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11515 39 Ave., 
Ednionton, Al'l-a. 
T6J OrAS 

10 Dec aO 

The Advisory Gonunittee on University affairs, 
c/o Peter Maxwell-Muir, Executive Secretaiy, 
805 - 9th Street S.W., 
Calgary, Alte. Td? ilYS 

Gentlemen: 

'»Vhile attending the Spring Session for Seniors at the Uni- 
versity of Aluerta this Spring, I mece the sug^^estion th^t the 
university establish an Office for Seniors, The iaea was given 
enthusiastic reception by the class on Contemporary Canaaian 
Issues and was espoused by the instructor. 

Subsequently I wrote a personal letter to the President of 
the University, Dr, M, Horowitz, outlining the prposal. He replied 
sympathetically, as did the pirector of Student Affairs and the 
Chairman of the President's Coamjittee on Seniors, Cojdes of this 
correspondence are herewith submitted for the attention of the 
Conmittee, 

!bty present purpose in appee^ring before this Cominitt^^e is to 
bring this suggestion to the attention of the Comir.ittee in the hope 
th-at it will be given wider attention throughout Aberta, and also 
the attention and support of the Provincial Goverrmert, 

I would like to emphasize that the handling of the participation 
of Seniors at the University level is a special problem and cannot 
simply be adequately handled within a program for 'mature students'. 
There are several reasons for this, including the aspects of funding, 
health, suitability of courses, ana social requirements, among others. 



Yours 




Wiilter R. Fryers. 









I 



11515 39 jive., 
EocoutoE, Altu, 

To J o;,;5 



11 May 1980. 

Dr. M. Horowitz, President, 
Universit-y of Alberta, 
Edmonton, Alt a. 

Dear Dr. Horc^tz: 

I write to suggest thot the University oi' Alberts, establish an 
"Office for Feniors". 

As a Senior Eyself , I have been talcing courses for a couple of 
years anu I believe I can perceive a need for such an office anc zhe 
services that it could provide. 

If the University is interested, there is a great potential for 
participation in the University by Seniors, but it would reruire some 
special arranfe-ements to reach this group end then to serve them in any 
substantial way. 

As thinfcis now stand most Seniors feel somewhat alien to the Cam- 
pus, where ti.e entire accent is on youth (except for the Sprinf/ Session 
for Seniors). 

The beriatric problem i^i society is growing. A multitude of 
Ljeasures to accocji.odate Seniors have alre^ay been taicen by all levels 
of government and by otner institutions €oo; but much reiriains to be done. 
The University Iv-.s a great op]ortunity here which could be of mutual 
benefit. Supjort in funding n-ould likely be available from several 
sources. 

An Office for Seniors would necessarily make a modest start, evolving 
as both demand and supjort developed, 1^ time it coulc serve as a proto- 
type for similar activities at other academic institutions, if such do 
not exist already. The requirement it, of course, a general one, appli- 
cable widely in Alberta, Canada ano beyond. 

Some directions that such a function mighL take could include: 

, Specific contacts via media, mailings, brochures, specJcer;s, etc, to ac- 
quaint Seniors with the facilities for themj 

, Intrainural bulletins for Senior students; 

, Inasmuch as the acadecic interests and recuiretjents of Seniors differ 
significantly from degree anc career oriented younger students, the 
selection of sultaole existing courses an',, the development of ne-v end 
special courses could be assiitea by the Olfice, as -^ell as proviair^ 
counselling, to the indivioual Seruor; 






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, The social needs of Senior students are unique anc. worthy of at- 
tention. Development of suitable organizations aric fijcilities could 
be encouraged by the Office, in conjunction perhapc with tne Stuc;ents' 
Union or tlie Graduate Students Association, or otrjer; 

• Liaison wito other institutions with siiuilar facilities. 

I spoke to Dean of Students, Dr. Burton Snith, on the telephor^ 
about this idea. He iamediately expressed interest and encouragement. 
I will be providing hiw with a copy of trds letter. 

Thie presentation is not intended as a criticism of present arran^je- 
ments for Seniors, which I have found generally helpful. It is siciply to 
sug£,est further development in this area. 



Yours trxily. 



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Tfelter R. Fryers, 



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office of the President 



The University of Albcru 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6G 2J9 

Telephone: 40}4J2-52t2 
403 4)2-}620 



May 15, 1980 



Mr. Walter R. Fryers 
11515 - 39th Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6J 0M5 



Dear Mr. Fryers: 



Re: Office for Seniors 



Thank you very much for your letter of May 11, 1980. I 
am placing importance on the need for this University to do more 
than it is now doing for Senior Citizens. I believe that we all 
benefit by having Seniors among us. Whether it will be possible 
at this time to move in the direction you suggest I am not cer- 
tain. As you know, we have serious budget problems. 

You indicate that you are forwarding a copy of your 
letter to the Dean of Students. It will be important for me to 
receive advise from him. I am also forwarding copies of our 
correspondence to the Director of Student Affairs and the Chair- 
man of the President's Committee on Seniors. 

I appreciate your taking the trouble to write. 



MH/nm 

CO. 



Yours sincerely 

Myer Horowitz 
President 



VT 



Dean B.M. Smith 
Dean of Students 

Mrs. Ruth Groberman 
Director of Student Affairs 

Mrs. Sharon Abu-Laban, Chairman 
President's Committee on Seniors 
% Department of Sociology 



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DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

TELEPHONE I 403 1 4323234 




THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 

EDMONTON. CANADA 
T6G 2H4 



May 18, 1980 



Mr. Walter R. Fryers 
11515-39th Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6J 0M5 



Dear Mr. Fryers 



Re: Office for Seniors 



I am in receipt cf your letter of May 11, 1980, to President Myer 
Horowitz, in which you suggest that the University of Alberta establish 
an Office for Seniors. 

The President's Committee on Gerontology is actively exploring 
ways to further the gerontological dimension on our campus - through 
teaching, research and service activities. One of our areas of concern 
has been admission procedures, guidance and opportunities for mature 
students, generally. Your suggestion regarding an office for seniors will 
be part of our sub-committee deliberations this coming fall. 



Thank you for your interest and suggestions 



Sincerely, 

Sharon Mclrvin Abu-Laban 
Associate Professor and 
Chair, President's Committee 
on Gerontology 



c.c. 



President Myer Horowitz 



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DO YOU HAVE 
SUGGESTIONS 

FOR ALBERTA UNIVERSITIES? 



The Advisory Committee on University Affairs is made up of 
citizen volunteers representing all areas of the province. Its 
purpose is to solicit the views of the public on matters affecting 
Alberta's universities and to pass them immediately and directly 
to the Minister of Alberta Advanced Education and Manpower. 

You are invited to present your views at a meeting of the 
Minister's Advisory Committee on University Affairs — Dr. John 
G. Paterson, Chairman — to be held in 



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EDMONTON 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9 
Room 315, University Hall 
UniversKy of Alberta 
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 



WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 10 
Dogwood Room 
Edmonton Inn 
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 



Interested groups and individuals wishing to make oral or written 
presentations should contact 

Peter Maxwell-Muir, Executive ^Secretary 
805 - 9th Street S.W. 
CALGARY, Alberta T2P 2Y6 
Phone collect, 261-6192 



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ADVANCED EDUCATION 
AND MANPOWER 



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CULTURE 



Historical Resources 
Historic Sites Service 



403/427-2022 

Old St. Stephen's College 

8820 - 112 Street 

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 

T6G 2P8 



August 21 , 1981 



Mr. V/alter R. Fryers 
n353A 

Technocracy Inc. 
9203. S 112 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6G 2C5 

Dear Mr. Fryers: 

The topic you propose "The Technocracy Moment on the Prairies in the 
1930's" may indeed prove of interest to the Prairie Forum . Prairie 
Forum cannot, however, undertake to fund research. In order to obtain 
support, you would have to make the traditional applications to either 
the Social Science and Humanities Council, or to other bodies that 
might be interested. The Journal of course follows the normal 
procedures of sending all submitted materials to at least two outside 
readers for their comments before any final decision can be made. 

In any case, I encourage you in your research endeavour - it will 
undoubtedly present many challenges. 

Yours truly, 




Frits Pannekoek 
Editor 
Prairie Forum 

FP/bm 




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25 July 1981 



Prairie Forum, 

Canadian Plains Research Center, 

University of Regina, 

Regina, Sask. 

