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Aristo Motto 



'T ^ TE believe permanency is the 
▼ ▼ Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




G. W. HARRIS, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Pres., P. A. of A. 

From an Artura Iris Frinl. 




yf 



\nri 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 190] 



Established 1906 



Vol. 2 



JANUARY 191 1 



No. 11 



January. The month in which 
the photographer who used East- 
man materials for the rush just 
passed, congratulates himself as 
he figures his percentage of 
profit. The month in which the 
other fellow sadly says, " It might 
have been." 



Now is the time to plan your 
1911 business campaign. Out- 
line your work and plan for each 
month's business. A little 
thought directed along this line 
will help you to increase this 
year's business over I9IO. 



And while you are making up 
your 1911 plan for new business 
don't forget to include newspaper 
advertising, if you are located in 
a medium size or small city or 
town. Our cut service will help 
you. See page 22. 



For trade-mark reasons we have 
changed the name of "Enol, " our 
new developing agent, to Elon. 



Elon is the same vigorous, reli- 
able, durable developing agent. 
The change is in name only. 
Tested and packed in sealed 
bottles for your convenience. 
Use Elon with Hydrochinon. 



The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Photography opens for 
the year I9II at Toronto this 
month, and from there the school 
goes to Montreal for another 
three day session. No photog- 
rapher who wishes to keep in 
touch with the latest and best in 
photography can afford to miss it. 
See dates, page I6. 



Put Eastman Permanent Crys- 
tal Pyro on the scales and it won' t 
fly into space — it's composed of 
crystals. Put it into the plate 
tank or developing tray and it 
will produce clean, vigorous neg- 
atives. It contains the acid pre- 
servative and is ready for use by 
simply combining with sodas. 
Put it on your list when you 
order. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



CONVENTIONS 1911 
Work on the coming con- 
ventions is well under way and 
the officers of the various associ- 
ations evidently appreciate the 
advantage gained by an early ar- 
rangement of the preliminaries. 
• Two conventions that will take 
a prominent part in the season 
of convention activity are the 
convention of the P. A. of A. at 
St. Paul, and the convention of 
the P. A. of N. E. at Bridgeport. 

The Photographers' Associa- 
tion of America with its able staff 
of officers will make a good show- 
ing at St. Paul. The officers 
who have the work in charge are 
making every effort to provide a 
good convention programme for 
members of the P. A. of A. A 
programme, fully as good or bet- 
ter than anything that has gone 
before. 

Signs of activity in New Eng- 
land are also apparent and things 
relative to the New England con- 
vention at Bridgeport are taking 
definite form. 

Geo. H. Hastings, secretary of 
the New England Association, 
says: 

"The date of the convention is not 
decided upon, but it will probably 
be held late in September or early 
in October.' 

'The Armory with its 14,000 feet 
of floor space and good illumination 
ought to prove acceptable to all ex- 
hibitors.' 

'There will be no prizes awarded, 
but an Inter-stateClass will be passed 
upon by a jury, and honorable men- 
tion given.' 



'A prize of five dollars will be 
given to any member of the New 
England Association for a design 
accepted by the executive board for 
a 1911 button, said design to be sub- 
mitted prior to Feb. 1st, 1911.' 

'The mayor of Bridgeport, also the 
secretary of the Business Men's As- 
sociation, the editors of the several 
papers and the local photographers 
are very enthusiastic over the pros- 
pects of a large gathering of the 
craft from New England, and ex- 
pressions given by the leaders in 
New York, Philadelphia and the 
eastern and middle sections warrant 
a large attendance from those cities, 
and the convention of the P. A. of 
A. being held so far away from this 
vicinity, we believe our ranks will 
be largely increased.' 

'It is proposed to make practical 
educational demonstrations a most 
important feature of the meet." 

The "educational feature" idea 
is spreading and many successful 
conventions have been made suc- 
cesses by featuring educational 
demonstrations. 

Several years ago the East- 
man School of Professional Pho- 
tography started the educational 
work and its success is due to 
the fact that educational demon- 
strations are what the photog- 
raphers want. 

The more of this work there 
is carried on the more rapid will 
be the advance of high grade 
photography and that is the end 
the "Eastman Professional 
School" and all progressive " Pho- 
tographers' Associations" are 
striving for. 

While speaking of conventions, 
there is another point in associ- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



ation work which if observed 
throughout the country would 
make the work more generally 
effective, and that is the setting 
of dates. 

It will be noticed that the New 
England Association is this year 
breaking away from its accus- 
tomed dates and is separating 
itself from the dates on which 
the National Convention is usu- 
ally held. This is a move toward 
harmony and will be beneficial 
to both. 

Of course this year the con- 
ventions of these two Associa- 
tions are so widely separated in 
location that the separating of 
dates is not as badly needed as 
has been the case in some of the 
previous years. 

Conflict of dates should be 
avoided, as it is always bad for 
one association or the other or 
both. 

Manufacturers' exhibits cannot 
jump from Boston to San Fran- 
cisco in three days or cannot be 
at two places on the same dates, 
and manufacturers' exhibits are 
a drawing card and a support. 
Thus in many cases the manu- 
facturer is forced to decide on 
one or the other and naturally 
chooses the convention nearest 
at hand or the one promising the 
largest attendance. 

How is this conflict of dates 
to be avoided? There may be 
several ways of accomplishing it, 
but one that suggests itself is the 
appointment of a committee for 



that purpose by the P. A. of A. 
Then let the officers or the execu- 
tive committees of the various as- 
sociations apply to this central 
board or committee for an open 
date— for a date that will not con- 
flict with the attendance of a 
neighboring association or with 
the chances of securing a full rep- 
resentation of the various manu- 
facturers and stock houses. 

The various associations should 
not compete with each other, but 
should work together without 
friction, as in this way the gen- 
eral work of organization and ad- 
vancement can best be accom- 
plished. 

The 1911 convention season 
promises to be a successful one, 
and we as manufacturers will 
lend our best efforts and support 
to the work wherever possible. 

Let photographic education, 
progress and harmony prevail. 



Use Elon with 
Hydrochinon 

Elon-Hydrochinon is 
a durable developer for 
negatives or prints. It is 
especially suited to the 
making of developing- 
out paper prints. 

At your dealer's. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



KODAK ADVERTISING 
CONTEST, 1911 — 
$2500.00 IN CASH PRIZES 

From our standpoint the pre- 
vious Kodak Advertising Contests 
have been a distinct and growing 
success. They have suppUed us 
with pictures that told interest- 
ingly of the charm and simplicity 
of Kodakery. But there has been 
one drawback. In the profes- 
sional division (Class A), the 
prizes have gone so often to the 
same people that we fear other 
photographers are likely to be 
discouraged. In order to remove 
this possible objection to our con- 
tests, these former winners will 
be barred from participation in 
Class A in the 19I 1 competition. 

GRAND PRIZE CLASS — AN 
INNOVATION 

While the barring of the for- 
mer Class A winners from com- 
petition in that class widens the 
opportunity for other profession- 
als — makes success more easily 
attainable — we still feel that for 
two reasons these former winners 
should also be entitled to com- 
pete for the prize money. First, 
because it is only fair to them, 
and second, because they have 
proved that they can make the 
kind of pictures that we want. 
The problem has been simply 
but expensively solved. Former 
Class A winners are barred from 
Class A, but may compete among 
themselves for the $500.00 cash 
prize in the Grand Prize Class. 



We hope to be repaid for this 
increase in the prize list by se- 
curing even better pictures than 
we have had before. 

No change is made in Class B, 
as the wide distribution of the 
prizes in that class from year to 
year seems to make such change 
unnecessary. 

THE PICTURES THAT WIN 

First of all, these contests are 
not for the purpose of securing 
sample prints. They are for the 
purpose of securing illustrations 
to be used in our magazine adver- 
tising, for street car cards, for 
booklet covers and the like. We 
prefer photographs to paintings, 
not only because they are more 
real, but also because it seems 
particularly fit that })hotographs 
should be used in preference to 
drawings in advertising the pho- 
tographic business. The success- 
ful ])ictures are those that sug- 
gest the pleasures that are to be 
derived from the use of the Ko- 
dak, or the simplicity of the 
Kodak system of photography — 
pictures around which the adver- 
tising man can write a simple 
and convincing story. Of course 
the subject is an old one — there- 
fore the more value in the picture 
that tells the old story in a new 
way. Originality, simplicity, in- 
terest, beauty — and with these 
good technique — are all qualities 
that ajipeal to the judges. 

In last year's contest ten prizes 
were awarded. In addition to 
these ten prize pictures we pur- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



chased twenty-three of the less 
successful pictures for future use 
in our advertising. So it will be 
seen that in reality our prize 
money is even bigger than we 
advertise it to be. 

To our mind there is a big 
future for the camera in the illus- 
trative field. There's a growing 
use of photographs in magazine 
and book illustrations to say noth- 
ing of the rapid advance along 
the same lines in advertising 
work. There's a constant de- 
mand for pictures that are full of 
human interest. Such are the 
pictures that we need, that oth- 
ers need. The Kodak Adver- 
tising Contests offer an opportu- 
nity for your entry into this grow- 
ing field of photographic work. 

TERMS 

1 Each picture is to contain a 
figure or figures and is to be suit- 
able for use as an illustration in 
advertising the Kodak or the 
Kodak system of amateur pho- 
tography. 

2 Each print in the Grand 
Prize Class and Class "A" must 
be from a negative 5 x 7 or 
larger. Each print in Class "B" 
must be from a negative 4x5 
or 3/4 X 5/4 or larger. 

3 Prints only are to be sent 
for competition — not negatives. 

4 Prints must be mounted 
but not framed. (Mounts should 
show about one inch margin.) 

5 No competitor will be 



awarded more than one prize. 
(This does not prevent a com- 
petitor from entering as many 
pictures as he may desire.) 

6 Due and reasonable care will 
be taken of all non-winning prints 
and, barring loss or accident, they 
will be returned to their owners 
at our expense, but we assume no 
responsibility of loss or damage. 

7 The negatives from which 
all prize winning prints are made 
are to become the property of 
the Eastman Kodak Company, 
and are to be received by it in 
good order before payment of 
prize money is made. 

8 Contestants who are award- 
ed prizes must also furnish to us 
the written consent of the sub- 
ject (in case of a minor, the 
written consent of a parent or 
guardian) to the use of the pic- 
ture in such manner as we may 
see fit in our advertising, as per 
the following form : 



For value received, I 
consent that the pictures taken of 

me hy , proofs of 

ivhich are hereto attached, or any 
reproduction of the same^ may he 
used by the Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany or any of its associate com- 
panies for the purpose of illustra- 
tion, advertising or publication in 
any manner. 



On the next page we print 
the form to be used in case the 
subject used for the picture is 
not of age. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



[Use Tliis Form for a Minor] 



/ hereby affirm that I am 
fj parent f 

''"^ guardian ^J " 

, and for value received , 

I hereby consent that the pictures 

taken of f^^ by ..-. 

proofs of which are hereto at- 
tached, or any reproduction of the 
same, may be used by the Eastman 
Kodak Company or any of its as- 
sociate companies for the purpose 
of illustration, advei'tising or pub- 
lication in any manner. 



Note — Blank forms will be fur- 
nished on application. 

*A11 entries should be ad- 
dressed to 

Eastman Kodak Company, 
Advertising Department , 

Rochester, N. Y. 

10 In sending pictures, mark 
the package plainly, " Kodak Ad- 
vertising Contest," and in the 
lower left hand corner write 
your own name and address. 
Then write us a letter as follows : 



/ am, sending you to-day by 

mil7^^ charges prepaid 

prints. Please enter in your Ko- 
dak Advertising Competition, 
Class 

Yours truly, 

Name 

Address 



•Entries from Canada should be sent to 
Canadian Kodak Co., Toronto, Canada. 

1 1 The name and address of 
the competitor must be legibly 
written on a paper and enclosed 



in a sealed envelope in the same 
package in which the prints are 
forwarded. There is to be no 
writing on prints or mounts. 

1 2 We will promptly acknowl- 
edge the receipt of pictures, and 
when awards are made, will send 
each competitor a list of prize 
winners. 

13 Only recognized profes- 
sional photographers conducting 
a studio will be allowed to com- 
pete in Class "A." Class "B" 
is open to all photographers not 
in above classification. 

14 This contest will close Oc- 
tober 1st, 1911, at Rochester, 
N. Y., and September 20th at 
Toronto, Canada. 

THE PRIZES 
Grand Prize Class 
Open only to professional photog- 
raphers who have won prizes in pro- 
fessional class in previous Kodak 
Advertising Contests. Negatives, 
5 X 7 or larger. 

Grand Prize, $500.00 
Class A 

PROFESSIONAL I'HOTOORAPHERS ONLY* 

Negatives. 5 x 7 or larger. 

First Prize $500.00 

Second Prize 400.00 

Third Prize 250.00 

Fourth Prize 150.00 

Fifth Prize 100.00 

Class B 

amateurs only 

Negatives. 4 x 5 or 3' 4 x 5' 2 <>r larger. 

First Prize $300.00 

Second Prize 150.00 

Third Prize 75.00 

Fourth Prize 50.00 

Fifth Prize 25.00 

•Winners in 1907 and in Class A. 1908, 1909 
and 1910, are not eligible. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



SUGGESTIONS 

First of all, it should be re- 
membered that these prizes are 
not offered for the sake of obtain- 
ing sample prints or negatives 
made with our goods. Merely 
pretty pictures, merely artistic pic- 
tures will not be considered. The 
pictures must in some way con- 
nect up with the Kodak idea — 
must show the pleasure that is 
to be derived from picture tak- 
ing, or the simplicity of the 
Kodak system, or suggest the 
excellence of Kodak goods. 
Must, in short, help to sell Ko- 
dak goods, by illustration of some 
one of the many points in their 
favor. 

The jury will be instructed to 
award the prizes to those con- 
testants whose pictures, all things 
considered, are best adapted to 
use in Kodak (or Brownie Cam- 
era) advertising. 

As reproductions of the pic- 
tures will often be in small sizes, 
too much detail should not be 
introduced. 

Pictures for reproduction 
should be snapp}^ — vigorous, for 
they lose much by the half-tone 
process. 

Where apparatus is introduced, 
it must be up to date. If you 
haven't the goods you can bor- 
row. 

It is highly probable that we 
shall want to secure some nega- 
tives aside from the prize win- 
ners. In such cases special ar- 
rangements will be made. 



If you are interested, let us 
send you a copy of the Souvenir 
of 1910 contest, which gives an 
idea of the kinds of pictures that 
we consider valuable from an 
advertising standpoint. 

THE JUDGES 

The jury of award will consist 
of photographers and of adver- 
tising men who are fully compe- 
tent to pass upon the work sub- 
mitted. Full attention will be 
paid therefore to the artistic and 
technical merit of the work as 
well as to its strength from an 
advertising standpoint. An- 
nouncement of the names of the 
judges will be made later. 

Eastman Kodak Company, 

Rochester, N. Y. 



By attending the three day 
session of the 

Eastman School 

of Professional 

Photog-raphy 

Avhen it comes your way you 
will be enabled to put to 
practical use in the studio 
many of the valuable ideas 
you will absorb. Ideas prop- 
erly used yield dollars. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



i^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ This month we take pleas- 
ure in reproducing the portraits 
of the officers of the P. A. of A. 
for 1911 — the men who have in 
charge the arrangement of the 
National Convention at St. Paul 
— the star attraction of the year. 

All are men of experience in 
convention work and the P. A. 
of A. is thus assured of a well 
arranged, instructive and inter- 
esting meet on the dates set for 
St. Paul. 

The cover illustration, which is 
also reproduced from a print on 
Artura Iris, is furnished by the 
"De Luxe" Studio of Denver, and 
the samples of work in both black 
and sepia tone done on Iris in 
this establishment prove it capa- 
ble of producing a high class of 
portraiture. 

Quality in photographic prints 
follows the use of Iris. 



c 



OMPETITORS 



BY TH E OFFICE BOY 



The gas man came in to read 
the meter the other morning, an' 
he says to the Boss, " I see your 
competitor down the street has 
put out a new show case." An' 
the Boss says, " Yep, an' a nother 
of my competitors has jus' fin- 
ished puttin' up a ten story build- 
ing." An' the gas man, he says, 
" I diden know they wuz a pho- 
tographic shop so big as that in 
town." An' the Boss says. 



"He aint a photographer — he 
runs a dry goods store." The 
Boss says the surest way to get 
your head bumped is to get to 
thinkin' that only the folks in 
your own line is your competitors. 

The Boss says if the other 
photographers in your town are 
doin' good work they are boostin' 
the game generally, an' if they 
don't do as good work as you do 
they are boostin' your game, but 
all the other people in town who 
have things to sell aint boostin' 
any part of your game, and that 
they are the ones for you to keep 
your eyes on. 

The Boss says that when 
mother comes down town Mon- 
day with a strangle hold on pa's 
pay envelope every store window 
in town is a tryin' to get her eye, 
an' that the paper of the evening 
before an' the morning paper has 
been givin' her tips jus' where 
to look, an' that you got to go 
some to get mother's eye glued 
on your show window and then 
into your studio in a loosenin' up 
frame of mind. 

The Boss says that the same 
reason that makes mother pry off 
an extra ten from pa's roll be- 
cause three of the kids need new 
shoes, will lead her to have their 
pitchers taken — an' that is pride. 

She thinks that pa is jus' 
about the fines' lookin' man in 
the township — and the kids, well 
every ma's kids are the bes' 
lookin' to her — an' ma, when 
she's got her hair frizzed an' the 



xl 




BEN LARRIMER, MARION, IND. 
1st Vice Pres., P. A. of A. 

Frovi an Artura Iris Print. 




12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



rats in, aint no slouch herself — 
an' that if you can show her in 
your show case how other folks 
is havin' their pitchers took of 
their kids, an' that pa and ma 
has had some taken, why some 
of that pride that was strong for 
shoes is pretty apt to sorta totter 
towards pitchers. 

Why do the shop keepers dress 
up dummy kids an' dummy folks 
with all the lates' things in glad 
rags — to show em off, of course, 
but they use the dummies to 
show you jus' how slick your 
kids an' you would look dressed 
up in 'em. 

An' the shop keeper that gets 
there is the one that always has 
somethin' new to show 'em — if 
what you got in to-day don't 
make a hit with ma, she may 
fall for what you put in to-morrow . 

The Boss says fishin' for 
wimmen is a good deal like fishin' 
for black bass — you can never 
tell jus' what they are goin' to 
bite on, so you got to keep 
changin' your bait till you land 



TNCREASED PROFITS 

■*■ The next month or two to 
come will be quiet compared to 
the busy months just passed and 
it is during such time that plans 
for increased business and in- 
creased profit may be laid. 

One of the opportunities for 
Increasing profits which photog- 



raphers as a rule overlook is the 
oijportunity offered by the hand- 
ling of enlargements. 

You are making many good 
original negatives that will en- 
large well with no work on the 
finished print except the usual 
spotting and it is in enlarging 
from such negatives that the 
greatest profit lies. Enlarged 
prints from poor negatives and 
copy negatives need so much 
hand work that the price of the 
finished picture is prohibitive and 
the margin of profit small. 

Take a good original negative 
and enlarge it on Artura Carbon 
Black in the Matte or Rough 
Matte grades and you have an 
enlarged print which is equal in 
every way to a contact print — an 
enlarged print ready to deliver to 
the customer when mounted or 
framed. 

Any good enlarging house will 
be pleased to put your prints on 
Carbon Black if you specify when 
ordering, or better still you can 
make them yourself. 

We need not go into the de- 
tails of selling enlargements fur- 
ther than to say that a few good 
sami)les at a reasonable price will 
appeal to nearly every sitter if 
their attention is called to them . 
If the sitter likes his or her order 
of contact prints they will surely 
want at least one enlarged print 
and all such business is increased 
profit. 

It doesn't require a great out- 
lay of cash to fit up an enlarging 




C. F. TOWNSEND, DES MOINES, lA. 
2nd Vice Tres., P. A. of A. 



From an Artura Iris Print. 




14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



outfit and the profits soon pay the 
investment. 

Frames can usually be sold 
with every enlargement and here 
is another source of profit. 

We publish a booklet called 
Enlarging" and this booklet 
outlines the process from begin- 
ning to end, giving diagrams, etc . , 
of the outfit required and several 
plans^of arrangement suited to 
conditions that may be found in 
nearly every studio. This book- 
let is free at your dealer's or from 
us by mail and a new edition, re- 
vised October 19 10, is ready for 
distribution. 

Get a copy and give this prop- 
osition serious consideration. 
Don't put it off for a day or two 
or a week. It is only in action 
that we realize the fruits of 
thought. 

/CORRECT CHEMICALS 






Photographic chemicals are 



not known to be absolutely cor- 
rect for the purpose intended 
until given an actual test and 
analysis. 

Take sodas for example. So- 
dium sulphite may originally be 
high grade and full strength but, 
due to atmospheric conditions, 
may deteriorate and become de- 
cidedly low grade before reach- 
ing the hands of the photogra- 
pher. In such cases the action 
is of course affected and it be- 
comes practically worthless. Sul- 
phite becomes sulphate and sul- 



phate is not a preservative. 
Therefore low grade sulphite 
does not act as a preservative as 
it should. 

In other cases deterioration 
not only destroys the originally 
intended function of the chemical 
but when the chemical thus af- 
fected is employed a harmful 
reaction may be set up causing 
unlooked for results in the fin- 
ished work. 

Impurities in chemicals are also 
common and certain impurities 
are harmless if present only to a 
limited degree. Other impuri- 
ties are very harmful if present 
in any degree and such impurities 
should not exist in photographic 
chemicals. 

Another thing to be considered 
is the combination of chemicals. 
Our formulae are printed in 
proper order. The chemicals 
should be dissolved in the order 
given to secure a perfect combina- 
tion. 

Still another thing equally im- 
portant in the combination of 
chemicals is care in selection of 
all chemicals used to make up a 
given formula. For example, 
Eastman Permanent Crystal Pyro 
is perfect, but its good qualities 
are partially destroyed if com- 
bined with sodas of indifferent 
quality. Eastman Sodas are per- 
fect, but when combined with 
inferior developing agents cannot 
of course make up for the short- 
comings of the low grade devel- 
oping agents, and so on through 




M. W. TYREE, RALEIGH, N. C. 
Sec, r. A. of A, 

From (in Artuni Iris Print. 




16 



STUDIO LIGHT 



the list. Every chemical used 
alone should be the best that 
can be produced and every chem- 
ical used in combination with 
other chemicals should be of high 
grade quality, as otherwise the 
entire combination is affected and 
possibly destroyed. 

Chemicals marked C-K tested 
must be of proper quality before 
they receive that mark. They 
are packed in a way to preserve 
that quality until used. 

The photographer who uses 
C-K tested chemicals is not ex- 
perimenting with the unknown — 
is not running the risk of spoil- 
ing good plates and paper with 
poor chemicals or chemical com- 
binations. That's why we test 
and pack chemicals under the 
named C-K tested. 

Our plates and paper to be suc- 
cessful must produce results and 
even our extreme care in making 
good, reliable sensitized materials 
may be entirely offset by the use 
of unreliable chemicals. 

Your dealer carries a full line 
of C-K tested chemicals — a line 
that comprises all chemicals in 
which purity and proper strength 
are essential. 

Specify C-K tested when you 
order and when you receive the 
goods look for this seal on the 
label: 




The Time: 
Jan. 17, 18, 19 

The Place : 

Toronto 

The Event : 

Eastman School 
of Professional 
Photography 

and again 

The Time: 
Jan. 24, 25, 26 

The Place: 
Montreal 

The Everit : 

Eastman School 
of Professional 
Photography 



COME ALT 



v) 




L. A. DOZER. BUCYRUS, OHIO 
Trcas., V. A. of A. 

From an Artuni Iris Print. 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE EASTMAN 
SCHOOL OF PRO- 
FESSIONAL PHOTOG- 
RAPHY, 1911 

This month the school again 
starts on its tour of instruction, 
teaching all that's new, good 
and practical in professional pho- 
tography. 

The course of instruction in 
lighting and posing alone is well 
worth every photographer's time 
and attention, and to this are 
added practical demonstrations 
of tank development, retouch- 
ing, working in grounds on neg- 
atives, local reduction, printing 





Seed Plate 



Cut No. 1 



Artnra Paper 



Cut No. 2 
Seed Plate Artura Paper 

by every process now in general 
use, the choice of mounts in 
mounting, show case trimming 
and display, talks on advertising 
through the medium of the show 
case and on business methods 
leading to the successful con- 
ducting of a photographic studio. 
The course is a practical one and 
the instructors are practical pho- 
tographers who know what is 
needed most and know how to 
])resent the course in a compre- 
hensive manner. 

To give a general idea of the 
breadth of the course in posing 
and lighting (and this is the very 
foundation upon which all pho- 
tographic successes are built), 
we reproduce herewith a few of 
the portraits, all of one model, 



STUDIO LIGHT 



19 



made at the school held in Roch- 
ester October 4, 5, 6, 19 10. 

Cut No. 1 illustrates the mak- 
ing of white grounds. The re- 
production is made from a straight 
print from the negative. The 
negative has in this case received 
no after treatment, except re- 
touching, and the print is not 
vignetted. Note the opacity of 
the white ground, allowing for 
the degradation of whites always 
caused by the introduction of 
the engraver's screen, and also 
note the delicate flesh values 
throughout the fece and neck. 

In cut No. 2 we have an ex- 



cellent example of line lighting 
in which the light is concen- 
trated on the profile. This line 
or cross lighting effect yields pic- 
tures of snap and brilliancy and 
yet, when properly made, there 
is roundness and softness in both 
highlight and shadow. 

Cuts 3 and 4 illustrate hand 
and figure posing and the effect 
produced by the introduction of 
a small piece of drapery . A flower 
is also introduced in cut No. 4 
to give the hand employment. 
Note the improvement in the 
general appearance of No. 4 as 
compared to No. 3. 




Seed Plate 



Cut No. 3 



Artura Paper 



Cut No. 4 



Seed Plate 



Artura Paper 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



No. 4 was made immediately 
after No. 3 without changing the 
pose or lighting, and by using 
the drape in connection with No. 
4 the picture is given breadth 
and stability. The use of the 
flower by giving the idle right 
hand something to do, is also an 
improvement. 




Cut No. 5 
Seed Plate Artura Paper 



No. 5 is another example of 
hand and figure posing in which 
a single piece of drapery and a 
flower are introduced. In this case 
the left hand is the idle one, the 
right being used as a support in 
an easy, natural way. 

Notice how the lighting is sub- 
dued in the lower portions of 
Nos. 3, 4 and 5. The strongest 



light in each is concentrated on 
the face, thus holding the eye 
and interest to that, the essential 
part of the portrait. 

In cuts 6 and 7 we find full 
drapery effects— examples of v/hat 
can be done with a strip of silk 
or satin or other suitable material 
without the use of a single pin 
or other fastening. 

In making the draped figures 
the arrangement of the drapery 
is explained to the attending 
photographers. The model is 
placed and draped and the com- 
plete picture is created step by 
step under the light. 

Note that in cut No. 7 both 
the waist and skirt are formed 
with a single strip of cloth. Then 




Seed Plate 



Cut No. fi 



Artura Paper 



N^ 



STUDIO LIGHT 



21 




Seed Plate 



Cut No. 7 



Artura Paper 



with another strip of lighter ma- 
terial the left shoulder and right 
forearm are draped in the same 
manner as shown in cut No. 4. 
The hands are again occupied, 
and flowers placed at the breast 
add a touch of interest to the 
upper portion of the picture. 

The handling and direction of 
the light, the use and position 
of the reflectors and screens and 
everything connected with the 
making of each portrait are care- 
fully and clearly explained at all 
of the demonstrations in lighting 
and posing. 

The portraits reproduced here- 
with can, of course, do nothing 



more than show the finished re- 
sult of the demonstrations and 
we use them merely to illustrate 
the course in portrait making. 

To fully grasp the real value 
of the course attend the school 
when it comes your way. If you 
have been to previous schools, 
come again because the full three 
day course is under constant re- 
vision, and as soon as something 
new appears possessing sufficient 
merit, it is adopted and incor- 
porated in the course of instruc- 
tion. 

Watch the advance dates as 
they appear on page 23 and pre- 
pare to close up your studio if 
necessary and attend. Bring your 
assistants with you and also a 
list of your local difficulties for 
advice on how to overcome them. 



Attend the 

Eastman School 

of Professional 

Photography 

held this month at Toronto 
and Montreal and take the 
full three day course. It will 
enable you to make better 
pictures at better prices. 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jlrst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 




CHILD portraits made 
by us are childlike, 
just as our portraits of 
adults possess strength 
and character. 

We are experts in light- 
ing and posing, and our 
equipment is complete. 

Come in and see our 
line. If you order we will 
please you. 



The Pyro Studio 



C. K. Co., Limited. No. 161. Price, 40 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



Toronto, Can Jan. 17, 18, 19 

Montreal, Can Jan. 24, 25, 26 

Boston, Mass Jan. 31, Feb. 1, 2 

New York City Feb. 7, 8, 9 

Philadelphia, Pa Feb. 14, 15, l6 

Syracuse, N. Y Feb. 21, 22, 23 

Toledo, O Feb. 28, March 1, 2 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The difFerence between tested 
chemicals and those of unknown 
quahty is distinguishable by this 
mark on the tested goods. 




Specify C-K tested when you buy. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
TouoNTo, Canada. 



All Dealers, 



3 

STUDIO LIGHT 25 

New Name=Same Goods 



For trade-mark reasons the devel- 
oper which has been so successful 
under the name 

"ENGL" 

will hereafter be known as 

ELON 

The change is all in the name — 
the goods are the same — the reliable 
Eastman Tested Chemical variety. 

Use Elon with Hydrochinon. 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited, 

Toronto. Canada. 



All Dealers. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 

Headquarters for 
Studio Supplies 



^WE HAVE THE GOODS— A 
FULL STOCK ALL THE TIME. 
qTHAT IS WHY WE FILL 
YOUR ORDERS SO PROMPTLY 



A complete line of all the products 
of the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
and Canadian Card Co. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 



For all-around studio work- 



THE 
ROYAL 
PLATE 



High speed and great 
latitude 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 




THE ROUNDS 
PRINT WASHER 

The quickest and most efficient washer 
made. Entirely automatic and designed 
to make the bruising or tearing of prints 
practically impossible. 

This washer requires only 12 lbs. water pressure to operate. 
Constructed of the best grade of zinc and will not rust. Height, 
9^2 inches; width, 23 inches; length, 20 inches; capacity, 100 
prints 5 X 7 or 150 cabinets or smaller. Price, $13.50. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

> Tr T^ , , Toronto, Canada. 
At Your Dealer s. 



STUDIO LIGHT 29 

A Sepia tone of pleasing warnith — 
a rich sepia of velvety texture and 
exquisite printing quality partly de- 
scribes the beauty of 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

Coated on buff stock in two surfaces 
— smooth and rough. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
At your dealer s. 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT 




Use 

THE EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 

It loads quickly and develops perfectly. 

Negatives developed in the Eastman Plate Tank are 
fine grained and clear, with an absence of red light fog, 
finger marks, scratches and other defects caused by hand- 
ling during dark-room tray development. 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 



A 11 Dealers 



TORONTO, CANADA 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 

A complete stock of 

Studio Supplies 

enables us to fill your 

mail orders correctly 

and promptly 



All the products of 

Canadian Kodak Co. , Limited, 

Canadian Card Co. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



A GOOD STYLE 

for PLATINUM, ARTURA and 
BACKED ARISTO PRINTS 




The Phantom 



Is designed esijecially for Platinums, both Black and White 
and Sepia — or Backed Aristo Prints. 

Made in Silver Grey and Chipmunk Brown, for C'abt. or 
smaller prints. 

This is one of the neatest folders on the market and has to 
be seen to be appreciated. Send for sample, made in two 
colors. Grey and Brown. Samj^le of one color free. 



Size For Photo 

AA Cabt. and smaller 



Size Outside 

41 2X6! 4 



'rice per 100 
$3.75 



DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



Aristo Motto 



'T ^ TE believe permanency is the 
' ^ Keystone of Pliotographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



Bv The IloUaday Studio 
Durham, N. C, 




irm 



ilEOU 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE 

Established 1901 



THE ARTURA BULLETIN. 

Established 1906 



Vol. 2 



FEBRUARY ign 



No. 12 



Conventions are again claim- 
ing the attention of photograph- 
ers in all parts of the country. 
Get in touch with your secretary 
and if possible work with him in 
making the convention you are 
most interested in a success. 



Elon combined with hydro- 
chinon and sodas makes an active, 
durable developer — a developer 
that keeps well before and dur- 
ing use — a clear, clean solution. 
Use Elon with Hydrochinon. 



The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Photography is well 
under way for the year 1911 and 
will again make every effort to 
assist professional photographers 
in producing the best possible 
results in the most convenient 
way. Watch the dates as they 
appear each month. This month 
see page 2 1 . 



If you want a warm black 
platinum print use Eastman E-B 
platinum. If a sepia use either 
Angelo or E-S. In the sepia you 
have your choice of two methods 
— cold bath Angelo or hot bath 
E-S. In the three papers men- 
tioned you have highest plati- 
num quality — they are platinum 
perfection as proved by results. 



Paragon Border Negatives make 
double printing easy and double 
printing makes better prices pos- 
sible. Read about them in this 
issue and look into the possi- 
bilities of the proposition for 
your better grade of work. 



Seed Plates in your plate hold- 
ers give you a sense of security 
when making sittings— a sense of 
security because you know that 
your work under the skylight is 
behig truthfully registered in the 
negatives, and this sense of se- 
curity leaves you free to put all 
your time, attention and skill 
into your posing and lighting 
without an element of doubt to 
distract you. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



T^NERGY 

-*— ^ Bill started his photo- 
graphic career as a combination 
errand and office boy in the best 
gallery in a small town. Bill was 
energetic. 

When he was sent on an errand 
he hustled. When he was left 
in the office to tell customers the 
boss would be back in half an 
hour he not only did it politely, 
but made the half hour pass 
pleasantly if the customers could 
be persuaded to wait by giving 
them something to read and mak- 
ing them feel at home. When 
he was told to clean up he did, 
although he never made the mis- 
take of scrubbing the crayon por- 
traits with a scrubbing brush or 
washing the show case with a 
mop — a common practice with 
some office boys. Bill used his 
head to think with, as nature in- 
tended he should, when it pro- 
vided him with a head. 

The working force in this par- 
ticular gallery in addition to Bill 
consisted of the boss and the 
printer. The printer was a good 
printer and a good natured printer 
and Bill spent his spare time 
watching him print and helping 
him in every way he could. The 
printer also did most of the re- 
touching and some of the dark- 
room work when the boss was 
too busy to take care of it all. 
The boss made the sittings, de- 
veloped the negatives and also 
did some of the retouching. 



Bill was tactful and and proved 
useful as an assistant operator 
and darkroom man. The first 
operating Bill did consisted of 
carrying the proper chair to the 
front and the first darkroom work 
was washing out bottles, sinks 
and trays, but Bill liked to work. 
He was energetic. 

After becoming familiar with 
the atmosphere in which he 
worked Bill gradually picked up 
the detail of formulae and their 
application to sensitized mate- 
rials. He became a valuable as- 
sistant in every branch of the 
business because he was not 
afraid to work with his hands 
and his head. 

Just about this time Bill devel- 
oped ideas of his own and saw 
what he thought was a chance to 
better the methods of working or 
the methods of book-keeping or 
the methods of showing samples, 
etc. An idea here and an idea 
there which seemed to him would 
effect a saving or increase the 
efficiency of the studio, and he 
sprung these ideas on the boss. 

The boss didn't exactly resent 
the suggestions but was indiffer- 
ent to them because he was an 
experienced photographer and 
Bill had only been in the busi- 
ness for five or six years and 
wasn't of age. These facts in the 
mind of the boss disqualified Bill 
in the role of advisor, and Bill 
chafed and stored the turned 
down suggestions in his head for 
future use. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Realizing that he couldn't per- 
suade the boss to cut down the 
waste and thereby the cost of 
production — that he couldn^t 
get him to take hold of the new 
and better things that meant 
more money to him, Bill decided 
to go into business for himself, 
and to tell the truth the boss 
welcomed this idea as in it he 
saw relief from the tireless Bill's 
suggestions. 

Bill had saved a little money 
— enough to start a studio in a 
modest way, and with the help 
of a rather influential friend he 
persuaded the owner of a down 
town building, then in the 
course of erection, to modify his 
plans somewhat and put in a sky- 
light for him on the top floor, 
which was done. 

Bill started to make photo- 
graphs and mount them on cards 
bearing his own imprint. The 
town was growing and Bill's 
showcase attracted much favor- 
able attention for he displayed 
in it prints and mounts that were 
right in every way. 

He advertised in the local 
weekly. He sent out finely 
printed announcements at fre- 
quent intervals to a selected 
list of prospective patrons call- 
ing attention to his better 
styles of work. He employed a 
clever receptionist for he real- 
ized he couldn't sell a man a five 
dollar gold piece for $4.50 and 
leave the man feeling satisfied 
with his bargain, and as his busi- 



ness increased he employed a 
printer and other assistants as 
needed. 

His old boss was still making 
the same kind of pictures at the 
same prices and although he was 
not envious he wondered at Bill's 
luck in getting more business 
than the growth of the town war- 
ranted, when his own business 
(and he didn't forget to add 
mentally, "and I am an exper- 
ienced photographer") was fall- 
ing off slightly. The old boss 
misjudged well directed energy 
in conducting a studio and to the 
success which followed Bill's ef- 
forts he applied the term "luck. " 

Like all tales this has a moral 
which, summed up and boiled 
down, is: "Be progressive and 
energetic." Don't get into a 
rut. Success isn't luck — it is 
properly applied energy and 
within the reach of all who earn 
it. Bill was energetic. 



For high grade enlarge- 
ments possessing the life 
and vigor of contact 
prints use 

ARTURA 
CARBON 
BLACK 



STUDIOLIGHT 



c 



KODAK ADVERTISING 
CONTEST, 1911 

This contest is now open . The 
rules and regulations have been 
pubhshed. We have also com- 
pleted a handsomely printed 
Souvenir containing reproduc- 
tions of the 1910 prize winners, 
together with reproductions of 
some of the purchased pictures, 
and practical applications of some 
of the pictures to our advertis- 
ing. We will be pleased to send 
a copy of this Souvenir and a 
copy of the rules governing the 
1911 contest to your address, 
upon application. 

Don't delay action if you have 
decided to go out after some of 
the prize money this year. Send 
for the Souvenir and rules now 
—look over the pictures that won 
in last year's contest — read the 
rules and then get busy. 

The pictures in the Souvenir 
may suggest a winning idea to 
you and the sooner you start 
executing these ideas the better 
chance you have of winning, for 
one idea brings another and the 
longer time you allow yourself 
for completing the set of pictures 
you eventually send in, the better 
chance you have of completing 
the set to your entire satisfac- 
tion. 

Winter oifers many opportu- 
nities for picturing the outdoor 
and indoor pleasures of Kodak- 
ing — fully as many as the sum- 
mer months, and if you can illus- 



trate a winter application of the 
use of the Kodak there is no 
time like the present for doing 
it, for spring will soon be here. 

A feature of the I91I Contest 
that will interest you is the creat- 
ing of the new Grand Prize Class, 
open only to former prize win- 
ners. The regular five hundred 
dollar prize remains open to 
all other professional photog- 
raphers, but is not open to these 
former winners. 

Send for the Souvenir and 
printed rules now and get an 
early start. 



i^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ The portraits produced in 
this number of Studio Light are 
from the Holladay Studio of Dur- 
ham, North Carolina. 

In the recent Appalachian Ex- 
position the Holladay Studio won 
distinction by being awarded one 
of a total of three prizes in com- 
petition with about 300 exhi- 
bitors. 

Two of the portraits which 
appear in this issue are from the 
prize winning groiip — the two 
subjects which appear in oval 
form. 

A study of the reproductions 
is convincing ])roof of skill in 
posing, lighting and finishing and 
the success of this establishment 
has been built upon merit — the 
only permanent foundation upon 
which to build. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By The Hollnday Studio 
Durham, N. C. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



|-^OUBLE PRINTING 

-*^^ Every photographer knows 
the vahie of double printing in 
the making of better prints at 
better prices, but there has al- 
ways been more or less uncertainty 
and inconvenience in the process 
to offset any advantages that 
might accrue. 

For example, the photographer 
might say, "Yes, I know that 
double printed photographs are 
attractive and bring better prices, 
but time and extra work con- 
sidered it hardly pays." 

It is true that the making and 
registering of the double print- 
ing masks is slow work, requir- 
ing some skill and great accu- 
racy, and beside this the pho- 
tographer is, as a rule, limited 
to plain flash tints. 

We now call to your attention 
our line of Paragon Border Neg- 
atives which we furnish in sixteen 
designs — each design being made 
in a variety of sizes. These de- 
signs range from the simple to 



the elaborate and comprise all 
sizes generally used in the mak- 
ing of portrait prints from 5x7 
to 1 4 x 1 7 . The line is complete 
and it is safe to say the size and 
design you desire can be furnished 
from the line. 

Double printing with Paragon 
Border Negatives is simple and 
certain and requires but little 
extra time in printing. The Bor- 
der Negatives with their corres- 
ponding masks are accurately 
registered and ready for use. 
They are fitted with raised guides 
or gauges in the upper left hand 
corners as shown below in illus- 
trations A and B. This permits 
easy and accurate registering of 
prints even in subdued light. 

Illustration A represents the 
printing mask upon which the 
negative is laid and print made. 
The print is then transferred to 
Border Negative B and the bor- 
der printed, after which the print 
is ready to develop or tone. Il- 
lustration C shows the finished 
effect produced by the use of 
masks A and B. 





STUDIO LIGHT 



We also show herewith several 
other designs to give a slight 
idea of the effects possible by the 
use of Paragon Border Negatives. 




r 


HI jji 


1^ ^TSB 



Remember there are sixteen dif- 
ferent designs to choose from, in- 
cluding the plain square and plain 
oval — all designs which have 
proved popular and desirable for 
use in connection with photo- 
graphic portraiture. To assist 
you in determining which designs 
and which sizes to order we have 
prepared a little booklet, entit- 
led "Paragon Border Negatives." 
This booklet contains half tone 
illustrations of all the designs, 
together with sizes and prices 
complete. 

Write to us to-day for the 
booklet or send to your deal- 
ers for it. It is supplied gratis 
and we want you to see the en- 
tire line. 

Double printing by this method 
is little or no extra work and 
means increased profits for you. 
Get a copy of the booklet noiv. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



GOOD MIXERS 
BY THE OFFICE BOY 

I heard the Boss talkin' 
to the head printer the other 
day, an' he says, "if you want 
to get along you gotto be a good 
mixer." Now I find mostly that 
when I follow the Boss' tips I 
land inside the money and so, a 
little later, when I wuz on my 
way to the stock house, an' a 
nother kid bumps into me, I fol- 
lows the Boss' words of wisdom 
an' mixes; I shoots one across, 
an' the other kid he comes back 
with a wallop that pretty near 
took the husk oiF my bean, an' 
put my right lamp out of order. 

When I gets back to the studio, 
the Boss takes one look an' he 
says to me, "Young man, what 
does this mean?" and I tells him 
I've only been followin' his ad- 
vice about mixin', and he says 
mixin' is all right when you don' 
get too far out of your class. 
The Boss says I wuz a shinin' 
example of what happens when 
you only get half of the story, 
an' that the kind of mixin' he 
meant wuzent nothin' like the 
brand I tried to put out. 

The Boss says bein' a good 
mixer don't mean huntin' for 
trouble, but means gettin' out 
an' gettin' acquainted with your 
fellow humans — an' he says get- 
tin' acquainted with the other 
fellow helps you a lot in gettin' 
wise to your own curves. The 
Boss says the more i)eo[)le you 
know the more people know you. 



an' that if you've been slick in 
knowin' them and in lettin' them 
know you, why, they are mosly 
apt to think of you when they 
want pitchers took. 

The Boss says that you want 
to get him straight on this mixin' 
business an' not get walloped 
thru a misunderstandin' like I 
did. He says his definition of a 
good mixer is a chap that treats 
his family as if they wuz human, 
that stays on the job when there 
is things to be done, but that 
devotes a certain portion of his 
spare time to good fellowship, 
an' the doin' of things that is 
goin' to help every one in town. 

The Boss says the successful 
good mixer is the chap every- 
body knows an' respects, an' that 
you gotto be mighty careful not 
to spend too much time mixin', 
or they'll jus' only k7i07v you. 

