 
increases  in  children's  books  notwith- 
standing  the   influenza. 

Deer  Park  shows  highest  proportion 
ot   fiction. 

The  number  of  books  in  foreign  lan- 
guages was  only  5,351. 

Large  increase  in  the  use  of  books  of 
poetry  and  drama. 

A  decided  decrease  in  the  use  of  books 
on  the  Great  War. 

BINDLE  AGAIN 

If  anything  "The  Adventures  of 
Bindle"  is  better  than  the  original 
Bindle  with  which  Herbert  Jenkins  so 
captured  the  hearts  of  many  thousands 
of  readers  on  both  sides  of  the  Atlantic. 
The  new  volume  is  published  by  Gordon 
&z  Gotch,  Toronto. 

There  is  a  most  attractive  jacket  with 
a  picture  in  colors  of  Bindle  himself  in 
his  striped  sport  cap,  with  its  peak  tilted 
down  toward  a  most  humorously  expres- 
sive half-closed  eye. 

One  must  go  back  to  Dickens  and  the 
sundry  associates  of  the  Pickwickians 
to  find  characters  truer  to  the  Cockney 
type,  but  Bindle,  of  course,  belongs  to 
the  ultra  modern  school — quite  different 
from  the  Dickensian  mid-Victorians. 
Bindle  is  as  sharp  as  a  steel  trap,  wittv. 
humorous  and  has  a  philosophy  all  his 
own.  Every  reader's  heart  goes  out  to 
Bindle,  and  the  more  one  gets  to  know 
him  the  stronger  becomes  the  desire  for 
continued  acquaintance. 
47 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN  CANADA 
Fiction 

1-  Dere   Mablc    Streeter  HO 

2 — Four   Horsemen   of  the 

Apoclypse    Ibanez  76 

3 — Joan    and    Peter     Wells  44 

J   -Cow  Puncher Stead  42 

5 — Daughter  of  the  La'nd Porter  40 

6— Golden    Bough    Gibbs  3  i 

Non-Fiction 

1— Three   Times    and    Out McClung  32 

2 — A  Minstrel   in    France Lauder  24 

3— The    Chasm    Moore  20 

1 — Winged   Warfare    . . Bishop  Id 

5 — Industry  and   Humanity    King  16 

6 — Canada's    Day   of   Glory ..  .McKenzie  14 

BEST    SELLING    BOOKS    IN    THE    U.S. 

(As  compiled  by  Baker  &  TaVlor'e  Bulletin) 

1  — Dere    Mable     Streeter 

2 — Shavings    -. Lincoln 

3— Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apoclypse. Ibatiez 
I  -Tne  Magnificent  Ambersons.  .  TarRingtrn 

5  —Joan   and    Peter    Wells 

6-   Tarzan   nnd  the  Jewels  of 

Opar Burroughs 

7— Out  of  the   Silences Waller 

S— A   Minstrel   in   France.  .  .    Ladder 

9— The  Amazing  Interlude   Rinehart 

10— The    Rough    Road     Locke 


BOOK  JOKES 

In  the  book  trade  many  of  the  stand- 
ard jokes  are  built  around  customers' 
mistakes  in  the  titles  of  books.  Of 
course,  booksellers  themselves  some- 
times err  or  disclose  faulty  judgment,  a.-= 
illustrated  by  the  hoary  story  of  the 
clerk  who  directed  an  enquirer  for 
Lamb's  Tales  to  a  butcher  shop.  It  is 
the  unusual  title  that  serves  as  the 
theme  for  elaborate  variations,  thus 
Mrs.  Untermeyer's  "Growing  Pains"  ap- 
peared on  an  order  the  other  day  as 
"Blowing  Pains."  And  in  another  shop 
a  customer  was  astonished  at  the  look 
of  indignation  that  appeared  on  the  face 
of  a  sweet  looking  girl  in  charge  of  the 
poetry  section,  when  he  asked  mildly, 
"Have  you  'Growing  Pains?'"  Fre- 
quently titles  are  deliberately  distorted, 
but  in  few  instances  has  it  been  done  to 
such  good  effect  as  in  the  case  of  Thor- 
stein  Veblen's  new  book,  "The  Higher 
Learning  in  America,"  when  Professor 
Beard  headed  his  review  of  this  volume, 
"The  Hire  Learning,"  thus  sounding 
the  keynote  of  the  work.  In  connection 
with  Veblen's  titles,  the  author  himself 
tells  with  a  chuckle  of  his  friends,  who 
insist  upon  referring  to  his  "The  Nature 
of  Peace"  as  "your  'nature'  book." 


Petrograd  is  the  scene  of  Hugh  Wal- 
pole's  new  novel,  "The  Secret  City,"  in 
which  he  again  turns  to  literary  account 
some  of  his  experiences  and  impressions 
while  serving  with  the  Red  Cross  in 
Russia. 


Selling  Point  Digest  of  Timely  Books 

new1  too^aTephow«TbJtdL7Ul'befoaie^e    Tips  For  Booksellers  About  New  Volumes  and  Standard  Works 


trade  the  possibilities  that  are  open  to  them  in 
developing  sales  of  sta'ndard  books  that  are  par- 
ticularly timely,  as  well  as  the  latest  publications. 


There  is  more  money  for  dealers 
in  selling  well-advertised  products, 
\\  hether  such  products  be  pins  or  pianos, 
foods  or  fads,  fashions  or  fiction.  Why? 
Because  you  have  less  resistance  to  over- 
come in  the  minds  of  prospective  cus- 
tomers in  that  the  advertising  has  put 
them  in  a  favorable  mood  to  entertain 
the  idea  of  buying  what  you  are  trying 
to  sell.  In  fact  it  is  frequently  the  case 
that  they  have  been  half  or  nearly  fully 
sold  by  the  advertising  before  you  even 
begin  to  talk  to  them; 

For  instance,  booksellers  are  reminded 
in  small  advertisements  appearing  each 
month  in  BOOKSELLER  AND  STA- 
TIONER of  three  different  lines  of  stand- 
ard sex  and  health  books,  each  line  of 
\hich  are  extensively  advertised  to  the 
general  public.  Many  booksellers  who 
have  noticed  the  helpful  influence  of 
this  general  publicity,  have  taken  a 
special  interest  in  pushing  their  sale 
with  amazingly  satisfactory  results.  They 
found  that  in  doing  so  they  were  culti- 
vating an  exceedingly  fertile  field,  made 
so  by  the  extensive  general  advertis- 
ing referred  to.  These  are  considera- 
tions which  no  bookseller  should  neglect, 
and  from  time  to  time  they  will  be  post- 
ed along  these  lines  in  this  department 
of  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 
to  help  them  with  different  lines  of 
books. 

PSYCHICAL  BOOKS 

In  this  connection  it  is  most  appro- 
priate to  refer  to  the  great  prominence 
which  has  been  given  to  Dr.  Watson's  re- 
markable book,  "The  Twentieth  Plane" 
in  the  news  columns  of  the  Toronto  press 
and  other  newspapers.  It  created  a 
veritable  sensation,  and  it  is  no  exagger- 
ation that  as  a  result  "everybody  in  To- 
ronto was  talking  about  this  book."  This 
is  a  most  notable  example  of  the  power 
of  publicity,  and  its  effectiveness  in  help- 
ing sales.  The  articles  in  the  newspapers 
and  the  resultant  discussion  created  an 
enormous  demand  for  this  book,  and  some 
of  the  more  alert  booksellers  were  not 
slow  to  take  advantage  of  this  circum- 
stance by  putting  in  special  window  dis- 
plays and  otherwise  advertising  the  book 
so  as  to  direct  prospective  purchasers  to 
their  stores.  There  are  many  other 
books  on  similar  subjects,  notably  "Ray- 
mond," and  "Christopher,"  by  Sir  Oliver 
Lodge,  and  the  novels  by  "Patience 
WoHh,"  advertised  as  having;  been  dic- 
tated by  the  medium  of  the  ouija  board. 
Booksellers  who  have  not  already  done 
so  should  specialize  most  aggressively 
in  pushing  the  sale  of  all  such  books 
because  this  is  a  big  harvest  time  for 
such  sales,  and  this  will  probably  be  true 
for  months  to  come. 

SEQUEL  TO  DERE  MABLE 

A  unique  record  as  a  best  seller  was 
established  in  1918  by  "Dere  Mable,"  and 


the  coining  of  further  love  letters  by  the 
same  "rookie,"  entitled,  "That's  Me  All 
Over,  Mable,"  should  be  an  inspiration 
to  booksellers  because  it  stands  to  reason 
in  view  of  the  extraordinary  hit  made  by 
the  first  volume,  that  the  many  thous- 
ands who  so  enjoyed  it  are  going  to  en- 
thusiastically welcome  the  new  volume, 
and  the  booksellers  should  not  lose  sight 
oi  the  fact  that  this  is  at  the  same  time 
going  to  create  additional  demands  for 
the  first   volume  as  well. 

BOOKS  BY  IBANEZ 

Another  of  the  really  big  sensations  of 
the  1918  fall  publishing  season  was  the 
appearance  of  "The  Four  Horsemen  of 
the  Apocalypse,"  by  the  Spanish  author. 
Ibanez,  which  went  to  nearly  sixty  edi- 
tions in  a  remarkably  short  time  in  the 
United  States,  but  which  is  only  now 
really  coming  into  its  own  in  the  Cana- 
dian trade.  A  new  book  by  this  author 
is  about  to  come.  Its  title  is  "The 
Cabin,"  and  in  view  of  the  complete 
arrival  of  his  other  book  .this  new  one 
will  be  sure  to  be  well  received,  especial- 
1\  if  booksellers  are  alive  to  the  situa- 
tion. 

FIGHTING  THE  HUN 

A  new  book  of  the  war  which  has 
special  Canadian  significance  is  the  re- 
cord of  three-and-a-half  years'  experi- 
ences at  the  front  with  the  Royal  Cana- 
dian Dragoons,  of  Sergt. -Major  William 
R  Jones,  a  volunteer  from  the  United 
States.  Its  title  is,  "Fighting  the  Huns 
From  Saddle  and  Trench."  The  narrative 
is  related  in  a  most  interesting  manner, 
the  natural  and  ready  wit  of  the  author 
greatly  relieving  the  effect  of  the 
horrors  which  are  necessarily  detailed. 
It  is  an  illustrated  volume.  The  fact 
that  it  is  the  story  of  a  United  States 
fighter  with  a  Canadian  force  is  one  that 
should  be  played  up  by  booksellers  in  ex- 
ploiting this  volume  in  their  sales  efforts. 

A    SIR    RIDER   HAGGARD   WINDOW 

In  his  new  novel,  "Moon  of  Israel," 
Sir  Rider  Haggard  tells  the  story  of  the 
Exodus  of  the  Israelites  from  Egypt,  as 
it  might  have  appeared  to  an  Egyptian, 
Ana,  who  took  a  leading  part  in  the 
circumstances  which  surrounded  that 
tremendous  event.     The  lines  of  the  Old 


Testament  narative  are  followed  closely, 
but  the  narrator,  the  scribe  and  novelist. 
Anana,  or  Ana  as  he  is  here  called, 
naturally  puts  his  own  interpretation 
upon  some  of  these  happenings.  To  him 
they  seem  to  represent  a  war  between 
the  God  of  Israel  and  the  gods  of  the 
Egyptians,  of  whom  Amon,  or  Amen, 
was  t>he  chief,  as  indeed  they  did  ac- 
cording to  the  Bible.  It  remains  to  be 
added  that  Anana  or  Ana  really  lived  in 
the  time  of  Seti  II,  and  was  the  author, 
among  other  romances,  of  the  famous 
"Tale  of  the  Two  Brothers." 

The  period  is  that  which  is  generally 
accepted  as  the  date  of  Exodus,  at  or 
about  the  end  of  the  reign  of  Pharaoh 
Meneptah,  the  son  of  Rameses  the  Great, 
and  it  is  based  on  the  theory  which  the 
late  Sir  Gaston  Maspero  informed  its 
writer  he  considered  quite  probable,  that 
the  usurper,  Amenmeses,  immediately 
succeeded  Meneptah  and  was  the  actual 
Pharaoh  of  the  Exodus.  The  love  in- 
terest in  the  tale  is  furnished  by  its 
heroine,  a  Hebrew  lady  named  Merapi, 
Moon  of  Israel. 

Booksellers,  in  displaying  and  adver- 
tising this  book  should  also  feature  re- 
prints and  cheaper  editions  of  all  of  this 
noted  novelist's  other  books.  A  most 
effective  Rider  Haggard  window  could 
be  devised,  thus  giving  the  filip  to  the 
sales  of  all  of  his  books,  besides  increas- 
ing the  interest  in  this  latest  of  Sir 
Rider's  novels. 

ITALIAN  NAVAL  POWER 

An  interesting  book  which  has  just 
come  from  Constables,  of  London,  is, 
"Italian  Naval  Power  in  the  Great  War," 
by  the  well  known  naval  authority, 
Archibald  Hurd.  The  writer  goes  back 
into  history  into  the  middle  of  the  last 
century,  which  saw  the  rise  of  the  Italian 
nation  as  it  is  now  constituted.  He  then 
takes  up  the  origin  and  the  collapse  of 
the  Triple  Alliance  and  proceeds  to  deal 
with  the  modern  .  Italian  navy,  with 
special  reference  to  the  part  it  played 
in  the  Great  War.  Booksellers  would 
do  well  to  have  a  special  shelf  of  books 
on  naval  subjects,  especially  those  hav- 
ing real  significance  in  connection  with 
the  Great  War. 

THE  NEW  STATE 

Another  work  similar  in  scope  to 
Mackenzie  King's  "Industry  and  Hu- 
manity" is  M.  P.  Follett's  "The  New- 
State, "  which  deals  with  group  organiz- 
ation as  the  solution  of  popular  Gov- 
ernment. The  most  striking  character- 
istic of  present  political  theory  is  its 
taction  against  the  state.  The  most 
salient  political  fact  to-day  is  the  in- 
creasing amount  and  power  of  group- 
life — trade-unions,  professional  societies, 
citizens'  leaeues,  neighborhood  associa- 
tions, etc.  The  most  pressing  political 
problem   is  the    relation     of     all     these 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


groups  to  one  another  and  to  the  state. 
All  this  indicates  a  new  state.  This 
book  seeks  to  find  the  essential  princi- 
ples which  shall  underlie  the  new  state 
through  an  analysis  of  the  psychological 
basis    of   group    organization. 

The  members  of  the  trade  will  find 
that  the  great  interest  in  this  subject, 
evidenced  by  the  good  reception  of  "In- 
dustry and  Humanity,"  will  enable  them 
to  sell  other  books  of  the  same  character. 

CHANCE    FOR   FOLLOW-UP   SALES 

A  novel  which  is  a  reply  to  Waugh's 
"Loom  of  Youth"  is  to  come  shortly,  be- 
ing the  work  of  Martin  Browne.  Its 
title  is,  "A  Dream  of  Youth."  Not  only 
should  booksellers  be  able  to  interest, 
with  this  new  book,  those  to  whom  they 
sold  "The  Loom  of  Youth,"  but  new  sales 
of  both  novels  should  result  from  featur- 
ing this  new  book. 

MARIAN  KEITH 

"In  Orchard  Glen,"  by  Marian  Keith, 
who  won  her  way  so  well  with  Duncan 
Polite  and  her  subsequent  novels,  is  an- 
other idyll  of  the  Scotch  folk  of  Ontario. 
It  presents  a  most  entertaining  love 
story  of  the  two  "ugly  ducklings"  of  the 
village  where  the  greater  part  of  the 
action  of  the  story  takes  place,  and  with 
it  is  provided  a  fund  of  whimsical  humor, 
vivid  drama,  and  characterization  of  dis- 
tinctly high  order,  the  spirit  of  war- 
time Canada  furnishing  a  strong  back- 
ground. Here  is  another  instance  where 
booksellers  have  an  opportunity  for 
specialization  whereby  they  may  de- 
velop sales  for  this  author's  previous 
books  as  well  as  this  new  one.  Marian 
Keith  has  a  place  all  her  own  in  Cana- 
dian fiction  and  there  will  be  a  natural 
demand  for  all  her  books,  but  the  trade 
can  greatly  augment  this  by  good  per- 
sistent bookselling  effort. 

LYRICS  FOR  MUSIC 

The  melodic  quality  of  Irene  McLeod's 
poetry  appeals  instantly  to  composers.  It 
is  too  soon  for  musicians  to  have  used 
any  of  the  lyrics  in  her  new  volume, 
"Before  Dawn,"  but  they  have  drawn 
on  the  treasury  that  "Songs  to  Save  a 
Soul"  and  "Swords  for  Life"  represent. 
Among  composers  who  have  recently 
supplied  musical  settings  for  Miss  Mc- 
Leod's poetry  are  Sidney  Homer  and 
Cecil   Forsyth. 

1?19  CENTENARIES 

This  year's  centenaries  include  James 
Russell  Lowell,  Charles  Kingsley,  and 
Walt  Whitman.  The  commemoration  of 
these  literary  celebrities  will  give  book- 
sellers an  opportunity  for  creating  a  big 
revival  in  the  sale  of  their  books.  This 
is  also  the  centenary  year  of  the  late 
Queen  Victoria,  which  is  also  of  literary 
significance. 

ECONOMY  OF  THE  WAR 

"The  Romance  of  the  Food  Adminis- 
tration," by  F.  C.  Wallcott  is  an  im- 
portant new  book  which  deals  with  the 
great  work  done  by  Hoover,  the  U.  S. 
food  controller.  Another  new  issue  of 
importance  to  economists  is  Clarence 
W.  Barron's  "War  Finance." 


THE  SAME  OLD  BILL 

Thousands  of  Canadian  readers  who 
read  "Dere  Mable,"  as  witness  its  posi- 
tion as  the  best  selling  book  in  Canada 
for  the  past  three  months,  will  welcome 
the  sequel,  "That's  Me  All  Over,  Mable," 
which  has  just  been  published  by-Briggs. 
There  is  the  same  uproarious  humor  and, 
with  the  same  elements  that  made  the 
first  book  such  an  outstanding  success, 
the  new  volume  should  score  a  similar 
hit.  Interest  is  added  by  the  fact  that  a 
third  book  to  be  entitled  "Dere  Bill: 
Mable's  Love  Letters  to  Her  Rookie,"  is 
now  in  active  preparation. 

WHO  CARES? 

Cosmo  Hamilton's  new  book  is  char- 
acterized as  being  a  novel  of  rebellious 
youth.  It's  title  is  "Who  Cares?"  It 
deals  with  a  boy  and  girl,  high  spirited, 
healthy,  normal,  vital  and  imaginative, 
flung  suddenly  upon  their  own  resources, 
buying  their  own  experiences,  opening 
the  secrets  and  the  seriousness  of  life 
themselves  without  guidance,  and  com- 
ing out  of  a  great  adventure  hurt  and 
with  the  price  to  pay,  but  not  damaged 
because  of  the  inherent  sense  of  clean- 
liness which  belongs  to  both. 

Handling  this  difficult  and  hitherto  un- 
attempted  theme  in  an  accomplished 
manner,  the  author  of  "The  Blindness  of 
Virtue"  and  "Scandal"  has  told  a  story 
of  surpassing  human  interest  and  move- 
ment. 

JAVA  HEAD 

Joseph  Hergesheimer,  author  of  "The 
Three  Black  Pennys,"  has  written  a  new 
novel  of  the  American  merchant  marine 
at  the  beginning  of  the  great  clipper 
ship  era.  It  is  laid  in  Salem,  when  that 
city  was  still  a  port  rich  with  the  traffic 
of  the  East  Indies;  a  story  of  choleric 
ship  masters,  charming  girls,  and  an 
aristocratic  Manchu  woman  in  carmine 
and  jades  and  crusted  gold.  There  is  a 
drama  as  secret  and  poisonous  as  opium, 
lovely  old  gardens  with  lilac  trees  and 
green  lattices,  and  elm-shaded  streets 
ending  at  the  harbor  with  the  brigs  un- 
loading ivory  from  Africa  and  the  ships 
crowding  on  their  topsails  for  Canton. 
U  is  a  romantic  novel — and  yet  true — 
rather  than  a  study  of  drab  manners; 
there  is  no  purpose  in  it  other  than  the 
pleasure  to  be  found  in  the  spectacle  of 
life  supported  by  high  courage  and  made 
beautiful  by  women  in  peacock  shawls. 
The  title  is  "Java  Head." 

KIDDIES 

J.  J.  Bell,  who  gave  us  "Wee  MacGreeg- 
or,"  is  entitled  to  a  lot  of  thanks  for 
another  delectable  volume  entitled 
"Kiddies,"  in  which  the  small  boy  and 
his  mischief  are  portrayed  as  an  enter- 
tainment for  his  elders.  The  wee  Scotch 
and  English  laddies  whose  stories  are 
here  related  are  examples  of  that  per- 
fection of  conduct  which  is  noticeable  in 
"Weeans"  the  world  over.  "Wee  Mac- 
greegor"  and  the  other  heroes  of  the  nar- 
ratives keep  the  reader  in  an  enjoyable 
state  half-way  between  laughter  and 
tears. 

This  book  has  just  been  published  by 
the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 

49 


MARY   OLIVIER 

Among  the  big  things  to  coine  this 
season  is  a  novel  by  May  Sinclair,  to  be 
entitled,  "Mary  Olivier."  This  author 
scored  so  tremendously  with  "The  Tree 
of  Heaven"  that  a  big  call  for  this  new 
work  of  hers  may  confidently  be  anti- 
cipated  by  booksellers. 

NEW  AND  FORTHCOMING 

•  "Clemenceau,  the  Man  and  His  Times" 
is  to  come  shortly. 

A  new  edition  of  "The  Canadian 
Lawyer"  is  to  come. 

"The  Roll  Call,"  Arnold  Bennett's  new 
book,  appears  this   month. 

An  important  February  issue  is  Hugh 
Walpole's  novel,  "The  Secret  City." 

Robert  Norwood's  new  book,  "The 
Man  of  Kerioth,"  is  to  appear  shortly. 

B.  M.  Bower  is  to  the  fore  with  an- 
other new  novel,  "The  Thunder  Bird." 

"The  Curious  Quest,"  the  new  Oppen- 
heim  novel,  is  in  this  author's  best  vein. 

"The  Avalanche  "  is  the  title  of  Ger- 
trude Atherton's  new  novel  of  the  Great 
War. 

"Rules  of  Order,"  by'  Bourinot,  in  a 
new  edition,  is  down  for  early  publica- 
tion. 

In  March  will  apear  "The  Boy  Scout 
Handbook,"  Canada,  official  and  author- 
ized. 

Leslie  Homer  has  compiled  a  volume 
of  "Fifty  Famous  Canadian  Stories." 
The  book  is  almost  ready. 

Ralph  Connor's  "Sky  Pilot  in  No 
Man's  Land,"  postponed  from  the  late 
autumn,  is  to  appear  this  month. 

"Hospital  Love  Stories,"  by  Mary 
Roberts  Rinehart,  is  an  interesting  an- 
nouncement for  early  publication. 

New  issues  to  come  in  the  Thornton 
Burgess  Bedtime  Stories  are,  "Bob 
White,"  and  '01'  Mistah  Buzzard." 

Irvin  Cobb's,  "Eating  in  Two  or  Three 
Languages,"  is  a  new  volume  similar  in 
size  to  his  "Speaking  of  Operations." 

"Across  the  Years;  Reminiscences 
Political  and  Personal,"  by  Sir  John 
Willison,  is  an  important  new  book  near- 
ly ready. 

"The  Navy  in  Battle,"  by  Arthur 
Pollen,  is  a  $2.50  book  that  should  fill 
a  big  place  in  bookselling  this  season, 
as  also  should  the  same  author's  "The 
Future  of  Sea  Power." 


NO  LICENSES  REQUIRED 

For  some  time  it  has  been  an  under- 
standing that  licenses  would  be  freely- 
granted  to  import  greeting  cards  from 
Britain  and  the  United  States,  and  the 
issuing  of  licenses  has  been  simply  a 
matter  of  form,  although  taking  up  con- 
siderable time  and  thereby  incon- 
veniencing all  concerned.  Word  has  now- 
come  that  licenses  are  no  longer  neces- 
sary, which  means  that  the  embargo  on 
greeting  cards  and  similar  goods  affect- 
ed is  completely  lifted.  This  will  be  good 
news  to  the  retailers,  who  have  from 
time  to  time  been  put  to  the  incon- 
venience of  having  to  obtain  licenses  to 
bring  in  shipments. 


H  0  0  K  S K L  L  E  R      AND     STATIONER 


NEW   EDITION  OF  KING'S  BOOK 

Following  two  editions  of  Hon.  Mac- 
kenzie King's  great  book,  "Industry  and 
Humanity,"  comes  the  announcement  of 
a  special  Canadian  edition  at  $2. 

CAESAR   OR  NOTHING 

Another  famous  Spanish  novelist,  Pio 
Barajo,  is  to  be  introduced  to  American 
leaders  with  a  translation  of  his  most 
noted  novel,  "Caesar  or  Nothing." 

SAINT'S  PROGRESS 

John  Galsworthy  has  produced  a  new 
story  with  the  Great  War  as  a  back- 
ground in  his  "Saint's  Progress,"  about 
to  appear.  The  chief  characters  are  two 
women. 

LEA COCK 

Stephen  Leacock's  new  humorous  book 
is  a  satiric  vision  of  the  Hohenzollerns 
and  the  Hapsburgs  coming  to  America  as 
emigrants  to  earn  their  own  livings. 
Needless  to  say  the  humorist  provides 
the  reader  with  a  great  fund  of  mirth, 
and  booksellers  will  undoubtedly  find 
this  to  be  a  ready  seller. 

WAR'S  SOLE  CAUSE 

Significance  is  lent  Andre  Cheradane's 
new  book  by  reason  of  its  title:  "The 
Soie  Cause  of  the  War"  which  book- 
sellers will  doubtless  find  a  great  pro- 
moter of  snles  for  this  book. 

ROOSEVELT  BOOKS 

"The  Life  of  Theodore  Roosevelt,"  by 
William  Draper  Lewis,  just  issued,  has 
an  introduction  by  ex-President  Taft. 
This  is  a  $2.25  volume. 

"Theodore  Roosevelt:  The  Logic  of  His 
Career,"  by  Charles  G.  Washburn,  is  be- 
ing brought  out  in  a  Canadian  edition 
at  $1.65. 

THE   ANCIENT   GRUDGE 

Owen  Wister  has  written  a  book  which 
will  pique  the  interest  of  Canadian 
loaders  in  a  very  particular  manner,  as 
it  deals  with  anti-British  prejudice  in 
the  United  States. 

MAETERLINCK'S    NEW    PLAY 

Belgian  and  German  character  brought 
into  contrast  will  prove  a  source  of 
ydded  interest  in  Maeterlinck's  new  play, 
"The  Burgomaster  of  Stilemonde."  The 
book  is  down  for  early  publication. 

IBANEZ   AGAIN 

"Mare  Nostrum"  (Our  Sea)  is  the  title 
of  the  new  novel  by  Ibanez,  the  author 
of  "The  Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apoca- 
'ypse."  The  new  book  will  appear  very 
shortly. 

WHICH? 

Jim  Clarke,  a  young;  lawyer,  is  en- 
gaged to  a  splendid  girl,  but  his  worldly 
lesources  do  not  measure  up  to  the  re- 
quirements of  her  family.  So  she  is 
induced  to  marry  a  more  acceptable 
suitor — a  "marriage  of  friendship,"  she 
calls  it,  in  which  love  has  no  pl'ice.  Can 
she  forget — or  even  ignore,  her  real 
lover?  Should  she?  This  is  the  theme 
of  Mary  Hastings  Bradley's  new  novel, 


"The  Wine  of  Astonishment."  The  in- 
tense human  appeal  of  the  problem  is 
such  that  booksellers  will  find  that  in 
many  cases  they  will  need  only  to  in- 
troduce the  book  to  make  a  sale. 

THE  CUP  OF  FURY 

Among  the  new  spring  novels  will  be 
"The  Cup  of  Fury,"  by  Rupert  Hughes. 
This  is  a  political  novel. 

ENGLAND  IN  THE  WAR  PERIOD 

A  novel  is  to  come  this  season  from 
the  English  author,  W.  L.  George.  The 
title  is  yet  to  be  chosen.  It  deals  with 
England  socially,  in  the  war  period. 

THE   WAY  OF   MAN 

Woman's  economic  independence  is  the 
theme  of  Thomas  Dixon's  new  novel,  to 
be  entitled,  "The  Way  of  Man." 

HISTORY  OF  THE  WAR 

Francis  A.  March  has  written  a  com- 
prehensive "History  of  the  World  War" 
which  is  about  to  be  published  in  a  $3.25 


E.    PHILLIPS    OPPENHEIM 

Whoso  new  novel  is  "The  Curious  Quest,"  has  just 
appeared. 


edition.  It  includes  "Canada's  Part  in 
the  War,"  by  Col.  George  G.  Nasmith, 
C.M.G.,  M.A.,  Ph.D.,  D.Sc.  Written 
frankly  from  the  viewpoint  of  the  Allies, 
this  book  visualizes  the  bloodiest  and 
most  destructive  conflict  of  all  ages, 
from  its  remote  causes  to  its  glorious 
conclusion    and   beneficent   results. 

DAWN 

Eleanor  Porter's  new  story,  "Dawn" 
to  come  soon,  is  a  tale  of  a  blind  boy 
who  achieves  self-mastery  and  success 
and  then  devotes  his  life  to  th«  service 
of  soldiers  blinded  in  the  war. 

THE  TIN  SOLDIER 

Temple  Bailey's  new  story  "The  Tin 
Soldier,"  published  by  The  Copp,  Clark 
Co.,  is  a  picture  of  America  going  into 
the  world  war  with  bravely  smiling 
countenance,  sure  of  the  ultimate  victory 
and  final  happiness  to  be  brought  about 
by  the  justice  of  the  cause  espoused. 
50 


The  tale  is  of  a  man  who  wishes  to 
fight  for  his  country,  but  who  is  bound 
by  a  promise  he  cannot  in  honor  break 
— that's  Derry.  A  girl  who,  because 
she  loves  him,  shares  his  humiliation  and 
suffering,  and  helps  him  to  win  through 
— that's  Jean.  These  two  and  others  are 
caught  in  great  world  currents,  trying 
with  sacrifice  to  preserve  what  they  hold 
dear  and  do  their  duty  with  loyal  ser- 
vice. 

SECRET  SERVICE  NOVEL 

The  many  readers  of  "Limpy"  will 
welcome  the  same  author's  new  novel, 
"The  Apartment  Next  Door,"  soon  to 
appear.  Advance  reports  have  it  that 
with  this  new  story  Mr.  Johnston  has 
done  something  even  better  than 
"Limpy."  It  deals  with  an  altogether 
different  theme,  being  a  story  of  the 
U.S.  Secret  Service,  and  of  the  ingen- 
ious methods  of  German  plotters,  to- 
gether with  the  clever  ways  in  which 
they  were  thwarted. 

MINNIGLEN 

Agnes  and  Egerton  Castle's  "Min- 
niglen,"  a  Copp,  Clark  Co.  issue,  is  a 
novel  of  the  wild  Cameron  country  of 
Scotland  with  transfers  in  scene  to  Lon- 
don. It  sets  forth  the  complicated  love 
story  of  Anne  Joceylyn,  a  spirited  Eng- 
lish society  girl,  and  Allan  McClung,  the 
young  laird  of  Minniglen.  There  is  a 
wealth  of  incident,  including  the  adven- 
ture of  a  girl  lost  in  the  northern  mist, 
the  gay  frivolities  of  a  Scottish  house- 
party  and  exciting  scenes  among  Lon- 
don   suffragettes. 

A  NEW  DICTIONARY 

"Webster's  New  Handy  Dictionary,"  in 
a  32c-edition  of  handy  size,  suitable; 
for  the  pocket  and  also  most  adaptable 
for  use  by  stenographers  and  school 
pupils,  has  just  been  put  out  by  the 
Copp,  Clark  Co.  It  is  a  clear-type  dic- 
tionary and  is  thoroughly  up-to-date  as 
indicated  by  the  fact  that  "camouflage" 
and  other  strictly  new  "English"  words 
are  in  it.  It  is  a  worthy  addition  to 
staples  of  booksellers. 

GUIDE  TO  ONTARIO  LAWS 

Mrs.  Edith  Hollington  Lang,  B.A.,  of 
Toronto,  has  done  the  average  man  and 
woman  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  a 
real  serviced  compiling  a  "Handy  Guide 
to  the  Laws  of  Ontario,"  a  book  of  110 
pages  published  by  The  Copp,  Clark  Co. 
It  is  a  book  of  interest  to  social  work- 
ers, and  to  all  desiring  information  on 
the  laws  regarding  the  common  affairs 
of  every-day   life. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  chapter 
headings— The  Franchise  Acts,  Laws  Re- 
lating to  Children,  Husband  and  Wife, 
The  Criminal  Code,  Laws  Relating  to 
Public  Health,  Liquor  and  Cigarettes, 
Laws  Relating  to  Persons  Va  Industry, 
Laws  Relating  to  Municipal  Affairs, 
Education,  The  Prison  System,  Wills, 
etc.,  Laws  Relating  to  Property,  Land- 
lord and  Tenant,  Laws  Relating  to  the 
Public  Lands,  Miscellaneous,  The  Admin- 
istration  of  the   Law. 


Why  Books  Have  Increased  So  Greatly 


In  the  January  issue  information  was  given 
about  the  sharp  advance  in  book  prices  indi- 
cated by  advice  from  leading  U.  S.  publishers. 
Now  follow  some  of  the  reasons  for  the  advances. 


Something  About  the  Trade  Conditions  That  Have  Boosted  the 

Cost  of  Production 


SOMETHING  was  said  last  month 
about  the  big  increase  in  the  price 
of  books  in  the  United  States  be- 
coming effective  with  the  beginning  of 
1919,  an  increase  that  will  average  over 
25  per  cent.  The  "Bookseller's  Turn- 
over" gives  some  statistics  of  the  book 
publishing  trade,  increased  costs  of  raw 
materials,  and  of  labor.  Here  is  the 
array  of  cost  increases  since  1914: 

Per  cent 

Book  cloth 100 

Cloth  board  over     100 

Super   (gauze)    300 

Labor    30-35 

Glue    100 

End  sheet  paper  (white)   3J/2-10c 

These  figures,  it  should  be  explained, 
were  given  in  round  numbers,  and  repre- 
sent spur-of-the-moment  responses  to  the 
interviewer's  question  rather  than  any 
attempt  at  minute  accuracy;  they  may 
be  accepted  without  question,  however, 
as  reflecting  the  situation  with  substan- 
tial accuracy. 

The  greatest  increases  in  labor  costs 
have  taken  place  during  the  last  year, 
one  jump  dating  back  to  December,  1917, 
the  other  to  this  past  September.  Indeed, 
so  great  were  the  advances  forced  by 
the  printing  trades  unions  during  the 
latter  month  that  large  printing  estab- 
lishments have  one  by  one  raised  their 
prices  20  to  25  per  cent.,  even  to  their 
old  customers. 

As  for  leather,  the  advance  in  raw 
material  has  been  even  greater  in  pro- 
portion than  in  the  case  of  cloth.  For 
instance,  the  grade  known  as  plain  buff- 
ing was  8V3  cents  of  foot  four  years  ago 
— now  it  is  over  20  cents. 

The  paper  trade  reveals  a  similar  con- 
dition of  affairs.  According  to  a  repre- 
sentative of  the  J.  W.  Butler  Paper 
Company,  of  Chicago,  paper  of  any  grade 
which,  roughly  speaking,  cost  5  cents  in 
1914,  costs  11  cents  now,  and  in  some 
lines  there  have  been  repeated  advances 
within  the  last  few  months — with  no  in- 
dication of  any  material  recessions  for 
a  lone  time  to  come,  and  even  with  the 
possibility  of  still  more  altitudinous 
figures  before  we  are  through  with  the 
effects   of  the   war. 

The  following-  figures  represent  in- 
creases in  the  past  four  years  in  other 
incidentals  entering  into  book  manufac- 
ture: 

Per  cent. 

Paper    50-100 

Inks    (average)    50 

Inks,  colored as  high  as  200-300 

Electrotype  metal   30 

Linotvpe   metal    70 

Gasoline     60 

Wipers  (waste)    150 

Rollers    100 

Wire  for  stitching 40 

Lubricating  oil 40 


Is  it  any  wonder,  in  view  of  such  aug- 
mented costs  all  up  and  down  the  long 
line,  that  publishers  have  been  obliged 
at  last  to  raise  their  list  prices?  In- 
deed, is  it  not  rather  a  source  of  wonder 
that  they  have  been  willing  or  able  to 
sit  tight  so  long,  and  that  now  their  ad- 
vances (which  are  still  occurring  and 
may  continue  to  be  looked  for  until  manu- 
facturing costs  begin  to  swing  the  other 
way)  have  been  so  modest  in  com- 
parison ? 


BUCHAN'S  WAR  HISTORY 

The  20th  volume  of  "Nelson's  History 
of  the  War,"  by  John  Buchan,  came  last 
r-onth.  It  deals  with  the  summer  cam- 
paign of  1917.  With  the  conclusion  of 
the  war  it  should  appeal  to  all  book- 
sellers that  they  can  now,  by  a  genuine 
effort,  makes  sales  of  the  complete  series 
to  quite  a  number  of  the  regular  book 
buyers  among  their  customers.  The 
idea  will  appeal  to  substantial  citizens 
who  have  not  already  bought  these  books 
as  they  appeared.  Some  live  booksellers 
have  had  regular  sales,  in  some  cases  as 
high  as  fifty  copies  a  month,  to  cus- 
tomers who  subscribed  at  the  beginning 
to  have  the  local  bookseller  supply  them 
with  the  issues  of  this  war  history  as 
they   appeared. 


5.000  FACTS 

The  1919  edition  of  "5,000  Facts  About 
Canada"  is  out,  and  is  meeting  with  an 
active  sale.  Its  compiler,  Frank  Yeigh, 
has  again  brought  within  small  compass 
a  wealth  of  data  regarding  the  Dominion, 
put  in  concrete  form  and  quicklv  acces- 
sible. The  compilation  of  Canadian  and 
British  war  facts  is  a  new  feature. 


LOANS  AND   DISCOUNTS 

In  Shaw's  Banking  Series,  a  recent 
issue  is  "Loans  and  Discounts,"  present- 
ing proved  methods  that  build  business, 
tested  time-saving  systems  and  records 
tor  loans  of  every  sort,  lending  to  farm- 
ers, and  how  to  increase  earnings.  From 
the  standpoint  of  the  banker,  loans  and 
discounts,  large  or  small,  are  of  vitai 
importance. 

The  granting  of  a  "safe"  loan  spells 
profit.  Yet  the  mere  fact  that  it  is 
"safe"  does  not  satisfy  the  progressive 
banker.  How  can  it  be  handled  thorough- 
ly— yet  inexpensively — and  in  the  quick- 
est possible  time?  Just  such  questions 
as  these  are  answered  in  this  volume. 
It  tells  how  to  simplify  the  necessary 
routine  work — gives  a  clear-cut  descrip- 
tion of  tested  methods  for  handling  all 
types  of  loans — answers  many  of  the 
most  imnortant  problems  of  this  depart- 
ment of  banking. 

51 


TAKE  OVER  CASSELL  LINE 

With  the  return  of  Mr.  McClelland,  of 
McClelland  &  Stewart  Ltd.,  from  a  trip 
to  England,  came  the  announcement  last 
month  of  the  taking  over  by  this  firm 
of  the  Canadian  business  of  the  House 
of  Cassell.  The  accession  of  the  Cassell 
line  is  an  obviously  advantageous  one 
for  this  enterprising  house.  The  Cassell 
publications  are  most  extensive,  and 
they  circulate  largely  throughout  the 
English  speaking  world.  Notable  among 
their  publications  is  that  prime  favorite, 
"Chums,"  the  annual  which  holds  the 
record  as  being  the  best  selling  of  all 
pnnuals.  The  Cassell  dictionaries  con- 
stitute an  important  branch  of  the  line 
as  to  their  gardening  books. 

Among  the  other  firms  now  represent- 
ed for  Canada  by  McClelland  &  Stewart 
Ltd.,  are  the  Century  Co.,  Geo.  H.  Doran 
Co.,  Norman  W.  Henley  Co.,  Theo  Audel 
Co.,  The  Ronald  Press  Co.,  all  of  New 
York;  Henry  Altemus  Co.,  of  Philadel- 
phia; Whitman  Publishing  Co.,  Racine, 
Wisconsin,  and  the  Cambridge  Bible  and 
Prayer  Book  line  is  controlled  for  Can- 
ada. 

Mr.  Boyd,  who  has  been  manager  of 
Cassell  &  Co.'s  Canadian  house,  joins  the 
McClelland  &  Stewart  staff  to  have 
special  charge  of  the  Cassell  publica- 
tions. 

Mr.  Stewart  will  cover  Toronto,  Mont- 
real, and  Ottawa,  while  the  other  mem- 
bers of  the  travelling  staff  this  year  will 
be  W.  J.  Brady,  the  West  and  Western 
Ontario;  Chas.  J.  Cranfield,  Northern 
Ontario  and  the  West;  Joseph  H.  Jeffries, 
Eastern  Ontario,  the  Maritime  Provinces 
and  Newfoundland,  and  Norman  B. 
Knowles,  Ontario. 

In  the  middle  of  March,  McClelland  & 
Stewart,  Ltd.,  will  move  from  their  pre- 
sent quarters  at  266  King  Street  West 
to  215-219  Victoria  Street,  where  they 
will  occupy  two  floors,  giving  them  more 
than  double  their  present  space.  They 
have  for  some  time  been  cramped  in  their 
piesent  quarters  and  with  the  addition 
of  the  Cassell  line  this  move  to  larger 
quarters   became   imperative. 


A    NEW    PARKER   NOVEL 

Sir  Gilbert  Parker  has  written  a  new 
novel  of  the  Canadian  West  entitled, 
"Wild  Youth  and  Another."  This  is  to 
appear  in  the  early  spring.  The  com- 
ing of  a  novel  by  this  premier  Canadian 
novelist  is  always  a  Canadian  literary 
event  of  the  first  magnitude,  and  natur- 
a'y  creates  enthusiasm  on  the  part  of 
retail  booksellers. 


"The  Mary  Frances  Knitting  Book," 
which  was  to  have  come  in  the  autumn, 
but  which  had  to  be  postponed,  has  at 
last  appeared. 


More  About  the  1919  Trade  Outlook 


The    drastic    increases    in    book    prices    ce 
create  a   problem,    but  the  general   feeling 
the    outlook     is     for    another    good     yea'r's    trade. 
There    is    little   or  no   indication    of   lower  prices    in 
stationery  lines. 


£*&£     Representative  Members  of  the  Trade,  Wholesale  and  Retail, 

Express  Their  Views 


What   About  Library  Trade? 

Toronto  Jan.   24th,   1919. 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER: 

You  have  asked  for  a  1919  forecast. 
All  the  "sure  enough"  prophets  are  now 
dead,  and  it  is  a  brave  man  who  at- 
tempts prophecy,  but  here  are  a  few 
rambling  suggestions. 

The  greatest  foe  to  continued  pros- 
perity in  Canada  is  the  merchant  who 
sits  waiting  for  "prices  to  come  down." 

Christmas,  1918,  was  admittedly  a  re- 
cord breaker  for  Canadian  booksellers. 
Prices  were  certainly  high.  There  never 
was  a  time  of  such  sluggish  movement 
in  the  book  trade  as  in  the  old  days  of 
low  prices. 

If  we  wish  to  invite  "hard  times"  let 
us  pass  around  the  word  that  "prices  are 
coming  down"  and  fold  our  hands  in  an- 
ticipation as  if  this  lower  level  of  prices 
would  in  some  mysterious  manner  be  a 
help  to  us. 

Prosperity  came  and  found  most  of  us 
waiting  around  and  watching  through 
''the  window,  individually  we  cannot  claim 
any  credit  for  its  coming,  but  individu- 
ally we  can  contribute  to  prolong  its 
stay. 

One  lesson  the  war  has  surely  taught 
is  the  enormous  importance  of  co-opera- 
tion. Depression  may  come,  but  if  the 
bookseller  and  publisher  work  together 
to  the  fullest  possible  extent,  the  printed 
page  in  its  many  forms  will  continue  to 
furnish  a  competency,  and  no  vendor  of 
books  ever  hopes  for  more.  Easier 
would  it  be  for  the  camel  to  lose  its 
hump  than  for  the  bookseller  to  become 
wealthy  in  his  profession. 

But  Oh!  You  booksellers  in  city  and 
town,  why  in  so  many  instances  do  you 
neglect  local  library  trade?  Think  it 
over! 

Yours  very  truly, 

S.    B.    GUNDY. 

Carry  Ample  Stock 

Toronto,  Jan.  23,  1919. 
Editor,    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER: 

Put  me  down  among  the  optimists. 
Last  year  ended  most  satisfactorily,  and 
1919  is  opening  up  very  well  indeed.  So 
f.,..  ..„  t  r,^n  jud?:e  the  outlook  for  the 
coming  year  is  that  it  will  be  one  of  the 
best  book  years  I  have  known.  The 
people  have  money  to  spend  and  the 
bookseller  is  bound  to  get  his  share  as 
well  as  the  moving  picture  show,  the 
theatre,  or  anyone  else.  My  advice  to 
the  bookseller  is,  while  of  course  exercis- 
ing due  judgment  in  his  buying,  to  have 
plenty  of  stock  of  the  good  things. 
Every  live  bookseller  knows  that  a  sale 
lost  by  a  book  being  out  of  stock,  is  so 
much  profit  lost  on  his  day's  business. 

In  reference  to  increased  book  costs,  I 


do  not  think  there  is  any  reason  to  be 
pessimistic.  The  working  man  and 
woman  is  everywhere  receiving  increased 
wages,  and  in  consequences  both  raw 
material  and  finished  product  are  costing 
more  than  ever  before.  But  people  of 
all  classes  everywhere  in  Canada  are 
earning  larger  salaries  than  every  be- 
fore, and  are  accustomed  to  paying 
higher  prices  for  what  they  buy  than 
ever  before.  It  would  be  unreasonable, 
and  Canadians  are  not  unreasonable,  to 
expect  books  to  be  cheap,  while  food  and 
other  necessaries  remain  dear.  The 
higher  price  for  books  is  part  of  a  condi- 
tion which  exists  at  the  present  time  and 
is  not  likely  to  alter  for  some  time  to 
come,  and  when  the  change  does  come, 
if  ever,  it  will  come  gradually.  There- 
fore, in  my  opinion,  the  bookseller  should 
not  starve  his  business  by  buying  from 
hand  to  mouth,  but  should  carry  on  his 
shelves  and  counters  a  sufficient  book- 
stock  to  meet  the  needs  of  his  customers. 
Yours  truly, 
W.  COPP, 
Vite-Pres.  The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd. 


Prices  More   Likely  to  Advance 

Editor,  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER:        ? 
Philadelphia,  January  20,   1919. 

Regarding  the  outlook  for  1919  we  do 
expect  a  considerable  increase  in  our 
volume  of  orders  for  this  year,  all  ten- 
dencies pointing  that  way. 

We  might  state,  however,  that  both 
dealers  and  jobbers  are  holding  off  and 
are  purchasing  only  for  present  require- 
ments' due  to  the  expected  deflation  of 
prices.  Inasmuch  as  the  United  States 
Government  has  guaranteed  the  price  of 
$2.40  per  bushel  to  our  farmers  for 
wheat,  as  long  as  wheat  continues  to 
be  sold  at  such  a  figure,  there  is  very- 
little  possibility,  to  my  mind,  of  any 
great  decrease  in  the  cost  of  other  com- 
modities. I  do  not  look  for  any  mater- 
ial decrease  in  the  cost  of  production 
during  the  next  eighteen  months. 

Labor  is  rather  unsettled — is  demand- 
ing higher  wages  and  shorter  hours — 
and  industrial  conditions  for  1919  and 
early  in  1920  are  goin?  to  be  rather  pre- 


carious. The  fact  of  the  matter  is,  in 
going  into  the  market  recently  to  make 
a  purchase  of  raw  material,  we  found 
that  in  most  cases  the  prices  have  ad- 
vanced since  our  last  purchase,  and  if 
there  is  any  change  to  my  mind  it  will 
be  rather  in  the  nature  of  an  advance 
than  a  decline. 

However,  we  feel  that  the  1919  busi- 
ness is  bound  to  be  good,  owing  to  the 
tremendous  demands  for  both  labor  and 
material  for  reconstruction  work  in  the 
devastated  regions  of  Europe.  There  are 
a  great  many  soldiers  returning  home 
from  the  campaign  who  are  looking  for 
jobs,  but  there  are  also  large  numbers 
of  men  going  to  European  countries 
She  United  States  now  more  than  ever 
do  not  consider  "foreign" — our  trade  in 
every  province  is  increasing  by  leaps 
and  bounds.  Our  Mr.  Riedell  has  just 
returned  from  a  Canadian  trip  which 
was  by  far  his  most  successful,  measured 
by  sales.  He  is  enthusiastic  as  to  the 
business  outlook  there.  We  wish  the 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  and 
our  many  Canadian  friends  the  best  of 
prosperity  in  1919. 

WELDON  ROBERTS  RUBBER  CO. 


52 


A  Good  Motto  for  1919 

Toronto,  Jan.  25,  1919. 

Editor,    Booksellor   and    Stationer: 

You  have  asked  for  opinions  and  fore- 
casts as  to  probable  business  conditions 
for  1919.  We  are  optimistic  first,  last, 
and  all  the  time,  and  believe  that  1919 
will  be  a  better  year  for  booksellers  than 
1918,   record   year   that   it   was. 

The  history  of  publishing  and  book- 
selling shows  that,  following  every  war 
there  has  been  a  wonderful  increase  in 
the  production  of  literature,  resulting  in 
good  business  for  the  bookseller  and  the 
publisher. 

Our  motto  for  1919  is  to  sell  two  books 
where  we  sold  one  last  year,  and  we 
hold  no  copyright  on  the  slogan,  so 
dealers,  take  it  uo  and  blazon  it  forth: 
Two  books  in  1919  for  one  in  1918!  Let's 
all  say  we  will  do  it.  Good  business,  eh? 
You  bet! 

The  dealer  who  waits  for  prices  to 
come  down  will  not  make  the  grade  re- 
quired by  that  "double  up"  slogan,  and 
will  wake  up  only  to  find  that  his  com- 
petitors have  the  goods — and  the  busi- 
ness. 

The  price  of  wheat  is  high  and  will 
remain  high  and  so  will  all  other  food- 
stuffs, and  the  workers  will  be  working 
shorter  hours  and  earning  more  money. 
We  are  not  prophets,  but  think  this  will 
be  the  way  of  things  for  1919. 

When  in  England  late  in  December,  I 
found  the  bookselling  trade  there 
buoyant  and  full   of  "pep"  for  1919. 

john  McClelland. 

Pres.  McClelland  &  Stewart,  Ltd. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Must  Buy  Now 

One  prominent  member  of  the  trade, 
who  has  an  aversion  to  publicity  for  him- 
self, but  who  yet  approved  the  action  of 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  in 
thus  discussing  the  question  of  prices 
and  presenting  facts  and  arguments, 
giving  the  retailers  a  line  on  the  proper 
attitude  to  adopt  toward  the  coming 
days,  laid  emphasis  in  his  remarks  on 
the  futile  attitude  of  some  retailers  in 
holding  back  orders  in  the  expectation 
of  getting  lower  prices.  The  depleted 
condition  of  stocks  generally,  both 
wholesale  and  retail,  was  sufficient  evi- 
dence to  convince  any  member  of  the 
trade  that  immediate  buying  must  pro- 
ceed, thus  necessitating,  without  any  ces- 
sation whatever,  the  manufacture  of  the 
goods  to  supply  this  urgent  demand. 

As  all  raw  materials  are  still  at  their 
war-time  levels,  the  goods  which  are  now 
being  manufactured  must  necessarily  be 
sold  at  the  prices  that  have  been  prevail- 
ing rather  than  at  a  lower  level.  If  the 
manufacturers  were  enabled  to  buy  the 
material  from  which  their  merchandise  is 
manufactured  at  lower  prices,  there 
would  be  some  ground  for  looking  for 
lower  prices  immediately,  but  as  every  - 
thine  that  is  now  being  turned  out  is  be- 
ing manufactured  from  the  old,  high-cost 
stock,  the  products  themselves  will  na- 
turally remain  at  old   quotations. 

Because  of  the  depleted  stocks  in  all 
the  stores  of  the  country  there  must  be 
an  unusual  amount  of  activity  just  at 
present.  In  other  words,  there  must  be 
considerable  buying.  No  dealer  will  be 
able  to  hold  off  with  the  intent  of  buy- 
ing later  at  lower  prices — the  goods 
must  be  had  now — and  as  a  result  the 
goods  he  will  buy  will  be  manufactured 
at  old  costs  with  the  natural  appendage 
of  old   prices. 

Normal  Conditions 

The  Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co., 
Chicago,  finds  that  conditions  are  rapidly 
returning  to  a  normal  basis,  and  the  com- 
pany believes  that  1919  will  be  an  excel- 
lent year  for  all  firms  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  metal  specialties  for  the 
stationery  trade. 

Mr.  Edison's  Message 

The  following  message  from  Thomas 
A.  Edison  has. Canadian  as  well  as  U.S. 
significance: 

"What  does  the  first  year  in  peace 
have  in  store  for  us  ?  I  have  been  asked 
to  attempt  to  answer  that  question. 
There  are  those  who  fear  a  business  de- 
pression. The  surest  way  to  bring  on  a 
depression  of  business  is  to  nurture 
fears  and  act  hesitatingly. 

We  now  have  a  national  financial  sys- 
tem which  is  capable  of  meeting  practi- 
cally any  situation  that  can  arise;  our 
farmers  have  harvested  an  enormous 
crop.  The  only  thing  needed  to  insure 
a  year  of  great  prosperity  is  a  deter- 
mination on  the  part  of  every  business 
man,  big  and  little,  to  go  ahead  with 
absolute  confidence  in  the  future. 


The  business  men  of  the  country  must 
see  to  it  that  the  employment  is  pro- 
vided for  our  war  workers  and  return- 
ing soldiers." 

More    Books   as    Gifts 

Orillia,  Ont.,  Jan.  7. 
Editor,    Bookseller    &    Stationer: 

Our  Christmas  trade  was  very  satisfac- 
tory. December  sales  fully  25  p.c.  ahead 
of  1917.  The  business  was  pretty  even'/ 
divided  over  the  five  days  before  Christ- 
mas. Book  sales  for  Christmas  gifts 
were  largest  for  many  years  with  us. 
We  expect  a  slight  decrease  in  business 
for  a  few  months  while  the  munition 
factories  are  changing  over  to  the  regu- 
lar line  of  business,  but  we  see  no  good 
reason  for  believing  that  business  wiil 
not  be  good  during  the  latter  part  of  the 
year.  We  are  planning  for  and  expect 
a   good  business   in    1919. 

R.  O.  SMITH  &  CO. 


BEST  IN   TWENTY  YEARS 

Jan.  25,  1919. 

Editor  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 
Trade  in  Fort  William  during  the 
past  year  was  one  of  the  best  ever  ex- 
perienced. Merchants  in  general  have 
been  wearing  the  smile  of  satisfaction 
I  know  of  no  year  in  our  twenty  years' 
experience  that  has  proved  so  generally 
a  success.  I  am  not  looking  for  so  good 
a  year  for  1919,  owing,  possibly,  more 
to  local  conditions  than  otherwise.  Ship- 
building is  to  a  very  great  respect    re- 


sponsible  for   our   good   times   for    1918. 
This  we  will  not  have  in  1919. 

J.  EDGAR   RUTLEDGE. 
Reason  for  Advances 

George  J.  McLeod,  just  back  from 
New  York,  had  some  interesting  things 
to  say  relative  to  conditions  in  the  book 
trade.  There  is  no  absence  there  of 
confidence  in  continued  good  business 
for  1919,  because  of  the  almost  com- 
plete manner  in  which  all  stocks,  whole- 
sale and  retail,  have  been  depleted,  mak- 
ing heavy  purchases  for  1919  imperative. 

As  to  prices,  some  statistics  quoted 
by  Mr.  McLeod  are  highly  significant. 
Last  year  the  large  publishers  of  juven- 
ile books  actually  published  a  great  pro- 
poition  of  books  at  a  loss,  because  of 
unforeseen  increases  in  costs  of  produc- 
tion, which  came  after  the  jobbers'  cata- 
logues had  been  printed.  This  year 
juveniles  that  retailed  at  35c  will  be  50c 
a  copy.  Reprint  novels  will  have  to  be 
75c  a  copy  in  Canada. 

Since  a  year  ago  paper  has  advanced 
nearly  two  cents  a  pound,  and  an  average 
novel  takes  a  pound  of  paper.  Costs  of 
binding  accounted  for  another  advance 
of  a  cent  a  book,  and"  printing,  almost 
half  a  cent  per  book. 

Pressmen,  who  used  to  get  $24  a  week. 
now  get  $34,  and  feeders,  who  formerly 
got  $16  to  $21,  now  get  $30  a  week. 
Still  another  demand  is  threatened  by 
the    pressman. 

These  were  cited  as  being  just  a  few 
inside  facts  showing  why  book  produc- 
tion costs  have  gone  up  so  materially. 


Wants  Trade  Association  Organized 

To  Put  a  Stop  to  Unfair  Competition 


Why  is  it  that  foreigners  are  allowed 
to  sell  magazines  ranging  in  price  from 
5c  to  25c,  or  even  higher,  within  a  few 
steps  of  a  legitimate,  cultivated  book- 
seller and  news   agent. 

This  is  exactly  what  happens  in  Mont- 
real. Foreigners  who  are  only  required 
to  obtain  a  police  permit  and  pay  25c  a 
year  for  a  badge.  This  allows  them  to 
camp  in  front  of  any  "legitimate"  book- 
seller and  stationer's  store,  obstruct  his 
windows,  and  compete   with   him. 

Would  anyone  else  stand  for  it?  No! 
No!  No!  Fruit  merchants  are  not  al- 
lowed to  expose  their  goods,  and  yet, 
during  the  "flu"  epidemic,  the  health 
authorities  closed  my  store  in  case  I 
should  have  over  25  people  in  at  one 
time,  and  yet  allowed  soap-box  news 
agents  to  distribute  germs,  wafted  up 
out  of  the  street  and  into  magazines, 
thus  being  carted  home! 

Some  people  call  these  soap-box  news 
agents  "utilities."  Why  doesn't  the  City 
of  Montreal  tax  them  as  they  have  done 
other  public  utilities? 

These  so-called  utilities  toil  not, 
neither  do  they  spin,  and  through  their 
53 


merchandising  methods  disease  is  spread. 

He  cannot  speak  our  language.  He 
has  not  any  vested  interests,  no  capital 
at  stake,  no  rent,  light,  heat  or  taxes  to 
pay.  Does  he  buy  Victory  Bonds?  Others 
do  his  fighting  for  him.  Why  should  he 
be  allowed  to  cumber  the  sidewalk? 

What  other  line  of  business  except 
that  of  the  unobtrusive,  gentlemanly, 
and  often  scholarly,  bookseller  would 
tolerate  such  a  condition  of  affairs? 

Why  do  not  the  booksellers  and  news 
agents  (legitimate)  combine  and  get 
these  people  off  the  streets,  or  else 
make  them   pay  an  adequate  tax? 

Another  pertinent  or  impertinent 
question:  Why  should  fruit  stores,  ice 
cream  parlors  and  drug  stores  be  allowed 
to  sell  our  merchandise?  It  seems  Lo 
me  that  a  booksellers'  and  stationers' 
association  could  be  formed  that  would 
soon  abolish  house  to  house  canvass  by 
non-taxpaying  peddlers  of  Christmas 
cards  and  canvassers  for  magazines. 

I  pay  heavily  for  the  privilege  of  do- 
ing business.  Why  should  not  my  com- 
petitors be  forced  to  do  the  same  ? 

I  should  like  to  hear  and  see  the  views 
of  others,  in  print,  on  this  same  topic. 
YE  OLDE  TIME  BOOKSTORE. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


Has   Confidence   in   Future 

When  Frank  Wise,  president  of  the 
Macmillan  Company  of  Canada,  was 
asked  for  a  forecast  of  what  1919  has 
in  store  for  the  book  trade  in  Canada, 
he  cited  his  firm's  cwn  experience  mark- 
ing the  first  month  of  the  new  year. 
Business  had  kept  up  to  a  most  satisfac- 
tory degree,  and  the  firm  had  had  to 
take  added  office  space  in  an  adjacent 
building.  Book  prices  could  not  be 
otherwise  than  higher,  but  Mr.  Wise  did 
not  consider  that  that  would  constitute 
any  serious  setback  in  business,  because 
in  the  case  of  any  particular  new  book 
by  a  noted  author  a  difference  of  25c 
in  its  price  would,  in  comparatively  few 
cases,  retard  purchasers.  This  had,  in 
fact,  been  proven  in  the  past  year  with 
Wells'  "Joan  and  Peter,"  which  was 
published  at  $1.75.  On  the  other  hand, 
where  customers  were  in  search  merely 
of  a  book,  or  several  books,  with  no 
particular  authors  or  titles  in  mind,  the 
choice  was  so  wide  that  there  was  little 


or  no  chance  of  price  advances  killing 
sales  of  that  nature. 

Another  interesting  incident  of  the 
autumn  publishing  season  with  this 
house  was  that  it  had  entailed  the  pay- 
ment of  royalties  on  Kipling's  books, 
which  they  control  for  this  mar-ket,  up 
to  a  total  that  equalled  any  similar  pre- 
vious period,  even  when  they  had  the 
advantage  of  publishing  a  new  book  for 
Kipling. 

All  in  all,  Mr.  Wise  saw  no  reason  for 
looking  to  the  coming  days  with  any- 
thing but  a  spirit  of  confident  hopeful- 
ness for  a  continuation  of  good,  sound 
business   in   the   book  trade. 