S^S 0A2 

Sirs : 

A bullttin posted in the Humanities 3uilding on this 
University of Alberta cani us drew my attention to your journal 
"Prairie Forum", and your interest in appropriate papers. 

I would like to propose an erticle on the Technocracy 
movement on the Prairies. Althou^'h still extant, it flourished 
mainly in the Canadian west in the *30*s. Its present status 
is precarious, and its future role is still uncertain, but it 
has been on the prairie scene for nearly fifty years, and would 
seem to warrant some academic attention. 

It will be difficult to pull » history of the organization 
together, hftich of the record has been dissipated and the num- 
ber of original participants is rapidly diniinishing. Access to 
newspaper records would be a principal source. Also fefelpful 
would be access to federal records associated with its ban by 
Order-in-Council for a period during the 2nd World War - & ban 
which was unconditionally lifted later in the war. 

If you find this item of history of interest, perhaps you 
could suggest how best to proceed with the research involved 
and, perhaps, how to enlist financial support for the costs 
incurred. 

l^ own association with the organization dates frwn 1936, 
principally in Manitoba and Albert* • We have had some succasa 
at this office in collecting some archival records. Another 
principal source would be the organization head office now at 
SsHannah, Ohio. 

lours sincerely. 



Walter R. Fryers. 



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11515 39 Ave., 

Edino: '.on, Al ta . 
T6J 0M5 

26 Mirch 1981. 

Letters to the Journal, 
Box 2i^21, 
Edmonton, Alta. 
T5J 2S6 

Sirs: 

Roy Farran's column ©f L4th l"Iarch was an interesting one, under the 
heading "Inflation is symptom but the disease is debt". As a former 
provincial cabinet member, I-tr. Farran has, perhaps, more insights than 
most int» the financial operations of the economy. He compares our 
present situation with that of the late 1920' s, preceding 'the cataclysm 
©f 1929' and the ensuing Great Depression of the 1930's. In both cases, 
he suggests that the menace was then and is now the 'monumental debt' 
and a resulting 'crisis of confidence'. 

So far, so good. But one raaist look further for the underlying 
caBses of the collapse of the 1930 's and ef the one now widely apprehended 
for these times. VJhy 'the pile up of debt', as Mr. Farran terms it. 

The answer: it was required to provide purchasing power commensurate 
with our rapidly increasing productive capacity. In successive stages 
mechanization, automation, cybernation (robotics) have combined to steadily 
eliminate man-hours in production - the main and basic source of purchasing 
power, Elxpansion of credit (another word for debt) became necessary 
to make up the deficit of purchasing power. 

Ever since the nadir of 'he Great Depression in the early thirties 
b»th g»vernments and private enterprise have enthusiastically espoused 
the Keynesian doctrine of expanding debt (credit), and so spend our way 
out of economic shut-down. It follows a predictable sequence. First 
comes credit inflation. Then monetary (price) inflation. Finally, 



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interest inflation. All to maintain the validity ef the growing debt 
structure, and ensure the continuance of a 'Price System' of operating 
the economy. 

But the driving force behind inflation and burgeoning debt is now, 
as before, the pervasiv* advance ©f science and technology, which combine 
to increase production and decrease the man-hours involved. Hence tha 
shcrt-fall in purchasing power. 

Debt structures can collapse, in whole or in part, and have, ©n oc- 
casion in the past. Sometimes an economy can be rebuilt. In a modern 
industrial society financial collapse is always a disaster. In present 
day America it is not really an option, for the physical operation of the 
means whereby we live must bo continuously assured whether the Price System 
is bankrupt or not. 

So we come to the epochal dilemma of 20th century America. We per- 
sist in trying to operate our high technology social mechanism by archaic 
'Price System' techniques. On the one hand, our technology can produce 
an abundance. On the other hand, our value system of exchanging men-hours 
for purchasing power denies it to us. This cor>flict and the problems it 
generates (including the ovei*whelming debt structure and its ultimate 
collapse) cannot be resolved without a fundamental change in the social 
structure to a non-value non-price system: a Technocracy . 

The crisis we face is more than a 'crisis of confidence' and a failing 
debt structure. It will be a crisis of survival . Soon or late, this is 
the re-casting of society which must be faced in America. Temporizing 
with desperate treatment of symptoms will merely add to the ultimate trauma 
of facing major social change and the building of the 'Technate of North 
America', Its time we took the challenge'. 




Walt Fryers. 







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Roy 

Farran 




Inflation is symptom 
but the disease is debt 

Edmonten Jpurnal - I4. i^-far 81 



As we labor along in the thralls of a Central Canadian 
ploy to retain and expand domination over a country 
4,000 miles in length, we should not forget that the 
drama is being played against a backdrop of world 
recession. 

The world is walking on eggs, fearful that recession 
might become depression in the style of the '30s. 

Remedies are being tried in as many different styles as 
there are economists. Most are trying to fight inflation by 
restraining the growth of money supply. But apart from 
that common denomimator, approaches are as varied as 
the colors of the rainbow. 

There are those who think solely of restoring the value 
of money, of slashing government spending and of 
shocking the workers back into production. At the other 
pole are those like Galbraith who say the market 
economy can no longer work without controls because 
power is too concentrated in the hands of big business 
and big unions. There's the Reagan style which believes 
in the short sharp shock of simultaneous tax cuts and 
budget cuts. And there are all sorts of hangovers from 
Keynes who think economies can be fine tuned by 
turning the money tap off and on. 

There are many parallels with the '30s. The origins of 
the Great Depression which hurt more people than either 
world wars are well enough known. 

And the conclusion is that it was caused more by a 
crisis of confidence in credit than by inflation itself, 
although both are interlinked. 

It was unmanageable debt that started the panic in the 
world banking system. And it is monumental debt that 
menaces us again today. 

The pile-up of debt continued from 1890 to the 
cataclysm of 1929. After the First World War, the 
European allies owed huge sums to the United States and 
sought to find them through reparations from defeated 
Germany. Though she had suffered most in loss of life 
and property, France had the strongest economy in the 



•20s. 

The Germans had wheelbarrow inflation in the early 
'20s until a smart banker called Schacht issued a new 
currency, raised tariffs and controlled foreign exchange. 
Germany also reneged on reparations and allies reneged 
on their debts to the Americans. 

Lloyd George, a Liberal, stopped inflation in its 
tracks, but in doing so turned full employment into 16 
per cent out-of-work. 

With the discovery of cheap energy in Texas, the 
Americans had a wonderful boom. Every speculator in 
the land borrowed to get in on the game. Europeans 
loaned them money at high interest rates and euphoria 



gripped the world. 

Austria collapsed and took Germany down with it. 
The French, ever conservative over money, could have 
helped more, but chose otherwise. The British tried and 
were sucked into the ra thole too. The French occupied 
the Ruhr when reparations were not paid. A crook called 
Hatry was discovered in an enormous swindle in 
London, the British banks began recalling loans 
everywhere including the U.S. and the bubble burst. 

It vvas the collapse of a pyramid of debt and the 
collapse began when the bankers lost their nerve. High 
interest rates only made matters worse because they hit 
hardest at the businesses which provided the jobs. 
Inflation could be hcked, but only at enormous cost. 
Farmers in North America suffered, not because they 
couldn't grow their own food but because they were 
mortgaged to the hilt. 

The cycle changed when money was spent freely in the 
Second World War and the Americans had another 
magnificent prolonged boom. But the pyramiding of 
debt has been occurring again since the heydays of the 
'50s. And this time we have the wild cards of expensive 
energy and no gold standard. To recycle petro-dollars, 
banks have been borrowing short and lending long in the 
style of Britain in the '20s but on a much bigger scale. 
High interest rates are again in vogue to try to slow the 
mounting debt. Welfare states compete with business as 
borrowers and it is job-providing industry that is hurt. 

Some people are now suggesting the radical alternative 
of allowing government to bypass the banking system by 
printing interest-free money for its own use. If it reduced 
its appetite first, that might work. Who knows for sure? 
That's what Schacht did and spent it on guns. 

One thing is certain, however. Inflation is the painful 
symptom, but the disease is debt. And a pure market 
economy has not been possible since 1920. Even a 
Montagu Norman, famous Bank of England pre-war 
governor, would agree. 