I know the Boss spends a good 
many evenin's down town, to 
lodge, or to the city improvement 
society, or to meetin' someone 
worth while, but when he is 
goin' to stay down town, he 
phones to the missus so she won't 
let the steak bum waitin' for 
him, an' lots of times he sends 
me out with a quart of choco- 
late and verniller to make up 
for his not bein' there. 

The Boss says a good mixer is 
a chap that can make a lot of 
folks like him, without seemin' 
to be workin' at it. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By The Holloday Studio 
Durham, N. C. 




( 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



i^ONVENTION NOTES 

^^ The Executive Board of the 
P. A. of A. reaches us by tele- 
gram as we go to press and an- 
nounces that the St. Paul Con- 
vention will be held the week of 
July 24th, in the St. Paul Ar- 
mory. The St. Paul Hotel has 
been selected as official head- 
quarters and the telegram states 
that the local enthusiasm is un- 
usually great and that indications 
point to a most successful con- 
vention. 

This favorable forecast of the 
coming National Convention in- 
dicates another success at St. 
Paul — a success which will rival 
the standard established by the 
P. A. of A. at Rochester and 
Milwaukee. 

The Professional Photogra- 
phers' Association of Pennsyl- 
vania, to be held at Philadelphia, 
March 7, 8 and 9. Edwin H. 
Cooper, secretary, 6th and Mar- 
ket streets, Chester, Pa. 

The Photographers' Associa- 
tion of Iowa, through its secre- 
tary, F. A. Free, of Davenport, 
Iowa, is ready to disseminate 
news in detail regarding the 2 1 st 
Annual Convention of the P. A. 
of Iowa, to be held at Sioux 
City, Iowa, on May 2, 3, 4 and 
5, ipil. Full information in 
regard to prizes, rules for ex- 
hibitors, etc., will be sent upon 
application to Mr. Free. 



I 



T STAYS WHERE YOU 
PUT IT 

Eastman Permanent Crystal 
Pyro is fast making friends among 
photographers who appreciate the 
advantages of using a pyro that 
does not fly about when handled. 

It is a well known fact that 
misplaced chemicals are a con- 
stant source of danger in causing 
spots and stains in unexpected 
places at unexpected times. Pyro 
in crystal form eliminates this dan- 
ger. Eastman Permanent Crystal 
Pyro stays where you put it. ' 

In addition to this feature is 
another equally desirable. East- 
man Permanent Crystal Pyro is 
acidified. When using this pyro 
no acid preservative need be 
added, as just the proper amount 
of acid is contained in the crys- 
tals. Combine it with sodas and 
it is ready for use. 

The merit and quality of this 
tested chemical will win your 
approval on first trial and if you 
are not acquainted with this pyro 
put it on the list for your next 
order. Your dealer will supply it. 



THE VALUE OF 
FORMULAE 

Our photographic materials — 
plates and papers — are the result 
of years of experience in the suc- 
cessful combination of all the 
parts that make up the finished 
product. 

Experience has taught us how 



STUDIO LIGHT 



13 



to combine quality with reliabil- 
ity—how to produce products 
that meet every requirement of 
the photographer, and naturally 
we use every precaution in the 
selection and composition of form- 
ulae as these formulae largely 
determine the final results. 

The formulae which you find 
in every package of sensitized 
material which we send out are 
formulae that have been thor- 
oughly tested and properly bal- 
anced. We do the experiment- 
ing and decide on the best com- 
bination of chemicals for use in 
connection with the goods. 

The photographer who does 
not follow specific formulae is 
experimenting — the photog- 
rapher who uses one formula for 
several purposes is sacrificing 
quality in finished results to a 
greater or less degree as there is 
no universal formula. That's 
why ours differ. 

We would be pleased to print 
and recommend one formula for 
several or all purposes, but our 
careful observation and tests 
prove that such a course is not 
practical. 

We are always pleased to find 
that a photographer has by a 
slight modification of our printed 
formulae improved his results be- 
cause in such cases he is doing 
something that we cannot do — 
he is adapting the formulae to 
suit local conditions. In decid- 
ing on a formula we adopt the 
one which is based on the broad- 



est lines — the one promising to 
work best under average condi- 
tions and in many cases a slight 
change to suit local conditions is 
advisable. 

The things we do not like to 
see are carelessness in compound- 
ing formulae or attempts to mod- 
ify a formula without reason. 
Unless some knowledge of the ac- 
tion of the chemicals making up 
the formulae exists in the mind 
of the photographer, no attempts 
to deviate from printed rule 
should be made. 

Don't throw formulae away 
with the wrappings without look- 
ing them over, as occasionally 
they are improved and revised. 

Don't doctor formulae with- 
out knowing why. 

Our expense in preparing and 
supplying printed instructions is 
incurred with the sole idea of 
providing the photographer with 
the means of securing the most 
desirable of all things — results. 



USE 

Eastman 
Etching- 
Black 
Platinum 

It satisfies high class patrons 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



TN FAIR JAPAN 

■*■ We reproduce herewith two 
Aristo prints recently received 
from Banco Ishikawa, proprietor 
of the Central Art Studio of 
Higashiku, Osaka, Japan. 

It is interesting to note the 
effect produced by American 
methods when applied to Japa- 
nese art, and it is also interest- 
ing to note that this man from 
Japan — from a country whose 
natives are marked for their keen 
perception, their discernment 
and appreciation of real merit — 
has selected Aristo products for 
use in his studio. A selection 
made after a thorough study of 
American photography and pho- 
tographic methods. 





Further proof of progressive- 
ness is furnished in a nicely print- 
ed announcement illustrated with 
half tone reproductions of pho- 
tographic portraits which is sent 
to prospective patrons of the 
studio. In the announcement 
Mr. Ishikawa makes a direct aj)- 
peal for new business, using the 
following argument : 

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FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By The Ilolladay Studio 
DurJutm, N. C. 









ConrtcK'j (•/ LIFE. 



TIIK ¥J 




Copyright 1910, LIFE Ptihlishing Co: 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



SEPIA TONES ON IRIS 
There is a varying demand 
for sepia tones and to enable the 
photographer to fulfill the de- 
mand when it occurs we offer a 
choice of several different pro- 
cesses. 

Hypo-alum, the old reliable 
way of making sepia tones on 
Iris, was the first one advocated 
and this method, modified to suit 
Artura Iris, was published in the 
Artura manual " Results " several 
years ago. 

Then came double-develop- 
ment, another original Artura 
formula and one which is success- 
fully used by many. This is also 
published in the manual "Re- 
sults." 

The newest and simplest and 
quickest sepia process of all is 
the use of "Artura Sepia Salt" 
which is fully explained in " Re- 
sults." 

Double redevelopment and Ar- 
tura Sepia Salts yield beautiful 
sepia tones, but both processes 
while simple require thorough- 
ness and cleanliness in handhng. 
There are several minor points 
which if not observed may affect 
the final result. 

Both double redevelopment 
and Artura Sepia Salts have their 
staunch champions who would 
not use any other method for 
sepia prints, but experience has 
proved that of the three, the old 
original hypo-alum method is 
the most reliable in the majority 



of cases, as it is not a so deli- 
cately balanced process and yields 
a better average result with little 
or no attention aside from using 
some care in making the original 
prints. 

The original black and white 
print should be made a shade 
darker than desired to allow for 
the change from black to brown 
and to obtain a satisfactory sepia 
tone must be fully and evenly 
developed. 

Full development is essential, 
as under development causes 
weak yellowish tones, and to 
facilitate full development double 
strength Iris developer with a 
minimum amount of Bromide 
may be used to advantage. 

To eight ounces of double 
strength Iris developer use about 
3 drops of a saturated solution 
of Bromide of Potash and expose 
prints so that they may be de- 
veloped to the stopping point. 
Then fix as usual, rinse well and 
tone. 

The Artura booklet gives com- 
plete instructions for making se- 
pias on Iris by all three meth- 
ods. It is a complete working 
manual covering all of the finer 
points of Artura manipulation. 
If you haven't a copy of the 
9th edition of the booklet, "Ar- 
tura Results," you can get a 
copy from your dealer or from 
us by mail. It's free for the 
asking. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By The Holladny Studi 
Durham, N. C. 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



PLATE DEVELOP- 
MENT 

The development of dry plates 
is caused by the contact of an 
active developing agent with 
such silver salts as have been 
acted upon by light. 

If a developer so balanced as 
to be vigorous and strong is used 
it will attack the exposed silver 
rapidly and darken it quickly, 
forming a coarse grained deposit 
of silver. The image thus formed 
will not possess full delicacy and 
detail. If a developer so bal- 
anced as to be slow in its action 
is used it will search out and 
produce an image of fine grain 
with full delicacy and detail. 

Judged by results the slow 
working developer has every ad- 
vantage over the stronger devel- 
oper, but in darkroom develop- 
ment there are two reasons why 
the slow working developer is 
not practical. First, the length 
of time required to develop has 
made the work of darkroom hand 
development tedious and slow. 
Secondly, the length of time re- 
quired to carry the development 
to completion with an extremely 
slow working developer makes it 
necessary to use caution as to the 
strength of the darkroom light, 
or fog will result. This condi- 
tion makes a quicker developer 
the best choice for hand develop- 
ment although the (juality of the 
finished negative is not entirely 
satisfactory. 



There is now a device in gen- 
eral use that makes it possible 
to realize all of the advantages 
of slow development without any 
of its disadvantages— a device 
that makes it possible to produce 
negatives of fine grain with an 
absence of red-light fog — a de- 
vice that eliminates the tedium 
of hand development — elimin- 
ates the probability of scratches, 
finger marks and frills caused by 
handling, and this device is the 
Eastman Plate Tank. 

With the proper use of the 
tank good results are assured 
and the work of plate develop- 
ment is made easier and at the 
same time better. Use the reli- 
able, conveniently constructed 
Eastman Plate Tank. 



Use 

Eastman 
Permanent 
Crystal 
Pyro 

For tray or tank 
development 



B 



STUDIO LIGHT '^l 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



Boston, Mass Jan. 31, Feb. 1, 2 

New York City . Feb. 7, 8, 9 

Philadelphia, Pa Feb. 14, 15, l6 

Syracuse, N. Y Feb. 21, 22, 23 

Toledo, O Feb. 28, March 1, 2 

Cincinnati, O March 7, 8, f) 

Chicago, 111 . March 14, 15, iG 

Omaha, Neb March 21, 22, 23 

St. Joseph, Mo March 28, 29, 30 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 




THE difference between the 
ordinary photograph and 
the kind we make is due to 
our skill and high grade 
equipment. 

Every sitter is given indi- 
vidual attention and treatment 
and the results we produce arc 
photographic portraits — not 
merely photographs. 

Let us demonstrate our skill 
by making for you the best 
portrait you have ever had. 



The Pyro Studio 



C. K. Co., Limited. No. 162. Price, 40 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 

Velvety finish and 
richness of tone dis- 
tinguish prints on 

ANGELO 



Canadian Kodak Co. , Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 



The diiFerence between tested 
chemicals and those of unknown 
quahty is distinguishable by this 
mark on the tested goods. 




Specify C-K tested when you buy. 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Canada. 



All Dealers, 



STUDIO LIGHT 



25 



New Name — Same Goods 

For trade-mark reasons the devel- 
oper which has been so successful 
under the name 




"ENGL" 

will hereafter be 
known as 

ELON 



The change is all in the name — 
the goods are the same — the reliable 
Eastman Tested Chemical variety. 

USE ELON WITH HYDROCHINON 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited, 

All Dealers. Toronto. Canada. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 



For all-around studio work- 



THE 
ROYAL 
PLATE 



Hzsi-h speed and ^reat 
latitude 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 21 

Headquarters for 
Studio Supplies 



f WE HAVE THE GOODS— A 
FULL STOCK ALL THE TIME. 
^THAT IS WHY WE FILL 
YOUR ORDERS SO PROMPTLY 



A complete line of all the products 
of the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
and Canadian Card Co. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 

Light feathery chemicals fly 
about the work rooms, causing 
spots and stains in unexpected 
places at unexpected times, 

Eastman 
Permanent 
Crystal 
Pyro 

Stays where you put it. 

THE PRICE 

1 oz., .... $0.20 V2 lb., .... $1.20 
4 ozs., .... 0.65 1 lb., .... 2.10 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 

At Your Dealer's. 




STUDIO LIGHT 29 




THE ROUNDS 
PRINT WASHER 

The quickest and most efficient washer 
made. Entirely automatic and designed 
to make the bruising or tearing of prints 
practically impossible. 

This washer requires only 12 lbs. water pressure to operate. 
Constructed of the best grade of zinc and will not rust. Height, 
9V2 inches; width, 23 inches; length, 20 inches; capacity, 100 
prints 5 X 7 or 150 cabinets or smaller. Price, $13.50. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 

At Your Dealer's. 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT 



i 




Tank development was changed from a theory 
to a practical certainty by the introduction of 

THE EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 

Its use means convenience, economy of time 
and better results. 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 

All Dealers. TORONTO, CANADA 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 

A complete stock of 

Studio Supplies 

enables us to fill your 

mail orders correctly 

and promptly 



All the products of 

Canadian Kodak Co. , Limited, 

Canadian Card Co. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



C 



A GOOD STYLE 

for PLATINUM, ARTURA and 
BACKED ARISTO PRINTS 




The Phantom 



Is designed especially for Platinums, both Black and White 
and Sepia— or Backed Aristo Prints. 

Made in Silver Grey and Chipmunk Brown, for Cabt. or 
smaller prints. 

This is one of the neatest folders on the market and has to 
be seen to be appreciated. Send for sample, made in two 
colors, Grey and Brown. Sample of one color free. 



Size 
AA 



For Photo 
Cabt. and smaller 



SiZK OUTSIDK 



Prick pkr 100 

$3.75 



DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURKD BY 



The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can, 



Aristo Motto 



'"l^T'E believe permanency is the 
^ ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




Wm. Lokm, Jr., Com-kctou of the Pokt of Nkw York 

From an Artura Iris print 



PINie MACDONALD 

40T00RAPHKR-0F-MC 

NEW YO R K 



TUiE© U 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 190] 



Established 1906 



Vol. 



MARCH 191 1 



No. 1 



Thousands of Canadian pho- 
tographers use Seed plates. The 
plate of quality — there's a reason 
why. 



Have you tried Artura Carbon 
Black for enlarging ? Choose a 
negative or two and make or 
have made some Carbon Black 
enlargements. The rich, bril- 
liant results will please you and 
help you to develop this profit- 
able branch of your business. 



Easter millinery creations for 
1911 may or may not be works 
of art. In either case the desire 
to be photographed in the new 
Easter hat will be strong in the 
feminine heart. A few neatly 
printed cards exploiting your 
ability along this line will receive 
due attention and bring in busi- 
ness. 



Every success is built upon 
system and the ideal system for 
studio use is the Eastman Studio 



Register System. It is simple, 
efficient and complete. A de- 
scriptive folder may be had from 
your dealer or we will be pleased 
to mail one to your address upon 
request. Now is the time to 
put this system into your studio. 

The negatives you have set 
aside for use in making up your 
convention display may be ef- 
fectively printed on platinum, 
developing, or printing out pa- 
pers. If you have decided to 
make a platinum display use East- 
man Etching Black, Eastman 
Etching Sepia or Angelo. If you 
intend to display on developing 
paper there is only one worthy 
of consideration — Artura. Use 
Artura Iris D or E. If you wish 
to display collodion quality and 
surface choose Aristo or Collodio- 
Carbon. Each of these papers 
is a leader in its class and will 
give your display a quality that 
will carry prestige and attract 
favorable attention to you and 
your studio. 



4 



STUDIO LIGHT 



INFLUENCING PUBLIC 
OPINION BY PHOTOG- 
RAPHY 

CLEVER WORK BY THE KLAXON 
COMVAHY 

In commenting upon the work 
that has been done through ad- 
vertising in influencing pubhc 
opinion to listen kindly to the 
somewhat strident notes of a 
Klaxon horn, William Allen John- 
ston writes as follows in Print- 
er's Ink: 

"The keynote of the periodical 
advertising was human interest. 

"Offhand one would say that 
there could be little human inter- 
est appeal in an automobile acces- 
sory. As a matter of fact there 
is human interest in everything 
that human hands touch and 
that human brains conceive and 
that human minds want. All that 
is necessary is to dig it out and 
then humanly portray it. 

"Photography is the best med- 
ium — if your product lends itself 
at all to photography— and what 
product does not ? 

"Photography is the reporter 
of life's realism — the real, inti- 
mate news and facts of life. It 
shows things as they are, and a 
photo carries an intimate human 
appeal such as no other repre- 
sentation does. Typographic and 
illustrative art create effects and 
are highly necessary to the best 
advertising display and sugges- 
tion, but your photo argues with 
a sweep and a conclusion. The 



distinction may, in a sense, be 
likened to the difference between 
facile, attractive — but superfi- 
cial — writing, and that which digs 
underneath and tells things with 
the unmistakable ring of truth. 

"Your editor knows the popu- 
lar appeal of photographs, and 
would as soon think of excluding 
them from the reading pages as 
an illustrated weekly would con- 
sider portraying world events 
with an artist's brush and pen. 
Why not more photography in 
the advertising pages? 

"The first pages of the new 
Klaxon advertising campaign were 
featured with photographs— real 
photographs taken in the crowded 
centers of New York city's traffic, 
and showing the effect of such a 
warning signal upon the pedes- 
trian. Then the story was told 
— sharply, concisely and with a 
catchline of direct human appeal. 
It is my opinion, both from the 
standpoint of magazine writing 
and practical advertising experi- 
ence, that few if any pages in the 
entire magazine were more gener- 
ally read than this Klaxon page. 
That result can be accomplished ; 
and I believe that in this instance 
it was accomplished. 

"There is another point here: 
The preparation of this advertis- 
tising cost considerable money. 
Five expert photographers — one 
a war photographer of note — were 
employed. It took several weeks 
to obtain just the right kind of 
photo. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



"Then much time and expense 
were also incurred in the prepar- 
ation of copy and plates. Every 
detail was carefully considered. 
More money was expended in 
buying preferred position. 

"The advertising idea here was 
simply this, that if you advertise 
at all it pays to do it in the best, 
even if most expensive, way. 
Largest obtainable space, best 
mediums, preferred position — 
these first of all, and then on top 
of this appropriation all the extra 
expense, however great, to make 
this costly space count for all it is 
possibly worth. 

"This advertising paid. Though 
it was not directed at the motor- 
ist at all, though it made no di- 
rect effort to sell the product 
advertised, nevertheless in the 
advertiser' s opinion Jt sold ejiough 
Klaxons to pay for the space used. 
In other words, the editorial pub- 
licity was secured practically 
free." 



PROOFS 
BY THE RECEPTIONIST 

Sometimes when I am 
showing proofs I'm almost sorry 
I ' m not a man, so I could go in- 
to the darkroom, shut the door 
and say words you wouldn't 
print. 

Honestly I think this proof 
proposition is the worst part of 
the whole business. The man 



under the light can work his 
head off to get something fine 
and artistic, and then it's my 
new hat against a package of 
chewing gum that the sitter se- 
lects the most commonplace proof 
in the lot to print up from. 
Argue the case? You can't argue 
with a woman — why even / come 
back with "because" when I 
can't think of anything else. 

"Why, my dear Mrs. Smith, 
see what a soft delicate lighting 
that one has, and what a grace- 
ful position." "Yes, but my dia- 
mond brooch shows so much bet- 
ter in this one." 

Oh! Wouldn't I just like to 
land my lily white hands in her 
twenty-five dollars worth of puffs 
for just one good pull, but, in- 
stead, I have to practice deep 
breathing for a minute, and then 
say, "Why, yes, that is so," and 
then try and get back by landing 
her order for twice as much as 
she had figured on. 

And it isn't all the women 
either, some of the men are just 
as bad; lots of 'em imagine that 
we can not only grow hair on 
bald heads and straighten cross 
eyes, but also put some elixir of 
youth into the developer and 
turn them out Apollos and Ado- 
nis' — and then when they gaze 
on the unretouched proofs and 
see just how unkind nature has 
been to them, and all the licks 
old Father Time has made at 
them, they just grouch — the 
conceited, horrid old things. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



i^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^^ The work of Pirie Mac- 
Donald is known because he 
dares to make his pictures tell 
the truth. He puts the charac- 
ter of his subject, as he reads it, 
into the picture. And MacDon- 
ald, himself a man among men, 
can read men. His critics, and 
like every man who has made a 
place for himself he has critics, 
have sometimes claimed that his 
work is brutally frank. Maybe 
so — but at least nobody ever 
said it was "wishy-washy." The 
"photographer of men" evidently 
believes that real MEN like the 
truth — prefer the honest likeness. 
He makes truthful pictures be- 
cause he knows how, because 
those are the pictures that he 
enjoys making. He has suc- 
ceeded because pictures of the 
vigorous stamp please the virile, 
energetic men who make up his 
clientele. 

Pirie MacDonald is his own 
operator ; every detail of his busi- 
ness from meeting the prospect 
to a personal inspection of the 
finished Artura print, is at his 
finger tips. His personality enters 
into every part of his business. 
He is that business. Under such 
conditions a large output, in the 
factory sense, is not possible. 
But the finished product being a 
part of his personality, a large 
income is possible. And the dis- 
cerning class is willing to pay for 
that personality. 



We consider it fortunate, both 
for our readers and ourselves, 
that we are able to illustrate this 
number with the forceful work 
of Pirie MacDonald, PHOTOG- 
RAPHER-OF-MEN. 

THE EVOLUTION OF 
RETOUCHING 

Retouching has at last taken 
its proper place in the making of 
portraits and has become an art 
in place of an elaborate display of 
manual skill. 

Time was when good retouch- 
ing consisted of filling every avail- 
able face space of the negative 
with retouching lead. True this 
lead was placed with great care, 
and to be able to create what 
was known as retouching texture 
a great amount of practice and 
skill was necessary. The finished 
result was a nicely rounded out 
face, and this result was consid- 
ered right, even though it did 
not truly represent the features 
of the sitter. 

To-day through evolution this 
is changed and a portrait by pho- 
tography is a portrait of the sit- 
ter—a portrait truly representa- 
tive of that sitter and appreci- 
ated as such by all who see it. 
True there are a few who wish 
to be flattered, but they are not 
as a rule the most desirable pat- 
rons, and the majority of sitters 
want what they came for — a 
pleasing likeness but not a false 
one. 




RIE MACDONAUD 

"OGRAPHER-OF-M 

N EW YORK 



Victor Herbekt, Conductor and Composer 

From an Artura Iris print 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



This change is due to a better 
appreciation of portraiture by the 
photographer and increased skill 
in posing and lighting. The pho- 
tographer of to-day makes his 
portraits pleasing by placing each 
subject in a lighting best suited 
to bring out the best points in 
the features of the sitter and in a 
pose equally well selected. 

This intelligent use of light 
and selection of pose does not de- 
stroy the likeness of the sitter 
and leaves little to be added by 
retouching. 

The good retoucher of to-day 
applies lead sparingly and doesn't 
attempt to change the modeling 
of the face to any extent, as this 
has been properly attended to in 
the making of the negative. Re- 
touching to-day where the better 
grades of work are produced has 
changed from the excessive use 
of lead to the use of a minimum 
amount and good retouchers agree 
that the secret of retouching lies 
in knowing where to put the lead 
and when to stop rather than in 
fine texture and plenty of it. 

HALF TONES 
BY P. Y. RO 

With the advent of the 
new year, I, in common with 
most of the rest of you, builded 
a platform of good resolutions. 
But like most folks who are their 
own architects, I built this plat- 
form on a slant, and slid across 
most of the good resolution planks 



at a forty horse gait. I am, 
however, hanging on to one plank 
with a death grip and that is the 
one wherein I resolved to slick 
up the studio for spring business. 

Now my studio fittings and 
furnishings are not so bad gener- 
ally, but I notice that as I go 
around town, the department 
stores and other progressive busi- 
ness houses are always ripping 
out fixtures that could be made 
to do, and installing the latest 
devices, or rearranging their 
places so as to afford a new effect. 
And I have also noticed that my 
wife and I, and a whole lot of 
other people, seem to prefer to 
trade at these up-to-date places. 

I believe a lot in first impres- 
sions; if I go into a store or 
office and the surroundings are 
spick and span and modem, it 
conveys to me a sense of pros- 
perity, and a feeling that the 
concern must be making good, 
in order to afford such surround- 
ings. Now that is the way I 
want my customers to feel when 
they come into my studio. Not 
only do I want my reception 
room right, but the studio proper 
as well. An ancient and marred 
camera, with a faded paper lens 
shade, may deliver the goods all 
right, but the customer thinks 
"things look sort of seedy here," 
and straightway feels that per- 
haps you can't deliver the goods, 
making it just so much harder 
for the operator to secure the 
best expression. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



9 



What I have remarked don't 
mean that I renew everything 
about the place each year, but I 
do renew every time any piece of 
apparatus or furniture gets into 
the "has been" class. 

I recently read a reporter's 
story about a photographer who 
said that he always kept the 
parents out of the room when 
photographing children, and that 
the last time he let a mother in 
while he was preparing to take 
the picture decided him. The 
woman wanted her little boy 
photographed while he was play- 
ing. After many unsuccessful 
attempts she exclaimed, "John- 
nie, if you don't begin playing 
this minute I'll lick you within 
an inch of your life." 
* * # 

I had a man working for me a 
while ago, a first-class man too, 
but he seemed to be always 
" agin the administration . " Noth- 
ing in my place was done to suit 
him, and his specialty seemed to 
be first tenor in the anvil chorus. 
I found upon investigation that 
he had the same reputation wher- 
ever he had been employed, and 
had lost several good positions 
solely on his propensity to al- 
ways knock. Elbert Hubbard 
seems to have encountered simi- 
lar individuals, and he expresses 
most clearly just what I would 
have liked to impress upon this 
man of mine : 



"If you work for a man in 
heaven's name work for him. If 
he pays you wages that supply 
your bread and butter, work for 
him, speak well of him, think 
well of him, stand by him, and 
stand by the institution he rep- 
resents. I think if I worked for 
a man I would work for him. I 
would not work for him a part 
of his time, but all of the time. 
I would give him an undivided 
service or none. If put to a 
pinch an ounce of loyalty is worth 
a pound of cleverness. 

"If you must vilify, condemn 
and eternally disparage, why re- 
sign your position, and when you 
are outside, damn to your heart ' s 
content. But, I pray you, so 
long as you are a part of the in- 
stitution, do not condemn it. 
Not that you will injure the in- 
stitution — not that — but when 
you disparage the concern of 
which you are a part you dispar- 
age yourself and don't forget — 
I forget' won't do in business." 



i^UR Advertising 
^^ Cut service will 
also help you to se- 
cure new business. 



See page 24, 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



T OCAL TROUBLES 

* ^ Photography as practiced 
to-day is in a high state of per- 
fection. ReUable materials and 
rehable chemicals are within the 
reach of every photographer who 
is a discriminating buyer, and 
through the use of these reliable 
materials uncertainty is practi- 
cally eliminated. 

Occasionally, however, trouble 
of a peculiar nature may arise, and 
a product that has been used suc- 
cessfully for years will apparently 
decide to cause trouble which is 
obscure and hard to locate. 

A plate demonstrator in mak- 
ing his rounds called on a cus- 
tomer who was having trouble 
with fogged spots about the size 
of a dime near the center of 
plates while others were perfect. 
He had experienced this trouble 
off and on for some time and had 
saved about a dozen of the plates 
to show the demonstrator upon 
his arrival. 

Here was a puzzler. Plates 
good in every way, with the ex- 
ception of this diffused black spot 
in the center. The similarity of 
the marking in each instance con- 
vinced the demonstrator that the 
fault lay in the camera or in some 
local condition of handling. This 
the photographer did not deny, 
but said, "I have searched the 
camera thoroughly for light leaks 
and can't find anything wrong. 
Look it over yourself and see if 
you can." 



The demonstrator inspected 
the camera carefully and like the 
photographer failed to find a leak 
of any kind. He and the pho- 
tographer then went into the 
dark room, loaded the holders, 
and the demonstrator could see 
nothing wrong in the way the 
plates were handled. The slides 
were examined and they proved 
to be light tight. Some plates 
were exposed and a record of 
which plates were used in each 
holder was kept. The plates were 
developed and the trouble ap- 
peared on just one plate. This 
seemingly pinned the trouble 
down to the particular plate hold- 
er in which this plate was ex- 
posed, and noting the general 
location of the black spot on the 
negative, a further inspection 
of this holder was made and up- 
on comparison to the other hold- 
ers the demonstrator noticed that 
the spring clip in the back of the 
holder was rubbed and shining 
brass, while the other springs in 
the remaining holders were dull 
and blackened, and here was the 
cause of the trouble. The light 
shining through the lens and 
through the plate was reflected 
by this shiny brass spring clip 
and caused a diffused fog on 
nearly every plate — especially 
strong if in or near a high light 
in the negative. Here was trouble 
easily corrected but hard to lo- 
cate. In most cases of trouble 
the condition is local as it was in 
this case, and in some it is fully 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



as hard to trace to its source. 

The proper way to trace trouble 
is by the method of elimination 
as this demonstrator did. He 
examined the camera for light 
leaks and found none. That elim- 
inated light leaks in the camera 
as a possible cause and this meth- 
od was used until all plate hold- 
ers were free from suspicion ex- 
cept the one finally proved guilty. 

This same method of elimina- 
tion will work successfully in a 
large majority of cases and is ap- 
plicable to every case regardless 
of the nature of the trouble or 
whether plates or paper are in- 
volved. 

There is a cause for every ef- 
fect and this cause is sometimes 
so elusive as to escape detection 
entirely. In the majority of cases, 
however, it is possible to find the 
local condition to which the 
trouble is due, and when the 
source of the trouble is located 
it is easy to correct it by remov- 
ing the cause. 

Most local troubles can be lo- 
cated and corrected by a thorough 
and systematic investigation and 
such a course is advisable for two 
reasons. First, because it is the 
quickest way to overcome a diffi- 
culty, and secondly, because the 
trouble thus located is a trouble 
that should it occur again is in- 
stantly recognized and the cause 
being known the remedy is easily 
applied. Be an investigator. 



w 



ORKED-IN 
GROUNDS 



BACK 



Many photographers are fully 
alive to the advantages of work- 
ing in background effects on the 
negative and are making many 
of their portrait negatives with a 
plain background as a base for 
the final hand work done at the 
time of retouching. 

The greatest advantage of this 
method lies in its elasticity. At 
the time of the sitting the sitter 
is placed before a plain black 
ground and the operator's atten- 
tion and skill can be concentrated 
on lighting and posing with no 
thought of the sitter's relation 
to the background. 

When a negative of this kind 
is retouched and prepared for 
printing a clouded or scenic back- 
ground can be worked in on the 
glass side of the negative and the 
relation of the sitter to the lights 
and shadows of the background 
can be contemplated and arranged 
at leisure subject to as many 
changes as are necessary to pro- 
duce the desired effect. 

When a clouded or scenic 
ground is used at the time of the 
sitting the operator must con- 
sider the proper placing of the 
sitter before that ground in ad- 
dition to the posing and lighting, 
as the location of the lights and 
shadows of such a ground are 
registered on the negative at 
the time of the sitting and are 
not subject to change in the 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



final finishing of the negative. 

The advantages of the plain 
black ground as compared to the 
scenic or clouded ground are all 
in favor of the former, looking at 
it from the elasticity standpoint, 
but the worked-in-on-the-nega- 
tive ground calls for practice and 
skill and should not be attempted 
by those who have no knowledge 
of the subject. 

There is a reason for the ar- 
rangement of the lights and shad- 
ows of the worked-in ground, or 
there should be. There must be 
a reason if a harmonious and 
correct final effect is to be pro- 
duced. This fact accounts for 
the difference in the worked-in 
ground effects produced by skill- 
ed and unskilled workers. 

For the benefit of such pho- 
tographers as wish to embrace 
the opportunity of harmonious 
combination of sitter and back- 
ground by the hand- work method 
a course of instruction in this 
kind of work was incorporated in 
the work of the Eastman Pro- 
fessional School of Photography. 

This year the course is being 
continued by the Eastman School 
as it held the interest of all visit- 
ing photographers at last year's 
sessions and thus proved itself a 
desirable feature. 

At the School this demonstra- 
tion is carried on in full view of 
all attending photographers by 
being projected onto a large 
screen. Those in attendance can 
easily see the work as it pro- 



gresses while remaining comfort- 
ably seated. 

This demonstration, like all of 
the Eastman School demonstra- 
tions, is complete. The mediums 
used and their application are 
fully explained together with the 
reasons for the general arrange- 
ment of the lights and shadows 
of the background in relation to 
the lights and shadows of the 
subject. 

The secret of successful in- 
struction lies in the ability of the 
instructor to treat the subject in 
hand thoroughly and compre- 
hensively, and that is just what 
the Eastman School instructors 
are doing at every session. The 
demonstrations are not only visi- 
ble and actual demonstrations, 
but the reasons for each method 
of procedure are carefully ex- 
plained in proper succession. 

The mission of the Eastman 
School of Professional Photog- 
raphy is to instruct the profes- 
sional photographer in the appli- 
cation of the simi)lest and best 
methods and the growing success 
of the School is proof that this 
mission is being fulfilled. 

When the Eastman School ar- 
rives in your section of the country 
don't fail to attend. This means 
dollars to you and increased suc- 
cess in your business. Watch the 
School dates as they appear in 
each issue. This month the ad- 
vance list appears on page 23. 




Gen. Chaffee, U. S. A. 



PIRIE MACOONAUO 

(OTOQRAPHER-OF-MEN 

N EW YOR K 



Retired 

From an Artura Iris print 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



npHE TANK 

■^ We have from time to time 
printed articles in regard to the 
proper use and care of the East- 
man Plate Tank and we wish to 
emphasize a few of the more im- 
portant points in the following 
paragraphs. 

In general use the Eastman 
Plate Tank has proved to be a 
great convenience — a great time 
saver and a quality producer. 

Negatives developed in the 
tank are clean and clear, pos- 
sessing fine grain and perfect 
gradation, but the tank, like 
every device or bit of apparatus 
employed by the photographer, 
must be used intelligently and 
properly if the best results are to 
be obtained. 

A most important point in the 
use of the tank is cleanliness. 
The tank must be kept clean. 
Using it repeatedly without clean- 
ing allows a precipitate or de- 
posit to form on the sides and 
bottom of the tank and on the 
cage. This deposit is harmful 
and when an excess has accumu- 
lated it affects the development, 
causing streaks or spots and a 
chemical veil or fog which gives 
the plates the ai)pearance of hav- 
ing been undertimed. 

When plates appear fogged 
and flat, weak and undertimed, 
or when streaks and spots ap- 
pear, it is generally due to an 
unclean tank. 

To clean the tank scrub it out 



with washing powder (powdered 
soap) and warm water. One pho- 
tographer successfully uses a weak 
solution of acetic acid for cleans- 
ing the tank — about eight parts 
of water to one part of 25% 
acetic acid. This solution is pour- 
ed into the tank, the cage is 
placed in position and the tank 
cover put on and the whole 
shaken up thoroughly. The tank 
is then rinsed with clear water 
and is ready for use. 

When we say keep the tank 
clean we do not say clean it every 
time it is used, for that is unnec- 
essary. An occasional cleaning is 
all it needs. Use the tank and 
when a deposit of a grayish 
color is noticeable remove it by 
cleaning as suggested. 

Other causes of non-success 
are the use of impure chemicals 
and failure to carefully observe 
the temperature of the developer 
and the time of development. 

Time and temperature are the 
two factors which determine cor- 
rect tank development, provid- 
ing the tank is clean and the de- 
veloper is made up of pure, act- 
ive chemicals. 

Thus it will be seen that for 
complete success in the use of 
the Eastman Plate Tank four 
conditions must work in harmony 
— time, temperature, cleanliness 
and chemical quality. 

Time is taken care of by the 
use of the indicator on the front 
of each tank in connection with 
the use of a watch or clock. An 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



alarm clock can be used to ad- 
vantage. For example, it is 
twenty minutes to four when the 
loaded plate cage is immersed in 
the tank and the time of devel- 
opment is to be twenty minutes. 
Wind the alarm and set it at 
four o'clock. The ringing of the 
alarm announces the completion 
of development. 

Temperature is taken care of 
by the convenient Eastman Ther- 
mometer made specially for use 
with the tank and sold by your 
dealer. 

Cleanliness is taken care of by 
an occasional tank cleaning. 

Chemical quality is assured by 
the use of C-K tested chemicals. 

Eastman Permanent Crystal 
Pyro and Eastman Sodas are pure 
and active — are tested and right 
in every way before they receive 
the C-K tested chemical seal. 
When ordering chemicals for pho- 
tographic use specify C-K tested 
and look for this seal on the 
label: 




T OW TONES 

■*— ^ A brother picture maker 
dropped in for a chat the other 
day, and in the course of our con- 
versation took exception to some 
of the exceedingly low toned work 
featured by some of the craft. 



These sort of pictures, he said, 
remind me of the story of a 
wealthy merchant who employed 
an artist to paint a panel on one 
of the walls of his new home, 
representing the Israelites Cross- 
ing the Red Sea. The painter 
worked for many days in the 
closed room , and at last announced 
that the picture was finished. 
When the merchant looked at 
the wall he saw nothing but a 
sombre mass of dark red. "What 
is this.V he asked. "The Red 
Sea," replied the artist. "But 
where are the Israelites? " "They 
have passed over." "And the 
Egyptians ? " " Gone under. " 
* # * 

I note in some of the recent 
magazines that a scientist is ad- 
vancing the theory that the action 
of light when it strikes the sen- 
sitive plate during an exposure 
produces an explosion of the small 
grains of silver bromide. I am 
not in a position to argue this 
question, but I do know of ex- 
plosions that have been caused 
when the boss of the place saw 
the results of some exposures. 



For high-class portraiture 



use 



Eastman s 

Etching' Sepia 

Platinum 




PIRIK MACOONALO 

PHOTOaR«PHCR-OF-MEN 

N CW YO RK 



£dmi;ni) Ci.ahknck Stkd.man, Poet-Bankku 

From an Artura Iris print 




Theo. N. Vaii,, Pres. Westrux Union Telegraph Co. 

From an Artura Iris print 



PIRIE MACDONALD 
PHOTOGRAPHER-OF-M 
NEW YORK 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



1 



SECRETS AND OTHER 
THINGS 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



Las' Sunday me and the Boss 
took a ride in the Boss' new 
tourin' car over to a Httle town 
'bout twenty miles away to see 
if it would be a live enough burg 
for us to open up a branch 
studio in. 

As we wuz ridin' down the 
main street we sees a display case 
an' the Boss sez "Let's stop and 
visit this feller a moment, if he's 
open." So we slides up to the 
curb, shuts off, an' goes in. The 
man he wuz there readin' the 
Sunday paper. The Boss says 
"Howdy," an' tole who he wuz, 
an' pretty soon they wuz gabbin' 
away firs' rate. After a while we 
gets up to go, an' the Boss seein' 
the dark room door open a little, 
starts to take a peek in jus' from 
force of habit, when the man 
jumps in front of him, an' slams 
the door an' says he don't 'low 
no one in his dark room, as it's 
full of secrets. The Boss says, 
"Oh, all right, but I didn't see 
no secrets in your show case." 
The Boss says them fellers wot's 
got secrets in their dark room, 
an' none in their show case, aint 
mutch to be feared as competi- 
tors, so I guess we starts the 
branch. 

The Boss says in the ole days 
of the pitcher business, men wuz 
always comin' roun' sellin' secret 
processes an' that mos' of them 



ivuz, for after you had bit you 
wuz mos' apt to keep it a secret 
that you wuz so easy. 

The reception room girl says 
that a secret is somethin' you 
jus' got to tell and hadent ought 
to. 

So far as I can see the Boss 
figgers that if he has tumbled on 
to any stunts in the way of doin' 
things, it pays him to pass 'em 
along to the rest of the boys, as 
they are dead sure to pass some- 
thin' back jus' as good, or better. 

A man comes in the other day 
and asts the Boss to come an' 
take a week off with him an' play 
golf down South somewheres. 
The Boss says he aint got no 
time to play cow pasture pool an' 
the man he says every man is 
better for havin' some hobby in 
recreation, an' the Boss says sure 
I got a game, an' the man says 
"What?" and the Boss says 
"Chase the wolf. " Where do you 
play that, says the man, and the 
Boss says. Right here in the 
studio, six days in the week, and 
if you want to be a good player 
you gotto keep in practice all 
the time." 

The Boss says keepin' the wolf 
outside the boundary line with a 
stack of dollars, furnishes all the 
excitement his system will stand. 



Wash your prints in the 

ROUNDS 
PRINT WASHER 



» 




PIRie MACDONAI.O 

PHOTOGRAPHER-OF-MEN 

NEW YORK 



Edward Bok, of the Ladies' Home Journal 

From an Artura Iris print 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



D 



EPENDABILITY 



Our aim in the manufac- 
ture of sensitized materials has 
been to combine quahty with 
dependabihty , and the interesting 
experience of Carlos E. Cum- 
mings, M. D., secretary of the 
Buffalo Society of Natural Sci- 
ence, helps to prove that we 
have accomplished our purpose. 

In the interest of the Society, 
Dr. Cummings visited several 
islands of the Pacific and among 
other things made a photographic 
record of his visit. 

To use Dr. Cummings' words, 
" My plates were for the purpose 
of lantern slides and it is there- 
fore necessary that they should 
be entirely clean, spotless and 
full of detail." He selected 
Standard plates because of his 
previous experience with their 
quality and reliability and sub- 
sequent events proved the wis- 
dom of his selection. 

Again quoting Dr. Cummings, 
"Not one of these plates was 
developed until my return home, 
and in the interval they had 
traveled nearly 24,000 miles, and 
had been subject to all kinds of 
weather and moisture from the 
Fijis in August to Vancouver in 
November. At the volcano of 
Kilauea in Hawaii, the air was 
so damp that twenty-four hours 
ex[)osure caused the paper stuck 
around the boxes to loosen so 
that it could be stripped off with- 
out tearing, and the air so full 



of sulphur and other gases that 
the hotel is obliged to use nickel 
table ware ; silver blackening in 
a few hours. 

"In Fiji I experienced a con- 
tinual rain of nearly two weeks, 
during which time several dozen 
plates were in the holders. 

"In New Zealand at the Gey- 
ser Region the air is so full of 
steam and sulphur as to rust out 
the interior of the shutters to a 
point where they required re- 
finishing. " 

Dr. Cummings then goes on 
to say that not one of the plates 
showed the slightest trace of de- 
terioration and ends by saying, 
" I can honestly recommend your 
plates to anyone working under 
the most exacting and trying 
conditions." 

Now that is exactly what we 
have advised right along — our 
plates for use under the most ex- 
acting and trying conditions. We 
would hardly expect plates to 
stand up under the conditions re- 
lated and always advise care in 
the keeping of all sensitized ma- 
terials when possible, but it is 
good to know that when put to 
the test — when conditions are 
not favorable — that our plates 
make good. 



Have you a copy of Artura 
Results, 9th Edition ? 

If not — yours for the asking. 



t 



I 




PIRIE MACOONALO 

PHOTOSRAPHER-OF-MEN 

NEW YORK 



W. R. Nelson, Kansas City Star 

From an Artura Iris print 



22 STUDIO LIGHT 



Records Smashed 



GOOD WORK IN THE 

EASTMAN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 

APPRECIATED BY 

HUNDREDS OF PHOTOGRAPHERS 

1911 Attendance: 

Toronto 130 

Montreal . . . . . . . 145 

New York City . . . . . .486 

Philadelphia 459 

Boston ........ 528 

Syracuse . . . ... . 140 

The Syracuse attendance is a gain of more than 100% 
over last year. 

The School is helping hundreds of others — perhaps 
it can give you some new idea that will be worth money 
to you. Watch for it. 



B 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional photography for 1911 



Toledo, O Feb. 28, March 1, 2 

Cincinnati, O March 7, 8, 9 

Chicago, 111 March 14, 15, l6 

Omaha, Neb . March 21, 22, 23 

St. Joseph, Mo March 28, 29, 30 

Joplin, Mo April 4, 5, 6 

Wichita, Kansas April 11, 12, 13 

Little Rock, Ark . April 18, 19, 20 

Dallas, Texas April 25, 26, 27 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. Thesecuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 




'VrOU are going to look 
^ your best in that new 
Easter suit. You're going 
to be photographed in it 
of course. 

There's no better time 
for some new pictures, 
and they're ideal Easter 
remembrances for your 
friends. 

Make an appointment. 



The Pyro Studio 



C. K. Co., Limited. No. l«.1. Price, 40 cents 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 



ELON 



The increased use of 
this developing agent 
is positive proof of its 
merit. 

Elon-hydrochinon 
developer is now a 
favorite with all who 
have tried it. 