Trade  Good  in  Canada 

Newark,  N.J.,  Jan.  11 

Editor,   Bookseller   &    Stationer: 

We  are  glad  to  have  the  opportunity 
to  express  ourselves  with  regard  to  the 
season's  trade  and  the  outlook.  Ever 
since    the    signing    of    the    armistice    we 


have  been  impressed  with  the  ease  with 
which  readjustment  from  war  condicions 
was  being  brought  about.  Business  is 
better  than  ever,  and  our  judgment  is 
that  there  is  the  greatest  possible  reason 
for  optimism.  Our  notable  business  in- 
crease for  some  time  past  has  been  m 
the  foreign  field.  This  was  good  during 
hostilities,  but  is  now  coming  stronger 
than  ever.  As  to  Canada — which  wo  ia 
seeking  opportunities  there,  and  there 
are  large  numbers  going  to  Europe  as 
laborers  for  contractors  on  reconstruction 
work  in  those  regions.  There  will  be  a 
continued  shortage  of  labor  for  the  en- 
tire year,  and  for  possibly  a  year  and  a 
half.  In  short,  we  view  the  1919  pros- 
pects with  confidence  and  are  planning 
for  an  increase  of  business  during  this 
year. 

Yours  very  truly, 
MOORE  PUSH-PIN  CO., 
P.  G.  Underwood, 
Sales  Manager. 


Monthly  Record  of  New  Books 

Published   by  Firms  Established  in  Canada 


THOMAS  ALLEN 
Fiction 

Who  Cares,  Cosmo  Hamilton,  cloth, 
$1.50;  The  Apartment  Next  Door,  Wm. 
Johnston,  cloth,  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 

The  Doctor  in  War,  Woods  Hutchinson, 
cloth,  $2.50;  Shipbuilding  Industry,  Roy 
Willmarth  Kelly  and  Frederick  J.  Allen, 
cloth,  $3. 

WILLIAM   BRIGGS 
Fiction 

Moon  of  Israel,  H.  Rider  Haggard, 
cloth,  $1.50;  That's  Me  All  Over,  Mable, 
E.  Streeter,  cloth,  75c;  Sir  Isumbras  at 
the  Ford,  B.  K.  Broster,  $1.25; 
The  Texan,  James  B.  Hendry,  cloth, 
$1.50;  Cap'n  Jonah's  Fortune,  James  A. 
Cooper,  cloth,  $1.50;  Fast  as  the  Wind, 
Nat  Gould,  cloth,  $1.50;  Blue  Aloes, 
Cynthia  Stockley,  cloth,  $1.50. 

THE  COPP  CLARK  CO.,  LIMITED 
Fiction 

The  Tin  Soldier,  Temple  Bailey,  cloth, 
$1.50;  Minniglen,  Agnes  &  Egerton 
Castle,  cloth,  $1.50;  Kiddies,  J.  J.  Bell, 
cloth,  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 

Echoes  of  the  War,  J.  M.  Barrie,  cloth, 
$1.50. 

J.  M.  DENT  &  SON,  LTD. 
Fiction 

The  Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apoca- 
lypse, and  The  Shadow  of  the  Cathedral, 
Vicente  Blasco  Ibanez,  cloth,  $1.90;  His 
Grace  of  Grub  Street,  G.  V.  McFadden, 
doth,  $2;  Capt.  Maraday's  Marriage, 
Thos.  Cobb,  cloth,  $2;  The  Choices  of  an 
Etonian,  Horace  Buckley,  cloth,  $2. 


Non-Fiction 

Far  Away  and  Long  Ago,  W.  H.  Hud- 
son, cloth,  $2.50;  Leaves  in  the  Wind, 
"Alpha  of  the  Plough,"  cloth,  $2;  Aero- 
batics, Horatio  Barber,  A.FAe.S.,  cloth, 
$3. 

Juvenile 

Mother's  Nursery  Tales,  Katharine 
Pyle,  cloth,  $2.50;  Fairy  Tales  of  Weir, 
Anna  McClure  Sholl,  illustrated  by 
Katherine  Pyle,  cloth,  $2;  Adven- 
tures of  Two  Ants,  Nanny  Hammar- 
stoon,  cloth,  $1;  Billy  Possum,  J.  Carter 
Beard,  cloth,  $1;  A  Little  Lost  Boy, 
W.  H.  Hudson,  cloth,  $1.50. 

GORDON  AND  GOTCH 
Fiction 

Adventures  of  Bindle,  Herbert  Jenkins, 
cloth,  $1.50. 

S.  B.  GUNDY 
Fiction 
Java   Head,  Jos.  Hergesheimer,  cloth, 
$1.50;  Anthony  Trent,  Master  Criminal, 
Wyndham     Martyn,    cloth,    $1.50;     The 
Solitary   House,    E.    R.    Punshon,    cloth, 
$1.50;    The    Three-Cornered    Hat,    J.     S. 
Fasset  Jr.,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  White  Rook, 
J.  B.  Harris-Burland,  cloth,  $1.25. 
Non-Fiction 
Why  God  Loves  the  Irish,  H.  J.  Des- 
mond, LL.D.,  cloth,  $1.25. 

THE  MACMILLAN  CO. 
N  on- Fiction 

China  and  the  World  War,  W.  R. 
Wheeler,  cloth,  $1.75;  Democracy  and 
the  Crossways,  F.  J.  C.  Hearnshaw, 
cloth,  $5.00;  Musings  and  Memories  of 
A  Musician,  G.  Henschel,  cloth,  $4.25; 
The  Re-Evangelization  of  England,  C. 
Hepher,  cloth,  $1.65;  Charles  Booth,  A 
54 


Memoir,  C.  Hepher,  cloth,  $1.65;  Harold 
Tennyson,  R.N.,  C.  Hepher,  cloth,  $1.65; 
The  Faith  of  the  Apostles'  Creed,  J.  F. 
Bethune-Baker,  cloth,  $1.65;  Belief  and 
Creed,  F.  H.  Chase,  cloth,  85c;  Sir  Wil- 
liam Ramsay,  W.  A.  Tilden,  cloth,  $3.50; 
Boundaries  in  Europe  and  the  Near  East, 
T.  H.  Holdich,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Aboli- 
tion of  Inheritance,  H.  E.  Read,  cloth, 
$1.50;  Good  English,  Canby  and  Opdycke, 
cloth,  $1.10;  The  Good  Man  and  the  Good, 
M.  W.  Calkins,  cloth,  $1.40;  Tbe  English 
Village— A  Literary  Study,  J.  Patton, 
cloth,  $1.60;  Christian  Internationalism, 
W.  P.  Merrill,  cloth,  $1.60;  The  Great 
Peace,  H.  H.  Powers,  cloth,  $2.25;  The 
History  of  Religions,  E.  W.  Hopkins, 
cloth,  $3.10;  Poems  and  Plays,  Vol.  I.  and 
Vol.  II.,  J.  Masefield,  cloth,  $5.00  the  set; 
America  and  Britain,  H.  H.  Powers,  cloth, 
40c;  Merchandising,  A.  W.  Douglas, 
cloth,  $1.00;  The  Newer  Knowledge  of 
Nutrition,  E.  V.  McCollum,  cloth,  $1.60. 

Fiction 

A  Chance  to  Live,  Zoe  Beckley,  cloth, 
$1.60. 

Juvenile 

The  Children's  Homer,  P.  Colum,  cloth, 
$2.00. 

GEORGE  J.  McLEOD,  LTD. 

Fiction 

The  Buccaneer  Farmer,  Harold  Bind- 
loss,  cloth,  $1.50;  White  Men,  George 
Agnes  Chamberlain,  cloth,  $1.75. 

Non-Fiction 

The  Great  Adventure,  Theodore  Roose- 
velt, cloth,  $1.25;  The  Marne,  Edith 
Wharton,  cloth,  $1.00. 

(Continued  on  page   59) 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


WELDON  ROBERTS 

•  RUBBER     ERASERS  • 


Do  you  know  our  399  TRI-PLY  CIRCULAR  ERASER  ? 

If  you  don't  mail  us  a  postal  to-day  for  a  sample.  This  is  a  "long-felt  want"  for  every  typist. 
Turn  the  sample  over  to  an  intelligent  typewriter  operator — and  await  her  verdict.  You'll  order 
when  you've  heard  from  her! 

A   combination    hard    and   soft   eraser    of   great    merit. 


WELDON  ROBERTS  RUBBER  Co. NEWARK,  N.J.  U.S.A. 


Special  Announcement 

The  attention  of  the  trade  is  directed  to  the  forthcoming  publications  of 
the  Milton  Bradley  Co.,  which  will  supplement  the  attractive  list  that  has 
already  appeared  of 

BRADLEY  QUALITY  BOOKS 

Stories   of    Great   Adventure    $1.25 

Krinkley    Eyes    1.00 

Children  in  the  Wood    1.25 

Every  Day  Stories,  by  Carolyn  S.  Bailey    75 

-    Fables  and  Folk  Stories,  by  Carolyn  S.  Bailey  75 

Hero  Stories,  by  Carolyn  S.  Bailey 75 

The   Mermaid's   Message    75 

The  Sunken  City,  by  Marie  H.  Frary  and  Chas.  M.  Stebbins  (new  edition)       .75 

Stories  From  Wakeland  and  Dreamland,  by  Anne  Elizabeth  Allen 75 

Stories  and  Rhymes  for  a  Child,  by  Carolyn  S.  Bailey .     1.00 

For  the  Story  Teller,  by  Carolyn  S.  Bailey    1.50 

Liberal  Discount  to  the  Trade 

Your  stock  of  Juvenile  Books  will  not  be  representative  without  these 
titles.    Exact  date  of  publication  will  be  announced  later. 

FOR  SALE  BY 
S.  B.  GUNDY  THE  GEO.  IVL  HENDY  CO.  Limited 

25-27  Richmond  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont.  215  Victoria  Street,  Toronto,  Ont. 


GETTHEBESTI  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THE  EATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee,  Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 

55 


Housatonic 


GREY  COLORED  CARDS  LAST  LONGER 

Do  Not  Get  Dirty  So  Quickly  as  White  Ones  —  A  Practical  Suggestion  For  the  Card 
Writer — How  One  Store  Speeded  Up  Number  of  Show  Cards 

Being  Made 

By  R.  T.  D.   EDWARDS 


THIS  is  third  of  a  series  of  ar- 
ticles on  departmental  store  card- 
writing,  which  will  not  only  aid 
the  large  store  cardwriter  in  his  work, 
but  will  be  of  benefit  to  the  cardwriter 
who  does  things  in  a  smaller  way. 

The  store  refei-red  to  in  this  article 
is  one  of  the  largest  in  the  Dominion 
and  has  a  great  area  of  selling  space. 
Consequently  the  number  of  show  cards 
used,  both  inside  the  store  and  in  the 
windows,    is    enormous.      Many    hundred 


Card 
Games 

_    and 

Prizes 

Card 
Parties 


cards  have  to  be  made  daily,  both  for 
replacing  soiled  cards  and  for  new  dis- 
plays. 

Dirty  Cards  Repulse  Trade 

To  keep  the  cards  clean  is  the  most 
difficult  proposition  in  a  large  store. 
Cards  are  continually  getting  dirty  or 
broken  and  should  be  replaced  with  new- 
ones  at  once.  That  is  an  important 
point  in  showcarding  any  store.  Cards 
must  be  kept  clean  at  all  times  because 
they  are  the  mouthpiece  of  the  interior 
of  the  store,  just  the  same  as  the  show 
windows  are  the  mouthpiece  outside. 

To  keep  cards  more   presentable,  and 

to    avoid    the    greater    consumption    of 

cards,  this   store   changed   their  regular 

store  cards  from  white   to  a  mist  grey 

color. 


The  grey  cards  have  proven  to  be 
a  great  success,  because  they  do  not 
show  dust  or  finger  marks  as  quickly 
as  the  white. 

Grey  cards  are  used  for  everything 
but  "advertised"  and  "sale"  cards.  For 
these,  white  cards  are  used  with  black 
or  red   color  for  the  printing. 

All  cards  are  of  uniform  size,  both  in 
the  windows  and  on  the  counters — 5% 
x  7;  7  x  11  and  11  x  14  being  the  vari- 
ous sizes  most  frequently  used. 

A  uniform  style  of  lettering  is  used 
on  these  cards,  which  can  be  quickly 
formed  and  which   is  quite  readable. 

The  system  for  operating  a  cardwrit- 
ing  office  in  a  departmental  store  de- 
pends largely  upon  the  amount  and 
quality  of  cards  that  it  has  to  turn  out. 
Many  offices  are  run  in  a  haphazard 
way.  That  is,  every  writer  lays  out 
and  rules  his  own  work  and  sorts  it 
when  completed.  This  is  a  very  expen- 
sive method.  If  an  employee  is  a  card- 
writer,  and  there  is  enough  work  to 
keep  him  going,  he  should  not  be  doing 
work  which  can  be  done  by  cheaper 
help. 

Speeding  Up  the  Work 

First  of  all,  the  larger  stores  need 
one  person  who  can  do  everything  about 
the  office  except  write  cards.  That  is, 
he  must  be  able  to  take  care  of  stock, 
ser  that  it  is  kept  in  good  condition  and 
see  that  it  doesn't  get  low. 

In  the  store  referred  to  this  man  lays 
out  orders  as  they  come  in.  The  cards 
are  ruled  in  pencil  very  lightly  so  that 
no  erasing  is  needed,  with  correct  lay- 
out-stencil, an  assortment  of  which  is 
always  kept,  and  piled  in  a  cabinet  which 
has  various  sections  denoting  the  time 
the  order  had  come  in. 

The  work  is  then  ready  for  the  card- 
writer.  After  cards  are  written,  they 
are  sorted  again  by  the  helper  back  to 
the  department  card  cabinet  where  they 
await  being  called  for. 

If  the  card  is  grey  with  black  letters, 
white  underlining  is  used.  This  can  be 
done  by  the  helper  after  some  practice. 

If  this  system  is  carried  out,  the  card- 
writers  very  seldom  have  to  get  off 
their  chairs.  This  means  at  least  two 
to  three  times  as  many  cards  can  be 
handled  as  by  the,  old  method  of  every 
man  for  himself. 

A  Big  Day's  Work 

More  than  sixteen  hundred  cards  were 
written    in    a    day   by    one    man    in    this 
store    on   account   of  using   this   system 
and  not  having  to  get  off  the  chair. 
56 


So  you  will  find  that  in  smaller  store 
work,  this  system  can  be  worked  out 
to  a  great  degree  without  making  the 
work  any  harder.  Have  a  helper  pre- 
pare all  the  work  for  you  while  you  do 
other  things  of  greater   importance. 


NORMAN    A.    SINCLAIR 

For  many  years  with  Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  who 
becomes  sales  manager  for  Charles  E.  Weyand 
&  Co.,  of  New  York,  extensive  manufacturers  of 
papeteries.  Further  particulars  of  this  change  will 
appear    next   month. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling- 
Dealers  :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


"DEXTER" 


The  highest 
grade  hand 
feed  Pencil 
Sharpener 
made  or  pos- 
sible to  make. 
Equipped  with 
POINT  AD- 
JUSTER 
which  SAVES 
THE  PENCIL 
produces 
point 
blunt  to 
stopping 
produced. 


and 
any 
from 
nne, 
int    is 


SHARPENS  ANY  SIZE  PENCIL 


Send  for  Price  List,  it  will  PAY  You 

AUTOMATIC  PENCIL  SHARP.  CO. 

1521  Garland  B.,    Chicago 

Canadian  Representatives 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co. 

468  King  St.  West  Toronto  Ont. 


Retail   price  per  package  of  60  boxes  £9.00 

Dealers  prfce  #5.85. 
Send  $5.85  for  a  Sample  Package  to-day 

H.  A.  BEMISTER 

10  Victoria   Street  Montreal 


••AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA4AAA*? 


'Th«  Guarantee  of  Quality" 


ULTON 

Self-Inking 


5  Stamp  Pads 


Line  Daters 
Numberers 
Sign  Markers 
Rubber  Type 
Printing 
Outfits 


•^  Manufactured  by 

4  FULTON  SPECIALTY  CO. 

J    Elizabeth,  New  Jersey 

••TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT^i 


NEW  GOODS 

DESCRIBED  AND  ILLUSTRATED 

A  "DIFFERENT"  TAG 

The  "Backbone"  Tag  is  a  new  kind, 
made  in  an  entirely  different  way  from 
the  ordinary  taj>-  with  which  practically 
everyone  is   familiar. 

The  name  itself  is  very  descriptive  of 
the  tag,  for  instead  of  having  a  hole 
or  eyelet  through  which  to  attach  a  cord, 
two  pieces  of  strong  twine  run  through 
the  entire  length  of  the  tag,  being  pasted 
between  the  two  layers  of  stock  that 
constitute  the  card,  and  extend  five 
inches  beyond,  for  tieing  purposes.  Thus 
this  double  twine  is  virtually  the  "back- 
bone" of  the  tag,  and  prevents  all  possi- 
bility of  the  tag  being  torn  off  either 
wholly  or  in  part 

Another  very  important  feature  of 
the  "Backbone"  Tag  is  that  it  is  water- 
proofed by  means  of  a  specially  pre- 
pared asphalt  material  being  placed  be- 
tween the  layers  of  the  card  in  its 
manufacture,  thus  protecting  it  against 
damage  by  water.  It  is  a  tag  that  will 
withstand  tear,  wear  and  weather.  This 
is  a  recent  introduction  by  the  Trinity 
Bag  and  Paper  Co.,  105  Hudson  street, 
New   York    City. 

NEW  PAPETERIES 

Among  the  new  papeteries  added  to 
the  line  produced  by  the  Copp,  Clark 
Co.  are  numbers  which  might  well  be 
styled  an  "art  series."  The  boxes  them- 
selves are  most  artistic  in  appearance, 
having  panels  with  beautiful  reproduc- 
tions of  girls'  heads,  some  as  centre- 
pieces, while  others  are  smaller  and 
placed  in  the  upper  left  hand  corner. 
Not  the  least  attractive  feature  of  each 
of  these  new  papeteries  is  the  quality 
and  good  appearance  of  the  stock  form- 
ing the  covering  of  the  boxes.  As  to 
contents,  there  are  boxes  with  Copp's 
kid  finish,  Copp's  fine  linen,  silk-velvet 
and  Swansdown  linen. 

NEW  ITEMS  ADDED 

Society  stationery,  one  of  the  popular 
l'nes  of  Buntin,  Gillies  and  Company, 
Ltd.,  Hamilton,  is  now  being  supplied 
in  a  full  range  of  notepapers,  envelopes, 
paneteries.  correspondence  cards  and 
writing  tablets.  The  cover  design  is 
stiikingly  executed  in  dark  blue  on  a 
mottled  grey  ground,  and  the  stock  is  a 
heavy  white,  linen  finish  paper  with  a 
pleasing  writing  surface. 


Pugh  Specialty  Co.,  Limited 

38-42  Clifford  Street 
TORONTO  -  CANADA 

Manufacturers  and  Manufacturers' 

Agents. 
French    Ivory    (Made    in    Canada). 
Photo       Frames,       Boxes,       Toilet 
Articles   and  Novelties. 
Booklets,   Post   Cards,   etc.,   for   all 
seasons   and   occasions. 
Toy  Books. 

Pennants    and     Textile    Novelties, 
Active   Service   Banners. 
Welcome       Home      Banners       and 
Pennants,    Victory    Pennants    and 
Celebration  lines. 
Purses,   Wallets   and    School    Bags. 
Souvenir   Novelties. 
If    you    don't    get    our    catalogue 
regularly,  send  us  your  name. 
It's  well  worth   having. 


L.E.B.  BINDER  CLIP 

Number  6. 

READY   FOR    DELIVERY 

R  emember, 
please,  that 
theL.E.B.  is 
the  ONLY 
Steel  Jaw 
B  i  n  d  i  n  g 
Clip  which 
permits  re- 
versing the 
arms  AB- 
SOLUTELY FLAT  against  the 
papers   which   it  contains. 

Write  for  catalog  and  prices 
CUSHMAN  &  DENISON  MFG.  CO. 

240-242  W.  23rd  St.,  New  York 


Artists' 
Material 

Drawing  Material 

Mfrs    since    1854  of  high 

grade  Artists'  and  School 

Oil     and     Water    Colors, 

Canvases,  Brushes, Wood- 

enware  Outfits,  Drawing  Tables,  Boards, 

Filing  Cabinets. 

Catalogue  and  sample  books  on  request 

F.  WEBER  &  CO. 


Branches  : 
St.  Louis,   Mo. 
Baltimore,  Md. 


57 


liOOK  S  E  L  L  E  R     AND     S  TATIONER 


t! 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling — 
Dealers :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


^_^ IMPROVCP    BOX 

BOX    LID  CANNOT  CRUSH   OOWN. 


Known  and  sold  wherever  Rubber 
Stamps  are  used 

B.  G.  Volger  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

Passaic,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 

Our  Specialty: 

STAMPING  INKS  OF  ALL  KINDS 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 
Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE  IS 

$5.00  Per  Month 

on  Yearly  Contract 

Single    Insertion    $7 

A  Good  Live  Page — High 

value  in  publicity  at 

minimum   cost 


Your   Sales    Increase 

when  you  adopt  our 
Sample-Set  Advertising 

for  more  business  on 
Typewriter  Ribbons  and  Carbons 
It  is   a   direct-to-user  adver- 
tising which  brings  the  pros- 
pect right  to  your  store. 
The  Caribonum  Policy 
is      "  Quality      First "      and 
stationers  can  therefore  rely 
on   a   line   of  goods   of   such 
standard     quality     and     uni- 
formity   as    puts    them    in    a 
position    to    permanently    re- 
tain the  trade  of  every  cus- 
tomer   who     once     uses     the 
goods. 

Gtvt  Us  A  Trial. 

CARIBONUM  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

54  Wellington  Street  East,  Toronto 


CATALOGUES   FOR   DEALERS 

From  the  Norman  W.  Henley  Co.,  of 
New  York,  represented  in  Canada  by 
McClelland  &  Stewart,  Ltd.,  comes  a 
copy  of  their  1919  catalogue  describing 
all  the  firm's  publications,  including 
some  new  books  just  added. 

The  prices  show  considerable  advance 
in  some  instances,  this  being  in  keeping 
with  the  general  tendency  with  all  pub- 
lishing houses.  An  interesting  )offer 
made  to  retailers  is  to  the  effect  that 
copies  of  the  catalogue  bearing  dealer's 
name  and  address  will  be  supplied  free 
to  booksellers  for  distribution  among 
their  customers. 


LISTS  RECEIVED 

"Sales  Stimulating  Stationery,"  by 
Louis  Victor  Eytinge,  has  been  printed 
by  the  Mortimer  Company,  Ltd.,  Ottawa, 
Canada.  It  dwells  on  the  importance 
of  the  proper  selection  of  letterhead  de- I 
sign  and  execution  to  help  soliciting  let- 
ters build  business.  The  book  is  written 
in  Mr.  Eytinge's  happiest  vein,  and 
shows  reproductions  of  some  very  effec- 
tive letterheads. 

From  S.  B.  Gundy  comes  a  list  of  the 
Milton  Bradley  "Story  Hour"  books  of 
which  there  is  already  a  goodly  list,  with 
six  new  titles  to  come  this  year.  The  list 
in  question  is  an  illustrated  one  and  of 
such  a  pleasing  appearance  combined 
with  convincing  descriptive  matter  and 
illustrations  of  the. different  volumes  as 
to  make  it  a  most  effective  selling-help 
for  booksellers. 

The  Compo-Lithograph  Company,  28 
Kingsland  Road,  London,  N.E.,  directs 
attention  in  recent  circulars  to  its  line 
of  duplicators.  In  addition  to  its  gela- 
tinous type,  generally  known  in  this 
country  as  the  hektograph,  it  offers  the 
Thelma  Duplicator,  using  a  clay  base. 
The  Compo-Lithograph  is  said  to  be 
capable  of  making  upward  of  fifty  copies 
of  writing,  drawings,  etc.  The  device 
alyo    ranroduces    typewritten    matter. 

Hamblin  &  Russell  Mfg.  Co.,  Wor- 
cester, Mass.,  who  are  represented  in 
Canada  by  L.  G.  Beebe  of  Toronto,  have 
just  forwarded  to  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER  a  copy  of  their  illustrated 
price  list,  No.  400.  This  firm  manufac- 
tures an  extensive  variety  of  wire  goods, 
including  wire  desk  baskets  and  waste 
paper  baskets,  wire ,  photograph  holders, 
and  various  household  specialties  of  par 
ticular  interest  to  those  stationers  who 
have  profitably  adopted  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER'S  suggestion  to  put 
in  a  stock  of  such  items. 


Dexter 's 

STAR 

MANIFOLD 

LINEN 


With  unlimited  uses.  Star  Manifold 
Linen  is  a  stock  that  practically  every 
customer  you  have  could  use, — par- 
ticularly for  foreign  letters.  Attrac- 
tive, strong:,  durable  and  beautifully 
finished;  suitable  for  pen  as  well  as 
typewriter.  For  all  kinds  of  office 
systems,  Star  Manifold  is  a  recog- 
nized   business    necessity. 

Send    for    samples   and    prices. 

C.H.  Dexter  &  Sons,  Inc. 

Windsor  Locks,   Connecticut 


FOUNTAIN   PENS 
GRAVITY  STYLOS 
INK  PENCILS 

We     offer     the     trade     new 
ideas        in        merchandise 
with    a    guarantee    that 
our    goods    are    right. 
PARAMOUNT 
SELF-FILLER 
PEN 
A  n      excellent 
pen,        splen- 


Gravity 

Stylo 

Pen 

With 
a    new 
and   exclu- 
s  i  v  e     self- 
filing   device. 
Three  styles  to 
retail     at     SI. SO 
$1.75    and    $2.50 
Prompt     Deliveries 
Assured. 

Farrell  &  Hosinger 

Company 
LARRY  1.  FARRELL 

GEORGE  N.  HOSINGER 
Manufacturers  of 
FOUNTAIN,  STYLO- 
GRAPHIC  All  cyio  /»rv; 
Canadian  Representative  Wanted 
6-1-65  Irving  St.,  Jersey   City,  N.J 


didly      made, 

that    retails 

at       $2.50. 

a  1  lowing 

a   liberal 

margin 

of 

Profit 


58 


HOOKSELL  E  K      A  N  I)     STATIONER 


"Hi 


$^^3V^t*:> ; 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling- 
Dealers  :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


INKSTANDS 

OF    ALL     STYLES 


Manufactured  by 


Frank  A.  Weeks 
Mfg.   Co. 

93  John  St..  NEW  YORK  CITY.  N.Y. 

Canadian  Jobbers   handle  our  lines. 


The  F-B  Loose  Leaf  Holder 


Pat.  May  13,  1913 

The  most  demanded  and  cheapest 
transfer  binder.  Adjustable  to  size  of 
paper  and  distance  between  punch 
holes.  Exchangeable  posts.  Wholesale 
$2.10  per   dozen.      Send   for   particulars. 

ROCKHILL  &  VIETOR 

Sole  Agents,  Dept.  F.B,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 
Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago 


MONTHLY  RECORD  OF  NEW  BOOKS 

(Continued   from   page   54) 

McClelland  &  stewart,  Limited 

Fiction 

Dr.  Paul,  Ethel  Penman  Hope,  cloth, 
$1.50;  In  Orchard  Glen,  Marian  Keith, 
cloth,  $1.50;  The  Man  Nohody  Knew, 
Holworthy  Hall,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Sky 
Pilot  in  No  Man's  Land,  Ralph  Connor, 
cloth,  $1.50;  The  Curious  Quest,  E.  Phil- 
lips Oppenheim,  cloth,  $1.50;  Shops  and 
Houses,  Frank  Swinnerton,  cloth,  $1.50; 
The  Roll  Call,  Arnold  Bennett,  cloth, 
$1.50;  The  Secret  City,  Hugh  Walpole, 
cloth,  $1.60;  The  Avalanche,  Gertruck- 
Atherton,  cloth,  $1.35;  Esmeralda,  or 
Every  Little  Bit  Helps,  Nina  Wilcox  Put 
nam  and  Norman  Jacobsen,  cloth,  $1.00. 

Non-Fiction 

The  Twentieth  Plane,  Dr.  Albert  D. 
Watson,  cloth,  $2.00;  Essays  in  Occul- 
tism, Dean  W.  R.  Harris,  cloth,  $1.25; 
Spiritism  and  Demonology;  Standard 
Canadian  Reciter,  D.  G.  French  and  F. 
H.  Kirkpatrick,  cloth,  $1.50;  Canadian 
Poems  of  the  Great  War,  Edited  by  John 
W.  Garvin,  B.A.,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Navy 
in  Battle,  Arthur  Pollen,  cloth,  $2.50. 


The  Famous  Health  and  Sex  Books 


"The  Life  of  Yashka"  is  an  interesting 
announcement.  Yashka  was  the  leader 
of  the  famous  Russian  "Battalion  of 
Death,"  and  this  book  tells  her  story 
from  her  young  life,  exile  in  Siberia,  cul- 
minating in  the  strenuous  war  experi- 
ences. 


Seiual  Knowledge  for  M-n'     -     -  1. 00 

*   lent  of  Gonorrhea      -     -     -  3.00 

.  ...orality 1.00 

Seiual  Crisis 3.00 

Her  Sea  and  Lore  Life  -  3.00 

.  ...ipolence      -----  4.00 

Seaual  Problems 2.00 

Lu  rentes  and  Marriage        -     -     -  1.00 

Stories  of  Lore  and  Life       -     -     -  1.00 

Uncontrolled  Breeding  -      -     -     -  1.00 

Never  Told  Tales 1.00 

Limitation  of  Offspring  -      -     -     -  1.00 

Prevention  of  Sexual  Diseases  3.00 

nThe  Ladies'  New  Medical  Guide  by  • 

Dr.  S.  Pancoast  -     -           -     -  200 


This  advertisement  appears  regularly  in  Mac- 
Lean's  Magazine,  Every  woman's  World  and 
Fanners'  Magazine,  thus  creating  demands  by 
the  pnbl  ic  at  the  bookstores.  You  should 
have  the3e  books  in  stock  to  fill  orders  that 
will    result. 


"Games  that  Amuse" 

Wanted  a  company  to  take 
over  the  Canadian  patents  of 
the  Liberty  Games  Company 
on  a  royalty  basis,  or  can 
buy  outright.  Products  in- 
clude : — 

Liberty  Checker  Board 
Liberty  Chess  Board 
Who? 
Tinkles 

To  those  interested  address 
The  Liberty  Games  Co. 

2149  N.  Vanpelt  St. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


If  You're  Wise 

You'll  learn   how  to   make   MORE 
MONEY  handling  TOYS. 

PLAYTHINGS 

£  TELLS  YOU  HOW. 

Subscription  —  $2.00     per    year. 
(Foreign    $3.00) 

Send     your     subscription     NOW     and     get     the 
"BIG  3" — also  the  Toy  Directory 


Playthings  1 


18  E.  28th  Street 
NEW  YORK 


RELIANCE  INKS 

are    noted    for  their  rich   color 
and  easy  flow. 

RELIANCE    "GRIP" 

The  strong  fluid  paste,  which 

never   dries   out,    is    a    profit 

maker.      Write  for  prices. 

Reliance  Ink  Co.,  Ltd. 

WINNIPEG.   MAN. 


59 


BOOKSELLER      A  $ D     STATIONER 


British  Goods  Are  Standards  of  Value 


Charles  W.  Baker 

Buying  Agent 

General  Merchandise  and 
Products  of  Great  Britain. 
M  a  n  u  facturers'  invoices 
forwarded  to  Buyers. 
A  live  buying  agent  on  the 
spot  will  save  you  money 
and  look  after  j;Qur  deliv- 
eries. %•*' 
Selling    Commissions     un- 
dertaken. 
References  on  application. 

24  Silk  Street  &  42-46  Whitecross  St., 
London    E.C.   1.,  England 

Cables  : 
Telereka,  London.      Code:    A. B.C.  5th 
Phones : 
693  Central.    2107  City.     aeiSDalston 

SCHOOL  AND  OFFICE 
REQUISITES 

GEO.  WRIGHT  & 
CO.,  Headquarters 
for  S  t  a  t  i  o  ners' 
Sundries.  The  "Re- 
quisite House,"  92. 
glejrkenwell  Road. 
ojtdon,  E.C.  1. 
Contractors  to  the 
Home  and  Colon- 
ial Governments, 
thr;  London  Coun- 
ty Council,  etc. 
Manufacturers  to 
the  Wholesale  and 
Export  Trade. 
Drawing  Instruments, 
Nature    Study     Box, 


For  Blackboards 
"Wright's 
Dustless"  Chalk 

Scholastic  :  Rules. 
Wright's  "Blackine, 
etc.  Commercial :  Filing  Apparatus,  Ink- 
stands, Stationery  Cases,  Cash  Boxes, 
Wright's  Pencil-pointed  Pens,  and  General 
Office  Sundries.  Fancy:  Tourists'  Writing 
Cases,    Penholders,    and    Gaines,    etc. 

But  we  cannot  execute  your  orders  till 
after  the  war,  when  we  will  also  be  open 
for  good  representatives  to  work  all  prin- 
cipal   towns. 


9 


AFTERTHE  WAR 

I  shall  welcome  orders  or  en- 
quiries for  my  British-made 
Carded  Goods,  Writing  and 
Drawing  Sets,  Stationers'  Sun- 
dries, etc. 

At  present  my  output  is 
absorbed  for  Government 
orders,  Orders  of  National 
Importance,  and  for  old- 
standing  Clients  of  the 
British    Wholesale    Trade. 


Illustrated  list  on  request 


H.  A.  COOMBS'S  CARDED  GOODS 

10  Farring-don  Avenue,  London,  E.C.  4.,  Eng. 


s^i^i^i^i^i^i^^iaiiiiiiiiaaiaaiaaii 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 

Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE   IS 

£1  0s.  7d.  Per  Month 

on  Yearly   Contract 

Single  Insertion  £1  8s  lid 

A    Good   Live   Page— High 

value   in    publicity   at 

minimum  cost 


For  All  British 

Fancy  Leather 

Goods 

Fancy    Jewellery,    Photo 
Frames,  Etc. 


Write: 

S.  P.  COOPER 

Central  Agency 

36    Camomile  St.,   London,  E.C.  3. 
England 


Before  placing  your  orders,  apply  to  us  for 
samples  and  quotations.  We  are  pa  per  makers 
and   wholesale  nnrl  export   paper  merchants. 


Registered 


Trade  Mark 


W.  V.    BOWATER  &   SONS,  LIMITED 

1  59  Queen  Victoria  St.,  London,  E.C.  4,Eng. 
Cables:  " Sparteolus"  London. 


60 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


tif  The  Davis  Novelty  Co.  ^ 

Registered 


Leather  Goods  and   Novelties 
BILLFOLDS   A  SPECIALTY 


^ 


212-214   Mappin   Building 

MONTREAL 

Phone    Uptown    398 


/y 


Manufacturers  of 
DIE-STAMPED 

CHRISTMAS  CARDS 

A  Five  and  Ten  Cent  Line 

AND 

PRIVATE  CHRISTMAS 
GREETING  CARDS 

329  Craig  Street  West,  MONTREAL 


Crucible  Pens 

BRITISH 

25  VARIETIES. 
Send  for  price  list 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co., 

Limited 

TORONTO         •         CANADA 


B.  CAIRNS 

Manufacturer  of 

Rubber  and  Metal  Stamps, 

Brass  Signs,  Seals,  Stencils, 

Burning  Brands,  Memorial   Plates. 

77  Queen  St.  East 

Tel.  Main  3760  TORONTO 

■ 

Your  advertisement  here 

will  be  read  by 

Booksellers  and  Stationers 

throughout  Canada. 


ART    SUPPLIES. 

Artists'    Supply    Co.,    77    York    St.,    Toronto. 
A.    Ramsay   &   Son    Co.,  Montreal. 
Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co.,    Limited,    215    Victoria    St., 
Toronto. 

BLACKBOARDS    (Slate   and   Hyloplate) 

Geo.   M.    Hendry   &   Co.,   215   Victoria   St.,  Toronto. 

BLANK   BOOKS. 

Boorum   &    Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Buntin.    Gillies    &    Co.,   Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Dominion    Blank    Book    Co.,    Berthierville.    Que. 
National    Blank    Book    Co.,    Holyoke,    Mass. 
The  Copp.    Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.    &   Rutter.   Toronto. 

BLOTTING   PAPERS. 

The    Albemarle    Paper   Co.,    Richmond,    Va. 
Eaton-Dikeman   Co.,   Lee,  Mass. 
Menzies    &    Co..    Limited.    Toronto. 
Richmond    Paper   Mfg.    Co.,    Richmond,    Va. 
Standard   Paper  Mfg.   Co.,   Richmond,   Va. 

CODE    BOOKS. 

The     American     Code     Co.,     83     Nassau     St..     New 

York. 
John    W.    Hartfield.   N.Y.    Produce   Exchange.   N.Y. 

CRAYONS. 

Binney    &    Smith,   New  York. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W., 
Toronto. 

EYELETTING   MACHINES. 

Elbe   File   and   Binder   Co..   New   York.   N.Y. 
Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited,   Toronto. 

ENVELOPES. 

Brown  Bros..  Limited,  Toronto. 
Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co..  Hamilton. 
Copp.    Clark    Co.,   Toronto. 

W.   V.   Dawson.    Limited,   Montreal.   Toronto.    Win- 
nipeg. 
Menzies   &   Co..    Limited.   Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter.   Toronto. 

ERASERS. 

Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited.    Toronto. 

St.    Mungo    Mfg.    Co..    Glasgow.    Scotland 

Weldon    Roberts    Rubber   Co.,    Newark.    N.J. 

FANCY    PAPERS.    TISSUES    AND    BOXES. 

Dennison   Mfg.    Co.,    Boston. 

M"n-u-s    &   Co..    Limited.   Toronto. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W., 

Toronto. 

FOUNTAIN   PENS. 
Modern    Pen    Co..    New    York. 
Mabie.  Todd    &    Co..    473    College   Ct..   Toronto. 
A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W., 

Toronto. 
Paul    E.    Wirt    Co..    Brown    Bros..    Ltd..    Toronto, 

Canadian   Agents. 

INKS.  MUCILAGE   AND   GUMS. 

Chas.   M.   Higgins    &   Co..    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

'rhe  Carter's  Ink   Co..  Montreal. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Reliance    Ink    Co..    Winnipeg.    Man. 
^oyal    Ink    Co..    53    Ynnge    St..    Toronto. 
S.    S.    Stafford    Co..    Toronto. 
"Glucine."   Menzies    &   Co..    Limited.    439    King    St. 

W..   Toronto. 

INDELIBLE   INK. 

Carter's    Ink    Co..    Montreal. 

payson's   Indelible   Ink. 

S.    S.    Stafford    Co..    Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co.,     468     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
The   Sengbusch    Co.,    Milwaukee. 

KINDERGARTEN    MATERIALS. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co..    Limited.    215    Victoria    St . 
Toronto. 

LEAD    AND    COPYING    PENCILS. 

American    Pencil   Co..  New  York. 

Wm.    Cane   &    Sons.   Newmarket.    Ont. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     &     Co..     468     King     St.     W., 

Toronto. 
Menzies    &    Co..    Limited,    Toronto. 


Hegone  Studio 

37-39  East  28th  Street 

New  York  City 

The  Atelier  of  Exquisite  hand  decorated 
Boxes  and  Lamp  Shades  for  Manufac- 
turers and  the  Trade.  Canadian  trade 
solicited. 

A  visit  to  our  Studios  will  convince  you 
that  our  work  is  original  and  of  the 
highest    quality. 

WATERSTON'S 


"BEE" 


BRAND 


SEALING  WAX 


factory: 
Warriston  Works,  Edinburgh,  Scotland 


Waste  Paper  Balers 

The  "CLIMAX" 

Steel  Fireproof  Baler 

turns  your  waste  into 
profit. 

Made  in  12  sizes. 

Send  for  Catalogue. 

CLIMAX  BALER  CO. 

HAMILTON.  ONT. 


<  **  J 

SELL 

MACLEAN'S 


The  Magazine  for  Canadians 


20c  A  COPY 


61 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


School  Rulers 

NEW  LINE  NOW  READY 

New   Shapes   and    Right    Prices. 
Send  for  samples  and  quotations. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

CANISTEO,  N.Y. 

W.  S.  TUTTLE.  Manager 
Commercial  Ruler  Department 


G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West,  Toronto 

Manufacturer  and  Importer 

Pictures,  Frames,  Mirrors,  Statuary  —  every, 
thing  in  Picture  Framing  outfits.  $150.00 
will  start  you  in  a  profitable  line  of  business. 
Crayon  and  Water  Color  Portrait  Enlarge- 
ments. Send  your  pictures  to  me.  I  will 
frame    them     at    low     prices.       I     manufacture 

500  different  pieces  of  beautiful  French  bronze 
finished  s.'atues.  $75.00  will  make  a  beauti- 
ful  display. 


MAPS 

We  can  supply  the  trade  with  anything  of 
the  map  line  as  well  as  undertake  any  kind  in 
Map-Making.  Road  Maps,  Motor  Guides, 
Commercial  Maps,  Atlases. 

The  Scarborough  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited 

36  James  St.  N.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 


William  Sinclair 
&  Sons,  (Stationers) 

LIMITED 
Otley  Yorks  England 

Manufacturers  of  Cheap  Stationery 


GILT  EDGE  AND 
BORDERED  CARDS 

Gold,  Silver,  and  Colored  Borders,  Be- 
velled and  Deckle  Edged  Cards  for  every 
kind  of  work.  Gilding,  Bevelling  and 
Bordering  to  the  trade. 

Send  for  Price  List 

JOHN  BRADFORD 

Card  Manufacturer 
70  LOMBARD  STREET  TORONTO 


LOOSE    LEAF    BOOKS,    BINDERS    AND 
HOLDERS. 

The    Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Boorum    &    Pease    Co.,    Brooklyn. 

Buntin.    Gillies   &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp,   Clark   Co..   Toronto. 
Luckett    Loose    Leaf,    Limited,    215     Victoria    St., 

Toronto. 
National    Blank    Book    Co.,    Holyoke,    Mass. 
Rockhill   &   Vietor,  22  Cliff  St..  New  York  City. 
Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter,   Toronto. 
Stationers'    Loose    Leaf    Co.,    203    Broadway,    N.Y.. 

and    Milwaukee.    Wis. 

LEATHER  AND  FANCY  GOODS. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

MAPS   AND   GLOBES 
Rand.    McNally    &    Co..    Chicago, 
The  Copp.   Clark    Co..   Toronto. 
Geo.    M.    Hendry   Co.,    215    Victoria   St..   Toronto. 
The    Scarborough    Co.    of    Canada.    Hamilton.    Ont. 

PAPER    BALERS 
Climax    Baler    Co..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
PAPER   FASTENERS. 
Ideal    Specialties    Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St..    New 

York    City. 
O.    K.    Manufacturing    Co..    Syracuse,    N.Y. 

PAPER    MAKERS 
Bowater     &     Sons,     Limited,     W.     V.,     159     Queen 
Victoria     St..     London,     E.C. 

PAPETERIES   AND  WRITING  PAPERS. 

The    Copp    Clark    Co.,    Toronto. 
Buntin,    Gillies    &    Co..    Hamilton.    Ont. 
Clark    Bros.    &    Co..    Winnipeg,    Man. 
W.   V.    Dawson,    Limited.   Montreal,   Toronto.    Win- 
nipeg. 
The  Brown   Bros..   Ltd..  Toronto. 
Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited.    Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.    &   Rutter.   Toronto. 

PLAYING   CARDS. 

Goodall's   English    Playing   Cards,    A.   O.   Hurst,   32 

Front  St.    W.,    Toronto. 
U.  S.  Playing  Card  Co..  Windsor,  Ont. 

POST  CARDS.  GREETING  CARDS,  ETC. 

A.    O.    Hurst.    Canadian    representative.    32    Front 

St.    W..    Toronto. 
Menzies    &    Co..    Limited.    Toronto. 
Philip    G.    Hunt    &     Co..    332    Balham     High    Rd.. 

London,    Eng. 
Pugh    Specialty   Co..    38-42    Clifford    St..   Toronto. 
Valentine    &    Sons    Publishing   Co.,   Toronto. 

RUBBER    STAMPS,    STENCILS,    ETC. 

Bernard    Cairns.    77   Queen    St.   W..   Toronto. 
Fulton    Specialty    Co.,    Elizabeth.    N.J. 

SCIENCE    APPARATUS 

Geo.   M.    Hendry   &  Co..   215   Victoria   St..   Toronto. 

SCHOOL   SUPPLIES. 

Gei.    M.    Hendry    Co..    Limited.    215    Victoria    St.. 
Toronto. 

SCHOOL    AND    OFFICE    RULERS. 

The    Up-to-Date    Co..    Canisteo.    N.Y. 

SHEET   MUSIC. 

McKinley   Music  Co..    1501-15   East  Fifty-Fifth   St.. 
Chicago. 
STANDARD    COMMERCIAL    PUBLICATIONS. 

Morton,   Phillips  &   Co..  Montreal. 

STATIONERS'  SUNDRIES. 

Brown   Bros..  Ltd.,  Wholesale  Stationers,    Toronto. 

Buntin.   Gillies   &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

The    Copp,    Clark    Co.,    Wholesale    Stationers.    To- 
ronto. 

Clark   Bros.    &   Co.,   Ltd.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 

W.   V.   Dawson,   Limited,   Montreal,  Toronto,   Win- 
nipeg. 

Warwick   Bros.   &  Rutter.  Toronto. 

STEEL    WRITING    PENS. 

John    Heath.    8    St.    Bride    St..    E.C.    London. 

Hinks.    Wells   &   Co..   Birmingham.  Eng. 

Esterbrook    Pen    Co..    Brown    Bros..    Ltd..    Toronto, 
Canadian   Representatives. 

TOYS.    PUZZLES 

A.    C.    Gilbert. 

Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited.   Toronto. 


62 


ELBE  FILE   &   BINDER   CO. 

97  Reade  Street 


New  York 


McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper  Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montrea 


TICKET   and  CONDUC 
TOR  PUNCHES 

the-  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Co. 

HAMILTON.  OHIO.  U.S.*. 


FLAGS    BRIGHTEN    THE    HOME    COMING 

Red,  White  &  Blue 
18"  x  27"  Banners. 
$4.50  doz. 
12"xl6"   Banners, 
$3.25  doz. 

6"  x  8"  Flags  on 
stick,    $6.67   gross. 

A  live  selling  spe- 
cialty for  home 
decoration. 

Send  for  Trial  Asiortmrnt 

Toronto  Trophy-Craft  Co. 

1710  Royal  Bank  Bldg  ,  Toronto 


Desk  PadsS'°:Cloth  Covered  Cabinets 


L.  Hoffman,  45  Lafayette  St.,  N.Y.C. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


BOOK  BUYERS'  GUIDE 


CODE  WILL  FORM 

Simple,  clear  and  concise 
Ready-made  Will. 

Price  $1,80  per   dozen. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited 

517  Wellington  St.  West  Toronto 


SELF  AND  SEX  SERIES 

Keep    these    books    in    sight.      They    are    Bteadj 
sellers  because  91)  out  of  every  100  who  pass  your 
store    are    prospective    customers. 
Four   Books   to  'Men: — 

What  a  Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know. 

Whal:   a  Young  Man   Ought  to  Know. 

What    a    Young    Husband    Ought    to  Know. 

What  a   Man   of  45   Ought    to    Know. 
Four  Books  to   Women:— 

What   a    Young   Girl    Ought    to    Know. 

What  a  Young   Woman   Ought   to  Know. 

What    a    Young    Wife   Ought    to    Know. 

What   a    Woman   of  45  Ought    to   Know. 
$1.00     Each. 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS.    Publisher.    Toronto 


WILLS 

of  the 

Law  of  Succession  after  Death 

Written  by  Walter  E.  Lear,  Barrister-at-Law, 
in  plain,  simple  language  and  intended  to  be 
used  by  the  general  public.  It  contains  concise 
statement  of  the  Law  of  Wills  in  force  in  all 
the  Provinces  of  Canada,  and  Forms  of  Wills 
and  Codicils.  Printed  in  large  type.  This  is 
a  book  that  should  be  read  by  every  person 
before  making  a  will.  Agents  wanted.  Price, 
$1,  in  cloth  binding.  Liberal  discount  to  the 
trade.  Law  Books,  Limited,  152  Bay  St., 
Toronto. 


LANGUAGES 

VJ/ORLiD-ROMIC  SYSTEM,  MASTERKEY 
to  All  Languages.  Six  Textbooks,  $1.44. 
French  Pronunciation-Chart,  37c  ;  Spanish,  37c. 
Aviation  Dictionary,  $1.50.  French-English 
Aviation  Dictionary,  61c.  Languages,  143 
West    47th,   New   York. 


DIRECTORY  OF  PUBLISHERS. 
FICTION. 

rhomas   Allen.  215  Victoria  St.,  Toronto.  Ont. 
William    Briggs.    Queen    and    John    Sts.,    Toronto, 

Ont. 
Cassell   &  Co.,  55   Bay  St..  Toronto,   Ont. 
Copp,   Clark  Co.,  617   Wellington  St.   W„  Toronto, 

Ont. 

J.  M.  Dent  &  Sons.  27  Melinda  St.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
S.  B.  Gundy.  25  Richmond  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Hodder   &    Stoughton.    25    Dundas   St.   E.,    Toronto, 

Ont. 
Thomas   Langton,   23   Scott  St.,  Toronto,   Ont. 
Macmillan    Co.   of    Canada,    70    Bond    St.,    Toronto, 
Ont. 

McClelland,    Goodchild    &    Stewart,    266    King    St 
W„   Toronto,   Ont. 

Geo.   J.   McLeod,    Ltd..    266   King   St.    W.,   Toronto. 
Ont. 

Musson  Book  Co..  25  Dundas  St.  E..  Toronto,  Ont. 

Thomas    Nelson    &    Sons,    77    Wellington    St.    W., 
Toronto,    Ont. 


BUSINESS    BOOKS. 

Frederick  D.  Goodchild,  266   King  St.  W.,  Toronto. 
Musson  Book  Co.,  25  Dundas  St.  E.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Wycil    &   Co.,   85   Fulton   St.,   New   York    City. 
Law   Books,    Ltd.,   15   Bay  St.,  Toronto. 

CODE  BOOKS  AND  CONVERSION  TABLES 

John   W.   Hartfield,  N.Y.,    Produce   Exchange,   New 

York. 

PERIODICALS. 
MacLean's  Magazine,  143  University  Ave.,  Toronto 
Imperial    News    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Montreal    and 

Winnipeg. 
Gordon   &    Gotch,    136    Bay   St.,   Toronto,   Ont..   and 

15    St.    Bride   St.,    London,   E.C. 
American   News   Co.,   Toronto   and   Hamilton,    Ont. 
American   News    Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 
American   News   Co.,   Winnipeg.   Man. 


Classified  Advertising 


pAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK  SUPPLIED 
by  all  wholesale  drug;  houses  in  the  Do- 
minion. The  best  seller.  Established  over 
eighty  years.  Ask  for  counter  -display  stand 
which  greatly  increases  the  sale  of  ink.  Re- 
ceived highest  award  at  many   Expositions. 


LET   US   HELP   YOU 

CECURE  DESIRABLE  MERCHANDISE  AT 
the  right  price.  If  you  desire  to  save  time 
and  money  on  your  buying  you  must  be  re- 
presented in  New  York.  A  great  amount  of 
service  at  a  very  small  cost.  Better  write  us 
to-day.  Associated  Buyers,  309  Broadway. 
New   York,   N.Y. 


OFFICE   SUPPLIES 

A  JAX     PATENT     FILE     WRAPPERS— FOR 

legal  papers,  specifications,  contracts,  etc.. 
sample  with  prices  on  request.  Desaulniers. 
Moline.     Illinois. 

BOOKS  WANTED 

"Darkness  and  Dawn,"  by  George  Allan  Eng- 
land. "This  is  For  You."  by  W.  L.  Lord 
(Revell) — The  Gaetz-Comett  Drug  &  Book 
Co..   Ltd.,  Red  Deer,  Alta. 


FOR    SALE 

pOR  SALE— FLOURISHING,  OLD-ESTAB- 
fished  book  and  stationery  business  in 
British  Columbia.  Edison  and  Kodak  agencies. 
Toys,  fancy  goods,  etc.  Capital  required 
$10,000.       Box    983,     Bookseller    and    Stationer. 

pOR  SALE— GOOD  PAYING  BOOK,  STA- 
tionery  and  News  Business  ;  old  established 
and  in  best  business  location  in  the  best  city 
in  Canada.  Apply  before  March  15th  to  W.  P. 
Cooke,    Port  Arthur,   Ont. 

AGENTS    WANTED 

A  GENTS  TO  SELL   CALENDARS   WANTED 
by  English   firm   dealing   in  highest  quality 
goods.     Box  C906,  c/o  Dawson's  Advter.  Agency, 
121   Cannon   Street,   London,   E.C.    4,   Eng. 

ARE  YOU  A  SALESMAN? 
VX/E  HAVE  OUR  CANADIAN  TERRITORY 
open  for  a  salesma'n  who  knows  the  Sta- 
tionery. Gift  and  Art  Store.  Department  Store, 
Book  Store,  etc.,  trade.  We  manufacture  an 
exceptionally  high  grade  line  of  Engraved 
Greeting  Card?  at  popular  prices.  All  cor- 
respondence considered  confidential.  No 
objection  if  carried  with  a  non-conflicting 
line.  The  Boston  Line.  178  Congress  St.. 
Boston,   Mass. 


Otto  Sauer  Series 

French,  Spanish 
and    Italian    Grammars 

MADE  IN   THE  U.S.A. 
Grammar  Separate,  $1.00 

Grammar  with  Key   $1.25 

WYCIL  &  COMPANY 

85  Fulton  Street,  New  York  City 
Liberal  Discounts  to  the  Trade 


SEXUAL   KNOWLEDGE 

Sex  Hygiene,  by  the  World's  Highest  Author- 
ity—Winfield  Scott  Hall,  M.D..  Ph.D.,  assisted 
by  Jeanette   Winter  Hall. 

RELIABLE  —  SCIENTIFIC  —  CORRECT 
Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Man  Should 
Have— Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Woman 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Husband 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Wife 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Father 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Mother 
Should    Have.  Cloth  Illustrated,  $1.25 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart,  ltd. 


266  King  Street  West 


Toronto,  Canada 


Who^_Pays  for  the  Advertising? 

"\\niO  pays  for  the  advertis- 
ing f 

The  consumer,  of  course. 
Ui  pays  for  every  expense  of 
putting  the  goods  into  his  hands 
— including  selling  cost.  This 
and  production  cost  are  both  so 
reduced  by  successful  advertis- 
ing that  he  pays  LESS  for  the 
same  goods,  just  because  they 
are  well  advertised.  You  ride 
cheaper  on  an  excursion  train 
than  if  you  hired  a  private  car 
— even  a  cattle  car.  And  you 
don't  ask  "Who  pays  the  fare?" 
— The  Optimist 


Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

All    good    titles   and    full 
of  colour. 

Full  list  on  application. 

2  Amen  Corner        London,  E.C.  4 

ENGLAND 


63 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


HOLD  THE  LINE 


(Registered) 


London  (  Eng. ) 
Export  Agency, 
8  St.  Bride  St., 
LONDON,  E.C. 


Here's  the  line  to  hold — 
John    Heath's    Telephone 
Pen.    You  will  not  hold  it 
long    because    it    sells    so 
quickly.     There's  quality 
about     it.       It    writes 
smoothly,  never  corrodes, 
and  lasts  long.     Get  con 
nected  with  the  Telephone 
Pen  for  quick  sales. 
Supplied 
by  ail  the 
leading 
whole- 
tale 
houses    in 
Toronto 

and 
Montreal 


ARTISTS  MATERIALS 


We  carry  a  complete  line  of  Artists  Materials 
Agents  for  Winsor  &  Newton.  London.  Eng. 

A.RAMSAY  &  SON   C9 

ESTD.   1842.    MONTREAL. 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgi 


ns 


Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the  finest  and   best   Inks  and   Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  tbe  ready- 
money  kind  who  know  wbat  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches  : 
Chicago.   London 


271   Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN.  N.Y. 


INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


Adams   Co.,   S.   S 22 

Albermarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co 23 

Allen,    Thos 2,3,4,5 

American    Lead    Pencil    Co 17 

Baker,   Chas.   W 60 

Bemister,   H.  A 57 

Binney  &  Smith  Co 17 

Blake,  Arthur  J 23 

Boorum   &   Pease    18 

Boston    Line,   The    18 

Bowater  &  Co.,  Lid 60 

Bradford,  John    62 

British     Drawing     Ink     &     Adhesive 

Mfg.   Co 21 

Briggs,    Wm 8-63 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co Back  cover 

Cairns,  Bernard    ' 61 

Canadian   Facts    Publishing   Co 

Inside  back  cover 

Cane  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Wm 20 

Caribonum   Co.,  Ltd 58 

Carmichael   &   Co.,  Ltd.,   Peter    21 

Carter's  Ink  Co .     23 

Climax  Baler  Co 61 

Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd 9,  10,  11,  61,  63 

Coombs,  R.  A 60 

Cooper,  S.  P 60 

Crippen,  E.  A 57 

Cushman  &  Denison  Mfg.  Co 57 

Davis  Novelty  Co 61 

Dawson,  Ltd.,  W.  V.   .  .  .Inside  front  cover 

Dexter  &  Sons,  Inc.,  C.  H 58 

Dent  &  Sons,  J.  M 28 

Dominion  Blank  Book  Co 30 


20 

55 

62 

13 

58 

Fulton  Specialty  Co 57 


Eaton.  Crane  &  Pike  Co.   . 

Katon-Dikeman    Co 

Kibe   File    &    Binder   Co..  . 
Ksterbrook    Pen    Mfg.    Co. 

Farrell   &   Hosinger  Co.    .  . 


Gale   &    Polden    . 
Goodchild,    Fred. 


D. 


63 
59 


Heath.  John,  &   Sons .- 64 

Hegone    Studios     61 

Henry  Co.,  Ltd.,  Geo.  M 55 


Hiergins  &   Co.,  Chas.  M. 
Hinks,   Wells   &   Co. 
Hilton   &   Co.,  W.  H.    .  .. 

Hoffman,    L 

Hurst.  Aubrey  O 


Imperial   News   Co.,  Ltd. 
Irish,   G.   L 


Jewel   Pen    Co.,  Ltd.,   The. 


64 
22 
18 
62 
1 

22 
62 

19 


Languages    63 

Law   Books,   Ltd 63 

Liberty   Games   Co 59 

Luckctt  Loos-  Leaf  Co.,  Ltd 16 

Mabie,  Tod  &  Co Front  cover 

MacDougall   &   Co.,  Ltd..  A.   R 24 

MacLcan's     26,  61 

McClelland  &  Stewart,  Ltd 6,7,63 

McFarlanc,  Son,  &   Hodgson,  Ltd....      62 

McKinley  Music  Co 28 

McCrcady  Publishing  Co 59 

.Marshall,    Percival,    &    Co 28 

64 


Modern  Pen   Co 23 

Moore  Push   Pin   Co 22 

Menzies    &    Co..    Ltd 32 

Meyers,  Fred.  J.,   Mfg.  Co 62 

Mittag  &   Volger,   Inc 

Inside  back  cover 

National   Blank   Book   Co 30 

National  Cash  Register  Co 12 

O'Gorman,   M.   E 29 

O.K.  Mfg.   Co 22 

Orken  Co.,  Oscar   22 

Packard    Bros 61 

Philco  Publishing  Co 21 

Pugh  Specialty  Co.,  Ltd 57 

Ramsay   &   Son    Co.,  A 64 

Reliance   Ink   Co 59 

Richmond   Paper   Mfg.   Co 19 

Robinson  Mfg.  Co 1 

Rockhill   &  Vietor   59 

Rolland  Paper  Co.,  Ltd 15 

Royal  Ink  Co 22 

Scarborough   Co.  of  Canada 62 

Sinclair  &   Sons,  Ltd.,  Wm 20,62 

Stafford,  S.  S.,  Inc Inside  back  cover 


28 

22 
62 

62 


Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Terry   &  Sons,  Herbert   .  .  . 
Toronto  Trophy  Craft  Co. 

Up-to-dato   Advertising   Co 

U.S.  Playing  Card  Co 14 

Valentine  &  Son 25 

Volger  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc.,  B.  C 58 

Warwick  Bros,  and  Rutter.  .    Front  cover 

Waterston  &   Sons.  Ltd.,  Geo 61 

Weber  &   Co.,  F 57 

Weeks  Mfg.  Co.,  Frank   59 

Weldon  Roberts  Rubber  Co 55 

Wright  &  Co..  George   60 

Wvcil  &  Co 63 


BOOKSELLER      ANT)      S  T  A  T  I  0  N  K  K 


The  Acmejpf  Perfection  in 
regulation}  weight  carbons 


Reliable — Permanent — Economical 
M.  &  V. 

TYPEWRITER 
RIBBONS 

and 

CARBONS 


Their  quality  is  beyond  question  and  is  due  to  our  modern  methods  of 
manufacture  and  the  first  quality  materials  we  use. 

Good  results — good  profits  and  satisfied  customers — can  always  be  looked 
for  from  a  display  of  these  M.  &  V.  Products. 

Are  you  stocked? 

Mittag  and  Volger,  Inc. 

Principal  Office  and  Factory:  Park  Ridge,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 

Agencies  all  over  the    World 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request. 


Canadian  Factory  and  Offices    at 


9-11-13  Davenport  Road 


Toronto 


Advance  Orders  for  the   1919 
Edition  of 

5000 

Facts  About 

Canada 

doubled  those  of  last  year.  This 
is  a  hint  to  the  live  newsdealer 
to  feature  it  and  keep  it  in  stock. 

It  contains  50  chapters  of  Facts, 
from  "Agriculture"  to  "War." 

Order  from  your  News  Company 

Canadian    Facts   Publishing 
Company 

588  Huron  Street,  Toronto 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATION  Kit 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


Advance  Samples 

of 

Christmas  Lines 

will  be  shown  by  our  salesmen  during  the  next 
few  weeks.  The  range  is  entirely  new,  compris- 
ing "Made-in-Canada"  Gift  Stationery,  British 
and  American  Booklets  and  Cards,  Gift  Dress- 
ings, etc.  You  will  make  no  mistake  in  seeing 
them  before  ordering. 


When  you  sell 

Dutch  Fabrik 

you  are  following  the  line  of 
least  resistance. 

Repeat  orders  from  satisfied 
letter-writers  have  made  Dutch 
Fabrik  the  most  widely  known 
popular  priced  stationery  on  the 
market. 

Note  paper,  envelopes,  papeter- 
ies  and  tablets  in  the  popular 
styles. 

(Made-in-Canada) 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


IKAVLLLLKb    NUMBLK 


AND 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted  to  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,   and  for  thirty-four    years  the  recognized  authority  for  those  interests. 


vol.  xxxv. 