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1, Author Heilf-'roi:nf?r is an ecoiKMuist, Vju* his bcoic is liOt about 
conventional economics. H-; avr^ics ^he moot obvinus sc^nari'^s that oth'^r 
economists EiGi'-t emphasize: that of econoiidc collapse o; iDnnp,t,'.ry 
structures, or the debt structure, or value systems, property ri^^hts, ant; 
such, Hedoes mention some economic features of the day 4^.ich as infl/^tion) 
as distnrbins ractors but not funtiamental factors leadin(;j to coilr.pse. 
Instead, he pursues jdoxfexiiixiEHxi^KKs 5 fundamental physical f<-ctors that 
he considers presage disaster; 

1. popul..tion gro-vth 

£, Ecological d.JDaL,e 

3. Tar, 
all of whiich he su^^^ests are the conseouence of the inexorable adv '.nee of 
science and techology. 

A 

2, But none of these factors are comprehensively or expertly/' analyzed. 

In each case he Lakes some coiiteroporiry and aominent trena and extrapolate; 
it to a disastrous conclusion, I have identified this t^-'pe of argument 
as a case of 'extrapolitis simplex'. It is a fairly common condition 
among latter day apoc.ilyptic_^friters, ♦Pessimism is fashionable today' 



says^u. '.^Titer in . 



I >ik i . u'^IX ... .4 the or^^an of the Atociic Fner^y 



Commission of Can.iua, Inueea it is. And no wonder there is a sp--te of 

books on the market offering various scenarios of gloom and doom - it 

sells] 

5, Heilbronner's book on The Human prospect is just one such. Others 

include 'The Technological Society'by Jacques Ellul (used in an course 

on Anthropology); The Closing Circle, by Barry Commoner; The Yco- 

Spasm Report, by Alvin Toffler; One Cosmic Instant by JohJi A, Livingston; 

Limits to Growth by the Club of Tome; The Diseconomies of Or -.vth, bv 

H. V, ibdgson, and so on anu so on. You can add lots more. 







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4, There is another characteristic of these tr«rnriy apolcal^^^^tic •.Titers 
that I vioui'l like to mention. They usually adopt the 'one ..crLi' vip-.v 
in their treatment of their subj^rct. That is, they e^ratuitoucly adopt 
all the varied problems of different parts of the world as our v-ry own, 
blithely overriding and ie,noring alx intermediate administrative and econo- 
mic boundaries and resjx)nsibilities. For them it is net enGu^;" that we 
solve our own problems nationally or coatinentally as the one step that 

we can manatje. It must be universal, however impractical. This posture, 
which we might term 'the world- statesman pes ture' is fxxx a faiily recent 
phenominon. Largely ignored are the legions of scientists an(i technologists 
fiV'yH i^y -teTatxwaT td xkfeg /AJikx of every country who are observing, measuring 
and defining the problems and working out the mtltiplicity of coping 
actions* within their own areas of expertise and resp'^nsibility, ik 
I think this phenomenon of the 'one world mega-view' arises from the 
relatively new paradigm we all have of the view of earth from sj^face. 
Terms like 'space-ship earth' and 'global village' are the buzz words 
vSxkkKXjaaca for these trendy new writers, 

5, There is a curious and contemporary anaomaly in our attitudes today. 
On the one hand, we indulge ourselves nationally in prog-rams and policies 
that favor disintegration, such as 'Separatism' and our squabbles oyer 
rights ana shares in our apparent scarcities, such as energy, and property 
rights. That is the real world of the day, ^ 

6, On the other hand, we make a quantum leap in altruistic concern, 
abandoning self-interest, and talk loftily of world-wide integration, 
sharing our resources fairly with the hane-nots of the world, and de- 
vising of 'new economies' to do it. Politicians, humanists, world 
bankers, exporters and multi-national corporations out-do each other 
talking about policies and progr/ims for exporting our mans ana money 
aboraad. Fortunately for our own self-interest and the welfare of 



5^. 



our chiinren /.nd future e;eneraLinn3, ^.dr. i:^ i;.r;.ei:- n Tvorl-'--vip v/of 
words. It is botn unreal aiid i::ipracticc2, 

7, But there is an intermedirite scenario that I '.vould like to mention. 
It can be suamed up in the term 'continental inte^ation'. It is a 
realistic, con<tmctive and practical concept. It is an on-£;oin(; -^ro-.vth 
phenomenon arising out of our advancing, technolOj^ical society. But it 
is getting little attention at the raoment, for reasons t'nat we will not 
attempt to analyze here anci now, 

8. In respect to Heilbronner aJid his book, I would venture an opinion 
that he is a committed 'one-worlder' , searching for larger ann more in- 
soluble problems on which to write books of trepidation and anxiety, 

9. His book focusses on what he terms external challenges. He em- 
phasizes thBee of these; 

a. Population growth 

b. War 

c. Environmental disruption, 

I cannot accept his simplistic presentation of any of thf^.^.e 'threats', 

10, First in respect to Population, His projections in the first 

atxrKk Aug, 
edition of 1973 were already obsolete by the date of his revision of Oct 

1979, a mere 6 years u 3 months later. He accedes to tlds r*^vision but 
persists in his Maithusian scenario. Even his revised data c.re now out- 
dated, China has just recently announced a program of 1 child per faiidly, 
which would instigate ZPO (Zero Population Growth) more abnjptly that 
anyone would have imagined. This is an exa..ple of the aoaptability of the 
human species and human society, and of the naievity of simple extra- 
polations, Heilbronner' s treatment of the population problem is simplistic 
in the extreme. He avoids >[^/y contrary and complicating trends that would 
upset his scenario of doom, We coula mention factors such as the efiect 
of high technology irdimiting popxilation size and even decreasing it. 



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(iiote Jofiepn P, Sf^en,,l*-r' s books: -\-c;ir.._, 7^ro poj'uiat^on "rcv/th, .■■nrl 

Tri.Jice Ff:ce.<? rej>op;j ation), 

11, S econd in respect to '"ar: ffi.s main conc^.-rn is, to my aptonishr)°nt, 

the spectacle Oi weak xsLkia have-iict nations attacjcirif-; stron^j nations 

with nuclear weapons. He sugj^-sts "wars of re-distribution V--- nuclf^ar 

weaponry" as perriaps "the only way by which the t-'oor rMitions can here 

to reicedy their condition" (page 45). He is careful not tc exan.ine this 

proposition in its practical details, as it would not stand up tc analysis 

militarily or economically, in my opinion. He is not a military/ expert 

for sure, and apparently has not troubled to defer to experts in any 

field, preferring to sJc let his book stand as a personal statement. 

And that is all it is. 

i;c. His ord external threat is directed at Environmental disruption. 

His favorite here is the possible warming of the atmosphere by heat 

CTiissions from roan's activities and the greenhouse effect of incre;ising 

COc ir^ the atmosphere. He could have chosen other portents of disaster. 

Some meteorologists (cliroatologists) focus on the threat of an ice age. 

Others decry the de-forestation of the Amazon basin of its jungle cover. 

Others attribute the balance of gases in our atmosphere to the micro- 

orgardsms in the top millimeter of the ocean. And so on. The atmosF here 

is an extremely complex system. But not to Heilbronner, And so to with 

other disruptions of the environment. They are matters of urgent concern 

to the world community of scientists and technologists, who will devise 

the means of coping. But Heilbronner is not a scientists. He is a 

populist writer for the contemporary market of pessimism. He is peddling 

Siacoi a concoction of 99'^ gloom and It hope. But he writes well, 

13, Although I am critical of Heilbronner I must concede that he and his 

contemporaries of similar vein do serve a purpose. They are raisin^ our 

collective consciousness of our environment, our social 'jxidTf ti-' r^j wn- 

and our collective respr nsibility to preserve our heritage for future 
gener,xtions. 



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I find myself in agreement with Heilbronnsr end many others in 

that I anticipate a major social crisis in the foreseeable future 

and that major social change will emerge out of the crisis. And 

are 
I agree that the root causeslH scientific and technological pressures, 

}^ competence is on the scientific side. Heilbronner's is on 
the economic side. But ty a curious inversion of roles, 1 anticipate 
that the most critical factors that will instigate ^exkkm crisis and 
change will be economic factors such as the collapse of an overwhelming 
debt structure and the catastrophic devaluation of money and the entir- 
value system. 