Packed in sealed bottles as follows : 

1 oz., .... $ .60 y2 lb., .... $4.25 

4 ozs., .... 2.25 1 lb., .... 8.00 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 




All Dealers. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 



For all-around studio work- 



THE 
ROYAL 
PLATE 



High speed and great 
latitude 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 



A complete stock of 

Studio Supplies 

enables us to fill your 

mail orders correctly 

and promptly 



All the products of 

Canadian Kodak Co. , Limited, 

Canadian Card Co. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 



It Stays where you put it. 




Eastman 
Permanent 
Crystal 
Pyro 



It does not fly about when handled — is 
clean and vigorous — contains the acid pre- 
servative and when combined with sodas 
is ready for use. 

THE PRICE 

1 oz., .... $0.20 V2 lb., .... $1.20 
4 ozs., .... 0.65 1 lb., .... 2.10 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 

All Dealers. 



7) 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



The importance of using pure 
and active chemicals cannot be 
overestimated. The dependable 
kind — tested and analyzed — carry 
this mark of distinction on the 
label : 




Look for it when you buy. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Canada. 

All Dealers. 



30 STUDIO LIGHT 

The beautiful texture — the rich 
warm sepia tone — the perfect 
printing quahty — ^these com- 
bined explain the universal 
popularity of 

ANGELO 

The platinum paper that wins 
prizes at conventions and wins 
customers at home. 




Canadian Kodak 
Co., Limited 

toronto, canada. 
'Angelo 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 

Headquarters for 
Studio Supplies 



qWE HAVE THE GOODS— A 
FULL STOCK ALL THE TIME. 
^THAT IS WHY WE FILL 
YOUR ORDERS SO PROMPTLY 



A complete line of all the products 
of the Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
and Canadian Card Co. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



% 



A GOOD STYLE 

for PLATINUM, ARTURA and 
BACKED ARISTO PRINTS 




The Phantom 



Is designed especially for Platinums, both Black and White 
and Sepia — or Backed Aristo Prints. 

Made in Silver Grey and Chipmunk Brown, for Cabt. or 
smaller prints. 

This is one of the neatest folders on the market and has to 
be seen to be appreciated. Send for sample, made in two 
colors. Grey and Brown. Sample ojone color free. 

Size For Photo Size Outside Price per 100 

AA Cabt. and smaller 41 2x614 $3.75 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



Aristo Motto 



""1^ 7"E believe permanency is the 
» ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Oeorge Oraham Holloway 
Terre Haute, Indiana 





IE© UOMT 



X C O R P O R A T I N G 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



APRIL 1911 



No. 2 



The certainty of success lies 
in the certainty of the materials 
you use. 

The confidence of the public 
depends on the confidence you 
have in yourself and your work. 
You cannot expect your custo- 
mers to believe in you if you do 
not believe in yourself. 

Use the genuinely good and 
be sure of yourself. Then when 
you have confidence in your own 
work, get out on the housetops 
and shout it to your customers. 

Seed Plates have the quality 
that is the first essential. C. K. 
Co. Tested Chemicals insure 
certain results when used in an 
Eastman Plate Tank. 

Then with a printing medium 
such as Artura or Eastman E. B. 
Platinum you can feel certain of 
your finished product. 

Build your success upon the 
genuinely good. Then advertise. 



With the passing of Easter and 
the coming of the warm spring 
days, you must not overlook any 
of your opportunities. 

Have a spring house-cleaning, 
brighten up the studio and buy 
those new accessories you have 
been needing. They will improve 
your work and lend the air of 
dignity to your studio that your 
profession demands. 

Then fill your show case with 
bright new samples on attractive 
spring mounts, and advertise. 
Send for our cut each month and 
make your advertising new and 
bright, never losing sight of the 
keynote, "Quality." 

F) REARING RECORDS 

^^ That the Eastman Profes- 
sional School is appreciated by 
photographers is proven beyond 
the shadow of a doubt by the 
growing attendance. 

The year 1911 is breaking all 
records. The attendance at To- 
ronto showed a gain over two 
years ago of 30%, Boston a gain 
of 36% over last year, New York 



STUDIO LIGHT 



a gain of 55%, Philadelphia 11%, 
Syracuse 100%, and so on as the 
school proceeds on its way. 

The reason for the success of 
the school is apparent — it in- 
structs the photographer how to 
produce the best possible work 
according to the latest and best 
methods. The course is practi- 
cal and the lectures and demon- 
strations are practical. No time 
is given to lengthy discussions 
of theories or exhaustive talks 
on art. 

When the school course was 
planned it was laid out along 
practical lines— along lines that 
enable the attending photog- 
raphers to make more money by 
doing better work and more of 
it. That is why the attendance 
grows and why every photog- 
rapher looks forward to the time 
the School will be within reach- 
ing distance of his locality. 

The new feature added to this 
year's course of instruction is a 
talk on the use of portrait lenses. 
This is not a technical talk on 
lens construction — not a talk 
filled with the unintelligible terms 
of the lens maker, but a short 
talk on the selection and use of 
lenses for the different kinds of 
studio work with reasons why. 

This is just one of the new 
features. The whole course has 
been revised and brought up to 
date, and even though you at- 
tended last year's School you 
cannot afford to miss the School 
of 1911. 



Watch the advance dates as 
they appear from month to month 
and prepare to be in attendance. 
Bring your assistants with you 
if possible. The course is free 
to all professional photographers 
and representatives of photo- 
graphic studios. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



Our illustrations this month 
are reproduced from Artura Iris 
prints from the Studio of George 
Graham Holloway of Terre 
Haute, Indiana. 

Mr. Holloway needs no intro- 
duction to the photographers of 
the United States as he is a 
national figure in photographic 
convention work. 

As one of the Pioneers of the 
Indiana Association, he helped 
to make it a success and served 
with distinction as its president. 

Going to the Board of the 
National Association, Mr. Hollo- 
way became in turn its president. 

With the advent of Artura 
Iris, Mr. Holloway became a 
loyal user of this paper and has 
held fast to that which is good, 
as is evidenced by the success of 
his business — a business built on 
business principles, work of merit, 
the best of materials and the 
personality of a man whose friends 
are only limited to the number 
who have met him. 

We are pleased to show ex- 
amples of the work produced by 
Mr. Holloway s Studio. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



QUALITY + ADVER- 
TISING = SUCCESS 

Mr. Robert Frothingham of 
the Butterick Trio and Every- 
body's Magazine gave one of his 
characteristic addresses before 
the Professional Photographers 
Association of Nev/York, at their 
annual meeting in February, that 
provides food for thought for 
every earnest worker in photog- 
raphy. Mr. Frothingham has had 
a broad experience in advertising 
work; he knows his subject and 
belongs to that growing group of 
advertising men who insist that 
the first essential in good adver- 
tising is good goods back of that 
advertising. 

He said in part: 

"What's to prevent the local 
photographer from convincing his 
clientele that he has something 
superlative to offer in the way of 
artistic photography ? 

"I am talking to you as a lay- 
man. I am so clumsy an amateur 
that I don't belong in your ranks 
at all. I am only one of the pub- 
lic that you operate upon, from 
whom you make your living. 
And I say that the public will 
stand for mediocrity in almost 
every other line of business more 
readily than they will stand for 
it in yours. 

"We will put up with poor 
teachers for our children; with 
doctors who are not the best; 
with lawyers whom we don't 
respect; with preachers who put 



us to sleep ; with merchants who 
make us mad. But when we come 
to having our pictures taken — 
we who know what a good pic- 
ture is — we call for quality. Our 
personal vanity is at stake. We 
have seen the best types of pho- 
tography, and we are going to 
have our pictures, and those of 
our family, as fine and artistic as 
the best. 

"This is one of the results of 
publicity. Why do we want to 
buy things ? Chiefly because we 
want the same things that other 
folks have, or better things than 
theirs. Compare our demands of 
to-day with the simpler demands 
of thirty years ago and you will 
see that they have been artifi- 
cially made. Step by step, we 
have seen what other people have 
bought, and then we went them 
one better. Publicity in all its 
phases has made the modern de- 
mand — and that demand is not 
for mediocrity — it is for quality. 

"We may go to a photographer 
who offers us a mark-down in the 
summer. 

"But in our hearts we expect 
he will give us just as good work 
at his half-price as he would at 
his regular price; and when he 
doesn't, we are ashamed of our 
pictures, and we are sore in the 
bargain. That doesn't do the 
photographer any good — No, sir. 

"Quality is the thing we, the 
public, exact of you down in your 
hearts, as we exact it of nobody 
else. If we desert you to go to 



STUDIO LIGHT 



a photographer in a bigger city, 
it is because we want quahty so 
badly, and we fancy we may get 
it by taking the trolley. 

"Then, why don't you adver- 
tise your quality? Speak for 
yourself, John.' Inasmuch as 
practically none of you could be 
anything but local advertisers, 
there's no point at which you and 
I could do business together, as 
I am interested in national adver- 
tising alone. 

"But I am concerned in the 
principles and the deeper science 
of advertising. That science has 
some of the same principles for 
the local advertisers as for the 
national advertisers. 

"Do you know what the mod- 
ern science of advertising rests on? 
Not on making a noise. Not on 
mere catching attention. Not 
on getting the public to buy once. 
The one thing you absolutely 
need — the keystone to your arch 
— is an insurance of the public's 
good will, secured by the highest 
quality of work adequately ad- 
vertised. To invest in the sure 
results of human nature is the 
only intelligent faith. 

"The first asset— and the most 
constant asset — of the up-to-date 
photographer is that his product 
must be 100% in quality. It 
must be as good as brains and 
skill and honesty of purpose can 
make it. Personal honor must be 
wrought into it. The integrity of 
the master craftsman must per- 
meate the workmen. Eagerness to 



improve the product constantly 
must rule the shop. The thing 
made must be the honest pride 
of the men who make it. 

"Such work is able to com- 
mend itself by itself. If not ad- 
vertised at all, it perchance may 
establish a certain place for it- 
self, though limited. If adver- 
tised properly, it proves its own 
best advertisement; for, after 
being introduced by adequate 
publicity, high grade work gath- 
ers momentum from itself. 

"The only advertising that is 
worth spending a dollar for is 
that which convinces the public 
that the advertiser is on the level, 
that he tells the truth, that his 
goods have quality. 

"There isn't any such thing as 
natural demand.' If a man 
thinks he is going to procreate 
an infant industry with quality 
for one leg and natural demand ' 
for the other leg, let him look 
out for a one-legged progeny — 
for the natural demand ' leg will 
be missing. By this time expe- 
rience should teach him that the 
only two-legged industries that 
can sprint around the whole cir- 
cle of possible consumers, must 
indeed have quality for one leg, 
but its mate must be the leg of 
publicity. That business can do 
stunts. 

" A merchant can make so 
much noise that the crowd will 
give him a matinee. But unless 
the quality of his goods is 100%, 
the crowd won't come back. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By George Orahani Holloivav 
Terre Haute, Indiana 






8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



"In other words, the one last- 
ing science of advertising is in 
having real quality to offer, and 
in not advertising anything that 
won't advertise itself when it be- 
comes known. 

*Sow an act, we reap a habit; 
Sow a habit, we reap a character ; 
Sow a character, we reap a destiny. ' 

"Now, do you see how your 
quality and my quality hitch to- 
gether.^ 

"When you advertise, you put 
yourself on record that your pro- 
duct is of superlative quality. It 
is the best that you can produce 
when you begin to advertise it. 
But you grow, and your work- 
men grow. You find not only 
how you can make it more eco- 
nomically, without damage to 
the quality, but also how you 
can further improve its efficiency 
without making the consumer 
pay more. Then, if for no other 
reason — just to make good the 
record you have given of your- 
self in your advertising — you are 
impelled to introduce these im- 
provements and raise your own 
standard. 

"For, as soon as you begin to 
advertise to your particular pub- 
lic, you begin to look at your 
product from the consumer's point 
of view, and you are spurred on, 
thereby, to devise new improve- 
ments which will give you new 
talking points in your advertis- 
ing. Whatever your industry, 
when you begin to advertise it, 
you have to ask yourself the 



blunt question: What excuse 
have I for being in business?' 
Your own answer to this search- 
ing self-examination is the com- 
mencement of improvements and 
increasing efficiency. 

"To express it as simply as 
possible — advertising that is 
based on quality creates a knowl- 
edgable bond of sympathy with 
the public. What pains have you 
taken to say frankly to the pub- 
lic : Let's you and I get really 
acquainted. I want you to know 
all about me and my business. I 
am putting the highest possible 
type of quality into my work. I 
am trying to serve you, honor 
bright. Look in detail at my 
service, and judge of my motives 
by my methods.' 

"I am not going to suggest 
ways and means to you ; not the 
methods of publicity, nor the 
percentage of your business which 
you should devote to an invest- 
ment in publicity. 

"But I do suggest that you 
take the very best specimens of 
your art and make the whole 
local public acquainted with your 
work at its finest and best, and 
not at its cheapest. When you 
produce a type of artistic picture 
that satisfies your sense of artistic 
merit ; when you produce a speci- 
men which compares favorably 
with the best type your keenest 
competitor can produce; then 
make your local public know all 
about it. Make them see it. 
Make them talk about it because 



STUDIO LIGHT 



9 



of its art. Make them say to one 
another, 'The man who did that 
surely put brains into his camera. ' 
Yes — 'Go out into the highways 
and hedges' and advertise it. 

" No matter now how you con- 
vey that message to them — 
whether by a dainty brochure 
with sepia reproductions, or by 
newspapers, or by street car 
signs, or by putting up your 
specimens in as many store win- 
dows as can be made to take 
them, — you are conveying the 
right thing. You are bidding 
for business because of quality. 
And because the best paying part 
of the pubHc want quality in pho- 
tography rather than cheapness, 
you will come into your own 
just as sure as night follows day. 
As Mark Twain put it: Blessed 
is the man who bloweth his own 
horn lest it be not blown,' but 
mark you, my friend, have a 
tune to play that is worth listen- 
ing to. 

"You know as well as I that a 
big percentage of men in any line 
of business are commercial cow- 
ards — timorous and uncertain, 
with just enough moral fiber to 
make a defensive fight. They 
understand cutting prices and re- 
trenching. They know how to 
run to cover. They peg along 
with a small degree of half-baked 
success because they lack cour- 
age. Having no confidence in 
themselves, they have none in 
the public. You know who these 
men are in your own towns. If 



they advertise at all, it's in a 
half-hearted way that leaves the 
field open to their aggressive 
competitor who puts quality in 
his goods and extols their merit 
to high heaven. 

"The public can be depended 
upon to recognize and appreciate 
enterprising merit, and the pub- 
lic will pay, willingly, for real 
quality if they know where it is 
to be found. 

"An enterprising, progressive 
photographer who makes a study 
of his business and keeps abreast 
of the advancing strides of his 
art — and advertises the fact — 
won't have to do a cut-rate busi- 
ness at certain times of the year. 
His name and his work — if well 
advertised — are a guarantee of 
quality which makes the question 
of price a secondary one. He can 
get any price within reason, sim- 
ply because the prizes of business 
always go to the aggressive fight- 
er who has 'the goods.' 

"A man must be an enthusiast 
in his work in order to accomplish 
anything. The Japanese have a 
proverb: No man can find the 
best way of doing a thing until 
he loves to do that thing.' 

"Unused talents — ungirt loins 
—unlit lamps— sink a man like 
lead. Doing nothing is enough 
for ruin. Rouse ye ! Put the best 
quality in your work that a com- 
bination of head, heart and hand 
can produce and advertise the fact 
— and you won't have to worry 
about the future. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



"While spending a forenoon in 
my friend Bradley's office, on 
Fifth Avenue, looking for a few 
points toward the building of this 
talk, like a thoughtless amateur, 
I asked him to show me what he 
considered his best piece of work. 
Bradley's reply came back like a 
flash : *My dear Frothingham, it 
has not yet been done.' There's 
a text for you, gentlemen, more 
eloquent than anything I could 
say if I spoke here all night long. 
It was in fact the inspiration of 
this halting address of mine, and 
it calls to mind most vividly those 
wonderful lines from Kipling: 

*L'ENVOI 

*When Earth's last picture is painted, 
and the tubes are twisted and 
dried, 

When the oldest colors have faded, 
and the youngest critic has died. 

We shall rest, and, faith, we shall 
need it — lie down for an aeon or 
two. 

Till the Master of All Good Work- 
men sets us to work anew ! 

*And those that were good shall be 
happy ; they shall sit in a golden 
chair; 

They shall splash at a ten-league 
canvas with brushes of comets' 
hair; « 

They shall find real saints to draw 
from — Magdalene, Peter, and 
Paul; 

They shall work for an age at a sit- 
ting and never be tired at all ! 

*And only the Master shall praise us, 
and only the Master shall blame ; 

And no one shall work for money, 
and no one shall work for fame ; 

But each for the joy of working, and 
each, in his separate star, 



Shall draw the Thing as he sees It 
for the God of Things as They 
Are!'" 

/CONVENTION NOTES 

^^ The Inter-Mountain Pho- 
tographers Association will hold 
its convention at Salt Lake 
City, Utah, April 5, 6 and 7, 
and it promises to be a hummer. 
The photographers of this sec- 
tion are enthusiastic and the con- 
vention will be well worth at- 
tending. 

The Kansas Convention will 
be held in Wichita, April 10, 11, 
12 and 13. 

The Photographers Associa- 
tion of Iowa will hold its 21st 
Annual Convention at Sioux City, 
May 2, 3, 4 and 5. 

Sioux City is a young man's 
city and claims to outclass any- 
thing on the state map when it 
comes to entertaining conven- 
tions. Their program promises 
to be right up to the tick of the 
clock. Better go. 

Other conventions will be as 
follows : 

Oklahoma at Shawnee, June 
6, 7 and 8. 

Indiana at Winona Lake, July 
11, 12, 13 and 14. 

National at St. Paul, Minn., 
July 24th to 29th. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



SURELOOK ROAMS, 
DEMONSTRATOR 

I was sitting in the oper- 
ating room having my usual chat 
with Barcon after he had given 
me his order, when the subject 
of demonstrators came up. 

Barcon needed a demonstra- 
tor to straighten him out on some 
minor troubles he was having 
and I casually mentioned the 
fact that Surelook Roams was 
about due to make the town and 
asked him if he had ever met 
him. 

"No, don't know that I ever 
have, Hotson; what kind of a 
fellow is he ? " 

"Well, if you had ever met 
him I know you would never for- 
get him." 

"I have been on the road for 
the last eleven years selling pho- 
tographic goods and have met 
all kinds of salesmen and demon- 
strators, but none to equal Roams 
when it comes right down to the 
fine points of getting at the bot- 
tom of things." 

"It seems like fortune telling 
or mind reading to me, but it's 
like reading out of your A, B, 
C book to him. Just seems to 
see the things other people think 
are too common to notice, I guess, 
and he enjoys it too. Give him 
a hard one and he goes right 
after it and eats it up. " 

" I really believe Roams would 
miss three square meals to get 



at the bottom of a man's plate 
or paper troubles." 

" I have not met him for about 
three months now. Saw him last 
over at Vicksport where he had 
been sent to find the trouble with 
some Seed plates, but it wasn't 
the plates at all. Roams looked 
at the negatives and told the 
photographer what was wrong 
with his plate holders and then 
proved it, and he didn't get any 
farther than the reception room 
either." 

"Well I'd like to see him, 
Hotson, if he is so blame smart 
as all that; what kind of a fel- 
low is he, anyway?" 

"Well, say, Barcon, he's one 
of the most likable fellows you 
ever met. Just a slim, keen 
looking fellow with a smooth 
face, sort of youngish looking, 
you know, but not young either. 
Don't impress you as being fresh 
or smarty at all, but just sharp. 
Quiet appearing, but when he 
talks he says something and when 
you tell him your troubles it's 
just like putting shavings on a 
smouldering fire; things begin 
to pop." 

"B r r r r r — Hello! — there 
goes your buzzer, you must have 
a customer." 

"No, I'll be jiggered if it isn't 
Roams. Talk about the Devil- 
how are you anyway?" 

"Hello, Hotson. Haven't seen 
you since that day over at Vicks- 
port." 

"Mr. Barcon, this is Mr. Roams. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



We were just talking about you, 
Surelook." 

Roams shook hands and glanced 
around the room. 

"I hope I am not intruding, 
Mr. Barcon, but I see you have 
finished with your sitting and 
Hotson has his order book in his 
pocket and I never knew him to 
put his order book away until he 
had his order." 

"Yes, Mr. Roams, I have fin- 
ished with Hotson, but what 
makes you think I have had a 
sitting this morning?" 

"Well, I would say that from 
all appearances you had made a 
couple of bust negatives of a tall 
nervous lady who wore glasses, 
and the last one was a profile." 

Barcon looked at me and then 
at Roams and asked : 

"How do you know all this, 
Mr. Roams?" 

"I know you made the nega- 
tives this morning because you 
have drawn that opaque shade 
to cut out the sunlight that is 
now striking the corner of your 
skylight and I could tell they 
were bust negatives of a lady 
because the back of the posing 
chair would never be adjusted 
that way for a man. 

"It is evident she was tall be- 
cause the head rest is quite high 
and she must have been nervous 
or you would not have used a 
head rest at all. 

"Now the general arrange- 
ment of camera, chair and back- 
ground would indicate the last 



negative was a profile and the 
position of the dark screen used 
to overcome reflections is proof 
that she wore glasses. The rest 
is easy. A rack full of holders 
and two of them reversed, and I 
venture to say if Hotson had not 
been here you would have made 
more negatives of the lady." 

"Well,you are just the Demon- 
strator I have been looking for. 
Roams. I want you to read my 
past and tell me what has taken 
the snap out of my negatives 
this last six months or so. Made 
a 14 X 17 group the other day 
and it seemed all right, but my 
small plates are not up to snuff. 
Must be a change in the plates, 
for the 14 X 17 Seeds were old 
and they were best." 

"No, I think you are wrong, 
Mr. Barcon. I would say you 
kept your large lens in the closet 
there, properly capped, while 
the one on the camera has gath- 
ered some moisture and a little 
dust with the change in temper- 
ature of your operating room 
during the winter and it needs 
cleaning. 

"Let's take it off and have a 
look at it. Yes, that's it all 
right. Just clean it up and I 
will be back after lunch and we 
will try it out." 

"Ready to go, Hotson? Good 
morning, Mr. Barcon." 



GENUINELY GOOD 
ARTURA 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By George Graham Holloway 
Terre Haute, Indiana 




i 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE MARVEL OF THE MOTION 
PICTURE 

AND ITS BEARING ON YOUR BUSINESS 
AND OURS 

In the February World's Work is a most 
interesting article on motion pictures from 
the pen of Asa Steele. Mr. Steele not only 
tells lucidly of how many of the freak pic- 
tures are obtained, but shows also how the 
motion picture is being used in business, in 
education, in science, and even in politics. 
It is a picture story that any photographer 
must be interested in, but perhaps the most 
marvelous part of it all is the record that he 
gives of what the motion picture business 
means in dollars and cents. To quote from 
the World's Work: 

"The year I9O8 was one of phenomenal 
growth in the amusement. With the begin- 
ning of 1909 there were 10,000 shows and 
a daily attendance of 3,000,000 people. The 
estimated expenditure by spectators was 
$57,500,000 a year. A canvass made about 
that time, of the number of shows and the 
estimated seating capacity in nine large 
American cities, showed an average of one 
seat for every 7622 persons. 

"Yesterday 4,000,000 Americans visited 
13,000 picture shows. They do so every day. 
One man, woman or child in twenty-three 
every afternoon or evening visits a cinemato- 
graph. They pay an average of seven cents 
each or more than $102,000,000 a year. 

"The moving picture shows have driven 
theatrical performances from 1 400 play houses 
and claim a patronage three times as great 
as that of the other theaters. Taken alto- 
gether, the play houses devoted to motion 
l)ictures seat at once 1,350,000 people. 
About $100,000,000 is invested in the busi- 
ness. Last year $18,000,000 worth of mo- 
tion picture films were sold." 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



Those photographers who attended the 
National Convention at Rochester in 1909 
will easily recall the immense proportions 
of the plant at Kodak Park where films for 
the amateur and for the motion picture con- 
cerns are turned out by the hundreds of miles. 
They will remember the four thousand em- 
ployees and the nearly forty acres of floor 
space in our Rochester factories alone — that 
there are factories also in Jamestown, N. Y., 
in Toronto, in Harrow, England, and in 
Melbourne, Australia, which serve to manu- 
facture goods for our world-wide trade. 

"Of what interest," you ask, "is all this in 
a professional photographic magazine ? " 

Just this. We have been making motion 
picture film for fifteen years. It is a business 
requiring the limit of accuracy. The maker 
of moving pictures requires high speed in the 
emulsion, and perfection in detail of manu- 
facture, for every tiny defect that appears in 
the film is magnified thousands of times 
upon the canvas. He requires absolute de- 
pendability in the product, for it often costs 
him thousands of dollars to stage a play and 
he must be sure that his film is going to give 
him good negatives. 

We have competition in the manufacture 
of motion picture films from England, 
France and Germany, yet we furnish nearly 
all of the motion picture films— not merely 
for the United States but for all the world. 
And we get this business because we furnish 
the best goods. 

The exactions of the motion picture film 
business are unequaled in any other depart- 
ment of photography and, we believe, in any 
other line of manufacturing on a large scale. 
These exactions have made care in every 
detail and refinement in every product a habit 
with our sensitive goods department. They 
have helped to strengthen the organization 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS TRINT 



By George Orahmn Ilolloway 
Terre Haute, Indiana 





FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By George Graham Holloway 
Terre Haute, Indiana 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



from within itself, while the tre- 
mendous volume of the business 
has enabled us to provide for 
our manufacturing departments 
not merely every modern facil- 
ity but the most expert techni- 
cal skill ; have enabled us to pur- 
sue experimental work and pro- 
vide experimental facilities at a 
cost which would have otherwise 
been prohibitive. 

Our professional business, our 
motion picture film business, our 
amateur business form a concrete 
whole, every part of which is of 
benefit to every other part. Just 
as the other business, by its sheer 
bulk, enables us to give to the 
professional the benefit of a mar- 
velous plant and high priced tal- 



ent, so has the professional, be- 
cause he too keeps us on our 
mettle, helped us in perfecting 
our other products. It was for 
him, some thirty years ago, that 
we first made goods and from 
that day to this his interests and 
ours have been closely inter- 
woven. 

Photography in its many sides 
touches business and science and 
recreation as well as the Art in 
which the professional is inter- 
ested. And it is through its 
many ramifications and our ex- 
perience in meeting the require- 
ments of each that we have been 
able to bring our professional 
products to their present state 
of perfection. 



T) A. OF A. NOTES 

-*■ • The coming National Con- 
vention to be held in St. Paul 
during the week of July 24th is 
an assured success. It could not 
be otherwise. The spirit of the 
Northwest is spreading and St. 
Paul is going to have a conven- 
tion of "The Best on Earth'* 
variety. 

Educational features will pre- 
vail, but the social side has by 
no means been overlooked. St. 
Paul knows how to entertain. 

You will have a warm spot in 
your heart for St. Paul as you 



still have for Rochester and Mil- 
waukee. 

The Executive Committee of 
the P. A. of Wisconsin held its 
annual meeting in Milwaukee 
Jan. 18th and the decision of 
the committee was to return the 
compliment of the Northwestern 
Association and hold over their 
meeting until 1912. 

Wisconsin is arranging to have 
the largest of any state's exhibit 
at a National Convention. It is 
a commendable spirit and recalls 
the enthusiasm shown last year. 




FROM AN AIITURA IRIS PRINT 



By George Graham HoUoivay 
Terre Haute, Indiana 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



HADOWS 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



The other day somebody said 
it wuz ground hog day, and I 
asts the reception room girl what 
wuz ground hog day, and she 
says if the ground hog comes out 
of his hole an' sees his shadow, 
he gets scared like, an' goes 
back in again for six weeks more, 
an' until he comes out for keeps 
we don't get no spring weather. 

I asts the Boss wuz the recep- 
tion room girl kiddin' me, an' he 
says nope, only she dident tell 
me all of it. That when the 
ground hog came out and didn't 
see his shadow it wuz time to fix 
up things for spring business, an' 
that if he came out and did see 
his shadow, an' got scared, an' 
got back in his hole for six weeks, 
that only chumps followed his 
example, an* that the spring 
cleanin' stunt wuz still a good 
proposition. 

The Boss says the ground hog 
aint the only animal that has 
wasted six weeks of good time 
by gettin' scared at his own 
shadow. 

The Boss says shadows wuz 
invented to make folks appreci- 
ate the sunshine, an' that if the 
shadow of a big stock house bill 
wuz leanin' your way, you mus- 
ent get scared but hustle so as 
you could turn on the receipted 
bill sunshine. 

The Boss says if it wuzzent for 
shadows us fellows wouldenthave 
no jobs, for a fottygraf without 



shadows would be about as mutch 
use as a arrow plane without air. 

I ast the Boss wuz there any- 
thing thinner than a shadow an' 
he says yep — a boardin' house 
steak; an' the guarantee of a 
manufacturer of a "just as good" 
imitation. 

The head printer says the 
"just as good man" don't get 
very far with him, for if the stuff 
he's sellin' wuz just as good, 
he'd claim it wuz a hole lot bet- 
ter, an' that most of the just as 
good fellers is only lookin' for 
one order for they know they 
dassent come back a secon' time. 

The Boss says, some wise guy 
said "imitation is the sincerest 
form of flattery," but he wants 
the real thing 'cause you can't 
cash flattery. 

The Boss says the only time 
he can recollect that he got some- 
thing for nothin' wuz when he 
got licked for some thin' his big 
brother did. 



Certain Results 

depend u})on certain 
chemicals 

Look for this vutrk: 





FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By George Graham Holloway 
Terre Haute, Indiana 




22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photog:raphers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




IT'S TIME to think of 
^ those pictures of the 
baby before the weather 
gets too warm. 

A¥e Hke to let them 
make our studio their play 
house. 

That means natural pic- 
tures. 

Make an Appointment Now. 



The Pyro Studio 



No. 164. Price, 40 cents. 



STUDIOLIGHT 23 



ULLETIN: THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1911 



B 



Joplin, Mo April 4, 5, 6 

Wichita, Kansas April 11, 12, 13 

Little Rock, Ark. April 18, 19, 20 

Dallas, Texas April 25, 26, 27 

San Antonio, Texas May 2, 3, 4 

El Paso, Texas May 9, 10, 11 

Los Angeles, Cal. May l6, 17, 18 

San Francisco, Cal May 23, 24, 25 

Portland, Ore May 31, June 1, 2 

♦ ^I 4» 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Time and 

Temperature 

These are two of the most important factors 
in photographic work — 

BE CERTAIN 



Use an 

Eastman Timer 

and an 

Eastman 

Thermometer 



IT SPLITS SECONDS IT IS TESTED 

Price, $2.00 Price, $ .50 




Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



25 



NEW LIST 



Angelo Sepia Platinum Paper 



PER DOZEN 



3H^ 
5 . 



31/2 X 
31/2 X 
4 X 
314 X 61 
Cabinet 
414 X 51 
4x6 
414 X 

4 X 

5 X 

X 



• I 



6I/2 

TI2. 
7 . 



7^4 
8 

8I/2 
9 



40 

45 

45 

45 

45 

55 

60 

65 

75 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

X y 1.20 

X 10 1.50 

X 12 2.25 

X 14 3.00 

X 17 4.80 

X 20 5.60 

X 26 1 9 dozen 4.00 

X 26 i dozen 8.00 

X 26 per sheet 70 

roll, 20 inches x 26 feet, equal to 12 sheets 

20 X 26 8.00 

Half roll, 20 inches x 13 feet, equal to 6 sheets 

20 X 26 4.00 

Angelo Sepia Solution, ^ ? gal. bottle 6.40 

I'pint *' 2.00 



5 

51^2 X 
6 X 
6I/2X 
7 
8 

10 

11 

14 

16 

20 

20 

20 

Full 



8 oz. 
3 oz. 

2 oz. 



1.05 
.40 
.30 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., LIMITED 

TORONTO, CANADA 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 



For all-around studio work — 



THE 
ROYAL 

PLATE 



Hi^h speed and great 
latitude 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supphes, for we carry a com- 
plete Hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 



It Stays where you put it. 




Eastman 
Permanent 
Crystal 
Pyro 



In crystal form and acidified — it is 
ready for use when combined with 
sodas. Results prove its merit. 




Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 




The best developed negatives 
are those developed in 

The Eastman 
Plate Tank 

A convenience — a time saver — a quality producer. 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

All Dealers. ToRONTO, CaNADA. 



30 STUDIO LIGHT 

The beautiful texture — the rich 
warm sepia tone — the perfect 
printing quality — these com- 
bined explain the universal 
popularity of 

ANGELO 

The platinum paper that wins 
prizes at conventions and wins 
customers at home. 




Canadian Kodak 
Co., Limited 

toronto, canada. 

tAngelo 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 



Have a Spring 
Housecleaning 
In Your Studio 



Stock up your shelves now with 
pure, vigorous, tested Chemicals. 
We have all the products of the 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited. 



We are ready at all times to fill oi^ders 
for all Canadian Made Papers, 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



A GOOD STYLE 

for PLATINUM, ARTURA and 
BACKED ARISTO PRINTS 




The Phantom 



Is designed esi)ecially for Platinums, both Black and White 
and Sepia — or Backed Aristo Prints. 

Made in Silver Grey and Chipmunk Brown, for Cabt. or 
smaller prints. 

This is one of the neatest folders on the market and has to 
be seen to be appreciated. Send for sample, made in two 
colors, Grey and Brown. Sample of 07ie color free. 



Size 
AA 



For Photo 
Cabt. and smaller 



Size Outside 

41 2 X 614 



Price per 100 

$3.75 



DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



Aristo Motto 



""WJ^ believe permanency is the 
» ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



Bv Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 





UilOO 




NCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol, 3 



MAY 1911 



No. 3 



THE NEW HOME OF 
SEED PLATES 

Think of stepping into a studio 
so perfect in its appointments 
and equipment, and with a force 
of workmen so well trained, that 
it would be possible at the end of 
the day's work to have thousands 
of negatives in the drying racks, 
better negatives than you had 
ever made before. 

The new Seed plate factory at 
Rochester, the "City Photo- 
graphic," practically did this 
Nov. 28th, 1910. 

On Nov. 27th the day's run 
of plates was turned out of the 
old factory as usual, and the next 
day the day's work was finished 
in the new factory, without a 
hitch, or the slipping of a single 
cog in the wonderfully perfect 
machinery. This will give you 
some idea of the careful and 
painstaking plans that were made, 
and the accuracy with which 
they were carried out. 

To the layman, it may not 
seem a wonderful accomplish- 



ment, but to those versed in the 
intricacies of manufacturing goods 
in large quantities, where every 
known precaution must be used 
to safeguard the finished product, 
it is an accomplishment to look 
upon with pride. 

This new plate factory is the 
largest single building in the 
world devoted to the manufac- 
ture of photographic goods. It 
is built of reinforced concrete 
faced with brick and is 357 feet 
long by 338 feet wide with a 
floor space of 229,000 square 
feet, or 5/{ acres. The capacity 
of the plant is 25,000 dozens, or 
300,000 plates per day, and these 
plates are coated and dried under 
such perfect conditions that the 
possibility of faulty manufacture 
is reduced to a minimum. 

Only the most perfect glass is 
used in the manufacture of our 
plates, and to avoid the possi- 
bility of being handicapped by a 
bad run of glass, enough is car- 
ried in our storeroom to run this 
factory for an entire year. The 
best Belgian, French and English 



STUDIO LIGHT 




PLATE STOCK ROOM— 160 x 82 ft. 




GLASS STOCK ROOM— 180 x 88 ft. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



glass is used, and the cars that 
bring the glass direct from the 
New York docks to our store- 
rooms, carry away the finished 
product. 

The cars are loaded with auto- 
matic carriers fitted with ball- 
bearing rollers to obviate the jar 
and friction of handling, and even 
here, a careful superintendent 
inspects the loading. 

The glass itself is inspected 
again and again before and after 
cleaning and all through the pro- 
cess, and then again before coat- 
ing. The clean, fresh country 
air, free from the smoke and dirt 
of the city, is filtered before 
entering the building, and again 
before entering the work rooms 
and drying rooms. 

The walls of the entire build- 
ing are enameled to permit of 
washing, and no wood is used in 
the construction of the floors. 
Washing, however, is not enough 
for this perfect plate factory. 
Soap and water has its part, but 
the most perfect vacuum clean- 
ers hunt out every particle of 
dust that may have escaped the 
other cleaners. Not once in a 
while, but every day these clean- 
ers go over every inch of the 
work rooms and take away every 
particle of dust and dirt. 

Another essential to the pro- 
duction of perfectly uniform 
plates, is the maintaining of uni- 
form temperatures during the 
various operations, day and night, 
year in and year out. 



The machinery regulating the 
ventilation, drying and chilling, 
and the thermostats controlling 
temperatures, are so arranged 
that they are always under lock 
and key and cannot be changed 
except by one in authority. 

To preclude the possibility of 
an accident to any part of this 
plant, causing delay, and to fa- 
cilitate the handling of the large 
force of employees, the plant is 
divided into three separate units, 
each working independently of 
the other and complete in itself. 
Each unit has its independent 
supply and output and is as nearly 
perfect as is possible for it to be. 

If the run of an emulsion in 
one of the units is less than that 
of another, that one may be 
opened to the light of day and 
the cleaning process begun, pre- 
paratory to the coating of the 
next and, probably, different 
emulsion. 

Such an enormous plant could 
never have been built were it 
not for the other units of our 
business. The expert knowledge 
could never have been acquired 
through the manufacture of plates 
alone. The expense of a refrig- 
erating plant to maintain an ab- 
solutely even temperature sum- 
mer and winter — a power plant 
for electric motive power, ventil- 
ating, lighting, heating, etc., 
would have been enormous. 

For these, we draw on the sur- 
plus capacity of our large refriger- 
ating, power and heating plants. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



We are the largest purchasers 
of pure silver bullion in the United 
States and probably the world, 
and the largest consumers out- 
side the mint. Seed plates are 
rich in silver, but the amount of 
silver used in sensitizing plates 
would not seem great if taken 
alone. It is the great volume of 
moving picture film and other 
sensitive goods that makes over 
a ton of silver bullion a week 
necessary to run our plant, and 
we nitrate this silver ourselves. 

These are essentials that were 
necessary to the success of this 
paper and moving picture film 
business — the result of the most 
expert skill and expensive ex- 
perimenting, made possible by 
the volume of this business. 



Nothing has been omitted that 
might tend to make a finished 
product more perfect. No ex- 
pense has been spared to accom- 
plish this end. 

It is a practical demonstration 
of our belief in obtaining quality 
at any cost. A proof of our con- 
tention that the best is always 
the cheapest. 

The fact that we manufacture 
a variety of articles has made 
this ideal plate factory possible 
— and what does it all mean to 
you.? 

It means goods of quality, 
produced under the most perfect 
conditions of manufacture, sur- 
rounded by every safeguard 
known to science and our years 
of experience. It means depend- 




NAILING MACHINES USED IN MAKING PLATE CASES 



STUDIO LIGHT 



able goods. Goods that are uni- 
form and will produce perfect 
results when you want them. It 
means quality without additional 
cost to you . We believe your suc- 
cess is identical with our own. 

Coincident with the firm es- 
tablishing of Seed Plates in the 
new home, comes a new plate of 
quality. Seed 30 Gilt Edge. The 
first plate to combine extreme 
speed with all the qualities of 
the ideal portrait plate. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



The work of Mr. Dudley 
Hoyt has become so well known 
that most of us can distinguish 
it on sight. The personality of 
the master workman is so plainly 
written in these wonderful por- 
traits^ their style is so distinct- 
ive and inimitable— that we scarce 
have to look for the name to be 
sure. 

His method of lighting and 
beautiful and painstaking arrange- 
ment of draperies, has practically 
created a new style of expres- 
sion and by holding fast to the 
one form of work, he has filled 
it with his individuality. 

Mr. Hoyt, from his studio on 
Fifth avenue. New York, appeals 
to a clientele of the highest class. 
From the very opening of that 
studio he has used Artura ex- 
clusively, the paper that he finds 
best adapted to the expression 
of his artistic conceptions. 



SPRING THOUGHTS 
BY THE OFFICE BOY 

Me an' the Boss we had an 
argument, he said them new Seed 
30 plates was twict as fast as the 
twenty-sevens, an' I said they 
wasent. 

The Boss said wot did a little 
shrimp like me know about it 
annyhow, an' I said I tested 'em 
—sure— I took a 27 an' a 30 an' 
went up on the roof an' dropped 
'em off and the 27 got to the 
ground jus' as soon as the 30. 

The Boss said that if I did 
any more of that sort of testin' 
that he'd speed me — some men 
ain't got no sympathy for inves- 
tigators. 

Seems like I got twisted like 
the Frenchman we got workin' 
up in the printin' room, he's 
study in' our langwidge, an' he 
asts the reception room girl wot 
is a horse when he is tied to a 
hitchin' post, an' she says "he's 
fast," an' he says what is he 
when he^s running away, an' she 
says "he's a fast horse," — an' 
there you are. 

Hones tho, them Seed 30 's 
is mighty fast, the Boss says they 
are simply grate for kid pitchers, 
jes' snipty snap of the shutter, 
an' it's took. The printin' room 
fellers say they are grate to 
print, as they don't have no 
fakin' to do, even from negs 
made on the darkest days — an' 
the quality is jes' as good as the 
27, an' that's goin' some. 

The Boss bot one of them new 



VJP 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Rounds print washers, an' I put 
a couple of the gold fish from 
the akquarium in the reception 
room in it, an' it whirled 'em 
aroun' so fast it made 'em sea- 
sick. 

That washer is sure some time 
saver though — I know 'cause I 
have to wash the prints, an' 
twenty minutes washin' does the 
trick — the permanganate an' soda 
test don't turn color. 

Me an' the Boss went fishin' 
the other day— the Boss says a 
day's fishin' helps him to get a 
better perspective — whatever 
that is — dident see him ketch 
none of them — I cot two chubs, 
an' the back of my britches on a 
barb wire fence, an' if the Boss 
hadent a brung me home in his 
buzz waggon I'd a cot somethin' 
else when I got home. 

The reception room girVs sis- 
ter gave me a invite for a May 
walk, I wassent hep to what they 
was, so I asts the Boss wot was 
a May walk, an' he says that's 
wot yo'll take if you don' 'tend 
to business 'round here. Now 
I'm wonderin' what the other 
May walk is— maybe I got a rival. 

The Boss is fixin' up a new 
display case, he says he ain't 
goin' to have so awful many 
prints in it, but that he is goin' 
to change them often. 

The Boss says a grate big case 
chuck full of prints reminds him 
a good deal of when a hive of 
bees gets after you, some of 'em 
are pretty blame sure to get you, 



but you can't tell jes' what ones 
made the impression. 

The Boss says he believes in 
concentration, that a dozen phony- 
grafts all play in' Caruso records 
to onct would drive all the neigh- 
bors out of the block, but that 
jus' one would hold 'em. 

The Boss says the very bes' 
work you can turn out aint none 
too good for your show case, 'an 
that he dasent have a big case 
even if he wanted to, because he 
couldent make enough of the 
right sort of prints to fill it every 
week. 



The ROUNDS 

PRINT 

WASHER 

will save you time 
and do the work as 
well as a careful 
workman. 

Entirely automatic 
and substantially 
constructed. 

Ask your dealer to 
show you this new 
print washer. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 




^f 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



E 



ASTMAN STUDIO RE- 
FLECTOR 




This is a new idea in a re- 
flector that quickly appeals to the 
photographer who keeps abreast 
of the times. It is hght, dura- 
ble and easy of adjustment and 
consists of two swinging screens, 
each 24 x S6 inches, mounted 
one above the other in a strong 
iron frame. Each screen is black 
on one side and white on the 
other and can be swung at any 
angle and securely locked. The 
frame is on casters, stands six 
feet high , and is elegantly finished 
in Japanned copper. 

Price llfl.OO 



REVERSAL OF THE 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 
IMAGE 

This unusual diverting of the 
negative image to that of a posi- 
tive or a combination of the two 
in which the positive image over- 
shadows that of the negative, has 
been encountered as far back 
as I860. 

The explanation given is that 
the partially developed image 
acted as a negative, and the 
underlying bromide of silver, with 
the latter action of light, re- 
ceives a positive impression, as 
in a printing process. 

With continued development 
this becomes stronger than the 
negative image and causes par- 
tial or almost complete reversal. 

Our Trouble Department oc- 
casionally hears from a photog- 
rapher who, when developing 
his plates, has been mystified by 
getting positives instead of neg- 
atives. 

This reversal may be })roduced 
in different ways, but the most 
frequent cause is the secondary 
action of light on plate after de- 
velopment has begun. 