PUBLICATION      OFFICE:      TORONTO,     MARCH.       1919 


No.  3 


This  Handsome  Display 


Will  Help  Your  Saleslady 
INCREASE  your  PROFITS 


Pi 


X 


It  is  regular  counter  height  and 
effectively  displays  six  dozen 

SWAN 

FOUNTAIN 

PENS 

With  large  closet  for  reserve  stock, 
boxes,  etc.,  and  occupies  only  1% 
square  feet  of  floor  space. 

SWAN  Fountain  Pens  are  made  in 
all  styles.  Standard  Safety  Self- 
filling,  from  $2.50  up. 

Full  particulars  and  Trade 
discounts  on  request. 


Mabie,  Todd  &f  Co. 

THE  MANUFACTURERS 

473  College  St.,  Toronto,  Ont 

London  Paris  New  York  Chicago 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER.  March.  1919.     Volume   XXXV.,   published   every   month.      Yearly     subscription   price.   $i.00:   U.S.,   $1.50.     Entered 


no      n*    +u 


BOOKSELLER      AND     S  T  A  T I O  N  K  K 


Eversharp  Points 
to  Quick  Profits 

Sales  well  past  the  million  mark! — That's  the 
record  of  Eversharp  in  the  United  States 
where  Eversharp  dealers  are  making  big 
money.  And  now  dealers  in  Canada  have  a 
chance  to  sign  up  for  Eversharp  prosperity. 
The  time  to  act  is — today! 

The  field  for  Eversharp  is  practically  un- 
limited because  Eversharp  guarantees  lasting 
satisfaction  and  economy  to  every  writing 
hand.  Always  sharp — never  sharpened. 
Built  with  jeweler  precision  for  life-long  serv- 
ice. Under  cover  Eversharp  carries  18  inches 
of  lead  and  uses  every  last  bit  for  perfect- 
pointed  writing.  Made  for  pocket,  chain  or 
lady's  bag.     A  wonderful  pencil  success! 

Eversharp  Leads 

Thirty-five  cents  replenishes  the  Eversharp 
lead  supply  —  enough  for  a  quarter  million 
words  -over  seven  thousand  words  one  cent. 
Filled  in  a  jiffy.  Eversharp  Leads,  made  spe- 
cially for  Eversharp,  have  a  fineness,  firmness 
and  smoothness  all  their  own.  They  are  big  re- 
peaters because  made  specially  for  Eversharp. 


Rifled 
Steel  Tip 
Eversharp 
Point 


ALWAYS  SHARP— NEVER  SHARPENED 

Right-Hand  Mate   to    the  famous    Tempoint    Pen 


The  symbol  of 
perfect  writing 
the  mark  of 
K  v  e  ••  s  h  a  r  p 
Pencil  and 
Tcmi>otnt    Pen. 


Rowland  CBb  Campbell,  Ltd. 
Winnipeg,  Manitoba 


The  Consolidated  Optical  Co. 
Toronto,  Ontario         Montreal,  Quebec 


Western    Agents 


1  astern  A»ents 


Made  and  Guaranteed  by 


THE  WAHL  COMPANY 

1800  Roscoe  Street  Chicago,  Illinois 

Send  today  for  catalog  and  interesting  literature  to  Canadian  representatives 


I5  00K.SK  ller     and    stationer 


^■—— — J 

tesraa"' 

KNHBHi 

^^r^ 

3l 

PlP' 

'jH  i  '.ft 
£5P§  i H 

Here  are  Four  Sellers  | 
From  the  Goodall  Assortments 

=  When  you're  stocked  with  Goodall's  you  can  please  every  taste  in  the  = 

p  matter  of  Playing  Cards.    Artistic  Designing  and  Fine  Quality  Board  dis-  = 

=  tinguish  all  of  Goodall's  English  Playing  Cards.  = 

Your  jobber  can  supply  you  with  these  Goodall  lines :  = 
Imperial    Clubs,    Whist,    Colonial    Gold  Edges,  Linettes,  Salons,  Society 

H  and  Sultan..   Patriotic  and  Bairnsfather  Series.  = 

Allbrey  O.  HurSt,  Representative  32  Front  St.  W.,  Toronto 


AUTOMATIC 
COMBINED  ADJUSTABLE 

ENVELOPE  AND  BAG 
FOLDING  MACHINE 


The  "CARMIC 


9)   BRITISH 
MADE 


TWO  machines  in  ONE. 

ANY  size  envelope  or  bag  can  be  folded  upon 

the   "CARMIC"   within   the   specified   range   of 

each  machine,  which  is  practically  unlimited. 

The  change  from  one  size  to  another  being  car- 
ried out  in  about  one  hour. 

The  change  from  envelope  to  bag  shape  being 

carried  out  in  about  half  an  hour.    NO  change 

of  box  is  necessary. 

All  classes  of  paper  can  be  folded. 

Output  of  machines  from  28,000  to  32,000  per 

day. 

Does   not  require   special   skill  to   operate. 

•Very    little    motive    power    is    needed    to    drive 

machine. 

Best  material  and  workmanship  throughout. 

Machine  does  not  gum  the  sealing  flap. 

Space  required  for  machine  and  operator,  6  feet 

by  5  feet. 

Machines  supplied  ready  for  working. 
Instruction  for  changing  and  adjusting  sent  with  all 
machines. 


:> 
C. 

7. 
8. 

9. 

Id. 
11. 

12. 


All  enquiries  should  be  accompanied  with  patterns 
and  particulars  of  range  (largest  and  smallest)  re- 
quired. 

Also  makers  of  Envelope  Gumming  Machines 
(Power  and  Hand.) 

Prices  and  full  particulars  to  be  obtained  from  the  makers 

PETER  CARMICHAEL  &  CO.,  Limited 

4  Carr  Street,  Limehouse 
LONDON,  E.  14  ENGLAND 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


J  he  Largest  selling 
quality  pencil 
in  the  world 


US 

Vpencils 


cT5he  standard  qy which 
all  pencils  ave  judged  — 

C^Aslcihe  expert ! 

Progressive  stationers  everywhere 
appreciate  that  there  is  but  one  BEST 
in  pencils,  and  that  its  trade-mark, 
the  well-known  VENUS  is  recog- 
nized the  world  over 
by  purchasers  who 
demand  Pencil  Per- 
fection. 


17  black  degrees  and 
3  copying,  all  of  the 
same  superb  quality. 

Our  leading  custom- 
ers all  are  preparing 
for  a  big  business  in 
quality  goods  this 
year.  Look  over  your 
stock  of  VENUS  Pen- 
cils and  send  in  your 
orders  early. 


merican    Lead    Pencil    Co. 

220  Fifth  Avenue,  New  York 

and  Clapton.  London.  England 


A  LINE  OF  WINNERS 


Colors 

SCHOOC'^RAYONS 


Travelers'  Samples  Cheerfully  Furnished 

BINNEY   &  SMITH   CO. 

81   Fulton  St.  New  York 


B 0 OKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


How  Dawson's 
Travelers  help 
the  Retailers 


A     Dawson   Traveller 
is  on  the  way  to  see  you 

Last  month  we  spoke  of  the  beginning  of  the  era  of  Peace,  the 
renewal  of  business  activities,  the  assurance  that  present 
prices  will  prevail  for  some  considerable  time  at  least  and 
the  consequent  necessity  for  retailers  to  buy  for  present  trade 
and  the  immediate  future. 

Then  we  told  you  about  some  of  the  outstanding  Dawson- 
made  products  for  stationers. 


Now,  we  want  to  emphasize  the  ad- 
vantage to  the  retail  stationers 
throughout  Canada  afforded  by  the 
frequent  visits  of  THE  DAWSON 
TRAVELERS  to  the  various  sec- 
tions of  the  country.  Every  Daw- 
son Traveler  is  freely  posted  not 
only  about  the  goods  of  our  own 
manufacture,  including  such  lines 
as 

BLANK  BOOKS,  LOOSE  LEAF 
GOODS,  MEMO  BOOKS,  TYPE- 
WRITING PAPERS,  WRITING 
PAPERS,  TABLETS,  ENVELOPES, 


PAPETERIES,  SCHOOL  WORK 
BOOKS,  etc.,  but  also  regarding 
the  various  Stationers'  Sundries 
which  we  sell  extensively  and  for 
some  of  which  we  are  exclusive 
Canadian  representatives. 

Any  Dawson  Traveler  can  give  you 
important  facts  that  will  enable  you 
to  add  to  your  profits,  if  you  will 
give  him  the  opportunity.  It  is  his 
business  to  know  why  Dawson  pro- 
ducts excel  and  how  the  retail  sta- 
tioner will  benefit  by  the  SERVICE 
of  W.  V.  Dawson,  Limited. 


Asy  him  WHY  it  is  better  for  you  to  handle  Dawson  Blank  Books  and  the  other  lines  with  the 
Jackdaw  Brand." 

The  work  of  the  traveler  is  backed  up  by  our  most  efficient  mail  order  service.  Write  us  now 
while  this  is  before  you  and  either  ask  us  to  give  you  full  particulars  or  arrange  for  a  call  bv 
one  of  our  representatives. 


Prompt  and 
courteous  attention 
to  all  orders- 
large  or  small 


l^IMI'TED 

MONTREAL   and    TORONTO 


Be    ready   for 

the  demand 

for    office 

supplies 


15  O  0  K  S  E  L  L  ER      AND      STATION  E  R 


Figure"Vbur 
Playing  Card 


Two  of  the  advertisements 
appearing  in  general  mag- 
vines  that  reach  more  than 
30,000,000    people    every 

month. 


Itf'iOO"— IM  Imm^l  - 
-i.,,  the  jnfctr  i'm.  !•■  i'ii,,. I  t  i i • 
.(,.,. ,t  thi,  oi  in  .  ..'I-,  r  t-.iiM  in  .my '"!'' "I 'hr-- t.  I. 


'■;.V  \ r^x-'^w""*    — Hl  ,/ 


IT  DOWN,  you  dealers  who 
have  displayed  playing  cards 
and  given  them  some  merchandising 
attention  and  total  up  the  profits  you 
have  made  on  the  line  since  say  last  Sep- 
tember. How  does  it  balance  up  against  the 
amount  you  have  invested  in  playing  cards  ? 
We'd  be  glad  to  know  the  result.    Send  it  in. 

BICYCLERS 

PLAYING 
CARDS 

earn  more  profit  on  the  amount  invested  in 
the  stock  than  almost  any  other  line  most 
dealers  carry.  And  no  line  is  easier,  simpler 
to  handle,  or  more  free  from  risk.  Playing 
cards  deserve  their  turn  at  the  display  win- 
dow and  mention  in  the  newspaper  adver- 
tising. 

National  advertising  of  these  two  famous 
brands  kept  up  year  after  year  is  constantly 
expanding  the  field  of  card  playing,  increas- 
ing the  volume  of  sales  and  speeding  up  the 
turn  over.  It  is  making  more  and  more  peo- 
ple ask  for  Bicycle  and  Congress  cards  by 
name.  Everybody  knows  them  and  accepts 
them  without  question.  An  argument  is 
never  necessary  to  sell  them — it  may  be  to  sell 
other  brands. 

Send  now  for  price  list  and 
sample  backs 

THE  U.  S.  PLAYING  CARD  COMPANY 

CINCINNATI,  OHIO  WINDSOR,  ONTARIO 


BOOKKELLEB      AND     s  T  A  T I 0 N E R 


Paper  Fasteners  and  Punches 

We  illustrate  leading  styles,  which  are  recognized  as  the  most  practicable  types  of  office  devices.       They  save  labor  and  do  good  work. 

The  Samson  Eyelet  Tool        No.  1  Samson  Hand  Punch 


The  Ajax 
Eyelet  Fastener 

The  new  automatic 
eyeletting  device 
which  binds  paper, 
cloth  or  leather,  and 
has  a  thousand  time- 
saving  uses  in  office 
and   factory. 


Ajax  Eyelets — Actual  Sizes 


tf2.  '3 


Packed  in  Boxes  of  oOO. 
With  one  strike  of  the  lever,  the  Ajax 
punches  the  hole,  inserts  and  clinches 
the  eyelet.  The  Ajax  Fastener  takes 
the  three  sizes  of  Ajax  rust-proof  eye- 
lets shown  without  any  adjustment. 
Remember,  Mr.  Dealer,  every  machine 
sold  creates  constant  demand  for  Ajax 
Eyelets. 


For  binding  ail 

correspondence, 
legal  docu- 
ments, etc.  It 
punches  a 
clean,  accurate 
hole  and 
clinches  the 
eyelet  per- 
fectly. 


Special    Samson     Advantages 
The  patented  spring   collet   prevents 
eyelet    slipping     out    of     position, 
gauge    fixes    the    margin    exactly    as 
sired.       Use     Samson     Zinc     Eyelets 


Will  take  inter- 
changeabl 
chang  e  able 
punches  and  dies 
in  sizes  from 
16  in.  to  '/i  in. 
diameter.  Fur- 
nished with  3  16 
punch  and  die 
unless  otherwise 
specified. 


Useful  in   any  office 


the 
The 

de- 

for 


The    No.     1    Samson 
drop     forged     steel. 


Hand    Punch    is    made    of 

attractively     nickel-plated. 


SIZES  OF  HOLES-PUNCH  N2  1 


Samson  Eyelet  Tools.  Rust-proof,  made 
especially  for  the  Samson  eyelet  tool  - 
packed  ">00  to  box  I  ten  boxes  to  ear- 
ton).  Two  sizes  long  and  short.  Sam- 
son Eyelets,  with  the  Samson  Eyelet 
Tool,  assure  best  results  but  any  stock 
eyelet    can    be    used. 

Write    for    Catalogue. 

MACHINE  APPLIANCE  CORPORATION,  351   JAY  STREET,  BROOKLYN,  N.Y. 

Canadian  Representatives:  Menzies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  439  King  Street  West,  Toronto,  Canada 


I'hroat.  1%  in.  deep.  Opening  between  dies. 
',  inch.  Will  punch  sheet  iron  and  soft 
iteel    up    to    20    gauge,    and    paper,    cardboard, 

leather,    etc..    up    to    %    inch    in    thickness. 


Classy  Birds 


(Every     standard 
pencil   is   a   bird) 

The  Quail 
Hexagon  shape — 
with  or  without 
rubber  tip.  Qual- 
ity unexcelled, 
also 

The   Wren 

The   Puffin 
The   Starling 

The    Lark 
The  Ibis 

The  Chat 
The  Thrush,  etc. 
This  line  of  pen- 
cils is  a  veritable 
find  for  the  job- 
ber and  the  office 
supply  house. 
The  price  attracts 
— but  the  quality 
is  the  principal 
asset. 

Write  us  for 
samples  and  quo- 
tations. Made  by 
the  Standard 
Pencil  Co.,  St. 
Louis,  Mo. 
Estab.  7  years 
DO  IT  NOW 


Easy  Money 
Makers 


FULD'S 

(Original  and  Patented  U.S.  and  Canada) 

Ouija  Board 

15  x  22  (large  size  only,  $18.00  doz.) 
CASH    IN    ON    THIS    PERSISTENT   CRAZE 


Toy  Balloons 

Round  Air  Balloons — sausage  shapes,  Airships 
Monster   Balloons,    Punching    Bags 

All  shapes   in  Squawker  Balloons 

Lowest  prices! — guaranteed   stock! 

The    big   business   starts    in    May   and   endures 

right  up  to   Chrismas 

Give  us  a   trial  order 


Menzies  &  Company,  Ltd.,  439  King  St.  W.,  Toronto 

Manufacturers'  Agents—Publishers  and  Importers  of  Xmas  Cards— Fancy  Stat'y— Toys— Blotting  Paper,  etc. 


B  OOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


Valentines  Serie© 

fost  ,^^^  CARDS 


^THROUGHOUT, 


R\S> 


THE  VALENTINE  &  SONS  UNITED  PUBLISHING  CO.,  LIMITED 

HEAD  OFFICE 

TORONTO 


Feb.  28,  1919. 
Mr.  Bookseller  and  Stationer, 

Anywhere,  Canada 

Dear  Sir:  — 

One  word  before  you  buy  your  CHRISTMAS  CARDS. 
We  have  made  arrangements  for  the  exclusive  handling  of  the 

DREYFUSS  ART  CO. 'S  LINES 
of 
CHRISTMAS,  NEW  YEAR,  VALENTINE  and  EASTER  CARDS 

We  haven't  advertised  the  fact  until  we  had  the  experience 
of  a  few  of  the  dealers  who  had  it  last  year.   "Compares  very 
favorably  with  any,  and  better  than  most,"  were  the  expressions  of 
opinion,  and  these  statements  were  backed  by  increased  orders. 

Will  you  wait  and  see  this  line  before  you  fill  right  up? 
Nothing  will  be  a  repeat  of  what  you  have  had  nor  even  look  similar, 
and  the  line  doesn't  cater  to  extreme  tastes,  but  is  a  popular,  at  the 
same  time  high  class  line,  five  and  ten  cent  numbers  predominating. 

The  series  is  made  up  in  OFFSET  PRINTING  HAND-COLORED 
AND  STEEL  DIE,  and  there  are  hundreds  of  designs. 

You  know  us  to  be  conservative  and  not  given  to  wild 
statements  and  would  thank  you  to  wait  until  you  have  seen  our 
representative. 


Yours  very  truly, 
The  Valentine  &  Sons  United  Pub.  Co.,  Ltd. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


ROLLAND'S  STANDARD 
WRITING  TABLETS 


These  four  standard  tablets  are  made  with  well  known  High  Grade 

watermarked  paper. 

MADE  IN  CANADA 

They  are  well  bound  with  these  attractive  covers — and  are  the  basis 
for  steady  tablet  sales  with  the  right  class  of  customers. 


f§me» 


WRITING 


Every  stationer  knows  that  Rolland's  Superfine  Linen  Record  is  the 
best  known  and  most  widely  used  paper  in  Canada.  But  many  do 
not  know  that  it  is  put  up  in  tablets,  note  and  letter  size,  and  is  the 
ideal  tablet  for  the  better  class  of  trade.  The  Earnscliffe,  Empire 
and  Crown  (laid)  papers  are  also  U  known  Canadian  papers  and 
ipply  a  range  in  price. 

Ask  your  wholesaler  for  quotations.     We  will  gladly  supply  samples 
on  request. 


THE  ROLLAND  PAPER  CO.,  Limited 

HIGH  GRADE  PAPER  MAKERS 

MONTREAL,  P.  Q. 


I5()  OK  SELLER      AND     STATIONER 


A  NECESSARY  NUISANCE? 

THE   CLOUD 

Sometimes  one  is  inclined  to  think  that  travellers  are  really  a 
bother.  They  come  in  when  you  are  busy — they  interrupt  your 
routine — they  interfere  with  your  work.  Sometimes  they  come 
when  everything,  it  seems,  has  gone  wrong — and  you  feel  dis- 
posed to  take  it  out  on  them.  They  may  want  you  to  come  to 
the  Sample  Room  when  it  is  most  inconvenient  to  you.  They  try 
to  sell  you  goods  that  you  don't  want.  In  fact,  you  almost  wish 
they  would  not  come  to  disturb  you. 

THE   SILVER   LINING 

But  now,  are  they  really  a  bother?  Of  course  not.  One  is  only 
inclined  to  feel  that  way. 

They  do  come  when  you  are  busy,  but  they  couldn't  come  any 
other  time.  And  they  arrange  their  time  to  suit  you.  The  Tra- 
veller also  has  his  troubles,  but  he  comes  to  you  smiling  and 
good-humored.  Tell  him  some  of  your  difficulties;  he  has  heard 
of  similar  trials  before,  and  may  have  just  the  suggestion  to  help 
you. 

He  sees  what  other  merchants  are  doing  in  other  cities  and  can 
frequently  give  you  some  good  pointers  that  would  cost  you  time, 
trouble  and  money  to  find  out. 

He  brings  new  goods,  new  selling  ideas,  new  systems.  He  opens 
up  new  possibilities  for  you.  By  all  means  use  him.  Cultivate 
him — gain  his  confidence,  his  friendship — it  will  pay.  Give  him 
your  suggestions  and  criticisms  of  his  goods.  Take  up  with  him 
any  complaints  and  smooth  them  out — you  will  feel  better. 

Look  at  his  samples — you  don't  have  to  buy — and  remember, 
that  if  he  didn't  come  to  you,  you  would  have  to  go  to  him.  So, 
when  all  is  said  and  done,  isn't  he  really 

YOUR  BEST  BUSINESS  FRIEND? 

Our   Travellers  are  out     Watch  for  them 

J.  H.  WALKER  -  Canada  (outside  Ontario) 

C.  C.  LIVESAY  -  Toronto  and  Ontario 

H.  L.  GELINAS  -  Junior  for  Toronto 

StcWlTnQJ     MADE    IN    CANADA    AND    MADE   RIGHT     SteWl1n[j 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf.  Limited 

539-543    King    St.    West,   Toronto,   Ontario 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


by  an  intelligent  interest  in 
their  needs.  When  a  pen 
customer  comes  in  ask  him  to 
look  thru  the 

Esterbrook  Pen 

Counter  Display  Case  and  see 
how  easy  it  is  to  find  exactly 
the  pen  best  suited  to  his 
needs. 


Ovallbmt- 

Nd.788^ 


>3fw 


w. 


M 


If  you  like  a  smooth  pen 

You  should  use  the  Esterbrook  Oval  or  Ball 
Pointed  Pen  It  glides  along  with  a  smoothness 
that  gives  confidence  and  speed  to  your  writing 
hand  You  can  write  more  quickly  over  rough 
surfaces,  smoothly  ovet  all  surfaces  and  not  be 
come  tired  The  chances  of  any  finger  or  hand 
strain  are  entirely  done  away  with  when  you  use 
an  Esterbrook  Oval  Pointed  Pen 
The  best  pen  in  the  world  for  addressing  and  free 
writing 

Send  I  St  lot  *  ample  dozen 

Esterbrook  Pen  Mfg.  Co 

18-70  Cooper  St..  Ckrnden,  N    i 


This  quarter  page  advertisement  will  be  read  by  hundreds 
of  thousands  whose  interest  can  be  cashed  into  sales  and 
profits  for  you  thru  your  co-operation. 

"If  I  were  a  retail  stationer,  I'd  send  a  clerk  with  samples 
of  this  celebrated  Oval  Pointed  Pen  to  every  large  office 
in  town  and  get  orders  for  boxes."    (Ad.  man.) 

The  Esterbrook  Counter  Display  Case 
helps  the  customer  —  saves  time  —  money 
—  counter  room  and  makes  selling  easy. 


60 

Year 


Esterbrook  Pen  Mfg.  Co. 

Camden,  N.J. 
The  Brown  Brothers,  Limited,  Toronto,  Canada 


■& 

BBS 

s$y$£*Q£»s 

**flfe 

£"&^ 

$k$i£ 

ISpf^ 


mm 


■Mrsm 


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HOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


ECONOMY 

VT'OU  can  depend  on  National 
-*•  Blank  Books  every  time.  That 
is  why  they  are  the  best  for  yon 
as  well  as  your  customers.  The 
National  '  Eagle  Trademark  ' 
stands  for  the  best  in  construction, 
material,  mechanism  and  service 
in  blank  books.  The  purchase  of 
these  qualities  represents  true 
economy  in  blank  book  buying. 

Another  point  of  economy  is 
this:  There  is  a  book  for  every 
possible  purpose  included  in  the 
National  Line,  in  both  Bound 
Books  and  Loose  Leaf  Devices. 
To  put  exactly  the  right  book  in 
the  right  place  is  good  business. 
A  large  stock  constantly  in  re- 
serve at  the  factory,  insures  quick 
shipments. 


We  shall  be  glad  to  help  you 
with  suggestions  for  profitable 
displays  of  "National"  goods. 
Why  not  Jet  us  help? 


P,W0©ffi3&H  laiLAPflK  [|@©K  (T©ME&K)V 


["[©luyo&SB,  [Ml&ag. 


Suggest  Unification 

of  Office  Records 

SPECIALIZATION  on  one  make  of 
blank  books  in  supplementing  and 
expanding  an  office  accounting  sys- 
tem insures  the  highest  efficiency. 
Do  you  suggest  this  idea  to  your  cus- 
tomers and  help  them  to  work  it  out? 
It  means  maximum  satisfaction  for 
them,  and  minimum  sales  cost  for 
you. 

The  best  and  most  complete  line  of 
Account  Books  and  Loose  Leaf  De- 
vices made  in  Canada  is  that  of  the 
Dominion  Blank  Book  Company.  It 
is  up-to-date  in  every  particular,  in 
a  wide  variety  of  styles  and  uses. 
We  can  also  offer  you  prompt  ship- 
ment. 

Sold  only  through  dealers.  May 
we  send  you  a  catalog  and  quo- 
tations on  your  present  require- 
ments ? 

Dominion  Blank  Book  Co. 

Limited 

BERTHIERVILLE  -  QUEBEC 


10 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Complete  information  about  the  day's  business 
just  as  soon  as  you  want  it 

That's    what    a    modern     National     Cash     Register    will     give    you. 
At    closing    time  a  glance    at    your    register  will    show  many  things. 

1.  Total  amount  of  merchandise  sold. 

2.  Total  cash  received  for  goods. 

3.  Amount  of  your  charge  sales. 

4.  Detailed  record  of  cash  received  on  account. 

5.  Detailed  record  of  cash  paid  out. 

6.  Amount  of  each  clerk  s  sales. 

7.  Number  of  customers  each  clerk  waited  on. 

8.  Total  number  of  transactions  made  during  the  day. 

All    these    figures    are    there    before    you — absolutely    accurate    and 
reliable    because    they   have    been    recorded    by    modern    machinery. 

You  cannot  afford  to  be  without  the  valuable  information  that 
an  up-to-date  National  Cash  Register  will  give  you. 


The    National    Cash    Register    Company    of    Canada    Ltd., 

Toronto,    Ontario 

Offices    in    all    the    principal    cities    of    the    world 

11 


B 0 0 K S  E L LER      AND     STATIONS R 


TWO  3±  PROFIT ! 


This  case  with  THREE  GROSS  5c. 
CHARACTER  CARDS  sent  carriage 
paid  for  $6.50  cash  with  order. 

D.  BOYCE 

Patentee     and     Manufacturer 

141  Minories,   LONDON,  E.  1,   England 


BRITISH 

Drawing    Inks 

MANUFACTURED  IN  19  COLORS 
Made 


FOR 

Draughtsmen 

Engineers 

Architects 

Artists 

Schools 

etc.,  etc. 
Used  in  all 
Government 

Works, 
Naval  and 

Military 

The 


British  Drawing  Ink  &  Adhesive  Mfg.  Co. 


31  Great  Orrnond  Street 


LONDON,  W.C.I. 


"Jewel"  No.  lOO 

Safety  Fountain  Pen 


Fitted  with  14k. 
Gold  Nib 


12\6 

Mounted  2  Bands  17/6 


Patented  in  All  Countries 


Advantages 


Large   Ink  Capacity. 

Strength. 

Perfect   Flow,  always  ready  for   use. 

Can  be  carried   in  any  position. 

Fitted  with  Gold  Nib    to  suit  any  hand. 


Recorder"    Stylographic    Pen 


Sole  Makers: 


Best  Workmanship  and   Finish.         "•    #"V   / 
Can   be   carried   in   any   position.         ™   ^<r 


JEWEL  PEN  COMPANY  LTD.,  76  Newgate  St.,  LONDON,  E.C.I,  England 


12 


BOOK  S ELLER      AND      STATIONE K 


B.&P. 

Hercules 

Price  Book 


Cov 


ers 


Are  All  That  The  Name  Implies 

EXCEPTIONALLY  STRONG 

Bound  in  very  flexible  Levant 
Grain,  Fabri-Hide,  the  most  dur- 
able artificial  leather  that  can  be 
produced. 

Experts  have  judged  it  to  be  real 
Cowhide  at  sight. 


In  view  of  the  present  high  cost 
of  good  leathers,  the  Hercules 
supplies  a  demand,  that  is  persis- 
tent at  this  time,  for  good  wearing 
Loose  Leaf  Price  Books  at  moder- 
ate prices. 

[f  properly  displayed,  Hercules 
Price  Books  will  be  one  of  the 
most  profitable  lines  for  the  pro- 
gressive Stationer.  Made  in  all  the 
Standard  Price  Book  sizes  in 
Yi-xw.  and  i-in.  capacities.  For 
sizes,  prices,  etc.,  see  page  No.  44, 
Dealer's  Net  Price  List. 

BOORUM   &    PEASE 
LOOSE     LEAF     BOOK    CO. 

Hud  son  Ave.  and  Front  St.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 


109-11!   Leonard  Street, 

New  York 
Old  South  Building. 

Boston,  Mass. 


SALESROOMS  : 

Republic  Building. 

Chicago,  III. 
4000  Laclede  Avenue, 

St.  Louis,   Mo. 


"JVST^UT" 


EASTER 
CARDS 

NOW  READY 

Write  for  samples  or  an  assortment. 

WHEN  YOU  THINK  OF  CARDS 
THINK  OF  COUTTS. 

Greeting  Cards  for  all  occasions 
Acknowledgment  Cards 
Birthday  Cards 
Birth  Announcement  Cards 
Birth  Congratulation  Cards 
Christmas  Cards 
Condolence  Cards 
Dance  Programmes 
Mother  Cards 
New  Year  Cards 
St.  Patrick  Programmes 
Tally  Cards 
Wedding   Congratulation   Cards 
Wedding  Announcement  Cards 


wwm 


WILLIAM  E.  COUTTS 

455  King  Street  West 

TORONTO  CANADA 


13 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Save   Your   Energy 

Moore  Push-Pins  are  necessary  for  Spring 
Cleaning.  Look  up  your  stock  and  be 
ready  to  supply  the  demand  created  by  our 
continuous     advertising. 

This  Style  L  Cabinet 

oi  MOORE 
PUSH  PINS 


sells  twice  as  much  with 
half  the  effort.  Get  one  to- 
day from  your  Jobber  or 
Direct. 


Cost 
Sells 


$12.50 
18.75 


Will     more     than     double 
vour    sales. 


Thumbtacks  Packed  to  Suit  the  Trade 


Bra- 


<£ 


No.  31 


No.  88 

■V 


Steel    (Nickel- 
Plated)  


-.,,    No.  51 


Steel    (One- 
Piece) 


No.  61 


No.  52      No. 
7  lfi"         i. 


No.  42      No.  43 
7  16"         '.." 


No.  62      No.  63 

7  16"         i.," 


MOORE  PUSH    PIN    CO. 


113  Berkley  St. 


•[Philadelphia,  Pa. 


TECHNICAL  BOOKS 

which  please  everybody 

We  have  a  line  of  popular  price 
technical  handbooks  which 
look  well,  read  well,  and  sell 
well.  The  subjects  include 
steam  engines,  gas  and  oil  en- 
gines, dynamos,  motors,  elec- 
trical apparatus,  tools,  lathe 
work,  instruments,  models,  X- 
rays,  and  wireless.  You  ought 
to  stock  them;  your  customers 
will  like  them. 

Canadians  in  England  are  buy- 
ing them. 


Complete  list  mailed  with  pleasure 


PERCIVAL    MARSHALL  &  CO. 

66  Farringdon  Street 
LONDON  ::  ::  ENGLAND 


PICTURE  .POSTCARDS 

.4   unique  collection  to  suit  all  tastes 

Birthdays     Easters     Comics       Heather      Relatives 

Xmas  and  New  Year     Studies     Greetings 

Lovers     Lucky   Black   Cats 

St.  Patrick's  Dav 


Specialty:  Local  View  Printing  from 
customers'  originals. 


New  Collection  of 

CHRISTMAS  FOLDING  CARDS 


SI. 00   to  $7.00  per   grots. 


now  ready  *r  WONDERFUL  VALUE!!! 


Writing   Fads  Dressed  and  Undressed  Dolls 

Condolence  Cards  Cabinets 

Birthday  Folding  Cards 


Terms:      Goods  shipped   through  London    Houses 

or  cash  with  order,   otherwise  write  for  address 

of  our  nearest  Agent. 

The 


PHILCO" 


Holborn     Plaec 


HDfSBE 


PUBLISHING 
Co 

London,  W.C.I.  Eng. 


Cable   Addresi:     "  Philcoco."  London 


William  Sinclair  &  Sons 

(Stationers)  Limited 

Makers  of 

Account  and 
Memorandum  Books 
Pocket  Books 
Writing  Pads 
School  Stationery 

Main  Office  and  Factory: 

ALBERT    WORKS 

Otley,    Yorks,    England 

LONDON:     22.   I»r  Lane.  Paterneater  Raw.  E.C.  4 


14 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


One    Hundred   Thousand   Canadians 


£IX0N'« 

DORAl 

"the.  m&ster  drawing  pencil' 


ELDffibO 


Nearly  five  years  ago  experiments  were  commenced — 
three  years  ago  a  Pencil  was  produced  that  was  declared 
perfect  by  unbiased  qualified  opinion.  Dixon's  Eldorado 
— "the  master  drawing  pencil" — for  three  years  has  had 
the  endorsation  of  Artists,  Engineers,  Draftsmen — now 
it  is  sweeping  the  country  and 

Advertised  in  The  Saturday  Evening  Post 

How  many  of  the  100,000  Canadian  readers  buy  from  you?     Have 
you  ELDORADO  in  stock  for  them  when  they  ask  for  it? 


STANDARD  CRAYONS 


Wax  Crayons  for  schools,  marking  and  checking, 
glass  marker,  lumber  crayons,  white  and  colored 
school  chalks,  pastels,  railroad  and  textile  mill 
crayons. 

No.  67,  Little  Gem,  7  crayons  in  round  box,  is  very 
popular;  the  colors  of  No.  4  Crayel  are  brilliant 
and  packing  is  attractive;  Crestlight  Crayons  are 
positively  non-smearing;  Standard  Lumber  Cray- 
ons are  low  priced ;  get  prices  on  Omega  Dustless 
and  Standard  School  Chalk. 

We  are  selling  a  few  items  of  lumber  crayons  and 
marking  crayons  at  special  prices  and  will  send 
samples  with  prices  when  requested. 


A.  R.  MacDOUGALL  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

TORONTO 

Representatives  for  Canada  and  Newfoundland 


15 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


A. 


Have  you  bought  your 
We  sell  them 


This  Sign  of  a  Patriotic  Service 
is  Seen  in  Many  Stores 

IS    IT   IN    YOURS? 


Become  an  authorized  agent  of  the  Department  of  Finance 
for  the  extension  of  the  War-Savings  Stamp  movement. 

While  you  do  not  make  an  immediate  profit  on  the  sale  of 
Thrift  Stamps,  your  volume  of  business  depends  on  the 
prosperity  of  your  community,  and  the  far-sighted  store- 
keeper gladly  helps  the  movement. 

The  money  raised  by  the  sale  of  War-Savings  Stamps  and 
Thrift  Stamps  is  used  by  the  Dominion  of  Canada  to  provide 
credits  to  other  nations,  who  are  thereby  enabled  to  purchase 
food  and  Canadian  manufactured  products. 

This  leads  to  steady  industry,  and  this,  again,  with  the  exer- 
cise of  Thrift,  provides  further  funds  for  Investment  —  a 
continuous  process  leading  to  Prosperity. 

Make  the  selling  of  Thrift  Stamps  a  real,  whole-hearted 
patriotic  service,  of  value  to  your  customers,  to  your  country, 
and  to  yourself. 

Explain  the  matter  to  your  helpers  and  secure  their  eager 
co-operation.  Have  them  look  over  the  Thrift  Stamp,  realize 
it  is  the  same  as  a  quarter  in  giving  change,  make  them 
familiar  with  the  Thrift  Card,  so  that  your  helpers  can  explain 
to  the  customers  how  16  Thrift  Stamps  on  a  Thrift  Card 
represent  $4.00  on  the  purchase  of  a  War-Savings  Stamp, 
which  will  be  redeemed  by  the  Dominion  of  Canada  Jan. 
1st,  1924,  for  $5.00. 


Set  your  customers  a  good  example  by  buying 

W-S.S.  yourself. 

S3 


BUY 


%  w  # 


16 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


m 

'  *A~\v*fc 

t*V 

:4p\ 

V  y 

%k 

W 

^aa^* 

Tally        Dance 

Cards  Programmes 

Eight  entirely  new  designs  in  figures. 
Printed  in  Sepia.  Just  manufactured 
by  us. 

Original 

Attractive 

Artistic 


AT  A  LOW  PRICE 
Tally  Cards  (no  tassels) 

No.   500 — 100    in    boz,    2    designs    (50   gets) 
50c  per  100,  $4.00  per   1.000 

No.  600—100   in   box.   2   designs    (50  sets) 
50c  per  100.  $4.00  per  1,000 

No.  700—100   in  box,  2  designs   (50  sets) 
50c  per  100,  $4.00  per  1,000 

No.  800—100  in  box,  2  designs   (50  sets) 
50c  per  100.  $4.00  per  1,000 

Dance  Programmes  (no  tassels) 

100  in  box,  8  designs  assorted.  50c  per  100. 
$4.00  per  1,000. 

Tassels   for  above,   25c   per   100.   $2.00   per 
1,000. 

THE   COPP,  CLARK  CO. 

LIMITED 

517  Wellington  St.  West,  Toronto 


NOW  READY 

SIR  GILBERT  PARKER'S  strangest  and 
most  daring  novel  since  his  earlier 
stories  of  Canada 

Wild  Youth 

and  Another 

Sir  Gilbert  Parker  writes  for  all 
classes.  His  novels  make  a  universal 
appeal.  His  popularity  has  grown  with 
the  years.  "Wild  Youth"  is  a  novel  of 
his  supreme  and  mature  genius.  Its  suc- 
cess as  a  Big  Seller  is  assured.  Begin  the 
Season  of  1919  with  this  Leader.  A 
great  opportunity  for  Booksellers. 

The  law  of  the  love  of  Youth  for  Youth  is  the 
background  of  this  new  novel  of  Beauty  and  the 
Beast.  Immutable  as  the  law  of  gravitation,  he  sets 
it  forth,  and  paints  in  his  men  and  women  with  the 
same  broad,  powerful  sweep  or' delicate  touches  with 
which  he  pictures  the  Canada  he  knows  so  well. 
Louise  Mazarine,  a  willowy  slip  of  a  girl,  and  Joel 
Mazarine  her  husband,  sixty-five — these  are  the  viola- 
tion of  the  law.  Then  comes  Orlando  Guise,  a 
neighboring  ranchman,  and  young.  And  the  law 
begins  to  work  as  surely  as  gravitation  pulls  the 
falling  apple  to  the  earth.  A  heart-gripping  tale  of 
love  and  jealousy,  and  hate  and  exquisite  romance  is 
the   result. 

BEAUTIFUL   PICTURE  JACKET,   CLOTH   BOUND 

4  Illustrations,  $1.50  net 

THE  COPP,  1CLARK  CO. 

LIMITED 

PUBLISHERS      -      TORONTO 


17 


15  0  0  K  S  E  I.  L  E  R      A  N  T)      S  T  A  T  I  0  X  E  R 


Wholesale  and  Export  Only 

FACTORIES: 
LEVER  ST.,  E.C.  ENFIELD,  N. 

We  Specialize 

in 

Manicure  Cases 


Fitted  Companions 


and  all  kinds  of 

Fancy  Leather  Goods 

Bags,  Purses,  Pocket  Books, 

Brush  Cases,  (Lady's  and 

Gent's),   Etc.,  Etc. 


Woolnough,  Draper  &  Co. 

Limited 

12-13  CHISWELL  ST.  LONDON,  E.C.  1 

Write  for  Samples  or  Illustrated  List. 


"WELCOME 

HOME" 
PAPETERIES 


The  next  big  occasion    in   every  city  and  town  throughout  th«- 
country  will  be  the  day  "When  the  boys  come  home." 
The  streets  will  be  gay   with   bunting  and   the  store  windows 
bright  with  the  colors  that  never  run  ! 

For  the  stationer,  the  EATON.  CRANE  &  PIKE  CO.,  PITTS- 
FIELD,  MASS..  has  introduced  a  "Welcome  Home"  papeteri- 
consisting  of  2  1  Plain  Sheets  and  21  Envelopes  of  its  Oliv^ 
Drab  stock   in   Commandant  size. 

The  box  cover  is  embellished  with  a  Flag  design  in  color  on 
an  Olive  Drab  background.  together  with  the  wording. 
"Welcome  Home"  intertwined  with  a  spray  of  laurel.  Retail 
price    10c. 

A  display  of  these  appropriate  boxes  in  a  dealer's  window  wilt 
give  it  the  right  keynote  and  the  boxes  will  sell  rapidly  when 
the  spirit   of   welcome   is    in   the  air. 

The  boys  are  going  to  be  delighted  to  b?  home  again  zr\'. 
they  will  want  to  write  their  numerous  friends  on  both  sides 
of   the   Atlantic  of   their   safe  arrival. 

This  package  will  make  its  appeal  to  them  personally,  an! 
nothing  could  make  a  more  suitable  little  gift  to  put  in  th^ 
hands  of  one's  soldier  friend  with  your  feelings  so  ampl, 
expressed  in  the  simple  words.  "Welcome  Home." 
These  goods  can  be  had  IMMEDIATELY.  Send  in  your  ordc- 
unci  have  a  supply  shipped  at  once  by  Parcel  Post  or  Expres 
SO    that    you    will   be   ready    for    the   big   occasion. 

Eaton.  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

Pittsfield,    Massachusetts 


(^nLLM^y  MH£&JCr(^ 


"A.A."  FOUNTAIN    PENS 

A  source  of  constant  profit. 

There's  an  "A. A.'  Pen  to  suit  the  most  fastidious  customer. 
The  ease  and  convenience  with  which  they  can  be  filled  — 
the  satisfaction  which  they  render — the  guarantee  under 
which  they  are  sold — and  the  margin  of  profit  to  dealers 
are  some  of  the  reasons  why  you  should  carry  this 

Profitable  "A.A."  Line. 

iw    ..     to  your  local  jobber  or  to  us  for  prices,  catalogue 
and    trade    discoun  ts    on    this    profitable    line. 

MODERN  PEN  COMPANY 

170  Broadway  New  York  City 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Lid. 

Canadian  Representatives 
468  King  St.  W.,    Toronto.  Ont. 


18 


I500KSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Dig  In! 


F  N  some  respects  this  year  1919,  in  its  portents,  is  the  most  important 
*~  that  the  retail  booksellers  and  stationers  have  ever  faced  and  for 
wholesalers  it  is  a  crucial  year,  because  the  fight  for  this  business  will 
be  keener  than  ever  before. 

Wholesalers  who  want  to  share  in  the  big  business  which  the  retailers  through- 
out Canada  will  be  placing  this  Spring  should  leave  no  stone  unturned  to 
capture  this  trade. 

It  will  not  do  to  "wait  and  see" — action  is  the  word.  The  trade  conditions  in 
Canada  were  never  better.  Reports  received  from  all  parts  of  Canada  attest 
the  general  prosperity  which  Canada  is  now  experiencing. 

The  retailers  realize  that  prices  must  necessarily  keep  up  in  the  book  and 
stationery  trade,  with  not  even  a  remote  probability  of  reductions  this  year, 
owing  to  the  market  conditions  of  the  raw  materials  and  the  steadily  rising 
cost  of  labour. 

Do  not  postpone  your  appeal  for  Canadian  business;  make  the  strongest  kind 
of  a  bid,  using 

The  Annual  Spring  Number  of 
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Coming  in  April — the  dividing  month  between  Winter  and  Spring — when  the  retailers 
put  away  Winter  lines  and  prepare  for  Spring  and  Summer  trade,  it  appears  at  a 
highly  opportune  time  for  effective  advertising,  and  this  is  greatly  accentuated  by  the 
fact  that  the  Annual  Spring  Number  reaches  the  trade  at  the  most  important  buying 
time  of  the  whole  year — when  the  dealers  order  goods  for  Autumn  and  Christmas 
trade  and  also  for  September  School  Trade. 

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MARCH  28 

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1919    CANADA'S  BIGGEST    YEAR 


19 


15  ( )  O  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      AND     STATIONED 


THE  McKINLEY  EDITION  OF 
TEN  CENT  MUSIC 

will   always   hold    first    place    as  an   Edition   of 
Standard,  Classic  and  Teaching  Music 

as  an  established  demand  for  this  line  of  Music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Student 
and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself  to  thousands  of  dealers  to  be 
the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  department. 
Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  150  per  cent  to  the  dealer. 
The  McKinley  Edition  (Revised  for  Canadian 
Trade)  conforms  in  every  detail  with  Canadian 
copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealer's 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
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Write  us  for  samples  and  particulars  to-day. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  CO. 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 
in  the   World 

CHICAGO:  1501-15  EAST  FIFTY-FIFTH  ST. 

NEW  YORK  CITY.   145   W.  15th  STREET 


J.  M.  Dent  &  Sons,  Limited 


27  Melinda  St. 


TORONTO 


New  Publications 


The    Shadow    of    the    Cathedral $1.90 

By  Vicente  Blasco  Ibanez,  author  of  "The 
Four  Horsemen  of  the  Apocalypse."  New 
American  edition. 

The   Red   Cow $1.50 

By  the  well-known  Canadian  author,  Peter 
McArthur.     Ready  February   14. 

"His   (irace  of   Grub   Street" $2.00 

By  G.  V.  McFadden.  A  splendid  old-time 
novel. 

Poland,  Past  and   Present $1.50 

By  J.  H.  Harley,  M.A.  Some  new  and  vital 
details  of  the  recent  history  of  this  un- 
fortunate country  are  conveyed  in  this 
vividly    interesting   volume. 

Children's   Picture   Books 

We  have  a  wonderful  selection  of  Books 
suitable  for  children  of  all  ages,  to  retail 
from  10  cents  to  $3.00  each.  Many  of  these 
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Among  them  are  Fairy  Tales,  Nature 
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The  rapid  sales  of 

STANDARD  BRAND 
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Particular  people  show  their  preference  for 
Standard  Brand  Blottings  by  coming  back 
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Other  worth-while  lines  are: 
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Standard  Paper  Mf  g.  Co, 

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terest to  every  man  who  has  money  invested 
either  in  his  own  business  or  in  bonds  and 
securities  of  various  kinds.  It  is  published 
weekly,  and  the  news  is  given  in  very  read- 
able form. 

Wholesale  and  retail  merchants  find  it 
valuable  because  they  are  interested  in 
market  tendencies  and  market  factors,  not 
only  as  applied  to  their  business,  but  also 
as  applying  to  business  in  general.  They 
need  to  know  conditions  local  and  remote. 
They  need  information  to  enable  them  to 
buy  right  and  sell  safely. 

And  the  knowledge  they  need  they  can 
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nually. 

THE  FINANCIAL  POST  OF  CANADA, 

143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 

Please  enter  me  as  a  regular  subscriber,  com- 
mencing at  once.  If  I  am  satisfied  with  the  paper, 
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of  bill. 


B.  &  S. 


20 


BO  0 K SELLER      AND     S  T  A  T I  0 N  E R 


•  KLCAlOOt!  B  POH 


. 

A  Man  Foursquare 


OUR  MARCH  DRIVE 

DAWN     By  Mrs.  Eleanor  H.  Porter 

The  author  of  "Just  David"  gives  us  here  a  story  of  mingled 
pathos,  humor  and  human  interest.  Keith  Burton,  the  plucky 
blind  boy  hero,  who  dedicates  his  life  to  the  service  of  soldiers 
blinded  by  the  war,  will  take  his  place  beside  David  and  Polly- 
anna.  Keith's  love  for  the  doctor's  daughter  adds  a  thread  of 
romance  to  the  whole  that  is  exquisitely  delineated  by  the  gifted 
authoress. 
Illustrated  by  Hitchcock,  and  priced  at  $1.50. 

A  DAUGHTER  OF  TWO  WORLDS 

By  Leroy  Scott 

A  vividly  told  story  of  New  York  life.  What  befell  the  daughter 
of  Black  Jerry  Malone,  keeper  of  a  low  dance  hall  in  New  York, 
who  is  rescued  from  her  environment  and  afterwards  mixes  in 
the  most  exclusive  New  York  society.  A  story  chock  full  of  thrill- 
ing dramatic  action,  with  convincing  characters  and  absorbing 
interest  throughout.     Price  $1.60. 

THE  DUCHESS  OF  SIONA    By  &»«t  Godwin 

A  romantic  story  of  the  Italian  Renaissance,  written  by  a  man  who 
can  write  of  Love,  War  and  Intrigue  in  a  way  that  grips  the  read- 
er's attention  until  the  last  page  is  turned. 
Illustrated  by  T.  W.  Benda.    $1.60. 

A     MAN     FOUR-SQUARE    By  William  MacLeod  Raine 

Lovers  of  a  rattling  Western  story  with  lots  of  excitement,  plenty 
of  gun-play,  and  a  "Bad  Man"  who  is  withal  "a  man  four-square," 
will  find  this  one  of  the  best  of  its  kind  yet  published. 
Frontispiece  by  Geo.  E.  Gage.    Price  $1.50. 

These  books  will  give  your  business  DRIVING  FORCE. 
Get     behind    them     with    your     best    selling     efforts. 

Thomas  Allen 

215  to  219  Victoria  St.  TORONTO 


IBOOkSOFMFRlT. 


21 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


In  Flanders 
Fields 


\i.  .Mil  prepared  for  the  big  sales 
which  are  absolutely  certain  for  Col. 
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Canada  in  advertising  and  literary 
notes,  and  in  song  and  story  center- 
ing around  the  great  title  pjem. 
The  book  more  than  bears  out  its 
early  promise.  The  reviews,  certain 
to  be  strong,  will  boom  it.  Have 
you    bought    sufficiently?    $1.50 


They're  Bound  to  be 
Splendid  Sellers 


— a  special  reason  in 
each  case 


My  Three 
Years  in  a 
German 
Prison 


The  serial  use  of  Dr.  Henri  S. 
Beland's  wonderful  story  in  a  dozen 
widely-separated  Canadian  news- 
papers has,  as  our  salesmen  have 
found,  already  stirred  up  strong 
interest.  Everyone  with  a  library 
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book  is  written  from  the  standpoint 
of  a  public  man,  and  is  "different." 
Illustrated    81.50 


Who  Giveth 
Us  the 
Victory 


Arthur  Mee's  name  is  familiarly 
known,  for  various  reasons,  all  over 
Canada.  This  is  a  book  which  you 
can  be  proud  to  push,  and  will  give 
excellent  results.  It  treats  not  of 
the  war.  but  of  Victory.  A  sugges- 
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preacher  in  your  town,  with  a  hint 
that  he  would  find  a  good  sermon  or 
two  in    it    $1.35 


They  are  published  by 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 

TORONTO 


Dere 
Bill 


This  worthy  successor  to  "Dere 
Mable"  from  the  woman's  stand- 
point—to be  more  definite,  "Mable's 
love  letters  to  her  rookie" — is  now 
ready.  It's  illustrated  like  "Dere 
Mable."  bound  like  "Dere  Mable," 
full  of  fun  like  "Dere  Mable,"  and 
should  sell   like   "Dere  Mable.".  .  .75c 


22 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Never  Beaten 


The  British  Navy 


The  Grand  Fleet 

Its  Creation,  Development  and  Work 

By 

Admiral  Viscount  JELLICOE  of  Scapa 

G.C.B.,  O.M.,  G.C.V.O. 

This  important  volume  gives  Lord  Jel- 
licoe's  personal  narrative  of  his  com- 
mand of  the  Grand  Fleet,  from  the 
time  of  his  appointment  in  August, 
1914,  until  his  relinquishment  of  the 
post.  The  book  deals  with  all  the 
naval  "affairs"  of  this  period,  includ- 
ing the  Battle  of  Jutland,  and  therein 
of  course  is  its  greatest  interest.  The 
story  of  the  battle  is  illustrated  by 
charts  and  diagrams,  and  will  secure 
world-wide  attention  in  view  of  the 
controversy  which  has  raged  around 
the  result  of  the  battle. 
With  numerous  Illustrations,  Maps 
and  Charts 
PRICE 
England  Canada 

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Books  by  the  Author  of 

"In  the  Northern  Mists" 

(A  GRAND  FLEET  CHAPLAIN) 

Punch  Says: 

'I  am  seriously  thinking  of  chaining  'Grand  Fleet 
Days'  to  my  bookcase,  for  it  is  written  by  the 
author  of  'In  the  Northern  Mists,'  a  book  which  has 
destroyed  the  moi-ality  of  my  friends.  Be  assured 
that  I  am  not  formulating  any  grave  charge  against 
the  anonymous  Chaplain  of  the  Fleet  who  has  pro- 
vided us  with  these  delightful  volumes;  I  merely 
wish  to  say  that  nothing  can  prevent  people  from 
purloining  the  first,  and  that  drastic  measures  will 
have   to   be   taken    if   I   am   to   retain    the    second." 

IN  PERIL  OF  THE  SEA $1.50 

THE  CURTAIN  OF  STEEL 1.50 

GRAND  FLEET  DAYS 1.50 

NAVAL  INTELLIGENCE 1.50 

IN  THE  NORTHERN  MISTS  ....     1.50 


$1.50 
$1.50 


75 


$3.00 
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The  Navy  Eternal 

By  "Bartimeus" 
The  White  Ensign 

By  "Taffrail"      -      -      - 
The  Sub 

By  "Taffrail"      -      -      - 
Naval  History  of  the  War 

By  Henry  Newbolt 
U-Boat  Devilry 

By  C.  T.  Bateman      -      - 
The  Merchant  Seaman  in  the  War 

By  L.  Cope  Cornford      -      -     $1.50 
Action-Stories  of  the  Modern  Navy 

By  John  S.  Margerison      -      -     .75 
With  the  R.N.R. 

By  "Windlass"       -       -       -  .75 

The  Fleet  Behind  the  Fleet 

By  W.  MacNeile  Dixon        -         .75 
Jack  Cornwall:  The  Story  of 

John  Travers  Cornwall.  V.C. 
Hero  of  the  Battle  of  Jutland 

By  J.  E.  Hoclder  Williams      -         .50 


The 

Surrender  of  the 

German  Fleet 

THE  OFFICIAL  RECORD 

Published  for  the  Admiralty  by 
HODDER  &  STOUGHTON 

Numerous  Illustrations 

$1.00 


HODDER  &  STOUGHTON,  Limited 

PUBLISHERS  TORONTO 


23 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Ihe  Leading  Automobile  Books  All  191 9  Editions 


Just  Published    1919  Edition  of 
Page's  Standard  Automobile  Books 

The  Modern  Gasoline  Automobile,  Its  Design,  Con- 
struction, Operation. 

By  Victor  W.  Page,  M.S.A.E.  This  is  the  most  com- 
plete, practical,  and  up-to-date  treatise  on  gasoline 
automobiles  and  their  component  parts  ever  published. 
In  the  new  revised  and  enlarged  1919  edition  all  phases 
of  automobile  construction,  operation  and  maintenance 
are  fully  and  completely  described  and  in  language  any- 
one can  understand.  Every  part  of  all  types  of  automo- 
biles, from  light  cyclecars  to  heavy  motor  trucks  and 
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sories, tools  needed,  supplies  and  spare  parts  necessary 
for    its    upkeep,    are    fully    discussed.      1000    pages,    1000 

illustrations Price,  $3.50 

The  Model  T  Ford  Car.  Its  Construction,  Operation 
and  Repair,  Including  the  Ford  Farm  Tractor. 
By  Victor  W.  Page.  This  is  the  most  complete  and 
practical  instruction  book  ever  published  on  the  Ford 
car.  All  parts  of  the  Ford  Model  T  Car  are  described 
and  illustrated  in  a  comprehensive  manner — nothing  is 
left  for  the  reader  to  guess  at.  The  construction  is 
fully  treated  and  operating  principle  made  clear  to 
everyone.  Complete  instructions  for  driving  and  repair- 
ing are  given.  Every  detail  is  treated  in  a  non-technical 
yet  thorough  manner.  To  the  1919  Revised  Edition 
matter  has  been  included  on  the  Ford  Truck  and  Tractor 
Conversion  Sets  and  Genuine  Ford  Tractor.  All  parts 
are  described.  All  repair  processes  illustrated  and  fully 
explained.  Written  so  all  can  understand— no  theory, 
no  guesswork.  New  Edition.     106  illustrations,  310  pages, 

2  large  folding  plates   Price,  $1.00 

Starting,  Lighting  and  Ignition  Systems. 
By  Victor  W.  Page.  A  practical  treatise  on  modern 
starting  and  ignition  system  practice.  This  practical 
volume  has  been  written  with  special  reference  to  the 
requirements  of  the  non-technical  reader  desiring  easily 
understood  explanatory  matter  relating  to  all  types  of 
automobile  ignition,  starting  and  lighting  systems.  It 
can  be  understood  by  anyone,  even  without  electrical 
knowledge,  because  elementary  electrical  principles  are 
considered  before  any  attempt  is  made  to  discuss  fea- 
tures of  the  various  systems.  These  basic  principles  are 
clearly  stated  and  illustrated  with  simple  diagrams.  All 
the  leading  systems  of  starting,  lighting  and  ignition 
have  been  described  and  illustrated  with  the  co-operation 
of  the  experts  employed  by  the  manufacturers.  Wiring 
diagrams  are  shown  in  both  technical  and  non-technical 
forms.  Nearly  500  pages,  297  engravings.  .  .  .Price,  $2.00 
Automobile  Repairing  Made  Easy 

By  Victor  W.  Page.  A  thoroughly  practical  book  con- 
taining complete  directions  for  making  repairs  to  all 
parts  of  the  motor  car  mechanism.  Written  in  a  thorough 
but  non-technical  manner.  Gives  plans  for  workshop 
construction,  suggestions  for  equipment,  power  needed, 
machinery  and  tools  necessary  to  carry  on  business 
successfully.  Tells  how  to  overhaul  and  repair  all  parts 
of  automobiles.     1056  pages,  100  illustrations.  Price,  $3.50 

Questions  and  Answers  Relating  to 
Modern  Automobile  Construction, 
Driving  and  Repair 

By  Victor  W.  Page.  A  self-educator  on 
automobiling  without  an  equal.  This  prac- 
tical treatise  consists  of  a  series  of  thirty- 
seven  lessons,  covering  with  over  2,000 
questions  and  their  answers — the  automo- 
bile, its  construction,  operation  and  repair. 
650  pages,  392  illustrations...  Price,  $2.00 
How  to  Run  an  Automobile 

By  Victor  W.  Page.  This  treatise  gives  concise  in- 
structions for  starting  and  running  all  makes  of  gasoline 
automobiles,  how  to  care  for  them,  and  gives  distinctive 
features  of  control.  Describes  every  step  for  shifting 
gears,  controlling  engine,  etc.  Thoroughly  illustrated. 
178  pages,  72  illustrations Price,  $1.00 


JUST  PUBLISHED 

Gasolene  and  Kerosene  Carburetors,  Construction, 
Installation  and  Adjustment 

By  Capt.  V.  W.  Page.  All  leading  types  of  carburetors 
are  described  in  detail,  special  attention  being  given  to 
the  forms  devised  to  use  the  cheaper  fuels,  such  as 
kerosene.  Carburetion  troubles,  fuel  system  troubles, 
carburetor  repairs  and  installation,  electric  primers  and 
economizers,  hot  spot  manifolds  and  all  modern  carbure- 
tor developments  are  considered  in  a  thorough  manner. 
Methods  of  adjusting  all  types  of  carburetors  are  fully 
discussed  as  well  as  suggestions  for  securing  maximum 
fuel  economy  and  obtaining  highest  engine  power.  250 
pages,  89  illustrations Price,  $1.50 

Inventor's  Manual,  How  to  Make  a  Patent  Pay. 

This  is  a  book  designed  as  a  guide  to  inventors  in  per- 
fecting their  inventions,  taking  out  their  patents,  and 
disposing  of  them.  It  is  not  in  any  sense  a  Patent  Soli- 
citor's circular  nor  a  Patent  Broker's  advertisement.  No 
advertisements  of  any  description  appear  in  the  work. 
It  is  a  book  containing  a  quarter  of  a  century's  experi- 
ence of  a  successful  inventor,  togethere  with  notes  based 
upon  the  experience  of  many  other  inventors.  Revised 
edition.     120   pages    Price,   $1.25 

Model  Making 

By  Raymond  Frances  Yates.  A  new  book  for  the 
mechanic  and  model  maker.  This  is  the  first  book  of 
its  kind  to  be  published  in  this  country  and  all  those 
interested  in  model  engineering  should  have  a  copy.  The 
first  eight  chapters  are  devoted  to  such  subjects  as 
Silver  Soldering,  Heat  Treatment  of  Steel,  Lathe  Work, 
Pattern  Making,  Grinding,  etc.  The  remaining  twenty- 
four  chapters  describe  the  construction  of  various 
models,  such  as  rapid  fire  naval  guns, 
speed  boats,  model  steam  engines,  tur- 
bines, etc. 

This  book  must  not  be  confused  with 
those  describing  the  construction  of  toys 
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Steam  Engine  Troubles 

By  H.  Hamkens.  It  is  safe  to  say  that  no  book  has  ever 
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By  Capt.  V.  W.  Page.  This  book  describes  the  basic 
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is  made  and  why  it  floats  in  the  air.  Describes  how 
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disadvantages  of  different  types  of  aircraft.  It  includes 
a  complete  dictionary  of  aviation  terms  and  clear  draw- 
ings of  leading  airplanes.  The  reader  will  find  simple 
instructions  for  unpacking,  setting  up  and  rigging  air- 
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is  given  and  methods  of  flying  are  discussed  at  length. 
This  book  answers  every  question  one  can  ask  about 
modern  aircraft,  their  construction  and  operation.  A 
self  educator  on  aviation  without  an  equal.  275  pages, 
130  specially  made  illustrations  with  7  plates.  Price,  $2.50 


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24 


B  0  0 K  S E  L L  E R      A  ND     STATION E R 


SIX 

SPRING 

LEADERS 


Canada's  favorite  author  in  this  new  novei 
strikes  again  the  humanly  spiritual  note 
that  first  gave  him  his  great  renown  and 
his  vast  a"udience.  Into  it  he  has.  as 
Major  Charles  W.  Gordon  of  the  Canadian 
overseas  forces,  poured  his  deep,  personal 
emotional  experiences  of  the  great  war.  It 
is  a  vivid  picture  of  the  development  of 
the  refinement  of  the  individual  soul  given 
us  in  the  story  of  Barry  Dunbar  arid 
coming  to  the  love  story  which  is  unfolded, 
"The  Little  V.A.D.,"  is  as  appealing  a 
heroine  as  one  can  recall.  This  is  un- 
doubtedly the  best  seller  for  spring,  1919. 
The  Sky  Pilot  in  No  Man's  Land,  by  Ralph 
Connor $1.50 

ARNOLD  BENNETT 

new  Arnold  Bennett  novel  is  his  greatest  performance.  Its 
ro  is  George  Cannon,  son  of  Hilda  Leeways,  of  the  Clay- 
nger  series,  but  this  novel  is  complete  in  itself,  entirely 
dependent  of  Bennett's  previous  novels  of  the  Five  Towns, 
most  brilliant  prospects  had  spread  out  before  the  hero  and 
came  the  drums  of  war.  The  hero  had  risen  to  high  suc- 
from  a  position  of  nonentity,  always  having  carried  the 
r  of  having  been  born  to  greatness.  The  novel  closes  with  the 
thor's  characteristic   dramatic   touch    of   naturalism. 