}fy final criticism of Heil tronner's hook rests in the title. 
Considering the i±±x± limitations of his presentation, it is presumrtious 
and arrogant to designate ±x« his thesis"The Human Propsect." 



~>.-" >;..-?*] 



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3 \fy:i^-.<'^;'f£s. 



'Tfi' fiJUPffv^iil.f^ .y- 



"n :*\.-^- :■ - v ' 



m 



P.O. Box i;60b, 
Mecaey, [dXt., 

^9<*"^-«P"9i<^ f June, l^li^ * 



iJT, J. BronowGkl, 
"AsC'-jnt ol' M.;.n" ':---.ri^-;f3, 

T oronoo, unt,. 



xjeax Dr. lironowsici: 



;4.ifc^^^ c/o The Salk Institute for liologlcal Studios, 

P.O. lox law, 

S£in OlagOf 
California. 92112. 



I have watched with great ixitere;.;t roobt of your pre-;entaLions in 
•Thf.^ Ascont of i(ian» soriic. It hxr;. tiirilled me both for its content 
all!-, for tl>; renfnveo hopt tk.t this wedlum - color TV - can ful'^fil its 
promiua of someday be'-'owing a gre.X feachiiit; c.evice for F.ver^rino.n - by 
bringiriij' ug great teacij^rs in a peri.:onal way, 

yru cor.cl-ude'.' with a sotai-iiii; ae .operate appeal Lo Eyerymau to join 
in tho cpirit and substance of the Science - tb? knowledge - ol our age. 
You are clearly on ^hc ci'^e oi' maLiG participation, raii/hor t-ten being 
coiiT.'.;nt •'iih a siiptir-' lite group jt^tiring bri^ iaaG:^e3, In t;dw I aiii 
very much with you, Tb? Ciirth, th. universe, the wcrki:; anu kno,ieae,e 
of Man, are of anc for everyone, 

I regard you as something of an indomitably brave man in your at- 
tempt to transcend, through the mac . medium of television, tiie cultur^J. 
blocks of these confuaed dayb, A magnificent efi'ort for oae man, But 
is it any more tiian a small splash in a great ocean? A fe.v ripplej, 
and gone? Die: you get much response? '."."hcit did thiy .^say? 

This response - my response - is special and purposeful. I aa a 
partisan - an cictivist - for r.cience. I aia a Technocrat (frcra 19 36). 
This position probably liiuits my au..i.;nce, my colleagues, my group, to 
those who can consi'Ier &x\ix finally make ^ coiJiaittrnfont to o^ction proao- 
tiiig thf; ap/lic.tion of . cience to society - Techno crc.cy. The action, 
in tills Case, is one oi' education, loadorsliip, organisation, stuay auu 
teacliing. E:ccept, possibly, for the element of 'organization* you too 
gire siDilarly a;: activist. As you suggiistcd in your fiiul presentation 
thii leadership of civilir^ation may pass to other peoples, to other races, 
to other c^^lors. Dut our leadersliip -.vill n:.^t be lost and our goals sub- 
vertec. by cy '.efault an., my inaction, Tids siuall -•/--erniinant, I c;.n 
crfiate ant; rustain. In soms saall way it may help to liuit the con- 
fusion an^i delay attending major social chan^;e. I Ci.n, I believe, be 
most effective as a declvred Technocrat, 

I would anticipate that a man of your In. rning a)'.' interests and 
concern for J'an nsust rairely liavc consi;erec thwj challenge of Technocracy, 
Did you reject it? Accept it? Ignore it? L>.amine it in depth? '.d you 
think it is a credible euLternative? Do we have a choice? Is it benign? 
I., it r'mote? Briefly, •■.hat do you kiiOv; of and wb.t do you tMhk of 
Technocracy - th»r. analysis ~ th.^ synthesis; of Ifowaru Scott; of Tf chno- 
cracy Inc., the organization? Or can you say? 



It has taken me this long to find a suitable address with which to 
contact you. 



,-3i*L'i- :f?r.i.*' -j^- :tfii-» ■>.'!* '■•-'- .i^vr'- j^vj.' ,:y.y>^\ :-is 



mii 



a^i^-g<>.^' 




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■,;,'^^". 



You have proclaim'id tb; challon^e of "cifjnce an 1 the dllpjmaa 
of our tines, Would you then i.er^ or ignore, uncon .iJer«d, the challin^^e 
of Technocracy? 

My immediate purposes in vo-itini^ you are: (1) to commen-a you on 
the series »Tht= A-cent of Man*; (;^) to ask if you will be supporting 
your presentation in written form; if 30 what anrj where; an (3) to 
a::k for a suggest ;d list of tho references you might recommend as a 
supplement to your ie.'les or to your concept of a larger esucai-ion for 
Evgryiaan, 

Anil incidentally I ;in reminding you 01 the challenge ol Technocracy, 

Yours sincerely. 



Walter K. l^ryers B, Go. (1939), 
MetcorolOtjic .1 projects Officer, 
Aerospace Engineeriiiii & Test Establishnent, 
CrB Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada, 



+ ■• --.-r "^ 



■^i 



'J:. 



BHOmi 



THE SALK INSTITUTE 



COUNCIL FOR BIOLOGY IN HUMAN AFFAIRS 



18 June 1974 



Mr. Walter R. Fryers 
P. O. Box 1308 
Medley, Alberta 
Canada 

Dear Mr. Fryers: 



Thank you for your letter of 9 June and the nice things 
you say about The Ascent of Man . I am glad that you found it help- 
ful as well as interesting. And thank you also for drawing my 
attention to the active work that continues to be done by Technocracy 
Inc. 

A book has now been published of The Ascent of Man . 
The British edition is obtainable through Pendragon House Ltd. , 
69 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, or the American edition 
from Little, Brown and Company, 34 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts. The book contains a fairly full bibliography 
which will, I think, meet the requirement of your last question. 



Yours /sincerely. 




J. Bronowski 
Director of the Council 



JB:kv 



Post Office Box 1809, San Diego. California 92112 • Telephone (714) 453-4100 



■-'"t'5 



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. -- '■i^v-'a 



RANDALL 

RETAIL. . WHOl-ESAl-e D-STRipUTOR 

'WILLARD WATER" 

As FEATURED ON 

60 Minutes TV 

EARU RANDALL CORBALEY 
P O. BOX 977 
LEMON GROVE. CA 9204S 
(714) AeO-OZZG 




operation survival hotline 



There Is A Better IV'cv 

Earl Randall Corbaley 

P Box 977 

Lemon Grove CA 9204 5 

(619) 460-0226 

April 26, 19d3 



Dear Walter Fryers: 

Our mutual friend, Jim Davidson, of Winnipeg, has sent me your 
name, and said you might be interested in hearing of some of the Tech- 
nocracy activity that's beginning to stir, down in this part of the 
Continent . 



I 'm one of the 
been watching closely 
keen interest. Fubll 
years (1970 - 19B0) - 
ing u£ iiiCoiiO'iTixc I'reii'' 
Energy) - that I no\v 
count of the disinteg 
he writes more like o 
these days. ) He has a 
and - one dav - he'll 



"old-timers" in Technocracy - and for 40 years have 
the events taking place in our Price System--with 
shed my own GPEI^IATION SURVIVAL NEWSLETTER for 10 



*br^.t 



S ' "t c h -"5. 1 

eing a: 



reier 



! excelj.enr. 
SPECIAL FRIENDS to 



lo.o or 



Rf-:search ano Proiect:- 
MYiERS (Myers' Finance & 
him - for a running ae- 
rating Price System (Vern isn't a Technocrat — but 
ne with every issue, and I'm sure he WILL BE one of 
copy of the TTSD and other Technocracy literature-- 
"get around" to "hearing what we're saying"! 



The enclosed two poems have nothing to do with Technocracy, but may 
tell you a little about me. They were written in Europe, during WW II, 
and will tell you a bit about my personal philosophy. 

From "philosophy" to ACTION - the enclosed sheet of Technocracy- 
Envelope-Labels will share with you a bit of the activity beginning to 
take place down this way. 

1 - I've been a MAL (Member-at-Large) in Technocracy for over 3 years, 
but (at their request) recently transferred my Menil?ership to RD 11833-2 
(Long Beach, Calif ornia^ for mutual coordination of effort. The enclosed 
Label Promotion has been approved by CHQ, and implemented by RD 1183 3-2, 
and a sheet of the Labels and a "Master" for reproducing as many more as 
you wish (locallv) - ar-e. enclosed. 