It may be due to light enter- 
ing dark room or on account of 
the developing light being ac- 
tinic. Other causes are pro- 
longed over-exposure or the pres- 
ence of Hypo in the developer. 

The latter causes, however, 
are comparatively infrequent and 
for this reason they will not be 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



considered in the present article. 
Explanations given by some 
of our representatives to the ef- 
fect that reversal is due to fog 
during the process of develop- 
ment, are not always accepted 
as being correct and we, there- 
fore, decided to make some ex- 
periments showing conclusively 
how reversal can be produced 
at will. 




No. 1 

No. 1 shows print from nega- 
tive having normal exposure and 
normal development. 

No. 2 shows slight reversal of 
the photographic image. This 
effect was produced by carrying 
the developing operation until 
same was about three-fourths 
completed, then giving an expos- 
ure of about one second to an 




No. 2 

actinic light, returning negative 
to the developer and completing 
development. The plate shows a 
slight reversal of the deepest 
shadows and is an effect which 
proves most puzzling to the aver- 
age photographer. 

No. 3 shows further reversal. 
This plate was left in the devel- 
oper until development was about 
one-half completed, then exposed 
to the light for about one second. 
In this case the negative char- 
acter begins to noticeably disap- 
pear. The reversal of shadows 
is complete and the reversed 
action of the light begins to ex- 
tend to the half tones. 

In No, 4 a still further rever- 
sal is seen. This plate was ex- 
posed to the light for one and 



Vf 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 




No. 3 

one-half seconds after being only 
one-fourth developed. Develop- 
ment was then completed. In 
this plate the reversal of the 
deep shadows and half tones is 
practically complete. Only the 
high lights retain the negative 
values in the plate. 

No. 5 shows almost complete 
reversal. This negative was one- 
fourth developed, then exposed 
to the light for two seconds and 
returned to the developer for the 
normal period of development. 
The result is an almost perfect 
positive. Only the most extreme 
high lights retain negative values 
in the plate. 

In these experiments Seed 26 X 
plates were used and the same 
exposure in camera was given for 



No. 4 




No. 5 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 






w 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



each plate. The plates were all 
developed for the same length of 
time and the same kind of de- 
veloper was used for each. Simi- 
lar experiments with other brands 
of plates gave the same results. 

In the minds of many photog- 
raphers this has been held a 
"freak" result, due to unexplain- 
able causes. As a matter of fact 
it is a simple experiment that 
can be made by anyone for his 
own satisfaction. The amount of 
the reversal is controlled by the 
relation between the time of de- 
velopment before and after ex- 
posure to actinic light. The 
shorter the preliminary develop- 
ment — after a well defined image 
is formed — before this secondary 
action of light takes place, and 
the longer the subsequent devel- 
opment, the greater the reversal. 

Reversal of the photographic 
image is natural and simple, 
given the necessary conditions. 
The moral is : For perfect nega- 
tives be sure that dark room light 
is safe, and use a plate tank. 



THE EASTMAN STU- 
DIO DARK ROOM 
LAMP 

This is a practical dark room 
lamp for the professional that is 
strong, sensibly constructed and 
mechanically correct as to ventil- 
ation. It is simple and easy to 
clean, the front glasses fit into 
light tight grooves, the ruby 




glass being double thickness and 
bound with a metal frame which 
has a lifting ring. The orange 
glass fits in front of the ruby 
and may be removed at will. 
The side lights are of heavy ruby 
glass and the front is protected 
by a hinged cover, supported at 
any angle by a metal rod. The 
lamp may be used with either oil 
or electricity, and when oil is 
used, the height of the flame may 
be controlled without opening 
the lamp. 

THE PRICE 
Eastman Studio Dark Room 

Lamp with oil lamp .... |S.OO 
Do., with Electrical Attachment 

only , 3.50 

Electrical Attachment only . . 1.00 
Oil Lamp only 50 



77/6' paper of known 

excellence : 
ARTURA IRIS 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 




RUDOLPH DUHRKOOP 



Berlin 



lEATURES OF THE NATIONAL CONVENTION 



"*■ The National Convention, as 
the annual meeting of the P. A. 
of A. is now called, has become 
such a permanent institution that 
it would seem very little that is 
new could be said about it. 

However, each succeeding Con- 
vention has its special features 
and problems due to the change 
of location and continual progress. 
New blood brings new ideas and 
fresh enthusiasm, and each year 
the officers strain every nerve to 
make their Convention "the very 
best ever." 

While it is difficult to imagine 
anything new that could be offer- 



ed in the way of instruction or 
amusements, still each year sees 
some new feature that compels 
attention and attendance. 

This year, when the school of 
photography, conducted by lead- 
ing men of the country, has lost 
some of its attraction and fresh- 
ness through repetition, we find 
that President C. W. Harris has 
had something up his sleeve, and 
has shaken this something out in 
the person of the widely known 
Rudolph Duhrkoop of Berlin. 

Internationally known, we 
might say, Mr. Duhrkoop has 
been more assiduously advertised 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 



lm0J 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



by photographic publications on 
both sides of the water than any 
other man of his age. 

A great many will remember 
the interesting looking German 
who visited a number of our 
American studios during the St. 
Louis Exposition and who ex- 
pressed himself so quaintly at the 
National Convention of that year. 

He was a big man in German 
photographic life even at that 
time and since then has added to 
his reputation, so it does not 
seem unreasonable to call him 
over from his Berlin Studio to 
show our American photograph- 
ers just how he accomplishes his 
vivid depictions of men, women 
and children. 

Mr. Duhrkoop will, of course, 
be the big drawing card of the 
Convention this year in St. Paul, 
but after all, he will be only one 
of a number of features. A 
National Convention must appeal 
to many interests. Its scope is 
so broad that it must be handled 
in a broad manner and this has 
led to the Congress of Photog- 
raphy, consisting of delegates 
from nearly all of the State so- 
cieties. This Congress is a feature 
every one will follow with in- 
terest. 

There will be lectures by such 
able men as William H. Rau, of 
Philadelphia, well known as the 
proprietor of one of the largest 
establishments in the world, de- 
voted to the photographing of 
everything under the sun. Mr. 



Rau's work has called him to the 
four corners of the world and his 
illustrated talk on Commercial 
Photography is bound to be of 
interest to all photographers. 

Another lecture will be de- 
voted to art problems that con- 
front the portrait maker in his 
every day life, and here again 
will be a man of international 
reputation. 

Still another talk will consider 
the perplexities of advertising. 
This is one of the most import- 
ant and valuable helps to any 
business, and yet is sadly neg- 
lected by the photographic pro- 
fession. This also will be an il- 
lustrated talk. 

The Federation of Women Pho- 
tographers, under the able guid- 
ance of Miss Mary Carnell, is 
planning to repeat its Milwaukee 
success. It will have its own 
particular lecture (though open 
to all) and its own exhibit of 
pictures. Our women photog- 
raphers will find that they take 
an important position in the minds 
of all Convention men. 

The National Exhibit is the 
one exhibition of the year that 
every one who can possibly spare 
the time and who is not abso- 
lutely too modest, prepares for. 
It is the one place where, if there 
is anything new in picturedom, 
we expect to find it. The National 
Exhibit has been responsible for 
many changes of style, for many 
schools of expression. Possibly 
this year may bring out some- 



FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



thing new again. Who knows? 
But it certainly is a good place 
to show just how you have pro- 
gressed during the past year and 
you are unwise if you fail to avail 
yourself of the opportunity offer- 
ed to compare your work with 
that of others. As usual^ there 
will be no prizes offered. 

The amusement features will 
be no small part of this year's 
program and they are in excel- 
lent hands. Though the plans 
have not been divulged, the lo- 
cal committee of St. Paul and 
Minneapolis photographers have 
raised a goodly sum and have 
many surprises up their sleeves. 

The National Convention is 
fast becoming the guiding body 
for all photographic affairs of 
more than local importance and 
is a means of instruction that 
cannot be equaled by any State 
Convention. It will certainly be 
worth while to spend that July 
week in St. Paul, for a more 
beautiful country is hard to im- 
agine, but taking the broader 
view point of the Convention as 
an investment in which there can 
be no losses, it is a poor business 
man who will not take a chance 
on a "sure thing." 

Dues in the P. A. of A. are 
now payable to the treasurer, 
L. A. Dozer, Bucyrus, Ohio, and 
membership buttons for 19 H are 
ready for distribution. They are 
entirely different from any used 
in previous years. With member- 
ship button and receipt, will be 



mailed an identification button 
with number corresponding with 
the number of your receipt. At 
the Convention, lists of members 
with their numbers will be dis- 
tributed, and if identification but- 
tons are worn conspicuously, no 
introductions will be necessary. 

HOTELS IN ST. PAUL. 

The Saint Paul (headquarters), 
European plan, $2.50 per day and 
upward. 

Ryan Hotel, European plan, $1.00 
per day and upward. 

Merchants Hotel, European plan, 
$1.00 to $2.00; with bath, $1.50 
to $2.50. 

Hotel Jewell, $1.00 to $2.50. 

The Frederic, European plan, 
$1.00 to $2.50. $1.00 added for sec- 
ond person in room. 

Hotel Northern, European plan, 
50 cents to $1.50; American plan, 
$1.50 and upward. 

Hotel Foley, European plan, 75 
cents to $1.50; American plan, $2.00 
and $2.50. 

Hotel Euclid, European plan, 
$3.50 to $12.00 per week. 

Hotel Magee (Stag Hotel), Euro- 
pean plan, $1.00 to $2.00. 

Additional hotels with similar 
rates in Minneapolis, 10 miles dis- 
tant, with 10 cent fare trolley service. 



Artura Carbon 
Black 

Enlargements 
will increase 
your profits. 



FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Dudley Hoyt 
New York City 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order injirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




rpHE dainty girl graduate 

^ must be photographed. 

Make the appointment early. 



PYRO STUDIO 



No. 165. Price, 50 cents. 



B 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



El Paso, Texas May 9, 10, 11 

Los Angeles, Cal May l6, 17, 18 

San Francisco, Cal May 23, 24, 25 

Portland, Ore. . . . .... May 31, June 1, 2 

Seattle, Wash June 6, 7, 8 

Spokane, Wash June 13, 14, 15 

Butte, Mont June 20, 21, 22 

Salt Lake City, Utah . . June 27, 28, 29 

Denver, Colo July 5, 6, 7 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 



The sparkle of the highhghts — 
the detail in the shadows — the 
roundness and delicacy throughout 
the negative are a few of the quali- 
ties that render the making of 
good prints easy for those who use 

SEED 
PLATES 




MASI-KD 



rsoo 



Manufactured Under License of the 
M. A. Seed Dry Plate Co. Inj 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



25 



The Century 
Universal Studio Outfit 



I 




THE PRICE 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 8x10 11x14 
Portrait Camera No. 2, with Century Universal Holder. Auto- 
matic Cabinet Attachment and one Curtain Holder (5 x 7, 
4-^4 X 6H or 4^ x 6I2, size optional). Century Semi-Centennial 
Stand with adjustable rack to carry twelve plate holders, $82.50 $115.50 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 
Portrait Camera, with Century Universal Holder, Automatic 
Attachment for 8 x 10 Holder, and one 8 x 10 Curtain Holder, 
Century Semi-Centennial Stand 123.75 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supplies, for we carry a com- 
plete line of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co. , Limited, products. 



TheD. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 



For all-around studio work- 



THE 
ROYAL 

PLATE 



High speed and great 
latitude 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 

The Proof of Quality 

Continued use of 

4ELON 

by those who have tried it. 

Combined with hydrochi- 
non, Elon is an ideal devel- 
oper for paper and plates. 

Put up in Glass Bottles as follows : 

1 oz $ .60 1/^ lb. ... . $4.25 

4 ozs 2.25 1 lb 8.00 




Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



^^ 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



^> 




Twelve Perfectly Developed 
Negatives Every Time 

When you use — 

The Eastman 
Plate Tank 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



so 



STUDIO LIGHT 




Fill your shelves with The Best — 




All Dealers 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 



31 



Grafiex Focal Plane Shutter 




To increase the efficiency of your View Outfit, equip 
your camera with a Graflex Focal Plane Shutter. 

The Graflex Focal Plane Shutter allows your lens to 
work at its full efficiency during the entire period of 
exposure — no decreased illumination during opening and 
closing. 

The Graflex Focal Plane Shutter is actuated to give 
time exposures of any duration, as well as automatic 
exposures from yV to toVo^ of ^ second. 



5 X 

61 S X 
8 X 10 



PRICES 

7 Graflex Focal Plane Shutter, $24.00 



27.00 
31.00 



NOTE.— Graflex Focal Plane Shutters are supplied to fit Graphic, Century, 
R. O. C. and Empire State View Cameras. When shutter is required for other 
cameras, a slight additional charge will be made for adapting. 

Folmer & Schwing Division, 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ALGONQUIN 

A New Style for Groups and Views. 




The Algonquin is our|^latest style for groups and views. 
Made in three colors: English Grey, Artists' Brown and 
White, of good firm linen finish stock, beveled edges. 
It has a rich tinted design, brought up in color to har- 
monize with the stock. 

Be sure and see samples of this style in all colors. 

It is one of the best values on the market. 

Sample mailed on receipt of two 2-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 

CANADIAN CARD COMPANY 

Toronto, Canada. 



Aristo Motto 



"T ^ /"E believe permanency is the 
» » Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 



( 




By H. Walter Bamett- 
London, England. 



KING GEORGE V 
Plate 





II© UGEf 



INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 190 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



JUNE 1911 



No. 4 



rpHEY STICK 

-*■ In silver papers there's just 
one best : — Artura. 

Artura has the color, the gra- 
dation, the simple manipulation, 
the rehability. 

Artura ran alike yesterday, 
runs alike to-day, will run alike 
to-morrow. The absolute cer- 
tainty of uniformly good results 
is the characteristic on which the 
great Artura business has been 
built. 

Artura has survived the loud 
noise and grown healthy on it 
because an Artura customer lost 
means, in a short time, an Ar- 
tura customer regained, and when 
such customer comes back he's 
happy to be in the fold again. 

Some of the "other attempts" 
have been cleverly, very cleverly 
exploited. But after all, it's the 
goods that count. Clever adver- 
tising, clever representatives, 
clever convention schemes are all 
good so far as they go, but they 
must have the goods back of 
them. 



Artura backs up the best we 
can say of it by satisfying our 
customers. They stick. 

That's why the Artura busi- 
ness grows. 



A NEW SEED MANUAL 

-*■ ■^ We are inclosing with this 
issue of Studio Light a new Seed 
Manual which we wish every 
photographer in Canada 
to have for ready reference. It 
contains information and sugges- 
tions regarding negative making, 
descriptions of the various brands 
of Seed plates with regard to 
their adaptability to different 
kinds of work and formulas which 
have been carefully balanced and 
thoroughly tested to work to the 
best advantage in developing the 
plates for which they are recom- 
mended. 

Unsatisfactory results are too 
often due to the use of a devel- 
oper that was never intended to 
be used with, and is not properly 
suited to the plate being devel- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



oped. It is only reasonable to 
believe that the manufacturer 
will take great pains to learn, by 
extensive experimenting, the 
formula which works best with 
the goods he is manufacturing 
and, — knowing what goes to make 
up the various brands of Seed 
plates, we have made the form- 
ulas in this manual to perfectly 
balance with, and give the best 
results from your exposures on 
Seed plates. 

You will also find many useful 
suggestions regarding difficulties 
and their remedies which may 
help you out of some trouble in 
manipulation when a plate dem- 
onstrator is not close at hand. 
Among other things is a hew 
formula to reduce negatives and 
remove stains. The particular 
advantage of this formula lies in 
its property of reducing the high- 
lights without affecting the shad- 
ows to any great extent. This 
makes it more of a reducer of 
contrasts, and as most negatives 
needing a reduction of density 
are also too contrasty, it is par- 
ticularly suited to the majority 
of cases where a reducer should 
be used. 

We have made this little Seed 
booklet as complete as possible, 
but if there are any points in the 
manipulation of Seed plates that 
are not perfectly clear to the 
reader, we will be glad to ex- 
plain more fully, either by cor- 
respondence or a personal call of 
the Seed demonstrator. 



THE NATIONAL CON- 
VENTION 

St. Paul, Minn., Apr. 25, 1911. 
To the Photographers of America: 
I wish to join in the invita- 
tion already given the Photo- 
graphic Association of Amer- 
ica to meet in St. Paul during 
the week of July twenty- 
fourth and to assure the mem- 
bers of that organization that 
they have chosen an ideal lo- 
cation for this gathering. The 
Twin Cities are surrounded 
by both natural and artificial 
beauties which place them in 
a class by themselves from 
the artistic standpoint. You 
may be assured of most cor- 
dial welcome from all our 
people. 

Yours very truly, 
A. O. Eberhart, 

Governor of the 
State of Minnesota. 

Thus reads the cordial wel- 
come just sent via letter- telegram 
by the governor of Minnesota, 
showing how great is the inter- 
est taken by all classes of people 
in the coming National Meeting 
at St. Paul. St. Paul is truly a 
beautiful city in the summer time 
and well worth the visit that 
nearly all photographers who are 
wise propose to make a few weeks 
from now. 

If we could only make our 
readers realize the unusual pro- 
gram which has been prepared 
by President Harris for this meet- 
ing and put the city of St. Paul 
before them in pictures instead 
of only words, the combination 
would be such that no one could 




MISS DUIIRKOOP 



Wlio will assist her father in his 
demonstrations at St. Paul. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



c 



resist, even if it meant the fore- 
going of other pleasures or an- 
other vacation. 

Never in the history of the As- 
sociation has so much money 
been devoted to the procuring 
of the very best in each depart- 
ment into which the convention 
affairs naturally divide them- 
selves. Rudolph Duhrkoop, the 
world^s master in portraiture, is 
making the trip especially for 
this convention, that he may 
show our photographers how he 
makes pictures. Not only Duhr- 
koop, but his daughter, too, will 
be here to teach us, and they do 
say that Duhrkoop's daughter 
ranks among women as high as 
he does among men. Duhrkoop 
himself attributes much of his 
success to his daughter and her 
wonderful artistic sense. The 
presence of Miss Duhrkoop will 
naturally appeal to our women 
photographers, so they will have 
a two- fold attraction as the Feder- 
ation of Women Photographers 
is again to hold its sessions in 
conjunction with the meetings 
of the Association. 

Then Alyn Williams, an 
Englishman who has reached the 
topmost rungs of the ladder of 
artistic success, will come over 
from the old country to lecture. 
His subject will be, "A Paint- 
er's view upon different forms 
of composition, and light 
and shade, as applied to Pho- 
tography." That sounds in- 
teresting, and from all we hear, 



the man is as interesting as the 
subject of his lecture. He is not 
only president of the Royal So- 
ciety of Miniature Painting of 
England, but also a member of 
the Royal Society of British Art- 
ists and Associate of the Royal 
Cambrian Academy of Arts, the 
leading art societies of Great 
Britain. 

Leslie Miller, one of our own 
people, and president of the 
School of Industrial Arts of Phil- 
adelphia, will lecture on "Some 
Lessons for Photographers from 
Great Masters of Painting. " 
Those who had the pleasure of 
hearing Mr. Miller talk before 
the members of the Pennsylvania 
Society, early this spring, say 
that his talk is full of "meat" 
and the best thing they had ever 
heard on those lines. 

William H. Rau of Philadel- 
phia forms the third of the big 
trio of lecturers. He will talk 
on a subject that is as familiar to 
him as his own name. His sub- 
ject will be "Commercial Pho- 
tography and its Possibilities." 
It will be splendidly illustrated 
and should attract numbers of 
the commercial folk, a class that 
has too often been neglected in 
our conventions. 

A subject which no photog- 
rapher can know too much about 
will be discussed by Juan C. 
Abel. An illustrated talk on 
practical advertising for photog- 
raphers will be his share of the 
general instruction and it will 



STUDIO LIGHT 



pay the man who knows how to 
make good pictures but does not 
know how to get the public to 
buy them, to hsten to this talk. 

The Women's Federation will 
have its own lecturer, too, and 
it will have its own exhibition of 
pictures. From all accounts this 
exhibition will surpass that of 
last year, and it was admitted 
on all sides that that exhibition 
pushed that of the men very 
hard. 

Then there are the entertain- 
ments. Thousands of dollars have 
been collected for entertaining 
and a good time is assured. The 
trip to the Yellowstone Park which 
is being arranged for the mem- 
bers, to start immediately after 
the Convention, will also be a 
point of attraction to many, who 
may not readily be so near that 
Wonderland of Nature again. 

It does seem as if the possi- 
bilities of a convention had been 
exhausted this year. Certain it 
is, that a program of such qual- 
ity and fullness has never been 
offered the members of the P. A. 
of A. before and it is hard to see 
how any man who can possibly 
get the money together can stay 
away. 



Q 



EPIA SENSE 



The Eastman Studio 
Register System 

The only complete and practical 
index system for studio accounts. 



k^ AN INEXPENSIVE PAPER FOR AN 
INEXPENSIVE PROCESS-AZO 

For black and white work — 
the work that always has been 
and always will be most in de- 
mand—surviving all temporary 
fads, Artura is unequalled. 

For sepias, there's no use in 
using a high priced paper. Dol- 
lar Azo gives as good sepias, yes 
better sepias than any other de- 
velopment paper on the market, 
and gives them simply and with 
certainty. 

There's no half way stop be- 
tween Azo and Eastman Etching 
Sepia Platinum — in sepias the 
platinum holds first place. Azo 
is easily next. 

The rare quality of Artura has 
made it the standby in the lead- 
ing studios that have adopted a 
development paper. Now and 
then such studios have a call for 
sepias. Azo will fill the bill. 
Not that good sepias caimot be 
made on Artura, but that very 
quality in the emulsion which 
makes it different from all the 
other development papers — in a 
class by itself, to use a trite ex- 
pression — renders it less suscept- 
ible to the influence of a simple 
hypo alum bath. It requires a 
special and careful handling for 
the best results in sepia toning 
that some photographers do not 
care to bother with. The answer 
is: Azo. We make no apologies 
for Azo. As a black and white 
it is in the same rank with the 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



best of the other development 
papers — Artura alone excepted. 
It offers all that any of them do 
in quality and more than any of 
them do in uniformity. As a 
sepia it asks odds of none of 
them — and the price is a dollar 
per gross cabinets, other sizes in 
proportion. 

Prints should be exposed and 
developed in the regular man- 
ner, using the Azo formula as 
follows : 

DEVELOPER 

(Dissolve chemicals in the order 

named) 

Water 20 ozs. 

Elon or Metol .... 7 grs. 

Hydrochinon 30 ^rs. 

*Sulphite of Soda (des.) . 110 grs. 
^Carbonate of Soda (des.) 200 grs. 
Sat. Sol. Potassium Bromide 5 drops 

This solution will keep indefinitely 
if placed in bottles filial to the neck 
and tightly corked. 

SEPIA TONING BATH 
For all grades of Azo. 
Boiling water (distilled or 

rain water) 120 ozs. 

To which add Hypo . . 16 ozs. 
When dissolved add 

Powdered Alum ... 4 ozs. 

Boil this mixture for two or three 
minutes. Then add 20 grains of Po- 
tassium Iodide which has been dis- 
solved in one ounce of water. Next 
dissolve 20 grains of Potassium Bro- 
mide in one ounce of water and 20 
grains of Silver Nitrate in one ounce 
of water. Pour these two together 
and add the mixture to the above 
bath while hot and it is ready for 
use after standing a few hours. 



NOTES 

This bath when heated to a tem- 
perature of from 120 degrees to 130 
degrees will tone prints in from 20 
to 30 minutes. 

Stir the bath constantly while 
adding the different chemicals. 

The white precipitate formed in 
the mixing of the bath may be al- 
lowed to settle and the clear solu- 
tion poured off, or it may be used as 
it is. 

This bath may be used repeatedly 
and as many prints as can be conve- 
niently handled may be placed in 
the bath at one time. 

Prints should be stirred occasion- 
ally to insure even toning. Should 
any print show unevenness in the 
first stages of toning no harm is 
done as the toning proceeds to Sepia 
and stops, making it impossible to 
over-tone. 



* If Crystal Sodas are used double the 
quantity. 




This mark means: 

Tested chemically 
and tested 
photog raphically. 



% 




By H. Walter Bamett — Seed Plate 
London, England 




10 



STUDIO LIGHT 




Garo. 

Bridgeport. 

Sept. 12, 13, 14. 

Put 'em all down on your cal- 
endar pad: New England Con- 
vention at Bridgeport, Sept. 12, 
13, 14, and Garo at the helm. 

Everybody who is acquainted 
with that tingling bundle of 
nerves will be sure that Bridge- 
port will be a live spot. The 
board and the local committee 
are— we started to wrongly say 
"back of him" — working shoulder 
to shoulder with him. It's the 
kind of board that can get the 
co-operation of big men from all 
over the country. At present 
they are thinking, planning, lay- 
ing wires. Later there will be 
important announcements. 

President Garo already has the 
assurance from many of the lead- 
ing workers that their pictures 
will be there and that they will 
be there personally. We shall 
have the news features about 
the Bridgeport show (no, not 
one of the circuses that winters 
there) for you later. Thus far 
there's considerable mystery 
about the whole affair— not the 



least mysterious thing being the 
hieroglyphic that adorns the head 
of this page. 

What does it mean, anyway? 
It has been hinted that you can 
only find out by coming to 
Bridgeport. 



s 



URELOOK ROAMS, 
DEMONSTRATOR 

Roams was sitting in an easy 
chair by the hotel window, smok- 
ing his pipe and apparently in 
deep thought. A letter in his 
hand was evidently the cause of 
his ruminations. 

I had not seen Roams for 
several weeks so I slapped him 
on the back and asked him what 
was on his mind. 

"Well, outside of the Mexican 
Revolution and Reciprocity with 
Canada, the only things bother- 
ing me just now are the biscuits 
I had for supper and this letter 
from the house." "Have to go 
down to Centerville to see Lev- 
ins who has written in that he 
has some paper that won't make 
prints ; says they seem weak and 
undertimed and he knows he ex- 
posed them all right." 

"I might tell him what his 
trouble was without going down 
to see him, for I ran across the 
same thing last week, but I may 
be able to help him in some 
other way so I will go down on 
the early morning train. Where 
do you go from here, Hotson?" 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



I told him I would be down 
to Centerville myself in the after- 
noon and we could take supper 
together. 

It was the next afternoon that 
Levins told me how Roams set 
him right. 

"Roams was in bright and 
early and caught Johnny in the 
act of sweeping down the stairs. 
Told him how to sharpen the 
end of the broom handle so he 
could use it to get the dirt out 
of the corners and the boy took 
his advice. We always learn 
something from him and when 
he gives us advice we feel he 
knows what he is talking about. 
It may make us feel foolish, but 
we like it." 

"Roams asked me if I didn't 
write the house about that paper 
Tuesday morning, and I told 
him I did. Said the reason he 
asked was because he saw by the 
bill boards that *The County 
Chairman' was here Monday 
night." 

"Did you go to see the play, 
Mr. Levins?" 

"Yes, I took my wife; but 
what has that to do with the 
poor prints I had Tuesday morn- 
ing?" 

"Well, I think 'The County 
Chairman ' was the cause of ALL 
the trouble, Mr. Levins; I don't 
see how we can blame anyone 
else." 

"You probably exposed a gross 
or so of paper Monday afternoon 
and as you had to go home for 



an early supper, you only devel- 
oped a part of it and left the 
balance here in the darkroom 
where it is rather damp, and 
Tuesday morning you couldn't 
get good prints." 

"You probably changed the 
developer and fussed around un- 
til you got quite peevish." 

"As you had used the entire 
gross of paper and had none left 
to try out, you got mad and 
wrote the house, telling them 
the blankety blank paper was 
no good. You opened another 
gross and found it was all right 
and then you were sure the paper 
was bad." 

"Am I right?" 

"Yes, you are right about that 
part of it, but I didn't think 
paper would work that way after 
being exposed and allowed to 
stand over night." 

"Well, Mr. Levins, you have 
always been accustomed to de- 
veloping your prints when you 
made them and it is advisable to 
continue doing so." 

"There is a certain amount of 
deterioration of the latent image 
when paper is allowed to stand 
after being exposed and you 
should be particular not to leave 
exposed prints where there is 
dampness, for you will lose the 
exposure much more quickly." 

"The same is true of plates, 
but not to so great a degree. 
Plates may be left for weeks or 
months, but prints should always 
be developed on the same day 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



immediately after being ex- 
posed." 

"Any other trouble, Mr. Lev- 
ins?" 

"Yes, I have been having 
trouble every Saturday with my 
plates and I am ashamed to say 
I can't figure it out." 

"I know it isn't the plates, 
for it only happens Saturdays. 
Small black spots, look like me- 
tallic spots, but they are always 
there when I take the plates out 
of the washing tank." 

"Well, let's dig up the trouble, 
Mr. Levins. A weak solution of 
Nitric Acid will take out the 
spots if they are metallic, but 
let's get at the bottom of it." 

"Can I use your 'phone?" 

"Certainly you can, go as far 
as you like." 

"Hello, Central, give me the 
City Waterworks." 

"Hello," "City Water Works?" 
"This is Levins' Studio." "Can 
you tell me what happens to 
your water supply on Saturday 
that don't occur on other days? " 

"No?" "Well, don't you test 
the city fire plugs or something 
of that sort on Saturdays?" 

"No?"— "Oh, yes, I see, and 
you draw it off every Saturday 
morning." 

"Yes, all right, thank you very 
much." 

" He says they draw the water 
out of the stand pipe every Sat- 
urday morning and fill it up with 
fresh water. Let's put some 
cotton in a cloth and tie it over 



the tap and let the water run 
for a while to see if we get some 
trace of iron rust." 

"You can be almost sure we 
will find it, for when the water 
gets riled up there is almost 
always a certain amount of rust 
in it and you would get it Satur- 
day evenings when you develop. " 

"I had a harder one than this 
a few days ago, but we found it 
before I left and it was so pecu- 
liar that I want to tell you 
about it. " 

"A man was using P. M. C. 
Bromide Post Cards and was 
making six cards for fifty cents. 
He showed me some of the cards 
and about one out of every six 
had a peculiar mark on it that 
looked like a letter IV or an M, 
and of course he was sure it was 
in the cards." 

"We soon reasoned it out, but 
the man was from Missouri and 
had to be shown." 

"He would open a package of 
postals and put them in a card- 
board box on his shelf and di- 
rectly above was a small light 
globe which was never used ex- 
cept when the box of postals 
was closed." 

"The only thing to be found 
the shape of the mark on the 
cards was the filament of the 
light globe, and on examining 
the lid of cardboard box I dis- 
covered a pinhole. You see it 
was a plain case of pinhole pho- 
tography." 

"The pinhole was the lens 




MARK TWAIN 



By H. Walter Bamett- 
London, England 



Seed Plate 




14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



that was photographing the fila- 
ment in the globe on the bro- 
mide post card. We put a plate 
in the box and got a very fair 
negative of the globe and then 
he was convinced." 

"Now let's look at our im- 
provised filter. Yes, there is the 
rust in the cotton we put in our 
filter cloth. Just filter the water 
on Saturdays and you will be all 
right." 

"I am glad I came to see you on 
Saturday, Mr. Levins, good bye." 

"Roams is down calling on 
my competitor now and as soon 
as I make this baby negative I 
will go over and look at your 
samples, Hotson." 

We were just going into the 
hotel when we met Roams and 
the way he told Levins about 
that baby negative was good. 

He saw it at a glance and 
said, "Mr. Levins, I should think 
it was about time to discard that 
antiquated fur rug you use in 
making baby pictures. Get Hot- 
son to show you the Century 
Baby Holder and make baby 
pictures in which you can find 
the baby." 

"You probably used that same 
rug when you photographed that 
baby's mother twenty years ago. " 

Levins flushed and said, "What 
you say about the old rug is true ; 
I have used it more or less in 
making baby pictures ever since 
I started in the business, but I 
can't figure out how you know 
I just made a baby picture." 



"Oh, that is easy, " said Roams. 
" There are a few grey hairs on your 
coat sleeve which are not yours, 
and when you picked the rug off 
the floor to put it over the baby 
chair, it struck you across the 
knees and left a dust mark and 
you forgot to take the baby rat- 
tle out of your coat pocket." 
"Good circumstantial evidence, 
isn't it?" 

Levins realized Roams was 
right. I sold the Baby Holder 
and the fur rug is now a thing 
of the past in that studio. 



rpHERE is an addi- 
tional profit to 
you in the sale of 
enlargements. 

Carbon Black 

Artura 
Enlargements 

have all the quality 
of contact prints. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

We are glad of the oppor- 
tunityof publishing in this 
month's Studio Light a series 
of pictures from the studio of 
H. Walter Barnett of London, 
England. Mr. Barnett is one of 
the most noted English photog- 
raphers and has made a wonder- 
ful success in the last few years 
in London. He has a patronage 
of the very highest class and has 
builded his success upon business 
principles closely applied to every 
detail of his studio. 

Mr. Barnett left Austraha a 
few years ago, going to England 
after a short visit in the States. 
He has recently made a tour of 
the United States in the com- 
pany of William Crooke, visiting 
a number of our most prominent 
studios. 

Mr. Barnett is a firm believer 
in quality without regard to cost 
and is a consistent user of Seed 
plates. To the progressive pho- 
tographer whose business de- 
mands quality and dependability, 
the ocean is not a barrier. Our 
increased exportation of Seed 
plates is proof of the fact that 
it is quality that is appreciated 
and demanded on the other side 
as well as among our own pho- 
tographers. 



Artura Carbon Black 

Ideal for enlargements. 



PUTTING 'EM OVER 
BY THE OFFICE BOY 

Las' week the Boss says to 
the reception room girl, don' 
make no engagements for me 
nex' Monday afternoon. 

I thot mebbe we wuz goin' 
fishin' again, and then I thot 
again an' foun' it wuz the openin' 
ball game. 

Me an' the Boss an' the Boss' 
brother-in-law wot keeps the cigar 
store where the team hangs out 
went. 

The Boss says that nex' to 
fishin' he likes a good ball game 
because then he can sit still an' 
watch the other fellow try an' 
put 'em over. 

The Boss says pitchin' ball is 
jus' like any other business. You 
got to put 'em over, an' the 
slicker your curves is the easier 
you can put the other feller out, 
an' he says that the way a good 
ball team captain works his team 
is a blame good lesson, for when 
the team gets in a hole, he jes' 
jumps in after 'em an' pushes 
'em out 'sted of jes' runnin' 
roun' the edge of the hole an' 
wonderin' wot he better do. 

I tole the Boss that I wuz try- 
in' to make up my mind whether 
to be a operator or a pitcher, an' 
he says that he wuz goin' to 
have my hed examined as it took 
branes to be either one of 'em. 
One of the fellers in the printin' 
room busted a prize negative the 
other day, an' then tried to lie 
out of it; the Boss seen him 



( 




Bv H. Walter Burnett - Seed Plate 
London, England 





By H. Walter Bamett — Seed Plate 
London, England 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



bust it, so he called him, he says 
lyin' don't pay, an' that if you'r 
goin' to be stung, be sure it aint 
a bee from your own hive that's 
doin^ it. 

A chap comes in las' week an' 
tries to interest the Boss in a fake 
coupon skeme, the Boss listens 
to him real pleasant like, an' 
then he says that it would be jes' 
as good bizness for him as fillin' 
his automobile tires wath tacks 
an' expectin' not to get a punc- 
ture, an' would he please close 
the office door with him an' his 
skeme on the outside. 

I aint goin' to be no pitcher, 
some of us kids had a game noon 
hour the other day ; I wuz pitcher , 
the firs ball I pitched wuz hit, an' 
I diden get out of the way quick 
enough. Can't tell whether I'm 
goin' to be a operator yet either 
till I take the hunk of raw beef 
offen my eye. 

Hope it gets well before con- 
vention time. 

Sure! me an' the Boss an' 
Jimmie the printer is goin' to 
the convention — we always go. 
I aint never been to Saint Paul — 
it ought to be a good town from 
the name. 

There's lots of towns named 
after Saints, aint they, but I 
never heard of one bein' named 
after St. Vitus— it would be a 
lively place, wouldent it? 

Joken aside, even a kid like 
me can get a lot of good from 
conventions, even if it's only 
watchin* the Boss an' the other 



fellers, an' seein' how quick they 
can get down to bizness when 
the meetins is called. 

The Boss says the money he 
invests in the National pays good 
interest. . ^ 




THE WINDOWPANE 
SCREEN 

As the name implies, the 
windowpane screen is an acces- 
sory used to make window-light- 
ing effects, and will be found 
very easy to construct and not 
at all expensive. 

The advantage of a screen of 
this kind in the operating room 
is obvious. 

Many beautiful "home por- 
traits" are being made by those 
who make a specialty of this 
work and the window plays a 
very important part in most of 
these pictures. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



19 




A window screen of the kind 
shown in our illustration brings 
the window into the studio with- 
out the disadvantages ordinarily 
encountered in working by a win- 
dow light. 

The screen may be placed in 
any position in the operating 
room where the light will fall at 
proper angle and beautiful nega- 
tives made, with full detail in 
the shadows and no halation 
whatever, as when a real window 
is included in the picture. 

The framework of the screen 
is covered with muslin or tracing 
cloth, which in turn is covered 
with "Windowphanie." This is 
a thin tissue, coated with a gela- 
tine like substance, and is used 



for covering windows to give a 
leaded or stained glass effect. 

It may be bought at any wall 
paper store in rolls the same as 
wall paper and is placed on the 
screen by soaking in water and 
squeegeeing in contact. 

Care should be used to select 
material without colors. The 
plain effects such as are shown 
in our illustration are best and 
will give a soft, translucent and 
well diffused light. 

A strip placed across the top 
of the screen with a curtain draped 
at either side and a book, or a 
vase of flowers, on the window 
shelf, adds to the homelike ef- 
fect. 

The shelf may be made ad- 
justable so that it can be lowered 
for pictures of children, or raised 
to give the effect of a high hall 
window for three-quarter length 
figures. When the window shelf 
is made adjustable, a panel should 
be made of some light material 
to fit under the shelf when it is 
raised, and the screen need not 
be changed. 

When the screen is placed in 
the proper light, with several 
toys on the shelf within reach, a 
child will soon feel quite at home 
and no posing will be found nec- 
essary. 

The many uses of the above 
screen and the additions that 
may easily be made to it to ob- 
tain different effects, are innu- 
merable. L^ 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



A NEW FIELD 

"^^ ^ In a recent issue of the 
Saturday Evening Post twenty- 
two of the advertisements are 
illustrated by photographs. In 
the April issue of Everybody's 
Magazine sixty - two advertise- 
ments, and in the April issue of 
Country Life in America, one 
hundred and sixty-four adver- 
tisements are illustrated by pho- 
tographs. 

"Who can I get to make ad- 
vertising photographs for me?" 
is a question that is frequently 
heard wherever advertising men 
get together. 

There are, of course, two 
classes of such pictures — those 
that are just photographs, and 
those that tell a story. There's 
business for you in both. Good 
straight commercial business at 
fair prices for photographs — any 
price that you may care to ask 
for those pictures that illustrate 
an idea. We would like to see 
the photographers get more of 
the latter class of business, and 
those of them who qualify for it 
can get it. 

Our prize offers for photo- 
graphs—they amount to $2500. 00 
this year — are made with a two- 
fold object. First, to get pic- 
tures for our own advertising, 
and next to assist those photog- 
raphers who are interested in get- 
ting in touch with this important 
field. 

The Portfolio of our 19 10 



Kodak Advertising Competition 
gives a line on just what kind of 
work should be made for this 
purpose — not merely our own 
individual judgment on this sub- 
ject, but the judgment of a jury 
consisting of some of the ablest 
advertising men and photogra- 
phers in the country. 

A copy will be mailed free 
upon request. 



N 



EW STYLES 



Styles are originated to sell 
goods. Styles, — new styles, cre- 
ate a demand. It is the demand 
you want. You who have some- 
thing to sell. If you don't find a 
style lying around loose where you 
can put your hand on it, look in a 
Canadian Card Co. catalogue 
and pick one out, — then push it. 
Advertise it in your paper, 
not once but a dozen times, in a 
different and attractive way each 
time. Make up clean, fresh sam- 
ples of your work in the new 
style and make enough so that 
you will be able to make frequent 
changes in your showcase to con- 
form with your newspaper adver- 
tising. Make the passer-by stop 
and look at your work and have 
something new for him to look 
at. Make him want pictures in 
the new style. Make him feel 
you are always abreast of the 
times. Don't worry about a few 
old mounts you may want to get 
rid of, for it may lose you dollars 
of profit in something new. 



/ 



By H. Walter Barnett — Seed Plate 
London, England 




22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



r>E A BOOSTER 

-*^ Are you , Mr . Canadian Pho- 
tographer, going to be a booster 
for your own National Associa- 
tion this year, 191 1? 

We believe you are. This is 
to be a banner year in the pro- 
fession of photography, so let us 
show our confidence and enthu- 
siasm by putting in an appear- 
ance at the Annual Convention 
of the Photographers' Associa- 
tion of Canada. Let us tell the 
other fellow what we know and 
find out what he knows. Some 
of us may feel we don't want to 
tell what we know and some of 
us may know but little to tell, 
but we can all learn and there 
will be those who imll be there 
to tell what they know and they 
are not all little fellows either. 
It is the way they grow large. 

Too many of us are prone to 
hide our light under a bushel 
and then crawl under with it, so 
we not only hide our own light 
but are unable to see how brightly 
the other fellow's light is burn- 
ing. The photographer who gets 
ahead, like the physician or bar- 
rister, is the one who keeps 
abreast of the times by attend- 
ing conventions, lectures and 
other similar gatherings where 
the latest ideas are discussed, 
and where he may come in con- 
tact with the broadening influ- 
ences of his more successful fel- 
low-man. 

The date of the Convention is 



July 5th and 6th— and the place, 
the Camera Club Rooms, To- 
ronto. A splendid program is 
being arranged by the executive 
committee and fine exhibits are 
expected from many of the lead- 
ing American Galleries. 

Be sure to keep these dates 
open and attend your own con- 
vention. Any further informa- 
tion will be gladly supplied by 
T. J. Leatherdale, 350 Yonge 
street, Toronto, president, or 
C. B.Wilson, Well and, secretary. 



E 



NLARGING 



The obtaining of diffusion 
when enlarging by means of a 
silk bolting cloth is a simple 
matter when enlarging in a dark 
room, but when some form of 
enlarging camera is used where 
the paper is enclosed in the cam- 
era, it becomes a different prop- 
osition. 

It has been suggested that 
when a camera of this type is 
used, that the bolting cloth be 
mounted on a sheet of clean glass 
the size of the enlargement, and 
placed in the camera in contact 
with the sensitive paper. This 
method allows the placing of the 
cloth directly in contact with the 
surface of the paper, or with the 
glass interposed. A pleasant soft- 
ness may be obtained by placing 
a sheet of fine matte celluloid, 
or ground glass in front of the 
paper. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of j^hotographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 




OUR pictures of brides are 
distinctive. The delightful 
effects we secure in the lighting 
and handling of dainty draperies 
are appreciated by discriminating 
friends. 

C Make the appointment early. 

THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



C. K. Co., Ltd. No. 166. Price. 40 cents. 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 



B 



ULLETIN: THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1911 



^ 



Seattle, Wash June 6, 7, 8 

Spokane, Wash June 13, 14, 15 

Butte, Mont June 20, 21, 22 

Salt Lake City, Utah June 27, 28, 29 

Denver, Colo July 5, 6, 7 

Kansas City, Mo July 11, 12, 13 

St. Louis, Mo July 18, 19, 20 

Vacation 



#» ^ ♦ 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supphes, for we carry a com- 
plete hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ROUNDS 




PRINT WASHER 

Thorough washing of prints is assured if you 
use this convenient and efficient print washer. 
It is a time saver, is entirely automatic and there 
is nothing to get out of order. Substantially 
constructed of the best of zinc, it will not rust. 

Height, 9)4 inches; width, 23 inches; length, 
20 inches; capacity, 100 prints 5x7 or 150 
cabinets or smaller. Only 12 lbs. water pres- 
sure is required. 

Rounds Print Washer, - $10.00 

Manufactured by the 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
A. ^ r^ 7 , Toronto, Canada 

At Your Dealer s. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



27 



EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 



ETCHING-BLACK 

is a paper that is distinctive — 
it will lend the individuality 
to your work that will com- 
mand better prices. A warm 
black tone resembling that of 
an etching. It will appeal to 
your best customers. 



ETCHING-SEPIA 

on buff stock, has a warmth 
and richness in the shadows 
that is not to be found in any 
other sepia platinum paper. 
The creamy tint of the high- 
lights adds to the richness. 
Furnished also on white stock. 