Roll   Call,   by    Bennett $1.50 


The  "Secret  City."  which  is  the  title  of  Huirh  Waipole's  new  novel, 
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Revolution.  Can  you  think  of  a  subject  richer  in  opportunity  for 
the  sort  of  a  novel  of  action,  intrigue,  plotting  and  counter-plotting, 
mystery,  peril?  The  scene  is  knit  of  a  multitude  each  a  facet  in 
the  weirdest  cauldron  of  history. 
"The  Secret   City,"   by   Walpole    $1.60 

OPPENHEIM 

With  an  unusual  plot  even  for  this  versatile  English  author.  "The 
Curious  Quest."  with  scenes  laid  in  London  before  the  war.  can  be 
relied  upon  to  rank  up  with  the  best  of  Oppenheim's  previous  tales  a<  ;i 
best  seller.  A  rich  young  idler  wagers  £2",  000  with  his  physician  that 
he  could  start  out  on  a  five  pound  note  arid  live  for  a  year  on  what  he 
could  earn.  The  physician  had  maintained  that  the  young  man  had  no 
moral  stamina.  Not  the  least  original  part  of  the  story  is  its  most 
unique  denouement. 
The  Curious   Quest,  by   Oppenheim SI. 50 


No  spy  story  of  the  war  has  been  written  that  exceeds  Frederick  Arnold 
Rummer's  "The  Web."  Booksellers  should  exploit  it  as  a  real  thriller  because  that 
is  what  it  is.  The  scenes  shift  repeatedly  between  England  and  Germany.  This  is 
a  story  that  is  most  admirable  in  its  development  with  suspense  held  to  the  very 
last  page.  Push  this  as  a  spy  story  par  excellence! 
"The  Web,"  by  Rummer   sl-'° 

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An  "after  the  war"  story  is  Holworthy  Hall's  new  novel,  and  it  is  even 
better  than  "Henry  of  Navarre"  and  "Pepper"  which  won  him  such 
fame.  The  new  title  is  "The  Man  Whom  Nobody  Knew."  The  hero, 
for  good  reasons,  drops  out  of  the  world  so  far  as  his  old  friends  are 
concerned.  As  a  man  utterly  unknown  to  the  community  this  story  tells 
how  he  made  good  in  spite  of  tragic  developments  which  threaten  to 
wreck    his    success    worthily    won. 

"The    Man    Nobody    Rnew,"    by    Holworthy    Hall     $1.50 

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To  the  Canadian  Trade 


Gentlemen, 


The  early  proximity  of  peace  enables  us  onoe  more 
to  visit  your  market ,  when  we  hope  to  resume  our 
long  standing  and  friendly  "business  relations. 

The  great  shortage  of  raw  materials,  depletion  of 
staff,  and  abnormal  shipping  conditions  during  the 
period  of  the  war  have  now  materially  improved  with 
market  conditions  "becoming  gradually  more  normal. 

While  our  goods  have  been  absent  from  your  market, 
we  have  received  a  large  patronage  from  Canadians 
Overseas  in  this  Country,  and  we  trust  the  popularity 
of  our  goods  will  still  meet  with  their,  and  your 
continued  support. 

Our  London  Director,  Mr,  A.  B.  Glen,  who  was  located 
in  Canada  some  years  ago,  will  visit  the  principal 
Cities  during  the  coming  Spring,  when  due  advice  of 
his  visit  will  be  forwarded. 

With  compliments, 

'  We  remain, 

Respectfully  yours, 
William  Collins  Sons  &   Co.,  Ltd. 


I 


% 

I 

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% 

I 

I 
I 


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26 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 
Vol.  XXXV.  MARCH,  1919  No.  3 

IN  THIS  ISSUE 

The  Traveller:  His  Place  in  Business 

Who's  Who  Among  Travelling  Men 

Representative  Men  Speak  of  Trade  Prospects 

Retailers  After  Greeting  Card  Pirates 

Displaying  Office  Equipment 

How  Show  Cards  Actually  Sell  Goods 

Canadian  and  Japanese  Toy  Industries 

How  One  Store  Increased  Music  Sales  400  Per  Cent. 

Selling  Point  Digest  of  Timely  Books 

A  Code  of  Ethics  for  the  Book  Trade 

Monthly  Record  of  New  Books 

New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated 


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BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


1919  LEADERS 


The  Desert  of  Wheat 

By  Zane  Grey 


$1  50 


A  thrilling  tale  woven  round  the  heart  of  the  wheat 
country,  a  story  of  grit  and  cowardice,  of  patriotism 
and  treachery  filled  with  the  spirit  that  makes  Zane 
Grey   the   well-loved   writer  he   is. 

The  Fighting  Shepherdess 

By  Caroline  Lockhart        -        $1.50 

Here  is  a  real  story  of  the  West  tense,  gripping;  with 
drama,  incident,  humor.  The  heroine  is  a  powerful 
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The  Best  Short  Stories  of  1918 

Edited  by  Edward  J.  O'Brien     $1.60 

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and  interesting  as  well  as  distinctive.  Uniform  with 
"The   Best   Stories  of  1915.    1916,   1917." 

The  City  of  Comrades 

By  Basil  King  -  -  $1.75 

Basil  King  is  not  afraid  of  the  grim  things  of  life 
— he  is  too  great  an  artist  he  pictures  life  naked  and 
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spiritual  fire. 

With  unforgettable  vividness,  they  move  before  you 
Regina,  the  girl  who  dared  break  her  engagement 
when  she  knew  she  couldn't  love  the  man,  Lovey,  the 
strange  old  man  with  his  terrible  secret,  and  a  genius 
for  friendship  the  man  with  the  power  of  rebuilding 
other  men,  of  remarking  idle,  worthless  women,  thieves, 
and  a  score  of  people  woven  into  this  interesting  and 
ennobling  story. 

From  Sunup  to  Sundown 

By  Corra  Harris  and 

Faith  Harris  Leach      -       $1.50 

This  story  is  told  in  letters  exchanged  between  a 
mother  who  runs  a  big  Georgia  farm  and  knows  how, 
and  her  newly-married  daughter  who  is  helping  her 
husband  to  run  his  farm  and  does  not  know  how.  These 
epistles  between  a  clever  mother  and  her  equally  clever 
daughter,  are  full  of  Nature  and  human  nature. 

Many  are  the  passages  and  remarks  which  tickle  the 
fancy  while  one  reads,  and  stick  in  the  memory  long 
afterwards. 


The  War  Story  of  the  C.A.M.C. 

By  Col.  J.  G.  Adami,  M.D., 

F.R.S.,  C.A.M.C.         -  $1.50 

An  attempt  is  here  made  to  record  the  outstanding 
facts  bearing  upon  the  activities  of  the  Canadian  Medi- 
cal Service  in  such  a  form  that  the  general  reader  may 
realize  and  become  interested  in  the  part  played  by 
medicine  and  surgery  in  modern  warfare,  while  at  the 
same  time  the  professional  reader  may  be  given,  as  it 
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of  military  medicine  in  the  great  war  as  exemplified  hv 
the   work  of  the   C.A.M.C. 


The  Diary  of  a  Nation 

Being  Editorials  Reprinted 
from  "Life",  edited  by 
Edward  S.  Martin         -         $1.50 

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ing in  what  is  nominally  a  comic  paper.  There  is 
hardly  a  page  that   does   not  invite  quotation. 


Four  Years  in  the  White  North 

By   Donald    B.   MacMillan, 

F.R.G.S.        -        -        -        $4.00 

The  thrills,  privations,  hardships  and  wonderful  dis- 
coveries of  the  Crocker  Land  Expedition  during  four 
years  of  exploration  in  North  Greenland  are  here  told. 
Long  journeys  across  frozen  sounds  and  wind-swept 
plateaus  are  described  — the  intense  anxiety  felt  by  the 
little  band  of  men  over  the  non-arrival  of  the  relief  ship 
the  hunting  of  walrus,  caribou  and  bear.  A  full 
account    of   the    scientific    work. 


How  to  Draw  and  Paint 

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and  painting,  containing  concise  instructions  in  outline, 
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figure  drawing,  artistic  anatomy,  landscape,  marine  and 
portrait  painting,  the  principles  of  colours  applied  to 
painting,  etc.,   etc. 

The  Cradle  of  New  France 


A  Story  of  the  City  Founded 

by  Champlain, 
By  A.  G.  Doughty  Clod       - 


$1.50 


Illustrated  with  twelve  coloured  and  seventeen  black 
and  white  full-page  illustrations  and  map  of  Quebec 
in   colours. 


The  MUSSON  BOOK  COMPANY,  Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS  -  TORONTO 


The  Traveller:  His  Place  in  Business 


THERE  are  some  men  who  are  peculiarly  adapted 
to  the  work  of  representing  a  house  "on  the 
road,"  but  of  these  the  variety  of  men  who  achieve 
varying  degrees  of  success  is  legion.  This  naturally 
leads  up  to  the  fact  that  a  certain  percentage  of 
them  approach,  far  metre  nearly  than  others,  the 
TOO  per  cent,  status  of  ability. 

The  hook  and  stationery  merchants  of  Canada 
are  fortunate  in  the  general  type  of  men  who  call 
upon  them  representing  the  wholesale  trade.  They 
are  a  clean-cut  lot  of  men,  ami  there  are  some  who 
have  heen  on  the  road  so  many  years  and  have 
formed  such  close  friendships  with  the  men  to  whom 
(hey  sell,  that  it  would  he  a  positive  hardship  for 
them  to  have  to  quit  the  road.  Others  there  are 
whose  ambition,  almost  from  the  outlet,  has  been 
of  a  different  type,  this  being  in  the  direction  of 
themselves  becoming  the  executives  to  preside  over 
the  peregrinations  of  their  own  travellers.  Tt  would 
seem,  from  the  nature  of  thiDgs,  that  the  firms  send- 
ing out  traveller^  would  be  well  advised  to  organize 
that  end  of  their  business  with  far-sighted  vision. 
The  traveller  is  such  an  important  cog  in  the  machin- 
ery of  business,  that  in  the  natural  course  of  progress 
from  junior  to  senior  traveller  the  advancement 
should  be  such  as  to  make  that  ultimate  position, 
at  the  head  of  the  travelling  force,  that  carries  with 
it  a  relatively  proportionate  financial  compensation. 

Many  houses  have  sales  managers,  and  these  are 
almost  invariably  men  who  have  been  successful 
travellers.  The  men  on  the  road  may,  therefore, 
always  look  forward  to  getting  a  berth  of  that  sort 
when  their  experience  and  demonstrated  ability 
prove  them  to  be  entitled  to  such  recognition. 

With  proper  recognition,  on  the  pail  of  the 
employing  concerns,  of  the  importance  of  the  place 
of  the  traveller  in  business,  and  a  painstaking  and 
persistent  endeavor,  on  the  part  of  the  traveller, 
to  get  out  of  himself  the  best  that  is  in  him  in 
carrying  out  his  part  of  the  selling  game,  both  can 
contribute  toward  greater  achievement  in  building 
bigger  business  through  this  medium  of  selling. 
The  traveller  should  be  posted  with  a  thorough  know- 
ledge of  the  firm's  policies  and  aims,  and  be  able 
to  intelligently  pass  on  to  the  retailers  the  imme- 
diate plans  and  ultimate  hopes  of  the  house. 

Some  salesmen  are  annoyed  by  the  tone  and 
nature  of  "pep"  letters  that  are  shot  at  them  by 
arm-chair  sales  "strategists."  Many  of  these  letters 
are  just  so  much  wasted  effort,  because  they  fail  to 
take   into   consideration   that   the  seasoned   traveller 


is  a  man  of  business,  who  is  usually  all  the  more 
keen  and  observant  because  of  the  nature  of  his 
calling,  and  consequently  is  able  to  work  on  his 
own  initiative  better  than  on  "unseasoned"  sugges- 
tions from  the  home  office.  On  the  other  hand, 
where  this  auxiliary  service  of  keeping  the  traveller 
properly  posted  is  intelligently  carried  out.  the 
traveller  will  usually  be  found  only  too  glad  to 
entertain  any  suggestions  and  advice  that  may  be 
offered.  The  aim  of  both  should  be  toward  the 
highest  possible  degree  of  such  co-ordination  be- 
tween  traveller  and  house. 

Now  a-  to  the  retailer  and  his  attitude  to  the 
traveller:  The  retail  buyer  can  make  the  lot  of  the 
traveller  a  happier  one  by  at  all  times  treating  him 
as  a  business  brother  and  extending  to  him  the  same 
courtesy  that  he  extends  to  the  people  to  whom  he 

himself  sells  g Is.     He  can  also  make'  a   traveller 

a  better  business  man  by  exacting  from  him  a  greater 
degree  of  constructive  help,  and  by  giving  a  hearing 
ear  to  all  efforts  of  that  sort  by  the  men  on  the  road. 
Heaping  abuse  on  the  traveller  is  apparently 
a  favorite  pastime  of  some  merchants.  And  how 
they  do  save  it  up!  Travellers  frequently  come  to 
know  instinctively  that  when  they  enter  (be  store 
of  Jones  of  Jonesville,  or  Smith  of  Smithtown, 
Old  Jones  or  Young  Smith,  as  the  case  may  be,  will 
be  Mire  to  fall  upon  them  with  a  fusillade  of*  fault- 
finding. Well,  that  sort  of  thing,  to  say  the  least. 
is  not  in  the  best  interests  of  the  merchant  himself, 
because  be  begins  by  stroking  the  traveller's  fur  the 
wrong  way.  If  there  is  a  real  kick  coming,  a  far 
better  way  to  register  it  would  be  to  wait  for  a  more 
opportune  time  than  to  make  this  kick  the  dealer's 
greeting  to  the  traveller.  Tact  is  a  requisite  for 
success  on  the  part  of  travellers  in  dealing  with 
retailers,  but  it  is  also  necessary  for  the  retailers  to 
be  tactful  in  their  demeanor  toward  the  travelling 
men,  because  the  traveller  is  frequently  in  a  position 
to  do  the  retailer  a  good  turn.  In  the  natural  course, 
whom  is  he  going  to  select  for  favorable  treatment — 
the  merchant  who  treats  him  in  a  courteous  manner 
or  the  one  who  doesn't? 

Let  it  be  the  aim  of  every  traveller  to  become 
a  better  representative  of  his  house,  and  to  extend 
his  usefulness  to  the  retailer  beyond  the  restricted 
scope  of  merely  selling  him  goods.  If  he  can  show 
the  way  to  the  dealer  to  sell  more  goods  the  logical 
sequence  is  that  he  will  get  more  orders  from  the 
retailer. 


29 


Who's  Who  Among  Traveling  Men? 


TRAVELERS'    NUMBER 

The  work  of  preparing  a  Travelers'  Number  has 
been  heavier  than  was  anticipated  and  while  the 
response  has  been  most  satisfactory,  data  was 
still  pouring  in  when  we  were  obliged  to  close  our 
forms.  Consequently,  a  further  grist  of  news 
about  men  on  the  road,  together  with  additional 
pictures,    will    appear    in    the    April    Number. 

The   Editor. 


AI.EX.    Gil, LIES 


THE  DEAN  OF  THE  ROAD 

From  the  information  that  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  has  been 
able  to  gather,  the  honor  of  being  ac- 
credited the  title  of  the  "Dean  of  the 
Road"  in  Canada,  so  far  as  the  travelers 
calling  upon  retail  booksellers  and  sta- 
tioners are  concerned,  goes  to  Alexander 
Gillies  of  the  Rolland  Paper  Co.,  of 
Montreal,  who  was  interviewed  by 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  at 
the  Toronto  office  of  that  concern,  a 
few  days  before  his  departure  on  a  reg- 
"ular  trip  through  Western  Canada.  He 
travels  the  country  from  coast  to  coast 
Mr.  Gillies  was  born  in  1844  in  Glas- 
gow, Scotland,  and  is  therefore  in  his 
75th  year,  but  a  glance  at  his  picture 
appearing  in  this  issue  would  seem  to 
make  "seventy-five  years  young,"  the 
proper  term   to  use. 

Alex.  Gillies  came  to  Canada  when 
but  nine  years  of  age.  He  has  been 
with  Rolland's  for  the  past  fourteen 
years  but  has  been  on  the  road  in 
Canada  in  the  paper  and  stationery 
trade   since   1865. 

Going  back  in  the  files  of  this  paper 
tc  the  issue  for  January,  1896,  reveals 
a  picture  of  Mr.  Gillies  taken  about 
twenty-five  years  ago  and  he  doesn't 
look  a  great  deal  older  in  the  picture 
shown  now,  which  by  the  way  is  from 
a   photograph  taken   in   1914. 

It  is  interesting  to  quote  the  follow- 
ing from  the  sketch  accompanying  the 
picture  as  shown  in  1896: 

"Mr.  Gillies  has  been  in  the  paper 
business  for  many  years  and  knows  it 
thoroughly.  He  comes  from  a  family  of 
paper-makers  and  stationers.  He  was 
for  thirty  years  with  Buntin  &  Co.,  and 
only  joined  the  Boyd  firm  in  1895.  He 
is  an  uncle  of  James  B.  Gillies,  of  the 
well-known  firm  of  Buntin,  Gillies  & 
Co..   Hamilton."   Then   follows   reference 


Some  Information  About  Ambassadors  of  Commerce  Who  Sell 

Books,  Stationery  and  Kindred  Lines 

in  Canada 


to  his  joining  the  travelling  staff  of  the 
old  firm  of  Austin  and  Robertson,  and 
;•.  facetious  mention  that  Mr.  Gillies 
was  said  to  be  a  grandfather,  which  the 
writer  was  inclined  to  scout  because  of 
his  youthful  appearance,  but  for  the  ir- 
refutable evidence  that  existed.  To-day 
Mr.  Gillies  is  a  great-grandfather!  He 
will  have  reached  the  75th  milestone  of 
life  on -the  9th  of  next  month  and  his 
hosts  of  friends  in  the  trade  from  coast 
to  coast  hope  to  be  able  to  offer  him 
congratulations  on  many  a  succeeding 
anniversary  of  his  birthday. 

MR.   BELL'S   FINE   RECORD 

As  regards  book  travellers,  the  record 
for  long  service  in  Canada  seems  to  be 
indisputably  held  by  W.  C.  Bell,  who  is 
now  acting  as  special  Canadian  repre 
sentative  for  several  prominent  firms 
of   British    and    American    publishers. 

Mr.  Bell  has  been  on  the  road  selling- 
books  for  over  forty  years,  and  as  tlrn 
years  have  added  to  his  knowledge  of 
books,  making  him  probably  the  best 
posted  man  in  this  country  on  biblio- 
graphy, so  has  his  place  in  the  esteem 
and  affection  of  his  co-workers  in  the 
trade  been  strengthened  with  each  pass- 
ing  year. 

It  is  interesting  to  quote  here  the  fol- 
lowing paragraph  from  the  issue  of  May, 
1903,  of  "Books  and  Notions,"  which 
afterward  became  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER: 

"Probably  the  best  posted  and  cer- 
tainly one  of  the  most  popular  traveller? 
in  the  book  business  for  the  past  fifteen 
years  is  Mr.  W.  C.  Bell,  of  C.  M.  Taylor 


W.   C.   BELL 
The    Dean    of    the    Bonk    Trave 

&  Co.,  who,  during  two-thirds  of  that 
time,  has  been  representing  their  inter- 
ests in  the  East  and  Maritime  Provinces. 
On  Saturday,  the  28th  ult.,  he  was 
joined  in  holy  wedlock  to  Miss  Lillian 
Warne,  of  Toronto.  His  fellow  em- 
ployees evinced  their  warm  friendship  on 
the  eve  of  his  marriage  by  presenting 
him  with  a  handsome  secretar  .  Mr. 
Taylor  presented  his  pretty  bride  with 
a  silver  tea  set  in  token  of  the  high 
esteem  in  which  Mr.  Bell  is  hel  '  by  his 
employers." 


A  GROUP  OF  WELL-KNOWN  BOOK  TRAVELERS 
1— John  Henry  (Oxford  University  Press):  2— T.  S.  Sinnott  (Imperial  News  Co.);  3 — Geo. 
Smithers  (Macmillan's);  4— Thoma's  Langton  ;  5— E.  S.  Fowkes  (Coop,  Clark  Co.);  6— Geo. 
Stewart  (McClelland  &  Stewart):  7— Fred.  Sparks  (Frederick  D.  Goodchild)  ;  8— Ronald 
Wilkinson  '(Macmillan's);  9— Arthur  Smart  (Frederick  D.  Goodchild);  10— T.  F.  Pike 
(Longmans,  Green   &   Co.) 

30 


I!  ( )  0  K  SELLER      AND     STATIONER 


J.     H.     WALKER 

Who  represents  Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Ltd.,  for 
Canada,  outside  of  Ontario,  and  who  also  repre- 
sents the  Whiting-Cook  Co..  Holyoke,  Mass.;  the 
Westcott  .Jewell  Co.,  Seneca'  Falls.  N.Y.,  and  the 
MeKee    Glass    Co.,    Jaenette.    Pa. 


C.    C.    LIVESAY 

Mr.    I  sells   the   line   of   Luckett   Loose   Leaf, 

Ltd..     tj     the    Ontario     trade. 


H.    L.    GELINAS 
Who    assists    Mr.    Livesay    in    caring    for    the    Tor- 
onto  trade   of    Luckett    Loose   Leaf.    Toronto. 


THE   PUSH-PIN   PUSHERS 

R.  G.  Underwood,  sales  manager  of 
the  Moore  Push  Pin  Co.  of  Philadelphia, 
in  an  interesting  letter  in  response  to  a 
request  for  a  list  of  their  travelers  cov- 
ering Canada  writes  as  follows: 

"We  have  your  letter  of  February  18. 
and  our  Canadian  traveling  men  are: 

Carroll  R.  Burkhart,  who  calls  on  all 
of  the  Canadian  trade  from  London, 
Ontario,  to  Halifax,  N.S.  Mr.  Burkhart, 
while  having  a  name  that  might  be 
mistaken  for  a  German  under  some  cir- 
cumstances, is  not  by  any  means  Ger- 
man. The  facts  of  the  case  are  that  he 
comes  from  real  good  English  stock  and 
spells  his  name  without  the  usual  Ger- 
man D.  Mr.  Burkhart  has  made  a  great 
many  friends  in  the  territory  he  covers. 
He  is  a  fine,  young,  likable  chap  who 
is  developing  rapidly  into  one  of  our 
best  salesmen  and  during  1918  headed 
the  list  for  several  months. 

Howard  Magee  covers  our  Western 
Canadian  territory  from  Winnipeg  to 
Vancouver.  Mr.  Magee  also  has  a  great 
many  friends  in  Canada  among  the  deal- 
ers. He  is  one  of  the  complacent, 
phlegmatic,  jovial  kind  of  fellows,  with 
a  big,  round,  cheerful  face  that  makes 
you  feel  good  to  look  at  him.  Mr. 
Magee  is  a  patriotic  American  of  the 
first  order  and  let  us,  immediately  upon 
the  declaration  of  war,  to  do  his  bit  in 
helping  to  build  ships  to  lick  the  Kaiser. 
Since  we  have  finished  that  little  job, 
however,  he  is  back  helping  to  keep  the 
smoke  coming  out  of  our  factory  chim- 
ney and  he  is  certainly  doing  it. 

The  writer  is  well  known  to  all  of  the 
Eastern  Canadian  trade  as  he  covered 
it  personally  for  many  years  and  re- 
members with  a  great  deal  of  pleasure 
meeting  such  men  as  Mr.  Campbell  of 
the  W.  J.  Gage  and  Company;  Mr.  Reed 
of  the  Copp-Clark  Company;  Mr.  Sin- 
clair of  the  Warwick  Bros,  and  many 
other  personal  friends  who  are  in  the 
wholesale  and  larger  retail  trade." 


UNDERWOOD 


An  interesting  item  in  connection  with 
the  Travelers'  Number  is  that  A.  B. 
Glen,  London,  director  of  the  house  of 
William  Collins,  Sons  &  Co  ,  of  Glasgow 


CARROLL  R.  BURKHART 

and  London,  is  to  visit  the  principal 
cities  of  Canada  in  the  spring.  -This  big 
Old  Country  house  did  an  extensive 
business  with  Canada  before  the  war, 
but  during  the  war  years  their  goods 
have  been  absent  from  this  market. 


The  travelling  stationery  and  book  men 
who  have  been  visiting  the  Maritime 
Provinces,    report   sales   fair. 


WM.  J.  BRADY. 

Sales    Manager 


EDWARD    J.    BOYD  CHAS.     J.     CRANFIELD        JOSEPH    H.    JEFFERIES 

TRAVELERS  FOR  McCLELLAND  &   STEWART.    TORONTO. 

31 


NORMAN    B.    KNOWLES 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


DIRECTORY   OF   TRAVELLERS 

Men  on  the  Road  For  Some  of  the  Lead- 
ing Wholesale  Houses 

Thomas  Allen,  Publishers,  Toronto: 

Melville    J.    McLean,    Coast    to    Coast. 
Thomas   Allen,   Toronto   and    Montreal. 
American  Lead  Pencil  Co.,  New  York: 

Thos.   S.  McCrea,  All   of   Canada. 
William    Briggs,    Publisher,    Toronto: 

E.    W.    Walker,    Sales    Manager. 

R.  J.   Kennedy,  Western   Canada  and   part 
of  the   Maritime   Provinces. 

J.  Ferris,  Eastern  Ontario  and  sections  of 
Western   Canada. 

W.  J.  Young,  Ontario. 

James    Portch,    Ontario. 
Buntin,   Gillies  &   Co.,   Hamilton: 

W.  C.  Cunningham,  Western  and  Northern 
Ontario. 

C.  P.  Rason,  Niagara  Peninsula  and  South- 
western  Ontario. 

Geo.  E.  Peene,   Western   Canada. 

R.  G.  Elmslie,  Eastern  Ontario  and  Grey 
and   Bru;e  District. 

S.  M.  Scott,  Maritime   Provinces. 

J.  F.  Neville,  Ottawa. 

T.  B.  Little,  Montreal. 

G.  R.  Fenwick,  Hamilton. 

W.   G.   McAndrew,  Jr.,  Hamilton. 

R.    L.    Mitchell,    Hamilton. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Toronto: 

H.  O.  Walker,  Eastern  Ontario. 

A.  B.  Corbett,  Northern   Ontario. 

H.  G.  Warren,  North-Western  Ontario. 

J.  T.  Swift,  Western  Ontario. 

H.  G.  Fairfield,  Western   Canada. 

J.  Graham,  Western   Canada. 

W.   Dutton   Copp,   Montreal. 

W.  J.  Fosdick,   Maritime   Provinces. 

J.  H.  Forman,   Ottawa  Valley. 

E.  S.  Fowkes,  Special   Book  Salesman. 
Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Ltd.,  Toronto: 

H.  L.   Gelinas,   Toronto    (Junior) 

C.  C.  Livesay,   Ontario   and   Toronto. 

J.    H.    Walker,    Canada    (outside    Ontario) 
F.  D.  Goodchild,  Publisher,  Toronto: 

A.   Smart,   larger   centres    in    Ontario,   the 

Far  West  and  the  East. 
Fred   Sparks,   Ontario. 

Frederick  D.  Goodchild,  Toronto,  Montreal 
and    Ottawa. 
S.  B.  Gundy,  Publisher,  Toronto: 
J.  F.  Henry,  Western  Canada. 
W.     E.     Mainprice,     Eastern     Ontario    and 

Province. 
G.  F.  Thompson,  Western   Ontario. 
A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Toronto: 
G.  McCrimmon,  Ontario. 

A.  R.   Haviland,   Toronto. 

M.   D.   Otty,  Western   Canada. 
S.    J.    Huber,    Kingston,    Ottawa,    Quebec 
Province. 

D.  A.   Mallette,  Maritimes,  Newfoundland. 

B.  S.   Hulse,   Special   Representative. 
Mabie,  Todd  &  Co.,  Toronto: 

James  A.  G.  Pike,  Ontario. 

John  Scott,  Prairie  Provinces  and  Mari- 
time  Provinces. 

Walter  Greaves,  British   Columbia. 
Macmillan    Co.,    Publishers,   Toronto: 

Hugh    S.   Eayrs,   Resident   Gen.   Sales    Mgr. 

Montrose  G.  Liston,  Special  Representa- 
tive. 

S.  A.  P.  Clark.  General  Representative. 

A.  S.  Thomas,  General  Representative 
Western  Canada  and  District  Repre- 
sentative British  Columbia. 

E.  C.  Renouf.  District  Representative 
Province    Quebec. 

H.  Dickenson,  District  Representative 
Maritime    Provinces.. 

Capt.  M.  G.  MacVicar,  District  Represen- 
tative  Manitoba  and   Saskatchewan. 

Capt.  A.  T.  Lowes,  District  Representative 
Alberta. 

George  G.  Smithers,  The  West,  Montreal 
and    Ottawa. 

Ronald    H.    Wilkinson,    Ontario    and    the 
Maritimes. 
Rumsey  &  Co.,  Toronto: 

F.  P.  Maddox,  Hamilton  and  Niagara  Pen- 
insula. 

J.  R.  Pyle,  Toronto. 

(Continued  on  page  51) 


BUNTIN,   GILLIES   &   CO.   TRAVELERS 

Top.   left— W.    C.    Cunningham  ;   right.    C.    P.    Rason.      2nd   row,    left     G     K 

Peene;    right,    R.    S.    Elmslie.      3rd    row,    left— Roy    Fenwick;    centie.    .1      L 

Neville  ;   right,   W.   G.    McAndrew.      In   circle— S.    M.   Scott. 


SOME  ROAD  VETERANS 

There  are  four  travelers  on  the  road 
for  Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  who  follow  close 
upon  each  other's  heels  in  point  of  long 
service.  They  are  W.  C.  Cunningham,  30 
years;  C.  P.  Rason,  29  years;  G.  E 
Peene,  28  years,  and  R.  G.  Elmslie,  27 
years.  There's  a  quartette  hard  to  beat 
in  many  other  respects  besides  long  ser- 
vice and  there  is  an  aspect  of  these  re- 
cords which  should  not  be  overlooked. 
It  is  that  a  house  which  holds  men  of 
their  calibre  for  so  many  years  must  be 
a  mighty  satisfactory  one  to  be  connect- 
ed with,  which  only  bears  out  the  repu 
32 


tation  for  square  dealing  which  this  ok: 
house  has  with  members  of  the  retail 
trade  throughout  the  Dominion. 

Two  other  travelers  have  long  service 
records,  which  might  seem  venerable  in 
some  other  houses,  but  they  seem 
dwarfed  by  Billy  Cunningham's  thirty- 
year  showing.  They  arc  G.  R.  Fen- 
wick, 14  years,  and  W.  G.  McAndrew, 
Jr.,  12  years.  They  are  both  on  the 
staff  of  city  travelers  in  Hamilton.  It 
is  a  pleasure  for  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER  to  include  these  veterans 
of  the  road  among  the  ni'-tures  shown  in 
the  TRAVELER'S  NUMBER,  together 
with  S.  M.  Scott,  who  travels  in  the 
Maritimes  and  J.  F.  Neville,  Ottawa 
branch    manage"   for  the   same   house. 


A  Splendid  Spirit  of  Optimism 


THE  TRADE   OUTLOOK 

Two  prominent  members  of  the  retail  trade  con- 
tribute letters  to  this  issue  of  the  trade  paper,  that 
will  prove  highly  interesting  and  full  of  inspira- 
tion for  the  retail  trade. 


Wholesalers  and  Retailers  Should  Continue  to  Think  Good 

Business,  Talk  Good  Business  and  Work  For 

Good  Business  For  1919 


THAT  a  great  measure  of  good  has 
been  accomplished  by  the  sane 
and  healthy-toned  letters  from 
representative  members  of  the  trade, 
wholesale  and  retail,  in  the  January  and 
February -issues  of  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER,  is  shown  by  the  confidence 
in  the  1919  trade  outlook,  which  they 
have  materially  helped  to  inspire,  an 
influence  that  the  traveling  salesmen, 
particularly,  have  felt  in  their  early  can- 
vassing of  the  trade  for  1919  business. 
This  will  be  further  accentuated  to  a 
high  degree  by  the  sound,  optimistic 
letters  which  follow: 

Toronto,  February   11,   1919 
Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 

I  should  like  to  congratulate  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  on  the 
splendid  spirit  of  optimism  found  in  the 
January  number.  "As  a  man  thinketh 
so  is  he,"  is  not  only  good  Scripture,  but 
sound  sense,  and,  generally  speaking,  if 
1919  proves  to  be  a  prosperous  year  for 
the  book  and  stationery  trade,  it  will  be 
because  the  wholesaler  and  the  retailer 
alike  think  good  business,  talk  good 
business,  and  work  intelligently  for  good 
business. 

In  1914,  after  war  broke  out,  for  some 
months  it  seemed  as  though  the  bottom 
had  dropped  out  of  everything;  that 
never  again  would  we  be  able  to  resume 
the  development  of  our  natural  resources 
or  the  building  up  of  large  industries, 
because  foreign  capital  would  not  be 
available,  and  we  had  supposed  that 
without  this  foreign  capital  we  could 
make  no  progress.  Canada  was  thrown 
absolutely  on  her  own  resources;  and 
how  splendidly  she  responded! 

Why  should  not  a  people  be  optimis- 
tic who,  during  the  war  period,  sub- 
scribed to  their  own  Government's  loans 
to  the  amount  of  $1,680,621,300.00.  The 
interest  on  this  huge  sum  will  be  paid  to 
our  own  citizens  and  spent  in  this  coun- 
try. 

Already  there  is  the  beginning  of  a 
very  large  export  business,  and  connec- 
tions have  been  and  are  being  formed 
which  will  mean  great  things  for  Can- 
ada's future  trade.  Moreover,  Canada 
is  a  food-producing  country,  and  the  na- 
tions of  Europe  are  clamoring  for  food. 

All  this  must  have  its  general  effect 
utton  the  book  and  stationery  business, 
but  what  concerns  us  most  intimatelv 
at  the  moment  is  the  immediate  outlook 
for  our  own  particular  lines.  That  there 
will  be  a  gradual  readjusting  and  a  re- 
duction in  prices  is  undoubted;  I  do  not 
anticipate  this,  however,  in  the  near  fu- 
ture for  the  reason  that  there  is  a  short- 
age and  there  must  continue  to  be  a 
shortage  of  paper  poods  throughout  the 
world,  and  until  the  shipping  of  the 
world  is   measurably  restored    and    the 


imports  of  pulp  from  Scandina- 
vian countries  to  America  are  resumed 
there  can  be  no  material  reduction  in 
paper  prices. 

Wages  are  high,  and  under  present 
conditions  should  not  be  reduced,  and 
wages  are  largely  the  determining  factor 
in  the  cost  of  both  raw  material  and 
finished   products. 

I  believe,  therefore,  it  would  be  good 
business  to  go  on  buying  freely  without 
stocking  too  far  ahead.  The  man  with 
his  order  placed  will  secure  first  service 
if  shortage  comes.  If  orders  are  with- 
held  now   and   rushed    in   later    on,   thus 


W.    P.    GUNDY 

President   of   the   House   of   Gage 

creating  an  unnatural  demand,  there 
will  not  be  enough  paper  stock  to  go 
around  in  a  few  months'  time.  If  this 
is  to  be  avoided  then  dealers  should  con- 
tinue to  buy  in  a  normal  way.  Any  other 
course  may  lead  to  disturbing  conditions, 
unprofitable,  if  not  disastrous  to  every- 
one. 

I  wish  to  acknowledge,  if  I  may,  on 
behalf  of  the  wholesale  booksellers  and 
stationers,  the  very  kindly  greetings  in 
your  January  number  from  Russell 
Lang  &  Co.,  Winnipeg,  who,  I  am  sure, 
were  conveying  the  good  wishes  of  the 
retail  trade.  This  kindly  spirit  is 
characteristic  of  booksellers  and  station- 
ers, wholesale  and  retail,  as  I  have 
known  them  fairly  intimately  during 
almost  forty  years. 

W.  P.  CxUNDY.  President. 

W.  J.  GAGE  &  CO.,  LIMITED. 
33 


Soldiers  Greater  Readers 

Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer,— 
One  point  on  which  ail  Canadian  pub- 
lisher will  agree  is  that  1918  was  a 
successful  year,  even  though  prices  were 
considerably  higher  on  many  popular 
or  standard  lines  of  books.  The  volume 
of  business  was  greater,  thus  proving 
that  the  public  will  pay  the  necessarily 
increased  list  prices  of  books.  But 
what  concerns  us  is  not  so  much  the 
year  that  is  passed,  but  the  year  we 
have  entered  upon.  As  regards  prices 
for  1919— the  publisher  must  get  more 
for  his  books.  Printers  and  binders  are 
getting  much  more  for  their  labor  and 
there  has  been  practically  no  drop  in  the 
price  of  materials,  and  books  cannot  be 
manufactured  for  nothing,  although  at 
the  cheap  prices  prevailing  before  the 
war  on  low  priced  or  standard  series  the 
public  had  been  educated  to  pay  a  low- 
er price  for  books  than  is  paid  for  al- 
most any  other  line  of  goods.  Some 
publishers  in  the  United  States  last 
year  lost  many  thousands  of  dollars  on 
the  books  they  sold.  One  thing  is  sure, 
prices  will  "never  again"  drop  as  low  as 
they  were  in  pre-war  times  and  I  doubt 
very  much  if  they  will  drop  at  all  per- 
ceptibly during  1919.  My  own  opinion 
is  that  certain  lines,  such  as  renrints, 
will  advance  still  further  during  the 
year.  I  think  by  Fall  we  will  see  a 
-Teat  many  books  of  fiction  published  at 
$1.75  or  higher  and  I  am  quite  sure  the 
Dublic  will  pav  the  increased  prices.  I 
do  not  think  there  will  be  an  adverse 
sale,  especially  of  the  books  by  well 
known  authors — of  course  in  spite  of 
the  publishers'  feeling  with  regard  to 
the  importance  of  books  it  must  be  ad- 
mitted that  a  greit  many  people  con- 
sider them  as  luxuries. 

As  regards  business  for  1919,  the 
booksellers,  especially  in  Ontario,  have 
had  the  most  successful  year's  business 
in  their  history.  Stocks  were  practic- 
ally sold  out  at  Christmas  time  and 
the  country  generally  has  more  money 
to  spend  than  ever  before.  Again,  the 
returning  soldiers  will  buv  more  books 
than  they  did  before  going  overseas. 
They  have  had  more  leisure  time  to 
read,  their  appetites  will  be  whetted  for 
literature,  and  as  our  Canadian  boys 
have  rubbed  shoulder  to  shoulder  with 
their  British  comrades,  who  are  as  a 
rule  greater  readers  than  Canadians,  is 
it  not  probable  that  increased  sales  will 
result?  I  think  so.  To  =um  up,  prices 
will  be  higher,  the  public  will  pay  the 
increased  prices  and  the  publishers  and 
booksellers  will  have  a  profitable .  bus- 
iness in  1919. 

ERNEST  WALKER, 
Manager  Wholesale   Dept. 
WILLIAM  BRIGGS. 


BOOKSELLER   AND  STATIONER 


In  reply  to  an  enquiry  sent  out  by 
the  editor  as  to  1919  prospects,  G.  J. 
Galloway  of  the  Old  Bookstore,  Van- 
couver, B.  C,  wrote  as  follows:  "You 
can  have  just  what  you  want.  If  you 
talk  blue  ruin  you  will  have  it  or  the  re- 
verse. It  is  up  to  the  mouth-piece  of  the 
world,  the  daily  and   weekly  press." 

1919  Will  Be  Best 

New  Glasgow,  N.S.,  Feb.  3,  1919 
Editor  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 
Re  your  request  for  a  brief  message 
regarding  our  1918  holiday  trade,  may 
say  that  business  was  beyond  our  ex- 
pectations. 1917  was  good;  1918  was 
much  better,  and  we  propose  making 
1919  the  best  of  all. 

Yours    truly, 
TORRY'S  BOOK  STORK, 
Per  J.  B.  Torry,  Mgr. 

West's  Outlook  Good 

Kdmonton,  Jan.  28.  1919. 
Editor  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 
In  reply  to  your  request  as  to  trade 
conditions,  I  might  say  personally,  that 
my  Christmas  and  New  Year's  business 
was  phenomenally  good,  considering  we 
were  right  in  the  worst  of  the  "flu"' 
epidemic  in  the  holiday  time.  My  sales 
were  35  per  cent,  better  than  last  year; 
also  the  outlook  for  1919,  I  think,  is  good 
for  trade.  The  very  mild  winter  we  are 
having  is  a  big  saving  to  the  household- 
ers in  their  coal  bins,  which  will  throw 
more  money  to  the  merchants.  I  think 
the  West  will  develop  faster  and  steadier 


than    heretofore,    with    better    classes    of 
settlers,   in   fact  the   outlook   is   good. 
J.  D.  HUTTON. 


RETAIL  BOOK    PRICES* 

Victoria,  B.C.,  February  4,  1919 
Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer, — 

In  response  to  your  request  for  infor- 
mation re  our  December  and  Christmas 
business,  I  think  we  with  almost  every 
branch  of  business  catering  for  holiday 
trade  can  say  that  it  was  far  beyond  our 
expectations.  While  we  are  not  in  a 
position  to  report  it  as  our  best  year, 
many  of  the  local  trade,  state  that  it 
was  the  best  December  that  they  ever 
had.  The  one  condition  that  mutilates 
against  a  profitable  book  business  is 
the  increased  cost  of  books  without  a 
possibility  of  a  proportionate  advance  in 
retail  prices. 

Yours  sincerely, 

T.  N.  HIBBEN  &  CO. 
Why    should    not    the    retail    booksel- 
lers   advance    their    prices    in    reasonable 
proportion   to   wholesale   prices? — Editor. 


TRIED  COMMISSION   IDEA 

The  Granville  Stationery  Co.,  of  Van- 
couver, B.C.,  replying  to  the  editor's 
enquiry  as  to  whether  a  commission  or 
1'onus  was  paid  to  salesmen,  stated  that 
they  had  tried  a  scheme  of  allowing  1 
per  cent,  commission  on  cash  sales  cov- 
ering the  whole  vear.  but  could  trace  no 
i:ood  results.  On  the  contrary  they 
found  that  salesmen  were  prone  to  neg- 


lect small  customers   in  favor  of  larger 
buyers.  N 


FOR  A  TAG  WINDOW 

A  source  of  considerable  profit,  very 
often  neglected  on  account  of  its  appar- 
end  insignificance,  is  the  humble  but 
serviceable  tag.  Stout  tags  are  needed 
at  every  season.  It  is  a  good  plan  to 
fit  up  a  window  in  such  a  fashion  that 
the  public  will  at  once  be  made  aware 
that  ail  its  wants  in  this  line  could  be 
freely  supplied.  Use  a  background 
papered  in  red.  with  white  lines,  to  rep- 
resent a  brick  wall.  In  the  foreground, 
on  a  hand  truck,  show  a  trunk,  duly 
tagged  and  labelled,  and  timetables 
strewn  on  the  floor.  A  large  card  in 
the  midst  of  the  display  could  carry  this 
query: 

Going  to  Take  a  Trip? 

Then  you  will  want  stout  tags  for  all 
your  luggage — tags  that  you  know  won't 
pull  off.  but  will  stick  closer  than  a 
brother  until  the  trunks  arrive  at  your 
destination. 

We  have  them — Pick  out  the  kind  you 
desire. 

Luggage    Labels  Pasteboard    Tags 

Cloth    Package    Tags 
Boxes    of    Supplies — Tags,    Twine    and 
Marker 

In  front  of  the  card  put  sampler  of 
all  the  supplies  mentioned,  with  little 
led  ribbons  running  from  the  printed 
sign  to  the  articles  themselves,  the  price 
of  each  article  being  stated  on  a  little 
card  attached  to  the  merchandise. 


Retailers  After  Greeting  Card  Pirates 


A    GOOD    EXAMPLE   TO    FOLLOW 

The  accompanying  article  discloses  a  trade  evil 
in  the  United  States  which  is  true  of  Canada  as 
well  in  the  case  of  one  or  two  distributing  house; 
Dealers  should  support  the  firms  that  give  the 
retail    trade    a    square    deal.      Editor. 


Manufacturers  Who  Want  Trade  of  Retailers  Should  Not  Sell  to 
Canvassers  and  Direct  to  Consumers 


IN  a  report  of  the  committee  on  paper 
and  envelopes  to  the  National  Asso- 
ciation of  Stationers,  the  following 
were  some  of  the  replies  received  to  the 
question:  "How  do  you  display  greeting 
cards,  and  what  is  your  method  of  sell- 
ing, from  samples  or  display  in  show 
rase?" 

"In  original  boxes." 

"Numbered  samples  on  rack  to  corre- 
spond with  numbered  boxes." 

"Original  boxes  on  counter.  The  in- 
creased business  from  this  method  more 
than  offset  cards  spoiled  by  handling." 

"Samples  mounted  on  card,  stock  on 
shelf." 

"Original  boxes  in  show  case." 

Replies  to  the  question  as  to  whether 
cards  of  a  personal  nature  for  engraving 
or  signature.,  or  cards  of  a  sentimental 
character  were  in  the  greater  demand 
indicated  hv  a  large  per  cent,  that  the 
greater  call  was  for  cards  of  a  personal 
character,  with  his  tendency  still  further 
on    the    increase. 


Ninety  per  cent,  of  the  replies  indi- 
cated that  customers  preferred  die- 
stamped  greeting  cards. 

The  dealers  put  themselves  strongly 
on  record  against  the  practice  on  the 
part  of  some  greeting  card  makers  send- 
ing samples  to  canvassers,  who,  without 
carrying  stock,  solicit  orders  in  compe 
tition  with  the  retailers,  who  are  in  the 
legitimate  trade  with  stores  that  entail 
the  payment  of  rentals,  taxes  and  the 
other  expenses  of  maintenance.  It  was 
the  concensus  of  opinion  that  such  agents 
could  not  properly  be  classed  as  dealers. 

This  is  a  trade  evil  that  is  not  re- 
stricted to  the  United  States.  It  is,  un- 
fortunately, true  of  Canada  as  well,  and 
Canadian  retail  stationers  would  do  well 
to  make  it  a  point  to  ascertain  from  the 
makers  or  wholesalers,  from  whom  they 
have  been  buying,  as  to  whether  they 
condone  this  trade  practice.  In  thaf 
manner  they  will  learn  which  firms  are 
acting  most  consistently  in  the  interests 
of  the  legitimate  retail  stationery  trade 
in  this  country.  BOOKSELLER  AND 
34 


STATIONER,  by  investigation,  is  con- 
vinced that  this  practice  on  the  part  of 
the  distributing  houses  is  carried  on  by 
only  a  very  small  percentage  of  concerns 
who  are  making  a  bid  for  the  business 
of  retailers.  There  are  some  who  do  not 
cater  to  the  retail  trade  at  all.  They 
are  at  least  consistent,  and  may  be  ab- 
solved from  the  charge  of  acting  against 
the  best  interests  of  the  retailer  and  still 
angling  for  his  trade.  Such  firms  should 
be  altogether  eliminated  from  the  con- 
sideration  of  the   retail  dealers. 

On  this  very  point  the  retail  station- 
ers, canvassed  by  the  committee  of  the- 
U.  S.  association  referred  to  in  the  fore- 
going, replied  almost  unanimously  in  the 
affirmative  to  the  question: 

"If  you  are  in  favor  of  the  manufac- 
turer selling  the  trade  only,  would  you 
give  such  a  manufacturer  your  support 
over  those  who  sell  both  the  trade  and 
to  the  agents,  or  direct  to  the  consumer  7"" 

Canadian  dealers  should  take  a  similar 
stand. 


NEWS  OF  THE  TRADE 


J.   G.  CLOKE   RETIRES 
Veteran    Hamilton    Bookseller    and    Sta- 
tioner,   After    Fifty    Years    in     the 
Trade,  makes  Way  for  His  Son 

After  fifty  years  in  the  book,  station- 
ery and  wall  paper  business,  J.  G.  Cloke. 
head  of  the  well-known  firm  of  Cloke  & 
Son,  Hamilton,  Ont.,  retiied  on  February 
1  from  the  management  of  the  business. 
Fred  Cloke,  who  has  been  associated 
with  his  father  for  twenty-three  years, 
has  acquired  the  entire  interest  and  will 
continue  the  business  in  the  same  pre- 
mises and  under  the  same  name.  J.  G. 
Cloke  was  one  of  the  veteran  booksellers 
and  stationers  of  Canada  as  well  as  one 
of  the  most  prominent  men  in  the  trade. 
He  served  efficiently  as  president  of  the 
Booksellers'  and  Stationers'  Association 
before  it  was  merged  •  with  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association. 

Fred  Cloke,  who  is  now  at  the  helm, 
has  the  best  wishes  of  the  trade,  and 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  can 
express  no  kindlier  hope  than  that  Fred 
rr.ay  be  accorded  as  high  a  degree  of 
success  as  that  achieved  by   his  father. 

Friends  of  Frank  H.  Palmer,  former 
Canadian  representative  for  the  Eaton, 
Crane  &  Pike  Co.,  will  be  interested  to 
know  that  he  has  been  appointed  manager 
of  stock  control  at  the  factory  of  the 
company  in  Pittsfield,  Massachusetts.  Mr. 
Palmer's  successor  as  Canadian  repre- 
sentative, Mr.  Herbert  G.  Popham,  has 
assumed  his  new  duties  after  some  time 
spent  at  the  factory. 

Among  the  names  of  new  members  of 
the  National  Association  of  Stationers 
and  .Manufacturers  of  the  United  States, 
appears  the  firm  of  Richardson  &  Bis- 
hop, Wii.nipeg,  Man. 

NEW  PHONOGRAPH  FACTORY 

Clayton,  Feb.  15.— L.  E.  Davis  &  Co. 
have  established  a  new  business  in  Clay- 
ton, located  in  the  Delaney  building  on 
Mary  street,  opposite  the  Otis  Books 
Lumber  Co.  They  are  engaged  in  turn- 
ing- out  phonographs  and  sewing  cab- 
inets. The  machines  play  any  style  of 
a  record,  and  the  cabinets  are  finished 
in  a  variety  of  woods. — Brockviile- 
"Recorder-Times." 

THE  JYNX  AT  WORK 

In  sporting  parlance  there  is  an  ex- 
pressive term  that  applies  to  unfortun- 
ate experiences  of  doughty  perform- 
ers who  have  unlucky  streaks.  It  is  the 
"Jynx."  Well,  this  "Jynx"  spirit  must 
have  insinuated  itself  in  some  manner 
or   other    into    BOOKSELLER    &    STA- 


TIONER'S composing  room.  In  the 
Moore  Push  Pin  Co.'s  advertisements, 
on  two  occasions,  a  cut  was  placed  up- 
side down.  Then,  in  a  letter  from  the 
Moore  Push  Pin  Co.,  appearing  with  tho 
letters  on  the  trade  outlook  in  the  Feb- 
ruary issue,  the  date  line  gives  Newark, 
N..T.,  instead  of  Philadelphia,  as  the  home 
address.  In  pointing  out  these  errors  a 
subsequent  letter  from  the  Moore  Push 
Pin  Co.  contains  this  morsel:  "We  re- 
alize that  the  editor  has  no  cinch  and 
that  it  is  hard  to  find  the  printer's  devil 
when  you   wish  to  chastise  someone." 

It  transpires  that  besides  lifting  thp 
Moore  plant  bodily  from  Philadelphia 
and  setting  it  down  in  Newark,  N.J.,  the 
said  "printer's  devil"  simultaneously 
transplanted  the  Weldon  Roberts  Rub 
ber  Co.'s  factory  from  Newark  to  Phila- 
delphia. Some  magician,  eh,  what? 
11, its   off   to    the    printer's   devil! 

The  explanation,  of  course,  is  that  the 
two  date  lines  were  transposed,  and  this 
error  was  not  detected  by  the  over- 
worked eye  of  the  proof-reader. 


Profit  Calculations 

.1  del  it  ion   to  Cont 

Profit  mi  Selling  Price 

5   per  cent. 

4 "i  per  cent. 

8%  per  cent. 

7   per  cent. 

10   percent. 

9   per  cent. 

12%  per  cent. 

1 1  'k  per  cent. 

16   percent. 

13   per  cent. 

lfi   percent. 

14'  i  per  cent. 

17%  per  cent. 

15   per  cent. 

20   per  cent. 

16  2-3  per  cent. 

25   per  cent. 

20   per  cent. 

30   Der  cent. 

23   per  cent. 

33  1-3  percent. 

25   per  cent. 

35   per  cent. 

26   per  cent. 

37%  per  cent. 

27%  percent. 

10   per  cent. 

28%  per  cent. 

45   per  cent. 

31   per  cent. 

50   per  cent. 

33  1-3  per  cent. 

55   per  cent. 

35%  per  cent. 

60   per  cent. 

37%  per  cent. 

65   percent. 

39%  per  cent. 

66  2-3  per  cent. 

40   per  cent. 

70   per  cent. 

41   per  cent. 

75   per  cent. 

42  2-3  percent. 

80   per  cent. 

44%  per  cent. 

85   per  cent. 

46   per  cent. 

90   per  cent. 

47%  per  cent. 

100  per  cent. 

50   per  cent. 

and    Book    Co.,   of    Regina,    as   a    notable 
example. 

It  is  not  to  be  presumed  that  these 
drug  stores  deal  in  books  that  are  drug* 
on    the    market! 

Shephard's  Bookstore,  Paris,  Ont., 
features  1919  wallpapers  "Made  in 
Canada  for  Canadians  by  Canadians." 

:;:  *  % 

W.  R.  Turner,  in  a  recent  display  ad- 
vertisement, has  the  words  "stationery, 
drugs,  jewelry"  following  his  name,  but 
at  the  head  of  the  advertisement  is 
"The    Bookstore"   in   big  type. 


BOOKS  *ND  DRUGS 

In  an  advertisement  of  the  "City 
Drug  Store,"  Provost,  Alberta,  chief  at- 
tention is  given  to  "books  and  maga- 
zines," with  special  reference  to  the 
circulating  library  conducted  in  this 
store.  Cameras  and  talking  machines 
are  featured  but  except  in  the  firm 
name  the  drug  end  of  the  business 
sleeps  in  this  advertisement.  There  is 
many  another  such  instance  in  the  West, 
but  in  many  cases  the  words  "drug" 
and  "book"  are  associated  in  the  name 
of   the    store:      Thus    the    Canada    Drug 

35 


USE  OF  INK  TABLETS 

The  convenience  of  ink  in  tablet  form, 
which  was  never  so  strikingly  emphasized 
since  writing  fluids  were  manufactured  in 
concentrated  form  as  during  the  worid 
war,  is  being  more  and  more  appreciated 
in  the  return  to  pursuits  of  peace  as  one 
of  the  necessities  demanded  by  modern 
business. 

Practically  the  entire  overseas  forces 
were  equipped  during  the  struggle  with 
fountain  pens;  and  as  bulky  bottled  ink 
meant  extra  space  in  the  soldier's  kit, 
with  every  possibility  of  breakage  under 
the  stress  of  hard  trench  service,  with 
consequent  spoilage  of  kit  contents,  sol- 
diers were  not  slow  to  appreciate  the 
superior  advantages  afforded  by  an  ink 
tablet,  at  all  times  easily  portable,  free 
from  breakage  under  any  service,  and 
which  by  simply  adding  water  made  a 
free  flowing,  non-clogging  ink  which 
neither  moulded  nor  froze  regardless  of 
climate  conditions. 

It  merely  remained  for  them  to  find 
such  tablets  in  a  size  just  right  for  a 
fountain  pen  filling  when  required — no 
more  and  no  less — and  that  would  dis- 
solve readily  without  leaving  a  sediment. 
In  fact,  an  ink  that  combined  the  essen- 
tial qualities  of  the  bottled  fluid. 

ARE  MADE  IN  CANADA 

In  a  recent  issue  of  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER,  it  was  stated  that 
no  cash  boxes  were  made  in  Canada 
but  it  transpires  that  there  are  several 
Canadians  firms  making  these  goods, 
including  E.  T.  Wright  &  Co.,  of  Ham- 
ilton, who  have  written  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER  that  they  have  been 
making"  cash  boxes  for  over  thirty  years. 
They  make  four  sizes  of  cash  boxes 
and  three  sizes  of  deed  boxes.  In  jus- 
tice to  Canadian  industry  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER  is  glad  to  publish 
this  information. 


Exclusive  Store  Uses  Small  Cards 

Show  Cards  in  the  Windows  a  Little  Larger  and  More  Easily  Read  Than  Those  Used 

in  the  Store — Color  Scheme  of  the  Cards  is  Frequently  Changed, 

Although  White  Cards  Are  Always  Popular 


ANYONE     interested     in     showcard 
writing,   whether  a  card-writer   or 
not,    when    travelling    throughout 
the  American  continent  will  take  notice 
of    the    particular    styles    of    showcards 
used    in    various    districts.     He    will    also 


One  of  a  series  by  R.  T.  D.  EDWARDS 

notice  the  similarity  of  the  work   in  one 
district  of  various  card-writers. 

This  seems  to  have  been  the  case  es- 
pecially throughout  Canada  where  card- 
writing  has  not  been  practised  as  long 
as  on  the  other  side  of  the  line.  Here, 
one  good  card-writer  settles  in  a  district 


and  from  him  many  amateurs  copy  their 
style.  This  is  gradually  improved  upon 
until  the  district  has  a  lot  of  good  card- 
writers,  all  with  much  the  same  style. 
Could  Be  Improved 
This  condition,  while  not  objectionable, 
could   be   improved  upon  by  varying  the 


faster  Lards 

Great  Profusion 


Latest  Ideas 

in 

Correspondence 


>&rs 


How  Show  Cards  Actually  Sell  Goods 

Window  Display  of  Cameras  Brought  in  a  Chance  Customer 

By  Reason  of  a  $28  Price  Ticket  on 

One  Camera 


IF  you,-  window  display  is  going  to 
sell  the  goods  it  should  sell,  thers 
should  be  plenty  of  show  cards 
along  with  the  display.  You  wouldn't 
tolerate  for  one  moment  a  clerk  who' 
refused  to  answer  any  question  pat  to 
him  by  the  customer;  then  why  allow 
a  display  in  the  window  without  shov 
cards  carrying  a  full  description  of  the 
article  shown,  as  to  quality,  uses,  etc.? 
The  use  of  show  cards  will  increase  the 
number  of  sales  made  by  the  display. 
All  dealers  cannot  afford  to  employ  an 
expert  show-card  writer,  but  a  mighty 
good  show  card  may  be  made  from  cut- 
ting out  the  advertisements  that  appear 
in  various  trade  journals  and  pasting 
them  to  card  boards. 

Then  it  will  be  necessary  to  accom- 
pany each  article  with  the  retail  price. 
The  very  first  question  the  average 
customer  asks  is:  "What  is  the  price?" 
Because  the  price  did  not  accompany 
the  display  has  lost  many  a  sale.  Nine 
times  out  of  every  ten  it  is  the  price 
that  brings  the  customer  in.  The  dis- 
play creates  a  desire  for  the  article  and 
then  if  the  price  is  right  the  sale  is 
made;  but  should  the  price  not  be  dis- 
played then  the  person  is  just  a  little 
bit  afraid  to  enter  for  fear  the  price 
my  be  too  high,  and  he  does  not  want 


to  be  considered  a  cheapskate.  Not  long 
ago  I  was  walking  down  the  main  street 
of  an  Ohio  city  and  I  came  to  a  fine 
display  of  kodaks.  I  had  been  con- 
sidering the  purchase  of  a  larger  kodak, 
and  I  saw  here  displayed  the  very 
thing  I  wanted,  but  there  wasn't  a  price 
in  the  whole  window.  I  didn't  go  in 
because  nothing  embarrasses  me  more 
than  to  price  an  article  and  find  it 
higher  than  I  can  stand.  The  following 
day  I  was  in  another  city  and  again  I 
came  on  to  a  fine  display  of  cameras, 
and  here  I  found  prices  accompanying 
each  camera — the  one  I  wished  to  pur- 
chase was  marked  $28.  I  was  surprised, 
for  had  any  one  asked  me  what  I 
thought  it  would  be  worth  I  would  have 
said  $40  at  least.  I  made  a  purchase, 
and  I  didn't  stop  at  that  either.  I 
bought  until  my  bill  was  over  $40.  I 
cite  this  just  as  an  example  of  the  pul- 
ling power  of  having  the  price  accomp- 
anying the  display.  Simply  because  one 
dealer  neglected  to  add  the  price,  he 
lost  a  sale  of  over  $40;  while  the  other 
man  who  did  appreciate  the  value  of 
accompanying  the  article  with  the  price 
made  the  sale.  Don't  forget  to  add  the 
price  to  the  display. — The  National. 
36 


'  '3  c-vmr'-'--!  in  showcards  used  in 
other  cities   with   the   local   style. 

With  the  object  of  improving  the  show- 
cards  in  various  localities,  we  are  run- 
ning this  series  of  showcards  explaining 
the  various  methods  used  in  large  stores 
throughout  Canada  and  the  United 
States. 

This  month's  article  deals  with  two 
large  stores  in  Chicago.  Their  methods 
of  preparing  showcards  are  well  worth 
studying. 

The  first  store  which  we  will  consider 
is  one  which  handles  very  high  class 
merchandise,  a  very  exclusive  store. 
Not  the  type  that  has  to  advertise  bar- 
gains to  sell  its  goods,  but  whose  mer- 
chandise is  so  exclusive  that  very  few 
cards  are  needed  for  the  display. 