Encl;:''Sed 1 .■:t""^-T'r ;.'■.:: "^ects one pcz^sible i^fie fo/, t."-^!^-^ — --trid a noc-too- 
sUi'jtle-method of readying MILLIONS of Canadia;.:' a-mx Aiaericari councr^men 
v/ith "punch-lines" on Technocracy during the wet.^Ks and months ahead. 



If this Promotxcfj is "picked-up" and ACTED UPON by Technocrats 
across the Continent (cis it MAY WELL BE) - I believe that BOTH a great 
many Citizens of the 
surprise! For this COULD BE a 



Continent - AND CHQ - may be in for a bit of a 

"bTGGEE" - and a GOOD PART OF THAT pos- 



sibility--rests in YOUR hands! So — ENJOY!!! 



(By the way--by shopping around a bit, I've found Xerox and 
Stationery siiops here where the Avery Pressure-Sensitive Address label 
sheet s--are available for IOC per sheet - and cost only 3 l/2<t per sheet 
to have printed--only about 1/3 of the label-cost I figured in the en- 
closed letter. So SHOP AROUND A BIT for these--CK?) [TURN PAGE PLEASE] 

PS - I'm an X-Stenotype Reporter (still type 9 wpm) and these pages fill 
up in a hurry. I appreciate Jim's putting us in touch — and D^ drop 

m.e a letter; tell me about YOU - what you're doing - and what you 
are interested ml It's time for AN OPEN LINE OF COMMUNICATION! 




^ 



AtiiiL 



2 - A second project which is generating some INTEREST and ACTIVITY 

(both INSIDE and OUTSIDE the ranks of Technocrats) - is what the 
writer (and some other Technocrats) are doing with Robert White's 
DUCK BOOK DIGEST (soon to be re-named The Financial Security Digest) , 

Robert White is probably about 40; a millionaire in Florida. Three 
years ago, his Dr. gave him 6 months to live--with "terminal cancer". 
He has a young wife and baby--so decided to "make his mark" - before 
he died. So he "took on" the IRS, the B/iNKERS , and the CROOKED 
POLITICIANS, and began publishing his "DUCK BOOK" (with cartoons 
of a cute DUCK--to get attention) . Offered "a lifetime subscription' 
for $10 ( HIS lifetime - with only 6 months to go — NOT YOURS ) ! 

THP^E YEARS LATER — he was "having too much fun to die" - the cancer 
was gone, his DUCK BOOK subscriptions had expanded to close to 
50,000 - and he had "dropped" over $800,000 on these $10 "life- 
time" subscriptions. 

I've been able to do a few favors for Bob (he-s a "vjutsy" guy — 
about as subtle as a barnyard mule--but a REAL PROMOTER and a REAL 
FIGHTER for what he believes in) . He has a copy of the TTSD and 
other Technocracy literature and HAS PROMISED TO READ THESE (which 
he will — eventually) . 

Meanwhile, I'm working with his 400 DUCK BOOK subscribers in my 
County here (includes 3 retired Navy Captains [1 of whom heads up 
one of White's DUCK CLUBS here — and he sent in $2 and my green 
slip for a copy of TTSD yesterday] - a retired Brigadier General, 
and a host of Attorneys, Tax Consultants and other V7ELL-EDUCATED 
people — ALL WORRIED ABOUT THE ECONOMY) . 

A couple of other Technocrats and I are running some small clas- 
sified ads in the DUCK BOOK DIGEST (for info on Technocracy) — and 
are getting some inquiries. 

If YOU WILL SEND $1 TO ROBERT WHITE, P Box 1928, cocoa, FL 32922 
(mention my name) - he'll send you a GIFT COPY of his 100+ page 
CURRENT DUCK BOOK DIGEST [it costs him more than this to send it 
1st cl^.3^ m.ail — which he does] . 



vcu -.' ^iij'jv -uiae of the a>-t !■'.•] es — and ads. 
day is coming when he'll start writing ab?uu 



I've cc;.i.a Bob thaL 
tne ANSWERS to our 



ne 



Continent's PR OBLEMS - rather chan about our PROBLEMS (and he will). 
Anyway--these articles + ads + responses to my littJ.e ads — GIVE ME 
THE CONTACTS TO WHOM I SEND ENCLOSED YELLOW LETTER, a couple of 
Technocracy Brief S--AND THE ENCLOSED GREEN SLIP, If this sounds 
like fun — "GO AND DO THOU LIKEWISE"! (as The Good Book says, huh?) 
Along with your GIFT COPY of the DUCi- BOOK DIGEST — you'll get 
White's PROMOTIONAL MATERIAL (you MIGHT want to become a DUCK CLUB 
"COORDINATOR" in your area — as some of as (Technocrats) are doing) ! I 1 



3 - * Daring my Economic Newsletter-writing days, I subscribed Lo — or ex- 
changed Letters with MOST of riy contemporar .les . Vern Myers and his 
"FINANCE & ENERGY" stands (in my opinion) head-jnd-shoulders above ALL THE 
r;EST! One of the most knowledgeable men en the Continent (he's a Canadian) 
on ENERGY, TrCHNOLOGY - and V7HAT ' S HAPPENING - '.vcr Id-wide . T wouldn't be 
without his LETTER — from here on out. It isn't cheap ($200 a year). A 
couple of close friends co- subscribe with me; each sends me $55 (a year) 



& 1 send him 



a copy in 24 hours. I'll make a soot 



tor vov jn our 



co-c: 



you're interested (saves $145 oer 



year ) 



DO KEEP JJ 



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11833-2 
TECHNOCRACY 

INC. 



DEAR FELLOW TECHNOCRATS: 

As you know, Technocracy Inc. has been primarily a "holding operation" 
for half a century. Especially, for the past 40 years. 

There was considerable activity during the 30' s ind 40' s; then came WWII, 
and the syndrome of INFLATION, DEPRESSION, and the ultimate Pries System 
"cijre"for both of these- WAR! 

This scenario has been played and replayed in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. 
"Arrangemants " are being made for another replay just as quickly as possible- 
to buy our old Price System a few gasping breaths. 

Of course, with Atomic and Nuclear Weaponry now in the picture, it is 
getting more difficult to "arrange" a "nice, safe war" anymore - but then, 
things are tough everywher^f'. 

The Technocrats over the years have been disseminating information pertaining 
to its body of thought by publications, lectures, and personal contact to 
let the people know that there is an alternative to the present method of 
social operation. It's scientific meihod is unique. 

o That situation could change fast - given some "rough water" on the economic 
~ scene - and that may not be too far down the road. It is a hell of a way to 

have to "make progress" - but THAT seems to be the option of the human animal 

at this point in time. 

Somewhere along the way- between here and there - will come the time for 
TECHNOCRACY to START MOVING AHEAD WITH SOME DYNAMIC ACTION on a broad front- 
not just an accasional class or lecture - but ACROSS AMERICA' 

QUESTION: HOW CAN A COMPARATIVELY S:-V\LL NUMBER OF TECHNOCRATS - 

MANY WITH LIMITED FI^^NCES - SOME WITH LIMITED MOBILITY- 
GENERATE A "MASS MOVEMENT" THAT WILL REACH THE GPEATEST 
NUMBER OR (STILL LETHARGIC - INCREASINGLY FRIGHTENED) 
PEOPLE IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME? 



The enclosed sheet of labels is submitted as one possible answer. 
Do you think this might possibly generate a bit of CURIOSITY about TECHNOCRACY? 
Frankly - I believe it COULD MOVE TECHNOCRACY INTO A PROGRAM OF ENTHUSIASTIC, 
DYNAMIC ACTIVITY OVER NIGHT! It can happen FASTI 

There is a bit ofstirring " - and a great deal of personal and public concern 
at this time - along with the usual apathy we are all so familiar with - on 
the part of the general public (my neighbors) 



LET'S LET THEM KNOW WE ARE HERE! 