Papers that will win the approval of your 
most exacting patrons. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT 



( 



Eastman 

Permanent Crystal 

Pyro 



It stays 
where you 
put it — 
pure clean 
crystals — 
acidified 
and ready 
for use. 




No more 
stains from 
flying par- 
ticles of 
Pyro dust 
when you 
use Eastman 
Crystal Pyro, 



In Glass Bottles. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



U£/ 




The proof of the tank is the 
quality of the negative. 

The Eastman 
Plate Tank 

automatically makes the best 
of every exposure. 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 

All Dealers. 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT 







ll 


I^WSii 





Insure your results: 




Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The Century 
Universal Studio Outfit 




THE PRICE 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 8x10 11x14 
Portrait Camera No. 2, with Century Universal Holder, Auto- 
matic Cabinet Attachment and one Curtain Holder (5x7. 
4^4 X qVz or 4l4 X eH, size optional), Century Semi-Centennial 
Stand with adjustable rack to carry twelve plate holders, $82.50 $115.50 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 
Portrait Camera, with Century Universal Holder, Automatic 
Attachment for 8 x 10 Holder, and one 8 x 10 Curtain Holder, 
Century Semi-Centennial Stand 



123.75 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ALGONQUIN 

A New Style for Groups and Views. 




The Algonquin is our latest style for groups and views. 
Made in three colors: English Grey, Artists' Brown and 
White, of good firm linen finish stock, beveled edges. 
It has a rich tinted design, brought up in color to har- 
monize with the stock. 

Be sure and see samples of this style in all colors. 

It is one of the best values on the market. 

Sample mailed on receipl of two 2-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANlirACTURED BY 

CANADIAN CARD COMPANY 

Toronto, Canada. 



Aristo Motto 



'A^7E believe permanency is the 
^ ^ Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




MR. MELVIN H. SYKES 



Artura Iris Print 







\=^l 




X C O R P O R A T I N G 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 190] 



Established 190( 



Vol. 3 



JULY 1911 



No. 



u 



SE A PICTURE 



Arthur Brisbane is not 
styled as an advertising man. 
He's an editor. But neverthe- 
less there's no better advertising 
man in the country to-day— either 
for his employer or himself. Mr. 
Brisbane in a recent talk to the 
Syracuse Ad Club said: "Use a 
picture; it's worth a thousand 
words. Use a picture with five 
words, a comparison in thirty 
words." 

The picture in advertising is 
the thing. And when that pic- 
ture is a photograph it's doubly 
effective because it bears the 
stamp of truth. But it must 
offer the argument, tell the story 
that the advertiser wants to con- 
vey. If it is merely pretty, or is 
irrelevant, it is meaningless and 
might better be omitted. 

We are offering |2500.00 in 
prizes for pictures that will help 
us tell the story of the witchery 
of Kodakery. Let us send you a 
portfoho of our I9IO Kodak Ad- 
vertising Competition and the 
terms for 1911- 



A 



RTURA 
T I O N S 



SUGGES 



The development of the medi- 
um speed brands may be carried 
on by yellow artificial light. 

It is safe to develop prints at 
a distance of six feet from a I6- 
candle power incandescent lamp 
(or light of equal strength), 
without a screen of any kind. 

Artura Carbon Black must be 
handled in orange or red light. 
A single thickness of orange 
(Post Office) paper as a screen, 
will be sufficient. 

To obtain the best quality in 
the prints, use the developer 
formula recommended by the 
manufacturers. 

Increasing the amount of Elon 
or Metol and reducing the amount 
of Hydrochinon will produce 
softer results. 

Increasing the amount of Hy- 
drochinon and reducing the 
amount of Elon or Metol will in- 
crease the brilliancy or contrast 
of the prints to a certain extent. 

For all Artura formulae : mix 
the chemicals in the order given. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Do not overwork the fixing 
bath. 

Allowing water to spatter on 
the dry prints before develop- 
ment will cause spots. 

All Artura developing formu- 
lae call for saturated solution of 
Bromide of Potash. One drop of 
saturated solution is about equal 
to ten drops of a ten per cent, 
solution. 

Do not use Glacial Acetic 
Acid, as it is too strong. Use 
No. 8 Commercial or 28% Acetic 
Acid. 

If you have mislaid your man- 
ual "Artura Results," ask us for 
a copy of the latest edition. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



To receive recognition by 
the Chicago public, one must 
have done something decidedly 
worthy of that recognition. Mel- 
vin H.Sykes,like all Chicagoans, 
is a busy man and he has kept 
busy for the last seven years, 
building up the reputation that 
has made the name of Sykes well 
known in his city where there are 
so many men on the rungs of the 
ladder of success that climbing is 
by no means an easy task. 

Mr. Sykes recognized in Ar- 
tura a means to further his suc- 
cess and the continued use of 
Artura in the Sykes Studio is 
proof that his judgment was well 
grounded. It was no easy task 
to select our few illustrations from 
the many beautiful examples of 



work to be found in the Sykes 
Studio, but we are pleased to 
give what we think is a good 
general idea of Mr. Sykes' work, 
though the engravings fail to 
reproduce the beautiful richness 
of the original Artura prints. 

ly/TORE SEPIA SENSE 

-^ -*• The extensive use of Ar- 
tura, and the fact that photog- 
raphers are generally so well ac- 
quainted with Normal Iris Artura 
Developer has led us to further 
experiments as to its suitability 
in connection with the formula 
for Sepia Azo tones published 
in last month's Studio Light. 

We find that the Normal Iris 
is probably even better for this 
purpose than the Azo formula, 
and that is saying a great deal. 
The sepia tones on Azo are bet- 
ter, richer and more uniform than 
anything ever produced on a de- 
veloping paper and the use of the 
regular Artura developer makes 
the process still more simple. 

Note: Do not think that be- 
cause you can get good black and 
white prints on Azo with the 
Normal Iris Developer that you 
can in turn get Artura sepias 
that are satisfactory with the 
Azo- Hypo- Alum bath. Artura 
is unlike the other development 
papers and requires special hand- 
ling to give proper sepias. 

To obtain the best sepia results 
on Azo, the same rule applies as 
for black and white prints. The 



STUDIO LIGHT 



print must have full exposure to 
allow a normal development. A 
print under-exposed and forced 
in development is of a cold blue 
tone and produces a cold purple 
in the sepia toning. A print 
over-exposed and under-devel- 
oped naturally contains too much 
olive tone with clogged shadows 
and produces a muddy sepia 
tone. 

It is obvious then, that enough 
bromide should be used to pro- 
duce, with normal development, 
a good clean olive tone. Such 
a print will in turn give a warm 
sepia tone. Too little bromide 
(or short exposure and forced 
development) will give a colder 
sepia — in extreme cases a purplish 
tone. 

As the color then, of the black 
and white print is the most im- 
portant factor in making good 
sepia tones, care should be taken 
to accurately determine the 
proper exposure and to properly 
develop without forcing. 

RECAPITULATION 

Normal Iris Developer 

Water 40 ozs. 

Elon or Metol 14 grs. 

♦Eastman Sulphite of Soda(dry) ^ oz. 
Hydrochinon ....... 60 grs. 

*Eastman Carbonate of Soda 

(dry) ^2 oz. 

Add one drop saturated solution Bro- 
mide of Potassium to each 2 ozs. of de- 
veloper. 

The print is rinsed after de- 
veloping and placed in the fol- 
lowing fixing bath, allowing not 
less than ten minutes for fixing: 

* If crystal sodas are used, double the 
quantity 



Acid Fixing Bath 

Water 64 ozs. 

Hypo 16 ozs. 

When thoroughly dissolved, 
add the following hardening so- 
lution, thoroughly dissolving the 
chemicals one at a time in the 
water in the order named : 

Water , 5 ozs. 

Eastman Sulphite of Soda (dry) V2 oz. 
Acetic Acid No. 8 (25 fo pure acid) 3 ozs. 
Powdered Alum ...... 1 oz. 

If a large number of prints are 
to be toned, it is advisable to 
rinse them out of the fixing bath 
in warm water to avoid carrying 
a quantity of cold water into the 
Hypo Alum toning bath. 

Azo Sepia Toning Bath 

Boiling water (distilled or rain 
water) 120 ozs. 

To which add Hypo .... 16 ozs. 

When dissolved add Powdered 
Alum , 4 ozs. 

Boil this mixture for two or 

three minutes. Then add 20 

grains of Potassium Iodide which 

has been dissolved in one ounce 

of water. Next dissolve 20 grains 

of Potassium Bromide in one 

ounce of water and 20 grains of 

Silver Nitrate in one ounce of 

water. Pour these two together 

and add the mixture to the 

above bath while hot and it is 

ready for use after standing a 

few hours. 

NOTES 

This bath when heated to a 
temperature of from 120 degrees 
to 130 degrees will tone prints in 
from 20 to 30 minutes. 

Stir the bath constantly while 
adding the different chemicals. 

The white precipitate formed 



STUDIO LIGHT 



in the mixing of the bath may 
be allowed to settle and the clear 
solution poured off, or it may be 
used as it is. 

This bath may be used re- 
peatedly and as many prints as 
can be conveniently handled may 
be placed in the bath at one 
time. 

Prints should be stirred occa- 
sionally to insure even toning. 
Should any print show uneven- 
ness in the first stages of toning 
no harm is done as the toning 
proceeds to Sepia and stops, mak- 
ing it impossible to over-tone. 

In washing the prints from the 
hot toning bath, they should be 
run through a change of luke- 
warm water and swabbed off with 
a tuft of soft cotton to remove 
any precipitated alum. 

In cold water this forms a 
milky scum but is easily removed 
in the warm water. 



STEE P L EC HAS E 
ISLAND FOR NEW 
ENGLAND CONVENTION 

The unprecedented demand for 
space from the manufacturers 
and exhibitors at the forthcom- 
ing Convention of the Photog- 
raphers Association of New Eng- 
land has made it necessary for 
the Executive Board to change 
its original intention of holding 
the Convention at the Bridge- 
port Armory in September. The 
committee has selected Steeple- 



chase Island, which offers an op- 
portunity for holding a photo- 
graphic exposition which the 
coming convention of the Asso- 
ciation has actually developed 
into, and the Board is now busily 
preparing plan? of the Island for 
the inspection of the members 
and exhibitors. 

This change in plan makes it 
possible for the Board to assure 
every manufacturer as much space 
as he requires and an absolute 
equality of opportunity to display 
his wares. The entire Island 
will be taken over for the pur- 
poses of the exposition and for 
the first time since the days of 
Celeron the old time Association 
spirit will prevail. 

I am more than gratified over 
the showing made by the Asso- 
ciation thus far, and the assur- 
ances received by the Board con- 
vince me that the coming expo- 
sition will achieve a great suc- 
cess and will establish a new 
mark in convention work. 

An entire building will be de- 
voted to the display of photo- 
graphs and from absolute book- 
ings already made I can safely 
promise the visitors and members 
the greatest exhibition of photo- 
graphs ever gathered in America. 

Full details of the Exposition 
and Convention are being pre- 
pared and will be sent forward 
to you in due season. 

Cordially yours, 
J. H. Garo, 
Pres. P. A. of N. E. 




FROM AN AIITURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin H. Sykes 
Chicago, III. 




8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THIRST AID TO THE POISONED 

-*• While it is very seldom one hears of a case of chemical poison- 
ing, and the chances are not so great as when the photographer 
mixed most of his own chemical solutions, still it is well to know 
what to do in a case of emergency, so we are publishing a list of the 
poisonous chemicals most commonly used in photographic work, the 
symptoms of poisoning from some and the most certain antidotes. 

The very first thing to do if there is any reason whatever to 
believe a person has by any mistake, taken poison, or a drink from 
a glass or graduate that has contained poison, is to 
CALL A DOCTOR. 

Then while awaiting his arrival a life may be saved by trying 
one of the following suggestions : 

SYMPTOMS OF POISONING BY PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS 
AND ANTIDOTES FOR SAME 



CHEMICAL 

Acetic Acid 



Carbolic Acid 



Fluoric Acid 



Nitric Acid 



Oxalic Acid 



SYMPTOMS 

Internally. Local in- 
flammation. Smother- 
ing due to closing of 
throat. 

Externally. Strong 
caustic. 

Internally. Rapid pois- 
on causing nausea, 
marked pallor of skin, 
stupor, insensibility. 

Externally. Powerful 
irritant causing whit- 
ening of skin. 

Internally. Strong irri- 
tant producing spasms 
of the throat. 

Externally. Caustic 
causing deep burns. 

Internally . Strong pois- 
on producing nausea, 
depressed pulse, ex- 
treme thirst. 

Externally . Caustic col- 
oring the skin yellow. 

Nausea, languor, great 
debility. 



ANTIDOTES FOR POISONS 
INTERNALLY 

Drink chalk or mag- 
nesia in water. 



Olive or castor oil. 
Saccharated lime. 



Wash out stomach. 
No good reliable chem- 
ical antidote. 



Drink magnesia 
chalk in water. 
Olive or castor oil. 



Drink large amount of 
chalk in water. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Sulphuric Acid 

Sulphurous Acid 

Gold Chloride 

Iodine 
Lead Salts 

Mercuric Chloride 
Pot. Bichromate 
Pot. Cyanide 

Pot. Ferricyanide 

Pot. Oxalate 
Pyro Gallol 

Silver Salts 
Wood Alcohol 
Ammonia 



Burning of throat and 
stomach, nausea. Dif- 
ficulty in breathing ; 
convulsions. 

Irritant to mucous mem- 
brane. Difficulty in 
breathing. 

Depressant to heart 
action. 

Constriction of throat, 
vomiting, colic. 

Irritant poison produc- 
ing burning of throat 
and stomach. Vomit- 
ing, acute colic. 

Burningof the throatand 
stomach. Severe pain, 
colic, convulsions. 

Violent irritant, causing 
vomiting, lack of cir- 
culation, heart failure. 

Spasms of jaws, difficult 
breathing, insensi- 
bility. 



When pure not poison- 
ous. 

Same as Oxalic Acid. 

Severe pain in stomach, 
vomiting. Lips pale ; 
skin greenish hue or 
jaundiced. 

Strong irritant, interfer- 
ing with respiration, 
convulsions. 

In large quantities 
causes muscular relax- 
ation, stupor, collapse. 

Internally. Caustic ir- 
ritant making respir- 
ation difficult. 

Externally. Caustic 
causing hot burning 
sensation. 



Drink chalk or mag- 
nesia in water; flour 
and water; or mucilage 
and water. 

Drink chalk or mag- 
nesia in water. 

Strong emetic, like 

mustard and lukewarm 

water. 

Milk, white of egg. 

Saleratus or baking 
soda. Epsom salts. 



Milk, thin flour paste, 
white of egg, stomach 
pump. 

Warm soap solution, 
bi-carbonate soda or 
baking soda, magnesia. 

No sure antidote. Wash 
stomach with SQ% per- 
oxide of hydrogen. 
Take very strong cof- 
fee. Smelling salts. 



Same as Oxalic Acid. 

Strong emetic, like 
mustard and warm 
water. White of egg. 

Common salt solution, 
warm soap solution, 
baking soda. 

Wash out stomach; 
strong emetic , like mus- 
tard and warm water. 

Inhale diluted acetic 
acid or vinegar. Drink 
thin flour paste or mu- 
cilage in water. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Benzine 



Ether 



Methyl Alcohol 



Platinum Salts 



Headache, giddiness, 
vomiting, peculiar in- 
toxication and appear- 
ance of hysteria. 

Powerful depressant to 
heart causing loss of 
consciousness. Mus- 
cular relaxation. 

Dilation of pupil of eye, 
contraction of jfield of 
vision. Total blind- 
ness. 



Internally . Irritates the 
mucous membrane of 
stomach and occasions 
violent headaches. 

Externally. Concentrat- 
ed solution produces 
violent itching. 



Emetics, like mustard 
and warm water; stim- 
ulants, like aromatic 
spirits of ammonia. Ar- 
tificial respiration. 
Artificial respiration. 
Inhale nitrate of amyl. 



No satisfactory treat- 
ment. Best is to elimi- 
nate alcohol and pro- 
ducts formed by free 
sweating and adminis- 
ter large quantities bi- 
carbonate of soda (bak- 
ing soda) and water. 
Wash out stomach and 
eliminate from system 
as fast as possible by 
use of cathartics. 



N UNPARALLELED CONVENTION 



Take it as an actual prov- 
able fact; the men who have made 
a success of photography both ar- 
tistically and financially, have 
been Convention men. Men w^ho 
have attended these affairs for 
years will tell you of young pho- 
tographers whom they have seen 
go to their first convention, — 
green, unskilled, not possessed 
of much money, but eager to 
learn, and after a few years these 
same young photographers are 
seen as leaders of affairs, with 
prosperous businesses of their 
own and much due to their belief 
in the Convention as an invest- 
ment. 

This year's National Conven- 



tion is almost without a parallel 
in the grade of instruction it has 
to offer you. Duhrkoop and his 
daughter, the leading photog- 
raphers of Europe, to show you 
their methods, — not merely to 
talk to you, but to show you 
under the skylight with ordinary 
people for their subjects, just 
how they get their wonderful 
pictures. Don't say that the 
kind of work they do can not be 
done in your studio. Maybe it 
cannot or maybe your class of 
trade would not want just that 
sort of picture, but you can apply 
their ideas to your needs and 
improve your work, for no mat- 
ter how cheap your trade, your 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



best efforts are none too good. 
Even the poorest class of trade 
will pay something more for 
something better. 

Then lectures by Alyn Wil- 
liams and Leslie Miller. These 
are two men who rank very high 
in England and this country for 
their expert knowledge of art 
and their ability to impart their 
knowledge. Their talks will show 
you how the lessons of the great 
masters of art can be applied to 
photographic portrait making. 
William H. Rau will tell all about 
commercial photography and its 
possibilities, and he will show you 
the many opportunities that lie 
around you for making money 
with your camera. Juan C. Abel, 
who has made a study of studio 
advertising, will tell you how to 
get the people in touch with 
your studio, and show by lantern 
slides good and bad styles of 
advertising. The photographer 
is too apt to let well enough alone 
and wait for customers instead 
of going after them. 

Then the exhibition. Of course, 
you will exhibit with the others 
and the mere fact that you are 
going to send your best work will 
make you do better work all along 
the line. The extra effort you 
have to put into your exhibition 
pictures will have its effect on the 
work you give your customers. 

The many entertainments pro- 
vided at the Convention will only 
help to make your stay in St. 
Paul the more enjoyable and if 



you want a little further recrea- 
tion you can take in the trip to 
Yellowstone Park , which will start 
immediately after the Convention, 
and which is arranged especially 
for members of the Association. 

By the way, here is a letter 
from the Mayor of St. Paul : 

"It will give me great pleas- 
ure to welcome to St. Paul as 
many members of the Photog- 
raphers of America as can be 
induced to attend the Thirty- 
first Annual Convention. 

"There is no more desirable 
city during the summer season 
to visit than St. Paul. With our 
many lakes and summer resorts 
we are peculiarly well situated 
for entertaining our friends, and 
St. Paul hospitality has become 
a by-word among those who know 
our city. 

"Through your well known pub- 
lication it gives me special pleas- 
ure to invite the Photographers 
of America to make Saint Paul 
their objective point this sum- 
mer, and I hope the prospective 
Convention will be the largest 
and best ever held." 

A fid it will. 



ARTURA 

CARBON BLACK 

ENLARGEMENTS 

have the quality of con- 
tact prints 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin H. Sykes 
Chicago, III. 




14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



H 



OT WEAT HER 
TROUBLES 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



The Boss has a habit of lookin' 
at the thermometer every morn- 
in' when he firs' comes in, an' 
the other mornin' when I herd 
him comin' I lit a match under 
the bulb, an' the jooee ran up 
to 104. 

The Boss gives one look, an' 
sets rite down, an' he says "if 
I am as hot inside as that ther- 
mometer sez I am outside, I'm a 
sik man," and then he sends 
me out for one of them soft 
boiled collers, an' orders a hund- 
red pouns more ice. 

When the Boss diden' hear no- 
body else kiken about the hete 
he thot he hadent looked strate, 
an' he sez it's grate wot imagi- 
nation will do. 

The Boss says if some fellers 
wuz as strong as their imagina- 
tions they wud have Carnegie 
an' Rockfeller workin' for 'em, 
an' glad to get the job. 

Me an' Jimmy the printer gets 
thirsty the other day an' we 
mixes up some lemmon-ade in a 
five seven tank an' sets it in the 
darkroom so's it would kepe 
coole. The Boss he wuz bizzy 
makin' sum exposure tests an' 
when he gets 'em exposed he 
goes into the darkroom an' 
plumps the plates into our tank 
of lemmonade. He wates twenty 
minutes, an' then looks at 'em, 
an' he don' see no image; the 



plates feels sticky like the de- 
veloper wuz too warm and he 
stiks the thermometer in an' it 
sez 40, an' he sez — Well, — me 
an' Jimmie we diden' wate to 
here no moor. 

The Boss he diden' say nothin' 
to us, bekaus he ' s all way s preach- 
in' about never using no solu- 
tions wot you don' know wot 
they are. 

I'm out seven cents for sug- 
ger an' lemmons tho. 

I know the Boss is wise tho 
bekaus I herd him laff an' say 
to the reception room girl, "It's 
a wize man that knows when 
he's been kiken hiz ownkorns." 

A demonstrator wuz in las' 
week tryin' to sell the Boss 
somethin' to take the place of 
Artura — say his job wuz as ezy 
as dippin' up Ten Mile Pond 
with a teespoon. 

The demonstrator he sez his 
paper wuz jes' as good as Artura, 
an' cos' less money. 

The Boss sez if your paper 
wuz as good as Artura, you would 
say it wuz better, an' you would- 
ent have to sell it at a lower 
figger. 

The Boss sez buyin' the jes' 
as goods for less money is about 
as safe as bettin' on a buzzard to 
win a singin' match. 

I'm gettin' my new sute for 
the Convention— dollar down and 
50 cents a weke, got the vest 
paid for now, an' one leg of the 
trowsers. 

So long! see you at St. Paul. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



TH,E CONGRESS OF 
PHOTOGRAPHY- 
IS IT CLEAR TO YOU? 

Every one knows how success- 
ful the Congress has been up to 
this time. The bond of unity 
which it has brought about be- 
tween the state societies alone 
would make it a success. 

The hope and aim is that we 
will be able to gather the rest of 
the societies under this one fold, 
so that more efficient work may 
be done for the improvement of 
photography. 

We started out simply as an 
auxiliary, or ways and means com- 
mittee, to the National. That 
was a good start, but to-day a 
new work appears for the Con- 
gress. 

I am thoroughly won over to 
the idea that the division of the 
work for the photographers of 
America should be separated 
thusly: the educational, includ- 
ing lectures and entertainment 
features, to the National. Busi- 
ness and politics, to the state 
organizations. 

In other words, the school of 
photography, demonstrations, 
and all entertainments should be 
conducted in open convention. 
The Congress should decide on 
the politics, the place of meet- 
ing, the selection and election of 
officers and all the business to be 
transacted for the Association. 

The condition that now exists 
in the Congress makes it unfair 



for those states which are not 
members of the Congress. After 
careful consideration, therefore, 
and consultation with the officers 
of the various state societies (and, 
by the way, I have attended 
nearly every state convention that 
has met this year, so far), I be- 
lieve the best way to get a fair 
representation is to do away with 
the per capita tax. 

Let every state be represented 
by two photographers who will 
be considered members of the 
Congress. That is, let the Con- 
gress be the senate of the Amer- 
ican photographers. 

Where there are two state so- 
cieties, as is the case in Ohio and 
Michigan, let each society send 
one delegate. In this way we 
would get a fair representation, 
for it would cost nothing to be- 
come a member of the Congress, 
and a state would have no excuse 
for not joining. 

Each state, whether on the 
Atlantic or Pacific coast, farthest 
north or farthest south, would 
only have to select some one from 
their state attending the National, 
and he could be designated as 
their delegate. 

These men would come as the 
representatives from state pho- 
tographers, duly instructed no 
doubt, to thrash out questions of 
importance to the profession, and 
to work and vote for whatever is 
for the best interests of the Na- 
tional Association. 

To illustrate how much good 




»^ 



FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin H. Sykea 
Chicago, III. 





FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin 11. Sykes 
Chicago, III. 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



would come from such a plan: 
I have found three different states 
instructing their delegates to go to 
the Congress this year and work 
for a plan to draw a perpendicular 
line through the United States 
running north and south, divid- 
ing the east and the west, to insist 
that the National Association 
conventions must alternate each 
year on both sides of that line. 

When I suggested the forego- 
ing plan at the various state con- 
ventions I was surprised to note 
that the majority were heartily 
in favor of it. I firmly believe if 
you would put your organization 
on the state basis representation, 
all business to be handled in the 
Congress, leaving to the open 
convention, instructions and dem- 
onstrations of all art and science 
subjects, as well as entertain- 
ments, the results would be 
doubled even the first year. 
G. W. Harris, 

Pres. P. A. of A. 



nniMETOCALLAHALT 






We have passed over, with- 



out comment, many of the state- 
ments made by the manufactur- 
ers of Cyko paper just to see 
how far they would go in their 
game of "claim everything in 
sight." 

But it's time to call a halt. 

In their report of the Iowa 
Convention, page 13 of June 
" Portrai t, " they say : " Cyko won 
more first prizes than all the 



other printing papers put to- 
gether and five times as many 
as all the other developing 
papers." 

Facts are : 

There were eight first prizes. 
Of these there were on Carbon . 2 
On Eastman papers .... 3 
On all other papers 3 

Total number of prizes were 
fourteen : 

Of these there were on Carbon . 2 
On Eastman papers .... 8 
On all other papers 4 

Now IF, mind you we say 
"IF," all the prints classified 
under "All other papers" were 
Cyko, their statement still is, to 
put it as mildly and politely as 
we know how, "misleading." 

Following this they say: "In 
connection with the above re- 
sults we wish to extend congrat- 
ulations to the prize winners, 
namely : " Here they give the 
full list of winners, the inference 
being that these people all used 
Cyko for their prize pictures. 
Facts are that out of this list of 
thirteen (one man took two 
prizes) ten are known NOT to 
have used Cyko. 

And we can prove it. 



Artura Success is 
based on quality: 

Artura advertis- 
ing on facts. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin H. Sykes 
Chicago, III. 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



CHEMICAL LOGIC 
The sale of chemicals is no 
new departure with us. But it 
is, perhaps, only within a few 
years that we have entered strong- 
ly into the chemical field. There 
was more reason for this than the 
mere profit we might hope to 
make from selling chemicals. 

We have fully organized our 
chemical department because we 
want our customers for plates 
and paper to get the best possi- 
ble results from their materials. 
An experience extending over 
many years of photographic man- 
ufacturing had absolutely proved 
to us that an astonishingly large 
percentage of photographic fail- 
ures was due to the use of im- 
pure chemicals. Of course good 
chemicals other than ours were 
and are sold— but likewise there 
were poor chemicals. And more- 
over it seemed advisable, in order 
to make sure of proper balance 
in the formulae, to establish and 
maintain a certain standard— hold 
our chemicals to that standard 
and thereby insure our custom- 
ers against both inferior quality 
and imperfect balance. 

It is to this end that we test 
our chemicals — not merely chem- 
ically but photographically and 
then take more than ordinary 
care in so putting them up that 
they will not deteriorate. 

Such testing, and such care in 
putting up costs us a great deal 
of money, but we consider it 



money well spent because, even 
if it does lessen the net profit on 
the chemicals themselves, it helps 
to improved results on the plates 
and papers and that means more 
profit to our customers and hence 
more profit to us in the long run. 

Our tested chemical seal means 
much to us; is beginning to mean 
much to those who are using the 
goods. 

We protect that seal with pains- 
taking care, that in time it may 
protect our other products and 
our customers. When you see 
this seal you know that the goods 
are right. 




E 



NTRIES FOR THE 
NATIONAL 

You may enter one, two or 
three pictures in your exhibit at 
the National Convention, but not 
more than three. The pictures 
may be framed or unframed and 
should be packed in a box ad- 
dressed to Ben Larimer, The 
Armory, St. Paul, Minn., with 
your own address on the under- 
side of the lid so it may be re- 
versed and returned to you. Pick 
out one, two or three of your 
best negatives and make an ex- 
hibit at St. Paul. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Melvin H. Sykes 
Chicago, III. 



liGBfJ 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jlrst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 




VACATION DAYS 

Are happy days for the child- 
ren and play pictures are most 
natural pictures. 

Bring them in for a romp 
and let us show you what pleas- 
ing pictures we can make. 

THE 

PYRO STUDIO 



C. K. Co., Ltd. No. 167. Price. 50 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



Kansas City, Mo. . . July 11, 12, 13 

St. Louis, Mo July 18, 19, 20 

Vacation 

Buffalo, N. Y Aug. 22, 23, 24 

Pittsburg, Pa Aug. 29, 30, 31 

Columbus, O. . . . Sept. 5, 6, 7 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 

Your success depends 
upon the quality of 
the material you use. 

We supply your wants promptly 
with the best — 

Pure Chemicals, 

the best Papers and Plates, 

Everything for the Studio. 



C Covtplete line of Canadian 
Kodak Co,, Limited, products. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
suppHes, for we carry a com- 
plete Hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd. 

Montreal, Canada. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 

Superior Sepias 

on an Inexpensive Paper : 

AZO 

Better, richer, more uniform, 
sepia results than you ever had 
before on a development paper, 
at less cost, and with perfect 
simplicity. 

Write us for the new Azo-Hypo-Alum formula. 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto. Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

Quality Papers — 
Distinctive Papers-^ 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

Each has a richness in tone value 
that will please discriminating patrons, 
who are willing to pay for the best. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

All Dealers. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Eastman 

Permanent Crystal 

Pyro 



It stays 
where you 
put it — 
pure clean 
crystals — 
acidified 
and ready 
for use. 




No more 
stains from 
flying par- 
ticles of 
Pyro dust 
when you 
use Eastman 
Crystal Pyro. 



In Glass Bottles, 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 



Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 




Better Results — 
even temperature 
maintained during 
development, and 
the stuffy dark- 
room omitted — 



These are only a few of the advan- 
tages of 

The EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 



All Dealers. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



30 



I 



STUDIO LIGHT 




This seal is 
the stamp of approval of our 
chemical testing department; 
It means, tested chemically — 
tested photographically — right 
for our use — right for your 
use. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 



Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



31 



The Century 
Universal Studio Outfit 




THE PRICE 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 8 x 10 11 x 14 
Portrait Camera No. 2, with Century Universal Holder, Auto- 
matic Cabinet Attachment and one Curtain Holder (5 x 7, 
4^4 X 6H or ili X 6^2, size optional). Century Semi-Centennial 
Stand with adjustable rack to carry twelve plate holders, $82.50 $U5.50 

Century Universal Studio Outfit, complete, including Grand 
Portrait Camera, with Century Universal Holder, Automatic 
Attachment for 8 x 10 Holder, and one 8 x 10 Curtain Holder, 
Century Semi-Centennial Stand 123.75 



CENTURY CAMERA DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE SIMLA STYLE 

An up-to-date mount for 4x6 and 5x7 prints. Square or Oval. 

For Sepia or Black and White Print, either 

"tacked on" or mounted solid. 




The Simla has an engraved border of beautiful design, 
either oval or square prints may be used, mounted solid or 
"tacked on" in 4x6 or 5x7. Extra weight stock, linen 
finish, beveled edges. 

The Simla gives you the opportunity to push the larger 
print and get out of the cabinet rut. Be sure and see samples 
of this style. It will bring the money easiest. 

MANUFACTITRED AND DESIGNED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



Aristo Motto 



WE believe permanency is the 
Keystone of PliotographiG 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 



(t 




SKED PLATE 



By Rudolph Dilhrkoop 
Berlin, Germany 




TUiEOLl 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE • THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



AUGUST 1911 



No. 6 



ST. PAUL— THE CEN- 
TER OF NORTH 
AMERICA 

The recent National Conven- 
tion, held in St. Paul, was a 
success from every point of view. 
The exhibits of the manufactur- 
ers were unusually large— the 
number and quality of photog- 
raphers' exhibits were exception- 
ally good, the attendance was 
above the average and the loca- 
tion of the Convention Hall and 
its arrangement was most con- 
venient. 

The wide publicity given the 
Convention and its many special 
features, both educational and 
social, brought many new faces 
to St. Paul this year, and all 
who came were loud in their 
praise of the Executive Board 
which so successfully planned the 
Convention, and the Twin Cities 
and photographers of the North- 
west who so royally entertained it. 

The reception by the officers 
of the Association in the St. Paul 
Hotel, Monday evening, broke 



the ice for the following days of 
work and play, and there were 
no strangers to be found after 
the opening day. The various 
lectures were of absorbing inter- 
est, those in the evening being 
followed by informal dances, 
which were very pleasant affairs. 

The series of demonstrations 
by Rudolph Duhrkoop and his 
daughter followed the lines of 
Home Portraiture rather than 
regular Studio work. The sit- 
tings were made by the light of 
an ordinary window in the as- 
sembly hall, and the accessories 
were only those one would find 
in the average home. The light 
was handled by a few pieces of 
white cloth, used as reflector and 
screens, and the results obtained 
were most interesting and sug- 
gestive of the great possibilities 
along these lines. 

The demonstrations of posing, 
lighting and handling of draper- 
ies by Mr. Don Scott of the 
Eastman School of Photography, 
were of such interest that the 
Seed Demonstrating Room was 



m 



STUDIO LIGHT 



filled to overflowing at all times 
with those who were anxious to 
see the methods used by Mr. 
Scott. The drapery effects were 
beautiful and the negatives made 
on the new Seed 30 Plates were 
excellent examples of the quality 
of this new Seed product. The 
demonstrations of Etching Sepia 
Platinum, Artura and the New 
Artura-Method Sepia, as well 
as Azo Sepias, filled the Paper 
Demonstrating Room every day 
with those who were anxious to 
take home new ideas. 

In the general display on the 
main floor, one entire end of the 
hall was a beautiful vine covered 
pergola. On the wall, banked 
with hundreds of potted plants, 
was the exhibit of Eastman Etch- 
ing Sepia Platinum, Artura, Ar- 
tura Sepia and Aristo. The prints 
exhibited were from the studios 
of many prominent photograph- 
ers throughout the United States, 
and to these men we wish to ex- 
tend our thanks for the beautiful 
exami)les of their work which 
made this exhibit by far the most 
interesting one on the main floor. 
The many easy lounging chairs 
under the pergola were a haven 
of rest to many a tired visitor. 
The exhibit of Eastman Profes- 
sional Materials was highly at- 
tractive, there being on exhi- 
bition a complete line of all the 
Studio Cameras, Apparatus and 
Sundries, as well as many beau- 
tiful enlargements on Bromide 
and Artura Carbon Black. 



Of the business of the Conven- 
tion, probably the most interest- 
ing subject was the discussion of 
the plan of President Harris to 
divide the United States into an 
Eastern and Western section by 
a line running North and South, 
the object being to hold the 
National Convention East of the 
line one year, and West of the 
line the following year. The 
matter was presented to the 
Congress, was favorably passed 
upon, and adopted by the Asso- 
ciation. 

This line follows the Missis- 
sippi River north to the Ohio 
River, then on the Ohio River to 
the Indiana line and over the 
Indiana line to Lake Erie. The 
section East of this line has a 
photographic population of 6300 
and West of the line, 6X00. The 
number of large cities in the 
Eastern and Western sections are 
approximately the same. 

The election of officers for the 
coming year resulted as follows : 

President, Ben Larrimer, Marion, 
Indiana. 

1st Vice-President, Chas. F. 
Townsend, Des Moines, Iowa. 

2nd Vice-President, Will H. 
Towles, Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, L. A, Dozer, Bucyrus, 
Ohio. 

Secretary, Manly W. Tyree, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Retiring President Harris was 
presented with a beautiful silver 
loving cup by his many friends J 
in appreciation of his untiring ij 
efforts in behalf of the Associa- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



tion, and as a token of the esteem 
in which he is held by those who 
know of his genial good fellow- 
ship. 

The fight for the 1912 Con- 
vention was between Atlanta, 
Ga., and Philadelphia, Pa., the 
latter city winning by a vote of 
181 to 107. The success of the 
next Convention is assured, and 
from the many favorable com- 
ments on the next meeting place, 
the attendance will be far greater 
than ever before in the history 
of the Association. 

Among the amusement feat- 
ures which were interspersed 
with the more serious work of 
the Convention, were several 
trips to the many beautiful parks 
and lakes of the Twin Cities in 
special cars chartered for the oc- 
casions. Refreshments were 
served and the amusement feat- 
ures were free to the members of 
the Association, who demon- 
strated the fact that they could 
play as hard as they could work. 
Every one went away from the 
Saintly City with only words of 
praise for the hospitality received 
and regret that so successful a 
convention must come to a close 
so soon. 



rpWO LETTERS 

^ The letter of June 6,1911, 
which we reproduce on the back 
cover of Studio Light, is a sin- 
cere acknowledgment of Seed 
Plate quality. Mr. Duhrkoop 
has used Seed Plates since his 
first visit to the United States 
during the St. Louis World's 
fair. 

The following letter of July 
28, 1911, is a further acknowl- 
edgment of the writer's convic- 
tion after his second visit to the 
United States as the principal 
attraction of the National Con- 
vention at St. Paul : 

July 28, 1911. 

I have seen the many wonder- 
ful results on the different exhi- 
bitions produced from the Seed 
Plates since I have been around 
the Convention Hall, have talked 
with the great photographers 
that speak so well of Seed Plates, 
and am convinced that I have 
made no mistake in choosing 
them for my work, and shall be 
glad to recommend them alto- 
gether for the future with pleas- 
ure. 

(Signed) 



Chemicals of certain strength, 

quality and dependability in original pack- 
ages bearing this seal, insure your results 




STUDIO LIGHT 



i^NLY 60 DAYS 

^-^ That is not very long, but 
it is ample time if you get busy 
at once and make an effort to 
capture a part of the $2500.00 
prize money of the Kodak Adver- 
tising Contest. 

Begin by sending for the il- 
lustrated Souvenir Portfolio of 
the 1910 Contest and full infor- 
mation in regard to the I9II 
Contest. The Portfolio and in- 
formation is free for the asking, 
and the illustrations will give you 
an idea of the pictures that make 
good. Look them over care- 
fully and go about the illustra- 
tion of your own idea with one 
object in view; to make your 
picture tell a story as simply as 
possible. 

The judges are among the best 
advertising men in the country 
and they are quick to see whether 
a picture really does tell a story 
or not. If not, no matter how 
good it may be as a picture, it 
has little value for advertising 
purposes. 

You need not go to any ex- 
pense in arranging details, for 
too much in the way of acces- 
sories almost invariably detracts 
from the picture. Oet your idea, 
plan the details and make your 
negative at once so you may 
have time to improve upon the 
idea if you are not satisfied with 
your first efforts. 

The Contest closes September 
20th, and you can have some of 



that prize money as well as the 
other fellow. You may have a 
picture in mind you feel will be 
better than those in the I91O 
Portfolio. If so, it will be worth 
your while to get your camera to 
working and make your entry 
before it is too late. 

XTO SYSTEM 

•^ ^ The following conversation 
between two Pullman porters was 
overheard in a western railway 
station : 

"Hello, George!" 

"Hello, Henry!" 

"Where youall workin' now, 
George ? " 

"I'm workin' on the G. & S. 
Q. System. Where you workin', 
Henry?" 

"I'm workin' on the D. R. 
&S." 

" Ah had no idea you was work- 
in' on the D. R. & S. System." 

"No, not the 1). R. & S. Sys- 
tem, George; just the D. R. & 
S. They ain't got no system." 

System is as noticeable to the 
patrons of your studio as to the 
patrons of a railroad or other 
large business corporation. If 
the system is right, your cus- 
tomer is better satisfied because 
there is the element of certainty 
and precision in your business 
transactions from the making of 
the engagement and sitting, to 
the time of delivery of proofs 
and finished pictures. 




SEED PLATE 



By Rudolph Dilhrkoop 
Berlin, Germai/y 




8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



^ 



You secure the full efficiency 
of your help because there is no 
lost motion in a good system, 
properly enforced. The Eastman 
Studio Register System is the 
most practical, convenient and 
efficient method for handling the 
work of your office because it 
keeps a detailed account of your 
engagements, sittings, delivery 
of proofs, orders, delivery of 
finished work and is your cash 
book, ledger and record of filed 
negatives. 

This system embodies the prac- 
tical ideas of men of experience 
in photographic work and is 
adapted to the large or small 
studio alike. With this system 
installed and properly handled, 
your attention can be devoted 
to the systematizing of the other 
departments of the studio. Stop 
up the many leaks that make a 
drain on the cash drawer and 
keep you in a continual bad 
humor. 

There is the matter of chem- 
icals, plates, paper and other 
materials that enter into the 
make-up of the finished picture. 
Always use the best and par- 
ticularly avoid anything that can- 
not stand on its own feet and 
must be represented as being 
"just as good" in order to be 
sold. The best is the cheapest 
because it stops the greatest 
leak of all, — waste. 

Let the Tested Chemical Seal 
be one of the factors of your sys- 
tem. Be sure of all your chemi- 



cal solutions being correct by 
first being sure of your chemicals. 
We remove the element of un- 
certainty by testing these chemi- 
cals for you. 

If the Eastman Plate Tank is 
not a part of your equipment, 
there is lost motion in the wheels 
of your system. The tank saves 
time, saves trouble, and gives 
better results, which is most im- 
portant of all. Time, however, 
is a factor in any system, and to 
be able to have your plates in 
the drying racks every evening 
means the delivery of proofs on 
schedule time and satisfied, rather 
than disgruntled customers. 
Every time you turn a customer 
away with an excuse for work 
not being ready you are injuring 
your business. Every time you 
make up a developer that con- 
tains impure chemicals and ne- 
cessitates throwing out prints 
that are not up to standard you 
are losing time, losing money, 
and allowing sand to get into the 
cogs of your business machinery. 
System will help to make the 
machinery run smoothly. 



INSTALL THE 

Eastman Studio 

Register System 

In your Studio. A complete 
and efficient system of keep- 
ing all Studio accounts. 



STUDIO LIGHT 




rpHE EASTMAN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 

^ The above cartoon from the Denver Post and its accompany- 
ing reading notice ( which was not a paid advertisement ) are ex- 
amples of the general interest shown in the sessions of the Eastman 
School throughout the country, and its consequent recognition by 
the press. 

The School has been referred to as a " Concentrated Education, " 
and so it is, for it brings to the very doors of the photographer a 
three days course of instruction that it would be impossible for him 
to acquire in any other way, in the same length of time and without 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



great expense. The School as an educational project is unique, and 
that the photographers are showing their appreciation of its many 
advantages is evidenced by the attendance doubling that of previous 
years. The instructors are the most competent men in their partic- 
ular line of v^^ork and they are continually adding to their store of 
knowledge by coming into contact with the conditions which exist 
in the various parts of the country as they travel from coast to coast. 
Each year the School has added features which keep it fresh and 
new and the man who sees it once is equally as anxious to see it a 
second time and finds new things of interest and of use to him in 
his work. When the dealer sends you an invitation to visit the 
School while it is in your locality, make up your mind to attend all 
of the three days sessions and get all of the benefit. 



HOME AGAIN 
BY THE OFFICE BOY 

Las' month me an' the 
Boss an' a fat feller an' a skinny 
feller goes automobile ridin' . 

My bes' girl's brother is a 
chiffonier in a garage an' he took 
me ridin' a couple of weeks be- 
fore over some hills. 

I wuz tellin' the Boss about 
them hills an' he sez Son you 
don' know nothin' about hills. 
I'll take you over some rele ones, 
an' that wuz how we happened 
to go. 

The Boss put the fat feller on 
the front sete with him, an' me 
an' the skinny feller in the sete 
behind. 

We went down one hill that 
wuz jus' like slidin' down the 
Soldiers monument up in the 
publick square. 

As we wuz goin' down the fat 
feller wuz makin' funny noises 
an' the Boss sez what's that 



you're singin'? an' the fat feller 
sez I aint singin', I'm prayin'. 

Twict when we struck a bump 
I went up in the air an' lit strad- 
dle of the fat feller's neck, and 
he never noticed it he wuz so 
bizzy hangin' on. 

The Boss says it takes a good 
man to hang on. 

Talkin' about high ones, when 
we wuz to Rochester we went 
down to the place where the 
Eastman Company makes plates 
an' papers, an' they had two ole 
whoppers of smoke stacks — the 
nex' to the highes' ones in the 
whole country, an' they give us 
a book tellin' about it. 

The other day I wuz reedin' 
a article by the folks that makes 
some of the "jus' as good" stuff, 
an' they say their stack is the 
highes' in their town. 