The  Difference 

This  is  one  of  the  predominating  dif- 
ferences between  the  Canadian  and 
American  stores.  The  better  class 
American  stores  use  showcards  sparing- 
ly and  those  they  use  are  very  small 
with   small   lettering. 

The  lettering  is  very  neat,  but  no  neat- 
er or  better  than  many  Canadian  card- 
writers  can  do.  The  lettering  is  kept  to 
the  centre  of  the  card,  showing  plenty 
of  background,  and  when  a  price  is  ne- 
cessary the  figures  appear  no  more  con- 
spicuously than  the  lettering.  The  work 
is  usually  of  brush  or  pen  stroke  con- 
struction. 

Now  take  the  Canadian  stores,  even 
the  most  exclusive;  you  find,  them  using 
cards  of  a  type  that  the  cheaper  Arner- 


KOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


ican  store  uses.  Large  cards  with  heavy 
type  and  often  of  gaudy  colors  are  com- 
mon. This  class  of  card  is  absolutely 
barred  in  the  type  of  American  store 
previously  mentioned.  They  are  consid- 
ered vulgar  and  absolutely  out  of  keepr 
ing  with  their  beautifully  designed  stores 
and  with  the  beautiful  merchandise  they 
sell. 

Cards  Are  Small 

Their  showcards  are  small,  this  letter- 
ing is  small  and  price  is  small.  The 
lines  are  straight  across  the  card  and 
all  layouts  are  uniform.  One  type  of 
lettering  is  used  throughout  the  store 
and  only  one.  These  cards  are  used  ex- 
ceedingly sparingly  and  not  placed  in 
a  too  conspicuous  place  so  as  to  detract 
from  the  merchandise  display. 

White    is    Popular 

White  cards  are  popular,  but  the  color 
of  the  cards  is  changed  from  time  to 
time.  But  no  matter  what  color  is  used 
it  must  be  uniform  throughout  the  store. 
The  card-writers  work  slowly  and  accur- 
ately to  get  uniformity  in  their  work. 

At  the  present  time  the  most  exclu- 
sive store  of  the  two  is  using  a  very 
pleasing  brown  mottled  card  with  small 
white  lettering  for  both  windows  and 
interior  use.  The  white  lettering  is  put 
on  with  a  small  brush  or  music  pen  which 
will  flow  the  heavy  opaque  card-writer's 
white    successfully. 

A  quarter  sheet  card  (11  in.  by  14  in.) 
is  used  in  the  windows  and  with  the 
most  exclusive  displays  no  cards  are 
used  at  all. 

The  other  Chicago  store  uses  a  white 
card  for  the  interior  and  vary  the  styles 
for  the  windows. 

On  the  main  and  second  floors  of  the 
latter  store  it  is  the  rule  not  to  use  any 
larger  card  than  5V2  in.  by  7  in.  The 
lettering  is  made  with  the  pen,  using  a 


black  carbon  ink.  Both  the  lettering 
and  price  are  put  on  small,  but  are  quite 
readable. 

The  Window  Cards 

The  window  cards  are  a  little  more 
elaborate  at  opening  times  when  color- 
ing is  used  very  sparingly.  Cards  sim- 
ilar to  the  grey  card  with  black  lettering 
illustrated  on  this  page  are  used.  The 
edges  of  this  card  are  sometimes  bev- 
elled and  gilded.  The  fancy  capital  is 
drawn  on  white  paper  and  pasted  on  the 
card. 

The  other  illustration  shows  the  style 
used  by  the  store  first  mentioned.  It 
is  a  dark  brown  mottled  card  with  white 
lettering.  This  store  always  has  the 
edges  of  their  good  display  cards  bev- 
elled and  gilded. 


AAkJiiLPAPEB 


A   GOOD  BOOK  AD. 

H.  F.  Prevost,  of  Cowichan,  B.C.,  will 
probably  be  surprised  at  the  appearance 
of  his  advertisement  herewith  as  repro- 
duced from  the  original  in  the  Cowichan 
"Leader."  In  the  newspaper  an  old  book 
illustration  of  doubtful  vintage  was  used, 
and  it  really  lessened  the  merit  of  an 
otherwise  good  book  advertisement.  The 
cut  introduced  here  is  more  pleasing  to 
the  eye,  and  the  advertisement  as  it 
stands  will  doubtless  be  good  enough  to 
be  used  as  a  model  bv  other  bookstores 
for  newspaper  advertisements.  Observe 
the  timely  reference  to  gardening  books. 


A.  Jacobson.  of  the  Famous  Doll  Stud- 
ios, New  York,  recently  visited  Mont- 
real, where  the  Canadian  factory  of  the 
Famous  Studios  is  located. 


Emily  P.  Weaver  has  in  preparation 
a  book  that  will  be  a  record  of  the  Can- 
adian winners  of  the  Victoria  Cross  in 
the   Great  War. 


Books  that  are  Bound 


to  interest  you  are  here  in  pro- 
fusion. The  thrilling  tale  of  ad- 
venture, the  dainty  love  story  or 
the  latest  up-to-date  detective  fic- 
tion are  all  here  waiting  to  be  read. 

COME   AND   CHOOSE 

the  book  you  like  best.  All  the 
prices  are  considerably  under  the 
regular,  so  you  can  get  good  read- 
ing at  little  expense.  While  here 
you  might  take  a  look  at  our 
stationery,  too.  It's  as  good  and 
cheap   as  the   books. 

As  a  springtime  special  we  are 
now  showing  a  large  range  of  gar- 
dening books,  dealing  with  every- 
thing relating  to  the  garden.  They 
are  good.     Get  one. 

30c  and  40c 


H.  F.  Prevost,   Stationer 

COWICHAN,  B.C. 


IN  many  cases,  especially  in  medium- 
sized  towns,  it  is  a  trade  practice  in 
Canada  to  combine  the  wallpaper 
business  with  the  book  and  stationery 
business.  This  was  the  case  to  a  greater 
extent  up  to  about  ten  or  fifteen  years 
ago  than  it  is  to-day,  but  the  majority 
of  booksellers  and  stationers  in  such 
towns  still  sell  wallpaper.  Even  in  re- 
cent years  some  of  these  merchants  who 
had  not  previously  sold  this  line  have 
inaugurated  wallpaper  departments  with 
distinctly  successful  results. 

As  F.  H.  Chappie  of  Gait  said  to 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  in 
the  course  of  an  interview,  there  is  no 
use  for  any  stationer  to  try  wallpaper 
business  without  putting  in  a  good  big 
stock  and  giving  the  department  ade- 
quate attention.  Mr.  Chappie's  view 
was  that  for  a  town  -of  8,000  or  10,000 
people  the  dealer's  wallpaper  stock 
should  be  in  the  neighborhood  of  $4,000 
to  $5,000.  At  Chappie's  the  wallpaper 
department,  in  fact  the  whole  business 
it,  thoroughly  systematized,  complete  re- 
cords being  kept  of  all  sales.  The  wall- 
paper sales  are  each  made  out  in  trip- 
licate, one  copy  going  to  the  customer, 
one  to  the  office,  the  third  is  kept  on 
file  in  the  department.  Entries  are  made 
each  morning  in  a  special  book  for  the 
purpose,  thus  registering-  a  complete  re- 
cord  of  each  day's   sales. 

Another  dealer  who  does  a  fine  bus- 
iness with  w;illpaper  is  J.  P.  Bender,  of 
Kitchener.  Ont.  He  carries  a  large  stock 
and  in  the  more  spacious  store  occupied 
since  1917  has  far  greater  opportunity 
for  advantageous  stocking  and  displaying 
of  this  line,  the  stock  being  carried  in 
large  space  at  the  rear  of  the  store. 
The  lines  carried  are  mostly  the  pro- 
ducts of  the  Canadian  wallpaner  mills, 
but  Mr.  Bender  said  he  found  that  he 
could  from  time  to  time  make  profitable 
purchases  from  United  States  makers. 
On  the  whole,  he  found  the  wallpaper 
department  to  be  one  of  the  most  satis- 
factory ends  of  his  business. 

Sutherland's  of  Woodstock  is  another 
case  where  wallpaper  is  an  important 
off-shoot  of  the  book  and  stationery  bus- 
diness.  Besides  goodly  stocks  of  Cana- 
dian-made papers  there  is  a  big  showing 
here  representing  two  or  three  promin- 
ent United  States  wallpaper  manufactur- 
ing concerns,  some  especially  Food  val- 
ues being  obtained  from  a  Brooklyn 
concern  and  some  distinctive  papers  from 
a  Buffalo  wallpaper  mill.  The  space  for 
showing  wallpapers  here  is  on  the  main 
floor  of  the  store  toward  the  rear.  This 
is  found  far  more  advantageous  than 
the  plan  of  taking  customers  upstairs  as 
is  done  in  so  many  stores. 


Do  you  like  this  book   ad.  ? 


"The  World  and  I"  is  the  title  of  a  new- 
volume  of  poems  by  Ella  Wheeler  Wil- 
cox. 


37 


Canadian  and  Jap  Toy  Industries 


WHERE  CANADA   FELL   DOWN 

Only  a  small  proportion  of  the  toy  factories  so 
flamboyantly  floated  on  the  strength  of  the  va- 
poroua  optimistic  representations  by  the  Govern- 
ment have  come  through  the  fires  of  dire 
experience.      The   Editor. 


Japanese  Exportation  Ten  Times  What  It  Was  a  Decade  Ago- 
Cheap  Labor  a  Big  Factor 


CANADIAN  toy  dealers  are  in- 
terested in  every  development  in 
the  toy  industry,  and  so  are  the 
manufacturers.  The  following  article, 
dealing  with  the  Japanese  toy  trade, 
carries  interest  for  all  members  of  the 
trade.  The  record  of  what  Japan  has 
done  should  not  be  lost  upon  present 
Canadian  toy  makers  and  those  who  con- 
template entering:  this  field,  and  it  will 
be  observed  that  the  Japanese  are  not 
regardless  of  the  probability  of  keener 
competition  and  a  stronger  challenge  for 
the  world's  toy  trade  on  the  part  of  those 
countries  whose  production  has  been  tied 
up  by  the  war. 

While  Canada  now  has  quite  a  stand- 
ing foi  toy  manufacturing,  especially  in 
products  of  wood,  there  have  been  a  lot 
of  dismal  failures  among  the  projects 
that  were  floated  following  the  roseate 
but  impractical  presentation  of  the  pos- 
sibilities of  toy  manufacturing  by  the 
Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce, 
under  the  paternal  ministry  of  the  genial 
Sir  George  Foster.  In  fact  less  than 
ten  per  cent,  of  the  "toy  factories"  then 
established  now  exist.  There  is,  of 
course,  satisfaction  to  be  derived  from  the 
fact  that  some  of  the.n  came  through  the 
experimental  stage,  in  spite  of  the  handi- 
cap of  a  form  of  "Government  encourage- 
ment" of  a  sort  that  was  lacking  in  es- 
sential qualities  of  sound  guidance. 

It  is  quite  evident  that  Japanese  pro- 
ducers had  Government  assistance  of  a 
more  substantial  character. 

"Four  years  ago  the  export  of  Japanese 
toys  was  limited  to  a  few  varieties  such 
as  dolls,  bamboo  models  and  the  like." 
So  writes  Mr.  S.  Kamiyama  in  the 
"Japan  Magazine."  He  is  an  authority 
on  the  subject  of  Japanese  toys.  "A 
great  change  has  taken  place,"  he  con- 
tinues. "Last  year  the  total  value  of 
toys  exported  from  Japan  amounted  to 
$4,200,000,  and  in  1918  will  exceed  $5,- 
000,000!  Thus  the  'land  of  dolls  and 
flowers;' as  Japan  has  been  so  charmingly 
called,  has  been  transformed  into  a  coun- 
try creating  playthings  of  every  descrip- 
tion for  the  children  of  foreign  lands  as 
well  as  for  its  own.  One  might  have 
suppose;!  that,  owing  to  the  cheapness  of 
labor  in  Japan,  it  long  ago  would  have 
become  the  largest  source  of  supply  for 
the  toy  trade;  but  until  the  shutting  off 
of  the  German  supply  the  toy  makers  of 
Nippon  never  attempted  seriously  to  en- 
ter foreign  markets.  Present  increase  in 
exportation  is  due  wholly  to  efforts  of 
Government  authorities  to  find  markets 
for  Japanese  toys  in  foreign  markets. 
And  only  a  beginning  has  been  made! 

'Officials  in  the  department  of  foreign 
trade  saw  that  great  possibilities  lay  in 
the  toy  business  and  stimulated  the 
r"°nufacturers  in  every  possible  manner. 
They  supplied  samples  from  all  parts  of 


the  toy-making  world,  most  of  which 
have  been  successfully  imitated.  In  ad- 
dition, the  workmanship  which  is  pecu- 
liar to  Japan  has  been  encouraged  and 
improved.  The  largest  export  has  been 
sent  to  America,  amounting  in  value  last 
year  to  $1,216,030.  (heat  Britain  comes 
next,  taking  a  total  value  of  $6.19,462  in 
1917.  The  value  of  exports  to  British 
India  and  the  Straits  Settlements  was 
$457,485.  and  to  Australia,  $447,664. 

"Japanese  toy  makers  have  risen  to 
their  opportunity  with  remarkable 
promptitude  and  efficiency.  In  another 
year  they  will  meet  the  demands  of 
Western  markets  which  they  cannot 
wholly  supply  at  present.  In  1907,  the 
extent  of  the  exportation  of  toys  from 
Japan  was  only  $394,904;  in  1917,  as 
stated  above,  it  exceeded  $4,200,000—  ten 
times  what  it,  was  ten  years  ago! 

"In  addition  to  common  toys  made  of 
earthenware,  wood  and  cotton,  the  Jap- 
anese now  fashion  them  from  rubber, 
metal  and  celluloid.  They  are  especially- 
apt  in  mechanical  toys.  The  story  of 
imports  of  toys  is  in  reverse  order,  from 
a  value  of  $54,406  in  1906,  imports  de- 
creased to  $21,045  in  1916,  and  the  fig- 
ures for  the  year  1917,  though  not  yet 
available,  are  much  less.  Japan  may 
regard  herself  as  one  of  the  leading  toy 
countries  of  the  world,  and  it  is  a  trade 
that  may  be  expected  to  continue.  In 
various  other  lines  Japan  has  also  gain- 
ed a  leading  place  during  the  war,  but 
whether  this  prosperity  will  continue 
when  competition  revives  is  another  ques- 
tion. In  toys,  however,  Japan  is  not  like- 
ly to  have  any  serious  rivals.  The  toy 
trade  has  been  created  for  Japan  by  the 
war,  but  it  will  not  be  destroyed  by  ces- 
sation of  the  war.  The  reason,  as  already- 
suggested,  is  that  material  and  labor  are 
much  cheaper  in  Japan  than  in  any- 
Western  country. 

"Mcst  wooden  toys  in  Japan  are  manu- 
factured by  hand  in  the  mountain  regions 
of  the  country,  where  wood  is  plentiful 
and  cheap.  Individuals  or  families  make 
them  in  their  houses  for  the  dealers.  The 
chief  centres  of  toys  made  in  factories 
are  Tokio,  Osaka,  Kyoto,  Nagoya  and 
Kanagawa. 

"Seme  complaints  have  been  received 
as  to  the  comparative  frailty  of  Jap- 
anese-made toys.  Every  attention  has 
been  paid  to  remedying  this  defect,  and 
in  future  no  such  complaints  will  be  justi- 
fied. Toys  are  now  made  in  more  dur- 
able manner  and  of  better  materials, 
with  great  improvements  in  designs  and 
finishings.  The  value  of  exports  in  toys 
sent  from  the  various  ports  is  as  follows: 
Yokohama,  $2,307,595;  Kobe,  $1,349,586; 
Osaka,  $264,514;  Nagasaki,  $1,171  and 
others,  $250,392. 

"Viewing  the  destination  of  exports  of 

38 


toys  from  Japan  more  in  detail  it  may  be 
said  that  the  largest  supplies  have  gone 
to  the  following  countries:  British  India, 
Straits  Settlements,  China,  Dutch  East 
Indies,  Great  Britain,  France,  United 
States,  Canada  and  the  Argentine  Re- 
public. Australia,  New  Zealand,  and 
South  Africa  have  also  taken  consider- 
able quantities  of  Japanese  toys.  It  is 
remarkable  how  the  taste  of  various 
countries  differ  as  to  the  kind  of  toys. 
Europeans  like  best  such  toys  as  bamboo 
flutes,  dolls,  earthenwares,  fans,  wooden 
toys,  cotton  birds  and  animals,  while  the 
Americans  prefer  Christmas  toys  such 
as  birds,  baskets,  celluloid  and  paper, 
toy  chairs,  furniture  suites  and  wooden 
dolls.  Australia  likes  flutes,  leaf  work, 
glass  toys,  rubber  dolls,  toy  mirrors,  mu- 
sical instruments.  Dutch  India  imports 
chiefly  such  toys  as  metal  leaf  ornaments, 
paper  and  celluloid  goods.  India  desires 
clay  dolls,  animal  toys,  and  South  Ameri- 
ca wants  toy  umbrellas,  lanterns,  bamboo 
models  and  dolls,  while  China  prefers  toy 
insects,  rubber  dolls,  warships  and  elec- 
tric cars." 


AN  INDIAN  TOY 

Peter  McArthur,  Canadian  author, 
who  is  a  regular  contributor  to  the  To- 
ronto Globe,  had  an  interesting  article 
in  the  issue  of  Feb.  8,  on  "Indian  Work," 
from   which  the  following   is  quoted: 

"Another  thing  that  this  squaw  had 
for  sale  was  a  snake  woven  from  bas- 
ket material.  It  is  about  as  amusing  a 
toy  as  the  children  have  had  in  a  long 
time.  As  I  never  happened  to  see  one 
before  I  was  as  much  amused  as  the 
children,  and  I  think  that  if  this  toy 
could  be  put  on  the  market  in  ordinary 
toy-shops  and  novelty  stores  it  would 
make  a  great  hit.  The  snake,  which  is 
only  about  half  an  inch  in  diameter, 
is  woven  from  basket  strips.  It  has  its 
mouth  wide  open,  and  tapers  down  to  a 
tail  that  gives  it  a  proper  snake-like 
appearance.  If  you  put  your  finger  in 
its  mouth  and  pull  on  the  tail  it  takes 
hold  of  your  finger  so  firmly  that  it 
cannot  be  pulled  loose.  Get  anyone  to 
put  a  finger  in  the  snake's  mouth,  and 
he  is  instantly  a  prisoner.  As  long 
as  you  pull  on  the  tail  the  snake  hangs 
on.  The  little  toy  is  amazinglv  simple 
in  construction,  and  I  have  no  doubt  that 
the  squaw  who  was  retailing  them  at 
five  cents  each  was  making  more  money 
on  them  than  on  the  baskets  that  re- 
tail at  tvventy-five  cents.  Here  is 
a  real  made-in-Canada  toy  that  would 
be  bound  to  be  popular  if  the  trade  were 
encouraged.  And  making  the  toys  would 
eive  winter  employment  to  the  Indians, 
now  that  there  is  no  hunting  to  engage 
their  attention.  They  must  get  tired 
of  the  long,  idle  winters,  just  like  other 
people." 


B  ( )  O  K  S  E  I.  L  E  K      A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  K  R 


From   Howitzers  to  Toys 

It  is  interesting  to  chronicle  the  de- 
velopment of  one  part  of  the  British  war 
equipment  industry  into  the  peaceful  pur- 
suit of  the  manufacture  of  toys.  The 
little  Kentish  town  of  Dartford  will  soon 
be  supplying-  children  with  all  the  kinds 
of  toys  that  the  present  generation  got 
from  Nuremberg. 

This  enterprise  is  due  to  Messrs.  Vic- 
kers,  Limited,  the  great  firm  at  Barrow- 
in-Furness,  which  can  supply  a  battle- 
ship or  a  howitzer,  and  at  Dartford  can 
give  you  a  doll,  or  a  toy  model  of  an 
aeroplane,  for  25  cents. 

Messrs.  Vickers  looked  ahead  some 
months  ago,  and  realized  that  the  time 
would  come  when  the  big  firms  would  be 
required  to  provide  ploughshares  rather 
than  swords,  and  they  determined  to  be 
early  in  the  field  with  their  peace  pro- 
ducts. 
Old   Men  and  Girls 

During  wartime  the  firm's  two  factories 
at   Joyce   Green    and    Powder-Mill    Lane, 


Dartford,  kept  3,000  workers  busy  on 
war  work,  such  as  shell-filling  and  wood- 
work, for  Government  requirements. 
When  the  armistice  came  they  set  to  work 
to  expand  the  tiny  nucleus  of  the  toy- 
making  business  which  has  been  estab- 
lished--by  the  employment  of  some  men 
of  50  years  old  and  a  handful  of  girls — 
in  the  last  twelve  months.  Much  of  their 
machinery  was  easily  adaptable  for  toy- 
making,  their  girl  workers  could  easily 
be  trained  to  the  work,  and  so  the  toy- 
making  soon  expanded. 

Before  long,  it  is  hoped,  the  numbers 
employed  in  making  toys  and  other  peace- 
time products  will  equal  the  numbers 
employed  on  munitions,  and  will,  in  fact, 
consist  largely  of  the  same  people.  About 
two-thirds  of  the  workers  will  be  women. 


TOY  MANUFACTURER   REPLIES 

Toronto,  February   12,   1919 

Editor,  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER: 

We    notice    a    letter    in    the    February 

edition    of   your    journal,     signed      "To;, 


Salesman,"  in  which  he  suggests  that 
all  steel  construction  packages  should 
be  in  wooden  boxes  instead  of  paste- 
board. 

In  Canada  we  put  up  Erector,  starting 
at  No.  4  size,  in  wooden  boxes,  and  we 
think  we  have  solved  the  dealer's  prob- 
lem of  keeping  the  small  boxes  intact 
by  putting  these  out  in  sealed  packages, 
making  the  label  attractive  as  well  as 
descriptive. 

It  would  be  impossible  to  put  the  $1.50 
or  $3.00  set  in  a  wooden  box  on  account 
of  the  present  very  high  cost  of  wooden 
ooxes,  but  we  might  say  that  we  are  con- 
vinced that  in  two  or  three  years'  time 
the  steel  construction  toy  will  receive 
such  recognition  as  an  educational  in- 
stitution that  the  preponderance  of  sales 
will  be  for  the  higher-priced  sets.  In- 
deed, some  of  our  dealers  stocked  only 
No.  4  to  No.  8  wooden  boxes  last  year, 
and,  as  far  as  we  can  make  out,  with 
great  success. 

A.  C.  GILBERT-MENZIES  CO.,  LTD. 


How  to  Display  Office  Equipment 


THE    OBJECT 

It  must  ever  be  borne  in  mind  that  the  primary 
object  of  every  display  is  to  promote  sales  of  the 
Koods.  If  it  doesn't  accomplish  that  object  it  is 
a  failure,  no  matter  how  the  display  may  measure 
up   in   the   artistic  sense. 


Whether  in  Window  or  on  Floor  of  Store,  Displays  Should  Be 

Orderly  in  Arrangement  and  Should  Represent 

a  Definite  Plan 


THE  primary  object  of  the  display, 
is  to  sell  goods — and  only  in  so  far 
as  it  accomplishes  this  result,  or 
contributes  toward  it,  is  it  profitable. 
It  may  be  attractive — it  may  be  impres- 
sive, or  it  may  be  artistic — and  yet  not 
be  productive  in  the  sense  that  it  in- 
duces the  resolve  to  buy  or  at  least  to 
investigate. 

The  display  is  the  silent  salesman, 
t.nd  subject  to  all  the  so-called  laws  of 
selling.  To  be  effective  it  must  attract 
interest,  arouse  a  desire  in  the  mind  of 
the  prospect  and  lead  up  to  the  point 
where  the  salesman,  relieved  of  these 
preliminary  steps,  enters,  to  "put  it 
over." 

What  arrangement  of  floor  display 
will  best  accomplish  those  results  will 
slways  remain  a  problem  of  individual 
requirements  and  facilities,  and  in  the 
quite  usual  case  of  limited  floor  space, 
inadequate  lighting,  etc.,  the  problem 
presents  some  interesting  aspects. 

In  its  relation  to  the  proper  display 
of  filing  equipment,  fireproof  safes, 
bookcases  and  filing  supplies,  the 
writer  offers  the  following  suggestions 
in  the  hope  that  they  may  be  of  help 
to  others  engaged   with  these  problems: 

Keeping  in  mind  always  that  the  dis- 
play is  made  for  the  purpose  of  selling 
goods,  it  should  present  an  orderly  ar- 
rangement and  a  definite  plan. 

Since  our  appeal,  in  the  sale  of  filing- 
equipment,  is  to  the  business  man — 
whose  demand  is  efficiency — we  made 
that  appeal  strongest  when  the  appear- 
ance of  the  floor  display  suggests  to 
him  order  and  planning.  We  are  preach- 
ing to  him  of  efficiency  in  his  office — 
if   hi",   first    impressions    of   our   display 


bear  out  this  idea,  we  have  accomplished 
the  first  step  in  the  sale — if  not,  we  are 
in  the  same  position  as  the  salesman 
whose  approach  is  weak. 

It  is  for  this  reason  that  a  miscel- 
laneous showing  of  all  kinds,  styles, 
types  and  colors  of  files,  stacked  about 
without  regard  to  order  or  arrangement, 
is  bad.  It  distracts  and  confuses  the 
prospect — he  wanders  from  one  to  the 
other  without  »iving  the  salesman  any 
clear  idea  of  his  requirements,  and 
H'ten  leaves,  only  to  go  to  competitors 
to  purchase  the  very  thing  which  could 
lave  been  sold  him  had  it  been  presented 
properly. 

A  remedy  for  this  difficulty  is  found 
in  the  grouping  of  the  different  forms 
and  types  of  equipment,  keeping  colors 
in  each  group  together.  For  example,  if 
the  prospect  is  interested  in  uprights  or 
half-width  or  full-width  horizontal  un- 
its, he  frequently  approaches  that  group 
and  indicates  by  his  remarks  and  actions 
which  colors  or  finish  will  meet  his 
needs  and  thus  obviate  the  many  ques- 
tions which  are  at  times  necessary  in 
order  to  determine  these   points. 

It  has  been  found  that  the  grouping 
of  the  different  forms  of  files  in  alcoves 
has  many  distinct  advantages.  All  these 
alcoves  face  so  as  to  present  an  open 
front  to  the  store  and  still  form  a  sort 
of  compartment  in  which  the  prospect 
may  be  shown  the  several  forms  of  files 
without  the  disturbing  influence  of  see- 
ing the  other  types  of  equipment  and 
thus  becoming  confused  as  to  which  will 
1  est  serve  him. 

Illustrating  this  point,  if  we  are  talk- 
ing   steel    horizontal      equipment      the 
prospect  can  be   taken  to  the   steel   al- 
39 


cove  or  grou(p  and  the  selling  talk" 
made  with  a  greater  degree  of  attention 
en  his  part  than  if  he  sees  steel  and 
wood  equipment  of  all  types  and  styles 
about,    and    thus    becomes    confused. 

One  of  the  bad  results  of  this  indis- 
criminate placing  of  wood  and  steel  to- 
gether and  the  failure  to  separate  the 
various  types  of  files  such  as  horizont- 
als, uprights,  half  sections,  etc.,  is  that 
the  prospect  is  very  apt  to  interrupt 
the  sales  talk  on  one  type  to  ask  about 
another  to  which  his  attention  drifts,  and 
hence  the  salesman  is  unable  to  make  a 
proper  presentation  of  the  goods.  This 
applies  particularly  in  the  case  of  wood 
rnd  steel,  for  in  order  to  answer  in  a 
helpful  way  the  frequent  question  as  to 
\\hich  is  best,  it  is  necessary  that  the 
relative  merits  of  each  be  made  clear  to 
the  prospect,  whose  attention  must  be 
held,  and  everything  possible  must  be 
done  to  hold  that  attention  during  the 
time  required. — Globe-Wernicke  "Do- 
ings." 


BATTLESHIP  BOYS 

In  the  "Battleship  Boys"  series  of  the 
house  of  Henry  Altemus  has  just  come 
"The  Battleship  Boys  on  Sky  Patrol," 
by  Frank  Gee  Patchin.  Among  the  ex- 
ploits of  Dan  and  Sam  are  included 
participation  in  the  storming  of  the 
Mole  at  Ostend,  in  the  famous  raid  of 
the  British  Navy  in  that  port.  There  i3 
excitement  and  adventure  a-plenty.  This 
makes  eight  volumes  in  this  series,  and 
booksellers  will  do  well  to  suggest  to 
customers  the  purchase  of  each  title 
in  turn. 


Increased  Music  Sales  by  400  Per  Cent. 


INITIATIVE 

In  this  story  of  a  young  woman's  success  in  build- 
ing up  music  sales  there  is  an  object  lesson 
showing  the  opportunities  for  business  ir:  the  sale 
of  sheet  music.  Why  not  conduct  a  musical  small- 
wares  department  along  with  the  phonograph  and 
record    business  ? 


Record  of  One  Year's  Achievement  by  Young  Lad}-  in  Hamilton 

Store 


T  ~Y  TITH  the  great  impetus  to  music 
V/Y/  sales  which  came  in  Canada 
^  *  with  the  popular  demand  for 
war  song-s,  in  the  first  years  of  the  war, 
sheet  music  won  back  its  old  position  in 
book  and  stationery  stores  as  a  good  sel- 
ling' line,  worthy  of  close  attention  and 
development.  This,  together  with  the 
increase  in  the  phonograph  and  record 
business,  induced  many  to  add  other 
lines  of  musical  merchandise,  including 
the  musical  smallwares,  piano  rolls,  and 
other  specialties.  Articles  have  from 
time  to  time  appeared  in  these  columns 
dealing  with  instances  of  big  achieve- 
ment in  building  up  sales  of  phono- 
graphs and  records,  such  as  the  cases 
of  Henderson  Bros.  of  Oshawa,  and 
Chappie's  of  Gait.  Now  it  is  sheet 
music  that  comes  in  for  attention  and 
the  exam  Die  of  success  is  (riven  bv  the 
G.  W.  Robinson  Co.,  of  Hamilton,  where 
Ihe  music  department  has  increased  its 
business  within  one  year  by  over  400 
per  cent. 

No  doubt  a  great  deal  of  the  success 
of  this  small  department  is  due  to  the 
initiative  of  the  little  lady  who  reigns 
supreme  there.  She  is  Miss  Viola  Bugg, 
a  very  young  lady,  who  came  to  Ham- 
ilton ju=t  a  little  over  a  year  ago,  a  com- 
plete stranger,  and  without  any  prev- 
ious experience  of  the  kind. 

"How  do  I  do  it?"  she  repeated,  with 
a  bright  smile,  when  asked  the  question. 
"Whv,  I  think  it  is  all  iust  a  matter  of 
'makine  ur>'  with  the  customers.  There 
are  other  things  necessary,  too.  I  sup- 
pose. For  instance,  one  has  to  adopt 
methods  which  will  assure  the  customer.-, 
that  t^ey  can  always  get  the  pieces  they 
want  here. 

What  to  Buy 

"First  of  all.  there  is  a  certain  amount 
of  music  which  has  a  steady  sale  from 
year  to  year.  I  always  keep  on  hand 
the  books  of  'old  favorites,'  which  sell 
at  15  cents,  and  the  standard  folios, 
which  are  now  75  cents.  Then  there 
is  the  popular  music,  which  comes  often, 
but  does  not  usually  last  long.  This,  in 
a  15-cent  line,  and  the  best  selections 
from  the  musical  comedies  at  35  cents 
are  the  lines  upon  which  biggest  bus- 
iness is  done,  but  the  15-cent  line  takes 
the  lead.  You  have  to  be  very  careful 
what  you  select,  or  else  you  are  going 
to  have  a  lot  of  merchandise  to  dispose 
of  at  a  loss." 

Miss  Bugg  pointed  out  that  the  new- 
size  in  15-cent  music  pays  the  best  of 
any,  if  bought  right.  The  small  size 
saves  a  good  deal  in  freight  charges 
also.  In  order  to  keep  on  hand  the 
stock  which  will  sell,  Miss  Bugg  keeps 
in  close  touch  with  the  "shows,"  not 
only  those  which  come  to  Hamilton,  but 
those   which   "make   a   hit"   in   Toronto; 


sometimes  an  especially  good  number 
or  two  from  New  York  shows  are  car- 
ried, for  there  are  times  when  a  New- 
York  song  hit  will  reach  Hamilton  quite 
a  time  before  the  play  comes  to  Canada 
at  all.  There  is  a  certain  amount  of 
traffic  to  and  from  New  York,  which 
carries  with  it  news  of  the  theatre  and 
song. 

"When  I  hear  of  a  play  or  a  musical 
comedy  making  a  particularly  good  hit 
in  Toronto,"  said  Miss  Bugg,  "I  imme- 
diately send  for  a  rather  big  stock  of 
the  leading  songs.  What  counts  in 
those  cases  is  to  have  the  stock  here  on 
h-and  for  the  people,  even  after  the  other 
stores  are  liable  to  have  run  out  of 
them.  Especially  is  this  necessary 
w  hen  word  comes  that  a  good  play  or 
comedy,  by  a  good  company,  is  booked 
for  Hamilton  (that  happens  sometimes). 
Then  comes  the  'making  up.'  To  sell 
music,  you  have  to  be  able  to  talk  to 
people  about  the  shows;  you  have  to 
show  interest  in  the  sources  of  the  var- 
ious selections,  and  you  have  to  size  up 
your  customer  as  well,  so  that  you  can 
make  suggestions.  Thev  must  feel  at 
home  to  come  often,  and  know  that  they 
can  always  procure  something  which  is 
just  what  suits  them,  at  any  time.  Those 
who  have  been  away  on  a  trip  and 
heard  something  which  attracted  them, 
especially  must  be  assumed  that  you  will 


get  it  for  them,  at  the  earliest  oppor- 
tunity, the  songs  or  selections  which 
they  mention. 

Music  Clientele 
"There  are  different  classes  of  people 
to  cater  to  in  selling  music.  For  in- 
stance, at  about  4.30  every  day,  you  have 
to  be  ready  to  talk  to  the  Colle. 
girls.  Boys  and  young  men  buy  a  great 
deal  of  music,  and  you  must  not  be 
afraid  to  talk  to  them.  I  have  secured 
a  good  deal  of  patronage  from  a  school 
which  offers  to  teach  beginners  to  play 
rag-time  in  20  lessons.  To  the  teachers 
there  I  sell  from  $2.00  to  $3.00  worth 
of  that  music  at. a  time.  Some  numbers, 
which  prove  especially  good  teaching 
numbers,  I  arrange  with  the  teachers  to 
keep  on  hand  for  the  pupils. 

"Numbers  which  get  torn  in  handling 
and  those  which  are  rather  slow  to  mo« 
(there  are  always  a  few  of  these)  are 
placed  on  the  counter  together  at  5  for 
25  cents.  An  announcement  in  the  store 
advertisement  always  clears  these  out 
in  less  than  half  a  day." 

Some  stores,  which  have  a  gramo- 
phone department,  are  able  to  co-oueraie 
with  the  music  department  in  playing 
records  from  the  popular  theatrical  pro- 
ductions. However,  the  Robinson  store 
has  no  department  of  that  kind  and  so 
the  music  counter  pays  on  its  own  ac- 
count   entirely. 


PAPER  MAKING  IN  CANADA 

This  Country  is  Second  Greatest  Producer  in  the  World- 
Strides  Forward  in  High-grade  Papers 


-Great 


CANADA  is  the  second  largest  pulp 
and  paper  producing  country  in  the 
world  and  is  rapidly  overtaking 
the  United  States,  which  holds  first  place. 
Paper  was  first  made  in  Canada  at  St. 
Andrews,  P.Q.,  in  1803.  In  1865  the  first 
large  mill  was  built,  with  a  daily  output 
of  1%  tons.  To-day  a  modern  mill  pro- 
duces from  250  to  300  tons  of  newsprint 
in  24  hours. 

Canada's  pre-eminence  as  a  paper- 
producing  country  lies  in  the  possession  of 
hundreds  of  thousands  of  acres  of  pulp- 
wood  forests  and  to  conveniently  located 
water-powers. 

The  combined  capital  of  91  incorpor- 
ated companies  making  paper  in  Canada 
is  estimated  at  $200,000,000.  The  total 
annual  output  of  the  industry  exceeds 
$85,000,000.  It  employs  25,000  individ- 
uals and  sent  over  3,000  men  to  the  war. 
As  the  greater  part  of  the  industry  is 
devoted    to    producing    pulp    and     pulp 

40 


papers,  it  is  fairly  well  known  that  Can- 
ada is  taking  a  leading  place  in  this  pro- 
duction, it  is  not,  however,  so  well  known 
that  Canada  is  producing  high-grade 
papers  quite  equal  to  those  produced  any- 
where. 

A  few  years  ago  the  percentage  of 
Canadian-made  papers  of  this  class  used 
in  Canada  was  small.  To-day  the  reverse 
is  true — and  there  is  also  a  lively  enquiry 
for  Canada's  high-grade  product  for  ex- 
port. 

The  prosperity  of  the  industry  is  a 
good  thing  for  Canada  as  a  whole,  and 
a  good  thing  for  paper  consumers. 


Another  new  edition  of  Bishop's 
"Winged  Warfare'  was  published  in 
February. 

Arnold  Bennett's  "The  Roll  Call"  wa3 
so  well  received  that  a  second  Canadian 
edition  had  to  be  published  within  ;•> 
month  of  its  first  appearance. 


III..  I '...... I" 

M ;-      mm 


An   Invitation 

Canada  in  Boston — 
May  1919 

New  York  City,  Feb.  25,  1919 
The  Nineteenth  Annual  Convention  of 
the  American  Booksellers'  Association 
will  be  held  in  Boston,  Mass.,  U.S.A., 
May  13,  14,  15.  It  will  be  known  as  "The 
Reconstruct  mn  Convention."  It  may  bo 
judged,  therefore,  that  some  earnest  work 
is  intended  in  the  direction  of  reform  ng, 
or  doing  away  with  certain  problems 
that  have  affected  the  book  trade  of  the 
United  States  these  many  years.  We 
certainly  hope  to  accomplish  much  in  tins 
direction. 

It  may  be  that  Canada  has  by  way  of 
■'Reciprocity"  taken  ever  some  of  thi.se 
problems  from  us  for  their  very  own,  and 
that  our  troubles  may  be  mutual,  which,  if 
r.rue,  makes  it  very  likely  that  the  work 
of  the  Convention  will  be  of  mutuai  in- 
terest and  value. 

.Members  of  the  Canadian  Book  Trade, 
both  wholesale  and  retail,  are  curdiaiiy 
invited  to  attend  this  Convention  in  Bos- 
ton, where  they  will  be  more  than  wel- 
come, and  according  to  the  plans  of  the 
Bo-.ton  Committee  of  Entertainment  a 
good  time  is  promised  to  all.  The  Ameri- 
can Bo^k  Trade  extend  hsreby  greeting 
to  the  Canadian  Book  Trade,  and  look 
forward  to  the  "May"  meeting  with  plea- 
surable  anticipation. 

Come  all  who  can. 
American  Booksellers'  Association, 

225  Fifth  Avenue.  New  York  City. 

Charles  E.  Butler,  President. 

H.  Gregory  MacGill,  although  the 
name  does  not  sound  like  it,  is  a  woman. 
Moreover,  she  is  a  judge  administrating 
the  Juvenile  Court  at  Vancouver,  B.C. 
She  is  the  author  of  "How  to  Conduct 
Public  Meetings  in  Canada."  Mrs.  Mac- 
Gill  is  a  native  of  Hamilton,  and  was 
one  of  the  first  woman  graduates  of 
Trinity   University,  Toronto. 

Margaret  Deland  is  represented  in  the 
season's  new  books  with  "Small  Things," 
in  which  she  brings  home  the  inner 
meaning  of  war.  as  well  as  what  the  war 
has  left  in   its   wake. 


SOLDIERS  HAVE  ACQUIRED  READING 

HABIT 

This  is  Bound  to  Have  a  Great  Effect  in  Stimulating  Book 
Sales  After  the  Boys  Are  Home  Again 


RESPONDING  to  a  request  from 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATION- 
ER, for  something  dealing  with 
the  war  from  the  viewpoint  of  its  in- 
fluence on  books  and  reading,  A.  B. 
Glen,  of  William  Collins  &  Sons,  pub- 
lishers, of  Glasgow  and  London,  has 
written  the  following: 

In  reviewing  the  war  from  a  literary 
point  of  view,  the  profession  of  arms 
has  greatly  stimulated  and  developed 
the  reading  habits  of  those  citizens 
who  joined  "to  do  their  bit"  and  had 
temporarily  to  abandon  their  everyday 
life  and   work. 

The  making  of  a  soldier,  and  a  neces- 
sarily highly  trained  fighting  unit,  out 
of  the  average  man,  is  not  an  under- 
taking which  can  he  carried  out  without 
ion"-  and  arduous  training,  with  conse- 
quent leisure  time  and  the  opTO'tunity 
of  indulging  and  developing  one's  hob- 
bies  and   inclinations. 

Most  training  camps,  usually  lo- 
cated some  considcrab'e  distance  from 
the  nearest  town,  nresent  few  opportun- 
ities of  social  intercourse,  and  one's 
leisure  means  more  than  often  the  sol- 
ace of  a  food  book,  something:  new,  or 
rubbing  shoulders  again  with  an  old 
friend. 

While   this    may  truly  be   said   of   the 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN  CANADA 
Fiction 
Fotir    Horsemen    of    the    Apocalypse 

Ibanez   118 

Daughter  of  the   Land    Porter     St 

Cow  Puncher   Stead     9  ( 

Desert    of    Wheat    Grey     32 

Golden    Bough    Gibbs     ">0 

Joan   and    Peter    Wells     -14 

Non-Fiction 

That's  Me  All   Over.   Mabie Streeter  124 

Deep    Furrows    Moorhouse  84 

The   Clash    Moore  iO 

Winged     Warfare     Bishop  40 

Industry   and    Humanity King  30 

New    Revelations     Doyle  30 

BEST    SELLERS    IN    UNITED    STATES 
(From    Baker   &   Taylor's   Bulletin) 

1      The    Four   Horsemen    of   the 

Apocalypse   Ibanez 

2 — Dere  MaWe    Streeter 

3— That's    Me    All    Over,    Mab'.e.  ..  Streeter 

4 — A   Daughter   of   the    Land    Porter 

5 — Shavings    Lincoln 

6 — Home   Fires    in    France Canfield 

7-  The    Magnificent    Ambersons, 

Tarkington 

8 — The    Amazing    Interlude Rinehart 

9 — Treat    'Em    Rough Lardner 

10— The  Winds  of  Chance Beach 


embryo  soldier  during  the  training 
stage  in  Canada  or  in  the  many  camps 
located  on  the  south  coast  of  England, 
i.  applies  equally  in  France  at  the  rest 
camps   behind   the   lines. 

There  is  nothing  strange  in  the  de- 
sire for  reading  as  an  antidote  to  the 
monotony  of  the  daily  task  and  the  un- 
certainty of  the  future;  all  part  of  a 
soldier's    life. 

One  of  the  wonders  of  the  war  to 
publishers  ir.  Great  Britain  has  been  the 
unprecedented  demand  for  books.  The 
information  and  figures  supplied  by 
booksellers,  whose  business  it  has  been 
to  supply  the  camps,  all  tell  of  the  large 
and  varied  demand,  fiom  the  highly 
technical  books  to  the  che;  p  editions  of 
the  classics  and  popular  reprints  of 
novels,  while  with  poetry  the  works  of 
Robert  W.  Service  have  been  largely  in 
demand.  While  official  figures  are  not 
issued  from  well-known  publishers'  sales 
it  is  no  exaggeration  to  sav  that  mil- 
lions of  books  have  been  sold  in  Great 
Britain  solely  to  the  fighting  forces,  Im- 
perial as  well  as  Dominion.  The  de- 
mand has  been  quite  unprecedented,  and 
it  can  truly  be  said  that  literature  has 
been  one  of  the  essential  industries  in 
connection   \\  ith  the  war. 

One  would  assume  that,  out  of  those 
three  to  four  hundred  thousand  men 
who  journeyed  across  the  seas,  and  who 
may,  ere  long,  be  home  again  to  build 
up  a  still  greater  Canada,  the  read- 
ing habits  they  have  acquired  will  re- 
main for  all  time. 

It  will  soon  be  apparent,  as  the  year 
p;ets  older,  how  much  of  the  above  sur- 
mise will  mature  into  facts,  and  a  con- 
sequent greater  demand  for  books  be- 
come evident.  The  present  ye"r  would 
seem  to  be  the  opportune  time  to  foster 
and  encourage  the  sale  of  literature,  and 
incidentally  take  advantage  of  what 
would  be  a  by-product  of  the  Great 
War. 


ADDITIONAL  PARTICULARS 
ABOUT  ANY  BOOK  MEN- 
TIONED IN  THESE  COLUMNS 
UPON  REQUEST  TO  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER'S 
SERVICE  DERPARTMENT. 


41 


Selling    Points   About  Timely   Books 


A    TIP 

When  ;<  new  novel  by  a  noted  author  appears, 
booksellers  should  feature  the  same  author's  pre- 
vious books  as  well.  Thus,  a  window  of  Sir 
Gilbert  Parker's  and  Ralph  Connor's  books  would 
now    be    in    order. 


A  Brief  Digest  of  the  Outstanding  Features  of  Many  of  the 
New  Books  and  Some  Older  Titles 


WILD  YOUTH 

"Wild  Youth  and  Another"  is  the  title 
of  Sir  Gilbert  Parker's  new  book  con- 
taining- two  stories,  of  which  the  better 
is  "Wild  Youth."  The  other  is  "Jordan 
is   a    Hard   Road." 

In  "Wild  Youth"  the  story  chiefly  con- 
cerns just  three  people — one  a  satyr-like 
old  man  with  Mormon  propensities;  his 
immature  child-like  wife,  Louise,  and 
Orlando  Guise,  who  is  the  first  good- 
looking  man  Louise  has  ever  met. 

These  two  have  their  romance,  and  in 
spite  of  the  suspicions  of  the  vicious  old 
man,  which  suspicions  he  magnifies  in 
his  own  murky  mind  as  certainties,  their 
idyl  is  unsullied  by  the  slightest  touch 
of  evil.  Nevertheless,  the  first  crossing 
of  swift,  eager  glances  does  awaken 
within  them  the  fire  of  "wild  youth'* 
below  the  surface. 

As  the  story  unwinds  itself,  a  protec 
tor  of  Louise  appears  in  the  person  of 
Li  Choo,  who  turns  out  to  be  a  Chinaman 
of  the  Mandarin  class,  unfortunately  so 
reduced  in  circumstances  as  to  become 
the  "washee-washee"  on  a  Western  Can- 
adian farm.  The  instincts  of  Li  Choo 
rebel  at  the  old  Caliban's  treatment  of 
his  wife,  and  when  he  essays  to  horse- 
whip her,  the  Chinaman  uses  his  fingers 
on  "the  hairy  old  gorilla's"  throat  to 
good    purpose. 

The  story  takes  a  good  grip  on  the 
leader,  desniro  the  fact  that  it  is  open 
to  criticise  in  its  construction  and 
artistry.  T'-e  touch  of  the  Orient  af- 
forded by  the  part  Dlayed  by  the  China- 
man may  be  suggestive  of  a  movie 
drama,  but  the  spectacle  of  the  long,  lean 
Chinese  fingers  wreaking  their  punish- 
ment on  the  vile  old  man  makes  an  in- 
'elihle  and  irrimly  satisfying  impression 
upon  the  reader's  mind. 

In  "Jordan  is  a  Hard  Road"  a  re- 
formed highwayman  becomes  a  model 
citizen  and  "mine  host"  of  a  temperance 
hotel.  His  daughter  has  grown  up  in 
complete  ignorance  of  her  relation  to 
him,  and  his  one  lapse  back  to  crime  is 
justified  in  his  own  conscience  by  his  big 
hearted  purpose  to  leave  her  safely  pro- 
vided for  against  the  uncertainties  of 
the  future. 

In  selling  this  new  Parker  volume, 
booksellers  should  put  on  a  selling-  cam- 
paign covering  all  of  his — Sir  Gilbert's 
— -books,  most  of  which  are  available  in 
uniform  reprint  editions. 


STORY  OF  THE  C.A.M.C. 

"The  Canadian  Army  Medical  Corps, 
1014-1915,"  is  the  title  of  a  book  by 
CJoJonel  J.  G.  Adami,  M.D.,  F.A.S., 
A.D.M.S.,  which  will  prove  a  fascinating 
story,  absorbing  to  everybody  who  is  in- 
terested   in  the   Canadian   soldier.     It  is 


told    with    such    wealth   of   incident    that 
there   is  not  one   dull   page. 

There  is  an  introduction  by  Premier 
Borden.  This  book  has  been  published 
for  the  Canadian  War  Records  Office. 
Booksellers  will  appreciate  the  fact  that 
this,  being  an  official  story,  dealing  in 
an  interesting  manner  with  a  subjecL 
close  to  every  Canadian  family,  is  a 
hook  that  will  carry  a  strong  appeal. 

THE  CHAOS  IN  EUROPE 

Frederick  Moore  has  written  an  ac- 
count of  the  political  destruction  that 
has  taken  place  in  Russia  and  elsewhere, 
and  deals  with  the  international  policies 
of  America,  in  his  book,  "The  Chaos  in 
Europe."  The  author  has  had  a  rare  ex- 
perience as  a  correspondent,  qualifying 
him  to  a  remarkable  degree  to  describe 
the  present  military  and  political  situa- 
tion. His  suggestions  referring  to  the 
future  foreign  policy  of  the  United 
States  merit  the  careful  attention  of 
leaders  of  opinion.  The  book  appears 
with  Putnam's  imprint.  Booksellers 
may  introduce  it  as  a  work  that  provides 
food  for  discussion  on  a  question  of  fu- 
ture significance  in  world  politics,  as 
well  as  of  present  interest. 

BRITISH    STATESMANSHIP 

In  "Traditions  of  British  Statesman- 
ship," Hon.  Arthur  D.  Elliot  has  pro- 
duced a  most  interesting  volume,  in 
which  he  comments  on  the  passing 
events  during  the  course  of  the  war, 
after  treating  of  the  general  lines  of 
British  foreign  policy  and  the  growth 
of  ill-feeling  between  Germany  and 
Britain  before  the  outbreak  of  war. 

The  concluding  chapter  presents  a 
vision  of  the  new  era. 

This  book  has  just  come  from  Consta- 
ble's of  London.  Canadian  bookseller's 
might  well  give  it  their  attention  as  a 
volume  that  will  appeal  to  the  many 
readers  who  follow  British  events 
closely. 

IN  ORCHARD  GLEN 

The  fact  that  Marian  Keith's  new- 
novel,  "In  Orchard  Glen,"  expresses  the 
spirit  of  war-time  Canada  is  one  that 
should  be  played  up  by  the  bookseller  in 
his  exploitation  of  this  new  book — a  book 
which  reflects  in  a  vividly  dramatic 
manner,  with  good  characterization  ant 
the  accompaniment  of  whimsical  humor, 
trie  morale  of  the  warriors  of  "the  honu 
flank." 

PLEWMAN'S  WAR  HISTORY 

W.  R.  Plewman's  "My  Diarv  of  the 
Great  War,"  gives  a  complete  history  of 
the  Great  War  told  in  simple  direct 
language.  Written  by  a  Canadian,  there 
is  naturally  much  in  this  book  of  special 
interest  to  Canadian  readers  since  it 
42 


concerns  the  actions  of  our  own  Domin- 
ion troops.  The  book  has  200  pages  and 
is  illustrated,  including  maps.  This  book 
is  having  a  popular  sale.  Bookseller 
should  keep  in  mind  that  its  sale  wi'l 
not  affect  the  demand  for  the  more 
ponderous  war  histories  to  follow,  but 
should  actually  awaken  in  its  readers  a 
more  insistent  desire  to  possess  the  more 
voluminous  books. 

BLUE  ALOES 

Cynthia  Ctockley,  in  "Blue  Aloes," 
which  has  come  from  Briggs,  tells  more 
stories  of  a  South  African  Karoo  farm. 
Few  writers  can  so  unfailingly  summon 
and  materialize  the  spirit  of  the  weird, 
mysterious  South  Africa  as  can  Cynthia 
Stockley.  She  is  the  favored  medium 
through  whom  the  great  Dark  Continent 
expresses  itself  to  the  rest  of  the  world, 
and  as  such  her  books  have  a  great 
measure  of  potentialities  for  the  book- 
seller who  keeps  on  the  look-out  for 
leads    to    help   sales. 

HO,   FOR  TAM! 

Tarn  of  "Tarn  o'  the  Scoots,"  Edgar 
Wallace's  book  of  that  title,  is  an  avi- 
ator, a  canny  Scot  from  the  Clyde,  and 
a  refreshing  personality.  The  book  has 
just  been  issued  by  Small,  Maynard  & 
Co.,  Boston. 

Tarn's  adventures  are  the  real  thing; 
every  incident  has  actually  happened  on 
the  Western  front;  Tarn  himself  is 
drawn  from  life.  His  unbounded  sense 
of  humor,  his  dare-devil  courage,  his 
astonishing  performances  against  the 
Hun,  his  meeting  with  the  American  girl 
who  drives  an  ambulance — a  meeting  as 
dramatic  as  it  is  unexpected — and  whav 
comes  of  it,  all  combine  to  make  a  story 
that    is    unique. 

Mr.  Wallace's  manv  admirers  know 
what  to  expect  from  his  gifted  men;  he 
surpasses  himself  in  "Tarn  o'  the 
Scoots." 

Booksellers  will  find  this  a  good  titlQ 
to  suggest  for  the  customer  who  wants  a 
book  with  lots  of  dash  to  it  and  plenty 
of  laughs. 

BEST  SHORT  STORIES  OF  1918 

The  fourth  volume  in  Edward  J. 
O'Brien's  vearly  compilation  of  the  best 
short  stories  is  out.  "The  Best  Short 
Stcries  of  1918"  is  uniform  with  the 
other  three  volumes.  It  has  just  been 
published  by  Small,  Maynard  &  Co., 
Boston.  This  yearly  volume  has  by  com- 
mon consent  come  to  be  a  landmark  of 
the  literary  year,  and  the  assured  place 
which  it  has  achieved  for  itself  justifies 
booksellers  in  putting  extra  effort  be- 
hind the  cultivation  of  sales,  in  the 
knowledge  that  in  most  cases  purchasers 
of  this  year's  volume  will  want  each  suc- 
cessive issue  as  well. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


A  New  Kipling 

This  year  we  are  to  have  a  new  volume 
cf  poems  by  Kipling.  The  title,  pre- 
maturely announced  as  "Gethsemane 
Garden,"   will   be  "The  Years  Between." 

The  volume  will  include,  in  addition 
to  all  of  Mr.  Kipling's  war  poems,  a 
"umber  of  pieces  which  have  never  been 
published  anywhere.  Among  the  poems 
included  will  be  "France,"  which  Kip- 
ling lovers  everywhere  have  declared  to 
dc  one  of  the  greatest  things  that  the 
poet  has  ever  done,  standing  as  one  of 
the  truly  great  tributes  to  our  great 
sister  republic  in  Europe.  Mr.  Kipling 
paid  an  eloquent  tribute  to  Theodore 
Roosevelt  after  the  Colonel's  recent 
tieath.  He  said:  '  It  is  as  though  Bun- 
yan's  Greatheart  had  died  in  the  midst 
■of  his  pilgrimage,  for  he  was  the  great- 
est proved  American  of  our  generation." 

As  soon  as  this  book  comes  in,  the 
bookseller  should  make  a  good  display 
of  all  his  books;  meanwhile  if  any  vol- 
umes are  out  of  stock,  this  lack  should 
be  supplied.  Every  bookshop  worthy  of 
the  name  should  be  complete  on  Kip- 
lint?. 

Simonds'   War   History 

Frank  H.  Simonds,  author  of  Sim- 
onds' History  of  the  World  War,  the 
first  three  volumes  of  which  have  al- 
ready been  published,  is  in  France  at- 
tending the  Peace  Conference  to  gather 
material  for  his  newspaper  and  the  two 
last  volumes  of  his  history.  He  has 
!<een  decorated  by  the  French  Govern- 
ment with  the  Cross  of  Chevalier.  The 
history  has  been  translated  into  Turk- 
ish and  Armenian  and  published  in 
I  hose  languages,  and  French  and  Ger- 
man editions  are  soon  to  be  brought 
.  out  by  Payot,  the  French  publisher.  Con- 
sidering  the  prestige  of  Simonds'  war 
wiitings  in  Canada,  as  throughout  the 
world,  all  booksellers  should  be  able  to 
do  a  good  business  in  subscriptions  from 
customers  to  take  all  issues  of  this  his- 
tory as  they  appear. 

Kathleen  Norris 

In  the  recently  published  book,  "The 
Women  who  Make  Our  Novels,"  by 
Grant  M.  Overton,  the  writer  concludes 
his  sketch  of  Kathleen  Norris  with  this 
■comment  on  her  fulfilment  and  her 
promise: 

"Mrs.  Norris  is  not  as  yet  at  the 
height  of  her  powers,  as  well  as  can  be 
judged  contemporaneously.  It  is  easy 
enough  to  look  on  the  completed  work 
of  a  writer's  life-time  and  say:  'Nero 
has  reached  his  apex,  here  he  begins  to 
decline,  here  he  rose  again  for  an  hour.' 
But  to  estimate  the  present  and  relate  it 
tentatively  to  the  future,  is  very  much 
harder.  'Mother,'  was  one  'peak'  in  the 
graph  of  Mrs.  Norris'  powers.  'The 
Story  of  Julia  Page,'  was  another  and 
a  higher.  'Josselyn's  Wife,'  recently 
published,  is  at  least  as  high.  There  is 
■every  prospect  that,  in  the  active  and 
happy  years  we  may  hope  are  ahead  of 
her,  Kathleen  Norris  may  excel  the 
impressive  novels  she  has  already  given 
us." 

"Miss  Ferber  is   going  forward.     The 
evidence  of  it  will  be  found  in  the  stories 


contained  in  her  latest  book,  'Cheerful 
by  Reauest,'  and  perhaps  particularly  in 
the  story  in  that  volume  called  'The 
Gay  Old  Dog.'  At  thirty-one,  she  has 
her  best  years — as  literary  records  go — 
before  her.  No  painstaking  appraisal  of 
her  work  would  be  wise  at  this  time.  In 
the  next  two  or  three  years  she  may 
overshadow  anything  she  has  done  so 
far." — From  "The  Women  Who  Make 
Our   Novels,"   by   Grant   M.    Overton. 

Cap'n  Jonah's   Fortune 

James  A.  Cooper  has  written  another 
of  his  delightful  "Cape  Cod"  stories  in 
Cap'n  Jonah's  Fortune,"  published  by 
Briggs. 

Tired  of  an  adventurous  life  on  the 
briny  deep,  Cap'n  Jonah  came  to  the 
Shell  Road,  to  make  his  home  with 
some  relatives  he  had  not  seen  for 
years.  His  troubles  began  almost  from 
the  moment  of  his  arrival  and  he  soon 
found  himself  in  a  swirl  of  happenings 
as  unusual  as  they  were  exciting.  He 
took  little  Pearly  under  his  wing,  made 
the  talkative  Cap'n  Abe,  the  storekeep- 
er, his  confidant,  and  concocted  a  mar- 
velous scheme  to  outwit  those  who 
were  treating  himself  and  the  girl  so 
unfairly. 

A  point  for  booksellers  to  play  up  is 
that  many  of  the>  quaint  characters  of 
the  same  author's  "Cap'n  Abe,  Store- 
keeper," appear  in  this  new  tale. 

Why  Von  Kluck  Lost 

In  Sir  Frederick  Maurice's  important 
new  book,  "Forty  Days  in  1914,"  the 
part  played  by  the  British  Army  in  the 
first  battle  of  the  Marne,  which  has 
never  been  appreciated  either  at  home 
or  abroad,  is  brought  to  light.  Cen- 
tral Maurice,  in  fact,  claims  that  Sir 
John  French  caused  Von  Kluck  to  begin 
his  retreat  several  hours  before  Joffre 
struck  his  famous  blow  on  the  Marne. 
The  book  is  illustrated  by  a  number  of 
maps,  which  show  clearly  the  position 
of  our  own  and  of  the  German  troops 
at  all  the  critical  phases  of  the  oper- 
ations. The  author  was  himself  a  mem- 
ber  of   the    "Old    Contemptibles." 

About  Carburetors 

With  the  ever  increasing  interest  in  cars 
number  of  owners  of  automobiles  and 
garage  workers,  the  opportunities  widen 
l'or  booksellers  to  get  increased  sales 
of  automobile  books.  One  of  the  latest 
arrivals  is  Victor  W.  Page's  "Gasoline 
and  Kerosene  Carburetors,"  published 
by  the  Norman  W.  Henley  Co.,  which 
comes  from  their  Canadian  representa- 
tives, McClelland  &  Stewart.  This  book 
is  a  simole,  comprehensive  and  author- 
itative treatise  for  practical  men  ex- 
plaining all  basic  principles  pertaining 
to  carburetion,  and  showing  how  liquid 
fuels  are  vaporized  and  turned  into  gas 
■•"or  operating  all  types  of  internal  com- 
bustion engines  intended  to  operate  on 
vapors  of  gasoline,  kerosene,  benzol  and 
alcohol.  All  leading  tvpes  of  carburet- 
ors are  described  in  detail,  special  atten- 
tion beir.e  given  to  the  forms  devised  to 
use  the  cheaper-  fuels  such  as  kerosene. 
Carburetion  troubles,  fuel  system  troub- 
les, carburetor  repairs  and  installation, 
electric   primers   and     economizers,     hot 

43 


spot  manifolds  and  all  modern  carbur- 
etor developments  are  considered  in  a 
thorough  manner.  Methods  of  adjusting 
all  typts  of  carburetors  are  fully  dis- 
cussed as  well  as  suggestions  for  se- 
curing maximum  fuel  economy  and  ob- 
taining highest   engine   power. 

Occultism 

Following  up  what  was  said  last 
month  about  psychical  books  and  the 
opportunities  afforded  booksellers  for 
making  sales  by  reason  of  the  great 
public  interest  inspired  by  newspaper 
publicity  given  this  subject  in  the  daily 
press,  it  is  interesting  to  record  the 
arrival  of  Dean  W.  R.  Harris'  "Essay- 
in  Occultism.  Spiritism  and  Demonoi- 
ogy,"  which  discusses  the  "Sixth  Sense," 
"The  Sense  of  Orientation."  "Biloca- 
tion,"  "Spiritism:  Ancient  and  Modern," 
"Evocation  of  the  Dead,"  "Apparitions," 
etc.  These  essays  represent  the  result 
of  wide  reading  and  earnest  thought 
on    the    part   of   the    learned    author. 