Sincerely, 
Earl Corbaley 




ADDRESS. SSCTION 2. REGIONAL DIVISION : 1833, TECHNOCRACY INC., JGS EAST MARKET STREET, LONG BEACH CALlPQRNIA 90805 
^io Staxemenr Of Policy S^iall Be Binding upon The Organization Unless issued From Continental Headauarters oi Tecnnocracv inc. At Savannan. Ohio 44874 



DON'T BERATE - 
INVESTIGATE 

TECHNOCRACY 



LOST YOUR JOB? 
IT'S TIME TO CHECK OUT 

TECHNOCRACY 



THE BRIGHT SPOT IS YOUR FUTURE 
IS 

TECHNOCRACY 



WHITHER YOUTH? 

98% OF ACTUAL WORK IS DONE 

BY TECHNOLOGY - 

TIME FOR TECHNOCRACY. 



TECHNOCRACY OFFERS THE WOMEN 
OF NORTH AMERICA A GOAL THAT IS 
REALLY WORTH FIGHTING FOR - 

INVESTIGATE! 



"SCIENCE - APPLIED TO OUR SOCIAL 
ORDER" IS THE DEFINITION OF 

TECHNOCRACY 



DONT BERATE - 
INVESTIGATE 

TECHNOCRACY 



THE VAST FRUrrS OF THIS CONTINENTS 
TECHNOLOGY CAN ONLY BE DISTRIB- 
UTED - NOT DESTROYED! 

TIME FOR TECHNOCRACY! 



THE ENGINEERED DESIGN - 
THE FUNCTIONAL BLUEPRINTS - 
HAVE BEEN READY FOR 50 YEARS NOW! 
TECHNOCRACY . 



ROBOTS ARE YOUR FRIENDS - 
NOT YOUR COMPETITICRS - 

IN 

TECHNOCrtACY 



YOUR GREATEST INVESTMENT IN 
YOUR FUTURE - IS TO INVESTIGATE 
TECHNOCRACY 

NOW. 



LOST YOUR JOB? 
IT'S TIME TO CHECK OUT 

TECHNOCRACY 



ROBOTS ARE YOUR FRIENDS - 
NOT YOUR COMPETITIORS - 

IN 
TECHNOCRACY 



ONLY TWO ALTERNATIVES ARE AVAIL- 
ABLE TO US - 

CHAOS OR TECHNOCRACY 

MAKE A CHOICE 



LET'S ELJMINATE 50.000 DEATHS PER 
YEAR - ON OUR HIGHWAYS - 
WITH 

TECHNOCRACY 



TECHNOCRACY IS THE ONLY ORGANI- 
ZATION WITH A SCIENTIFIC DESIGN 
FOR LIVING IN A TECHNOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY. 

INVESTIGATE! 



WORKERS: 
HOW ABOUT WORKING 4 HOURS A DAY 
- 4 DAYS A WEEK - UNDER 

TECHNOCRACY? 



WORKERS: 
HOW ABOUT WORKING 4 HOURS A DAY 
- 4 DAYS A WEEK - UNDEn 

TECHINOCRACY? 



FOR NORTH AMERICA'S CONTINENTAL 
DEFENSE THERE'S ONLY ONE SOLUTION: 

TECHNOCRACY 



WHAT WOULD YOU PREFER TO DO? 
YOU'LL BE EDUCATED AND TRAINED 
TO DO IT IN TECHNOCRACY. 



TECHNOCRACY IS THE ONLY ORGANI- 
ZATION WITH A SCIENTIFIC DESIGN 
FOR LIVING IN A TECHNOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY. 

INVESTIGATE! 



EVEN TODAY'S INCOMPETENT POLI- 
TICIANS ARE ASSURED 'PPOSP^ERIT"!'" 
-r RETIREME.NT IN 

TECHNOCRACY 



THE ENGINEERED DS3?GN - 
THE FUNCTIONAL BLUEPRINTS - 
HAVE BEEN READY FOR 50 YEARS NOWl 

TECHNOCRACY 



ROBOTS ARE TODAY'S WORKERS. 
TECHNOCRACY HAS A DESIGN TO DIS- 
TRIBUTE PURCHASING POWER TO RE- 
PLACE WAGES AND SALARIES. 
INVESTIGATE! 



A CONTINENTAL HYDROLOGY AND THic 
GREATEST IN ENVIRONMENTAL PRO- 
TECTION ARE ENGINEERED INTO 
TECHNOCRACY. 



TECHNOCRACY 

ITS ENGINEERED DESIGN HAS SEEN 
AVAILABLE TO YOU FOR 50 YEARS NOW! 



"SCIENCE - APPLIED TO OUR SOCIAL 
ORDER" IS THE DEFINITION OF 

TECHNOCRACY 



A COPY OF TECHNOCRACY'S TECHNO- 
LOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN IS AVAILABLE 
FOR $2. FROM: 

TECHNOCRACY INC. 

SAVANNAH. OHIO 44874 



TECHNOCRACY'S MAGAZINES BY 

SUBSCRIPTION FOR S10. (8 COPIES) 

THE NORTHWEST TECHNOCRAT 

7513 GREENWOOD AVE. N 

SE.ATTLE, WA 98103 



FOR FREE INFORMATION WRITE: 

TECHNOCRACY INC. 

435 E. MARKET ST. 

N. LONG BEACH, CA 90805 



I SPELL "SOCIAL SECLRITY' 

TECHNOCRACY 



ELIMINATE 30% -95% OF ALL CRIME 
WITH 

TECHNOCRACY 
NOW! 



TECHNOCRACY LABELS 
FOR LETTERS. ENVELOPES, 
PACKAGES, ETC. 



1^ . ..*.>jT,a 



■ ■( 




•"r^ntfTiHiinira 



I^Oi^ol 



OCIAI. 



T^anda// 



Dear Fellow Technocrat 

and/or 
Very Special Friend: 



back to nature 
operation survival 



There ]s A Better Wax; 

Earl Randall Corbaley 

P Box 977 

Lemon Grove CA 92045 

(619) 460-0226 

April 15, 1983 



"THE TIME HAS COME" 



TECHNOCRACY ' S 

50th 
BIRTHDAY : 



ENCLOSED — 



IMPACT: 

JUST 1 
PERSON: 



YOUR TOTAL 
INVESTMENT 



SUGGESTION 



SO NOW — 



THE MARCH OF EVENTS — and the POINT OF INDIVIDUAL CONCERN, 
DISPLACEMENT and SUFFERING — indicate that it is NOW time 
to SHARE with EVEN MORE AMERICANS — the FACT that there 
ARE - TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS - to America's major — and 
rapidly multiplying BIG PROBLEMS ! Perhaps significantly — 
1983 is ALSO the 5 0th ANNIVERSARY of TECHNOCRACY INC . 

— is a Master-sheet of Technocracy Labels, which can be 
affixed to LETTERS, PACKAGES, etc. (Especially designed 
to go on the OUTSIDE OF ENVELOPES (1st Class Mail) - near 
the LOWER LEFT-HAND CORNER of the FRONT OF THE LETTER 
Ceasily visible) ! Any GOOD Stationery Store or Xerox 
Shop will reproduce these on Avery (or similar) Pressure- 
sensitive Labels for about 4 0<: per sheet — or you can buy 
them by the package and have them run on ANY Copy machine 1 
On the reverse side of. that Master-sheet is copy of letter 
from TecPinocracy ' s RD 11833-2 (Long Beach, CA) , who is 
implementing this CHQ-approved Program. 

The IMPACT (for untold GOOD) - which JUST 1 PERSON can make 
with the PLANNED use of these labels — is STAGGERING! 

For example — just suppose that YOU have 20 sheets of these 
"Masters" Xeroxed ON PLAIN WHITE PAPER — with the explana- 
tory letter on the other side — JUST LIKE THE COPY ATTACHED. 
(My cost here is 7<: per sheet — 2 sides) = $1.40. 

Then — you have 20 copies of THIS LETTER Xeroxed =$1.40 

You then m.ail these to 20 of your BEST FRIENDS — people who 
THINK and who WANT A BETTER LIFE — for themselves — and others 
Postage: 20 letters x 20<: = $4.00 . You have now invested 
$6.80. Suppose you have 5 sheets of the Avery Pressure- 
Sensitive labels run off FOR YOUR IMMEDIATE PERSONAL USE. 
At 4 0<: per sheet — that's another $2.00. Total now: $8.80. 

Add a PERSONAL MESSAGE to the blank back-side of THESE 
20 letters you send out (there's room on the back of this 
page — doesn't have to be long)! And you might want to 
enclose a Technocracy Brief — I like #28, WHY TECHNOCRACY, 
with its graph of IRREVERSIBLE PHYSICAL TRENDS which are 
SHAPING AMERICA'S DESTINY. 