The Boss says it don't take 
mutch to have a high stack in a 
j)enny ante game. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



These same folks allso sez that 
their plant has akkomodations 
for two thousan' employees. 

Pa's hed has akkomodations 
for two thousan' hairs but he 
aint got 'em. 

I got my sute to ware to the 
Convention pade for the nite be- 
fore we left. When I tride it 
on one leg wuz two inches longer 
than the other. 

The tailer sed he mus' have 
got the last installment payments 
mixed, an' I got a seventy-five 
cent installment leg instead of a 
fifty center. 

When we gets to Saint Paul 
the Boss he sez he's goin' to 
stop at the St. Paul Hotel, an' 
that I'd better stop at the Ryan, 
'cause he wuz afrade it would 
bee too excitin' for me at the 
other one. I foun' out the reezon 
the secon' nite — but say, we had 
rele fine wether the hole weak. 

Before the end of the firs' day 
I wisht I had two pare of feet, 
as there wuz so many things to 
see an' do. 

The Eastman folks had enuff 
pitchers an' things to make a 
convention all by themselves. 
They had all there pitchers under 
a grate big arber-like thing, all 
covered with vines, a pergooza- 
lum, I think a feller called it, it 
reached clere across one end of 
the big hall and they wuz all- 
ways a lot of people lookin' at 
'em, an' sayin' "Artura fer 
mine." 

They had a big section full of 



swell pitchers on E. S. Platinum, 
made by a man they called 
"Goldie." I ast a feller why 
they called him Goldie an' he 
says bekaus he allways puts his 
pitchers in gold frames — he wuz 
kiddin' me tho' bekaus I foun' 
out the man's name was Golden- 
sky, an' that's too long when 
you're in a hurry. 

Us fellers diden' scarcely have 
time to ete, there wuz meetin's 
an' lectures an' demonstrations 
all the time, an' jus' when you 
thot you had a minute to rest up 
a bit, the Twin City fellers fixed 
up a trolly ride or somethin' 
like that. 

They made Ben Larrim.er Pres- 
ident — bettcha the wimmen all 
voted for him— he's a slick looker 
an' they give Harris a whoppin' 
ole silver cup to mix his Artura 
developer in. 

Gee! I'm glad I'm to home 
again, even if I have got to un- 
pack all that new stuff the Boss 
bot. 

Nex' yere we're going to Phil- 
adelphy — that's the place where 
they invented the American flag 
an' 'lectricity. 



ARTURA 

will help your business because it 

GIVES YOU 

the foundation of all success — 

QUALITY 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



T^XTRA DOLLARS 

■*— ^ The field for outdoor work 
is unlimited and in most instances 
is neglected by the local pho- 
tographer and left for the itiner- 
ant man who drops in at irregu- 
lar intervals, stays a week or 
ten days and takes a hundred or 
so dollars out of your town. This 
is not true of every town to be 
sure, for there are some that the 
itinerant photographer gives a 
wide berth. 

These are the towns where 
the local studios are awake to 
every opportunity and get this 
business themselves. The travel- 
ing photographer, as a rule, takes 
a chance and he must be a good 
judge of human nature to know 
when to take this chance. The 
local photographer should be in a 
better position to judge pros- 
pective customers for this kind 
of work and, as the Home Por- 
trait idea is gradually growing, 
the field for all classes of out- 
door work is enlarging and the 
wise man is taking advantage of 
this increased demand for pic- 
tures. 

The real up-to-date studio of 
to-day, in towns of reasonable 
size, includes, in many instances, 
such modern equipment as the 
Graflex and Cirkut cameras, or 
at least a focal plane shutter 
which is readily attached to the 
view camera. In many instances, 
however, the studio cannot even 
boast of a first-class view camera 



and the dollars which should go 
into the local man's pocket, go 
to the outsider. 

There is a way to prevent this 
and at the same time help your 
regular portrait business. Tlie 
first step is to invest in a first- 
class view camera. The second 
is to go after the outdoor work 
yourself. Make it your business 
to know what is going on outside 
your studio as well as inside and 
don't grumble when you are 
asked to make a group, a view 
or a home portrait. Do it will- 
ingly and do it well and you may 
soon have enough outside work 
to at least pay the running ex- 
penses of the studio. Anything 
of unusual interest is worth pho- 
tographing for the advertisement 
it gives you. 

Secure a place where you can 
exhibit interesting pictures other 
than your portrait work and show 
new pictures once or twice each 
week. The writer knows of one 
photographer whose studio he 
had occasion to pass every day 
for a couple of years and there 
was one glass case that contained 
a new picture or enlargement 
every Saturday, and many times 
was changed in the middle of 
the week. 

People went out of their way 
to see that show case because it 
always contained something in- 
teresting and new. Many of the 
pictures were salable and many 
were not, but the disi)lay created 
a desire for good pictures and 




SEED PLATE 



By Rudolph Diihrkoop 
Berlin, Germany 




14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



linked his name to all things 
photographic in that town. It 
is safe to say that when pictures 
were wanted, he was most always 
the man thought of and sent for. 
It was an inexpensive and effect- 
ive way of advertising and you 
can do the same thing. 

You will enjoy the little out- 
door trips, you will get better 
acquainted with your townspeople 
and you will get the extra dollars 
for your work. 

Select a camera that is thor- 
oughly practical and convenient 
to use. The Empire State No. 2 
just fills the want. It has feat- 
ures designed to meet every con- 
dition wliich may arise, so that 
the most particular photographer 
can wish for no convenience or 
adjustment which it does not 
possess. And these features are 
no mere talking points, but care- 
fully thought out and distinctive 
advantages which the photog- 
rapher who has considerable use 
for a view camera will be quick 
to appreciate. 

The sliding tripod block may 
be rigidly clamped at any point 
of the front extension and allows 
the center of weight of the cam- 
era to rest directly above the 
tripod when a lens of short focus 
is being used. 

The automatic bellows support 
keeps the bellows in proper shape 
without the use of supporting 
hooks or rings and folds auto- 
matically when the camera is 
closed. 



A device in the back of the 
camera excludes any light that 
might leak into the holder from 
unevenly inserting the slide. No 
need to throw the focusing cloth 
over the camera in withdrawing 
the slide. 

The front and back extensions 
are securely locked by pushing 
in a key and giving it a quarter 
turn. No turning of long thread- 
ed screws. Back extension is 
further strengthened by two 
clamp catches which make it 
perfectly rigid and the front ex- 
tension is fitted with a strong 
piano hinge. 

The lens board is very large 
and will accommodate the heav- 
iest lenses, making it possible to 
use this camera for almost any 
kind of work. The operating is 
simplified by having all oper- 
ating nuts on the right hand 
side and locking nuts on the left. 
Every movement of setting up 
the Empire State No. 2 is quick 
and simple. You can have your 
camera ready for an exposure 
while the other fellow is tuning 
uj) his antiquated view box. 



G 



EORGE GARDNER 
ROCKWOOD 

Mr. George Gardner Rock- 
wood, one of the pioneers of 
American photography, died sud- 
denly at his home in Lakeville, 
Conn., Monday, July 10th. 

Mr. Rockwood, who was sev- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



enty-nine years old, was born in 
Troy, N.Y., and opened a studio, 
in New York City at Thirteenth 
and Broadway, in the old Roose- 
velt building, in the early fifties. 

He photographed many celeb- 
rities in the old studio and is 
credited with having personally 
made 250,000 sittings in the 
course of his New York career. 

Many of these sittings were of 
children and Mr. Rockwood's 
love for the youngsters made 
him very popular with them. 

The profession will mourn the 
death of this genial and well 
known figure in photographic 
circles. 



SURELOOK ROAMS, 
DEMONSTRATOR 

I looked over the hotel regis- 
ter as usual to see if I could find 
anyone I knew and was mighty 
glad to see Roams' name well 
toward the bottom of the page. 
The clerk said he had bought a 
magazine and gone to his room 
and as it had been one of those 
sultry rainy days when it is hard 
to work and the storm had 
broken again just at dusk, I felt 
sure my company would be ac- 
ceptable, so I went up. 

There was a hearty "come in" 
in answer to my knock and I 
found the usual cordial welcome 
and Roams with his pipe and 
magazine, evidently enjoyinghim- 
self. 



"I am awfully glad to see you, 
Hotson. I was just thinking 
what an enormous amount of 
electricity is running around loose 
to-night and what a fine thing it 
would be if it could be bottled 
up and used about Christmas 
time to run Aristo Lamps, or 
better still, used right now on a 
few extra ice machines. And 
that reminds me of a joke on 
myself I must tell you about. 
So many troubles just now are 
traced to lack of care in the tem- 
perature of solutions that I have 
formed the habit of carrying my 
stirring rod thermometer in my 
pocket and taking the tempera- 
ture of all solutions I use. 

"Well, I was looking over my 
mail at lunch to-day and when 
the waiter brought me my iced 
tea, without thinking, I dropped 
the thermometer into it and 
when I looked up a moment 
later, was on the point of telling 
him the developer was too badly 
discolored to be very fresh, but I 
awoke to the fact that I was at 
lunch and not in a studio." 

As Roams seemed in a talk- 
ative mood, I thought I would 
get some good information from 
him, for the Stock House man 
has a chance to help the photog- 
rapher out of trouble once in a 
while himself. I asked him what 
the summer troubles of the pho- 
tographer really were. 

"Well, Hotson," he replied, 
"I have just been reading that 
interesting little story, 'The Re- 




SEED PLATE 



By Rudolph Dithrkoop 
Berlin, Germany 







SEED PLATE 



By Rudolph Dilhrkoop 
Berlin, Gerttiany 




STUDIO LIGHT 



turn of Peter Grim,' and it has 
made me wonder what some old 
wet plate and albumen photog- 
raphers would think of our mod- 
ern day methods if they could 
come back to earth, as Peter did, 
and see what we have grown up 
with in the progress of things pho- 
tographic and look upon as mat- 
ter of fact. 

"Why, Hotson, you could give 
one of those old boys a manual 
and the paper, negatives, and 
chemicals and the chances are 
two to one he would do better 
than many of us, for he would 
not be self-confident. We feel 
too sure of ourselves. We are 
living in a day and age when we 
think things ought to work auto- 
matically, but those boys of the 
old school had to work out their 
own salvation and find the cause 
of their own troubles, for there 
were no demonstrators in those 
days to help them out and they 
were the manufacturers them- 
selves. 

"Just now, the troubles are 
mostly with fixing baths being 
too warm or overworked and the 
prints partially toning during the 
time they are fixing. You see 
when the bath gets too warm or 
too old, sulphurization begins and 
the prints start to tone se])ia or 
yellow in spots. The sulphite 
of soda prevents this if the bath 
is fresh and the sulphite pure but 
the temperature should never be 
over 70°. 

"Then some sulphite contains 



sulphate and a drop of sulphate 
will make the bath milky in short 
order. It is also a fact that good 
sulphite will deteriorate in solu- 
tion after a time and the bath 
become milky. This is a good 
danger signal, but a fixing bath 
should never be used as long as 
possible before a new one is 
made. Always be sure the 
bath has not been overworked 
and is not too warm and the great- 
est danger of poor prints in warm 
weather is overcome. Our ex- 
perience has taught us that the 
usual 64 oz. fixing bath should 
not be used for more than two 
gross cabinet prints. 

"Only last week on one of 
those warm days, I found a man 
who was troubled with prints 
turning yellow while drying, and 
what do you suppose was the 
cause of it ? 

"That was an easy one. Hot- 
son; the fixing bath was par- 
tially worn out and some sulphur 
had been released. The prints 
had not been thoroughly washed. 
They were black when they came 
out of the wash water, but as 
they contained some hypo and 
became warm when they were 
laid out in the air naturally, 
sulphurization, begun in fixing, 
continued in the wet prints and 
they toned in spots while they 
were drying. I proved my the- 
ory by the permanganate test. 
It is the best way to be cer- 
tain the hypo is all out of a print 
and the test never fails. " 




SEED I'LATE 



By Rudolph Dithrkoop 
Berlin, Germany 




20 STUDIO LIGHT 



B 



ULLETIN: THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 

Professional Photography for loii 



BufFalo, N. Y • • • Aug. 22, 23, 24 

Pittsburg, Pa • • • Aug. 29, 30, 31 

Columbus, O. . . Sept. 5, 6, 7 

Indianapolis, Lid Sept. 12, 13, 14 

Grand Rapids, Mich Sept. 19, 20, 21 

Milwaukee, Wis Sept. 26, 27, 28 

Des Moines, la Oct. 3, 4, 5 

•I ^i 4» 




SEED PLATE 



By Rudolph Diihrkoop 
Berlin, Gerviany 






22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON" 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirsly as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




fTlHE composition, lighting 
and posing of each pic- 
ture is given the individual 
attention necessary to make it 
a study of your most attract- 
ive personality. 

That is why our 
portraits please. 



THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



No. 168. Price, 40 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 

Less than two months 
now in which to get 
ready to land part of the 

$2500.22 CASH 

offered for pictures in 
the Kodak Advertising 
Contest. 



The First Step 

Send for portfolio of the last 
contest. It's free on request. 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 

Your success depends 
upon the quality of 
the material you use. 

We supply your wants promptly 
with the best — 

Pure Chemicals, 

the best Papers and Plates, 

Everything for the Studio. 



C Coviplete line of Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 



Empire State No. 2 




For all around out-door work requiring^ either long-focus, 
wide angle or portrait lenses, the Empire State No. 2 will be 
found to have every attachment and convenience necessary to 
meet the most trying conditions. 

Not mere talking points but features which are the results 
of inquiries and suggestions received from men who have 
encountered every imaginable difficulty in their years of 
experience with view cameras. 

Among other advantages are the sliding tripod block, 
automatic bellows support, supplementary light trap and 
exceptionally large front board. 

PRICE 

5x7, $23.00; 61^2 x 8l^2. $25.00; 8 x 10, $28.00 
jit all dealers' : : : Catalogue on request 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 

A Simple Process 

on an Inexpensive Paper. 

Azo Sepias 

The results are certain, the 
tones richer, and the prints 
more uniform than you have 
had before. 

Write us for the Azo-Hypo-Alum formula. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

To ask more for your work 
you must give more in quality. 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 



Each has that distinctive quahty cus- 
tomers appreciate. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

All Dealers. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Eastman Permanent 
Crystal Pyro 

There is no waste — it stays 
where you put it, pure clean 
crystals, acidified and ready 
for use. 

It bears the Tested Chemical Seal, 




ELON 

Combined with hydrochi- 
non, Elon is a perfect de- 
veloper for paper and plates. 

// bears the Tested Chemical Seal, 
Canadian Kodak Co., I^imited 

Toronto, Canada 
All Dealers. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



KEEP 
COOL 

and secure better re- 
sults by developing 
in the plate tank. 

It would be 

worth while if it 

only eliminated 

the dark-room, but it does more — it 

gives better results. 

The EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

,„ ^ , Toronto, Canada. 

All Dealers. 




so 



STUDIO LIGHT 




We must be 
certain of oHr chemicals— 
therefore we test ^hem. You 
can also be certain oi your 
chemicals— because weXtest 
them. 

This seal tells. 



Canadian Kodak Company, Limited 
Toronto, Canada 

AH DeaUn. 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supphes, for we carry a com- 
plete Hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co. , Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



< 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE SIMLA STYLE 

An up-to-date mount for 4x6 and 5x7 prints, Square or Oval. 

For Sepia or Black and White Print, either 

"tacked on" or mounted solid. 




The Simla has an engraved border of beautiful design, 
either oval or square prints may be used, mounted solid or 
"tacked on" in 4x6 or 5x7. Extra weight stock, linen 
finish, beveled edges. 

The Simla gives you the opportunity to push the larger 
print and get out of the cabinet rut. Be sure and see samples 
of this style. It will bring the money easiest. 

MANUFACTURED AND DESIONED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



OUR POLICY 
Our business was established on a quality basis. 

It has grown because we act on the belief that we 
can maintain our position in the trade just so long as 
we make better goods than our competitors — and no 
longer. 

Our customers receive the benefit of the most ad- 
vanced photographic thought of Europe, America and 
Australia. These Kodak factories are in constant 
touch with each other. Each has the benefit of the 
work and the discoveries of the other. The very 
breadth of our business enables us to give to each de- 
partment absolutely the best that the world affords in 
technical skill and in producing facilities. 

Our theory is that we can best serve ourselves by 
supplying our customers the best goods. Our acts 
have made this Theory a Policy, for we have not 
merely the desire to make the best goods but the 
means of converting that desire into a Reality. 

In thirty years in the photographic business Kodak 
has seen several revolutionary changes. Doubtless 
there will be many more. Whatever they may be 
our Policy shall be to furnish (without following every 
mere will-o'-the wisp) the very best of those goods 
which painstaking testing shall prove to be of benefit 
to our customers in the Simplification of Photographic 
Processes and the Advancement of the Art. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




FROM AN ETCHING SEl'IA I'LATINUM PRINT 



By Elian Goldensky 
Philadelphia, Pa. 





m© UOET 



INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



SEPTEMBER 191 1 



No. 7 



r>UILD RIGHT 

■^~^ Fortune is sometimes won 
by chance, but success is achieved 
by hard work, close apphcation 
to business, courtesy to custom- 
ers and a standard of quality 
maintained and properly adver- 
tised. Lay a foundation of qual- 
ity and build upon a certainty, 
using only the materials that are 
dependable and which may be 
relied upon at all times. 

Uncertainty should, as far as 
possible, be eliminated. It weak- 
ens the structure one has taken 
infinite pains to build. It is 
easier to tear down than to build 
up, hence the necessity for build- 
ing right. 

Artura has stood the test by 
helping to make the permanent 
structure of many a photogra- 
pher's success. 

Artura is the best foundation 
because its success is built on 
quality. An important part of 
this quality is its uniformity. Ar- 
tura runs the same, every gross 
alike, every day in the year. 
The results you secure to-day 



may, with certainty, be produced 
to-morrow, next week, or next 
year. 

Artura also has extreme lati- 
tude ; it allows for the maximum 
of over or under-exposure. Prove 
this statement to your own satis- 
faction by making a test. You 
will be convinced that the great 
latitude of Artura makes it the 
cheapest paper for your own use 
because there is the minimum of 
loss from incorrect exposure. 

Add to these qualities the 
richness of tone, transparency of 
shadows and wonderful scale of 
gradation and you have the secret 
of Artura Success — Your Success 
if you choose to make it so. 



QQ DAYS LEFT 
^^^ Not very much time, to 
be sure, but the amount of prize 
money to be distributed in the 
Kodak Advertising Contest is in- 
centive enough for you to devote 
a part of the remaining month 
to this work. 

$500.00 is a good price to pay 



4 



STUDIO LIGHT 



for a single picture 5 x 7 or 
larger, but some photographer 
will receive this amount and the 
money will not go to a previous 
prize winner. You will not com- 
pete with anyone who has pre- 
viously won a prize in this Con- 
test. 

This means you have a better 
chance than ever, for a class has 
been made for former prize win- 
ners only. This has been done 
so that you may not have to 
enter your pictures against those 
of photographers who have had 
more experience in this class of 
work. It is to encourage you — 
to draw out more talent than 
ever before and to make the 
chances more even than would 
be the case if the class were free 
for all. 

Suppose you don't win the 
first prize — there are other prizes, 
and besides the prizes, we pur- 
chase many of the pictures that 
are less successful. In last year' s 
contest ten prizes were awarded. 
In addition to these ten prize 
pictures we purchased twenty- 
three of the less successful pic- 
tures for future use in our adver- 
tising. So in reality our prize 
money is even bigger than we 
advertise it to be. 

You undoubtedly have an idea 
for a good advertisement. Illus- 
trate the idea and enter it at 
once in the contest. It will help 
you to become proficient in the 
making of pictures of value to 
advertising concerns. They are 



always willing to pay a good 
price for the picture which tells 
a story or has a selling argument. 
Send at once for the illustrated 
Souvenir Portfolio of the 1910 
Contest and full information re- 
garding the 1911 Contest. 



THAT IOWA CONTRO- 
VERSY 

In the July Studio Light we 
made the claim that eight of 
the prizes awarded at the Iowa 
convention were on Eastman 
papers , and that all other papers 
(including carbon) took the re- 
mainder. At that time we put 
no loud pedal on the matter of 
first prizes, but now call attention 
to the fact that the first prize in 
the Grand Portrait Class, the 
most sought after prize at every 
convention, was awarded to Mr. 
Melvin H. Sykes, of Chicago, 
the print being on Eastman Etch- 
ing Sepia Platinum. 

The first prize, Class B, went 
to Mr. J. A. Clay, Cedar Falls, 
Iowa, on an Angelo print, and 
the first prize in Class D to Mrs. 
A. D. Presley, Woodbine, Iowa, 
on an Artura print. Two of the 
remaining first prizes were car- 
bon prints. 

In connection with the award 
made to Mr. J. A. Clay we wish 
to state that the Ansco company 
evidently had an error in their 
report, they having published 
that Mr. Dyall won this prize on 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Cyko. Our report said Mr. Clay 
had won on Angelo. Abel's 
Photo Weekly also said Mr. Clay 
had won, and to verify the mat- 
ter before writing this article we 
telegraphed Mr. Clay as follows: 

"Did your Sioux City exhibit 
on Angelo win first or second? 
Please wire our expense." To 
which he replied : 

" Took first prize on Angelo 
Sepia Platinum." 

[Signed] J. A. Clay. 

Other prize winners on East- 
man papers at the Iowa Conven- 
tion were: J. W. Mc Nees, Ar- 
tura; W. H. Dinsmore, Artura; 
J. C. Scoles, Angelo; A. M. 
Noland, Artura; Anton Goeser, 
Artura. 

After all the shouting to the 
contrary, we can prove that, as 
per our statement in July Studio 
Light, three first prizes and a 
total of eight prizes went to 
prints on Eastman papers. Two 
prizes went to carbon prints. As 
to who won the rest we are not 
sure. 

We said in connection with our 
statement: "And we can prove 
it." 

We have now given the names. 
We have the telegrams and letters 
to back this all up. 



Artura, the Real Success — 
because its success is 
based on superiority. 



SIDE LIGHTS 
BY THE OFFICE BOY 

Me an' the Boss wuz openin' 
up some of the stuff we bot when 
we wuz to the Convention, an^ I 
asks him why wuz he always 
buyin' new stuff like backgrounds 
when the ole ones wuzent wore 
out an' he says : You gotta keep 
up to date an^ about three laps 
ahed, an' that jus' puttin' youre 
money away an' savin" it don* 
earn you nothin'. I tole him my 
ma wuz savin' my money for me 
an' that she kep' it in a ole 
stockin'. The Boss says a per- 
fectly good stockin' may make a 
mighty poor bank. 

The Boss says the only rele 
willin" worker, on the job twenty- 
fore hours a day, seven days a 
weke is money, an' that if we 
have any of it lay in' aroun' idle, 
an' not puttin' it to work either 
in our business, or in the savin's 
bank, we're over lookin' the bes' 
trick in the deck. 

I'm goin' to take that ole 
stockin' an' push it across to the 
Receevin' Teller to-morrer, an' 
get it workin' an' then maybe I 
can buy the Boss' branch studio 
nex" year. 

Me an' the reception room 
girl's sister wuz to a ice cream 
soshable the other evenin', an' 
I spent atey cents. 

I asks the Boss the nex' day 
had I ot to have spent all that 
money, an' he says sure, you 
can't afford to be no tite wad, 
an' that that wuz a legitimate 



STUDIO LIGHT 



(gee! that's some word) expens 
to be charged against good will 
an' advertisin'. 

The Boss says that you can do 
two kinds of advertisin'. That 
you are — an' that you aint. 

The are kind tells folks that 
youre in bizness, and got jus' 
what they want, an' that youre 
a good feller. 

The aint kind tells folks youre 
in bizness, an' lets it go at that, 
an' it's mitey seldom that folks 
is goin' to spend their money or 
time tryin' to find out what youre 
advertisin' ought to tell 'em. 

The Boss says that rele adver- 
tisin' pays, an' that if you fele 
that you don't know good adver- 
tisin' when you see it, pay some 
rele money to a feller that does, 
an' let him do it for you. 

The Boss says good advertisin' 
is jus' as good a tonick for the 
man that owns the bizness as it 
is for the bizness, because the 
owner has got to live up to his 
advertisin'. 

That if your advertisin' says 
you make the bes' pitchers in 
town, you gotta make 'em — if 
it says your studio is artistic an* 
refined you gotta keep it that 
way — if it says youre up to date 
in your methods you gotta fire 
out them old backgroun's with 
holes in the floor cloth, an' them 
old rickety chares, an' wobbly 
camera stand, an' put in the 
things your advertisin' says you 
have. I guess that's the reezon 
the Boss made me take the green 



laces out of my tan shoes, — I 
wuz too loud for my surroundin's, 
— diden' harmonize, I think he 
said. 

The Boss says good advertisin' 
will make good bizness, but your 
bizness has gotta live up to your 
advertisin' . 

ASSOCIATED PHOTOG- 
RAPHERS OF WEST 
VIRGINIA — FIRST 
ANNUAL MEETING 

The Associated Photographers 
of West Virginia will hold their 
first annual meeting at Grafton, 
W. Va., October 10th and 11th. 
The officers of the Association 
invite and urge the photogra- 
phers of West Virginia and ad- 
joining states to meet with them 
and promise those who attend, a 
programme filled with interest. 
Every hour of the two days will 
be taken up with instructive dem- 
onstrations and talks that will be 
of interest and a benefit to the 
photographer in his every day 
work. 

The exhibit of pictures gath- 
ered from the leading photogra- 
phers of the state as well as 
exhibits from many other states 
and several from Europe, will 
make this the largest and finest 
exhibit of pictures ever shown 
in West Virginia. This feature 
alone will well repay you for the 
trip. 

Mr. Dudley Hoyt of New York 
will demonstrate, under the sky- 




FROM AN ETCHING BLACK PLATINUM PRINT 



By Elias Goldensky 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



light, the methods he uses in 
making the beautiful pictures of 
women which have made him 
famous in this country and abroad . 
Mr. Harris and Mr. Towles of 
Washington, D. C, Mr. Fell 
of the Eastman Kodak Co., and 
many others will also make inter- 
esting talks and demonstrations 
and there will be a competent 
artist to make an impartial criti- 
cism of the pictures on exhi- 
bition from an artistic standpoint. 
Our space is too limited to tell 
of all the good things promised, 
but the officers of the Associa- 
tion will gladly give you ad- 
ditional information. 



N 



EW ENGLAND CON- 
VENTION 

The change of plans for the 
New England Convention which 
gives the association the Crystal 
Palace on Steeplechase Island for 
an art building makes it possible 
to extend to the photographers 
of the United States an invita- 
tion to put their work on view 
side by side with the work of 
hundreds of other photographers 
all over the country. 

In former years there has 
always been the fear that too 
many pictures would be sent by 
individual photographers or that 
the space at the disposal of the 
Association was too small and in 
consequence restrictions were 
made which frequently prevent- 
ed members from displaying a full 



and comprehensive collection of 
photographs. This year the con- 
vention extends to all of its 
members and to photographers 
generally an invitation to present 
a display which will fully repre- 
sent their best endeavors. 

Every picture sent to the con- 
vention will be hung if the man 
who sends it says that the col- 
lection represents the best photo- 
graphic work he can do. All 
other restrictions have been with- 
drawn and it remains for the 
photographers of New England 
and the adjacent territory to co- 
operate with the officers in mak- 
ing a display of photographs 
which has never been equalled 
on the continent. Ample ar- 
rangements have been made to 
display the collection of " one 
man " exhibits, which have been 
promised President Garo, by the 
leaders of photography in every 
state, so that the members and 
exhibitors need have no hesitancy 
in making their exhibit complete- 
ly representative of the things 
which they are doing. 

President Garo believes that 
the greatest educational feature 
of a photogra])hic convention lies 
in the exhibition of photographs 
and for this reason alone the 
bars have been opened to every- 
one alike to show his best. 

DEMONSTRATIONS 

A great tent is to be erected 
on the Exposition grounds which 
will be given over entirely to 
demonstrations by the various 



STUDIO LIGHT 




TREAS U R.E R. W. H. PARTRI DCE 



Olives 



OFFICERS PHOTOGRAPHERS' ASSOCIATION OF 
NEW ENGLAND, 1911 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



manufacturers represented. Am- 
ple opportunity is to be given 
every manufacturer of photo- 
graphic material to demonstrate 
new and improved processes for 
the making of photographs. 

NEW INVENTIONS 

To encourage invention the 
Executive Board has arranged 
for the free display of any new 
and novel device of interest to 
photographers. Only two rules 
have been made to cover this 
new and interesting feature : 

1 — The exhibitor shall become 
a member of the Association. 

2 — The device or process shall 
not be actually upon the 
market as a manufactured 
product. 

The object of this separate and 
distinct exhibition is primarily to 
bring the photographic inventors 
directly in touch with manufac- 
turers. Bridgeport is a great 
manufacturing center and offers 
splendid opportunities for the 
promotion of new business enter- 
prises. Mr. H.J. Seeley, Pres- 
ident of the Photographers Club 
of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, 
Conn., is in charge of arrange- 
ments for the Inventors Exposi- 
tion. 



B 



USINESS PROBLEMS 



$2500.00 IN CASH 

offered for pictures in the 
Kodak Advertising Contest 
which closes September 20. 



We are very apt to imagine 
that if we were only doing busi- 
ness in some other town or 
country, we would find things 
very much easier, but human 
nature is pretty much the same 
everywhere, and the problems 
that confront us for solution ap- 
pear about the same regardless 
of latitude or longitude. 

The President of the Profes- 
sional Photographers' Association 
of Great Britain in his address 
before the second annual congress 
of that body, analyzed in a most 
practical manner a number of sit- 
uations that confront the work- 
ers in this country. In discuss- 
ing the taking of orders he re- 
marked: "A good receptionist 
can easily double a business — 
she is almost worth her weight 
in gold. 

"If possible she should have 
nothing to do but receive custom- 
ers and book the orders. If the 
receptionist retouches, say, as 
well as receiving customers, she 
will most likely consider retouch- 
ing her i)rincipal work, and will 
get rid of the customers as soon 
as possible in order to get back 
to it." 

If you have ever had a printer 
waiting for a bunch of negatives, 
you will appreciate the situation 
of the retoucher, and will not 
wonder that she slights the cus- 
tomers when she has a large 
number of negatives ahead of 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



her. The President also cited 
an occurrence on a visit to one 
of the city studios that is not 
without a parallel over here : 

"On opening the door a bell 
rang and the receptionist jumped 
out from a curtained off place ; I 
asked to see the proprietor and 
was informed that he was en- 
gaged, so I said I would wait. 

" Now the receptionist did not 
know who I was, I might have 
been a very promising customer, 
but she took no further notice of 
me, and back she went to her 
hidey-hole. 

"In about three minutes the 
bell rang again and a lady and 
gentleman walked in; and had 
evidently been having their child 
photographed and were much 
pleased with the results. They 
ordered two dozen cabinets which 
the receptionist booked without 
a smile and bowed them out. If 
that girl had been my reception- 
ist I would have sacked her on 
the spot. She could have got 
anything out of those people, 
she had only to show them a 
specimen or two, and they would 
have ordered, but, after all, was 
it her fault? 

"I don't think so. It was the 
fault of her employer and he 
paid for it. 

"A receptionist must have time 
to talk to people." 

He also offered a good sug- 
gestion in the selling of enlarge- 
ments : 

"I find the enlarging lantern 



very useful in helping custom- 
ers to make up their minds what 
size enlargement they want. If 
you show them different sizes on 
the screen they almost invariably 
order the largest." 

Speaking of prices and price 
cutting, he exemplified the atti- 
tude of the public by the follow- 
ing story: 

"I happened to overhear a 
conversation in a tramway car 
between a man and his wife who 
were evidently going to be photo- 
graphed with their family. They 
were debating to which of two 
photographers they should go, 
and mentioned the names. 

"I know as far as the quality 
of their work was concerned that 
there was nothing to choose be- 
tween them. At last the wife 
said : ' Well, John, it' s not every 
day we get our pictures taken; 
we'll just go to the best man' — 
the best man, mark you, being 
the one who charged the most. 
The ordinary public know very 
little about good or bad photo- 
graphs; they take the photog- 
rapher at his own valuation." 



For Results 

Artura 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 




EASTMAN DUPLEX 
PRINT SQUARE 

The above illustration shows a 
convenient device for quickly de- 
termining the proper spacing and 
trimming of prints. Very few 
photographers use a plate of the 
same size as the picture they are 
making and in nine cases out of 
ten the composition and general 
effect of the finished picture is 
improved by judicious trimming. 
It is necessary to cut out ob- 
jectionable features that have a 
tendency to detract from the 
center of interest and which are 
not noticeable at the time the 
negative is made. 

The Eastman Duplex Print 
Square is composed of two alu- 
minum try- squares with grooves 



and guides fitted in 
same to allow of 
their being shifted in 
either a perpendicu- 
lar or horizontal po- 
sition. The device is 
of unusual value in 
quickly determining 
just what the appear- 
ance of the print will 
be when trimmed. 
When the proper 
spacing has been de- 
cided upon and the 
binding nuts given a 
turn to make the 
squares rigid, the 
print may be accu- 
rately marked for 
trimming. The 
markings on the one square give 
the width and length the print 
will be when trimmed so the 
mount may be selected before 
trimming. 

The device is also of great 
value in deciding the most suit- 
able proportions in masking a 
negative, as the result may be 
seen by placing the square on the 
negative and shifting same to in- 
clude the portion suitable for 
printing. The negative may then 
be marked and the mask placed 
in position. 

Ask your dealer to show you 
the Duplex Print Square. It 
will impress you with its useful- 
ness in the studio as it already 
has many other photographers. 
Price, four dollars. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



13 




By EHaa Qoldenaky 

i^\UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ We are very much pleased 
to offer our readers in this num- 
ber of Studio Light, a series of 
illustrations from the studio of 
Elias Goldensky of Philadelphia. 
The genius of the man, however, 
is so versatile that it is impossible 
to convey a fair idea of his work 
in such a limited space. Mr. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Goldensky has risen to his high 
position in the photographic 
world by the sheer force of char- 
acter he instills into his work 
which has been recognized by an 
appreciative public. His clientele 
is of the very highest and is made 
up of those who appreciate qual- 
ity and artistic ability regardless 
of price. 
The exhibit of Mr. Goldensky 's 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



work at the recent National Con- 
vention on Etching Sepia Plati- 
num was one of the most remark- 
able and attractive shown. He 
is a consistent user of this paper, 
the distinctive quality of which 
is so well suited to the reproduc- 
tion of his wonderful pictures. 
Our half-tones only show in a 
measure the beauty of the origi- 
nal prints. 

THE ARTURA- METH- 
OD SEPIA 

There were many things of 
interest at the recent National 
Convention at St. Paul, but the 
Success of the Convention — the 
one thing most talked about and 
which attracted more attention 
and elicited more favorable com- 
ment from those present than 
any other one thing, was the 
introduction of the new Artura- 
Method Sepia — a method which 
gives to the photographer for the 
first time in a development paper 
the rare qualities of a black and 
white Iris Artura print repro- 
duced in the sepia. 

Those very qualities in the 
Artura emulsion which have given 
that paper its distinct superiority 
as a paper for black and white 
prints, have rendered it unde- 
sirable for sepia tones by the 
ordinary Hypo - Alum process. 
Beautiful sepias have been and 
are made upon Artura, but Ar- 
tura, being unlike Azo and the 
other development papers, has 



not lent itself readily to the more 
common forms of the Hypo- Alum 
process. 

But there now is a sure way 
of obtaining Artura Sepias — a 
way that makes sepias on Artura 
that are superior to those ob- 
tainable on any other silver paper 
— a way that makes it possible 
to make a dozen, a hundred or 
a thousand sepia prints that are 
absolutely uniform in tone. More- 
over, it's an extremely simple 
process — simple because it cuts 
out the most difficult part of the 
Hypo- Alum process as applied to 
other papers. 

Every photographer knows that 
in making Hypo- Alum sepias the 
difficulty has been in getting the 
right sort of a black and white 
print to start with. The result- 
ing tone depended entirely upon 
the tone of the black and white 
print. If it was too cold, the 
resulting "sepia" would be pur- 
ple; if too warm, there would 
be a tendency toward yellowish- 
ness. Short exposure and forced 
development or too little bro- 
mide meant purple, not sepia, 
and at the same time there was 
the danger of going too far the 
other way. 

In the new Artura-Method 
Sepia all this is obviated. The 
color of the black and white print 
does not affisct the color of the 
sepia. With the ordinary develop- 
ment papers and the Hypo- Alum 
bath, the highlights tone first. 
By the Artura-Method Sepia the 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



toning works evenly over the en- 
tire surface of the print and when 
the desired tone is reached, the 
print is removed from the bath. 
It is as easy and as sure as toning 
Aristo prints in the gold bath, 
and the shadows are even more 
transparent than in the original 
black and white prints— a distinct 
advantage over other methods. 

This combination of the Hypo- 
Alum and Gold Toning methods 
gives to Artura Sepias, not only 
Artura quality but certainty, uni- 
formity and simplicity in secur- 
ing results. 

THE METHOD 

DEVELOP in the regular way. 

FIX in the regular way. 

RINSE. 

TONE as follows: 

Formula for Sepia Toning Bath for 
Iris Paper 

Dissolve 8 ozs. Hypo in 128 ozs. 
boiling water (Rain or Distilled). 
Then add powdered alum, 2 ozs. 
After this is dissolved allow bath to 
cool, then add sodium phosphate, 
2 ozs. Next dissolve 60 grains of 
silver nitrate in 1 oz. water and 180 
grains potassium bromide in 1 oz. 
water. Pour the bromide solution 
into the silver solution and add to 
the above mixture. Stir the bath 
constantly while adding the various 
chemicals. When thoroughly mixed 
add chloride of gold C. P., 8 grains. 
The bath is now ready for use. 

In toning the prints the bath should 
be kept at a temperature ranging 
from 120 to 125 degrees. 

If the bath is too cold the gold tone 
will predominate; if too hot, the 
sulphur tone will predominate. 

Give prints several changes of 
water to remove any sediment and 



RETURN print for five minutes in 
regular fixing bath. 

WASH in the regular way. 

NOTE : The above bath will tone 1 gross 
cabinet or 4 x 6 prints or the equivalent in 
other sizes. It is advisable to use fresh 
bath when this number of prints have 
been toned rather than attempt to renew 
its strength by the addition of gold. 

The entire lot of prints should be placed 
in the bath at one time, keeping them 
well separated during the process of 
toning. 



T ARGER THAN LIFE 

■*— ^ There were many interest- 
ing exhibits at the National Con- 
vention at St. Paul, but one of 
the most remarkable was that of 
three portrait negatives, two and 
one-half by five feet, made direct 
from the subjects. These enor- 
mous negatives with transparen- 
cies and contact prints from same 
were exhibited by W. S. Lively, 
president of the Southern School 
of Photography of McMinnville, 
Tenn. The negatives were made 
by Mr. Lively and his son Joseph 
and the work required the mak- 
ing of a camera of enormous pro- 
portions for this special purpose. 

Large direct negatives have 
been made before, but these 
were, without doubt, the three 
largest portrait negatives ever 
shown at a National Convention, 
being, by actual measurement, 
one fourth larger than the sub- 
jects themselves. The plates 
used were Seed 26x, the emul- 
sion being coated on plate glass 
for this special purpose. 

"Daddy" Lively conceived the 




FROM AN ETCHING SEPIA PLATINUM PRINT 



By Klias Ooldeiiftky 
Fhiladelphia, Pa. 





FROM AN ETCHING BLACK PLATINUM PRINT 



By Elias Goldensky 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



idea of making this unusual ex- 
hibit while attending the Nation- 
al Convention in Milwaukee, and 
when he reached home set about 
formulating the plans for the 
camera and materials that were 
to be used in the undertaking. 
He and his son Joseph worked 
and planned until the last ob- 
stacle was overcome, and it is 
needless to state that there were 
enough to discourage the aver- 
age workman. The camera was 
made almost as large as an ordi- 
nary room, being ten feet from 
front to back, six and one-half 
feet high and five and one-half 
feet wide. Being too large for a 
stand of any kind, it sits on the 
operating room floor and instead 
of moving the camera, the sub- 
ject is placed on a movable plat- 
form and moved to or from the 
camera to secure proper size and 
spacing. As it was not practical 
to make a camera of the bellows 
type, the box shape was adopted, 
but unlike any other box camera, 
this one was fitted with back 
and side swings which were work- 
ed from the inside of camera. 

No ground glass was necessary, 
but instead, a thin board the 
thickness of the plate and covered 
with a dull white paper was 
found to be more practical. When 
the proper focus was obtained, 
the board was removed and the 
plate was set in its place ready 
for exposure. 

Seed plates were selected for 
this work because of their uni- 




form quality and dependability. 
Each one of the big fellows 
weighed fifty pounds and it re- 
quired two men to place them in 
the holder and return them to 
the original boxes, the work being 
done inside the camera. The 
exposure by daylight was short- 
ened by the addition of flash 
light. The developing of these 
large plates was no small task, 
each one requiring eleven gallons 
of developer. Not a flaw was 
found on the plates, the coating 
being so perfect and the manip- 




FROM AN ETCHING SEPIA PLATINUM PRIN' 



By Elias GoldensTcy 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



r 



TOP VIEYf 




?7a.A clot K 



n 





> 






/ 






r 












c 


J. 




F 














/ 








/ 



a 



ulation so accurate. The five 
foot carbon prints were also re- 
markable for their quality and 
much credit is due Mr. Lively 
and his son for the successful 
accomplishment of so great a 
task. As will be seen by the 
illustration, the negatives have 



wonderful quality. The light- 
ing is soft and round, the drap- 
eries full of delicate detail in 
shadow and the scale of grada- 
tion is perfect. We regret that 
we have not space to publish the 
entire set of illustrations from 
these wonderful negatives. 




FROM AN ETCHING BLACK PLATINUM PRINT 



By Elias Goldensky 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jlrsl, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. Thesecuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




'l^ yE like to make por- 
^ ^ traits of men, and 
many men prefer us, as 
we seem to possess that 
faculty which enables us 
to fully bring out charac- 
ter and individuality. 

Phone us for an 
Appointment' 



THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



No. 169. Price, 40 cents. 



B 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 191i 



Columbus, O. ..,..., o .,. . Sept. 5, 6, 7 

Indianapolis, Ind Sept. 12, 13, 14 

Grand Rapids, Mich Sept. 19, 20, 21 

Milwaukee, Wis , . . Sept. 26, 27, 28 

Des Moines, la Oct. 3, 4, 5 

Louisville, Ky Oct. 10, 11, 12 

Nashville, Tenn , , . . Oct. 17, 18, 19 

New Orleans, La Oct. 24, 25, 26 

Atlanta, Ga Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 2 

^ V<^ ^ 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 



Twenty Days — 

The time is short, but 
the inducement is 

$2500.00 CASH 

offered for pictures in the 
Kodak Advertising Con- 
test. It closes Sept. 20. 



The First Step 

Send for portfolio of the last 
contest. It's free on request. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



25 



Empire State No. 2 




For all around out-door work requiring either long-focus, 
wide angle or portrait lenses, the Empire State No. 2 will be 
found to have every attachment and convenience necessary to 
meet the most trying conditions. 

Not mere talking points but features which are the results 
of inquiries and suggestions received from men who have 
encountered every imaginable difficulty in their years of 
experience with view cameras. 

Among other advantages are the sliding tripod block, 
automatic bellows support, supplementary light trap and 
exceptionally large front board. 

PRICE 
5x7, $23.00; Gl'z x 8I2, |25.00; 8 x 10, $28.00 
j4t all dealers' : : : Catalogue on request 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



26 STUDIO LIGHT 

A Simple Process 

on an Inexpensive Paper. 

Azo Sepias 

The results are certain, the 
tones richer, and the prints 
more uniform than you have 
had before. 

Write us for the Azo- Hypo- Alum formula. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supphes, for we carry a com- 
plete Hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Eastman Permanent 
Crystal Pyro 

There is no waste — it stays 
where you put it, pure clean 
crystals, acidified and ready 
for use. 

It bears the Tested Chemical SeaL 




ELON 

Combined with hydrochi- 
non, Elon is a perfect de- 
veloper for paper and plates. 

// bears the Tested Chemical Seal. 
Canadian Kodak Co., I^imited 

Toronto, Canada 
All Dealers. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



Better, more 

uniform, and 

certain results 

follow the use 

of the plate 

tank, and the 

saving of time 

makes up for 

its nominal 

cost. 