Selling    Oppenheim    Books 

Among  the  new  novels  issued  this 
season  is  a  new  Oppenheim,  "The  Cur- 
ious Quest."  Few  authors  have  a  larger 
following  than  E.  Philips  Oppenheim, 
and  booksellers  will  do  well  to  take  ad- 
vantage of  this  fact  not  only  to  sell  the 
new  novel  to  those  who  have  read  some 
or  all  of  his  previous  works  but  to  push 
the  sale  of  all  Oppenheim's  novels,  to 
which  end  an  Oppenheim  window  would 
be  good  business.  "The  Curious  Quest," 
which  McClelland  &  Stewart  published 
last  month,  is  a  tale  of  London  before 
the  war  It  is  the  story  of  the  amazing 
experiences  of  Mr.  Ernest  Bliss,  a  rich 
young  idler  who,  when  told  by  his  frank 
physician,  Sir  James  Aldroyd,  M.D.,  that 
be  had  no  moral  stamina,  wagered  the 
doctor  £25,000  "to  a  shake  of  the  hand 
and  an  honest  apology"  that  he  could 
start  out  with  a  five-pound  note  and  live 
for  a  year  on  what  he  could  earn. 

Then  follows  the  unique  adventures 
of  this  temporary  imuecunious  young- 
man  in  his  various  employments,  which 
included  the  task  of  selling  alpha  cook- 
ing stoves,  assistant  to  a  green  grocer, 
and  bus  driver.  He  meets  an  engaging 
typist  who  engages  his  affections,  but  to 
her  as  well  as  his  older  friends  whom  he 
encountered  he  remained  an  enigma 
until  the  end  of  the  year.  Then— but 
the  denouement  of  this  original  and  en- 
grossing story  must  be  left  to  the  in- 
terested reader  to  discover.  Told  in  his 
characteristic  manner,  this  captivating 
narrative  will  afford  ample  entertain- 
ment to  Mr.  Oppenheim's  large  fol- 
lowin  -. 


In  April  will  come  Frank  Packard's 
"Further    Adventures    of    Jimmie    Dale." 

Emerson  Hough's  new  novel  entitled 
"The   Web"  is  to  Come  next  month. 

James  Oliver  Curwood's  "Nomads  of 
the  North"  is  down  for  early  publica- 
tion. 

In  the  early  summer  "Saint's  Pro- 
gress," by  John  Galsworthy,  a  novel,  is 
to  be  published. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


NEW   AND    FORTHCOMING 

The  U.  S.  publishing  rights  for  "The 
Twentieth  Plane,"  by  Dr.  Watson,  have 
been  sold  to  George  W.  Jacobs  &  Co.,  of 
Philadelphia. 

The  new  Connor  book,  "A  Sky  Pilot 
in  No  Man's  Land,"  will  be  ready  by  the 
time  this  issue  of  BOOKSELLER  & 
STATIONER  reaches  the  trade. 

A  new  Canadian-made  dictionary  to 
retail  at  25c  comes  from  McClelland  & 
Stewart,  being  especially  designed  for 
school  use  and  as  a  convenient  volume 
for  the  stenographer  or  the  office  desk. 

THE  ODYSSEY  OF  A  TORPEDOED 
TRAMP 

"The  Odyssey  of  a  Torpedoed  Tramp," 
published  by  Constables,  is  a  bright  and 
interesting  recital  of  the  journeyings 
of  a  tramp  steamer  during  the  first  two 
years  of  the  war.  The  story  appears 
to  be  intended  as  a  scathing  comment 
upon  the  laxity  of  the  Government  auth- 
orities in  dealing  with  the  German  spy 
system,  and  upon  their  tardiness  in  sup- 
plying merchant  shipping  with  wireless 
and  with  guns  as  a  protection  against 
the  U-boats.  Although  the  boat  is 
supposed  to  be  a  French  one  and  the 
French  Government  is  in  all  cases  re- 
Terred  to,  the  characters  are  essentially 
English  and  the  criticism  appears  to  be 
directed  in  reality  at  the  British  auth- 
orities. The  author  evidently  would  not 
be  disposed  to  endorse  those  laudatory 
statements  regarding  the  efficiency  of 
the  British  secret  service  in  foiling  Hun 
activities  which  have  been  so  prominent 
of  late  in  current  literature. 

WEE  BOOKS 

Booksellers  will  welcome  a  new  boolt 
for  children  of  from  three  to  five  yearn 
of  age  This  new  issue  is  "The  Little 
Wise  Chicken  that  Knew  it  All."  It  is 
a  half-dollar  book  of  remarkably  attrac- 
tive make-up,  and  has  29  illustrations  in 
color.  This  is  uniform  with  the  other 
Altemus  publications  in  the  "Wee  Books 
for  Wee  Folks"  series. 

PENNY  OF  TOP  HILL  TRAIL 

A  mystery  story,  a  rollicking  tale  of 
adventure,  a  romantic  recital  of  love's 
young  dream,  a  story  rich  in  humorous 
situations — "Penny  of  Top  Hill  Trail"  is 
all  that.  It  is  by  Belle  K.  Maniates, 
author  of  "Amarilly  of  Clothes-Line 
Ally,"  and  booksellers  may  safely  recom- 
mend it  to  the  customer  who  comes  in 
seeking  "a  rattling  good  story  of  the 
sort  that  keeps  the  reader  guessing  to 
the  end."  It  has  just  been  issued  by  the 
Copp,  Clark  Co. 
THE  WEB 

Frederic  Arnold  Kummer,  the  author 
of  that  stirring  new  book,  "The  Web," 
was  fortunate  in  being  able  to  obtain  in- 
formation concerning  certain  work  car- 
ried out  by  the  secret  service  authori- 
ties of  Great  Britain,  which  work  re- 
sulted in  a  great  naval  victory.  One 
cannot  fail  to  be  stirred  by  the  knowl- 
edge that  the  actual  combat  at  sea  re- 
sulted from  the  efforts  of  men  and  wo- 
men, enmeshed  in  a  web  of  romance  and 
intrigue,  many  thousands  of  miles  re- 
moved from  the  scene  of  the  battle,  un- 


seen figures  in  a  drama  so  astonishing 
in  its  nature,  so  brilliant  in  its  results, 
that  one  is  again  reminded  of  the  old 
adage  that  "truth  is  stranger  than  fic- 
tion." It  is  a  novel,  and  as  such  alone  it 
is  mighty  good  stuff,  which  fact,  linked 
up  with  its  presentation  of  Britain's 
fighting  at  sea,  gives  it  double  selling 
force  for  booksellers. 

JOAN  AT  HALFWAY 

Grace  McLeod  Rogers,  a  Canadian 
author  whose  home  is  now  in  Amherst, 
N.S.,  but  who  was  formerly  a  missionary 
in  India,  has  written  a  new  novel  en- 
titled "Joan  at  Halfway,"  of  which  great 
things  are  expected  by  her  publishers. 
They  acclaim  it  a  book  that  will  carry 
a  wide  appeal  of  the  same  nature  as  did 
"Pollyanna."  This  author  achieved  .. 
reputation  for  good  literary  work  with 
her  meritorious  book,  "Letters  From  My 
Home  in  India."  Booksellers  will  be  able 
to  so  associate  these  facts  as  to  pave 
the  way  for  many  sales  of  "Joan  at 
Halfway." 

ANOTHER  SHEAF 

John  Galsworthy  has  published  an- 
other volume  of  his  charming  and  char- 
acteristic essays  and  stories.  Its  title 
is  "Another  Sheaf,"  and  it  has  just  been 
published  by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.  It  has 
a  particularly  timely  interest  in  that  it 
is  so  largely  concerned  with  (|uestionb, 
material  and  artistic,  of  reconstruction; 
and  it  has  a  more  special  interest  fo.' 
Americans  in  many  of  Its  studies  which 
deal  with  American  standards,  intel- 
lectual and  practical.  Among  the  titles 
are:  "American  and  Briton,"  "Th<5 
Drama  in  England  and  America,"  "Im- 
pressions of  France,"  "Balance  Sheet  ot 
the  Soldier-Workman,"  "The  Road,"  etc 

'INGLE  PEACE 

When  one  hears  about  a  book  of 
science  and  travel  there  seems  to  be  u 
natural  impulse  to  shy  away  from  it, 
but  it  would  be  a  mistake  to  do  so  in 
the  case  of  "Jungle  Peace,"  published 
by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  in  which  Wil 
liam  Beebe  gives  the  result  of  his  ex- 
periences while  in  charge  of  the  Tropica1 
Research  Station  of  the  New  York  Zoo- 
logical Society.  It  will  appeal  to  the 
layman  as  W.  K.  Hudson  or  John  Bur- 
roughs apDeals,  and  to  the  scientist  for 
its  sound  observation  in  a  new  field.  On 
an  earlier  trip  to  South  America,  Mr. 
Beebe  dug  up  a  square  yard  of  jungle, 
spread  it  on  the  deck  of  a  coastwise 
steamer,  and  explored  it  with  a  micro- 
scope. The  results  made  him  wish  to 
go  much  further.  The  war  and  his  ex- 
perience as  an  aviator  intervened;  and 
then,  disabled  for  further  air  service  and 
longing  for  the  jungle's  peace  and  a 
chance  to  carry  on  his  research  he  re- 
turned to  Guiana.  He  writes  of  islands 
and  adventures  on  the  way  and  of  the 
mixed  human  elements  of  Guiana  towns, 
but  chiefly  of  the  jungle.  His  style  has 
a  magic  which  transforms  fact;  his 
record  is  of  a  venture  in  observation  new 
to  the  annals  of  science. 

Booksellers  will  appreciate  that  here 
is  a  "different"  book  that  will  provide  a 

44 


welcome  change  to  many  habitua. 
readers,  who  always  welcome  something 
new,  if  it's  good. 

BLIGHT 

A  book  entitled  "Blight,"  by  M.  Ful- 
ton, purports  to  treat  of  the  ways  and 
customs  of  London  "smart"  society.  It 
is  typical  in  its  style  and  matter  of  that 
unwholesome  fiction  which  has  had  a 
certain  vogue  in  England  for  some 
years,  and  of  which  it  was  to  have  been 
hoped  that  the  war,  with  all  the  heights 
and  depths  of  character  and  real  emo- 
tion it  has  brought  forth  from  the  souT 
of  man,  would  have  rid  us  forever.  Evi- 
dently   it  has  not,  since  here's  another. 

As  a  warning  of  the  effect  likely  to  be 
produced  on  the  minds  of  its  readers, 
"Blight"  is  an  excellent  title  for  the 
work.  It  is  true  that  in  several  descrip- 
tive passages,  as  in  the  sharp  impres- 
sions of  London  streets  or  the  dream- 
like scene  in  Richmond  Park,  the  author- 
shows  glimpses  of  an  ability  to  do  better 
— were  he  not  so  anxious  to  be  "smart." 
But  that  covert  love  of  indecency,  which 
calls  itself  "modernism,"  and  which  is- 
anathema  to  all  lovers  of  literature, 
trails  its  way  over  the  whole. 

It  is  doubtful  whether  there  exists  in 
Canada  a  class  of  reader  likely  to  take 
an  interest  in  this  sort  of  thing,  but  the 
book  will  probably  provide  the  London 
suburban  shop-girl  with  many  a  thrill 
ing  moment.  The  book  is  published  by 
Duckworth. 

THE  TUNNEL 

"The  Tunnel,"  by  Dorothy  G.  Richard- 
son (Duckworth)  is  the  fourth  volume 
in  a  series — which  is  apparently  to  con- 
tinue indefinitely — describing  the  mental 
development  of  an  English  girl  named 
Miriam  Henderson.  At  this  stage  of 
her  existence  Miriam  takes  an  attic- 
room  near  the  Euston  Road,  London, 
and  becomes  secretary-attendant  to  a 
dentist,  for  the  munificent  salary  of  a 
pound  a  week. 

The  anxious  reader  will  have  some 
difficulty  in  finding  out  what  it's  all 
about  after  that,  but  we  gather  that  the 
time  has  now  come  for  Miriam  to  pass 
through  the  "tunnel"  of  doubt  and  de- 
spair. Perhaps  the  size  of  her  salary 
has  something  to  do  with  it;  in  any  case 
she  discovers  an  astonishing  number  of 
things  to  be  miserable  about,  that  there 
cannot  possibly  be  any  religion,  that 
men  are  base  and  ineffectual  and  wo- 
men only  half  human,  that  all  Nature 
is  cruel,  while  science  and  art  only 
serve  to  accentuate  the  general  wretch- 
edness. After  some  300  pages  of  it, 
we  leave  her,  in  her  boarding-house 
sitting  room,  still  sunk  in  profound  de- 
jection. 

There  is  nothing  in  the  nature  of  a 
"story";  the  authoress  only  concerns 
herself  with  "moods,"  "impressions," 
etc.  This  jumbled  and  formless  writing 
is  the  parallel,  in  literature,  of  that 
school  of  painting,  the  exponents  of 
which  make  a  practice  of  flinging 
masses  of  violent  color  on  to  the  canvas 
to  conceal  the  fact  that  they  do  not 
know  how  to  draw. 


I5  0  0KSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


JOYCE  KILMER 

A  notable  issue  this  season  is  a  two- 
volume  set  of  the  works  of  Joyce  Kil- 
mer, including  poems,  fiction  and  essays. 
This  popular  American  writer  had  such 
a  large  following  that  this  appearance 
of  his  complete  works  affords  a  good 
opportunity  to  all  booksellers  to  place 
many  of  these  sets  with  their  customers. 

LUXEMBURG 

Ruth  Putnam  in  her  book  "Luxemburg 
and  Her  Neighbors,"  published  by  G.  P. 
Putnam  &  Sons,  presents  a  record  of  the 
political  fortunes  of  the  present  Grand 
Duchy  from  the  eve  of  the  French  revolu- 
tion to  the  great  War. 

Many  small  independent  states  have 
continued  to  survive  in  Europe  under 
more  or  less  anomalous  conditions  in  spite 
of  the  growth  of  the  larger  nations,  but 
Luxemburg  has  been  peculiar  in  its  his- 
tory. It  is,  in  truth,  a  land  without  a 
country.  Its  political  isolation  is  a  mat- 
ter of  recent  date.  Through  centuries 
its  fate  was  decided  by  reasons  alien  to 
its  own  interests.  The  volume  presents 
the  checkered  history  of  this  bit  of  border 
territory,  marked  by  so  many  dramatic 
vicissitudes.  This  history  must  be  taken 
into  account  in  connection  with  the  settle- 
ment of  the  future  status  of  Luxemburg. 
Like  Belgium,  a.  victim  of  the  German  in- 
vasion, Luxemburg  has  voiced  its  resolu- 
tion to  remain  independent.  The  refrain 
of  its  national  song  contains  the  ringing 
line, — "Prussians  we  will  never  be." 

TRADITIONS    OF    BRITISH    STATES- 
MANSHIP 

This  is  a  volume  by  the  Hon.  Arthur 
D.  Elliott,  giving  a  history  of  British 
relations  with  Germany  since  the  time 
of  Waterloo  and  of  the  events  leading 
up  to  the  Great  War.  It  contains 
nothing  new  in  the  way  of  information, 
hut  shows  clearly  that  British  states- 
men, of  no  matter  what  party,  have 
throughout  been  actuated  by  worthy  and 
disinterested  motives,  that  "the  more 
thoroughly  British  foreign  policy  is  ex- 
amined, the  better  it  comes  out,"  and  that, 
"if  secret  diplomacy  is  to  be  abolished, 
whatever  that  may  mean,  our  nation 
will  not  come  off  worst  in  the  new  Palace 
of  Truth,  in  which  some  of  our  advanced 
politicians  intend  to  house  in  the  future 
the  foreign  secretaries  and  ambassadors 
of  the  world." 

It  is  a  volume  which  will  particularly 
interest  the  political  student  and  any 
who  may  have  aspirations  to  enter  the 
political  world.  Constables  are  the  pub- 
lishers. 

CREDITS    AND   COLLECTIONS 

In  the  Shaw  Banking  series  a  new 
issue  is  "Credits  and  Collections,"  a 
volume  of  over  260  pages.  Ask  a  score 
of  progressive  bank  officials  the  routine 
they  have  established  for  extending  and 
handling  credit,  and  in  all  probability 
you  will  get  a  score  of  different  replies 
Most  of  these  methods  will  be  good,  but 
which  are  the  most  practicable?  These 
questions  are  answered  in  "Credits  and 
Collections."  Here  is  a  volume  that 
covers  this  important  subject  from  A  to 


Z — the  methods  to  use  in  establishing 
the  right  credit  basis  and  in  fortifying 
your  credit  policy.  Here,  too,  are  plans 
which  137  bankers  are  using  to  insure 
a  profit  from  handling  collections.  It 
must  be  obvious  to  booksellers  that  there 
is  a  remarkably  wide  field  for  them  tc 
work  in  introducing  this  practical  vol- 
ume. 

STRINGER'S  NEW  NOVEL 

Arthur  Stringer's  new  novel,  his 
twentieth,  which  is  about  to  begin  as  a 
serial  in  "Hearst's  Magazine,"  will  be 
called  "This  Light  Must  Live."  It  has  a 
Canadian  for  its  hero,  and  a  consider- 
able part  of  the  story  is  laid  along  the 
nearby  shores  of  Lake  Erie,  though  the 
greater  part  of  the  action  takes  place  in 
New  York.  The  novel,  in  fact,  is  both  a 
study    of   this    young      Canadian's    reac  - 


WILLIAM    MacLEOD    RAINE 

Author     of     "A     Man     Four-Square, "     an     Arizona 
"bad    man"    story    of    excitement    and    adventure. 


tions  to  the  questionable  stimuli  of  that 
great  metropolis  and  an  exposition  of 
how  he  eventually  saved  himself  from 
those  darker  currents  of  city  life  which 
at  one  time  so  nearly  enmeshed  him  in 
tragedy.  It  is  not  an  adventure  story, 
but  one  of  realism  and  character-study, 
somewhat  after  the  lines  of  Stringer's 
e:\rlier  novel  of  New  York  life,  "The 
Silver  Poppy."  It  has  a  good  deal  to  do 
with  artists  and  art-circles  in  New  Yorki 
as  the  hero  is  a  young  sculptor  and  one 
of  his  reasons  for  going  to  New  York 
is  to  complete  a  statue  of  Tecumseh 
which  was  to  adorn  Tecumseh  Park  in  a 
Western  Ontario  city — and  that  city 
very  plainly  is  Chatham. 

BELGIUM 

Among  the  most  notable  publishing 
events  of  the  ensuing  season  will  be  the 
appearance  of  Brand  Whitlock's  "Bel- 
gium," to  comprise  two  large  volumes, 
the  set  to  be  published  at  $7.50. 

Brand.  Whitlock  was  so  big  a  figure  in 
the  tragic  occurrences  in  Belgium  at  the 
beginning  of  the  war,  and  gained  such 
international  fame  as  a  true  humanitar- 
ian, that  his  voluminous  record  dealing 
with  that  little  hero-nation  more  particu 

45 


larly  as  the  storm-centre  of  the  cata- 
clysmic conflict,  will  be  such  a  contribu- 
tion to  history  that  it  will  naturally  find 
a  place  in  every  public  library,  and 
should  be  added  to  every  other  library. 
Booksellers  will  be  well  advised  to  give 
the  coming  of  this  book  their  earnest 
attention. 

LABOR'S  ASPIRATIONS 

Norms n  Angell  has  chosen  an  apt  title 
for  his  new  book,  "The  British  Revolu- 
tion and  the  American  Democracy." 
Americans  are  paying  the  penalty  of  a 
long  indifference  to  foreign  affairs  and 
now  that  the  U.  S.  is  beset  by  the  prob- 
lems that  Europeans  have  struggled 
with  there  is  eagerness  to  learn  the 
causes.  In  this  book  will  be  found  the 
British  situation  with  regard  to  labor, 
its  past  and  present  and  its  aspirations 
for  the  future,  focussed  intelligently  and 
presented  with  that  clarity  for  which  Mr. 
Angell  is  famous.  Not  its  least  value 
is  that  it  will  serve  as  a  guide  for  those 
seeking  illumination  in  the  darkness  of 
undoing  war  legislation;  labor  unrest;  de- 
mobilization and  suspicious  questionings 
of  the  old  orcier.  The  book  contains  two 
important  appendices:  the  British  Labor 
Party's  Programme  and  one  more  radi- 
cal and  less  known  on  this  side,  the  so- 
cailed   Lansbury-Herald  Programme. 

Booksellers  will  find  that  they  can 
make  many  sales  of  this  volume  by  in- 
troducing it  to  the  notice  of  men  promin- 
ent in  labor  circles  and  educationists,  as 
well  as  men  of  affairs  who  are  closely 
following  this  great  subject. 

SHOPS  AND  HOUSES 

McClelland  &  Stewart  have  put  out  a 
new  Frank  Swinnerton  novel  entitled 
"Shops  and  Houses,"  which  has  as  its 
theme  the  indignation  of  youth  against 
the  instinct  of  oppression.  It  is  an  ab- 
sorbing story  of  modern  life  in  an  Eng- 
lish suburban  town,  near  enough  to  Lon- 
don to  be  the  home  of  city  men.  It  is 
an  exquisitely  humorous  picture  of  small- 
town snobbishness. 

A  black  sheep  of  one  of  the  "first 
families"  has  the  effrontry  to  return  and 
set  up  as  a  grocer  in  Beckwith  itself! 
The  solution  here  of  the  exciting  tangle 
wrought  is  through  love.  And  even  Mr. 
Swinnerton  has  never  been  happier  than 
in  his  portrayal  of  Louis  Vechantors,  of 
Dorothy  and  of  Veronica — and  of  the 
town  gossip,  Miss  Lampe. 

This  touches  such  a  human  note  that 
booksellers  should  sound  it  and  make  it 
resound  to  the  natural  accompaniment  of 
added  sales. 


HONESTY  PLUS 

Every  young  salesman  should  learn 
at  the  outset  of  his  career  that  honesty 
and  square  dealing  are  the  foundations 
of  successful  business,  but  a  building 
which  never  gets  farther  than  its  foun- 
dation will  not  afford  much  protection  or 
comfort.  Good  judgment,  properly  dir- 
ected activity,  sound  business  methods, 
and  the  ability  to  serve  pleasingly,  must 
be  coupled  with  honesty  and  square 
dealing  if  success  is  to  be  attained. 


Books  Banned  by  Order-in-Council 


There  has  been  previous  intimation  in  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  of  books  under 
ban  in  Canada,  but  the  subject  is  in  the  public 
eye  again  and  this  article  with  list  of  books 
banned  will  prove  a  helpful  Kuide  to  the  book 
trade. 


Library  Shelves  Diligently  Searched  For  Obnoxious  Titles 
List  of  Volumes  Under  the  Ban  For 
Guidance  of  Booksellers 


IT  has  transpired  that  in  some  cases 
public  libraries  have  continued  to  cir- 
culate certain  books  banned  by  an 
order-in-council,  which  took  effect  at 
Ottawa  last  May.  One  of  these  books, 
Myer's  "History  of  Canadian  Wealth," 
has  been  freely  read  by  patrons  of  the 
Toronto  Public  Library.  The  explanation 
is  that  no  notice  was  received  at  the 
library  that  the  book  had  been  banned. 
Actions  have  cropped  up  in  the  courts 
of  late,  and  what  with  press  publicity, 
w'th  lists  of  all  books  placed  under  the 
ban  being  given,  the  different  librarians 
have  instituted  careful  searches,  and  all 
the  volumes  prohibited  by  the  Govern- 
ment have  been  withdrawn  from  circula- 
tion. 

It  seems  that  the  blanket  ban  on  all 
the  publications  of  Charles  H.  Kerr  and 
Company,  of  Chicago,  was  imposed  be- 
cause a  postcard  named  "After  War" 
was  sent  out  by  that  firm. 

H.  H.  Lang-ton,  M.A.,  librarian  of  the 
University  of  Toronto,  has  made  a  sur- 
vey of  his  shelves  and  has  found  about 
a  dozen  works  published  by  Charles  H. 
Kerr  and  Co.,  of  Chicago. 

"What  have  you  done  with  them? 
Destroyed  them?"  asked  a  newspaper 
interviewer. 

"No,  I  have  just  removed  them  from 
the  shelves,  and  I  will  write  to  Ottawa, 
asking  instructions  as  to  their  disposal, 
for  all  of  them  were  published  before 
the  war;  some  as  far  back  as  1895.  One 
of  them  is  a  presentation  volume  from 
the  late   Prof.  Goldwin  Smith." 

"What  are  some  of  the  titles  of  the 
dozen?" 

"A  translation  of  'Karl  Marx  on 
Capital,'  Elmar  on  'History  of  Monetary 
Systems,'  Handy's  'Banking  System  of 
the  World,'  and  Engel's  'Landmarks  of 
Scientific    Socialism.'  " 

Mr.  Langton  asserted  that  he  had 
examined  the  books  and  come  to  the 
conclusion  that  they  were  not  propa- 
ganda, but  lather  a  compilation  of  matter 
in  regard  to  subjects  treated. 

In  regard  to  the  point  as  to  the  con- 
trol of  the  University  Library,  he  said 
it  was  vested  in  a  library  committee  of 
the  University  senate,  and  books  were 
recured  on  requisition  from  the  com- 
mittee or  members  of  the  faculty. 

Prof.  Mclver,  associate  professor  of 
political  economy  in  the  University  of 
Toronto,  takes  the  view  that  the  order- 
in-council  is  too  drastic  and  has  the  fatal 
weakness  of  failing  to  grade  the  Social- 
istic literature  that  is  harmful  and  that 
which  is  harmless  in  separate  classes. 
For  instance,  there  is  no  question  that 
such  a  leaflet  as  "The  Red  Terror  in 
Russia,"  advocating  as  it  does  revolution 
by  force  of  arms  and  violence  and  seizure 


of  property  should  be  suppressed  and 
those  who  circulate  it  punished,  but  liter- 
ature that  aims  at  industrial  and  poli- 
tical reforms  and  changes  by  purely 
constitutional  means  should  not  be  in 
the  same  class. 

"There  will  surely  be  a  protest  before 
this  order-in-council  is  enforced  as  it 
stands,"  said  Prof.  Mclver.  "The  idea 
that  you  can  suppress  that  kind  of  liter- 
ature is  a  mistaken  one.  Prosecution 
simply  gives  an  added  value  to  the  ban- 
ned works,  and  makes  them  more  pre- 
cious in  the  sight  of  the  followers  of 
such  movements.  Prosecution  of  people 
who  circulate  literature  not  of  the  ter- 
rorist type  is  apt  to  have  the  opposite 
effect  to  that   intended." 

He  pointed  out  that  at  the  time  the 
English  trades  unions  were  illegal  there 
was  far  more  violence  and  trouble  than 
when  the  unions  were  recognized  by 
law  . 

For  the  guidance  of  booksellers,  so 
that  they  may  not  unwillingly  violate 
these  orders-in-council,  a  list  of  these 
banned   publications  is   given   herewith: 

"The  Battle  of  Armageddon,"  a  book 
published  by  the  International  Bible 
Students'  Association. 

"Blatter  und  Bluten,"  a  book  publish- 
ed at  St.  Louis  in  German. 

"Bull,"  an  illustrated  New  York 
monthly. 

"The  Conference  of  Mennonites,"  a 
booklet  containing  resolutions  passed  by 
Mennonites  in  Kansas  in  1917  and  print- 
ed in  German. 

"Daily  Heavenly  Manna  and  Birthday 
Record,"  a  tract  published  by  Watch 
Tower  Bible  and  Tract  Society. 

"Defeat?  The  Truth  About  the  Be- 
trayal of  Britain,"  by  Arthur  Mee  and 
J.   Stuart  Holden,  published  in   Britain. 

"The   Fiddlers,"  by   Arthur   Mee. 

"The  Freeman's  Journal,"  of  New- 
York. 

"Have  we  given  the  people  of  Germany 
a  Fair  Deal?"  a  pamphlet  by  Gustavus 
Hillier,   published   in   Indianapolis. 

"Hindenburg's  Einmarsch  in  London," 
a  book  printed  in  German  at  Philadel- 
phia. 

"The  Parasite,"  by  Arthur  Mee  and 
Ben   H.   Spence. 

Pastor  Russell's  .Sermons. 

Pearson's  Magazine,  New  York. 

"The  Vampire  of  the  Continent,"  a 
book  by  Count  Ernst  zu  Reventlow,  and 
published  in  New  York. 

"The  Vital  Issue,"  a  New  York  weekly. 


"War— What  For?"  a  book  by  George 
R.  Kirkpatrick. 

"Why  Germany  Will  Win  the  War," 
a  pamphlet  by  George  Humphrey,  print- 
ed in  En-dish  and  distributed  by  the 
Solomon  News  Company  of  Detroit. 

"Zeppelins  uber  England,"  a  book  pub- 
lished in  German  at  New  York. 

The  Additions 

Among  the  additions  to  the  revised 
list,  issued  after  August  9  last,  are  the 
following: 

"After  War,"  a  postcard  issued  by- 
Charles  H.  Kerr  and  Co.,  of  Chicago.  ' 

"Anarchism  and  Communism,"  a  pam- 
phlet published  in  the  Russian  language 
by  parties  unknown. 

"A  Reply  to  the  Press  Lies  Concern- 
ing the  Russian  Situation,"  a  pamphlet 
issued  by  the  Alberta  Executive  of  the 
Socialist    Party. 

"The  Bolshevist  Declaration  of 
Rights,"  a  leaflet  published  anonvmous-  • 

lv. 

Poster  bearing  the  legend  in  the  Eng- 
lish   language,   "Prohibition    Dope." 

"The  Democrat,"  a  daily  newspaper 
printed    in    Chinese     and     published     in 

Canton,  China. 

Two  pamphlets  printed  in  Chinese, 
"Labor"  and  "The  Free  Record." 

"The  Working  People,"  a  Russian 
weekly  published  at  Winnipeg. 

Pamphlet  by  Nicholas  Lenine,  "Politi- 
cal Parties  in  Russia,"  issued  by  the 
Socialist    Publication    Co.    in   New   York. 

"The  Western  Clarion,"  published 
weekly  in  Vancouver  by  the  Socialist 
Party. 

The  book  entitled  "The  History  of 
Canadian  Wealth,"  by  Gustavus  Myers, 
had    previously   been    banned. 

Ottawa's  action  in  amending  the 
orders-in-council  re  banned  publications 
and  associations  by  providing  that  the 
Attorney-General  must  give  his  consent 
and  approval  to  all  prosecutions  and  that 
the  accused  shall  have  the  right  to  be 
tried  by  a  jury  if  he  chooses,  by  no  means 
satisfies  the  Labor  forces  that  have 
taken  up  the  cause  of  Charles  Watson 
£.nd  Harry  Cheesman,  and  others  ,  con- 
victed   of    political    offences. 

They    Want    All    Oiders-in-Council     Re- 
pealed 

"It  is  time  for  a  return  to  Parliamen- 
tary Government.  We  cannot  continue 
to  have  the  knowledge  of  the  Canadian 
people  on  world  matters,  including  Rus- 
sia, filtered  through  the  chief  press 
censor  at  Ottawa,"  said  A.  W.  Roebuck, 
counsel  for  Watson  and  Cheesman,  as 
reported  in  the  "Toronto  Star." 


46 


Library  of  Automobile  Publications 


A   GOOD  SERVICE   PLAN 

The  idea  of  having  a  library  of  automobile  pub- 
lications in  a'  bookstore  is  a  good  one.  Customers 
should  be  invited  to  visit  it  freely.  This  will 
naturally  promote  sales  of  books  and  subscriptions 
for  periodicals  devoted  to  motor  cars,  motorcycles. 
.'tc.  -The  Editor. 


Live  Booksellers  Realize  the  Value  of  Such  a  Department  in  Their 
Bookstores  as  a  Means  of  Promoting  Sales 


THERE  are  in  Canada  over  200,000 
motor  cars,  and  it  is,  of  course,  the 
total,  comprising  both  imported 
and  Canadian-made  cars,  that  is  of  chief 
significance  in  its  relationship  to  the 
selling  of  books  dealing  with  the  motor 
car,  whether  in  its  capacity  of  a  vehicle 
of  pleasure,  business,  or  the  more  tech 
nical  side,  as,  for  instance,  books  deal- 
ing with  upkeep  and  repairs.  The  fol- 
lowing facts,  bearing  solely  upon  the 
automobile  industry  in  Canada,  arc 
nevertheless  of  great  importance  in  this 
connection,  and  it  will  be  good  business 
for  booksellers  to  post  themselves  thor- 
oughly on  this   whole  question. 

A  preliminary  report  of  the  statistics 
relating  to  the  automobile  and  other  al- 
lied industries  has  been  compiled  by  the 
Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics  which 
covers  the  operations  of  establishments 
engaged   in  the   manufacture  of 

(1)  automobiles, 

(2)  automobile  accessories,  and 

(3)  automobile  repairs. 

The  number  of  establishments  classed 
as  manufacturers  of  automobiles  in 
Canada  in  1917  was  11,  in  automobile  ac- 
cessories 24,  and   in  repair  work  497. 

The  total  capital  invested  in  these  in- 
dustries was  $35,780,677,  apportioned  as 
follows:  in  automobiles  $28,192,858,  in 
accessories  $3,155,89.°.,  and  in  repair 
shops  $4,431,926. 

The  number  of  persons  employed  on 
salaries  by  sex  distribution  was  730 
males  and  174  females  in  automobile 
plants,  106  males  and  21  females  in  ac- 
cessory plants,  2-">0  males  and  48  females 
in  auto  repair  shops  and  garage,  and  the 
total  salaries  paid  were  respectively  $1.- 
376,692  in  automobile  plants,  $266,147  in 
plants  making  accessories,  and  $334,780 
in  repair  shops. 

The  number  employed  on  wages  ir. 
each  class  and  the  amount  paid  in  wages 
were   as   follows: — 

Number 

Males   Females  Wages 

Automobile    plants..  1.852  1G4  $4  862.770 

Accessory    plants     ..  1.405         122  1.198,596 

Repair    shops     1.508  34  1.200,958 

The  value  of  materials  used  in  manu- 
facturing and  repair  work  in  each  class 
was  (1)  automobiles,  $35,585,820;  (2)  ac- 
cessories, $3,788,308;  and  (3)  repairs, 
$1,961,773. 

The  total  value  of  production  and  re- 
pair work  for  all  classes  was  $66,077,207, 
of  which  automobiles  amounted  to  $54,- 
466,273,  accessories  to  $6,519,868,  and  re- 
pairs to  $5,091,066. 

Classified  according  to  purpose  the 
numbers  of  the  different  classes  of  cars 
recorded  in  the  census  returns  were  (1) 
touring  cars,  80,544;  (2)  runabouts,  5,- 
502;   (3)  closed  cars,  1,165;    (4)  delivery 


wagons,  1,231;  (5)  club  roadsters,  561; 
(6)  trucks,  117;  and  (7)  not  classified, 
556,  or  a  total  of  89,676  cars. 

Many  Tractors  Imported 

An  important  contribution  to  food  pro- 
duction  was   the  arrangement  made   for 


Sell  More 
Auto  Books 


(~)NE  person  in  every  39  of  Canada's 
^^  population  owns  a  motor  car,  and 
this  representation  is  fairly  well  dis- 
tributed throughout  the  whole  Domin- 
ion; consequently  the  opportunity  for 
selling  of  books  on  automobile  sub- 
jects is  open  to  the  booksellers  every- 
where throughout  Canada,  whether  in 
the  small  towns  or  the  big  cities. 

When  the  bookseller  applies  the  in- 
formation in  the  accompanying  article 
to  his  business,  and  reflects  upon  the 
numerous  good  books  that  are  avail- 
able dealing  with  the  different  aspects 
of  automobile  and  allied  interests,  he 
will  appreciate  the  advisability  of  de- 
veloping this  end  of  the  book  business 
in    the    most    aggressive    manner. 

Some  booksellers  have  instituted 
separate  libraries  in  their  stores  of 
volumes  coming  under  this  heading, 
and  make  a  point  of  keeping  this 
section  thoroughly  up-to-date,  includ- 
ing periodicals  as  well  as  books.  So 
interesting  is  such  a  department  that 
auto  owners,  or  others  interested  in 
the  subject,  frequently  visit  this  lib- 
rary and  thus  many  sales  nr->  do 
veloped. 

When  the  whole  gamut  of  such 
volumes,  comprising  guide-books, 
question-and-answer  volumes,  the 
many  titles  relating  to  operation,  up- 
keep, repairs,  as  well  as  books  for 
the  garage-owner  and  those  dealing 
exclusively  with  motorcycles,  trucks, 
farm  tractors,  or  other  cars  of  a  more 
restricted  nature  than  the  regulation 
touring  car  or  runabout,  is  taken  into' 
consideration,  along  with  the  natural 
growth  that  each  year  has  shown 
and  that  each  subsequent  year  will 
unfold,  the  wisdom  of  booksellers 
who  have  begun  to  specialize  in  books 
of   this   class    is   amply   demonstrated. 

In  passing  let  it  be  said  that  similar 
consideration  should  be  given  to 
books  on  airplane  subjects;  the  im- 
mediate future  cannot  fail  to  show 
wonderful   developments   in   that  field. 


the  distribution  of  farm  tractors  at  cost 
to  farmers,  declares  the  report  of  Can- 
ada Food  Board.  The  allocation  of  thesp 
by  provinces  was  as  follows: 

British  Columbia   21 

Alberta   334 

Saskatchewan    382 

47 


Manitoba    149 

Ontario    203 

Quebec    9 

New   Brunswick    5 

Nova   Scotia    14 

Prince  Edward  Island 6 

1,123 

In  addition,  fifteen  demonstration 
tractors  were  distributed  to  Alberta, 
Saskatchewan,  and   Manitoba. 

A  satisfactory  arrangement  was  made 
with  Henry  Ford  &  Son,  Inc.,  Dearborn, 
Michigan,  for  the  purchase  of  1,000  farm 
tractors.  The  price  agreed  upon  was  $750 
each,  f.o.b.  Dearborn.  One  of  the  condi- 
tions of  the  contract  reads: — 

"The  entire  arrangement  is  contingent 
upon  the  Government  of  Canada  dis- 
tributing these  tractors  direct  to  farm- 
ers in  Canada  at  the  price  specified  plus 
freight  and   with   no   profit   allowed." 

Orders  were  taken  from  farmers  by 
provincial  Departments  of  Agriculture 
and  forwarded  by  them  to  Food  Board, 
thus  furnishing  to  Canadian  farmers 
tractors  at  cost.  This  measure  assisted 
greatly  in  the  work  of  greater  produc- 
tion during  the  spring  of  1918.  Canadian 
firms  which  manufacture  tractors  were 
engaged  at  high  pressure  on  other 
classes  of  farm  machinery,  and  their  out- 
put at  that  time  was  not  expected  to  ex- 
ceed 300  tractors  a  year.  The  steps 
taken,  therefore,  were  necessary  to  meet 
the  immediate  need.  A  representative  of 
the  Board  was  sent  to  Detroit  to  expe- 
dite shipments.  Twenty-five  tractors  a 
day  had  been  arranged  for.  As  Dear- 
born is  a  way  station,  there  was  a  danger 
of  delay  and  consequent  demurrage 
charges,  but  it  is  worth  noting  that  the 
Board  had  only  to  pay  $9  car  rental  on 
the  entire  order.  With  shipments  for 
the  East  much  difficulty  was  experi- 
enced, and  it  was  necessary  in  almost 
every  instance  to  trace  cars  from  Dear- 
born to  Detroit  through  the  yards  it 
Windsor   to   ensure   speedy  delivery. 

Tractors  Duty  Free 

Farm  tractors  valued  at  not  more  thaw 
$1,400  each  imported  by  Canada  from 
February  7,  1919,  can  claim  remission  of 
duty,  according  to  an  Order  in  Council 
passed  in  January  30,  1919,  as  follows: 

His  Excellency  the  Governor-General 
in  Council,  on  the  recommendation  of 
the  Minister  of  Finance  and  under  the 
provisions  of  Section  92  of  the  Consoli- 
dated Revenue  and  Audit  Act,  is  pleased, 
from  the  seventh  day  of  February,  1919. 
and  until  otherwise  provided  for,  to 
grant  and  doth  hereby  grant  authority 
for  remission  and  refund  of  the  Customs 


K 00  K SELLER      AND     STATIONER 


duty  on  gas  or  gasolene  traction  engines 
for  farm  purposes  valued  at  not  more 
rhan  fourteen  hundred  dollars  each  and 
repairs  therefor  when  entered  at  Cus- 
toms after  the  seventh  day  of  February, 
1919. 

In  a  later  issue  further  facts  will  be 
given  dealing  with  the  importations  of 
automobiles  and  motor-cycles,  together 
with  something  more  about  the  signifi- 
cance of  this  information  in  direct  rela- 
tion  to   the   bookselling  business. 


A  Code  of  Ethics  For  the  Book  Trade 

Standard  of  Practice  as  Adopted  by  American  Booksellers' 

Association. 


CANADIAN   COPYRIGHT 

It  is  in  the  interests  of  the  publishers 
of  Canada  and,  incidentally,  the  retailers 
of  books  and  musical  publications,  that 
Canada  should  no  longer  lag  behind  in 
the  matter  of  copyright  protection  of 
Canadian    publications. 

The  necessity  for  this  is  of  course 
especially  vital  to  the  actual  creators 
of  literature  and  musical  compositions. 
The  newly  formed  Authors'  and  Com- 
posers' Association  of  Canada  is  working 
hard  to  influence  the  Dominion  Gov- 
ernment to  put  through  legislation  act- 
ively co-operatin »  with  the  Imperial 
Copyright  Act  of  1911.  The  Laurier 
Government  had  such  a  Canadian  copy- 
right act  in  preparation  and  almost 
ready  for  adoption  just  before  it  went 
down  to  defeat  in  S^itember.  1911,  and 
since  that  time  nothing  has  been  done. 
The  authors  and  composers  deserve  the 
active  assistance  of  all  members  of  the 
trades  affected,  in  influencing  the  fed- 
eral authorities  toward  bringing  Canada 


JOSEPH     C.      LINCOLN 
Author   of   "Shavings" 

into  line  with  the  different  European 
nations  and  the  other  self-governing 
Dominions,  in  the  matter  of  Internat- 
ional copyright. 

This  subject  was  ably  dealt  with  by 
John  H.  Moss,  K.C.,  in  an  address  be- 
fore the  Authors'  and  Composers'  Assoc- 
iations in  Toronto.  Among  those  who 
attended  were  many  representatives  of 
the   publishing   houses   of   Canada. 


"The  Keeper  of  the  Door,"  by  Ethel 
M.  Dell,  has  been  out  of  print.  A  new 
edition  is  nearly  ready. 

A  new  volume  of  poems  is  "Golden 
Stars  and  Other  Verses,"  by  Henry  Van 
Dyke,  and  the  same  author  has  written 
a  new  volume  of  prose  uniform  with 
"The  Blue  Flower."  The  title  is  "The 
Vallev  of  Vision." 


BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER  is 
in  receipt  of  "A  Code  of  Ethics  for 
the  Book  Trade,"  being  a  reprint 
in  booklet  form  of  a  paper  read  by 
Charles  E.  Butler,  president  of  the  Am- 
erican Booksellers'  Association,  at  the 
1918  convention.  It  deals  exhaustively 
with  the  standard  of  trade  practice  for 
the  book  trade  as  proposed  by  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  association.  This  stand- 
ard of  practice  is  just  as  applicable  to 
booksellers  in  Canada  as  to  the  trade  in 
the  U.  S..  and  it  is  therefore  reprinted 
herewith : 

Standard  of  Trade  Practice 

The  following  questions  have  been  a 
bone  of  contention  in  the  book-trade  for 
years,  and  promise  to  continue  so  if  we 
do  not  take  action  and  decide  the  right 
course  to  pursue.  The  Board  of  Trade 
have  considered,  at  the  same  time  and 
with  the  same  care,  the  following  im- 
portant questions,  as  to  whether  dis- 
counts should  or  should  not  be  given, 
and  what  would  be  the  correct  course  Lo 
pursue  in  certain  cases: 

Should  college  students  buy  at  trade 
rates  and  sell  other  students  at  a  dis- 
count? They  should  not.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  college  students  act  as  agents 
for  publishers  in  selling  books  to  stu- 
dents? Yes,  if  there  is  no  local  book- 
store.     (Vote    unanimous.) 

Should  college  bookstores  and  co- 
operative stores  sell  books  to  student* 
at  a  discount?  It  should  be  discon- 
tinued; demoralizing  and  unfair.  (Vote 
unanimous.) 

Should  a  discount  be  given  to  public 
libraries?      Yes.      (Vote  unanimous.) 

What  discount  shall  be  given  to  public 
libraries?  Committee  to  be  appointed 
to  meet  Library  Association.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  philosophical  societies,  histori- 
cal societies,  and  all  other  societies  be 
given  a  discount?  Yes,  if  maintained 
for  public  use;  otherwise,  no.  Same 
discount  as  other  libraries.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  Sunday  School  libraries  be 
given  discount?  Yes,  same  discount  as 
other  libraries. 

Should  naval  ship  libraries,  army  post 
libraries,  state  libraries,  free  libraries, 
traveling  libraries,  Government  librar- 
ies, college  libraries,  school  district 
libraries,  literary  school  libraries,  mu- 
nicipal libraries  be  given  a  discount? 
Yes,  if  supported  by  public  funds.  Same 
discount  as  other  libraries.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  club  libraries,  law  libraries, 
medical  libraries,  scientific  libraries,  pri- 
vate libraries,  semi-public,  as  the  mer- 
cantile and  society  library,  he  given  a 
discount?     Yes,  if  of  recognized  stand- 

48 


ing.  Same  discount  as  other  libraries. 
(Vote   unanimous.) 

Should  booksellei-s  give  up  selling  to 
libraries?      No.      (Vote    unanimous.) 

Should  publishers  sell  to  libraries?  No. 
(Vote   unanimous.) 

Should  jobbers  sell  to  libraries  on  an 
equitable  commission  arrangement  with 
the  bookseller?  Yes.  (Vote  unani- 
mous.) 

Should  the  publishers  show  new  books 
to  libraries  and  take  orders,  and  give 
said  orders  to  local  booksellers,  giving 
commission  on  the  order?  Ideal  ar- 
rangement, if  possible.  Yes.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  a  discount  be  given  to  sta- 
tioners who  do  not  keep  or  sell  books? 
No.     (Vote  7  to  2.) 

Should  exporters,  canvassers,  Cham- 
bers of  Commerce  be  given  discounts? 
Yes.     (Vote  unanimous.) 

Should  magazines  or  newspapers  ad- 
vertising and  selling  books  by  mail,  bul 
carrying  no  stock,  be  given  a  discount? 
No.      (Vote   unanimous.) 

Should  newspapers,  magazines  as 
such,  or  individuals  connected  therewith 
be  given  a  discount?  No.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  the  privilege  be  given  to  book- 
sellers to  return  a  certain  portion  of 
their  new  book  purchases  to  publishers? 
Consider  return  privilege  desirable  and 
just.     Yes.     (Vote  unanimous.) 

Should  booksellers  charge  postage  ? 
Minimum  zone  rate.  Yes.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  publishers  advertise  postage 
extra  ?  Minimum  zone  rate.  Yes.  (Vote 
unanimous.) 

Should  the  basic  discount  to  booksell- 
ers be  33  1-3  or  40  per  cent.?  Mini- 
mum discount  of  33  1-3.  (Vote  un- 
animous.) 

Should  publishers  and  jobbers  solicit 
consumer's  trade,  and  supply  same  by 
mail  or  express  prepaid  ?  Should  not  be 
done.     (Vote  unanimous.) 

Continuity  of  net  prices,  or  "once  net 
always  net."  Is  it  desirable  and  should 
it  prevail?     Yes.     (Vote  unanimous.) 

These  are  likewise  vital  questions  to 
every  member  of  the  trade,  and  the 
Board  of  Trade  asks  the  association  to 
approve   as   follows: 

"The  American  Booksellers'  Associa- 
tion in  convention  assembled,  May  14,  15, 
16,  1918,  expresses  its  approval  in  prin- 
ciple of  the  standard  of  trade  practice 
between  the  publishing,  jobbing,  book- 
selling interests  and  the  libraries,  as 
proposed  by  the  Board  of  Trade,  and 
urge  the  trade  as  a  whole  to  endeavor 
to  bring  about  these  reforms  to  the  end 
that  fair  and  equitable  methods  of  mer- 
chandising   may    prevail." 

(The  adoption  of  the  resolution  was 
thereupon  moved  and  carried.) 


Monthly  Record  of  New  Books 

Published   by  Firms  Established  in   Canada 


THOMAS  ALLEN 
Fiction 

Dawn,  Eleanor  H.  Porter,  $1.50;  A 
Daughter  of  Two  Worlds,  Leroy  Scott, 
$1.60.;  A  Man  Four-Square,  William 
MacLeod  Raine,  $1.50;  Cornelia,  Lucy 
Fitch  Perkins,  $1.25;  The  Duchess  of 
Siona,  Ernest  Goodwin,  $1.60;  The  Old 
Gray  Homestead,  Frances  Parkinson 
Keyes,  $1.50;  Sniper  Jackson,  Frederick 
Sleath.   $1.60. 

Non-Fiction 

Dormitory  Days,  Arthur  Stanwood 
Pier,  $1.35;  My  German  Prisons, 
Horace  Gray  Gilliland,  $1.50;  Pris- 
oners of  the  U-90,  Lieut.  Ed- 
ouard  Victor  Isaacs,  $1.35;  War 
Finance,  Clarence  W.  Barron,  $1.50; 
A  Manual  of  Universal  History, 
Carl  Ploetz,  $3.00;  Field  and  Study,  John 
Burroughs,  $1.50;  Goat  Feathers,  Ellis 
Parker  Butler,  50c;  Convention  and 
Revolution  in  Poetry,  Prof.  John  Living- 
ston, $1.75;  The  Student's  Book  of  In- 
spirations, Edward  Dickinson,  $1.00; 
Letters  of  Harry  James  Smith,  $2.00; 
[van  Speaks,  Thomas  Whittenmore,  75c; 
Theodore  Roosevelt,  The  Logic  of  His 
i  :ireer.  Charles   G.   Washburn.   $1.65. 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 
Fiction 

Dere  Bill,  Florence  Elizabeth  Rum- 
mers, 75c;  The  Man  from  the  Clouds, 
Storer  Clouston,  $1.50;  The  Cabin, 
Blasco  Ibanez,  $1.50;  The  Crimson  Alibi, 
Hoy  Cohen.  $1.50;  Room  No.  3,  Anna 
Katherine  Green,  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 

Claude's  Book,  Mrs.  Kelway-Bamber, 
■<2.00;  Who  Giveth  Us  the  Victory, 
Arthur  Mee,  $1.35. 

THE  COPP  CLARK  CO..  LIMITED 
Fiction 

Wild  Youth  ."n-i   Another,   Sir  Gilbert 
Parker,  cloth,  $1.50;  Penny  of  Top  Hill 
Trail,  Belle  K.  Maniates,  cloth,  $1.35. 
Non-fiction 

Jungle  Peace.  William  Beebe,  cloth. 
$1.75;  Another  Sheaf,  John  Galsworthy, 
cloth,  $1.50. 

S.  B.  GUNDY 
Non-fiction 

Living  Bayonets.  Lieut.  Coningsby 
Dawson,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Women  Who 
Make  Our  Novels,  Grant  M.  Overton, 
cloth,  $1.60;  Our  Poets  of  To-day,  How- 
ard Willard  Cook,  cloth,  $1.60;  The  Dead 
Have  Never  Died,  Edward  C.  Randall, 
cloth.  $1.50. 

THOMAS  LANGTON 
Fiction 

The  Family,  Elinor  Glyn,  cloth,  $1.50; 
The  Wine  of  Astonishment,  Mary- 
Hastings  Bradley,  cloth.  $1.50;  Judee  of 
Rogues  Harbor,  Grace  Miller  White, 
cloth.  $1.50:  The  Undefeated.  J.  C. 
Snaith,  cloth,  $1.50;  His  Wife's  Job, 
Grace  Sartwell  Mason,  cloth.  $1.50; 
The    Riddle    of     the      Purple      Empei-or, 


Thomas  W.  Hanshaw,  cloth,  $1.50;  The 
See  Saw,  Sophie  Kerr,  cloth,  $1.50;  Bos- 
ton Blackie,  Jack  Boyle,  cloth,  $1.50; 
The  Shielding  Wing,  Will  Levington 
Comfort,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Whirlwind, 
Edna  Worthley  Underwood,  $1.50. 

THE  M  ACM  ILL  AN  CO. 

Non-Fiction 

English  Poets,  Vol.  5,  T.  H.  Ward, 
cloth,  $1.75;  Our  National  Forests,  R. 
H.  D.  Boerker,  cloth,  $1.50;  325  Group 
Contests,  W.  J.  Cromie,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Pilgrims  and  Their  History,  R.  G. 
Usher,  $2.00;  Highways  and  By-ways  of 
Florida,  C.  Johnson,  cloth,  $2.00;  A  His- 
tory of  Spain,  C.  E.  Chapman,  cloth, 
$2.00;  The  War  and  The  Bible,  H.  G. 
Enelow,  cloth,  60c;  The  Disabled  Sol- 
dier, D.  C.  McMurtie,  cloth,  $2.00;  The 
Boys'  Own  Book  of  Great  Inventions,  F. 
L.  Darrow,  cloth,  $2.50;  Who's  Who, 
1919,  cloth  $10.00;  The  Coming  of  the 
Lord,  J.  H.  Snowden,  cloth,  $1.75,  Vis- 
count Bryce,  Essays  and  Addresses  in 
War  Time,  cloth,  $2.25. 

McCLELLAND     &     STEWART,     LTD. 
Fiction 

The  Sky  Pilot  in  No  Man's  Land,  Ralph 
Connor,  $1.50;  The  Secret  City,  Hugh 
Walpole,  $1.60;  The  Avalanche,  Gertrude 
Atherton,  $1.35;  The  Man  Nobody- 
Knew,  Holworthy  Hall,  $1.50;  The  Web, 
Frederick  Arnold  Kummer,  $1.50;  Slippy 
McGee,  Marie  Conway  Oemler,  $1.35. 
Non-Fiction 

Rules  of  Order,  J.  G.  Bourinot,  $1.00; 
The  Boy  Scout  Handbook,  Canada,  Of- 
ficial and  Authorized,  limp,  50c,  cloth, 
75c;  Among  the  Canadian  Alps,  Law- 
rence J.  Burpee,  F.R.G.S.,  $3.50;  Where 
the  Buffalo  Roamed,  E.  L.  Marsh,  $1.25; 
Eating  in  Two  or  Three  Languages,  Ir- 
vin  S.  Cobb,  60c;  This  Famishing  World, 
Arthur  W.  McCann,  $2.00;  The  Worlds 
and  I,  Ella  Wheeler  Wilcox,  $3.50; 
Christ  in  You,  $1.25;  With  Those  Who 
Wait,  Frances  Wilson  Huard,  $1.50, 
Putnam's  Automobile  Handbook,  N. 
Clifford  Brokaw  and  Charles  A.  Starr, 
$2.00;  Joyce  Kilmer's  Complete  Works, 
(wo  volumes,  $5.00. 

Juvenile 

For  Freedom  of  the  Seas,  Ralph 
Plenry  Barbour,  $1.35;  The  Masters  of 
the  Peaks,  Joseph  A.  Altsheler,  $1.35; 
The  Lost  Hunters,  Joseph  A.  Altsheler, 
$1.35;  The  Amateur  Mechanic,  A.  Fred- 
erick Collins,  $1.10;  Running  Fox,  El- 
mer Russel  Gregor,  $1.35. 

GEORGE    J.    McLEOD,    LIMITED 
Fiction 

The  Bargain  True,  Nalbro  Bartley, 
cloth,  $1.50;  Number  Seventeen,  Louis 
Tracy,  cloth,  $1.50;  Twenty-six  Clues, 
Isabel  Ostrander,  cloth,  $1.50;  Three 
Live  Ghosts.  Frederic  S.  Isham,  cloth, 
$1.50;  The  Playground  of  Satan,  Bea- 
trice Baskerville,  cloth,  $1.50. 
49 


THOMAS   NELSON   &   SONS 
Non-Fiction 

A  History  of  English  Literature,  Ar- 
thur Compton  Rickett,  M.A.,  LL.D 
cloth,  $2.75;  Modernism:  Its  Failure 
and  its  Fruits,  M.  D.  Petre,  cloth,  $1.75; 
Biological  Chemistry,  Professor  Schry- 
ver,  cloth,  $1.75;  Sculpture  and  the 
Sculptor's  Art,  H.  H.  Stansfield,  cloth, 
$1.75:  Switzerland.  C.  F.  Cameron,  cloth, 
$1.75;  Rome,  Elizabeth  O'Neill,  cloth, 
?1.75;  Favorite  Recitations  of  Favorite 
Actors,  edited  by  Percy  Cross  Standing, 
cloth,  $1.75;  How  Animals  Work,  F. 
Martin  Duncan,  cloth,  $1.75;  Water 
in  Nature.  W.  Coles  Finch  and  Ellison 
Hawks,  cloth,  $1.75;  The  Deliverance  of 
the  Captives,  Henry  Bordeaux,  cloth, 
$1.25;  The  Victory  of  Lorraine,  Adrien 
Bertrand,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Human 
Needs  of  Labor,  B.  S.  Rowntree,  cloth, 
$1.25;  Scientific  Amusements,  translated 
from  the  French  by  "Tom  Tit," 
adapted  by  Professor  '  G.  C.  Knott, 
cloth,  $1.75;  Eve  in  Khaki,  Edith 
M.  Barton  &  Marguerite  Codv,  cloth, 
$1.25;  History  of  the  War,  Volume  21, 
Buchan,  cloth,  85c. 

Juvenile 

Three  Jolly  Sailors  and  Me,  Will 
Owen,  cloth,  $1.75;  Staircase  of  Stories, 
edited  by  Louey  Chisholm  and  Amy 
Steedman,  cloth,  $2.75. 

Fiction 

The  Desert  of  Wheat,  Zane  Grey, 
$1.50;  The  High  Flyer,  C.  B.  Kelland, 
$1.50;  The  Private  Wire  to  Washington, 
Harold  McGrath,  $1.35;  Gregg,  Fleta 
Springer,  $1.50;  Priest  and  Layman, 
Ada  Carter,  $1.50;  The  Seamless  Robe, 
Ada  Carter,  $1.50;  The  Fighting  Shep- 
herdess, Caroline  Lockhart,  $1.50;  Best 
Short  Stories  of  1918,  Edward  J. 
O'Brien,  $1.60;  Drifting  with  Brownie, 
Byers  Fletcher,  $1.50;  Too  Fat  to  Fight, 
Rex   Beach.   75c. 

Non-Fiction 

Mother  Love  in  Action,  Prudence 
Bradish,  $1.35;  Keeping  Fit  All  the  Way, 
Walter  Camp,  $1.55;  Recipe  Cabinet  (in 
lex),  Fannie  Merritt  Farmer,  $2.00; 
How  to  Draw  and  Paint,  $1.00;  The 
Cradle  of  New  France,  A.  C.  Doughty, 
$1.50;  The  Diary  of  a  Nation  (Editorials 
from  Life),  E.  S.  Martin,  $1.50. 


ANNUAL 

SPRING  NUMBER 

NEXT 

MONTH 


Simple  Book-keeping  for  Merchants 

How  to  Start  With  Two  Books  Only— Perfect  Record  of  Transactions  Can  Be  Kept- 
Position  Ascertained  at  Any  Time  —  Profits  Easily  Calculated 


By  C.  J.  MORRIS 


HOW  many  failures  on  the  part  of 
retailers  are  attributable  to  the 
fact  that  the  victims  were  not 
acquainted  with  the  real  condition  of 
their  affairs  until  it  was  too  late  to  seek 
a  remedy?  In  other  words  they  have 
failed  to  keep  track  of  their  progress, 
or  lack  of  progress,  by  a  proper  system 
of  bookkeeping  and  in  many  instances 
a  business  which  had  in  it  all  the  ele- 
ments of  success  has  thus  turned  out  a 
dismal  failure. 

The  man  who  launches  out  on  his  own 
account  is  in  many  cases  an  experienced 
man  in  his  line;  he  knows  how  to  buy- 
well  and  how  to  show  his  goods  at- 
tractively. He  treats  his  customers  with 
courtesy  and  gives  good  service,  but  if 
he  knows  nothing  of  bookkeeping  nor 
makes  it  his  business  to  find  out  how 
to  keep  a  proper  record  of  his  trans- 
actions so  that  he  can  find  out  period- 
ically exactly  how  he  stands  he  risks 
losing  all  the  advantages  which  his  ex- 
perience and  capability  in  other  direc- 
tions of  the  business  should  bring  him. 

Systems  Usually  too  Complicated 

It  is  not  that  he  is  unwilling  to  take 
the  necessary  pains  or  give  the  neces- 
sary time  to  it;  the  trouble  usually  is 
that  he  has  very  hazy  ideas  of  how 
hooks  should  be  kept,  and  all  the  sys- 
tems which  profess  to  make  the  way 
easy  for  him  are  too  complicated  to  be 
understood  without  a  personal  explan- 
ation. 

With  a  view  to  overcoming  this  diffi- 
culty it  is  proposed  to  show  in  this 
series  of  articles  how  a  small  mer- 
chant can  start  bookkeeping  with  two 
books  only  and  how,  with  these  two  books, 
a  perfect  record  of  all  his  transactions 
can  be  kept.  It  will,  further,  be  dem- 
onstrated how,  after  taking  stock,  he  can, 
with  an  hour  or  two's  work,  or  even 
less,  calculate  exactlv  what  his  Dosition 
is,  how  much  he  owes,  how  much  is  ow- 
ing to  him,  and  what  his  profits  have 
been  since  his  last  stock-taking  period. 
The  keeping  of  these  two  books  need 
not  involve  more  than  half  an  hour  to 
an  hour's  work  each  day  and  could  prob- 
ably be  carried  out  at  odd  moments  dur- 
ing the  day  itself. 