You have invested $8.80. You have perhaps spent 2 hours 
of your time, mailing & writing your 20 Special Friends, 
and you have a supply of Technocracy labels to PUT ON 
ALL YOUR LETTERS . To see WHAT COULD HAPPEN — turn over 
this page, please: — 



LET'S 
SUPPOSE^-- 



AND NOW — 



That 10 of your 20 Special Friends are THINKERS - and also 
PEOPLE -OF-ACTION . And that these 10 friends DO EXACTLY 
WHAT YOU ARE DOING. They each invest $8.80 — start USING 
THE LABELS PERSONALLY - and each mails THIS LETTER (with 
a personal note Ibelow THIS] - to 20 Special Friends. 

Let's suppose that your 10 friends' 20 Special Friends 
DON'T DO ANYTHING. They are still doing OK financially — 
and are just not THAT MUCH CONCERNED. OK? 



But — 



THERE'S STILL 
ROOM FOR A 
SHORT PERSONAL 
NOTE TO YOUR 
FRIEND, AT THE 
BOTTOM OF 
THIS PAGE. 
OK? 



TODAY — 



You - AND your 10 ACTION Special Friends are (let us say) 
EACH - personally - putting your Technocracy labels on 
10 letters per week (bills you pay, letters you NORMALLY 
write — NOT "Special Mailings"— tho you might send out 
some of THOSE, too) . 

So — that's 110 letters PER WEEK - mailed by you and your 
10 ACTIVE friends — with TECHNOCRACY stickers affixed. 

That's 440 letters PER MONTH . ( All from YOUR original 
20 letters. OK? 

There are approximately 18 months FROM NOW UNTIL THE 
1984 NOVEMBER ELECTIONS ! That TOTALS 7,920 TECHNOCRACY 
MESSAGES - all instigated by JUST 1 PERSON! YOU! ! ! 

Let's assume that each of these letters is "scanned" by 
5 POSTAL EMPLOYEES - from the time it's mailed, until it 
is delivered to the recipient. That's 7,920 X 5 = 39 ,600 
TECHNOCRACY IMPRESSIONS - YOU HAVE CREATED — between NOW 
AND ELECTION-TIME NEXT YEAR! (Let's call it 40,000 , for 
easy figuring, OK?) 

We are sending The Editors of Technocracy's 2 Field 
Magazines (Seattle and Vancouver, BC) - a copy of THIS 
LETTER - and a copy of the Technocracy Master-Label-Sheet 
and RD 11833-2 's Cover Letter, and — 



SUGGESTING THAT THEY EACH REPRINT THESE IN THEIR NEXT 

ISSUES OF "THE NORTHWEST TECHNOCRAT" and "TECHNOCRACY DIGEST". 



SHOULD THEY 
DO THIS — 



For a moment — let's just visualize their doing this, and 
that AS A RESULT OF THIS - and the complete Membership 
distribution given this Program by RD 11833-2 (Long Beach) — 
that AN ADDITIONAL 1,000 TECHNOCRATS - AND THEIR FRIENDS - 
DO EXACTLY WHAT YOU ARE DOING! And WITH THE SAME RESULTS! 



WHICH MEANS — 



AND ALL ON 
FIRST-CLASS 
LETTERS ! 



That 40,000,000 (that's FORTY MILLION ) TECHNOCRACY MESSAGES 
have flooded the Nation - between now - and Nov. , 19 84 
CElection time)! THAT'S ONE FOR NEARLY HALF THE ADULT 
POPULATION. IS THIS WORTH $8.80 - and 2 hoiirs of YOUR TIME? 

Most sincerely. 





^i-v 



'.-lyst*. :»-fa .• 



■'■-h 'A 



DOWT BERATE - 
INVESTIGATE 

TECHNOCRACY 



WHITHER YOUTH? 

98% OF ACTUAL WORK IS DONE 

BY TECHNOLOGY - 

TIME FOR TECHNOCRACY. 



DONT BERATE - 
INVESTIGATE 

TECHNOCRACY 



ROBOTS ARE YOUR FRIENDS - 
NOT YOUR COMPETITIORS - 

IN 
T F C \i .%' O C R A C Y 



LOST YOUR JOB? .("^"^^ tf'^nn ^^^ BRIGHT SPOT IS YOUR FUTURE 

ITS TIME TO CHECK OUT '\^ ' ■■ * UJcJc |S 



TECHNOCRACY 



TECHNOCRACY OFFERS THE WOMEN 
OF NORTH AMERICA A GOAL THAT IS 
REALLY WORTH FIGHTING FOR - 

INVESTIGATE! 



THE VAST FRUITS OF THIS COrmNEf^TTS 
TECHNOLOGY CAN ONLY BE DISTRIB- 
UTED - NOT DESTROYED! 

TIME FOR TECHNOCRACY! 



YOUR GREATEST INVESTMENT IN 
YOUR FUTURE - IS TO INVESTIGATE 
TECHNOCRACY 

NOW. 



TECHNOCRACY 



"SCIENCE - APPLIED TO OUR SOCIAL 
ORDER" IS THE DEFINITION OF 

TECHNOCRACY 



THE ENGINEERED DESIGN - 
THE FUNCTIONAL BLUEPRINTS - 
HAVE BEEN READY FOR 50 YEARS NOW! 

TECHNOCRACY 



LOST YOUR JOB? 
IT'S TIME TO CHECK OUT 

TECHNOCRACY 



ROBOTS ARE YOUR FRIENDS - 
NOT YOUR COMPETITIORS - 
IN 

TECHNOCRACY 



TECHNOCRACY IS THE ONLY ORGANI- 
ZATION WITH A SCIENTIFIC DESIGN 
FOR LIVING IN A TECHNOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY. 
INVESTIGATE! 



FOR NORTH AMERICA'S CONTINENTAL 
DEFENSE THERE'S ONLY ONE SOLUTION: 

TECHNOCRACY 



ONLY TWO ALTERNATIVES ARE AVAIL- 
ABLE TO US - 

CHAOS OR TECHNOCRACY 

MAKE A CHOICE 

WORKERS: 
HOW ABOUT WORKING 4 HOURS A DAY 
- 4 DAYS A WEEK - UNDER 

TECHNOCRACY? 



WHAT WOULD YOU PREFER TO DO? 
YOU'LL BE EDUCATED AND TRAINED 
TO DO IT IN TECHNOCRACY. 



LET'S ELIMINATE 50.000 DEATHS PER 
YEAR - ON OUR HIGHWAYS - 
WITH 

TECHNOCRACY 



WORKERS: 

HOW ABOUT WORKING 4 HOURS A DAY 
- 4 DAYS A WEEK - UNDER 

TECHNOCRACY? 



TECHNOCRACY IS THE ONLY ORGANI- 
ZATION WITH A SCIENTIFIC DESIGN 
FOR LIVING IN A TECHNOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY. 

INVESTIGATE! 



r. 



EVEN TODAY'S INCOMPETENT POLl 
TIC3A:JS ART. ASSUritO 
- RETIREMENT IN 

TECHNOCRACY 



HO£P:£nJTY" 



A CONTINENTAL HYDROLOGY AND THE 
GREATEST IN ENVIRONMENTAL PRO- 
TECTION ARE ENGINEERED INTO 
TECHNOCRACY. 



Tiiii ENCiNEERED i;LSiGN - 
THE FUNCTIONAL BLUEPRINTS - 
HAVE BEEN READY FOR 50 YEARS NOWl 
TECHNOCRACY 

TECHNOCRACY 

ITS ENGINEERED DESIGN HAS BEEN 
AVAILABLE TO YOU FOR 50 YEARS NOW! 



ROBOTS ARE TODAY'S WORKERS. 
TECHNOCRACY HAS A DESiGrJ TO DIS- 
TRIBUTE PURCHASING POWER TO RE- 
PLACE WAGES AND SALARIES. 
INVESTIGATE! 



"SCIENCE - APPLIED TO OUR SOCIAL 
ORDER " IS THE DEFINITION OF 

TECHNOCRACY 



A COPY OF TECHNOCRACY'S TECHNO- 
LOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN IS AVAILABLE 
FOR $2. FROM: 

TECHNOCRACY INC. 