Once adopted, the Eastman 

Plate Tank method is never 

discarded. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 4x5. $ 3.50 

Do., 5x7, 4.50 

Do., 8 X 10, 10.00 




Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



80 



STUDIO LIGHT 




certain of 



We must be 
chemicals— 
therefore we test ^kem. You 
can also be certain ot your 
chemicals— because we\test 
them. 

This seal tells. - 



Canadian Kodak Company, Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 31 

Your success depends 
upon the quality of 
the material you use. 

We supply your wants promptly 
with the best — 

Pure Chemicals, 

the best Papers and Plates, 

Everything for the Studio. 



C» Complete line of Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE SIMLA STYLE 

An up-to-date mount for 4x6 and 5x7 prints, Square or Oval. 

For Sepia or Black and White Print, either 

"tacked on" or mounted solid. 






The Simla has an engraved border of beautiful design, 
either oval or square prints may be used, mounted solid or 
"tacked on" in 4x6 or 5x7. Extra weight stock, linen 
finish, beveled edges. 

7'he Simla gives you the opportunity to push the larger 
print and get out of the cabinet rut. Be sure and see samples 
of this style. It will bring the money easiest. 

MANITFACTITRED AND DESIGNED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



i 



^ 



OUR POLICY 
Our business was established on a quality basis. 

It has grown because we act on the belief that we 
can maintain our position in the trade just so long as 
we make better goods than our competitors — and no 
longer. 

Our customers receive the benefit of the most ad- 
vanced photographic thought of Europe and America. 
Kodak factories all over the world are in constant 
touch with each other. Each has the benefit of the 
work and the discoveries of the other. The very 
breadth of our business enables us to give to each de- 
partment absolutely the best that the world affords in 
technical skill and in producing facilities. 

Our theory is that we can best serve ourselves by 
supplying our customers the best goods. Our acts 
have made this Theory a Policy, for we have not 
merely the desire to make the best goods but the 
means of converting that desire into a Reality. 

In our thirty years in the photographic business 
there have been several revolutionary changes. Doubt- 
less there will be many more. Whatever they may be 
our Policy shall be to furnish (without following every 
mere will-o'-the wisp) the very best of those goods 
which painstaking testing shall prove to be of benefit 
to our customers in the Simplification of Photographic 
Processes and the Advancement of the Art. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




ARTUHA PAPER — SEED PLATE 



Diihrkoop Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 





mmu 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



OCTOBER 1911 



No. 8 



From now on through the busy 
HoUday season the days will be- 
come shorter and shorter and 
every minute of daylight must 
be used to the best advantage. 

The wise photographer cleans 
his lens, washes the skylight and 
white curtains and places his 
order for Seed plates at this 
time of year. 



did you fall short and how can 
you best avoid a repetition of the 
same experience? If there was 
a loose cog in your business sys- 
tem now is the time to tighten 
it up. Don't wait until the 
machinery is running at high 
speed and have to shut down for 
repairs, but do it now. 



It is not too early to think of 
Holiday business and to get the 
studio in condition to take care of 
the increased amount of work 
that it will be necessary to turn 
out at that time. There are 
probably new backgrounds to 
buy and devices for the printing 
room that must be replaced be- 
fore the rush. Do the things 
that have been left undone dur- 
ing the warm summer months 
and have your studio in order for 
the long winter. 



You have the experience of 
last season to profit by. Where 



The convention season is about 
over and every photographer who 
has attended a convention or 
the Eastman Professional School 
should have new ideas to put 
into execution. An idea is only 
of value to a man as he can apply 
it to his own use. Some people 
have this faculty to a greater 
degree than others, and it is the 
man who can turn an idea to his 
own profit who is most success- 
ful. 

If you have absorbed an idea 
from another's experience, apply 
it to your own business and try 
it out. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



r)RAIN CREASES 

^^ The photographer who uses 
newspaper advertising for a short 
period of time and is disappointed 
because he cannot see that he is 
getting results has probably not 
studied the subject carefully from 
all points of view, and the lack 
of immediate returns prompts him 
to discontinue the advertising and 
condemn it as being worthless. 

Let us consider the matter 
from the view point of some of 
the great advertisers who spend 
hundreds of thousands of dollars 
every year in advertising and see 
how the same principle may be 
applied to studio advertising. 
These great advertisers work to 
create a demand for their goods 
and accomplish results. The re- 
tailer feels the demand and orders 
from the jobber who has in turn 
anticipated the demand and is 
ready to supply it — but how did 
the advertising create the de- 
mand? Was it one or two or a 
dozen advertisements that did it? 
Most certainly not. It was the 
continual exploiting of the article 
in newspapers, street cars, bill 
boards, and in fact everywhere 
that the eye might turn. The 
advertisement of that particular 
article was making brain creases 
on the mind of the public, con- 
tinually, in hundreds of cities all 
over the country. 

A writer in Everybody's Mag- 
azine explains in a very interest- 
ing manner the susceptibility of 



the mind and the plasticity of 
the nervous system. It is alto- 
gether reasonable and very easy 
to understand and is particularly 
applicable to advertising. Bend 
a piece of paper and crease it, 
the crease will remain even after 
the paper has been straightened 
out again. The paper is plastic 
and offers resistance to adopting 
a new form, but when impressed 
upon it, the new form is re- 
tained. The brain is plastic and 
every thought leaves its indelible 
mark. Just as it is easy for the 
paper to bend where it has been 
creased before, so is it easy for 
action to take place in the brain 
where it has taken place before. 
See an advertisement a dozen 
times and it makes a deeper im- 
pression each time, just as the 
name of a person is forgotten 
after hearing it the first time 
but becomes perfectly familiar to 
you, and is retained by the mind, 
after hearing it a great many 
times. 

The public does not buy pho- 
tographs as often as breakfast 
food or the many articles that 
receive such wide advertising, 
but on the other hand, it is only 
your own community that you 
have to impress your advertising 
upon. There is as much reason 
for you to continually advertise 
in a local way, as for the large 
manufacturer to advertise gen- 
erally. The first impression is 
hard to make, just as the 
paper resists the first time, so 



STUDIO LIGHT 



your advertising should be at- 
tractive and convincing. It 
should have an argument to im- 
press the reader, and the best 
argument is quality. Once the 
reader is convinced of your abil- 
ity and the quality of your work, 
it is only a matter of miaking the 
brain crease so deep by continual 
advertising that w^hen he thinks 
photographs he thinks only of 
one studio and that one, yours. 

To be sure, the show case is 
very valuable and should be 
carefully looked after, for if the 
display is poor the public will 
not go to the trouble of learning 
whether or not you have better 
work in the studio. Good news- 
paper advertising will cause 
people to examine your display 
who would never see it other- 
wise, hence the necessity of liv- 
ing up to your advertising by 
displaying your best work in the 
showcase, making the display at- 
tractive and changing it often. 

Give your advertising a chance 
to make an impression by making 
it attractive and keeping it up 
for a year and you will see the 
result. Let our advertising cut 
service help you. 



B 



USINESS PHILOS- 
OPHY 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



If you have read the 

above, 

Read page 22. 



Las' weke I went to the Boss 
an' tole him I thot I ot to have 
more money, an' he said he thot 
so too, an' why diden' I get 
bizzy an' earn it. 

The Boss says that there is 
lots of fellers that ot to get more 
money or get fired. 

He sez that seme fellers know 
how to do a hole lot better than 
they are doin', but somehow they 
don' seem to be able to com- 
mence beein' better — that they 
lack push like a broom without 
no handle. 

The Boss sez every feller ot to 
take a personal inventory of him- 
self as well as of his bizness, an' 
not to begin by chargin' up a big 
sum for good looks; an' that a 
diamond studded lovin' cup ain't 
in it with the ole oaken bucket 
for practical work. He also sez 
don' waste too mutch time set- 
tin' down your good points but 
to look for the rusty spots, an' 
the gears that don' mesh, an' to 
allways remember that we kik the 
mos' about our worst faults when 
we find 'em in the other feller. 

The Boss says that the firs' 
time he finished takin' his per- 
sonal inventory, an' sized up 
what a good fer nothing feller he 
wuz, he mos' threw himself on 
the scrapheap, but he got bizzy 
an' patched himself up, an' mos' 
doubled his bizness that yere. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



We take a regeler inventory 
too, twict a year, the Boss says 
the only way to know where 
youre at is to know where youre 
at in figgers, that guessin' don' 
go, an^ that many a man has 
guessed himself out of bizness. 

He says a lot of fellers take a 
inventory all rite but that they 
don' allow nothin' for wear an' 
tear an' go on figuring there 
cameras and stands, an' trays at 
just what they cost 'em when 
they wuz new, 'stead of figurin' 
a certin amount off, so bimeby 
when they need new ones they 
ain't got so mutch net profit as 
they thot they had to pay for 
'em out of. 

The Boss says foolin' yourself 
is jus' as ezy as feedin' a stray 
cat creme an' jus' about as profit- 
able. 

/^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ The illustrations in this 
issue are reproductions from Ar- 
tura prints made from Seed Plate 
negatives which were made at 
the demonstrations of posing, 
lighting and drapery effects at 
the recent St. Paul National Con- 
vention. As may be seen, the 
same model was used to produce 
the various effects of drapery 
which is one of the many inter- 
esting features of the Eastman 
Professional School . On another 
page we have endeavored ]>y two 
series of illustrations to show how 
the making of two of these ef- 



fects is accomplished, but the 
actual demonstration is much 
more comprehensive. 

Our first page illustration is 
from one of the Seed plate neg- 
atives made by Mr. Duhrkoop 
during his series of demonstra- 
tions, and not only shows the 
quality of the Seed plate but the 
possibilities of Home Portraiture 
which is constantly gaining favor 
with the best workers. 

Mr. Duhrkoop made his dem- 
onstrations by the light of an 
ordinary window and worked 
under practically the same con- 
ditions which would be encounter- 
ed in the average home. 



M 



R. W. P. BUCHANAN 



Mr. W. P. Buchanan, the 
well-known manufacturer of flash 
powder, who was for years a 
prominent dealer in photographic 
supplies, died Friday, Sept. 22, 
from burns received the previous 
week in an explosion of chemi- 
cals in his laboratory at the rear 
of his home at No. 2111 West 
Hunting Park Ave. , Philadelphia. 
Mr. Buchanan started in the 
photographic supply business in 
Philadelj)hia in 1884 and made 
hosts of friends in the profession, 
by his genial good nature and 
close attention to the wants of 
his customers. His many friends 
will be shocked to learn of his 
untimely death. 



^ 




SEED PLATE — ARTURA PAPER 



Eastman Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 



STUDIO LIGHT 



N 



EW ENGLAND CON- 
VENTION 



The Fourteenth Annual Con- 
vention of the Photographers As- 
sociation of New England held 
in Bridgeport, Conn., Sept. 11 
to 15, was the second largest in 
point of attendance in the history 
of the Association, between six 
and seven hundred photograph- 
ers being registered. 

The officers of the Association 
and the Bridgeport Photogra- 
phers Club were untiring in their 
efforts to make the convention a 
success. The exhibits were of 
unusual excellence, including the 
work of many prominent pho- 
tographers throughout the 
country as well as that of the 
Association members. 

There were displays from prac- 
tically all the leading manufac- 
turers, one of the most remarkable 
being the collection of prints on 
Artura and Etching Sepia Plati- 
num of the work of prominent 
photographers throughout the 
country. 

The Seed Plate exhibit also 
came in for a large share of at- 
tention as it was composed of the 
Duhrkoop negatives, with posi- 
tives from same, so arranged to 
show their exquisite quality to 
the best advantage. 

The various entertainments and 
social features were most pleasant 
and the business meetings de- 
veloped the fact that the Associ- 
ation is in a most satisfactory 



financial condition. The election 
of officers resulted as follows : 

President, Fred A. Frizell. 

Vice President, A. AUyn Bishop. 

Secretary, Geo. H. Hastings. 

Treasurer, W. H. Partridge. 

Springfield, Mass., was selected 
as the place for holding the 1913 
convention, it having been de- 
cided to meet with the National 
next year in Philadelphia. 



V 



ICTOR E. GEORG 



Victor E. Georg of Spring- 
field, one of the best known pho- 
tographers in Illinois, died Aug. 
14th at the Nordrach Ranch 
near Colorado Springs, Colo., 
where he had been for some time 
for the benefit of his health. 

Mr. Georg Avas very prominent 
in photographic circles, having 
been a charter member of the Pho- 
tographers Association of Amer- 
ica and active in organizing the 
Photographers Association of Ill- 
inois. He served for several years 
as secretary of this organization, 
then as trustee, and was later 
elected the society's president. 

Mr. Georg also occupied the 
honored position as a member of 
the board of directors of the 
American Free Art League. 
Aside from his great business 
ability, Mr. Georg was known 
and loved for his modesty and 
dignity in both private and j^ro- 
fessional life and will be mourned 
by hosts of friends in the pro- 
fession. 




SEED PLATE -ARTURA PAPER 



Eastman Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 




f 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



A CLEARING HOUSE 
OF IDEAS 

The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Photography is well 
along on its fall trip and will visit 
four cities of the South during 
the present month. The pho- 
tographic profession has been 
quick to reaUze the advantages 
to be derived from the course of 
the Eastman School and its ap- 
preciation is shown in the con- 
tinued increase in attendance. 

As the school is practically 
brought to the door of the pho- 
tographer, the expense of at- 
tending is nominal and he and 
his help can readily give three 
days of their time in return for 
the many benefits to be derived 
from so thorough a course of in- 
struction. We know of no way 
in which the photographer can 
secure such a practical post grad- 
uate course, as it were, in the 
same number of weeks. 

Were the three days entirely 
taken up with a series of demon- 
strations of the products of the 
Eastman Company, it would be 
well worth while, but as those 
who have attended one of the 
schools know, the subjects treated 
are so varied and interesting and 
the ideas suggested so practical 
and helpful that they more than 
make up for the small expense 
incurred. 

The instructors who conduct 
the series of lectures and demon- 
strations are exjjerts of many 



years standing and have been 
selected, not only for the knowl- 
edge of the work they have in 
hand, but for their ability to con- 
cisely impart this information in 
the most intelligent and compre- 
hensive manner to their audi- 
ences. There must of necessity 
be a systematic method of con- 
ducting each day's instruction in 
order that so much work may be 
crowded into such a short space 
of time, but ample opportunity 
is given the individual to bring 
his studio troubles to the school 
and have the help of the in- 
structors in solving his difficulties. 
The wide experience of these 
instructors in their travels over 
the country has been gained by 
personal contact with the pho- 
tographers and conditions in the 
different localities visited, and 
they are constantly adding new 
ideas to their store of knowl- 
edge. These new ideas if found 
to be practical and useful are 
made into new features to add 
to the course of instruction, and 
so the school constantly grows 
newer, better and of more value 
each year. In this plan of con- 
stant improvement and continu- 
ally keeping abreast of the times 
lies the continued success of the 
school. If you see it once you 
will want to see it again, and in 
so doing you will materially add 
to the success of your business 
by having new ideas constantly 
at hand to stimulate trade and 
keep your customers interested. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



To those who have never at- 
tended the Eastman School we 
would speak of its many advant- 
ages, not only as a concentrated 
course of instruction, but as a 
clearing house of useful ideas 
that will be found applicable to 
any man's business, no matter 
how great or how small. There 
are no features to detract from 
the real work of the school and 
the subjects are so interesting 
that the attention is held from 
start to finish. 

The location is selected with a 
view to its adaptability to the 
work to be accomplished and 
easy access to the visiting pho- 
tographers. It will pay you to 
bring your assistants that they 
may also get new ideas to use in 
their v/ork and have a better 
understanding of the materials 
they are handling. Everyone 
connected with the studio will be 
filled with enthusiasm after a 
visit to the school and you will 
be amply repaid for the small 
expense by the additional effi- 
ciency of your help. 

From the proper methods of 
advertising, show case dressing 
and handling of the customer in 
the reception room, to the de- 
livery of the finished print, the 
methods best suited to the pro- 
gressive and up-to-date photog- 
rapher are explained in such a 
practical manner that they may 
be applied to any studio no mat- 
ter how small or how large it 
may be. The demonstrations 



cover completely the entire pro- 
cess of printing and finishing by 
every process now in general use, 
including masking, single and 
double border tinting, fancy bor- 
der designs, vignetting, print 
spacing and preparing prints for 
embossing and folder mounting. 

The demonstrations under the 
light include not only the vari- 
ous methods of lighting and neg- 
ative making but hand and figure 
posing and control of white dra- 
peries. There is also a special 
demonstration of new and origi- 
nal drapery effects showing how 
the complete drapery effect is 
secured by using a single piece 
of silk and without the use of a 
single pin for fastening. In this 
demonstration the model is placed 
under the light and the process 
of draping is shown and explained 
step by step so the photographer 
may readily produce the same 
result or use the idea as a base to 
work on in making other forms 
of drapery to suit his particular 
subject. This has seemed a most 
difficult task to many photogra- 
phers and the very simplicity of 
securing beautiful drapery effects 
in so simple a manner has been 
a revelation to many who have 
visited the school. 

We give several illustrations 
showing some of the effects and 
the methods used to obtain them. 
Cut No. 1 shows how the center 
of the five yard strip of silk is 
drawn across the chest and un- 
der the arms of the subject. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



Cut No. 1 



Cut No. 2 shows the effect after 
the two ends have been continued 
over the shoulders and crossed, 
giving the complete effect of a 
waist. Cut No. 3 shows the 
finished drape. The two ends 
of silk have been wound round 
the waist and tied, making it 
perfectly secure so that the silk 
may be laid in perfect folds, 
placed higher on the shoulders 





Cut No. 2 



Cut No. 3 

or changed in any way without 
danger of becoming disarranged. 

Another more elaborate effect 
of waist and skirt combined which 
may be used for three-quarter 
figures without vignetting is 
shown in cuts 4, 5 and 6. 

One end of the five yard strip 
of silk is placed under the right 
arm of the sitter and with the 



^ 



STUDIO LIGHT 



13 



arm held firmly against the body 
is drawn over the right shoulder, 
across the bust and under the 
left arm ; then over the left arm 
across the bust again as shown 
in Cut No. 4. 

The silk is now laid in folds 
and drawn once around the waist 
to give the eiFect of a narrow 
girdle or belt as shown in Cut 
No. 5. Enough material will be 




Cut No. 4 

left to go around the waist a 
second time when it is spread 
out to its full width and made 
to cover the entire lower portion 
of the figure below the belt, as 
in Cut No. 6. The effect may 
be enhanced by gathering the 
drapery over the shoulder with 
a pin and using a pin at the waist 
as an ornament. 




Cut No. 5 




Cut No. 6 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



( 



An additional piece of very 
light material thrown over the 
shoulder may also be used to add 
to the effect. 

These are only two of the very 
interesting methods shown at this 
demonstration. 

Old and new methods of de- 
veloping are compared and the 
after treatment of the negative 
is explained. The illustrated 
lecture on retouching, etching 
and working in backgrounds is 
most instructive and there is an 
evening demonstration of enlarg- 
ing with chloride and bromide 
papers followed by an illustrated 
lecture on lenses and the proper 
use of same in the studio. The 
negatives made under the light 
during the demonstration of pos- 
ing and drapery effects are used 
to print from in the paper dem- 
onstrations, and the results show 
conclusively that these demon- 
strations are thoroughly practical 
and not merely theoretical. 

Nothing that could add inter- 
est to this three days instruction 
has been omitted and you can 
only get a comprehensive idea of 
its worth to you in your work by 
attending the school when it is 
within your reach. The bulletin 
of school dates will be found on 
page 23. 



For enlargementfi u.se 
Artura Carbon Black 



OETTER PRICES 

^^ To ask more for your work 
you must give more in quality. 
This is a fact which cannot be 
disputed, but there are many 
things which go to make up the 
quality which commands the bet- 
ter price. The public to day is 
better informed regarding pic- 
tures than it was ten years ago, 
and the photographer who would 
keep abreast of the times must 
be up and doing. He must get 
out of the rut and go ahead 
faster than his customer or the 
customer will not have confidence 
in his abihty to produce pictures 
that are worth the price he may 
choose to ask for them. 

Just here the question arises, 
"What is the value of a dozen 
pictures of a given size?" but 
the question is too broad for a 
direct answer. It has been said 
that a dozen pictures are worth 
just what a man asks for them, 
and this certainly */io//W be true. 
The photograi)her who puts his 
best conscientious effort into the 
production of a dozen portraits 
should receive a price sufficient 
to make the transaction a profit- 
able one, and to do this the 
quality of the pictures must be 
such that the customer will will- 
ingly pay the price asked. A 
few photographers have been 
able to so fill their work with 
their individuality that they are 
able to ask prices that, to the 
average person, might seem ex- 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



orbitant, but in every instance 
where these men have been suc- 
cessful, there has been first of 
all, the groundwork of quality 
back of it. As with a portrait 
painter, once the photographer 
adds individuality to this quality, 
he may place almost any value 
on his work and there are those 
who will be willing to pay the 
price. However, this article will 
not deal with these few but 
rather the many who wish to 
better their work and so secure 
better prices. 

First of all it is taken for 
granted that the studio is properly 
equipped for the making of good 
pictures and that the photog- 
rapher has a fair amount of abil- 
ity. The studio must be neat 
and attractive, for the first im- 
pression the customer receives 
should be a good one. The re- 
ceptionist must be courteous and 
tactful and a good j udge of human 
nature. The impression created 
here means much; a customer 
may be easily antagonized and a 
good order lost, or may be in- 
duced to pay your best price and 
made a permanent customer if 
handled with tact. 

Samples of the best work of 
the studio should be displayed 
and handled in a way that would 
indicate their value to the cus- 
tomer. Step into any store where 
expensive luxuries are for sale and 
you will not find the expensive 
goods lying about on the show 
case or counter where they may 



be handled and soiled. Keep 
samples of your best work in the 
same condition, and handle with 
the same care that the merchant 
uses in displaying and selling his 
best wares. It helps to give the 
impression of the value of your 
work . 

It is under the skylight that 
the picture is really made and 
where the greatest skill is neces- 
sary. The best plate will only 
record the image you create for 
it and the best paper will only 
reproduce what you have in the 
negative. 

If you are in a rut in your 
negative making, get out of it by 
all means. See what the other 
man is doing, and change your 
methods, if necessary, to get new 
effects. Experiment until you 
have overcome the difficulties en- 
countered and never be satisfied 
so long as you can do better. If 
you do not have the opportunity 
to see what the other photog- 
raphers are doing, have your 
dealer send you a copy of "With 
Other Photographers," from 
which you can get ideas that will 
be of inestimable value to you in 
bettering your work under the 
skylight. 

When you are satisfied that 
the negatives you are making 
are good, look carefully to the 
printing from these negatives, 
for while the best printer cannot 
make perfect prints from a poor 
negative, poor prints are often 
made from good negatives. 




SKKI) PLATK -ARTURA PAPER 



Eastman Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 



MGBfj 




SEED PLATE — ARTURA PAPER 



Eastman Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 




18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Select a paper to use for your 
best work that has distinctive 
quahties which will appeal to 
your best customers. You can- 
not expect to sell five dollar pic- 
tures for ten dollars by merely 
using a larger mount. You in- 
sult the intelligence of your cus- 
tomer when you use such tactics. 
Etching Black or Etching Sepia 
Platinum or Artura Iris Grade 
D or E have qualities that are 
distinctive. There are no better 
papers made and you can feel 
that you are giving to the cus- 
tomer the best to be had when 
you deliver an order on one of 
these papers. Then they are 
different — you get away from the 
effects obtained in your cheaper 
work. Make the prints larger 
and of a different shape — use 
some of the Paragon Border Neg- 
atives to enhance the attractive- 
ness of the better work and add 
to the variety of styles and ef- 
fects. All of these little things 
add to the value of the finished 
picture and you must have for 
your motto, "Not how cheap but 
how good" if you would have 
the customer pay more for your 
work. You must give more in 
value if you wish to receive more 
in profit. It is the old rule of 
give and take and it works both 
ways. 

Last of all, but not least by any 
means, comes the matter of fold- 
ers, mounts, enclosures, etc. By 
all means do not sacrifice quality 
here. Use the very best, even 



to the cord you use to tie the 
package. Get a catalogue of 
The Canadian Card Co. and order 
samples of mountings to suit the 
particular style of picture you 
are making. When you have 
found a suitable mount, or en- 
closure, make it a part of the 
work, not merely a thing that 
adds expense to the picture. It 
is quality all the way through 
that gives the beautiful and har- 
monious finished product. You 
have no doubt paid one-third 
more for a pound of candy many 
a time because it was packed in 
a handsome box, neatly wrapped, 
instead of being delivered to you 
in a paper bag. And the candy 
tasted better too, didn't it? Just 
keep in mind the fact that qual- 
ity must go all the way through 
the transaction and do not sacri- 
fice the effect you have worked 
so hard to produce for the sake 
of fifty cents or a dollar on the 
mounts or a few cents in making 
an attractive package. You can 
raise your standard very easily, 
but you must give more in qual- 
ity if you would receive more for 
your work. 



A, 



THE EASTMAN SCHOOL 

OF PROFESSIONAL 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

will help you increase your 
business and secure better 
prices. See page 23. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



19 



CORRECT EXPOSURES 
FOR ENLARGE- 
MENTS 

Do you make enlargements 
from your portrait negatives ? If 
so, the following method of de- 
termining the correct exposure 
for any size enlargement will ap- 
peal to you. It is practical, not 
merely theoretical, but may only 
be applied to the making of en- 
largements by artificial light. 

When you are printing the 
regular order of contact prints 
from the negative, note the time 
necessary for making an Artura 
Iris print with the negative at a 
given distance from the light. 
This last is most important as 
each succeeding test must be 
made with the negative at the 
same distance from the light. 
For example, we will say this 
Iris time is six seconds. Now 
make an Artura Carbon Black or 
Bromide enlargement 8 x 10, 
being sure to make tests to get 
the exposure absolutely correct. 
We will say you are using Bro- 
mide and the correct exposure is 
fifteen seconds. Divide the fif- 
teen by the six and you have 
2)^, which is the factor to use 
in determining the correct ex- 
posure for an 8 X 10 enlargement 
from any negative. 

Suppose, for example, the cor- 
rect exposure for the Iris print is 
ten seconds; the exposure for 
the 8 X 10 Bromide will be 2>^ 
times ten or twenty- five seconds. 



You may now take any nega- 
tive of the same size as the one 
used in the first test and when 
you know the correct exposure 
for an Iris print and multiply it by 
2/^ you will have the correct 
time for an 8 x 10 Bromide en- 
largement. It is easy to see what 
an advantage this method is to 
the photographer who is making 
a specialty of a certain sized en- 
largement, but it may also be 
used to determine the exposure 
for any other sized enlargement. 
It is not necessary to find the 
factor for each size, as the result 
may be obtained without making 
the different sized test enlarge- 
ments. 

If a larger print is desired 
you have the exposure for the 
ten inch print; square the ten 
and you have 100. You want to 
make a 14 x 17 print ; square the 
seventeen and you have 289; 
divide the 289 by 100 which 
gives 2.89, showing that the sev- 
enteen inch print has an area 
2.89 times greater than the ten 
inch print. Hence if the proper 
time for the 8 x 10 enlargement 
is 25 seconds, the time for the 
14 X 17 enlargement will be 2.89 
times as long which is 12}{. sec- 
onds. The light decreases in 
intensity in proportion to the 
larger area which it covers, so 
the time for any size enlarge- 
ment may be determined by hav- 
ing the correct exposure for a 
given size. In using this factor 
to determine the exposure it is 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



understood that the lens 
of enlarging camera is 
stopped down to a given 
point and used at the 
same stop for all expos- 
ures. 

The process of making 
enlargements of a given 
size may be made still 
more simple by having 
a set point for the enlarging easel 
and camera front where the full 
size of negative is to be enlarged, 
making the apparatus fixed focus. 
Of course where only a part of a 
negative is to be used, the regu- 
lar method of focusing would have 
to be resorted to. 



CONVENTION DATES 
West Virginia Photograph- 
ers' Association, Grafton, W. Va. , 
October 10th, 11th; Secretary, 
Friend Cochrane, Charleston, 
W. Va. 

Missouri Photographers' Asso- 
ciation, Kansas City, Mo., Octo 
ber 3d, 4th, 5th; Secretary, 
L. S. Kucker, Springfield, Mo. 

Photographers' Association of 
Illinois, Springfield, 111., October 
17th, 18th, 19th, 20th; Sec- 
retary pro tem., Victor Georg, 
Jr., Springfield, 111. 




IT STAYS WHERE YOU 
PUT IT. Eastman Permanent 
Crystal Pyro is also acidified 
ready for use. 



rpWO GOOD ONES 

'*■ In mounting prints a good 
heavy roller is a necessity. It 
saves time and insures the print 
being in contact with the card. 
These two rollers are both good 
ones. The Eastman No. 1 Double 
Print Roller has two eight inch 
rolls covered with first quality 
heavy white rubber and the solid 
heavily nickeled handle affords a 
strong, firm grip. The weight is 
a full five pounds. The East- 
man Single Print Roller has a 
single ten inch roll, first quality 
heavy white rubber, weight same 
as the double roller, five pounds. 

Eastman Single Print 
Roller .... $2.50 

Eastman No. 1 Double 
Print Roller . . $3.00 





SEED PLATE — ARTURA PAPER 



Eastman Demonstration 
St. Paul Convention 




22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order \njirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, fi permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




Athletic Pictures 

are most interesting to 
the friends at home, and 
you will appreciate them 
highly when college days 
are over. Let us show you 
our new College Panels 
and other suitable styles. 



Make an appo'mt7ne7it to-day. 



THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



No. 170. Price, 40 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



Des Moines, la. . . , , Oct. 3, 4, 5 

Louisville, Ky Oct. 10, 11, 12 

Nashville, Tenn. . „ . Oct. 17, 18, 19 

New Orleans, La Oct. 24, 25, 26 

Atlanta, Ga. ......... . Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 2 

Roanoke, Va Nov. 7, 8, 9 

Baltimore, Md Nov. 14, 15, 16 



( 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 

Your success depends 
upon the quality of 
the material you use. 

We supply your wants promptly 
with the best — 

Pure Chemicals, 

the best Papers and Plates, 

Everything for the Studio. 



C Complete line of Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, p7oducts. 



J. G. RAMSEY &c CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 



The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
supplies, for we carry a com- 
plete line of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



TheD. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT 




Make better work 
at better prices by 
double printing with 

Paragon 

Border 

Negatives 



Design No. 11. 

They are easy to use — accurately 
registered and furnished in a great 
variety of designs ready for use. 



We supply an illustrated booklet showing all of the 
designs with directions for use and a list of sizes and 
prices. Ask for a copy of the Paragon Ihrder Negative 
Booklet. It is free at your dealer's or from us by mail. 



Eastman Kodak Company, 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



At your dealer s. 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

Distinctive papers for the 
photographer whose customers 
demand the best he can give. 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

Their quality is appreciated 
by discriminating patrons. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All Dealers. 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 




1^21 



Economical, 
Clean and 
Convenient. 

There is a satisfaction 
in using pure, clean 
crystals of Pyro, acid- 
ified ready for use. 



Eastman Permanent 
Crystal Pyro 

stays where you put it. There 
is no pyro dust to fly about the 
dark room. 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 







The day's work is shorter — the neg- 
atives better — and the dark room ehm- 
inated when 

The Eastman 
Plate Tank 

is used. The cost is nominal compared 
with its great convenience. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 



Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT 




Order Kodak 

Tested Chemicals 

and be certain. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Canada. 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



31 



Make Your Own Enlargements 




The Graphic Enlarging Camera may be used 
with either dayhght or artificial light. No con- 
densers are necessary. 

PRICE 

Including Negative Carrier, full set of Kits, Reflecting Cone 
and three sheets of Ground Glass: 

No. 1— For negatives 5x7 and smaller, $28.00 
No. 2— " " 8 X 10 " " 35.00 

No. 3— " " 11 X 14 " ♦' 45.00 



FOLMER k SCHWING DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The Inslip Style 

For Sepia, Black and White and Re-developed Prints, 
"Slipped in" Cabinet Prints, Square and Oval. 




The Inslip, for the "Slip-in" print, does away with the bother 
of trimming your print, and an excellent style when you want to 
deliver quick. The insert is of good quality Bristol, deckled edge, 
with a rich two-line design tinted in soft shades to match and centre 
cut out, so you can just slip your print underneath and do away with 
pasting and trimming. This is one of the best sellers ever designed. 

Sample on receipt of three two-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED MY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



OUR POLICY 
Our business was established on a quality basis. 

It has grown because we act on the belief that we 
can maintain our position in the trade just so long as 
we make better goods than our competitors — and no 
longer. 

Our customers receive the benefit of the most ad- 
vanced photographic thought of Europe and America. 
Kodak factories all over the world are in constant 
touch with each other. Each has the benefit of the 
work and the discoveries of the other. The very 
breadth of our business enables us to give to each de- 
partment absolutely the best that the world affords in 
technical skill and in producing facilities. 

Our theory is that we can best serve ourselves by 
supplying our customers the best goods. Our acts 
have made this Theory a Policy, for we have not 
merely the desire to make the best goods but the 
means of converting that desire into a Reality. 

In our thirty years in the photographic business 
there have been several revolutionary changes. Doubt- 
less there will be many more. Whatever they may be 
our Policy shall be to furnish (without following every 
mere will-o'-the wisp) the very best of those goods 
which painstaking testing shall prove to be of benefit 
to our customers in the Simplification of Photographic 
Processes and the Advancement of the Art. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




Bv Oertrude Kasebier 
New York.N.Y. 




\nT^ 



mmu 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



NOVEMBER 1911 



No. 9 



ART AND BREAD AND 
BUTTER PHOTOG- 
RAPHY 

"Yes, those pictures are beau- 
tiful, but can anyone deliver 
them ? " 

Such was the remark that the 
Associate Editor overheard from 
a photographer who was stand- 
ing in front of Mrs. Kasebier's 
exhibit at the Photographers As- 
sociation Convention in Roches- 
ter two years ago. 

The A. E. retorted: "Yes, 
Mrs. Kasebier can and does de- 
liver them and in sufficient quanti- 
ties to make a very comfortable — 
yes, a very handsome income." 

A few weeks ago the A. E. 
approached Mrs. Kasebier and 
told her that he wanted some of 
her characteristic work for Studio 
Light. 

Mrs. K. promptly informed him 
that he was a "nuisance," and 
then with that incomprehensi- 
bility of temperament which a 
mere man can never understand 



spent three hours in going over 
prints, discussing their merits or 
demerits, their suitability for the 
purpose. The A. E. came away 
happy with an assortment of prints 
under his arm which were typical 
of the work of this famous woman 
photographer. 

There are some of our best 
photographers whose work maj'^ 
be said to have so strong an indi- 
viduality as to be almost always 
immediately recognizable as the 
work of "so and so." Mrs. Kase- 
bier's work certainly has indi- 
viduality, yet she is so versatile 
that it would perhaps be impos- 
sible to say that she has a recog- 
nizable "style." Her forte seems 
rather to be in surrounding the 
subject with an atmosphere that 
fits his or her character. As an il- 
lustration of this point — although 
rarely resorting to the worked- 
in background — she has in the 
picture of the typical city-bred 
man (page 22) departed from 
her usual custom. It is not, 
however, a mass of foliage that 
she has put into the background 



STUDIO LIGHT 



but a suggestion of the hum of 
industry of a great city. 

Mrs. Kasebier's work, by its 
daring simplicity, has forced her 
recognition as an artist. Such 
work would not appeal to all 
classes — would be beyond the 
understanding of some custom- 
ers — perhaps we should say "of 
most customers," but that it has 
found favor with a large clientele 
is evidenced by the fact that 
Mrs. Kasebier has made more 
than an artistic success. It is 
our object to present in these il- 
lustrations in Studio Light^ work 
that is typical of the best work- 
ers — the best photography of the 
every day sort as well as the best 
work of those who have broken 
away from the style to which 
we are accustomed. We are glad 
to be able to show in Mrs. Kase- 
bier's work a typical collection 
of pictures from one who has 
dared to be different — and has 
at the same time made this dif- 
ferent photography a success as 
bread and butter photography. 

Mrs. Kasebier's work is that 
of one who delights in her art. 
She is interested in every nega- 
tive for the very love of doing 
things well, and every print has 
her personal inspection. Her 
conscientious work naturally calls 
for the best of materials and the 
finished prints that go to her 
customers are on the paper that 
offers the best medium for the 
expression of her art — Etching 
Black Platinum. 



c 



HARACTER 
LIGHTING 



I N 



Of all the works of the old 
masters those which are proba- 
bly best known and appeal to us 
most strongly are the wonderful 
portraits by Rembrandt. There 
have been painters of other 
schools who have painted greater 
pictures of a higher degree of 
merit probably, but those bold, 
forceful studies of light and shade 
and color have made their in- 
delible impression on our minds. 
We have found much to learn 
from this old master in the mat- 
ter of lighting that may be ap- 
plied to our studio work, but the 
so-called Rembrandt lightings we 
so often hear spoken of by pho- 
tographers are, as a rule, far 
from the style used by the old 
master. 

Rembrandt's father was a mil- 
ler and it was in the old mill, so 
the story goes, that Rembrandt 
began his career as a portrait 
painter. Imagine working by 
the small windows of an old 
Dutch wind mill and you can get 
a fair idea of the lightings he 
saw and reproduced in his first 
paintings and the effect it must 
have had on his future work. 
He painted what he saw by the 
light of the window in the old 
Dutch mill and that little old 
light brought out all the charac- 
ter of the subject in wonderful 
contrasts of light and shade. 

The prominent features were 




By Gertrude Kasebier 
Nexv York, N.Y. 




STUDIO LIGHT 




No. 1 




pointed up with snappy high- 
lights that made possible the 
greatest range of gradation to the 
rich, transparent shadows. In 
many instances the draperies were 
almost entirely subdued, but even 
when his imagination clothed his 
subject in the most costly fabrics 
and jewels (he was poor and 
often painted pictures of his wife 
arrayed in costly gowns and jew- 
els), these were always painted 
in low tones that would not de- 
tract from the main point of inter- 
est, the subject's face. 

Rembrandt would possibly 
never have been the painter he 
was had he worked under the 
modern skylight. At least it is 
reasonable to believe he would 
have developed a much different 
style for he would have seen 
things differently. We try to 
make our subjects look natural, 
and yet we sometimes photo- 
graph them in the most unnatural 
environment. We see the old 
grandmother as she sits by her 
favorite window with her sewing 
basket beside her and our mind's 
eye retains the picture and car- 
ries it through our entire life. 
Is it any wonder then that the 
])ictures of grandmother made 
under the broad skylight of the 
modern studio do not seem natu- 
ral to us? 

When we think of these things 
it is not hard to understand why 
there is the growing demand for 
home portraits. It is not alto- 
gether the desire to have the 



No. 2 



STUDIO LIGHT 




No. 3 




picture made in the environment 
of the home so much as it is to 
have pictures of people as they 
really are and as we see them in 
their home life. Make a picture 
of grandmother in the studio, 
but make it as we are accustomed 
to see her at home and it will be 
a characteristic and pleasing pic- 
ture. 

We build a skylight that is 
large enough for a group of fifty 
and use the same for single sub- 
jects, cutting it down with many 
screens, some opaque and some 
of muslin, until we have lost all 
the snap and brilliancy of the 
direct light. Then we blame the 
plates for being too slow or lack- 
ing in contrast or wonder how 
the other fellow manages to make 
his negatives with a little two by 
four light and get good results. 

(Our illustrations Nos. 1 and 
2 show the subject under the 
open skylight and the result ob- 
tained by such a broad, diffused 
light. Illustrations Nos. 3 and 4 
show the subject under a 3 by 6 
ft. light and the result obtained, 
no screens being used between 
the subject and the light in either 
instance, the exposures being 
identical.) 

I remember walking down the 
main street of a small town ten 
or eleven years ago and having 
my attention attracted by a pho- 
tographer' s sign over the door of 
a car or small portable house. I 
hardly thought it worth while to 
look at the display case, but the 



No. 4 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



first glance forced me to stop and 
examine closely what proved to 
be wonderful pictures resembling 
very much the effects of some 
of the old masters in lighting 
and tone values, and I wondered 
how it could be possible. 

On making the acquaintance 
of the photographer I found him 
working by a little side and top 
light, the two combined measur- 
ing not over 4x7 feet, and the 
secret of his success lay in his 
ability to make pictures as he 
saw them by that light. He was 
about ten years ahead of his time, 
for to-day most of us are build- 
ing little skylights around our 
subjects by the use of numerous 
screens and allowing a small vol- 
ume of light to fall on the sub- 
ject. 

We might have accomplished 
the same result ten years ago 
had we been forced to work 
under a small light and we can 
do the same thing to-day by cut- 
ting down the light with opaque 
curtains and working under it in- 
stead of in the cell of screens. 

The fact of the matter is, there 
is much that is of advantage in 
the small light for portrait work. 
The exposure does not need to 
be more for the 4 x 6 ft. light 
than with larger lights, it being 
simply a matter of placing the 
subject nearer to the small hght. 
The highlights will be better 
pointed up and there will be a 
greater range of gradation and 
more roundness, provided direct 



light is used and only a small 
reflector to light up the shadow. 

There was a time when pho- 
tography was merely a matter of 
making a map of one's features 
and the process was thought to 
be so wonderful that nothing 
more was expected. Then more 
attention was devoted to light- 
ing, as plates of reasonable speed 
were manufactured and placed 
on the market. Now, that great 
progress has been made both in 
the manufacture of fast lenses 
and plates, and the public has 
ceased to wonder at photogra- 
phy, it is only natural that this 
public is demanding more of 
photography than ever before. 

It is no longer satisfied with a 
map of the features in monotone 
but is demanding half tones in 
gradation, flesh tints that differ 
in tone from draperies, in short, 
probably without knowing just 
what they want, certain classes 
of customers are demanding more 
natural lifelike pictures— less arti- 
ficiality we might call it — and 
there are many photographers 
who are working to satisfy this 
demand. 

There has probably been less 
lead used in retouching in the 
last few years than ever before 
because men of the business world 
are demanding pictures with more 
character and less flattery. The 
same is true of pictures of child- 
ren and there is reason to believe 
that women may eventually want 
pictures that look like them. 




By Gertrude Kasebier 
New York, N. Y. 




10 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Go home and look at your 
family in the natural home en- 
vironment, and while you may 
not see the lightings you are get- 
ting under your studio skylight, 
you ivill see many that are prob- 
ably much more natural and char- 
acteristic, and if you should also 
carry a camera home some day 
and leave your ideas of por- 
trait lightings at the studio, you 
might make some negatives of 
the family that would give you 
some better ideas of what can be 
done with a small volume of gen- 
uine direct light. 

Rembrandt painted what he 
saw and we can do the same in 
photography, but we must see 
our subjects as others see them 
and not in a strange light of our 
own creation. 



ARTURA METHOD 
TONING 

The Artura-Method Sepia Pro- 
cess is the one process that is 
enabling photographers to intro- 
duce individuality into their work 
on developing paper. 

No other process for producing 
Sepias on developing paper en- 
ables the operator to produce, at 
will, any tone from a beautiful 
warm black to a rich sepia closely 
resembling a Platinum Sepia in 
color. 

With this method the toning 
action is uniform over the entire 
print and the toning action can 



be stopped at any desired point. 
With other methods for produc- 
ing Sepias on developing paper 
the half-tones of the print are 
acted on first and the print must 
be left in the bath until the en- 
tire silver image is sulphurized 
or the print is worthless. 

We are in receipt of many 
favorable letters from photog- 
raphers who claim that the Ar- 
tura-Method of producing Sepias 
is the best thing that has ever 
been introduced. 

Below we are giving a few 
notes on the process that were 
not published with the formula 
in the September issue of Studio 
Light. 

NOTES 

It is necessary to have the 
water at boiling point when the 
hypo and alum are being mixed. 
The other ingredients must be 
added at lower temperature. 

The toning bath should be 
about neutral. This can be de- 
termined by testing with litmus 
paper. 

Do not begin toning at a lower 
temperature than 120 degrees. 

In toning the prints the bath 
should be kept at a temperature 
ranging from 120 to 125 degrees. 

If the bath is too cold the gold 
tone will predominate ; if too hot, 
the sulphur tone will predomi- 
nate. 

To determine when the prints 
have been toned, examine by 
transmitted light, and when all 
black has been removed from the 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



deepest shadows it is safe to as- 
sume that the final color has 
been obtained. 

Give prints several changes of 
water to remove any sediment. 

Return prints for five minutes 
in regular fixing bath. 

Wash in the regular way. 



The entire lot of prints should 
be placed in the bath at one 
time, keeping them well sepa- 
rated during the process of toning. 

In toning a small number of 
prints, mix a small quantity of 
bath, preserving the same pro- 
portions as in formula. 