Any    Queries    Will    be    Answered 

It  will  first  be  shown  how  the  books 
should  be  started  by  anyone  first  com- 
mencing business  and  later  on  details 
will  be  given  as  to  how  the  system  can 
be  instituted  at  any  moment  by  those 
already  in  business  who  may  wish  to 
adapt  it  to  their  own  needs.  The  pos- 
sibility of  expanding  the  system  will 
also  be  dealt  with. 

As  far  as  possible,  technical  language 
will  be   avoided   and   explanations   given 


in  everyday  phraseology.  Should,  how- 
ever, any  point  arise  which  is  not  per- 
fectly clear  to  the  reader,  or  should  any 
problem  occur  which  is  not  dealt  with 
herein,  any  query  will  be  gladly  ans- 
wered. 

In  order  to  make  the  system  of  enter- 
ing up  various  transactions  as  clear  as 
possible,  a  series  of  typical  happenings 
in  the  conduct  of  a  business  will  be 
taken  and  the  way  in  which  they  should 
be  entered  will  be  explained.  This  ser- 
ies of  transactions  will,  necessarily,  cov- 
er only  a  short  period  of  three  or  four 
days  and  this  period  will  then  be  dealt 
with  exactly  as  if  it  were  for  a  year 
and  a  profit  and  loss  account  and  bal- 
ance sheet  drawn  up  just  as  would  be 
the  case  for  the  longer  period.  The 
principles  of  the  system  can  be  illus- 
trated equally  as  well  with  a  few  entries 
as  with  those  for  a  whole  year. 

Books  Required 

The  first  of  the  two  books  mentioned 
is  called  a  Journal  or  Day-book,  in  which 
every  money  transaction  and  every  case 
of  selling  or  buying  of  goods  is  en- 
tered at  the  time  it  takes  place.  This 
book  should  be  headed  and  ruled  for 
single  column  entry  thus: 


Date 


Page  in 
Ledger 


It  is  a  simple  account  book  which  can 
be  purchased  at  any  bookseller's.  The 
second  book,  which  is  called  the  Ledger, 
will  be  dealt  with  in  the  next  article. 

In  addition  to  these  two  books  we  shall 
require  two  small  memo  books,  one  for 
entering  any  orders  which  may  be  re- 
ceived (although  these  can,  if  neces- 
sary, be  entered  in  detail  in  the  day- 
book) and  the  other  for  entering  small 
items  paid  out  for  Petty  Cash,  which 
are  not  large  enough  to  make  it  worth 
while  entering  singly  in  the  larger 
books. 

We  shall  also  require  a  numbered 
invoice  pad,  with  carbon  copy,  for  goods 
sent  out  on  credit  or  taken  away  and 
charged  up  to  the  customer.  Two  files 
will  also  be  necessary,  one  for  filing  the 
carbon  copies  just  referred  to  and  the 
other  for  filing  invoices  of  goods  re- 
ceived. Either  a  cash  register  or  some 
other  system  of  recording  the  amount 
of  each  sale  as  it  is  made  will  also  be 
required. 

Making    a    Start 

With  the  outfit  now  complete  we  open 

our  store;  having  the  day-book  handy  in 

which    to    make    any    necessary    entries. 

purchases,  enter  Mrs.  Jones,  of  24  Main 

50 


St.,  who  gives  an  order,  the  details  of 
which  we  enter  in  our  order  book  and  for 
which  we  make  out  Invoice  No.  1, 
amounting  to  $5.60. 

We  now  make  the  first  entry  in  our 
Journal  as  follows: 

Jan.  1, 

Mrs.  Jones,  24  Main  St., 
Goods  as  per  Invoice  No.  1   5.60 

The  next  item  which  concerns  us 
is  the  arrival  of  some  goods  from  An- 
derson &  Co.,  value  $57.20,  on  which 
there  are  freight  charges  to  pay  of 
$2.75.  We  therefore  make  the  follow- 
ing entries  in  the  Journal: 

Jan.   1, 

Goods  rec.  from  Anderson  &  Co.  . .  57.20 
Freight  paid   on  "         2.75 

The  telephone  collector  calls  for  $7.50 
which  we  pay,  entering  same  in  Jour- 
nal; and  so  as  each  transaction  takes 
place  an  entry  is  made  recording  same 
in   the   Journal. 

At  the  end  of  four  days  our  Journal 
shows  the  following  record: 

JOURNAL 
r,  4.  Page  in 

Dat*  Ledger 

1.     Jan.   1-  Mr.  Jones,  24  Main  St.. 
Goods    as    per    Invoice 

2         •'       i      a    a  N°-     ^  'A «  $  «  •• 

*•  1 — Anderson    &   Co., 

Goods  received 101     §7  »v 

1— Freight  paid   on   good* 

from    Anderson's    ....     807       2   75 

i-  1— Paid    Telephone    Account     107       7  59 

a.  1--E.  W.  Smith,  64  High  St. 

Goods    as    per    Invoice 

c         ..       ,      „       No.   2    g       3   40 

6.  1— Mr.  Brown,  135  North  Are. 

Goods    as    per   Invoice 

..       ,      „      ,No-   3    2       7  20 

■  •  1 — Goods     received     from 

Green    ft    Son 202     20   65 

8.  1— 3aken     from    Til]    for 

Petty    Cash     807       5   00 

sj  1 — Mrs.  Robinson,  41  South  St.. 

Goods    as    per    Invoice 

No.   4    7        <  .12 

10.  1— Mrs.   Jones,   24   Main   St. 

Goods    as    per   Invoice 

No.    5     5  7S 

"•  1 — Paid  out  for  Price  Cards     307  I    5(1 

12.  "      1— Amt.    of   Ca'sh    Rales    for 

day      50     52  90 

13.  Jan.  2 — Paid    into    Bank 301     fi2  90 

14.  "      2— J.  W.  Robinson,  89  West- 

ern Ave.,  Goods  as  per 

Invoice  No.  6  6   9  39 

16.       "      2— J.  W.  Robinson,  Paid  on 

Account   6        <  M 

16.  "      2— Returned         from        Mr. 

Brown,      125      North, 
Ave..   Goods  to  be  Ex- 
changed,   Value    (Red.)  t        I    40 

17.  "      2 — Goods    sent    in    Exchange 

to  Mr.  Brown,  Invoice 

No.    7     2        1   79 

15.  "      2— Mrs.  Jones.  24  Main  St  , 

Invoice  No.    8    5       9  35 

19.  "      2— Mrs.   Green.   87   King  St, 

Invoice  No.  9 4       4   30 

20.  "      2— Mrs.  White.  89  Queen  St.. 

Invoice  No.    10    9      11    15 

21.  "      2— E.    W.    Smith,    Paid    on 

Account     8       340 

22.  "      2— Mr.   Elack.  90  Upper  St.. 

Invoice   No.    11     1        S   55 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


23.  "      2— Holden  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Good* 

Received    208     74  00 

24.  "      2 — Sent  Cheque  to  Anderson 

&     Co 201     56   16 

Discount    1  74 

25.  "      2— Paid     for     String     and 

Paper 307       3  80 

26.  "      2— Total  Cash  Sales  for  Day       50     78  90 

27.  "      2— Short  in  Till  (P.  £  L.)..      302  85 

28.  Jan.  3— Paid  into  Bank 301     85  30 

29.  "      3 — Drew     from     Bank     for 

Change    301     50  00 

30.  "      3 — Drew  from  Bank  for  Pri- 

vate   Account    301     25  00 

31.  "      3— E.  W.  Smith,  54  High  St., 

Invoice  No.    12    8       3  59 

3£.       "      3  —  Anderson    &    Co.,    Goods 

Received    201     37   10 

33.  "      3— Mrs.  Jones,   24  Ma'in   St., 

Paid  on   Account 5     10  00 

34.  "      3— Mrs.  White,  89  Queen  St. 

Paid  on  Account 9     1100 

35.  "      3— Discount     9  15 

36.  "      3— H.  E.  Edwards,  77  Main 

St.,   Invoice  No.   13.  .  3       7   40 

37.  "      3 — Universal    Supply    Co., 

Goods    Received    204     22  30 

38.  "      3— Total  Cash  Sales    50     64  79 

39.  "      3— Over    in    Till    302  35 

40.  Jan.  4 — Paid    into   Bank    301     85  79 

41.  "      4— Mr.  Black.  90  Upper  St., 

Invoice  No.    14    1       8  80 

42.  "      4— Mr.   Black   Paid.   Cheque.  1     10  00 

43.  "      4— H.   T.    Edwards   Paid 3       5  00 

44.  "      4— Mrs.  White,  89  Queen  St., 

Invoice   No.    15 9     17  63 

45.  "      4 — Mrs.   Robinson,    41   South 

St.,  Invoice  No.  16 7       9  38 

46.  "      4-   Mrs.   Robinson   Paid  Last 

Account     7       8  32 

47        "      4^Paid  Holden  Bros.,  Cheque     203     50  00 
48.       "      4— Cash    Sales    50     83  70 

The  vertical  lines  with  which  the  Jour- 
nal is  ruled  are  not  here  shown. 

In    the    next    article    the    method    of 
transferring  these  items  from  the  Jour- 
nal to  the  Ledger  will  be  explained. 
(To  be  Continued) 


BRIGGS'  TRAVELLERS 

It  has  ever  been  the  practice  of  the 
Briggs  House  to  educate  its  own 
travellers,  encouraging  and  promoting 
young    men    in    the    establishment    who 


TRAVELLERS'  DIRECTORY 

Continued  from  page  32 

R.   B.   Redditt,  Western   Ontario. 

I.  N.  Berenson,  Eastern   Ontario. 

J.  Bidgood,  Northern   Ontario. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto: 

Win.  M.   Woods,   Western   Ontario. 

Jas.  B.  Fraser,  Eastern  Ontario. 

F.  W.  Barnett,  Quebec  Province. 

H.  A.  Dawson,  Northern   Ontario. 

Edward  Hazen,  Maritime  Provinces. 

Wm.   Warwick,   Middle   West. 

Richard  T.  Lewis,  Toronto. 

C.   C.   Pearson,  Montreal. 

H.  B.  Gardner,  Toronto. 

H.  P.  Lee,  Toronto. 

J.  C.  Brown,  Northern  Ontario. 

C.  J.  B.  Wood,  Toronto. 

W.  V.  Roberts,  Toronto. 

R.    S.    Greenwood,    British    Columbia    and 
Alberta. 
B.  Cairns,  Rubber  Stamps,  Toronto: 

W.  P.   Johnson,   Toronto. 

B.  Cairns,  Ontario  and  Quebec. 
Moore  Push  Pin  Co.,  Philadelphia: 

R.  G.  Underwood,  Sales  Manager;    Carroll 

R.    Burkhart,    London,    Ont.,    to    Halifax. 
N.S. 

Howard   Magee,  Winnipeg  to   Vancouver. 
J.  M.  Dent  &  Son,  Publishers,  Toronto: 

W.  A.  Gardner,  Sales  Manager. 

Frank   Matthews,  Far  West. 

Albert  Victor,  Middle  West. 

Duncan     T.     Hargreaves,     Montreal      and 
East. 

J.  G.  Gulliford,  Ontario. 
Geo.  J.  McLeod,  Ltd.,  Publishers,  Toronto: 

J.  C.  Murrie,  Western  Canada. 

H.  R.  Hambly,  Eastern   Canada. 
W.  E.  Coutts,  Greeting  Card  Publisher,  To- 
ronto: 

W.    E.    Coutts,    Western    Canada. 

Wm.  D'Eye,  Ontario. 

Walter  Begg,  Quebec   and   Maritimes. 
Carter's  Ink  Co.,  Montreal: 

Harry    L.    Brooks,    Ontario,    Quebec    and 
Manitoba. 

George  E.  Eaton,  Ontario. 

Henry   W.   Johnson,   Alberta,    British    Co- 
lumbia   and    Saskatchewan. 

R.  H.  Pardellian.  Ontario  and  Quebec. 

Fred  L.  \,  halen,  New  Brunswick  and  Nova 
Scotia. 


showed  special  promise.  The  success  of 
this  method  has  been  attested  by  the  con- 
siderable number  of  travellers  formerly 
with  Canada's  pioneer  publishing  house 
holding  leading  positions  with  other  Can- 
adian houses.  Of  the  five  now  carrying 
Briggs'  books   throughout   Canada,  with 


one    exception    all    have     been     trained 
in  the  House. 

Ernest  W.  Walker,  head  of  the  sales 
department,  came  to  the  house  as  a  boy 
twenty-five  years  ago.  He  was  at  first 
employed  in  the  ship- 
ping department,  but 
in  a  couple  of  years 
iemonstrated  his 
worth,  and  was  taken 
into  the  sales  branch 
Fifteen  years  ago  h? 
was  given  charge  of 
this  section  of  the  busi- 
ness, and  since  then 
.has  established  large 
.connections  not  only 
among  Canadian  book- 
sellers, but  also  among 
the  publishers  of  the 
United  States  and 
Great  Britain. 

R.  J.  Kennedy,  who 
covers  the  cities  of 
Western  Canada,  has 
also  come  up  through 
the  Briggs  school, 
coming  to  the  firm 
about  fifteen  years 
ago,  and  making  his 
way  unward  through 
the  shipping  depart- 
ment, and  one  or  two 
other  positions  until 
he  established  himself 
successfully  in  the 
sales    department. 

John  Ferris  likewise 
has  been  with  the  firm 
about  sixteen  years. 
For  a  time  he  served 
with  the  Retail  Sales 
Department  and  in 
stock-keeping.  Some 
time  later  he  was  giv- 
en charge  of  a  develop- 
Department  which  he 
brought  forward  another  stage,  and 
about  a  year  ago  was  promoted  to 
a  position  on  the  the  travel  linj 
staff. 

W.  J.  Young,  the  single  exception  to 
Continued  on  next  page 


ing      Library 


Eaton,  Crane  &   Pike  Co.,   Pittsfield,  Mass.: 

Herbert   G.    Popham,   Whole   of   Canada. 
"Up  To  Date  Advertising  Co.,  Canisteo,  N.Y. 
(Rulers)  : 

W.  S.  Tuttle,  Eastern  Canada. 

Ernest  Wallace,  Western  Canada. 
Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co.,  New  York: 

Mr.  Barnett,  New  York   City. 

Mr.  Voss,  Denver  to  Coast. 
Chas.  M.  Higgins  Co.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y.: 

A.  N.  Davidson,  Montreal  to  Vancouver. 

A.  C.  Helfenstein,  Texas  to  Winnipeg. 
Pugh   Specialty   Co.,   Toronto: 

Wm.    Cowan,   Toronto    City. 

J.  G.  Jessup,  Sarnia  to  Smith's  Falls  and 
North. 

T.  E.  Young,  Windsor  to  Quebec  City. 

J.  Ross,  Montreal  City  and  Maritime  Pro- 
vinces. 

W.   A.    Crone,   Winnipeg   to   Victoria. 

John  Bidgood,  Northern   Ontario. 

T.  J.  Pugh,  Special  Trips. 
Aubrey     O.    Hurst,     Manufacturers'    Agent, 
Toronto: 

B.  G.  Whitelaw,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Quebec, 
St.  John,  Halifax,  Moncton  and  Freder- 
icton  and  Western   Canada. 

'Calling  on  jobbers  only. 
Boorum  &  Pease  Co.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y.: 

51 


H.  E.  Copeland,  Eastern  territory,  includ- 
ing Quebec. 

P.    Reitzell,    Manitoba,    Alberta    and    Say 
katchewan. 

W.  H.   Palmer,  British    Columbia. 
Musson  Book  Co..  Toronto: 

Wm.  S.  Smart,  Western   Canada. 

I.  L.  Hobden,  Eastern   Canada. 

L.  A.   Gemmel,  Toronto. 

W.   M.  Currer,  Western   Ontario. 

George   Clark,  Eastern   Ontario. 
Weldon   Roberts   Rubber  Co.,  Newark,    N.J.: 

J.  A.    Riedell,   Eastern    Canada. 
Holland  Paper  Co.,  Montreal: 

R.  H.  Ecclestone,  Sales  Manager. 

V.  T.   Haney,  Ontario. 

Alex  Gillies,  Coast  to   Coast. 
Valentine    &    Sons,    United    Publishing    Co- 
Toronto: 

W.  Banks,  Ontario. 

O.   Rittenberg,   Ontario. 

R.  H.   Paget,  Toronto.  . 

J.  C.  Edy,  Winnipeg  and  the  West. 

J.  B.  Blizard,  Montreal  and  the  East        * 
Menzies  &  Co.,  Toronto: 

E.  Howard   Baker,   Western    Canada 
Robt.  Brownlee,  Eastern  Canada. 

F.  J.  Venator,   Ontario. 
J.  B.  Orr,  Toronto. 

W.  C.  Hall,  Special  Representative. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


the  home-education  method,  is  a  graduate 
of  an  English  business  house,  coming  to 
Canada  in  1907,  and  soon  after  entering 
the  Briggs'  employ. 

James  H.  V.  Portch  also  entered  the 
Briggs'  establishment  as  a  boy  of  four- 
teen, and  has  made  progress  through 
practically  every  department  in  the  house, 
for  a  number  of  years  having  charge  of 
the  firm's  shipping.  Within  the  last  few 
months  he  has  been  given  special  charge 
of  library  sales. 


was  "I  forgot."  He  wasn't  ready  for 
the  next  step.  He  did  not  put  his  heart 
in  his  work.  He  learned  nothing  from 
his  mistakes.  He  felt  that  he  was  above 
his  position.  He  was  content  to  be  a 
second-rate  man.     He  ruined  his  ability 


learn    that    the    best    of    his    salary    was 
i.ot  in  his  pay. 


THIS  IS  NOT  SALESMANSHIP 

A  woman  was  heard  to  remark  rec- 
ently that  she  had  purchased  an  article 
from  a  store  at  25c  whereas  her  own 
stationer  had  been  charging  her  45c  for 
the  same  thing.  She  immediately 
i  bought  her  dealer  had  been  robbing 
her.  Upon  enquiry  it  was  found  that 
the  dealer  who  was  selling  this  article 
M  25c  was  losing  money.  It  had  been 
Landed  out  by  a  clerk  who  evidently  did 
not  know  the  price  of  the  goods.  Not 
only  was  he  losing  money  for  his  em- 
ployer but  his  action  was  placing  dis- 
credit on  a  merchant  who  knew  some- 
thing about  his  costs  and  knew  what  he 
should  get  for  every  article.  Salesman- 
ship is  often  defined  as  selling  products 
;t  a  profit.  It  is  not  salesmanship  to 
hand  out  an  article  at  20c  less  than  its 
proper  price. 


WHY  HE  WASN'T  PROMOTED 

He  grumbled.  He  watched  the  clock. 
He  was  stung  by  a  bad  look.  He  was 
always  behind-hand.  He  had  no  iron  in 
his  blood.  He  was  willing,  but  unfitted. 
He  didn't  believe  in  himself.  He  asked 
loo   many  questions.     His   stock   excuse 


A    group    showing    Jeffery    Farnol    engaged    in    a 
game    of    croquet    at    his    home    in    England. 

by  half  doing  things.  He  chose  his 
friends  from  among  his  inferiors.  He 
never  dared  to  act  on  his  own  judg- 
ment. He  did  not  think  it  worth  while 
to  learn  how.  Familiarity  with  slip- 
shop  methods  paralyzed  his  ideal.  He 
tried  to  make  a  bluff  take  the  place  of 
hard  work.  He  thought  it  was  clever 
to  use  coarse  and  profane  language. 
He  thought  more  of  amusements  than 
of  getting  on   in  the  world.     He  didn't 


OPENING  FOR  CANADIAN  TOYS 

According  to  official  information  there 
is  an  opening  for  Canadian  made  toys 
in  China.     A  report  says: 

"The  Chinese  children,  in  common 
with  those  of  other  races,  like  toys. 
China,  being  an  old  country,  possesses 
toys  only  of  the  most  ancient  type,  very 
;  imple,  and  without  mechanical  devices. 
Chinese  toys  are  also  crudely  designed 
and  made  of  cheap  material,  such  as 
mud,  bamboo,  wood,  and  paper;  there- 
fore they  are  offered  on  the  market  at 
small  prices.  In  the  past,  toys  were 
mostly  peddled  by  the  poor,  and  even 
made  and  sold  by  beggars. 

"There  are  certain  seasons  when  toys 
are  in  greatest  demand,  this  being  no 
exception  to  the  custom  in  other  coun- 
tries. The  best  time  for  their  sale  is 
the  New  Year  holidays.  Appropriate 
toys  are  also  sold  for  other  festal  times 
and  seasons. 

"German  competition  has  been  com- 
pletely shut  out  on  account  of  the  war, 
and  the  extremely  high  price  at  which 
American  toys  must  be  sold  precludes 
their  purchase  by  any  but  the  wealthier 
classes  of  people.  The  Spanish  industry 
has  made  great  progress,  but  would  not 
be  able  to  compete  with  the  industries 
of  other  countries  under  normal  con- 
ditions. At  present  Spanish,  British, 
and   American  toys  are  found  on  sale." 


H.    H.    Marshall,    bookseller   and    sta 
tioner  of  Halifax,  left  for  a  trip  to  the 
West  Indies,  the  middle  of  February- 


The  Best  Automobile 
Books 

The  MnHprn    f,a«    Fntrirm  By  J.  B.  RMkun,  B.s.C.E. 

i  ne  moaern   v>as   engine  420  Pages     I50  Dr«wing,  land  illustration, 

PARTIAL  TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 
How  to  Install  How   to   Operate  How    to    Make    Repairs 

The    Carburetor    and    Valves  Storage  Batteries 

The    Ignition    System  Lubricating    and    Oiling 

Mechanism   and   Construction  Foundations.    Piping    and    Shafting 

The   Cream    of   Daily    Experience 

QUESTIONS  AND  ANSWERS  FOR  AUTOMOBILE  STUDENTS  AND  MECHAN- 
ICS.    By  Thomas  Russell.  A.M.     150  pages  ....         Price  $1.25 

AUTOMOBILE  IGNITION,  TIMING  AND  VALVE  SETTING  AND  LIGHTING 
INCLUDING  FORD  SYSTEM.  By  Thomas  H.  Russell,  A.M.,  M.E..  and  John 
B.  Rathbun,  C.E.,  M.E.     240  pages.     Fully  illustrated  -         -         Price  $1.25 

MOTOR  TROUBLES  AND  HOW  TO  REMEDY  THEM.  By  Charles  P.  Root, 
former  Editor  "Motor  Age."     255  pages.     Illustrated  -         -         Price  $1  25 

MOTOR  TRUCK  AND  AUTOMOBILE  MOTORS  AND  MECHANISM.  By  Thomas 
H.  Russell,  A.M..  M.E.,  and  extensions  by  John  B.  Rathbun,  C.E.,  M.E.,  Con- 
sulting  Engineer.      240    pages.      Illustrated  -  Price    $1.25 

AUTOMOBILE  DRIVING  SELF-TAUGHT.  By  Thomas  H.  Russell.  M.E.,  LL.B.. 
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A.B.C.  OF  THE  MOTORCYCLE.  By  W.  J.  Jackman,  M.E.,  author  of  "Facts  for 
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THE  PRACTICAL  HANDBOOK  OF  GAS,  OIL  AND  STEAM  ENGINES.  By 
John  B.  Rathbun,  Instructor  Chicago  Technical  College.  370  pages.  150  line 
drawings    and    illustrations  -------         Price    $1.25 

JOHNSTON'S  NEW  HANDY  MANUAL  on  Plumbing,  Heating,  Ventilating  and 
Mechanical  Refrigeration.     Revised  up-to-date,  fully  illustrated       -     Price  $1.00 

DUSTMAN'S  BOOK  OF  PLANS  AND  BUILDING  CONSTRUCTION.  By  U.  M. 
Dustman  (Licensed  Architect).  The  plans  for  150  modern  houses,  bungalows, 
barns,  etc. Price   $2.00 

RATHBUN'S  AEROPLANE  ENCYCLOPEDIA,  AVIATION  ENGINES,  AERO- 
PLANE CONSTRUCTION  AND  OPERATION,  GLOSSARY  OF  AVIATION 
TERMS  AND  PHRASES.  By  John  B.  Rathbun.  429  pages.  Cloth.  More 
than    220    illustrations  - -  -  Price    $2.00 


Paper 
Motor  Car  Overhauling...    By  V.   W.   Page$   .58 

Motor   Car   Engines By    V.    W.    Page     .35 

Motor  Car  Chassis By  V.  W.  Page     .25 

Motor   Car  Tires    By  Wm.   W.  Scott     .25 

Motor  Car  Magneto   By  V.  W.   Page     .35 

Motor  Car  Carburetors   ...By  V.  W.  Page     .35 

Motor  Car   Battery    By   V.   W.   Page     .35 

The    Motorcycle    Construction,    Operation. 

Care   and    Repair    By   C.   Shattuck     .35 

Motor  Car  Operation By  V.  W.  Page     .50 

Motor  Car  Lighting   ...By  C.   P.   Shattuck     .50 
Motor   Truck   Construction   and   Operation, 

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The    ABC    of    Aerial    Navigation    

By   V.   W.   Page   1.00 
Information.    By  Harvey  E.  Phillips,  cloth  2.50 

THESE   BOOKS  ARE  THE  BIGGEST  VALUE 
IN    THE    TRADE. 


FREDERICK  D.  GOODCHILD, 


266-268  KING  ST.  WEST, 

TORONTO 


PUBLISHER 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


WELDON  ROBERTS 

•  RUBBER     ERASERS  • 


"I  have  heard  nothing  but  praise  for  your  products,  and  hence  I  wish  to 
feature  them  in  my  catalog." — D.  E.  Hotchkin,  The  School  Supply  House, 
Marysville,  Mo. 


WELDON  ROBERTS  RUBBER  Co. NEWARK,  N.J.  US. A. 


THE  "REGENT"  LEVER  FILE 
Packs  Flat. 

Manufacturedby 


The 

Four 
Leading 
Lines  in 

Letter 

Files 

ROTAX       SpriiiR 
Clip 

KISMET      Quick 

Binder 
FALINGE      Flat 

File 

REGENT     Lever 
File 

(Packs  Flat) 

Specially 

Designed   for 

EXHORT 


W.  H.  HILTON  &  CO. 

VEROTAX  WORKS,  ROCHDALE,  England 

Catalogues  and  Samples  on  application. 


THERE  ARE  REASONS 

for  the  largely  increased  sales  of 
Bradley     Water     Color     Boxes     for 

schools.    The  standard  of  quality  has 
been  maintained  and  prompt  deliver- 
ies are  always  made. 
A  few  of  the  leading  boxes: 

B-l  — 8  semi-moist  pans,  6  stand- 
ard colors  with  sepia  and 
charcoal  gray. 

B-l  — Special — 8  semi-moist  pans, 
6  standard  colors  with  white 
and  black. 

A-13 — 4  semi-moist  pans,  carmine, 
blue  and  2  pans  of  gamboge. 

A-14 — 4  semi-moist  pans,  carmine, 
blue,  gamboge,  black. 

A-8  — 4  dry  cakes,  carmine,  blue, 
and  2  pans  of  gamboge. 

A-9  — 4  dry  cakes,  carmine,  blue, 
gamboge,  black. 

For  sale  by  the  leading  jobbers,  or 
trade  orders  will  be  promptly  filled 
by 

The  Geo.  M.  Hendry  Co.,  Ltd. 

215  Victoria  Street,  -  TORONTO 


The  wonderful 


Lines 


Paper  Fasteners 

Erasers  and 
Letter  Openers 


The  constantly  increasing  demand  for  these  products  prompts  our  suggesting  that  dealers  anticipate  their  requirements  well 
in  advance.     This  will  enable  you  to  render  the  best  service  to  your  customers  by  having,  in  stock,  what  they  want  —  always. 
Q  K     ^1  —   Write  for  our  Latest  Prices  and  Literature  — 

THE  0.  K.  MANUFACTURING  CO.,  SYRACUSE,  N.  Y„  U.S.A. 


53 


I'.OOKSKLL  E  R      AND      S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  K 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

—A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling- 
Dealers  :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


Manufacturers  of 


Adding   Machine  Rolls 
Die    Wiping    Paper 

and 

ALL  CLASSES  OF  SMALL  ROLLS 
FOR    AUTOMATIC    REGISTERS 

Paper    Manufacturers    Co. 

Philadelphia  Penna. 


Retail   price  per  package  of  60  boxes  tfo.oo 
Dealers  price  #5.85. 

Send  $5.85  for  a  Sample  Package  to-day 


H.  A.  BEMISTER 


10  Victoria   Strest 


Montreal 


••▲▲▲▲AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA9* 

The  Guarantee  of  Quality" 


ULTON 

Self-Inking 

\  Stamp  Pads 

■^  Hcmufactured  '<// 

3  FULTON  SPECIALTY  CO. 

J    Klizabeth,  New  Jerxri/ 

••▼▼▼▼YVTT*YTTVTVTTTYYY<r«5 


Line  Oaters 
Numberers 
Sign  Markers 
Rubber  Type 
Printing 
Outfits 


► 


NEW  GOODS 

DESCRIBED  AND  ILLUSTRATED 

WELCOME  HOME  PAPETERIES 

An  interesting  new  offering  by  the 
Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co.,  is  a  "Welcome 
Home"  papeterie  containing  a  quire  of 
paper  and  24  envelopes  of  olive  drab 
stock.  The  box  cover  has  a  flag  design 
in  color  on  olive  drab  background,  with 
the  words  "Welcome  Home'*  intertwined 
with  a  laurel   spray. 

A   NEW  CALCULATING  MACHINE 

The  Controller  Company,  Inc.,  a 
corporation  organized  under  the  laws  of 
the  State  of  New  York,  is  manufactur- 
ing a  new  calculating  machine  called 
"The  Controller."  The  company's  fac- 
tory is  at  '!2  Central  avenue,  Newark. 
N.J.,  and  its  general  offices  are  tempor- 
arily at  32  Broadway,  New  York,  but  it 
is  stated  they  will  soon  be  moved  to 
Newark. 

The  Controller  has  several  interesting 
features,  a  description  of  which  would 
require  a  great  deal   of  space.     The  ma 


•THE    CONTROLLER" 
A     New    Calculating     Machine 

chine  is  not  bulky,  notwithstanding  the 
fact  that  it  has  a  capacity  of  8x9x16 
figures.  It  is  portable  and  occupies 
small  space.  A  view  of  this  machine, 
taken  from  a  photograph,  is  shown  here- 
with. 

NEW  TIME  STAMP 

The  Ecor.omo  Time  Stamp  is  a  new 
device  of  its  kind  designed  for  stamping 
time  on  mail  when  received  or  answered, 
to  stamp  time  tickets,  or  shop  tickets 
and  other  transactions  where  the  hour 
and    date    would  eliminate    guess    work, 


Pugh  Specialty  Co., Limited 

38-42  Clifford  Street 


TORONTO 


CANADA 


Manufacturers  and  Manufacturers' 

Agents. 
French    Ivory    (Made    in    Canada). 
Photo       Frames,       Boxes,       Toilet 
Articles  and  Novelties. 
Booklets,  Post   Cards,  etc.,  for  all 
seasons   and   occasions. 
Toy  Books. 

Pennants    and     Textile    Novelties, 
Active  Service  Banners. 
Welcome      Home       Banners      and 
Pennants,    Victory    Pennants    and 
Celebration  lines. 
Purses,  Wallets   and   School   Bags. 
Souvenir   Novelties. 
If    you    don't    get    our    catalogue 
regularly,  send  us  your  name. 
It's    well   worth  having. 


L.E.B.  BINDER  CLIP 

Number  6 

READY    FOR    DELIVERY 

R  emember, 
please,  that 
the  L.E.B.  is 
the  ONLY 
Steel  Jaw 
Binding 
Clip  which 
permits  re- 
versing the 
arms  AB- 
SOLUTELY FLAT  against  the 
papers  which  it  contains. 

Write  for  catalog  and  prices 
CUSHMAN  &  DENISON  MFG.  CO. 

240-242  W.  23rd  St.,  New  York 


Artists' 
Material 

Drawing  Material 

Mfrs.  since  1854  of  high 
grade  Artists'  and  School 
Oil  and  Water  Colors, 
Canvases,  Brushes, Wood- 
en ware  Outfits,  Drawing  Tables,  Boards, 
riling  Cabinet-. 

Catalogue  and  sample  books  on  request 

F.  WEBER  &  CO. 

Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Branches : 
St.  Louis,  Mo. 

aj*  Baltimore, Md. 


54 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling — 
Dealers :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


Known  and  sold  wherever  Rubber 
Stamps  are  used 

B.  G.  Volger  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

Passaic,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 

Our  Specialty: 

STAMPING  INKS  OF  ALL  KINDS 


The  F-B  Loose  Leaf 
Holder 


Pat.    May   13,   1913 

The  most  demanded  and  cheapest 
transfer  binder.  Adjustable  to  size  of 
paper  and  distance  between  punch 
holes.  Exchangeable  posts.  Wholesale 
$2.10  per  dozen.     Send  for  particulars. 

ROCKHILL   &   VIETOR 

Sole  Agents,  Dept.  F.  B,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 
Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago 


Your   Sales  „  Increase 

when  you  adopt  our 
Sample-Set  Advertising 

for  more  business  on 
Typewriter  Ribbons  and  Carbons 
It  is  a  direct-to-user  adver- 
tising which  brings  the  pros- 
pect right  to  your  store. 
The  Caribonum  Policy 
is      "  Quality      First "      and 
stationers  can  therefore  rely 
on   a   line   of  goods   of   such 
standard     quality     and     uni- 
formity   as    puts    them    in    a 
position    to    permanently   re- 
tain the  trade  of  every  cus- 
tomer   who     once    uses     the 
goods. 

Give  Us  A  Trial. 

CARIBONUM  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

54  Wellington  Street  East,  Toronto 


promote  efficiency  and  show  the  time 
required  on  orders  as  they  move  from  one 
department  to  another.  The  dial  indi- 
cator is  held  in  position  by  a  friction- 
spring,  which,  when  set — stays  set. 

The  rubber  die  being  mounted  on  a 
cushion  three-sixteenths  of  an  inch  thick 
and  the  flexible  cord  in  handle  are  assur- 
ances of  uniform  impressions  regardless 
of  rapidity  of  use. 

NEW  TALLY  CARDS 

Eight  new  designs  in  tally  cards  and 
as  many  in  dance  programmes,  all 
printed  in  sepia,  are  among  the  month's 
new  offerings  by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 

A   NEW  DEVICE 

A  Niagara  Falls  man,  Customs  In- 
spector Maurice  J.  MacMahon,  has  just 
received  a  patent  on  a  remarkably  sim- 
ple but  useful  device  which  will  prove 
a  boon  to  the  employees  of  banks  or  anv 
other  institution  which  has  to  handle 
money  or  sheets  of  paper. 

The  device  is  the  MacMahon  finger 
band,  and  is  simply  a  three-quarter  cir- 
clet of  corrugated  rubber  fitted  on  a 
steel  form  to  fit  the  end  of  the  thumb 
or  any  finger,  and  takes  the  place  of 
wetting  the  finger  with  tongue  or 
sponge  in  counting  bank  notes,  sheets 
of  paper,  leafing  books,  etc.  Mr.  Mac- 
Mahon got  the  idea  through  his  aversion 
to  using  the  sponge  in  his  office,  and 
finally  he  hit  upon  the  plan  of  stretch- 
ing a  rubber  band  around  his  finger. 
This  suggested  that  if  a  bendable  steel 
form  could  be  put  inside  a  band,  a  de- 
vice to  save  health  and  time  could  be 
produced  which  would  be  a  boon  to  hu- 
manity. 

The    device    may      be      worn      on    the 
finger   without   inconvenience   when    one 
is  writing. 
A  TOY  KNITTER 

A  new  toy  for  girls  is  "Yankee-duz- 
zit,"  which  is  a  real  construction  toy. 
The  ingenious  little  machine  knits  a 
beautiful  cord  of  varying  thickness.  The 
production  of  the  cord  is  in  itself  most 
fascinating,  but  this  is  only  the  begin- 
ning, for  with  the  cord  the  child  can 
make  and  trim  dolls'  clothing,  picture 
frames,  pillow  cords,  handkerchief  and 
{•love  cases,  and  many  other  articles  both 
I'seful  and  ornamental. 

It  is  the  invention  of  Sergeant  E.  R. 
Madan,  who  during  the  war  helped  de- 
\elop  gas  masks  and  gas  defense  mater- 
ial at  the  Long  Island  City  gas  defense 
plant.  He  is  president  of  the  Yankee 
Toy  Products  Corporation,  whose  office 
is  at  13-15  East  22nd  Street.  New  York. 


,  Dexter's 

STAR 

MANIFOLD 

LINEN 


With  unlimited  uses.  Star  Manifold 
Linen  is  a  stock  that  practically  every 
customer  you  have  could  use, — par- 
ticularly for  foreign  letters.  Attrac- 
tive, strong,  durable  and  beautifully 
finished;  suitable  for  pen  as  well  as 
typewriter.  For  all  kinds  of  office 
systems,  Star  Manifold  is  a  recog- 
nized   business    necessity. 

Send    for   samples   and    prices. 

C.H.  Dexter  &  Sons,  Inc. 

Windsor  Locks,   Connecticut 


The  Best  Automobile  and  Scientific  Books 


Motor  Car  Overhauling  by  V.W.Page    .50 
Motor  Car  Engines  by  VictorW.  Page    .35 
Motor  Car  Chassis  by  Victor  W.  Page    .25 
Motor  Car  Tires       by  Wm.  W.Scott    .25 
Motor  Car  Magneto      by  V.W.Page    .35 
Motor  Car  Carburetors  by  V.W.Page    .3 
Motor  Car  Battery  by  Victor  W.  Page    .35 
The  Motorcycle  Construction,  Oper- 
ation, Care  and  Repair  byC.Shattuck    .35 
Motor  Car  Operation     by  V.W.Page    .50 
Motor  Car  Lighting  by  C.P.  Shattuck    JO 
Motor  Truck  Construction  and  Oper- 
ation, Maintenance,  Repair  and  Care  1.00 
GasEngineTroublesbyJ.B.  Rathbun  1.25 
Handbook  of  Gas,  Gasoline  and  Oil 
Engines  by  JohnB.  Rathbun  1.25 

Automobile  Ignition  and  Lighting, in- 
cluding Ford  System  1.25 

FREDERICK  D.  GOODCHILD,    -  fj^/j 

PI.lBI.IMHm 


This  advertisement  appears  regularly  in  Mac- 
Lean's  Magazine,  Every  woman's  World  and 
Farmers'  Magazine,  thus  creating  demands  by 
the  public  at  the  bookstores.  You  should 
have  theme  boobs  in  stock  to  fill  orders  that 
will    result. 


INKSTANDS 

OF    ALL     STYLES 


Manufactured  by 


Frank   A.  Weeks 

Mfg.  Co. 

93  John  St..  NEW  YORK  CITY.  N.Y. 
Canadian  Jobbers   handle  our  lines. 


55 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Good  Selling  Specialties  for  the  Stationery  Trade 

— A  Guide  for  Buying  and  an  Aid  to  Selling- 
Dealers  :  Keep  Your  Eye  on  This  Department  for  New  Lines 


FOUNTAIN   PENS 
GRAVITY  STYLOS 
INK   PENCILS 


We     offer 
ideas 
with 
our 


the     trade     new 
i        merchandise 
guarantee    that 
goods    are    right. 
PARAMOUNT 
SELF-FILLER 
PEN 
A  n      excellent 
pen,         splen- 
didly     made, 
that    retails 
at        $2.50. 
a  1  lowing 
a    liberal 


gravity 

Stylo 

Pen 

With 
a     new 
and   exclu- 
9  i  v  e     self- 
filing   device. 
Three  styles  to 
retail     at     $1.50 
$1.7.",    and    $2.50 
Prompt     Deliveries 
Assured. 

Farrell  &  Hosinger 

Company 
LARRY  J.  FARRELL 

GEORGE  N.  HOSINGER 
Manufacturers  of 
FOUNTAIN.  STYLO- 
GRAPHIC  AND  GOLD  PEVS 
Canadian  Representative  Wanted 
63-65  Irving  St.,  Jersey   City.    N..I. 


margin 

of 

Piofii 


NEW  IN  MAIL  DISTRIBUTOR 

The  Currier-McCord  Company  of 
Minneapolis,  Minn.,  is  marketing  a  new 
mail  distributor  in  which  the  trays  are 
arranged  in  a  group  on  either  side  of  a 
standard,  one  above  the  other.  The  ar- 
;  angement  is  such  as  to  use  a  minimum 
of  desk  space  and  easy  access  to  the 
contents  of  each  tray  is  one  of  its 
features.  The  device  is  made  for  light 
>\ eight  sheet  steel  and  is  finished  in  olive 
green  enamel.  It  is  provided  in  four, 
six   or  eight  tray   sizes. 

NEW   DESK   PAD 

The  accompanying  illustration  shows 
the  new  clip  glass  desk  pad  introduced 
by  L.  Sainberg,  of  West  Houston  street, 
New   York.     It  is  flexible,   and   covert- 1 


with  an  extra  quality  of  silk  moire.  The 
glass  is  held  in  place  by  two  nickeled 
clips.  The  bottom  is  lined  with  canton 
flannel.  There  are  no  extension  edges  to 
gather  dust  as  glass  and  pad  fit  flush. 
French  plate  glass  is  used. 


T.  C.  Allen  &  Co.,  Halifax,  are  printing 
another  edition  of  the  Cape  Breton  Giant, 
by  J.  D.  Gillis. 


Made 
in 
Canada 


Adding  Machine  Rolls 

More   Profit  for  the  Dealer 

Manufacturers'  Agent  for 

PURE  VEGETABLE 
PARCHMENT 

There  is  good  money  in  these  lines  for  Dealers' 
Get  afier  this  business  in  your  lerritory. 

E.  A.  CRIPPEN 

Successor  to.Trie  Monarch  Paper  Co. 

79  Spadina  Avenue,  Toronto 


"Games  that  Amuse" 

Wanted  a  company  to  take 
over  the  Canadian  patents  of 
the  Liberty  Games  Company 
on  a  royalty  basis,  or  can 
buy  outright.  Products  in- 
clude : — 

Liberty  Checker  Board 
Liberty  Chess  Board 
Who? 
Tinkles 

To  those  interested  address 
The  Liberty  Games  Co. 

2149  N.  Vanpelt  St. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


GET  THE  BEST!  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THE  EATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee,  Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 


Housatonic 


56 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


British  Goods  Are  Standards  of  Value 


Charles  W.  Baker 

Buying  Agent 

General  Merchandise  and 
Products  of  Great  Britain. 
M  a  n  u  facturers'  invoices 
forwarded  to  Buyers. 
A  live  buying  agent  on  the 
spot  will  save  you  money 
and  look  after  your  deliv- 
eries. 

Selling    Commissions     un- 
dertaken. 
References  on  application. 

24  Silk  Street  &  42-46  Whitecross  St., 
London   E.C.  1.,  England 

Cables  : 
Telereka,  London.     Code:  A. B.C.  5th 
Phones : 
693  Central.    2107  City.     2615   D.iUton 

SCHOOL  AND  OFFICE 
REQUISITES 

GEO.  WRIGHT  & 
CO.,  Headquarters 
for  S  t  a  t  i  o  ners' 
Sundries.  The  "Re- 
quisite House,"  92, 
Clerkenwell  Road, 
London,  E.  C.  1. 
Contractors  to  the 
Home  and  Colon- 
ial Governments, 
the  London  Coun- 
ty Council,  etc. 
Manufacturers  to 
the  Wholesale  and 
Export  Trade. 
Drawing  Instruments, 
Nature    Study    Box, 


For  Blackboards 

"Wright's 
Dustless"  Chalk 

Scholastic :     Rules, 
Wright's     "Blackine, 

etc.  Commercial :  Filing  Apparatus,  Ink- 
stands, Stationery  Cases,  Cash  Boxes, 
Wright's  Pencil-pointed  Pens,  and  General 
Office  Sundries.  Fancy :  Tourists'  Writing 
Cases,    Penholders,    and    Games,    etc. 

We  are  now  open  again  for  good  travelling 
representation    in   Canada. 


Hold  the  Line 

Here's  the  line  to  hold 
-^lohn  Heath's  Tele- 
phone Pen.  You  will 
not  hold  it  Ion"-  be- 
cause it  sells  so  quick- 
ly. There's  quality 
about  it.  It  writes 
smoothly,  never  cor- 
rodes, and  lasts  long. 
Get  connected  with 
the  Telephone  Pen  for 
quick  sales. 

Supplied  by  all  the  leading  Whole- 
sale Houses  in  Toronto  &  Montreal 

(Registered) 

London  (Eng.)  Export  Agency 

8  St.  Bride  Street 
LONDON,  E.C. 


AFTER  THE  WAR 

I  shall  welcome  orders  or  en- 
quiries for  my  British-made 
Carded  Goods,  Writing  and 
Drawing  Sets,  Stationers'  Sun- 
dries, etc. 

At  present  my  output  is 
absorbed  for  Government 
orders,  Orders  of  National 
Importance,  and  for  old- 
standing  Clients  of  the 
British    Wholesale    Trade. 


Illustrated  list  on  request 


H.  A.  COOMBS'S  CARDED  GOODS 

10  Farrintjdon  Avenue,  London,  E.C.  4.,  Enj. 


'^mmmimmim'mm'mmmiw'Mi' 


The   spaces   on   this 

page  are  equivalent 

to 

Double  Buyers' 

Guide  Spaces 

THE  RATE  IS 

£1  Os.  7d.  Per  Month 

•on  Yearly   Contract 
Single  Insertion  £1  8s  lid 
A    Good   Live    Page— High 

value    in    publicity   at 
minimum  cost 


ft^i^iyWt?Wti^t^f^fi^w<iMwti»rtffgrit^vir?i 


For  All  British 

Fancy  Leather 

Goods 

Fancy   Jewellery,    Photo 
Frames,  Etc. 


Write: 

S.  P.  COOPER 

Central  Agency 

36    Camomile  St.,   London,  E.C.  3. 
England 


Before  placing  your  orders,  apply  to  us  for 
samples  and  quotations.  We  are  paper  makers 
and   wholesale  and  export   paper  merchants 


Registered 


Trade  Mark 


W.  V.   BOWATER  &  SONS,  LIMITED 

1  59  Queen  Victoria  St.,  London,  E.C.  4. Eng. 
Cables:  " Sparteolu*       London. 


BOOKSELLER      A  N"  D     STATIC  N  E  R 


&   The  Davis  Novelty  Co.  ^ 

*  Registered 


Leather  Goods  and   Novelties 
BILLFOLDS   A  SPECIALTY 


^ 


212-214   Mappin   Building 

MONTREAL 

Phone    Uptown    398 


A 


Manufacturers  of 
DIE-STAMPED 

CHRISTMAS   CARDS 

A  Five  and  Ten  Cent  Line 
AND 

PRIVATE  CHRISTMAS 
GREETING  CARDS 

329  Craig  Street  West,  MONTREAL 


Crucible  Pens 

BRJTI3H 

25  VARIETIES. 
Send  for  price  list 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co., 

Limited 

TORONTO  CANADA 


B.  CAIRNS 

Manufacturer  of 

Rubber  and  Metal  Stamps, 

Brass  Signs,  Seals,  Stencils, 

Burning  Brands,  Memorial   Plates. 

77  Queen  St.  East 

Tel.  Main  3760  TORONTO 

Your  advertisement  here 

will  be  read  by 

Booksellers  and  Stationers 

throughout  Canada. 


ART   SUPPLIES. 

Artists'    Supply    Co.,    77    York    St.,    Toronto. 
A.    Ramsay   &   Son    Co.,   Montreal. 
Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co..    Limited.    215    Victoria    St.. 
Toronto. 

BLACKBOARDS    (Slate   and   Hyloplate) 
Ceo.   M.    Hendry   ft   Co.,   215   Victoria   St..  Toronto. 

BLANK    BOOKS. 

Boorunt   &   Pease  Co.,   Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,    Gillies    &    Co..   Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal,      Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Dominion    Blank    Book    Co.,    Berthierville.    Que. 
National    Blank    Book    Co.,    Holyoke,    Mass. 
The  Copp,    Clark    Co..  Toronto. 
Warwick   Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 

BLOTTING    PAPERS. 

The    Albemarle    Paper   Co..    Richmond.    Va 
Eaton-Dikeman   Co.,   Lee,   Mass. 
Menzies    &    Co..    Limited.    Toronto. 
Richmond    Paper   Mfg.    Co..    Richmond.    Va. 
Standard   Paper  Mfg.   Co.,   Richmond,   Va. 

CODE    BOOKS. 

The    American    Code    Co..    88    Nassau    St.,    New 

York. 
John   W.    Hartfield.   N.Y.    Produce   Exchange.    NY 

CRAYONS. 

Binney    ft    Smith,   New  York. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     ft     Co..      168     King     St.     W. 
Toronto. 

EYELETTING   MACHINES. 

Elbe  File   and   Binder  Co..  New  York.   N.Y. 
Menzies    ft   Co.,    Limited.    Toronto. 

ENVELOPES. 

Brown  Bros..  Limited,  Toronto. 
Buntin,  Gillies  ft  Co..  Hamilton. 
Copp.    Clark    Co.,   Toronto. 

W.   V.   Dawson,   Limited.   Montreal.   Toronto.    Win- 
nipeg. 
Menzies   ft   Co.,   Limited.  Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros,    ft    Rutter.    Toronto. 

KRA8RR8. 

Menzies    ft   Co.,    Limited.   Toronto. 

St.    Mungo   Mfg.    Co..    Glasgow.    Scotland 

Weldon    Roberts    Rubber   Co.,    Newark.    N.J. 

FANCY   PAPERS.   TI8SUES   AND  *BOXES. 

Dennison    Mfg.   Co.,    Boston. 

Mpn-'es    ft    Co..    Limited.   Toronto. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     ft     Co.,     468     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 

FOUNTAIN   PENS. 
Modern    Pen    Co..    New    York. 
Mabie.   Todd    ft    Co..    473   College   Ct..   Toronto. 
A.     R.     MacDougall     ft     Co..     468     King    St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
Paul    E.    Wirt    Co..    Brown     Bros..    Ltd.,    Toronto, 

Canadian    Agents. 

INKS.  MUCILAGE   AND  GUMS. 

Chas.   M.    Higeins    ft    Co..    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

The  Carter's   Ink   Co..  Montreal. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,      Montreal.      Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
Reliance    Ink    Co..    Winnipeg.    Man. 
Royal    Ink    Co..    53    Yonge    St.,    Toronto. 
R.    S.    Stafford    Co..    Toronto. 
"Glucine."   Menzies    ft    Co..    Limited.    439    King    St 

W..    Toronto. 

INDELIBLE   INK. 

Carter's    Ink    Co..    Montreal. 

Payson's   Indelible   Ink. 

S.    S.    Stafford    Co..    Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 

A.     R.     MacDougall     ft     Co.,     468     King     St.     W. 

Toronto. 
The  Sengbusch   Co.,   Milwaukee. 

KINDERGARTEN   MATERIALS. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co..    Limited.    215    Victoria    St  . 
Toronto. 

LEAD  AND  COPYING  PENCILS. 

American    Pencil   Co.,   New  York. 

Wm.    Cane   ft    Sons.   Newmarket.    Ont. 

A.     R.    MacDougall     ft    Co..     468    King    St.     W., 

Toronto. 
Menzies    &    Co..    Limited.   Toronto. 


MAPS 

We  can  supply  the  trade  with  anything  of 
the  map  line  as  well  as  undertake  any  kind  in 
Map-Making.  Road  Maps,  Motor  Guides, 
Commercial  Maps,  Atlases. 

The  Scarborough  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited 

36  James  St.  N.,  Hamilton,    Ont. 


WATERSTON'S 


BEE 


BRAND 


MARK 


SEALING   WAX 


Factory: 
W'arriston  Works,  Edinburgh,  Scotland 


Waste  Paper  Balers 

The  "CLIMAX" 

Steel  Fireproof  Baler 

turns  your  waste  into 
profit. 

Made  in  12  sizes. 

Send  for  Catalogue. 

CLIMAX  BALER  CO. 

HAMILTON.  ONT. 


SELL 


MACLEAN'S 


The  Magazine  for  Canadians 


20c  A  COPY 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


School  Rulers 

NEW  LINE  NOW  READY 

New  Shapes   and    Right    Prices. 
Send  for  samples  and  quotations. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

CANISTEO,  N.Y. 

W.  S.  TUTTLE.  Manager 
Cemmercial  Ruler  Department 


G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West,  Toronto 

Manufacturer  and  Importer 

Pictures,  Frames,  Mirrors,  Statuary  —  every- 
thing in  Picture  Framing  outfits.  $150.00 
will  start  you  in  a  profitable  line  of  business. 
Crayon  and  Water  Color  Portrait  Enlarge- 
ments. Send  your  pictures  to  me.  I  will 
frame    them    at    low     prices.       I     manufacture 

500  different  pieces  of  beautiful  French  bronze 
finished  s.'atues.  $75.00  will  make  a  beauti- 
ful  display. 


William  Sinclair 
&  Sons,  (Stationers) 

LIMITED 
Otley  Yorks  England 

Manufacturers  of  Cheap  Stationery 


YOUR  ADV. 

HERE 

WILL  BE 

RECEIVED  BY 

STATIONERS 

FROM 

COAST  TO 

COAST 


LOOSE    LEAF    BOOKS,    BINDERS    AND 
HOLDERS. 

The   Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Boorum    &    Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn. 

Buntin.    Gillies    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 

W.      V.      Dawson,      Limited,     Montreal.      Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp,   Clark  Co..  Toronto. 
Luckett    Loose    Leaf,    Limited,    215    Victoria    St., 

Toronto. 
National    Blank    Book    Co..    Holyoke,    Mass. 
Rockhill  &   Vietor,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York  City. 
Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter,   Toronto. 
Stationers'    Loose    Leaf    Co.,    203    Broadway.    N.Y., 

and    Milwaukee,    Wis. 

LEATHER  AND  FANCY  GOODS. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

MAPS   AND   GLOBES 
Rand,    McNally    &    Co..    Chicago. 
The   Copp.   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
Geo.   M.   Hendry   Co.,    215   Victoria   St..   Toronto. 
The    Scarborough    Co.    of    Canada.    Hamilton.    Ont 

PAPER    BALERS 
Climax    Baler    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
PAPER  FASTENERS. 
Ideal    Specialties   Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St.,    New 

York   City. 
O.    K.    Manufacturing    Co.,    Syracuse,    N.Y. 

PAPER    MAKERS 
Bowater    &     Sons,     Limited,     W.     V.,     159     Queen 
Victoria     St.,     London,     E.C. 

PAPETERIES   AND   WRITING   PAPERS. 

The   Copp    Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
Buntin,    Gillie3    &    Co..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Clark    Bros.    &    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
W.   V.   Dawson,   Limited,   Montreal,   Toronto.    Win- 
nipeg. 
The  Brown  Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Menzies    &   Co.,    Limited,   Toronto. 
Warwick    Bros.   A   Rutter.   Toronto. 

PLAYING  CARDS. 

Goodall's   English    Playing   Cards.    A.   O.    Hurst.   32 

Front   St.   W.,   Toronto. 
U.   S.  Playing  Card  Co.,   Windsor,   Ont. 

POST   CARDS.   GREETING   CARDS,   ETC. 
A.    O.    Hurst,    Canadian    representative.    32    Front 

St.    W.,    Toronto. 
Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited,   Toronto. 
Philip    G.    Hunt    &    Co.,    332    Balham     High    Rd.. 

London,    Eng. 
Pugh   Specialty  Co.,   38-42   Clifford  St.,  Toronto. 
Valentine   &   Sons    Publishing   Co..   Toronto. 

RUBBER    STAMPS,    STENCILS,    ETC. 

Bernard   Cairns,    77    Queen   St.   W.,   Toronto. 
Fulton    Specialty    Co.,    Elizabeth.    N.J. 

SCIENCE    APPARATUS 

Geo.   M.   Hendry   &  Co.,   215   Victoria   St..   Toronto 

SCHOOL   SUPPLIES. 

Geo.    M.    Hendry    Co.,    Limited,    215    Victoria    St.. 
Toronto. 

SCHOOL   AND    OFFICE   RULERS. 

The    Up-to-Date    Co.,    Canisteo,    N.Y. 

SHEET  MUSIC. 

McKinley  Music  Co.,   1601-15   East  Fifty-Fifth   St.. 
Chicago. 

STANDARD    COMMERCIAL    PUBLICATIONS. 

Morton,  Phillips  &  Co.,  Montreal. 

STATIONERS'  SUNDRIES. 

Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,   Wholesale  Stationers,    Toronto. 

Buntin,   Gillies   &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

The    Copp.    Clark    Co.,    Wholesale    Stationers,    To- 
ronto. 

Clark  Bros.   &  Co..   Ltd.,  Winnipeg,   Man. 

W.  V.  Dawson,   Limited,   Montreal,  Toronto,   Win- 
nipeg. 

Warwick  Bros.   &  Rutter.  Toronto. 

STEEL    WRITING    PENS. 

John    Heath,    8    St.    Bride   St.,   E.C,    London. 

Hinks.   Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 

Esterbrook    Pen    Co.,    Brown    Bros.,    Ltd..    Toronto, 
Canadian  Representatives. 

TOYS,    PUZZLES 

A.    C.    Gilbert. 

Menzies    &    Co.,    Limited.   Toronto. 


59 


ELBE  FILE   &   BINDER   CO. 

97  Reade  Street  New  York 

McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper  Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montreal 


TICKET   and  CONDUC 
TOR   PUNCHES 

the  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Co 

HAMILTON.  OHIO.  U.S.*. 


Desk  Pads  a^Cloth  Covered  Cabinets 


L.  Hoffman,  45  Lafayette  St.,  N.Y.C. 


Sloan-Duployan     is     the     world's     best     and 
simplest   system    of   shorthand. 
Sloan-Duployan    Shorthand   Instructor^  .80 

Sloan-Duployan    Reporters'    Rules 1.00 

Sloan-Duployan        Learner's       Reading 

Book     50 

Sloan-Duployan       Reporters'       Reading 

Book    50 

Sloan-Duployan    Shorthand    Dictionary     .40 

Sloan-Duploya'n    Phrase   Book    1.25 

List    of    other    S-D     Shorthand     Books    on 
application. 

Over  5,000  students  of  this  system  in  the 
Dominion  of  Newfoundland  and  Canada. 
Every  up-to-date  educational  book  store 
should  carry  a  stock  of  these  books.  Lib- 
eral discount  to  the  trade. 
S.  E.  Garland,  Publisher,  Garland  Building, 
117-9  Water  St.,  St.  John's,  Dominion  of 
Newfoundland. 


MENTION 

BOOKSELLER  AND 

STATIONER 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


BOOK  BUYERS'  GUIDE 


CODE  WILL  FORM 

Simple,  clear  and  concise 
Ready-made  Will. 

Price  $1.80  per    dozen. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited 

517  Wellington  St.  West  Toronto 


SELF  AND  SEX  SERIES 

Keep    these    books    in    sight.     They    are    stead) 
sellers  because  90  out  of  every  100  who  pa.*«  your 
store    are    prospective    customers. 
Four    Books   to  Men: — 

What  a  Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know. 

W'haJt  a  Young  Man  Ought  to  Know. 

What    a    Young    Husband    Ought    to  Know 

What  a   Man  of  46   Ought   to   Know. 
Hour   Books   to   Women:— 

What   a    Young   Girl    Ought    to    Know. 

What  a  Young   Woman   Ought  to   Know. 

What   a    Young    Wife   Ought   to    Know. 

What  a   Woman  of  45  Ought   to  Know. 
$1.00    Each. 

WILLIAM   BR1GGS.    Publisher.    Toronto 


WILLS 

of  the 
Law  of  Succession  after  Death 

Written  by  Walter  E.  Lear,  Barrister-at-Law, 
in  plain,  simple  language  and  intended  to  be 
used  by  the  general  public.  It  contains  concise 
statement  of  the  Law  of  Wills  in  force  in  all 
the  Provinces  of  Canada,  and  Forms  of  Wills 
and  Codicils.  Printed  in  large  type.  This  is 
a  book  that  should  be  read  by  every  person 
before  making  a  will.  Agents  wanted.  Price, 
$1,  in  cloth  binding.  Liberal  discount  to  the 
trade.  Law  Books,  Limited.  152  Bay  St.. 
Toronto. 


LANGUAGES 
yyORLID-KOMrC  SYSTEM.  MASTERKEY 
to  All  Languages.  Six  Textbooks,  $1.44. 
French  Pronunciation-Chart,  37c  ;  Spanish,  37c. 
Aviation  Dictionary,  $1.50.  French-English 
Aviation  Dictionary,  61c.  Languages,  143 
West   47th.   New   York. 


DIRECTORY   OF  PUBLISHERS. 
FICTION. 
Thomas  Allen,  215  Victoria  St.,  Toronto,   Ont. 
William    Briggs,    Queen    and    John    Sts.,    Toronto, 

Ont. 

Cassell   &   Co.,   55    Bay   St.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
Copp.  Clark  Co..  517   Wellington   St.   W.,  Toronto, 

Ont. 

3.  M.  Dent  &  Sons.  27  Melinda  St.,  Toronto.  Ont. 
S.  B.  Gundy,  25  Richmond  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Hodder   &    Stoughton.    25    Dundas   St.    E.,   Toronto 

Ont. 

Thomas    Langton.    23   Scott  St.,   Toronto,    Ont. 
Macmillan    Co.    of   Canada,    70    Bond    St.,    Toronto, 
Ont. 

McClelland,    Goodchild    &    Stewart,    266    King    St. 

W..   Toronto,   Ont. 
Geo.  J.  MeLeod,   Ltd.,   266   King   St.   W.,   Toronto, 

Ont 

IMusson  Book  Co.,  25  Dundas  St.  E.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Thomas    Nelson    &    Sons,    77    Wellington    St.    W.. 
Toronto,    Ont. 


BUSINESS    BOOKS. 

Frederick  D.  Goodchild.  266   King  St.  W.,  Toronto. 
Musson  Book  Co.,  25  Dundas  St.  E.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Wycil   &   Co.,  85  Fulton  St.,   New   York   City. 
Law  Books,   Ltd.,  15  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 

CODE  BOOKS  AND  CONVERSION  TABLES 

John  W.  Hartfield,  N.Y.,   Produce  Exchange,   New 

York. 