A 



NEW ARTURA PRINTER 



The distinct advantages of 
the Artura Printer are in a large 
measure due to the fact that it 
has been designed by practical 
developing - out paper printers 
who know the essential points of 
a machine for this work, and is 
manufactured by skilled mechan- 



ics who are thoroughly familiar 
with the needs of the profes- 
sion. 

The new model Artura Printer 
has all the advantages of the 
former model with added con- 
veniences and improved construc- 
tion and appearance. The special 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



pattern of Copper Case Arc Lamp 
is wound to our specifications in 
order to give the finest quality 
of printing light. It uses small 
carbons, giving a much more 
steady light than the ordinary 
arc lamp and uses a minimum 
of current. 

The top of the machine is 
fitted with a hinged frame con- 
taining a sheet of plate glass 
12^/i xl4^ inches on which the 
negative to be printed from rests. 
This frame may be raised to ad- 
just a vignette or pieces of tissue 
used to hold back any portion of 
the negative in printing. A 
ground glass which slides in a 
groove directly underneath dif- 
fuses the light and is a support 
for the vignette or sheets of 
tissue. 




The hinged back is similar in 
appearance to that of a printing 
frame but is so controlled that 
the back half comes in contact 
with the negative first. This al- 
lows the printer to place the 
paper on the negative and hold 
it in position with the hand until 
the back is in contact with the 




Artura Printer— Back Partly Lowered 



Artura Printer with Print in Contact 

paper. The hand may then be 
removed and the entire back 
brought in contact by pressing 
down on the handle until it auto- 
matically locks. The back is 
padded with fine soft felt and is 
adjusted automatically for various 
thicknesses of negatives and 
paper. 

The exposing shutter is opened 
and closed by moving the small 
metal handle on right side of the 
machine, the shutter of orange 



STUDIO LIGHT 



13 




By Gert)~ude Kasehier 



Neiv York, N. Y. 



material being in the back of the 
cabinet directly in front of the 
light box. This gives plenty of 
good orange light when the shut- 
ter is closed, allowing the paper 
to be placed where desired be- 
fore exposing. 

The cabinet has a 14 x 17 drop 
leaf at either side to hold the 
paper and exposed prints and oc- 
cupies only 24 X 37 inches of 
floor space. It is constructed of 
oak and is handsomely finished 
in Flemish oak stain, waxed. 

This printing machine com- 
bines simplicity with rapid, easy 



manipulation and, once used, will 
be found indispensable. 



The Success of Artura 

is explained in one 

word: 

QUALITY 



*?kK AO 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



OME THOUGHTS 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



Me an' the Boss wuz arguin' 
the other day about that raze of 
pay for me, an' I asts him diden' 
he think I ot to have it, as he 
says many a boss thinks a fel- 
ler's pay ot to be razed when he 
dasent too give it to him for 
feer of spoilin' him. 

The Boss says a 6% salery for 
a 7/^ job saves many an em- 
ployee frum brane fag. 

I asts the Boss wot wood he 
do if I quit, an' he says he 
guessed he'd have to cloze up. 

I wunder if he wood hav too? 

Me and Jimmy the printer 
have been inventin' a 'lectric 
flash lite; we fastened it too a 
lite soket in the printin' room 
an' I touched the button, an' 
blue out every lite in the buildin' 
— Jimmy says I maid a short 
sirkut — annyhow I no I made a 
long jump to get outen the way 
befoar the Boss come in. Me 
an' Ben Franklin an' Edison we 
awl have our troubels inventin'. 

The Boss says that heerafter 
I had better confine my inventin' 
jenious too inventin' a way of 
keepin' the front stares clene. 

Las' weke me an' the recep- 
tion room girFs sister went to a 
show, an' in the show wuz a 
feller allways doin' nobel dedes 
an' things for other people, so 
the nex' mornin' I thot I'd do a 
nobel dede when the Boss started 
to go away in his macheen. 

When he stepped in to tern 



on the jooce I thot I'd crank it 
up for him an' save him gettin' 
out again. I turned the handel 
an' it flue bak an' nocked out 2 
of my teath. 

The Boss says that moast of 
the heroes that get away with the 
goods is on the stage. 

The Boss says that bein' a 
hero is awl rite after youre ded, 
but befoar that it's the feller 
that can look a bill from the 
stock house in the faice Avithout 
turnin' pail that gets the glad 
hand. 

When I went to hi skool (sure ! 
our room wuz on the top floor) 
they wuz a line in the copy book 
reedin' "money is the root of all 
evil," an' I asts the Boss wot 
did that mene, an' he says he 
never had time to figgur it out 
as he wuz always two bizzy try- 
in' to get some of the sprouts. 

Me an' the Boss wuz walkin' 
down the strete the other day, 
an' we passes a feller's show 
case, an' the same pitchers wuz 
in there as wuz there when I 
firs' came to work for the Boss, 
an' there wuz allso ate ded flys. 

The Boss says if you are a ded 
one don' advertize it. He allso 
says that the ded ones say it 
don' pay to advertize, an' that it 
don't the way they do it. 

The Boss says good advertisin' 
is tellin' folks in a kommon cents 
way that you got what they 
want, an' that if you ain't got 
what they want don' advertize. 

Tomorrow me an' the Boss is 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



goin' down to the stock house to 
pik out the fixins' for his new 
branch studio. Gee ! I wisht my 
whiskers wud gro faster, 'caus 
then he mite let me run it. 



pLATE TROUBLES 

'■" Cold weather brings its quota 
of plate troubles, one of the most 
common of which is irregular 
semi-opaque spots with blended 
edges. Many of us forget from 
season to season the cause of 
these troubles and do not take 
necessary precautions. 

These spots are caused by lay- 
ing the film side of one plate 
against the glass side of another 
in removing plates from holders 
previous to development. Plates 
as a rule are kept in a cold dark- 
room and in removing same from 
the holders it is natural for the 
warm fingers to come in contact 
with the glass side of the cold 
plate and leave a finger or thumb 
mark. This is particularly true if 
the hands are moist or have chem- 
ical impurities on them. In plac- 
ing the film side of a plate against 
these finger marks, they offset on 
the sensitive film and cause the 
irregular spots mentioned above. 

The remedy for this trouble is 
quite obvious. Always place 
plates film to film in removing 
from holders. 

Care should likewise be used 
in placing plates in boxes before 
developing. If plate boxes are 



used it is a good idea to have a 
fresh box every week for this 
purpose as cardboard boxes are 
easily worn and may leak light. 
To readily distinguish the box of 
exposed plates, stick two strips 
of gummed white paper on top 
of the box in the form of the 
letter X. ^ 

rpHE LARGEST 

^ We stated in the last num- 
ber of Studio Light that the New 
England Convention was the sec- 
ond largest in point of attendance 
in the history of the Association. 

After the final summing up, 
with reports all in, we find the 
convention was the largest in the 
history of the New England As- 
sociation. 

We are more than glad to make 
this correction that due credit may 
be given the officers whose earnest 
work in behalf of the Association 
was responsible for the large at- 
tendance. 

President Garo is also to be 
complimented for his ability in 
being able to bring the great 
number of exhibits from other 
states to Bridgeport, most of 
which were due to his wide ac- 
quaintance and personal efforts 
and friendships. 



Certain in strength and 
action. Eastman Tested 
Chemicals. 




By Oertrude Kcmebier 
Netv York, N.Y. 





By Gertrude Kasebier 
New York, N,Y, 



ImBfj 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



A N IMPRESSION 

-^~^ Well, I went to the East- 
man Professional School and I 
certainly did cram in a lot of real 
ideas and incidentally had a good 
time. It's so nice to get out 
and meet people in the same 
business. There were quite a 
few receptionists there. I was 
tickled to death when the Boss 
said I could go. At first he 
wasn't very keen on the idea, 
said someone had to stay with 
the studio. I fixed that up all 
right by bringing my sister in 
and telling her how to talk to 
customers and explain that Mr. 
Roe was at the School learning 
new ideas and that he would 
make better portraits when he 
came back. That settled the 
argument over my going. 

The School was held in a hall 
and it looked like an art gallery. 
All around were large screens of 
dark green burlap and on them 
some of the best photographs I 
have ever seen. They were on 
different papers, Artura, Angelo, 
Aristo and Etching Sepia. That's 
a new paper this year and it is 
splendid. I told Mr. Roe that if 
we only had some samples I knew 
lots of the best people in our 
town would be perfectly willing 
to pay $50 a dozen for pictures. 

The first day was awfully inter- 
esting. Mr. Scott, he is a dem- 
onstrator, showed how to make 
a whole dress out of five yards of 
satin, and it looked swell too. 



Mr. Roe knows how to do it now 
and that gives me a good card to 
play when a customer tells me 
she would have a sitting to-day 
only "her best evening gown is 
at the cleaner's." That excuse 
won't go at the Richard Roe 
studio any more. Mr. Scott told 
a lot about lighting and Mr. Roe 
said Rembrandt effects will be 
easy for him now. That will 
help my end of the business, 
too, for lots of our customers ask 
me to show samples of Rembrandt 
lightings. Mr. Scott has a mighty 
slick little head screen. It was 
made of black netting and had 
four parts, each one of a different 
thickness. The Century Company 
makes them and Mr. Roe is going 
to order one. There were lots 
of new ideas about posing, too, 
and it was wonderful what good 
effects he got with just a few 
simple tricks. 

Mr. Wade and Mr. Hazlett 
were the paper demonstrators 
and they showed how easy it is 
to use Artura and Etching Sepia 
if you are careful, and Mr. Wade 
told all about show case adver- 
tising. I learned a lot from his 
talks and now I'll know just 
what negatives to mark down in 
my little book to use for our 
show case. Here are the essen- 
tials he gave us for show case 
trimming: Novelty, cleanliness, 
merit, harmonious coloring, avoid- 
ing over crowding, make frequent 
changes. 

But to me the best part of the 




By Gertrude Kasehier 
Xeio York, N.Y. 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



School came the last day when 
Mr. Scott told us about retouch- 
ing. That's part of my job in 
our studio. The best rule he 
gave was that the less lead you 
use the better the result, only 
the lead must be in the right 
place. One of my sins that he 
pointed out, and he says it's a 
common one, is making a high- 
light of the same value the entire 
length of the nose. He says 
that few subjects have noses per- 
fect enough to stand such a high- 
light. He gave us a lot of good 
advice about not destroying the 
half-tones that ought to be in 
the picture. One of the helpful 
"don'ts" was: "Don't destroy 
the shadow under the nose. " He 
made a demonstration of work- 
ing on the back of the negative 
that was great. 

When the School comes your 
way go by all means for I couldn't 
begin to tell you in a letter all I 
learned. The Reception Girl. 



PRACTICAL SUGGES- 
TIONS 

All of us know about some of 
them but some of us do not know 
about all of them . 

« « » 

I was called upon recently to 
make an outdoor negative and 
on setting up the camera at the 
only point where the desired view 
could be obtained, I found there 
would be some very objectionable 



wires showing across the upper 
portion of the picture. To over- 
come this a long bamboo pole 
was used to keep the wires in mo- 
tion and the picture was secured 
without the wires showing. We 
would suggest that the operator 
trying this means of disposing of 
objectionable wires in the pic- 
ture, use care not to connect up 
with dangerous electric wires. 

* * * 

Almost every photographer 
cleans his lens several times dur- 
ing the year and very often one 
will be stubborn and refuse to be 
unscrewed. Thereis a little knack 
about these things and in this case 
it is simply a matter of pressing 
in on the lens at the same time it 
is being turned. 

* * * 

A lady photographer offers the 
following suggestion: To pre- 
vent waste of time and temper, 
glue that elusive stick of India 
ink on a piece of cardboard, say 
4x6 inches — you will find it 
when you want it." 

Another suggestion is to make 
the cardboard in the form of an 
artist's palette with a hole for 
the thumb and a piece of lantern 
slide cover-glass glued to the card 
to mix the ink on instead of using 
the thumb nail as many of us do. 



The Eastman Plate Tank 
in.snre.s better results. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



21 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1911 



Atlanta, Ga Oct. 31, Nov. 1, 2 

^ Roanoke, Va Nov. 7, 8, 9 

Baltimore, Md Nov. 14, 15, 16 

vacation 

♦ ^1 # 



A 







ii\m\i 




By Gertrude Kasebier 




By Oertrudc Kasebier 
New York, N. Y. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order injirst, as it w ould not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, s. permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 
C. K. Co., Ltd. 




/^UR pictures of child- 
^-^ ren are more than 
photographs. They are 
studies of child hfe that 
will interest you and your 
friends, and the children 
— grown up — will also 
appreciate them. 



Telephone Jhr a7i appmnttnent . 



THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



No. 171. Price, 35 cents. 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 

The studio that 
gets the business is 
the studio that uses 
the best materials. 



When you order from us 
you get the very best studio 
suppHes, for we carry a com- 
plete hne of all the Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



The D. H. Hogg Co., Reg'd, 

Montreal, Canada. 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 

Your success depends 
upon the quality of 
the material you use. 

We supply your wants promptly 
with the best — 

Pure Chemicals, 

the best Papers and Plates, 

Everything for the Studio. 



C Complete line of Canadian 
Kodak Co., Limited, products. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada. 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT 



Make better work 
at better prices by 
double printing with 




Paragon 



Design No. 12 

They are easy to use — accurately 
registered and furnished in a great 
variety of designs ready for use. 



We supply an illustrated booklet shoiving all of the 
designs with directions for use and a list of sizes atid 
prices. Ask for a copy of the Paragon Border Negative 
Booklet. It is free at your dealer's or from us by mail. 



Eastman Kodak Company, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
At your dealer's. 



i 



STUDIO LIGHT 



27 



Select a medium that will lend 
the final tone of quality and dis- 
tinction to your highest grade 
pictures: 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

Each has an individuahty — 
the quahty and tone of an old 
etching. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All Dealers, 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 



98.2% Pure 



When you buy one pound of 
Kodak Tested Carbonate of Soda 
you receive ISik ounces pure 
Carbonate of Soda. 



Analysis of Kodak Carbonate 
of Soda 

Sulphates, ----- None 

Heavy Metals, - _ - - None 

Chlorides, - . - - Slight Trace 

Iron, ----- Slight Trace 

Na2 CO3 (carbonate), - - - 98.2% 

Na H C O3 (bi-carbonate), - - None 

Moisture, - - - - - 0.85% 



LOOK FOR I C IK I THIS SEAL 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Canada. 

All Dealers. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



29 




Invaluable during the busy Holiday 
season when promptness is a necessary 
requisite. 

The Eastman 
Plate Tank 

not only saves time — it insures better 
results. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



30 STUDIO LIGHT 




Your 
assurance 
of uniform 
quality. 



Chemicals bearing this 
seal are dependable — 
of certain strength and 
action. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada. 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



31 



The Century Vignetter 




Showing Vignetter attached to Semi-Centennial Stand. 

This Vignetter can be instantly adjusted to any position, all 
movements being controlled from the back of the camera. It has no 
cords or strings to wear out, and is attractively finished. 

The Century Vignetter can be fitted to any camera stand with- 
out the use of tools. 

Efficient in operation, simple in construction and made to stand 
continued usage, the Century Vignetter is the best. 



CENTURY CAMERA DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The Inslip Style 

For Sepia, Black and White and Re-developed Prints, 
"Slipped in" Cabinet Prints, Square and Oval. 




The Inslip, for the "Slip-in" print, does away with the bother 
of trimming your print, and an excellent style when you want to 
deliver quick. The insert is of good quality Bristol, deckled edge, 
with a rich two-line design tinted in soft shades to match and centre 
cut out, so you can just slip your print underneath and do away with 
pasting and trimming. This is one of the best sellers ever designed. 

Sample on receipt of three two-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can. 



OUR POLICY 
Our business was established on a quality basis. 

It has grown because we act on the belief that we 
can maintain our position in the trade just so long as 
we make better goods than our competitors — and no 
longer. 

Our customers receive the benefit of the most ad- 
vanced photographic thought of Europe and America. 
Kodak factories in Europe and America are in constant 
touch with each other. Each has the benefit of the 
work and the discoveries of the other. The very 
breadth of our business enables us to give to each de- 
partment absolutely the best that the world affords in 
technical skill and in producing facilities. 

Our theory is that we can best serve ourselves by 
supplying our customers the best goods. Our acts 
have made this Theory a Policy, for we have not 
merely the desire to make the best goods but the 
means of converting that desire into a Reality. 

In thirty years in the photographic business there 
have been several revolutionary changes. Doubt- 
less there will be many more. Whatever they may be 
our Policy shall be to furnish (without following every 
mere will-o'-the wisp) the very best of those goods 
which painstaking testing shall prove to be of benefit 
to our customers in the Simplification of Photographic 
Processes and the Advancement of the Art. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 



jgf 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS TRINT 



By Schaldenhrand Bros. 
Pittsburg h, l^a. 




MOU 




INCORPORATING 



THE ARISTO EAGLE •• THE ARTURA BULLETIN 



Established 1901 



Established 1906 



Vol. 3 



DECEMBER 1911 



No. 10 



rpHE WINNERS 

^ The awards made in the 
1911 Kodak Advertising Contest 
would indicate that interest in 
this line of camera work is grad- 
ually working westward. 

The profession is undoubtedly 
awakening to the fact that there 
is a future for it in this branch of 
photography which not only taxes 
the ability of the man as a pho- 
tographer but requires careful 
thought and study of the matter 
from the standpoint of the adver- 
tising man as well. 

As usual the prizes have been 
won by those pictures that told 
their story in the most simple 
and convincing manner. We wish 
to thank those who took part in 
the contest for the interest shown . 
The awards were as follows : 

Grand Prize — $500.00 — S. H. 
LiFSHEY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLASS A 
First PWze- $500.00— Mrs. Mary 
L. Taylor, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second PHze — $400.00 — D. Van 
DE Venter, Winona Lake, Ind. 

Third Prize- $250.00 — A. E. 
Riley, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Fourth Prize — $150.00 — H. W. 
Gallichan, Gravenhurst, Ont., Can. 

Fifth PHze — $100.00 — J. B. 
Hostetleu, Davenport, Iowa. 

CLASS B 

First Pme — $300.00 — Mrs. Gus 
WiNTEMBERG, East Cleveland, Ohio. 

Second Prize -$150.00— James L. 
Baldwin, Auburn, N. Y. 

Third Prize-$75.00— Harry F. 
Blanchard, South Glen Falls, N. Y. 

Fourth Prize— $50.00— H. Krebs, 
Wayne, Pa. 

Fifth P7'ize— $25.00— Miss Emilie 
Zeckvver, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The following competent and 
representative men in their re- 
spective lines acted as judges : 

Dudley Hoyt, New York City. 

J. H. Garo, Boston, Mass. 

Geo. H. Fowler, Adv. Mgr., 
Colgate & Co., New York. 

Curtis P. Brady, Adv. Mgr., 
McClure's INIagazine, New York. 

Clarence D. Newell, Secy., 
Frank Seaman, Inc., New York. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The 

Eastman School 

of 

Professional 
Photography 



THE TIME THE PLACE 

Jan. 23, 24, 25 . . . BOSTON 

Convenient for Photographers of Maritime Provinces 

Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1 . MONTREAL 
Feb. 6, 7, 8 ... . TORONTO 



w 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Schaldenbrand Bros. 
Pittslnirgh, Pa. 




STUDIO LIGHT 



o 



UR PLANT 

In March, 1900, the Can- 
adian Kodak Co., Limited, com- 
menced business in Toronto, and 
its remarkable growth from small 
beginnings most satisfactorily em- 
phasizes the fact that Canadians 
will heartily support Canadian- 
made products of quality. 

At the commencement but ten 
employees were necessary, and 
a small three - story building, 
twenty by seventy-two feet, suf- 
ficed to house the entire plant. 
At the present time the em- 
ployees number three hundred, 
and the plant, with the new ad- 
dition just completed, encloses 
an area of one hundred and fifty 
thousand square feet. 

Within the confines of this 
plant are manufactured thousands 
of the famous Kodaks and Brow- 
nie cameras, hundreds of miles 
of the sensitive film for the 
taking of the pictures, acres in 
area of glass dry plates and sen- 
sitized papers, and tons of the 
chemicals necessary for the after 
processes of picture making. 

As a basis on which to estimate 
the enormous output of this com- 
pany, it may be stated that the 
annual output of film if extended 
in a strip two and a quarter 
inches wide would much more 
than loop the distance from To- 
ronto to Quebec, and the sensi- 
tized paper in a like strip would 
reach from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, while glass plates would 



serve to floor a two-foot bridge 
across Lake Ontario. 

The picture on the following 
page shows only the front of the 
executive buildings. 



M 



ANAGING THINGS 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 



A new travelin' man, a big 
fat feller came a bouncin' into the 
studio the other mornin', an' 
slaps the Boss on the shoulder 
an' says, "How are you. Old 
Top," and pokes a cigar at the 
openin' in the Boss' faice befoar 
the Boss could say anythin'. 

I could feal the temperature 
goin' down. 

The travelin' feller he flops 
open a sample case kerbang an' 
hands out sum pretty nifty stuff, 
but the Boss woodent enthuz, so 
l)retty soon the travelin' feller 
notices the ice sickles a hangin' 
on the gas fixtures an' found 
himself in a hurry to ketch a 
trane. 

After he wuz gone the Boss 
says, "It don' pay to start the 
overture with the loud peddle 
unless you know youre audeins 
is fond of ragtime." 

The Boss is some slick feller 
himself; I remember onct when 
we wuz try in' to brake in a grene 
reception room girl an' she wuz- 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT 



ent makin' mutch hedway with 
a lady who looked like she wuz 
the wife of the man that invented 
the mint. The Boss he takes a 
look careless like, an' then steps 
into his offis, an' comes out with 
a kuppel of korkin' fine prints 
that he wuz gettin' ready for a 
convention. He steps over to the 
girl, an' says, "Oh by the way, 
Miss Brown, here's a new style 
we were not quite ready to show, 
but I guess you'd better let this 
lady see them" — an' then he 
hands the pitchers, not to the 
girl but too the lady— that gives 
him a openin' — and when he wuz 
through — Gee, I wisht the price 
of that order wuz my wages. 

The Boss says that it don't 
pay very often too but in, but 
that when you have too, don't 
but — jus' slide in. 

Another feller comes in a while 
ago, an' asts the Boss diden he 
want to put in a side line of per- 
fumes to sell to hiz lady custom- 
ers, an' the Boss says, "Sure— I'm 
goin' to put in baled hay and 
horse shoin' next weke," and 
then befoar the feller could kome 
out of his trantz, he says, "I got 
a ole hen down on my plaice, 
sposin' she tride to set on foar 
nests too onct. " 

The Boss he bot one of them 
Cirkut cameras the other day, 
that's the kind you put on a tri- 
pod an* it will take a pitcher all 
the way roun' if you want it too. 

I asts the Boss why did he buy 
it, an' he sez he wuz goin' to put 



it on the roof of the studio nex 
spring when the baseball seezon 
opens, so'se he can kepe track 
of me. 

Betcha that aint the rele rea- 
son tho', as I herd him say when 
he wuz ordering it, that if they 
wuz anny frute hangin' on the 
dollar tree that you couldent 
reech, it wuz up to you to get a 
longer pole, an' that he guessed 
that Cirkut wud help him jar the 
top lims. 

I no he jiggled some off with 
that Graflex he bot las' yere, 
takin' pitchers durin' old home 
weke. 

The Boss says that some fellers 
can whittle mos ' anything out wi th 
a jack knife, if you give 'em time 
enough, but that he wants the 
tools for doin' things the bes' an' 
quickes' way, so nobody won't 
beat him to a job while he's 
whittlin' out another one. 

The Boss says branes in men's 
heds is a good dele like gold in 
gold mines; that some branes is 
high grade an' ezy to work, an' 
some is lo grade, hard to get at 
an' hard to handle, an' that there 
is more lo grade than hi grade of 
both gold an' branes. 

An' he says, that if you have 
the tools an' no how to handle 
'em there is good money in lo 
grade stuff. He says his is mosly 
lo grade so that's the rele reezon 
he gets all the tools to work 'em 
with. 

I ast him wot kind wuz my 
branes, an' he says that he aint 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Schaldenbrand Bros. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



Home Portrait 

Jiij Hchaldenhrand liron. 

PHtnlmryh, Pd. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



11 



discovered enough yet to have 
a assay made of. 

I guess I'd better lern how to 
use the tools. 



AN OCCASIONAL TANK 
DEVELOPMENT DIF- 
FICULTY 

A peculiar trouble which some- 
times occurs when developing in 
the Tank is the appearance of 
minute semi-transparent spots 
covering the entire surface of the 
negative. This is very noticeable 
on light backgrounds. Photog- 
raphers have frequently offered 
the explanation that this is a 
moldy effect, due to plates being 
old or having been kept in a 
damp place. Sometimes the 
Tank is blamed and is suspected 
of not being thoroughly clean or 
that the metal of which the Tank 
is constructed has an injurious 
action on the developer. 

These explanations are, how- 
ever, Incorrect. The effect is 
due to minute air bells from 
effervescence in the water when 
same is highly aerated. This 
trouble is most often experienced 
in the winter and in the early 
spring. When the water drawn 
from the supply pipes is highly 
charged with air, an effervescence 
occurs which requires some little 
time to subside. 

To prove that this effervescence 
does occur as stated it is only 
necessary to draw water into a 



glass pitcher, tumbler or bottle, 
and allow it to stand for a few 
minutes. When the water com- 
ing from the faucet is highly 
charged with air there will be 
thousands of small air bells form 
on the inside of the glass. This 
is just what occurs under the 
same conditions when developing 
in the Tank. The air, as it is 
being expelled from the water, 
forms numerous small bubbles, 
which adhere to the plate just 
the same as to the inside of the 
glass container. Naturally the 
bubbles would retard develop- 
mentj but after the development 
begins, these air bells gradually 
subside and by the time they 
have entirely disappeared the 
action of the developer becomes 
uniform. The negative will , how- 
ever, have a spotted or mottled 
appearance on account of develop- 
ment having been partially re- 
tarded where these little bells of 
air have attached themselves to 
the emulsion. 

This explanation is very simple, 
the action being of a mechanical 
nature instead of chemical as 
might hastily be concluded. The 
development being retarded only 
while the air bells are adhering 
to the surface of the plate ex- 
plains why spots are only semi- 
transparent. 

To overcome this trouble it is 
advisable to draw off a sufficient 
quantity of water, allowing it to 
stand for a while before using to 
mix the developer. It is also a 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT 



good plan to reverse the Tank 
and shake quite energetically 
after first immersing the plates. 
This will insure the surface of 
the plates being wet over thor- 
oughly and prevent bubbles from 
adhering. This effect is more 
liable to show itself when de- 
veloping in the Tank , as with tray 
development the rocking motion 
of flowing solutions back and 
forth, prevents bubbles from 
forming and adhering to the 
plates. A little attention to this 
detail will save much annoyance 
at times and avoid unnecessary 
retouching. 



i^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^^ Schaldenbrand Bros., 
whose work it is our good for- 
tune to use in illustrating this 
number of Studio Light, have 
for a number of years been pleas- 
ing their patrons with the very 
high quality of portraits shown 
in these illustrations. 

C. A. and F. W. Schalden- 
brand began their photographicv 
career with Mr. James Arthur 
of Detroit and after several years 
of experience with Mr. Arthur, 
located in Pittsburgh. They are 
at the present time conducting a 
very profitable and high -class 
portrait studio in the fashionable 
East End district. 

Schaldenbrand Bros, attribute 
much of their success to the qual- 
ity of the materials they use in 



their studio. The continued use 
of Artura and Aristo Platino, 
Seed Plates and the Eastman 
Plate Tank has been the import- 
ant factor in maintaining the high 
standard of work that has made 
their business such a success. 

Mr. F. W. Schaldenbrand, 
the operator, is a most enthusi- 
astic exponent of the principles 
of tank development. It is in 
the Tank that he produces the 
wonderful printing quality of his 
negatives. They are clean and 
crisp — the delicate details and 
gradations are all preserved — 
there is a total absence of fog 
which has such a deteriorating 
effect on the half-tones of a neg- 
ative. 

With Seed Plates and Tank 
Development he gets quality in 
the negative ; with Artura Paper 
he gets quality in the print. 
This high standard of quality in 
working materials combined with 
courtesy to customers and good 
business methods is the secret of 
the Schaldenbrand Bros, success. 



The Eastman Plate 
Tank will give you 
better quality in the 
negative, which means 
better quality in the 
finished print. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Schaldenbrand Bros. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




14 



STUDIO LIGHT 



rpHREE STATES 

-*- We have been quoted in a 
recent issue of a trade organ, 
"Portrait," as having withdrawn 
certain claims that we had made 
some two years ago as to the 
number of prizes taken at the 
Missouri convention of that year. 

We more than admit it — we 
call attention to the fact that we 
did at the time acknowledge our 
error. We had been misinformed 
and when we got the correct in- 
formation we immediately pub- 
lished it. Will the publishers of 
that trade organ be equally frank ? 
IOWA. 

In Studio Light for Septem- 
ber we published the names of 
the photographers who had been 
awarded prizes on Eastman papers 
at the Iowa convention. There 
were eight of them, including 
two first prize winners and the 
winners of the Grand Prize. 

There was a mix-up regarding 
the first prize in Class B, on 
which no doubt the Binghamton 
claims were based — but the facts 
are that Mr. J. A. Clay has the 
prize and his prints were on An- 
gelo. Will the Binghamton i)eople 
acknowledge their eiTor as we 
did in the Missouri case two years 
ago? No matter who has a let- 
ter or certificate (issued in error) , 
who was finally awarded the 
prize? Who has it? 

TEXAS. 

The following referring to the 



Texas convention appeared in 
"Portrait" for October: 

Cyko again repeated former suc- 
cesses and won three times as many 
first prizes as all other developing 
papers. 

The Association Cup was awarded 
to a Cyko print by Mr. O. Hege- 
mann, this gentleman also winning 
the Cyko Cup, and congratulations 
are also extended to Messrs. T. S. 
Higginbotham, G. W. Miller, F. M. 
Boyd, C. R. Sauer, Jos. Lux and 
M. L. Potash, who captured various 
other awards. 

Here are the facts as verified 
by us in every instance where 
claim is made that our papers 
were used. We have letters, in 
every case, from the photog- 
ra])hers themselves to prove our 
claims. 

Rating, Class A. 

First Prize — Jos. Lux, Sealy, 2 
Artura, 1 Cyko. 

Second Prize — F. M. Boyd, Gaines 
ville, Artura. 

Rating, Class B. 

First Prize— C R. Saner, New 
Braunfels, Artura. 

Second Prize — T. S. Higginboth- 
am, Anson, Artura. 

Class B. 

Fi7'st Prize — M. L. Potash, Vic- 
toria, Cyko. 

Cyko Cup. 

*0. Hegemjinn, San Antonio, 
Cyko. 

Association Cup. 

*0. Hegemann, San Antonio, 
ARTURA. 

Grand Trophy. 

L. T. Powell, San Antonio, 2 Ar- 
tura, 2 Cyko. 

Class A. 

First Prize — T. S. Higginbotham, 
Anson, Artura. 

Second Prize — Geo. W. Miller, 
Midland, Artura 



STUDIO LIGHT 



15 



In addition to above Mr. F. 
M. Boyd (Artura) was placed 
second in the Association Cup 
Class, though no prize was 
awarded. 

* Please note that Mr. Hegemann used 
Artura for the Association Cup, contrary to 
the statement in "Portrait," although, of 
course, using Cyko for the Cyko Cup. 

See Pages 16 and 17. 

Now will the Binghamton 
people, as we did in the case of 
Missouri two years ago, frankly 
publish a statement to the effect 
that they had been misinformed ? 
They claim "three times as many 
first prizes as all other develop- 
ing papers." Throwing out, of 
course, the Cyko cup, here are 
the facts : 

Exhibits on Artura exclusive- 
ly won three first prizes, mixed 
exhibits (with four prints on Ar- 
tura and three on Cyko) won 
two first prizes. Cyko won one 
first prize. 

Perhaps they meant to say 
that Cyko won "one-third as 
many prizes as another develop- 
ing paper," instead of "three 
times as many," and we shall 
gladly accept that explanation. 

Texas is a long way from Roch- 
ester, but Uncle Sam's mails are 
still working and we have letters 
in every case to prove our claims. 

Will "Portrait" acknowledge 
its error? 

ILLINOIS. 

The winners at Illinois were as 
follows : 

Grand Portrait. 
C. O. Towles, Washington, D. C. 



Class A. 
First Prize — A. R. Nicholson, 
Peoria. 

Second Prize — C. L. Venard, Lin- 
coln. 

Class B. 
First Prize — F. Fawkner, Cairo. 
Second Prize — C. L. Venard, Lin- 
coln. 

Class C. 
N. S. Godfrey, Abingdon. 
Special Class No. 1. 
F. Fawkner, Cairo. 

Miniature Class. 
FirstPrize — R. A. Heath, Pontiac. 
Second Prize — J. J. Fein, Chicago. 

Cabinet Class. 
First Prize— C C. Venard, Lin- 
coln. 

Second Prize — A. R. Nicholson, 
Peoria. 

Of the foregoing eleven prizes 
nine were on Eastman papers, 
with three each on Platinum, 
Aristo and Artura. Of the seven 
first prizes six were on Eastman 
papers. 

And we have the letters from 
these prize winners to prove the 
statement. 

WILL THEY QUIBBLE? 

Perhaps this publishing of lists 
of winners with one's papers is 
not important. We are by no 
means sure that it is, and may 
in the future, as we often have 
in the past, let them go by with- 
out comment. 

But we shall not pass by any 
such flagrant cases of misstate- 
ment as that published in "Por- 
trait" regarding the results in 
Texas. 

Will they admit that we are 
right or will they quibble.^ 



16 STUDIO LIGHT 



From October "Portrait" : 



The Texas Convention 

The Convention held at Houston, Tex., recently, 
was reported to be a success in every way, particular 
interest being displayed in the Cyko demonstrations. 
Cyko again repeated former successes and won three 
times as many first prizes as all other developing papers. 
/ The Association Cup was awarded to aTCYKO prints 
Lby Mr. O. H eg emann,/ this gentleman also winning 
the Cyko Cup~and congratulations are also extended 
to Messrs. T. S. Higginbotham, G. W. Miller, F. M. 
Boyd, C. R. Sauer, Jos. Lux and M. L. Potash, who 
captured various other awards. 



13 



A PART OF 



STUDIO LIGHT 17 



0. HEGEMANN 

PORTRAIT PHOTCXjRAPHER 

104« EAST HOUSTON STREET, AT THE BRIDGE r\ n y 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS C/c^. J/-// 















OUR PROOF 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT 



QEPIA NOTES 

^^ The Artura Method Sepia 
continues to gain in popularity as 
is shown by the many letters re- 
ceived praising the beautiful re- 
sults secured and requesting in- 
formation regarding points not 
mentioned in the working in- 
structions. 

In the introduction of a new 
process such as the Artura Method 
Sepia, questions arise regarding 
details which it is impossible for 
one to anticipate and include in 
a sheet of directions. The fol- 
lowing notes and suggestions will 
therefore be of interest to work- 
ers of the new sepia method. 

In the preparation of the Ar- 
tura- Method Toning Bath we 
would advise that the Chloride 
of Gold should not be added 
until after the bath has been 
heated and has almost reached 
the temperature at which it is to 
be used. 

The Chloride of Gold Solution 
should be prepared by dissolving 
a fifteen grain bottle of Chloride 
of Gold C. P. in fifteen drams 
of water. Of this solution add 
one dram to each sixteen ounces 
of the bath to be used. 

It will not be necessary to wash 
prints thoroughly that are to be 
toned soon after fixing, but they 
should be rinsed sufficiently to 
eliminate the surplus Hypo and 
hardener. If this is not done un- 
even tones and scum on the sur- 
face of prints will be the result. 



The simplest way of handling 
a toning bath such as the Artura- 
Method is to use a double tray 
or boiler. The upper tray should 
be smaller than the lower one and 
should be arranged so that the 
bottom and sides of the two trays 
are separated. Two small strips 
of wood placed in the lower tray 
will effectually keep the trays 
separated . The lower tray should 
contain water and the upper one 
the toning solution. Apply heat 
under the lower tray containing 
the water. In this way the heat 
is distributed evenly to the toning 
bath and it is much easier to 
maintain an even temperature. 
Should prints settle to the bot- 
tom of the bath there is not the 
danger of changing their surface 
by becoming too hot in spots, thus 
causing them to be glossy or shiny . 

Do not fix the prints after ton- 
ing in an old Hypo Bath or in one 
in which too many prints have 
been fixed. The object of fixing 
prints after they are toned is to 
remove a light-sensitive salt that 
is formed during the process of 
toning, and unless the fixing bath 
is in good condition this lighf 
sensitive salt will not be elimin- 
ated and the prints will change 
color — becoming warmer in tone. 



Artura uniformity and de- 
pendability are appreciated 
during the busy season. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Schaldenbrand Bros. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




20 



STUDIO LIGHT 



PRACTICAL SUGGES- 
TIONS 

IDEAS THAT HAVE BEEN TRIED BY PHOTOG- 
RAPHERS AND FOUND TO BE USEFUL. 

The average photographer is 
occasionally called upon to pho- 
tograph floral pieces and as a rule 
finds it rather hard to suitably 
arrange a number of pieces. A 
photographer located near a 
prominent florist's writes: "As 
we often have to photograph floral 
designs, we have been compelled 
to find a suitable way to get good 
results. We use a large frame cov- 
ered with a wire screen to which 
the floral pieces may be attached 
with small wire hooks. The 
frame may be set at any angle, 
being supported by props at the 
sides. A suitable ground may 
be used behind the screen and 
the mesh of the wire will not 
be at all objectionable in the 
picture." a 

If you have a bottle in the 
darkroom containing a solution 
you i)articularly wish to designate 
from other solutions, or if you 
have bottles about the studio con- 
taining poisons, they may be 
readily distinguished by placing 
several pins through the corks 
from the under side. The busi- 
ness ends of the pins projecting 
from the toi)S of the corks will 
quickly remind the careless per- 
son of the nature of the contents. 



In flowing the back of a nega- 



tive with Ground Glass Substi- 
tute, never drain the solution 
back into the bottle. The solu- 
tion which has been so exposed 
to the air has partially evaporated 
and the surplus solution should 
not go back into the bottle to 
contaminate the unused portion. 
Never leave the bottle uncorked. 



While stained fingers have not 
been in evidence so much since 
the Introduction of the plate 
tank, there are still many who 
use tray development and conse- 
quently are possessors of beauti- 
fully colored nails and fingers. 

This stain may readily be re- 
moved even though it has been 
on the fingers for some time, or 
the remedy may be applied each 
day after developing and the 
hands kept perfectly clean. 

Dissolve Yz ounce of potassium 
permanganate in 8 ounces of 
water. The stained fingers 
should be rubbed well with this 
solution which will stain them a 
deep rich brown. Rub the fingers 
thoroughly with a saturated solu- 
tion of jjotassium metabisulphite 
and both the pyro and perman- 
ganate stains will be removed and 
the fingers will be perfectly clean. 
The hands should of course be 
well rinsed afterwards. 

To remove stains from under 
the nails, use a brush to apply 
the two solutions. We know of 
no ill effects resulting from the 
proper use of the above remedy. 




FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT 



By Schaldenbrand Bros. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




22 



STUDIO LIGHT 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obhged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
(luoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in^first, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one v[\onih.,iipcrvuincnt 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut wanted. These cuts 
consist of the illustrations 
only, thus making it possi- 
ble for the printer to change 
the wording or the amount 
of space to be occupied by 
the wording if so desired. 

C. K. Co., Ltd. 




For Christmas 

Have you thought of por- 
traits as a solution to the gift 
problem.? A dozen of your 
portraits made in one of our 
new distinctive styles will 
make twelve appropriate gifts, 
each one of which is sure to 
be appreciated. 



Make the appmntjnent to-day. 



THE 
PYRO STUDIO 



No. 172. Price. 40 cents. 



STUDIO LIGHT 23 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional Photography for 1912 



New York City . Jan. 16, 17, 18 

Boston, Mass Jan. 23, 24, 25 

Montreal, Can Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1 

Toronto, Can. Feb. 6, 7, 8 



The Eastman School of Professional Photography will open the 
season of 1912 in New York City with a better and more interesting 
course of instruction than ever before. There will be many added 
features that are entirely new and novel and the old features that 
are retained will be improved upon in so many ways that we can 
truly say, the school will be entirely new. 

To those who have previously seen the school, it will be well 
worth another visit; to those who have never attended, the oppor- 
tunity should not be allowed to pass. It will pay you many times 
over in dollars and cents for the three days you are away from your 
business. 



24 STUDIO LIGHT 

SERVICE 

The Keynote of our Success is 
Service. 

Service means not only promptness, 
attention and courtesy — these we ren- 
der as a matter of course — but above 
and beyond all we give you the benefit 
of our thorough knowledge, gained by 
years of experience as dealers in photo- 
graphic goods. 

We have all the 

Canadian- Made Products of the 

Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. 



J. G. RAMSEY & CO., Limited, 

Toronto, Canada, 



STUDIO LIGHT 25 

WHEN THE 
CHRISTiMAS RUSH 
COMES YOU WILL 
FIND US READY TO 
SUPPLY EVERY 
STUDIO NEED 
PROMPTLY ON 
SHORT NOTICE 

Everything 
for Photography 

A complete and fresh line of the Canadian- 
made products of the Canadian Kodak Co. , Ltd. 



THE D. H. HOGG CO., Reg'd 
Montreal, Canada 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT 



EASTMAN PRINT ROLLERS 

SUBSTANTIALLY CONSTRUCTED FOR 
PROFESSIONAL USE 




The Eastman Single Print Roller has a single ten inch roll, first 
quality heavy white rubber. The weight is a full five pounds. 



Eastman Single Print Roller 



.50 




The Eastman No. 1 Double Print Roller has two eight inch rolls 
covered with first quality heavy white rubber and the solid heavily 
nickeled handle affords a strong, firm grip; weight same as the 
single roller, five pounds. 

Eastman No. 1 Double Print Roller $».00 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

All Dealer. Toronto, Canada 



STUDIO LIGHT 27 

Warm, mellow, black and 
white prints — rich velvety 
sepias. 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

Each offers a medium for 
the expression of character 
and individuality. 
The highest quality in the 
finished print. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All Dealers, 



28 STUDIO LIGHT 



98.2% Pure 



When you buy one pound of 
Kodak Tested Carbonate of Soda 
you receive IS-Jk ounces pure 
Carbonate of Soda. 



Analysis of Kodak Carbonate 
of Soda 

Sulphates, ----- None 
Heavy Metals, _ _ _ _ None 

Chlorides, - - - - Slight Trace 

Iron, ----- Slight Trace 
Na H C O3 (bi-earbonate), - - None 

Na2 CO3 (carbonate), - - - 98.2% 

Moisture, ----- 0.85% 

LOOK FOR ( Qk ] THIS SEAL 

Canadian Kodak Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Canada. 

All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



29 



Fog destroys the 
brilliancy of a neg- 
ative. 

Compare the rabbet 
edge of a Tank Devel- 
oped negative with one 
developed by a dark- 
room light. The Tank 
negative has clean edges 
— is clean throughout. 
The tray developed 
negative usually 
shows fogged edges 
— that fog extends over the entire negative, 
deteriorating the halftones. 




Use 



The Eastman 
Plate Tank 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 



All Dealers. 



Toronto, Canada 



30 STUDIO LIGHT 




The mark 

of 
distinction. 



We protect this seal with 
painstaking care that it may 
protect our products and our 
customers. 

When you see the seal you 
know that the goods are right. 



Canadian Kodak Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



All Dealers. 



STUDIO LIGHT 



31 



The Century Vignetter 




Showing Vignetter attached to Semi-Centennial Stand. 

This Vignetter can be instantly adjusted to any position, all 
movements being controlled from the back of the camera. It has no 
cords or strings to wear out, and is attractively finished. 

The Century Vignetter can be fitted to any camera stand with- 
out the use of tools. 

Efficient in operation, simple in construction and made to stand 
continued usage, the Century Vignetter is the best. 



CENTURY CAMERA DIVISION, 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT 



The Inslip Style 

For Sepia, Black and White and Re-developed Prints, 
"Slipped in" Cabinet Prints, Square and Oval. 




The Inslip, for the "Slip-in" print, does away with the bother 
of trimming your print, and an excellent style when you want to 
deliver quick. The insert is of good quality Bristol, deckled edge, 
with a rich two-line design tinted in soft shades to match and centre 
cut out, so you can just slip your print underneath and do away with 
pasting and trimming. This is one of the best sellers ever designed. 

Sample on receipt of three two-cent 8tam2)s. 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 

The Canadian Card Co., Toronto, Can.