PERIODICALS. 
MacLean's  Magazine,  143  University  Ave.,  Toronto 
Imperial   News    Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto.    Montreal    and 

Winnipeg. 
Gordon  &   Gotch,   136   Bay  St.,  Toronto,  Ont.,  and 

15    St.    Bride   St..    London,    E.C. 
American   News   Co.,   Toronto   and   Hamilton,    Ont. 
American   News   Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 
American   News  Co.,    Winnipeg.   Man. 


Classified  Advertising 


pAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK  SUPPLIED 
by  all  wholesale  drug  houses  in  the  Do- 
minion. The  best  seller.  Established  over 
eighty  years.  Ask  for  counter  lisplay  stand 
which  greatly  increases  the  sale  of  ink.  Re- 
ceived  highest  award  at  many   Expositions. 


OFFICE   SUPPLIES 
A  JAX     PATENT     FILE     WRAPPERS— FOR 

■^  legal  papers,  specifications,  contracts,  etc.. 
sample  with  prices  on  request.  Desaulniers. 
Moline.     Illinois. 

BOOKS  WANTED 

"Darkness  and  Dawn,"  by  George  Allan  Eng- 
land. "This  is  For  You."  by  W.  L.  Lord 
(Revell)  —  The  Gaetz-Cornett  Drug  &  Book 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Red  Deer,  Alta. 

ARE  YOU  A  SALESMAN? 
\1/E  HAVE  OUR  CANADIAN  TERRITORY 
"  open  for  a  salesman  who  knows  the  Sta- 
tionery. Gift  and  Art  Store.  Department  Store, 
Book  Store,  etc.,  trade.  We  manufacture  an 
exceptionally  high  grade  line  of  Engraved 
Greeting  Card?  at  popular  prices.  All  cor- 
respondence considered  confidential.  No 
objection  if  carried  with  a  non-conflicting 
line.  The  Boston  Line.  178  Congress  St., 
Boston,   Mass. 


One  of  these 

Buyers'  Guide 

spaces 

H/2"  x  2»/i" 

costs  $3  a 

month  on 

yearly  contract. 

Highly  Effective 

Publicity  at 
Minimum  Cost 


Otto  Sauer  Series 

French,  Spanish 
and    Italian    Grammars 

MADE   IN   THE   U.S.A. 
Grammar  Separate.  $1.00 

Grammar  with  Key    $1.25 

WYCIL  &  COMPANY 

85  Fulton  Street,  New  York  City 
Liberal  Discount*  to  the  Trade 


SEXUAL   KNOWLEDGE 

Sex  Hygiene,  by  the  World's  Highest  Author- 
ity— Winfield  Scott  Hall,  M.D.,  Ph.D.,  assisted 
by  Jeanette   Winter  Hall. 

RELIABLE  —  SCIENTIFIC  —  CORRECT 
Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Man  Should 
Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Young  Woman 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Husband 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Wife 
Should  Have— Sex  Knowledge  Every  Father 
Should  Have — Sex  Knowledge  Every  Mother 
Should    Have.  Cloth  lllu.trated.  $1.25 

McClelland,  goodchild.  &  steuart,  ltd. 

266  Kins  Street  West  Toronto.  Caned* 


Who^Pays  for  the  Advertising? 

"VVIlO  pays  for  the  advertis- 
ing? 

The     consumer,     of     course. 

\lr  pays  for  every   expense  of 

putting  the  goods  into  his  hands 

— including  selling  cost.     This 

and  production  cost  are  both  so 

reduced  by  .successful  adverts 

ing  thai  he  pays  LESS  for  the 

same  goods,  just   because  they 

are  well  advertised.       You  ride. 

cheaper  on  an  excursion  train 

than  if  you  hired  o  private  car 

— even  a  cuttle  car.     And  you. 

don't  ask  "Who  pays  the.  fare?" 

— The  Optimist 


Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

All    good    title-   and    full 

of  colour. 

Full  list  on  application. 

2  Amen  Corner         London,  E.C.  4 

ENGLAND 


60 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 

The  Big  Canadian  Story 

of  the  Year 

1LHJALMUR  STEFANSSON,  the  famous  Canadian  explorer,  who 
returned  some  months  ago  from  a  four  years'  trip  through  the  new 
continent  that  lies  north  of  Canada  in  the  Arctic,  has  written  a  com- 
plete and  graphic  story  of  his  experiences.  It  will  appear  exclusively 
in  MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  in  Canada,  starting  in  the  April  issue. 
The  story,  which  will  be  completed  in  six  instalments,  will  tell  all 
about  this  wonderful,  unknown  land  and  of  the  hardships  and  experi- 
ences that  Stefansson  and  his  hardy  band  met  with.  It  is  illustrated  by 
a  series  of  most  remarkable  photographs. 

This  Stefansson  story  will  be  the  biggest  magazine  feature  of  the  year. 

Brimful  of  Brilliant  Features 

This  April  issue  of  MACLEAN'S  is  one  that  will  command  a  ready  sale  because  it 
contains  a  round  dozen  of  other  features  quite  as  interesting  and  up-to-the-minute  and 
hig  as  the  Stefansson  material.     Look  over  this  list: 

"Opening  the  New  Book,"  by  J.  K.  Munro.     A  strik- 
ing article  on  the  political  situation  which  has 
;  developed  since  the  death  of  the  Liberal  leader. 

"Fishmonger  —  General    Green,"    by    Thomas    M. 

Fraser.     An  article  on  a  young  Canadian  who 

sold  five  million  dollars'  worth  of  Canadian  fish 

to  the  British  army  by  Barnum  and  Bailey  pub- 
licity methods. 
"The  Troubles  of  the  Turk,"  by  Stephen  Leacock.    A 
I  humorous  description  of  a  trip  to  Turkey  and  of 

what  Canada's  great  laugh-maker  saw  there. 
"Bombing  the  Boche,"  by  Lieut.  J.  Vernon  McKen- 

zie.     An  article  on  the  most  spectacular  phase 

of  warfare,  the  bombing  of  enemy  territory. 
"Bulldog  Carney,"  by  W.  A.  Fraser.     A  remarkable 

novelette    of   Western    life    by   this    well-known 

Canadian  author. 
"Man  and  Wife,"  by  C.  W.  Stephens.     The  start  of 

a  charming  three-part  serial  by  a  new  Canadian 

writer. 
"The    Sun-Gazer,"    by    Charles    G.    D.    Roberts.      A 

short  story  laid  in  the  Canadian  wilds. 

Here's  Where   YOU   Come   In! 

The  Stefansson  story  will  create  a  big  demand  for  MACLEAN'S  because  it  is  a 
matter  of  intense  interest  to  Canadians.  It  is  in  your  interest  to  be  prepared  to  meet 
this  demand.  Order  a  good  supply  of  the  Aoril  issue  and  display  it  well.  It  will  mean 
a  permanently  quickened  sale  of  this  magazine  for  you. 

If  your  wholesaler  cannot  supply  you,  write  direct  to  Circulation  Manager,  C.  W. 
Buchanan,   143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 

61 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


TERRY'S 

"Avecta"   clip 

For  Early  Delivery 

Put  that  trial  order  through 
to-day — plan  ahead — be  ready 
for  early  supplies. 

Prevents  pen  or  pencil  loss,  sells 
well,  profitable. 


HERBERT  TERRY  &  SONS,  LTD. 

The  Spring  and  Presswork  Specialists 
REDD1TCH.  ENG. 


A  popular 

quick   selling  pen  : 

THE 

"ROB  ROY" 


Made  from  fine  steel  and  made 
in  one  of  Birmingham's  best 
equipped  factories,  this  dandy 
writing  pen  will  prove  a  mighty 
fine  seller  for  every  live  dealer. 


Be  sure  to  see  samples  before  you  order  your  new  stock.   You'll 
find  our  prices  are  right. 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


THE   INK  •  FOR  ALL-  PEOPLES 


Our  new  counter  display  box  is  now  ready.  Full 
particulars  as  to  prices,  assortment  and  discount 
sent   upon  application. 


Let  us  show  you  the  extra  profit  you  can  make  by 
stocking-  Royal  Ink  Powder. 


ROYAL  1N14  COMPANY 

II  COLBORNE  ST.    TORONTO.    CANADA 


Make  Your  Show  Windows  Pay  Your  Rent 

M.nv  Silo  m  m.d,  on  ibt  S.dcw.lk 

Window  Display  Fixtures 

A  Wnndrrlul  M  o(  PnCnl.J  Inl,  rfl  I,  .,„«  able  Window  Di>nby  FiIllKO 
dtrpbyini!  Book;.  Stjl.oncry.  Office  Suppliei  and  Surtdrict.  Set  will  give  10 
iri  Cood  Scrv.ct  in  cff.eii.e  lu.te  pulling  v.indo*  trim, 


M.ide  of  Ojk.  oilier  Gold,  n.  Anfi,,,..- 

If  irdwOOd    Itnfied    Lid   Storjfie   Chi 

.in.  mil  111  UK,       1  here  arc  ihou'andi  D 


No.  20        Set  h.is  89  InlcrchiinCtribIc  Younils  Kor  l.aitu:  Store  Window.,    »38.50 

No.2[)',     Scl  has  50  InltrchanjMblc  Younitl  For  Small  Slorc  Wlndowt,    S23.10 

-Slock  carried  in  Hamilton,  On!      Order  direct  or  ifim  your  f'oorrtr      Strut  /or  tataloa.     Paltnltd  and  mode  in  Canada. 

The  Oscar  Onken  Co.    2650  Fourth  Street    Cincinnati.  Ohio,  U.  S.  A. 

Fixtures   Set   Up   Without  tibe   Aid  of  a  Tool. 


RELIANCE  INKS 

are    noted    for   their  rich   color 
and  easy  flow. 

RELIANCE   "GRIP" 

The  strong  fluid  paste,  which 

never   dries   out,    is    a    profit 

maker.     Write  for  prices. 

Reliance  Ink  Co.,  Ltd. 

WINNIPEG,   MAN. 


XF  YOU  WANT  SOME- 
THING AND  DON'T 
KNOW  WHERE  TO  GET 
IT— WRITE  US— WE'LL 
TELL  YOU. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

Special  Service   Department 


If  You're  Wise 

You'll  learn   how  to   make   MORE 
MONEY  handling  TOYS. 

PLAYTHINGS 

TELLS  YOU  HOW. 

Subscription  —  $2.00     per    year. 
{Foreign    $3.00) 


Send     your     subscription     NOW     and     get     the 
"BIG  3" — also  the  Toy  Directory 


Playthings  " 


8  E.  28th  Street 
NEW  YORK 


ARTISTS  MATERIALS 


We  carry  a  complete  line  of  Artists  Materials, 
Agents  for  Winsor  &  Newton,  London,  Eng. 

A.RAMSAY  &  SON   C° 

EST'D.   1842.    MONTREAL. 


62 


IM)()KSELLER     AN  D     S  T  A  TIONER 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request, 


Canadian  Factory  and  Office*    at 


9-11-13  Davenport  Road 


Toronto 


CI  CO  for  Short 

CICO  is  the  short  word  for  Ad- 
hesion. 

CICO  is  the  short  way  to  do  past- 
ing that  is  to  last  long. 

CICO  in  short  is  short  paste  stocks 
and  long  paste  profits. 

CICO  is  the 
short  cut  to  sell- 
ing your  trade  the 
full  line  of  Carter 
Quality  Products. 

Made   in    Canada 

THE 

CARTER'S  INK 

COMPANY 

Mt.  Royal  Avenue  and  Drolet 
Street,  Montreal,  Que. 


(Established 
1878) 


Louis  Wolff  &  Co.,  Ld. 

Fine  Art  Publishers  and  Dealers  in  Oil  Paintings  and  Water-Colour  Drawings 
245,  TOTTENHAM  COURT  ROAD,  LONDON,  W.  1,  ENGLAND 


A  FINE  COLOUR 
REPRODUCTION 

Size  of  work 
15%"x22",  mount- 
ed on  India  tinted 
mount,  size  27x33. 

Published   at 

12s/6d  each 

($3.00) 

Unmounted  cop- 
ies specially  suit- 
able for  mailing 
published  at 

10s/6d  each 

($2.62) 


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"«^-                                .■;_.              i 

This  remarkable 
picture  should  be 
stocked  by  every 
Canadian  book- 
seller and  station- 
er. 


Catalogues  and 
wholesale  terms 
furnished  against 
trade  card. 


Original      picture 

exhibited   at 

Royal    Academy 

1916 


THE  CANADIANS  AT  YPRES.     After  W.  B.  Wollen.  R.|. 
(The  Historic  Stand  made  by  Princess  Patricia's  Regt.  is  faithfully  portrayed) 


63 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Display  Cane's  Pencils  like  this 
and  they'll  sell  themselves 

The  accompanying  cut  can  only  give  you  a 
faint  idea  of  the  attractive  appearance  of 
this  counter  display. 

The  way  it  shows  the  pencils  will  keep  them 
selling  without  any  effort  on  your  part. 


Each  stand  contains  half  a  gross — tipped 
and  finished  in  six  different  colors,  one-half 
of  which  sticks  up. 

Your  wholesaler  can  send  you  one.  It  costs 
you  $2.40,  and  the  pencils  retail  at  5c  each. 

Remember:  Cane's  Pencils  are  entirely 

Canadian-made  and  are  just  as  good  as 

the  best  imported. 


The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Company 


Newmarket,  Ontario 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgins' 


I    Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the  finest  and  best   Inks  and  Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  the  ready- 
money  kind  who  know  what  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches : 
Ckic*fa,   London 


271    Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN.  N.Y. 


Canada  in  a  Nutshell 


This  describes  Frank  Yeigh's 
Popular  and  Famous  Compil- 
ation, 

5,000  Facts  about  Canada 

for  1919.  Now  out  and  selling 
like  hot-cross  buns  at  Easter 
time. 

Revised,  improved,  enlarged, 
with  special  Chapter  of  War 
Facts. 

The  live  newsdealer  keeps 
stocked  up  all  through  the 
season;  the  dead  one  kills 
business  for  himself  and 

The  Canadian  Facts  Pub.  Co. 

588  Huron  Street,  Toronto 


64 


I'.OOKSELLER      AND      ST  A  T  I  ( )  X  K  K 


"M.  &  V." 

Typewriter 
Ribbons  and 
Supplies  are 
made  in  this 
Factory 


The  products  of  this  factory  have  won  pre-eminence  because  of 
their  reliability,  and  in  business  offices  all  over  the  land  "M  &  V" 
Typewriter  Supplies  are  looked  upon  as  the  very  acme  of 
excellence. 

Make  your  store  headquarters  for  "M  &  V"  Products  and  you'll 
win  the  confidence  and'  the  trade  of  the  business  men  of  your  town. 

Write  for  our  illustrated  catalogue  and  price  list. 

Mittag  and  Volger,  Inc. 

Principal  Office  and  Factory:   Park  Ridge.   N.J,,   U.S.A. 

Agencies  all  over   the     World 


Each  Memo  on  a  Perforated  Coupon 


Tear  it  out  when  attended  to. 

No  lost  data,  no  searching  through  obsolete 
notes.  Therefore,  no  excuse  for  forgetting. 
Without  doubt  the  handiest  memo-book 
made.  Everybody  needs  it.  High  officials, 
superintendents,  purchasing  agents,  depart- 
ment managers — also  all  other  business  men 
and  women,  society  women,  shoppers,  clergy, 
faculty,  students. 

Easy  to  Sell — Good  Profit 

Reminder  with  extra  filler  and  handy  pocket 
in  cover. 

SELLING   PRICES   IN    U.S.A.  3  x5 

Handsome   Black   Leather    $1.00 


Always — 
live  notes 
for  quick 
reference. 


Seal  Grain  Cowhide  or  India  Calf.... 

Genuine  Seal  or  Morocco    

In   Imitation   Leather    

In  Cloth   (without  extra  filler)    

Ladies'  Shopping  Reminder,  2^  x3',i, 

with  pencil  and  extra  filler,  $1.00;  in 

patent  leather,  $1.25 

Dealers 


1.75 

2.25 

.50 

.25 


3' 2  x7 

$1.50 

2.00 

3.00 

.75 


Introduce  it 
NOW 


EXTRA    FILLERS 


Size  3x5  (4  coupons  to  a  page)....$  .75  per  dozen 
Size  Zl/z"  x  7  (6  coupons  to  a  page).  .  .  .  1.00  per  dozen 
Size  2)4"x3J/i"  (3  coupons  to  a  page)  .70  per  dozen 
Name  in  gold  on  cover   25c  extra 


We  have  a  very  inviting  discount  to  offer  you  on  the  above  retail  prices. 
Write  for  it. 


ROBINSON    REMINDER 

ROBINSON    MFG.   CO.,    74   ELM   STREET,    WESTFIELD,   MASS. 


Nationally    Advertised 
in    Canada 


Boo  K  S  !•:  J.  L  E  R      AND      S  T  A  T  ION  E  R 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


NSJGN 


WRITING 
TABLETS 


i 


No  single  line  of  stationery  offers  a  better  profit  or  quicker  turnover  for 
the  retailer.  We  believe  that  our  range  of  papers  is  unsurpassed  in 
value,  and  our  assortment  of  covers  extensive  and  attractive  enough  to 
suit  every  taste. 

Your  name  on  each  cover  would  lend  an  added  value  to  your  sales, 
and  place  a  constant  reminder  in  the  hands  of  every  buyer. 

If  you  are  not  already  carrying  our  line,  we  would  appreciate  the  op- 
portunity of  sending  you  samples  and  prices  of  our  stock  lines  and  par- 
ticulars of  the  special  cover  proposition. 


THE  PARKER  SAFETY-SEALED,  SELF-FILLING  PEN 

We  are  now  in  a  position  to  supply  the  Parker  Pen  in  all  the  popular 
sizes  and  styles— Self-fillers  from  $3.00,  and  Standard  Fillers  from 
$1.75  up,  also  reliable  pens  at  $1.00  and  $1.50. 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


35th  ANNUAL  SPRING  NUMBER 


AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 

The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted   to   the   Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,   and  for  thirty-four    years  the  recognized  authority  for  those  interests. 


VOL.  xxxvi. 


PUBLICATION      OFFICE:      TORONTO,     APRIL,      1919 


No.  4 


Holiday  Papeteries 


We  are  told:  "Comparisons  are  odious,"  but  in  merchandis- 
ing they  are  considered  essential  to  good  buying.  Compare  the 
De  Luxe  line  with  any  other  series  for  quality  and  value, 
novelty  and  workmanship,  and  we  shall  be  quite  satisfied  with 
your  decision.  Dealers  who  always  buy  the  De  Luxe  line  know 
this  is  not  a  mere  boast,  but  a  simple,  straightforward  pledge  to 
you,  and  worth  considering. 

"Just  dainty  boxes  filled  with  good  Stationery-" 


Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Manufacturing  Stationers 
TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER,   April,   1919.     Volume  XXXVI.      Published  every  month.      Yearly  subscription    price,    $1.00:   U.S.,    $1.50.      Entered  as 
second-class    matter   July    1st.    1912.    at    the    Post  Office    at   Buffalo,    under   the    Act   of   March    3rd,   1S79.      Entered  as   second-class   matter  at  the   Post 

Office    Department,    Ottawa. 


B  0  0  K  S  K  LI.EK      A  N  I )     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  K  R 


„  Jra?-  Mi/or  lead  to  sales  o 
WGiwmmQ  for  wntinQ 


^sss**** 


When  you  sell  Esterbrook  Pens  to  your  customers  you  have  chances  for  the 
sale  of  everything  else  they  use  in  writing.  Esterbrook  Pens  give  complete 
writing  comfort  and  satisfaction.  They  are  displayed  to  advantage  in  the 
Esterbrook  Counter  Display  Case.  The  selection  is  easy  for  the  customer 
and  he  feels  good  about  it.  The  impression  is  good  and  you  should  get 
the  benefit  of  his  good  feeling. 

The  Display  Case  contains  a  most  complete  assortment. 

It    fies  up  little  money. 

It  keeps   the  pen    department  alive. 

It   helps    the  customer. 

We  have  an  attractive  window  display  that  will  catch  and  hold  attention 
to  your  store  window  if  you  use  it. 

We  would  be  gladto  have  you  use  it  with  our  suggestions  for  a 
good  window  show     Write  for  particulars. 

Easterbrook    Pen    Mfg.    Co. 

18-70  Cooper  St. 
CAMDEN        -        -        N.  J. 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


JUST  A  WORD 

Regarding  the 
SaleaDility  of 

GOODALI/S 

English 

PLAYING 
CARDS 


Card  lovers  every- 
where know  Good- 
all's.  They  find 
Goodall's  all  that 
could  possibly  be 
desired  in  the  matter 
of  artistic  designing 
and  fine  quality 
,      board. 

1  When  you're  stocked 
*i  with  a  representative 
showing  of  Goodall's 
jl  ,  you  will  be  outfitted 
Hiil -to  attract  this  trade  to 
•    '"your  counter. 

And  remember — the  Goodall  lines  are  varied 
enough  to  satisfy  every  card  player.  We 
illustrate  these  favorites  here,  but  the  com- 
plete line  includes: — 

Imperial  Clubs  —  Whist.  Colonials  —  Gold 
Edges,  Linettes,  both  Standard  and  Whist 
sizes.     Salons — Society — Sultan  and  Patriotic 

series. 

AUBREY  O.  HURST 


Representative 
32   Front   St.   W. 


Toronto 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 

-MiiiiiiiimiiiimmuiiiiMiiiumiiiiiiiiii:i.i!i:iiiiiiw 


r- 


"  ALWAYS  SOMETHING  NEW" 

HEADQUARTERS   FOR 
SPRING  NOVELTIES 

BALLOONS  We  carry  a  large  stock  of 
Balloons  of  all  sizes  and  shapes  to  retail 
at  from  2c.  to  10c. 

CHILDREN'S  GARDEN  SETS,  SAND 
PAILS,  SHOVELS. 

TORPEDOES,  SPARKLERS,  CAP  and 
REPEATING  PISTOLS. 

HARD     RUBBER     BALLS,    GIRLS 
WHITE  BATS. 

LOCAL  VIEW  POST  CARDS,  BIRTH- 
DAY and  COMIC  POSTALS. 

BOOKLETS    AND    FOLDERS    FOR 
EVERY  OCCASION. 


RUMSEY  &  CO.,  LIMITED 


1528  QUEEN  W. 


TORONTO 


-tiinmi.mrmm  in  mini  mi  mm  minimi  rim 


CI  CO  for  Short 

C1CO  is  the  short  word  for  Ad- 
hesion. 

CICO  is  the  short  way  to  do  past- 
ing that  is  to  last  long. 

CICO  in  short  is  short  paste  stocks 
and  long  paste  profits. 

CICO  is  the 
short  cut  to  sell- 
ing your  trade  the 
full  line  of  Carter 
Quality  Products. 

Made    in    Canada 

THE 

CARTER'S  INK 

COMPANY 

Mt.  Royal  Avenue  and  Drolet 
Street,  Montreal,  Que. 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request. 


Canadian  Factory  and  Officas    at 


9-11-13  Davenport  Road 


Toronto 


(&nJte> 


THE  McKINLEY  EDITION  OF 
TEN  CENT  MUSIC 

will   always  hold    first    place    as  an   Edition   of 
Standard,  Classic  and  Teaching  Music 

as  an  established  demand  for  this  line  of  Music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Student 
and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself  to  thousands  of  dealers  to  be 
the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  department. 
Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  150  per  cent,  to  the  dealer. 
The  McKinley  Edition  (Revised  for  Canadian 
Trade)  conforms  in  every  detail  with  Canadian 
copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealer's 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  samples  and  particulars  to-day. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  CO. 

The  Largest  " Exclusively  Sheet  Music  Htuse" 
in  the   World 

CHICAGO:  1501-15  EAST  FIFTY-FIFTH  ST. 

NEW  YORK  CITY:   145  W.  45th  STREET 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Q. — What  is  the  Highest  Type  of 
Blotting  Paper  Made? 

A.— "WORLD'  Blotting— for  more  than  thirty  years 
conceded  to  be  the  best.  Made  in  a  wide  variety  of  colors 
and  finishes. 


Q. — Where  is  "World"  Blotting 
made? 

A. — In  Richmond,  Va.,  by  the 
Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Q. — Do  the  Albemarle  people 
manufacture  any  other  brands  of 
blotting? 

A. — Yes,  six  others — Hollywood, 
Vienna,  Moire,  Reliance,  Eldor- 
ado, Albemarle  Halftone  and 
Albemarle  Enameled. 

Q. — What  about  the  quality  of 
these? 

A. — They  are  undoubtedly  the 
best  of  their  kind.  HOLLY- 
WOOD has  been  a  favorite  with 
the  advertising  public  for  years. 
It  is  a  dependable  paper  in  every 


respect.  RELIANCE  is  a  commer- 
cial blotting  "unequalled  at  the 
price."  Fine  for  office  use. 
ELDORADO  and  ALBEMARLE 
HALFTONE  are  reliable  and 
growing  in  favor  every  day. 
ALBEMARLE  ENAMELED  as- 
sures the  full  perfection  of  the 
printers'  art. 

Q. — Where  are  these  blottings 
obtainable? 

A. — Through  principal  stationery 
and  paper  jobbers  everywhere. 

Q. — Will  the  manufacturers  send 
me  prices  and  samples? 

A. — Gladly,  and  they  will  also 
give  you  the  name  of  your  near- 
est wholesale  dealer  carrying 
these  goods. 


THE  ALBEMARLE  PAPER  MFG.   CO. 


BLOTTERS     ONLY 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


PARAGON 


Inkstands 

of  all  styles 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


Frank   A.   Weeks 
Mfg.  Co. 

93    JOHN    STREET 
New  York  City,  N.Y. 

Canadian  Jobbers  handle  our  lines. 


Save   Your   Energy 

Moore  Push-Pins  are  necessary  for  Spring 
Cleaning.  Look  up  your  stock  and  be 
ready  to  supply  the  demand  created  by  our 
continuous     advertising. 

This  Style  L  Cabinet 

of  MOORE 
PUSH-PINS 

sells  twice  as  much  with 
half  the  effort.  Get  one  to- 
day from  your  Jobber  or 
Direct. 


Cost      - 

Sells     - 


$12.50 
18.75 


Will     more     than     double 
jrour   sales. 


Thumbtacks^ Packed  tc/SuitfthefTrade 


No.   81 

■■<" 


No.    :.l 


No.    32 


No.   52 

7/16" 


No.    33 
No.    53 

y2" 


Celluloid       (Col- 
ored) 


No.    42  No.    43 

t  is"  y»" 


No.    til  No.    62  No.    63 

84"  7    16"  U," 


MOORE  PUSH-PIN   CO. 

113  Berkley  St.  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


Hand-writing  is  often  used  to  de- 
lineate character.  Writing-paper, 
to  some  extent,  might  be  used  for 
the  same  purpose,  for  it  is  a  per- 
fect index  of  the  personal  dis- 
crimination of  the  writer.  The 
use  of 


(3 


ranes 


The  Correct  Writing  Paper 

at  once  catalogs  one  in  the  ranks 
of  those  who  are  accustomed  to 
following  the  exclusive  dictates 
of  good  form  and  perfect  taste. 
The  very  newest  ideas  in  station- 
ery creations  for  the  season  are 
shown  in  the  large  assortment  we 
are  now  offering. 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike 

Pittsfield,  Mass. 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


GOOD   NEWS   FROM   THOMAS    ALLEN 


DA  IVN  HAS 
COME 

Put  Eleanor  H.  Porter's  new  book  in  your  window  and 
watch  the  jacket  tell  its  own  story  of  sweetness,  sun- 
light and  joy.  There  are  two  full-color  poster  repro- 
ductions of  this  picture,  one  mounted  on  an  easel ;  also 
a  charming  portrait  poster  of  the  author — link  that  up 
with  the  publisher's  advertising  campaign  of  unusual 
scope  and  continuity. 

"DAWN" 

Do  You  Want  These  Helps  ? 

To  booksellers  who  have  ordered  or  will  order  DAWN'  ade- 
quately these  dealer-helps  are  free.    State  your  requirements: 

copies  full-color  posters. 

copies  jacket    reproductions    with    easel. 

copies  portrait   posters   of  author. 

copies  extra  jackets. 

By  ELEANOR  H.  PORTER.       Illustrated,  $1.50. 


*£►"•  ELEANOR  H.  PORTER 


H  Item 


This  Is  the  Jacket  of 
the  Book  of  the  Year. 


BOOKS  BY  THE  SAME 
AUTHOR ; 


44 


Just  David" 

Price  $1.25 


44 


Oh,  Money 
Money !" 

Price  $1.50 


I 


("books  Of  >  . 

J  *  V 

Thomas  Allen 

PUBLISHER 
215-219  VICTORIA  ST. 

TORONTO, 
ONT. 


The  jour-color  jacket,  handsome  old  rose  and  gold 
binding,  and  seoen  illustrations  (one  double  page) 
make  "Dawn"  the  most  attractive  Porter  book.  We 
have  yet  issued. 


ELEANOR  H.  PORTER 


BOOKSELLER      AND      STATIONER 


Use  an  up-to-date  N.  C.  R.  System  and 
match  your  neighbor's  success ! 


The  merchant  who  combines  a  cash 
register  system  with  progressive  mer- 
chandising is  bound  to  grow. 

The  merchant  who  handles  his  money 
and  accounts  slowly  by  hand  instead  of 
quickly  by  machinery,  cannot  meet  com- 
petition. 

An  up-to-date  N.  C.  R.  System  protects 
hard-earned    profits;    increases    trade; 


cuts  down  expenses;  makes  clerks  more 
efficient;  stops  errors,  losses,  and  dis- 
putes; speeds  up  the  business. 

Every  merchant  needs  the  help  of  an 
up-to-date  N.  C.  R.  System  in  handling 
his  money  and  accounts. 
An  N.  C.  R.  System  is  within  the  reach 
of  everybody.  The  payments  are  easy 
and  the  machine  will  more  than  pay  for 
itself  out  of  what  it  saves. 


An  N.  C.  N.  System  is  a  modern  business  necessity 

The  National  Cash  Register  Company  of  Canada,  Ltd. 

Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all  the  principal  cities  of  the  world 

6 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


.NATIONAL  . 


THE  HIGHEST 
niTfllNMENT 
IN  LOOSE  LEHF 
CONSTRUCTION 

MHDE  BY 

NnTiONHLBLBNK 
BOOK  COMPANY 

HOLYOKE.MHSc 


W 


^ 

"W 

f^-- .          1 

r 

3 

-^■■i 

3 

Ijy 

i 

t^totl 

».  NATIONAL  .» 


'•'  '<#  ' 


A  Ledger  embodying  Perfection  in  Quality,  Appearance,   Construction  and  Service. 
Send  for  Complete  Information  and  Prices. 

NATIONAL  BLANK  BOOK  COMPANY 

HOLYOKE,  MASSACHUSETTS. 


Completeness  Characterizes  the  Dominion  Line 

HIGH  quality,  great  range  of  styles,  sizes  and  prices  and  prompt  service  are  the 
reasons  why  Dominion  dealers  dominate  their  local  market.  Have  you  a  catalog, 
full   information   and  prices  ? 


You  get  all  the  dealer's 
profit.  WVYiever  sell  to 
consumers. 


Build  a  permanent  and 
profitable  trade  on  the 
Dominion  Line  of  Blank 
Books. 


r^ 

INDEX 

ii- 

_ 

INDEX 


DOMINION   B^ANK  £0,   pERTHIERVILLE,  P.Q. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Do  Your  Bit! 


D 


O  not  think  patriotic 
work   is   a   thing   of 
IP  the  past.     The  great  need 
^^*     to-day     is     to     repatriate 
the  returned  soldier,   and 
to  promote  Prosperity 
so    as    to    solve    the    pro- 
blem of  the  War  Burden. 
The  Dominion  of  Canada 
requires    your   help. 

You  can  be  a  vital  fac- 
tor in  the  Government's 
plan  to  sell  War-Savings 
Stamps  by  getting  your 
customers  to  buy  Thrift 
Stamps. 

If  they  buy  the  Thrift 
Stamps  from  you,  they 
will  soon  be  War-Savers, 
helping  themselves  and 
the  country  in  the  great 
work   of   Reconstruction. 

Put  up  your  Thrift  signs, 
get  your  stock  of  stamps, 
and  push  the  sale  among 
your  customers. 

Every  Bank  and  Money- 
Order  Post  Office  carries 
Thrift  Stamps. 


Sell  Thrift  Stamps 


Eversharp 

Is  a  Big  Seller 


"Biggest  seller  we  ever 
had!  In  a  class  by  itself. 
It's  a  beauty.  Writes 
like  a  wizard." — These 
are  some  of  the  enthusi- 
astic comments  recent- 
ly made  by  Eversharp 
dealers. 

The  Canadian  success 
ofEversharpisnolonger 
a  prophesy.  It's  a  fact! 
A  big  money-making 
fact.  Ask  any  Ever- 
sharp  dealer. 

Always  sharp  —  never 
sharpened.  The  world's 
most  economical  pencil. 
No  wonder  Eversharp 
is  smashing  all  pencil- 
selling  records. 

18  Inches  of  Lead 

And  every  last  bit  is  used 
for  perfect -pointed  writing. 
Thirty-five  cents  replenishes 
the  supply — enough  for 
another  quarter  million 
words  —  sharp,  economical 
writing  always.  Eversharp 
leads  are  made  specially 
for  Eversharp  Pencils  and 
have  a  firmness,  fineness  and 
smoothness  all  their  own. 
They  are  big  repeaters. 


The  symbol  of 
perfect  writing 
—  the  mark  of 
Eversharp  Pen- 
cil andTempoint 
Pen. 


WAHL 


EVERSHWP 

The  Perfect  Pointed  Pencil 

Alzvays  Sharp — Never  Sharpened 
Made  and  Guaranteed  by 

THE  WAHL  COMPANY 

1800  Roscoe  Street,  Chicago,  Illinois 

Send  today  for  Catalog  and  Interesting  Literature  to 
nearest  Canadian  representatives : 

The  Rowland  &  Campbell  Co.,  Ltd..  Winnipeg,  Manitoba 

The  Consolidated  Optical  Co. 
Toronto,  Ontario  Montreal,  Quebec 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


HIGGINS'  INKS 


ADHESIVES 


THE  HIGGINS'  INKS  AND  ADHESIVES,  through 
honest  merit  in  their  originality  and  quality  and 
honest  American  enterprise  and  push  in  their  ex- 
ploitation, have  penetrated  to  the  most  remote  points 
of  civilization,  until  now  they  are  well  known  and 
largely  used  in  Canada,  Central  and  South  America, 
Mexico,  Great  Britain,  South  Africa,  Australia,  New 
Zealand,  Philippines,  Japan,  China,  Norway, 
Sweden,  etc.,  etc.,  as  well  as  ever  maintaining  their 
unique  position  in  their  birthplace,  the  United  States 
of  America.  The  home  trade  has  always  shown  its 
appreciation  of  and  reliance  on  these  goods,  and  it 
will  always  be  our  effort  to  merit  the  confidence  of 
the  trade  in  every  respect. 


Write  for  Prices  and  Discounts 


Kg- 


CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO., 

MAIN  OFFICE:   271  Ninth  Street) 

FACTORY:  240-244  Eighth  Street) BROOKLYN,   N.Y.,   U.S.A. 

9 


Originators      and     J^g   an(J    AdhesiveS 

Manufacturers  or 

NEW  YORK   CHICAGO  LONDON 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


•  i  ■■  \  i    i :  "  r  -  ' : ' ' '  I  • ; ' ;  ]  i ; !  5 ; '  j 

Hllill ■llllllll 

iiih  si  Ml 

;  r :  ill  1 1 1 


Help  Yourself 

to  Better  Pencil  Sales 


THE  Counter  Display 
Stand  shown  in  this  ad- 
vertisement makes  better  pen- 
cil sales  not  only  possible  but 
certain. 

You  know,  of  course,  that  Cane's  Pencils  are  Canadian-made. 
They  are  put  up  in  these  attractive  stands,  flying  the  colors,  as 
you  will  notice,  and  it  goes  without  saying  that  a  stand  like  that 
on  your  counter,  with  half  of  contents  sticking  up,  as  shown,  is 
going  to  get  you  quick,  profitable  pencil  sales. 

RECONSTRUCTION— Money  spent  in  Canada  for  Canadian 
products  will  keep  Canadians  employed. 

Ask  your  wholesaler  for  a  Cane's  Counter  Display  Stand. 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Co.        Newmarket,  Ontario 


BANK  BLOTTING 

High  in  Quality.    Moderate  in  Price. 

Good  Absorbent,  Very  Thick  for  Weight,  Colors  Bright  and  Clear. 


Stocked  in  19x24 — 60,  80,  100  and  140 
in  White,  Canary,  Pink,  Granite, 
R.  E.  Blue,  Dark  Blue  .and  Buff. 
Sold    by    the    leading    Paper    Dealers. 


Made  by 

Richmond  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 


10 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


SPRING  LEADERS  OF   NOTE 

PUBLISHED 

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he  makes  you  visualize  his  slim  craft  bursting  through  wild,  wind-  the  pages  of  any  contemporary  naval  chronicler." — "Scotsman." 
whipped    seas,    or    racing    gracefully    along    in    calm,    throwing 

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fight  is  concerned.   — The     Times. 

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chanty." — Glasgow  "Evening  News." 


Conscript   "Tich,! 


Cheerio!    Some  Soldier  Yarns 


"Every   line  true  to  life." — "Northants  Telegraph." 

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excellent,   and   it  made  me   laugh   many   times.      I   only  hope  you 

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his  sense  of  humor  is  extremely  refreshing."  a  man." — "Land  and  Water." 

"Hardly  one  that  does  not  score  a  good  point." — "The  Nation."  ,     ,                                ,  ,         .            ,    .        .   ...       ,,      ., 

"He  has  got  the  hang  of  the  Army  and  knows- where  the  shoe  "Hi  a   dU^.  to  water'    T,ch    t0ok  t0  aCt,Ve  fiSht,nS'        Abe>- 

pinches    and    the    tunic    doesn't   fit.      Some    of    the    yarns    might  <leen      Journal. 

have  been  written  by  O.  Henry.     Altogether  it  is  a  jolly  book."—  "Remarkably  well  told.     Its  interest  does  not  depend  altogether 

"Everyman."  on  the  incidents  that  are  related  with  exceptional  vigor  and  dash. 

"Some  of  the   brightest  short   stories   we   have   seen.     We  owe  Dut     a]s0     on     tne     lesson     which     it     drives     home." — Glasgow 

the    a'uthor    gratitude    for    a    happy    hour    or    two."-   "Sheffield  "Herald." 

Telegraph."  .                  . 

"Mr.   Tilsley    has    caught    the    cheery,    humorous    spirit   of   our  "Increases   one's   pride   in   our   glorious   fighting   army.        Edin- 

brave  boys  to  a  tunic  button."— "Referee."  burgh  "Evening  News." 

TRADE  SPECIAL  OFFER  TO  CANADIAN  BOOKSELLERS: 

TERMS:  All  orders  for  above  Booths  received  by  August  1st  will  be  Supplied  at  33]^%  off  Selling  prices  net. 

W.  &  R.  CHAMBERS,  Ltd.,  339  High  St.,  Edinburgh  and  38  Soho  Sq.,  London, W.  1 

19 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


AUTOMATIC 

COMBINED         ADJUSTAALE 

ENVELOPE  AND  BAG 

FOLDING    MACHINE 


The  "C  ARMIC 


99  BRITISH 
MADE 


1.     TWO  machines  in  ONE. 
2.     ANY  size  envelope  or  bag  can  be  folded  upon 

the   "CARMIC"   within   the   specified   range   of 

each  machine,  which   is  practically  unlimited. 

The  change  from  one  size  to  another  being  car- 
ried  out  in   about  one   hour. 

The  change  from  envelope  to  bag  shape  being 

carried  out  in  about  half  an  hour.     NO  chanirt 

of  box   is   necessary. 

All  classes  of  paper  can  be  folded. 

Output  of  machines  from  28,000  to  32,000  per 

day. 

Does  not  require  special  skill  to  operate. 

Very    little    motive    power    is    needed   to    drive 

machine. 

Best    material    and    workmanship    throughout. 

Machine  does  not  gum   the  sealing  flap. 

Space    required    for    machine    and    operator.    G 

feet  by   5  feet. 

Machines  supplied  ready  for  working. 
Instruction  for  changing  and  adjusting  sent  with  all 
machines. 


3. 


5. 
6. 


9. 
10. 

11. 

12. 


All  enquiries  should  be  accompanied  with  patterns 
and  particulars  of  range  (largest  and  smallest) 
required. 

Also  makers  of  Envelope  Gumming   Machines 
(Power    and    Hand) 

Prices   and    full   particulars   to  be   obtained    from    the   maker*. 

PETER  CARMICHAEL  &  CO.,  Limited 

4  Car  Street,  Limehouse 
LONDON,  E.  14  ENGLAND 


Attention,  Dealers 

I  Carry  Everything  in  Phonograph  Needles 

VIOLAPHONE  (Gold  Point),  medium,  loud, 
and  extra  loud  tones.  Each  needle  will  play 
10  times  without  change.  50  needles  in  a  box 
retailing  for  15  cents.  60  boxes  packed  in  a 
counter  salesman  carton  retailing'  for  $9.00. 
Dealer's    price,    $5.85. 

BLACK  DIAMOND  SEMI-PERMANENT. 
soft,  medium,  and  loud  tones.  Each  needle 
will  play  up  to  100  times  without  change. 
3  needles  in  each  package  retailing  for  15 
cents.  100  packages  containing  40  loyd,  40 
medium,  and  20  soft  tones,  in  red,  white  and 
blue  colors  are  mounted  on  a  display  card 
with  easel  back,  retailing  for  $15.00.  Dealer's 
price,    $10.00. 

STEEL  NEEDLES.  I  can  sell  a  first 
•juality  steel  needle  for  from  75  cents  to  $1.00 
per  thousand   according  to  quantity. 

SAPPHIRE  BALLS  AND  POINTS  for 
Edison,  Pathe  and  Brunswick  Records.  Retail 
price,  $1.00  each.  Dealer's  price,  50  cents 
each. 

DIAMOND  POINTS  for  Edison  Records. 
Retail  price,  $5.00  each.  .Dealer's  price,  $3.50 
each. 

I  solicit  your  valued  orders,  and  can  assure 
you  that  they  will  have  my  prompt  and  per- 
sonal  attention. 

H.  A.  BEMISTER 

Mappin  &  Webb  Bldg.  10  Victoria  St.  Montreal,  Que. 


PIONEER  SERIES 

All  British  Postcards 

EVERY  ONE  A  SURE  SELLER 

250  different  new   Birthday  Greeting  Series 

72         "  "  "  Personal   Series 

36         "  "     Greeting  Verse  Series 

72         "  "    Christmas  Greeting  Series 

36         "  "     New  Year  Greeting  Serie- 

All  beautifully  printed  in  litho.,  three-color 

and  sepia  tones,  with  good  verges  and  a;reet- 

ings.       From     $12.50     to   .$17.50   per   1,000 

F.O.B.,    London.      Special    terms    to    large 

buyers,   shippers   and   wholesalers.     Sample 

orders  direct,  or  through  your  usual  London 

shippers. 

Send  for  a  sample  collection  to  any  value, 
cash    with    order. 

SUMMIT  SERIES  ALL  BRITISH 

Christmas  and  New  Year  leaflets,  Celluloid 
jeweled  cards  a  specialty.  New  sample-. 
ready  by  June. 

JOHN  THRIDG0ULD  &  CO. 

t  Fine~Art"  Publishers 

14  to  22  Sidney"  St.,  Commercial   Road, 
LONDON,  ENGLAND 

ESTABLISHED    OVER    SO     YEARS 


20 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


"I'LL  SEE  YOU  AT  12.13" 

A  man  "made  a  hit"  with  us  the  other  day.  He  made  the 
above  appointment — and  KEPT  it.  He  was  a  stationer,  too 
— a  real,  live  one.  The  idea  is  so  good  we  want  to  pass  it 
on,  it  will  help  us  all.  When  your  customer  wants  a  new 
ledger,  make  an  appointment  at  some  exact  "odd"  minute — 
then  KEEP  it.  The  time  will  be  so  unusual  that  it  will  make 
an  impression,  follow  it  up  by  being  on  time  to  the  minute, 
show  him  a  STYLE  ASL  and  get  the  order. 


STYLE    ASL 

If  this  doesn't  suit  him,  there  are  EIGHT  other  styles,  and 
if  you  cannot  please  him  with  any  of  them,  then  by  all  means 
let  us  know  what  he  wants  (if  he  knows  himself)  and  we 
will  try  to  satisfy  him. 

You  have  received  our  new  ledger  prices  and  our  assort- 
ment offer.  It's  worth  a  trial,  anyway.  You  cannot  lose 
and  we  are  willing  to  take  all  chances.  So,  if  you  haven't 
accepted  our  offer,  do  so  at  once,  and  be  prepared  to  actually 
show  your  customer  any  style  of  a  ledger  he  wants. 

We  can  furnish  ledger  outfits  with  sheets  and  index  that 
retail  from  $5.60  to  $38.40.  MADE  IN  CANADA  and 
made  RIGHT  by  a  strictly  Canadian  company. 


STERLING  LUCKETT  LOOSE  LEAF,  LIMITED  GteRLInR 

-UNE-    l-l  539-543  King  St.  West,  Toronto,  Canada  «  -line-    U 


21 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


THIS  SEASON'S  «  LIST 


FRANK  L. 

•PACKARD 

$1.50 

THOMAS 

•DIXON 

$1.50 
MARGARET 

•DELAND 

$1.35 


"The  Further 
Adventures 
of 
Jimmie    Dale 


The    Way 
of 
a  Man'" 


"Small 
Things" 


SIR  GILBERT 

•PARKER 

$1.50.      Illustrated 

ETHEL M. 

•DELL 

$1.50 


"Wild 

Youth 

and 

Another' 


"The 
Keeper 

of  the 
Door" 


HUGHES  ~m 

*MEARNS     ST 

$1.50 


JOHN 

•GALSWORTHY  '-- 

$1.60 

Also  " Another  Sheaf"    $1.50 

BELLE    K.  "Penny 

•MANIATESr.pi//w 

$1.35 


WILLIAM 

•BEEBE 

$1.75.        Illustrated 

DOROTHY 

•CANFIELD 


"Jungle 
Peace" 


The 
Day 


$1.00 


AGNES  &  EUERTON 

•CASTLE 

$1.50 

JAMES  OLIVER 

•CURWOOD 

$1.50.     Illustrated 

TEMPLE 

•BAILEY 

$1.50.      Jacket  by  Coles  Phillips 


Minniglen 


"Nomads 
of  the 
North" 


'The   Tin 
Soldier" 


J.  J 

•BELL 

$1.50 


Glory" 


"Kiddies 

with  Wee 

McGregor" 

Again 


"The 
Valley  of 
Vision" 


HENRY 

•VAN  DYKE 

$1.50.      Illustrated 

{Also  "Goldei  Stars  and  Other  Verses."  50c.) 

All  Star  Sellers 

of  Sterling  Merit 


BOOKSELLERS:    GET   BUSY! 


4 


SAINT'S 
PROCRESS 

JOHN  GALSWORTHY 


NOMADS 
NOFLTH 

.fames  Oliver 
Cur  wood 


THE    COPP,    CLARK    CO.,  LIMITED 


517  Wellington  St.,  West 


Publishers  of 

'STAR    SELLERS" 


Toronto 


22 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


School 

Opening 

1919 

New  Scribblers 

and 

Exercise  Books 


We    have    always  maintained    a    high 

order  of    merit    in  the    production    of 

Artistic  Scribbler  and  Exercise  Book 
covers. 

As  usual  they  are  meritorious. 

i 

Illustrated  here  are  four  strikingly  artistic 
designs,  printed  by  offset  Lithography. 

We  are  the  only  house  in  Canada 
printing  their  own  covers  by  this 
method. 


We  believe  these 

covers  will  win 

the  children. 


The 


Copp,  Clark  Co. 

LIMITED 

517  Wellington  St.  West 

TORONTO 


23 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Paper  Fasteners  and  Punches 

We  illustrate  leading  styles,  which  a're  recognized  as  the  most  practicable  types  of  office  devices.     They  save  labor  and  do  good  work 


Eyel 


The  new  automatic 
■yeletting  device 
which  binds  paper, 
cloth  or  leather,  and 
a  thousand  time- 
HkVing  uses  in  office 
and   factory. 


The  Samson  Eyelet  Tool 


No.  1  Samson  Hand  Punch 


The  Ajax 
et  Fastener 


For  binding  all 
correspon- 
dence, legal 
do  c  u  m  e  n  ts, 
etc.  It  punches 
a  clean,  ac- 
curate hole 
and  clinches 
the  eyelet  per- 
fectly. 


Will  take  inter- 
changeable 

punches  and  dies 
in  sizes  from 
1  16  in.  to  ' i  in. 
diameter.  Fur- 
nished with  3  16 
punch  and  die 
unless  otherwise 
specified. 


Ajax     Eyelets — Actual     Sizes 


Useful    in    Any    Office 


12. 

'3 


The    No.    1    Samson    Ha'nd    Punch    is    made    of 
drop     forged     steel,     attractively     nickel-plated. 


SIZES  OF  HOLES-PUNCH  N?  1 


Packed  in  Boxes  of  ">00. 
With  one  stroke  of  the  lever,  the  Ajax 
punches  the  hole,  inserts  ami  clinches 
fhe  eyelet.  The  Ajax  Fastener  takes 
the  three  sizes  of  Ajax  rust-proof  eye- 
hown    without    any    adjustment. 

Remember,  Mr.  Dealer,  every  machine 
sold  creates  constant  demand  for  Ajax 
Eyelets. 


L    J  f     1  _ — j  Special  Samson    Advantages 

The  patented  spring  collet  prevents  the 
eyelet  slipping  out  of  position.  The 
gauge  fixes  the  margin  exactly  as  de- 
sired. Use  Samson  Zinc  Eyelets  for 
Sa'mson  Eyelet  Tools.  Rust-proof,  made 
especially  for  the  Samson  eyelet  tool 
packed  oOO  to  box  I  ten  boxes  to  car- 
ton). Two  sizes — long  and  short.  Sam- 
son Eyelets,  with  the  Samson  Eyelet 
Tool,  assure  best  results  but  an> 
eyelet  can  be  used. 

Write   for      Catalogue. 
MACHINE  APPLIANCE  CORPORATION,  351  JAY  STREET,  BROOKLYN,  N.Y. 

Canadian  Representatives  :  Menzies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  439  King  Street  West,  Toronto,  Canada 


Throat.  1%  in.  deep.  Opening  between  dies, 
Vt  inch.  Will  punch  sheet  iron  and  soft 
steel  up  to  20  gauge,  and  paper,  cardboard, 
leather,    etc.,    up   to    xi,    inch    in    thickness 


Classy  Birds 


I  Every  standard 
pencil    is   a   bird) 

The    Quail 

Hexagon  shape — 
with  or  without 
rubber  tip.  Qual- 
ity unexcelled, 
also 

The    Wren 

The   Puffin 
The   Starling 

The  Lark 
The   Ibis 

The   Chat 
The  Thrush,  etc. 
This  line  of  pen- 
oils  is  a  veritable 
find   for   the   job- 
ber and  the  office 
supply   house. 
The  price  attracts — but 
the  quality  is  the  prin- 
cipal asset. 

Write    us    for    samples 
and    quotations.      Made 
by  the  Standard  Pencil 
Co.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
Estab.  7  years 
DO  IT  NOW 


Easy  Money 
Makers 


FULD'S 

Original  and  Patented  U.S.  and  Canada 

Ouija  Board 

15  x  22  (large  size  only,  $18.00  doz.) 

CASH  IN  ON  THIS  PERSISTENT 
CRAZE 


Toy  Balloons 

Round  Air  Balloons — sausage  shapes, 

Airships 

Monster  Balloons,  Punching  Bags. 

All  shapes  in  Squawker  Balloons 

Lowest  prices! — guaranteed  stock! 

The   big  business  starts  in   May  and 

endures  right  up  to  Christmas. 

Give  us  a  trial  order. 


Menzies  &  Company,  Ltd.,  439  King  St.  W.,  Toronto 

Manufacturers'  Agents- -Publisher a  and  Importers  of Xmas  Cards--Fancy  Stat'y--Toys--Blotting  Paper,  etc 


24 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


This  is  the  $9.00  outfit  in  Canada.  It  makes 
about  12  models  such  as  Coaster.  Glider, 
Go-Cart,    YVTieelbarrow,    Bob    Sled,    etc.,   etc. 


Gilbert's  "New  Toy" 

Put  up  just  like  the  bigger  sets 
of  Erector.  Knocked  down  in 
wooden  case.  A  boy  (or  girl) 
can  make  from  it  a  corking  good 
waggon,  a  real  glider  and  a 
dozen  more  toys. 

They  are  of  stronger 

construction  than  anything  in  a 

J°  GEARED     RACER 

Wheel    tOV    eVd"    pUt    OUt.  This  is  a  real  speedster  that  works  by  gears 

and    pinions.         Made     with    the    $15     retail 
outfit. 

The  sets  retail,  Canada, 
$9.00  and  $15.00. 

Can  be  shipped  June  1st. 

ORDER  NOW 


When  Ordering  the  New  Wheel  Toy 

For   the    Summer    include    an    assortment   of 

Gilbert's    New    AIR -KRAFT    TOYS 

A101  retails  at  $2.25,  guaranteed  to  fly. 
A102  retails  at  $4.50,  guaranteed  to  fly. 
A103  retails  at  $7.50,  is   operated  from    ceiling    by    P58 
Battery  Motor  which  is  included  in  the  set. 


Write  for  particulars  of  our  Special  Demonstration  of  Erector  and  ait  Gilbert  Toys  for  Xmas  selling 

THE  A.  C.   GILBERT-MENZIES   CO.,   LIMITED 

439  KING  STREET  WEST,  TORONTO 

Manufacturers    -Erector  the  Famous  Steel  Construction  Toy  —Gilbert's  Toys 


25 


KOOKSELLER   AND   STATIONKI! 


IARO-AVAC 

1-1  NCS 

SUNDRIES 


BELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES" 


ARO/^AC 

LI  ME.S 


%M1acDq  u  dall  &  $■  uV'T* 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


ELdSdO 

"the  m&ster  drawing  pencit" 


ELDORADO  SELL- 
ING CASE  No.  1181 
greatly  assists  all  dealers. 
Attractive  store  display 
coupled  with  national  ad- 
vertising, sampling  and  per- 
sonal calls  on  consumers  by 
our  salesmen  cannot  fail  to 
impress  your  customer  and 
pave  the  way  for  sales  with 
the  least  effort  on  your  part. 
Send  for  colored  photo- 
gravure of  Eldorado  Selling 
Case  No.  1181. 


CENGBUSCH 

IT     Self-Closing     JL" 

InkstanD 


Recognized  the  world  over  as  the  standard. 

Automatically  seals  tight  yet  always  ready 
for  the  pen.  No  spurting  or  spattering. 
Natural  dip  of  the  pen  gives  always  just 
the  right  amount  of  ink.  Prevents  evapor- 
ation and  insures  fresh  ink  to  last  drop. 
Economical.     Efficient. 


The  IDEAL 

mjT     SANITARY      f\ 

MoisteneR 


An  efficient  ami  sanitary  device  for 
moistening  gummed  labels,  stamps,  en- 
velope (lap-,  etc.  .Made  of  "lazed  porce- 
lain, with  nickel  plated  hearings,  which 
arc  noiseless  and  allow  free  revolution  of 
cylinder,  thus  insuring"  plenty  of  moisture. 
Nothing  to   weai'  out.   gum    up   or  break. 


The  "Sengbusch"  line  is  carried  by  the  best 
stationers.  There  is  profit  in  handling  it 
and  sales  grow  as  its  merit   becomes  known. 

Use  Sengbusch  advertising  imprinted  with 
your  name.       It's   supplied   without   charge. 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

Representatives  for  Canada  and  Newfoundland 

468  King  St.  West,  Toronto 


26 


!'>  < )  < )  K  S  E  L  L  E  R      AND     S  T  A  T  I  O  N  E  R 


ARO-AVAC 


SELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES' 


ALL 


<$ 


1,1/nTeo 


K 


ARO-.HAC 

'-j  L,  1  ISI E.  S 

SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


Standard  Wax  Crayons  and  Chalks 


Little   (Jem 

Seven  crayons  in  a  round 
wood  box;  low  price  and 
sells  well.  We  have  several 
others  in  varying'  prices 
packed  in  round  boxes  at- 
tractively labelled. 


Stationers  who  have 
textile  mills  in  their 
city  should  not  over- 
look their  need  for 
textile  mill  crayons. 
A  recent  experiment 
in  sampling  brought 
many  orders  which 
were  filled  through 
local  dealers  as  we 
sell  only  to  the 
trade. 


Standard  School  Chalks  have  been 
adopted  by  many  schools.  When  tender- 
ing on  the  next  school  business  get  our 
samples  and  prices  on  Standard  Brand 
White,  Standard  Brand  Enamelled, 
Standard  No.  3  Colored,  Colored  Chalk 
in   packages. 

Omega  Dustless  Chalk  Crayons,  white 
and  colored,  are  economic  from  every 
standpoint.  They  outwear  common  chalk 
three  or  four  times  and  cost  less  to 
handle;  easy  marking,  easy  to  erase,  no 
grit,  minimum  dust. 


A  COMPLETE  LINE  OF  SCHOOL  CRAYONS  AND  CHALK  OF  EVERY 

DESCRIPTION;  WAX  CRAYONS  FOR  MARKING,  CHECKING,  LUMBER; 

CHALK  FOR  MILLS,  CARPENTERS,  RAILROADS,  ETC. 


"Hyryfi 


Crest  Light  Crayons  Marking  Crayons 


Mark  freely,  are  brilli- 
ant and  do  not  smear. 
Being:  hydraulic  press- 
ed, they  are  very  dur- 
able and  the  usual  rub 
and  blur  of  wax  cray- 
ons is  absent.  No.  19 
Crest  Light  should  be 
in  every  dealer's  hands 
as  the  best  crayon  for 
schools. 


for  every  purpose,  and 
all  colors;  checking 
crayons  in  all  colors; 
marker  for  glass,  tin 
and  all  smooth  sur- 
faces; handy  pocket 
crayon;  lumber  crayons 
in  all  colors  and  several 
grades.  Samples  sup- 
plied. 


The  Clover 

The  Clover  is  one  of 
many  tuck  box  school 
packages  in  prices 
ranging  from  low  to 
high.  Packages  con- 
tain standard  colors 
with  combinations  of 
other  tints  and  are  de- 
signed to  satisfy  the 
needs  of  advancing 
scholars. 


No.  4  Crayel 

Eight  colors  being  six 
standard  with  black  and 
brown;  crayons  wrap- 
ped, blue  package  with 
white  lettering.  Colors 
are  most  brilliant  and 
of  exceptionally  fine 
blending  qualities. 
Package  is  very  attrac- 
tive. 


No.  230 — Eureka  Chucking  Crayon,  black  and 
blue,  V2"  x  4%",  wrapped,  one  dozen  in  a  box. 
Per  gross,  net $2.00 

No.  333 — Lumber  Crayon,  yellow  and  red,  %"  x 
4%",  wrapped,  for  green  or  wet  lumber.  Will 
not  wash  off.  Packed  one  dozen  in  a  box. 
Per  gross,  net  $5.00 

No.  335 — Lumber  Crayon,  black,  Vz"  x  4  Ms",  un- 
wrapped, for  coarse  or  heavy  work.  Packed  one 
dozen  in  a  box.     Per  gross,  net   $4.00 

No.  32 — Handy  Pocket  Crayon,  black  and  blue, 
Mi"  x  3%",  very  handy,  convenient  and  clean  in 
the  pocket,  hydraulic  pressed  and  durable. 
Packed  one  dozen  in  a  box.    Per  gross,  net  $2.75 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

Representatives  for  Canada  and  Newfoundland 

468  King  St.  West,  Toronto 


27 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Highest  Award  Always 
GOLD  MEDAL 

Dependable 
Crayon  Line 

The  best  known  line  in  the  world.     Of  every  kind 

For  every  use. 

SCHOOL  HOME  ARTISTS  OFFICE  FACTORY 

WAX  PRESSED  PASTEL  CHALK 


Catalogue  and  Samples 
Sent  on  Request 

BINNEY  &  SMITH  CO. 

81-83  Fulton  Street 

NEW  YORK 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


Holland's  Standard 
Writing  Tablets 

These  four  standard  tablets  are  made 
with  well-known  High  Grade  water- 
marked paper. 

MADE  IN  CANADA 

They  are  well  bound  with  these  attrac- 
tive covers — and  are  the  basis  for  steady 
tablet  sales  with  the  right  class  of  cus- 
tomers. 


I  EM  PI-RE  1! 

TABLET          J! 

BSE;  Sk^j 

WRITING 


Every  stationer  knows  that  Rolland's 
Superfine  Linen  Record  is  the  best 
known  and  most  widely  used  paper  in 
Canada.  But  many  do  not  know  that  it 
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HIGH  GRADE  PAPER  MAKERS 
MONTREAL,  P.  Q. 


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455  King  Street  West 

TORONTO  :  :  CANADA 


29 


r,  (>  <  >  K  S  E  I.LER      AND      STATION  E  K 


SPRING  TONICS  FOR 


Four  Leaders  For  April 

"The  Second  Bullet"         "Personal    Efficiency    in 


By  Robert  Orr  Chipperfield 

The  very  best  kind  of  a  detective  story,  for  the  interest  is  cen- 
tred in  the  solution  of  the  crime  and  not  in  the  criminal.  In 
this  story  of  the  young  crime  expert,  Paul  Harvey,  you  are  car- 
ried alopr,  step  by  step,  from  the  murder  without  clues  in  the 
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ynu   in   suspense—  and   you'll   like   it. 

$1.60   net. 

"Practical  Rabbit  Keeping" 

By  Edward  I.  Farrington 

Author  of  "The  Home  Poultry  Book" 

Rabbits  good  to  eat,  easy  to  raise,  a'nd  above  all  inexpensive 
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Bus 


iness 


99 


By  Edward  Earle 
Purinton 


Author  of  "Efficient  Living"  and  "The  Triumph  of   the 
Man  Who  Acts" 

In  this  new  book,  Mr.  Purinton  has  applied  to  business  prac- 
tices the  principles  of  personal  efficiency  he  has  been  teaching 
for  over  sixteen  years.  He  shows  how,  in  the  office,  in  the 
factory,  on  the  road,  in  every  trade  and  business  and  profession, 
it  is  the  ma*n  himself  who  must  make