SAVANNAH. OHIO 44874 



I SPELL SOCIAL SECURITY" 

TECHNOCRACY 



TECHNOCRACY'S MAGAZINES BY 

SUBSCRIPTION FOR $10. (3 COPIES) 

THE NORTHWEST TECHNOCRAT 

7513 GREENWOOD AVE. (M 

SEATTLE.. WA 98103 



ELIMINATE 30%-9S% OF ALL CRIME 
WITH 

TECHNOCRACY 
NOW! 



FOR FREE INFORMATION WRITE: 

TECHNOCRACY INC. 

435 E. MARKET ST. 

N. LONG BEACH, CA 90805 



TECHNOCRACY LABELS 
FOR LETTERS, ENVELOPES, 
PACKAGES, ETC. 



$3 



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"SURVIVAL" may begin for America SOON? HOPEFULLY! 




back to nature 
operation survival 



There Is A Better Way 

Earl Randall Corbaley 

P Box 9 77 

Lemon Grove CA 92 045 

(619) 460-0226 



Note: Any who send me $2 for the TTSD - I merely endorse THEIR checks 
lor send my own — if they send CASH— which some do] - and send to CHO 
for shipment of the TTSD Booklet. + whatever literature they wish to 
enclose. I've SUGGESTED they enclose a Tech. MA with the TTSD). ERG 

You are certainly knowledgeable in the area of America's current 
BIG PROBLEMS ! Would you be interested in acquiring some knowledge and 
information which you do not have — on its BIG SOLUTIONS ? 

Fortunately, most of America's present PROBLEMS were forseeable — 
some 50 years ago now, by the Engineers and Scientists who headed up the 
Research for an Analytical, Educational organization called Technocracy Inc, 

These Researchers FOUND and PROJECTED the FORSEEABLE and MEASURABLE 
Technology (use of Energy) ^ which they (correctly) analyzed to be UNI - 
DIRECTIONAL and I RREVERSIBLE TRENDS - resulting in the incompatible (and 
soon — UNSURVIVABLS ) situation now confronting us ON MANY FRONT S! 

Fortunately — these "men of science" also found THERE ARE ANSWERS to 
these PROBLEMS! And the purpose of this letter is TO PLACE SOME OF THESE 
"ANSWERS" IN YOUR HANDS — and to INVITE YOU TO "DISCOVER" MANY MORE! These 
have been awaiting your "discovery" - FOR HALF A CENTURY NOW! 

Enclosed Technocracy Brief #54 will tell you IN ONE SENTENCE what 
Technocracy is — and its purpose! It should be obvious to you which road 
we are on — (and it isn ' t "social enlightenment" is it)? 

The graph on Brief #28 WHY TECHNOCRACY illustrates the IRREVERSIBLE 
PHYSICAL TRENDS SHAPING AMERICA'S DESTINY. 

Brief #29 (or 60) illustrates the ONLY way an ABUNDANCE of Goods & 
Services can be DISTRIBUTED (instead of DESTROYED, as it must be under 
our obsolete "Price System" [which mandates a SCARCITY of EVERYTHING, in 
order to maintain "value" and "price"]). 

This is Technocracy's ENERGY (DISTRIBUTION) CERTIFICATE which — in 
ADDITION to being a "medium of Distribution" - will AUTOMATICALLY elimin- 
ate 90/95% of Americans CRIME (our biggest business today) ! Not bad, huh? 
(But who REALLY wants to eliminate Crime today? Let' s face it! ) 

It will require some "homework" on YOUR part, to comprehend the 
DISTRIBUTION OF AN ABUNDANCE which is mandated by America's highly- 
advanced Technology today (due for another giant stride ahead with the 
current installation of ROBOTS — to further add to the 98+% of Mechanical/ 
Electrical ENERGY now utilized in producing/distributing Goods & Services 
(less than 2% is HUMAN ENERGY — on which we are DEPENDENT FOR 100% OF OUR 
PURCHASING POWER) . 

I urge you to send in the enclosed green slip — and $2 — for a 75-page 
copy of Technocracy's illustrated, easily-read TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL 
DESIGN. You'll not only find it f ascinating--you may also find it a 
LIFE-SAVER — literally ! 

Sincere=^es3: wishes 



End. (SEE OVER PLEASE) 



Earl Rfand^ri Corbaley 
RANDALL OPERATION SURVIVAL 




back to nature 
operation survival 



There Is A Better Wa\; 

Earl Randall Corbaley 

P Box 977 

Lemon Grove CA 9 2045 

(619) 460-0226 



Dear "DUCK BOOK" Subscriber: 



Thanks for your current inquiry in response to my little ad in 
Robert White's DUCK BOOK DIGEST. Your interest is appreciated. 

Enclosed is some information regarding Technocracy Inc. , of which 
you have probably never heard (the Establishment has been very care- 
ful — for half a century — to make sure that you have not) . It is the 
one Organization - and Program - which Politicians - and their co- 
horts — -Pirf^ df^athly afraid of — for they have NO DEFENSE against "Science, 
applied to our Social Order" - and a "GOVERNANCE OF FUNCTION" to replace 
their bungling / out-moded, self-destructing "Price System". Except 

[ IGNORANCE! 

It is similar to replacing a crew of "mule-skinners" (who may be 
"the best mule-skinners who ever skun mules)" - in the cockpit of a 747 
with a crew of technically-trained Pilot, Navigator, Engineers & Me- 
chanics. Small wonder that you have never heard anything (or anything 
FAVORABLE) regarding Technocracy - from the Media or the Press — for 
half a century now. 

And yet this little-known Organization of VOLUNTEERS , primarily 
interested in SCIENCE and EDUCATION - have a FANTASTIC "TRACK- RECORD" 
for accurately projecting our uni -directional and irreversible Social 
and Economic trends — FOR OVER 50 years now ! The INTELLIGENT ADMINIS - 
TRATION of BILLIONS of Horsepower is very confusing — to "Mule-skinners"! 

rf you are not familiar with this most unusual Organization — you 
have som e home-work to do! And perhaps not too much time in which to 



do it. 



The enclosed information will give you a STARTING POINT! 

I, personally, urge you to invest $2 in a copy of Technocracy's 
TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN! The enclosed green order form will bring 
this amazing illustrated, easily-read booklet to ycu, prepaid. It's 
about the size of Robert White's DUCK ^BOOK DIGEST - and you'll find 
it BEGINS where the DUCK BOOK ENDS - that it's working with America's 
BIG SOLUTIONS - not just our BIG PROBLEMS! 

Incidentally, Bob has a copy of Technocracy's TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL 
DESIGN; I've asked him to keep it available — for — not very far down the 
road — he may find it MORE VALUABLE than EVERYTHING ELSE he's working 
with — including his off-shore Investment Seminars in Costa Rica and 
London. 

I'm working with Robert White, as a Coordinator of his DUCK CLUBS 
in the San Diego area, and finding his Subscribers unusually well- 
informed. The 4 00 locals include a couple retired Navy Captains and 
an Army General. I'll be happy to hear from you further. 



End. 




Earl Randall Corbaley 
RANDALL OPERATION SURVIVi 



.e«K.A-',*4.;>^.^-'?«v^^>>^g>B^u>nicra:.-? ^z;^aMKi,.:^. 



'uasL 



< ^ i~''< :■-'-,':■■ ' 



i^fti 



rftt. 



•Randall 

? Box 9 77 

Lemon Grove 



Date 



"•TV C ■-, f\ A Z, 
,r\ ^ i, i> 'i -I 



Dear Randall: I realize I have some "home-work" to do — to understand t.'-e 
"Governance of Function" in a Technological Economy where over 98% of the 
energy used in producing and distributing goods and services is iMechanical / 
Electrical Energy - and less than 2% is Human Energy (on which we still 
depend for our PURCHASING POWER) ! 

In the days of America's Founding Fathers — these figures were just 
reversed! I begin to understand why - with Robots nov/ replacing 
hundreds--thousands — of workers - increasing PRODUCTION while decreasing 
EiMPLOYMENT (jobs) - a NEW DESIGN IS NEEDED - in America - to replace our 
disintegrating "Price System" (which precludes a SCARCITY of EVERYTHING 
to maintain "VAlue) ! (Over) 



// 



A&v^ 



-n be expressed in .he fo.. or a credo: 
Tne discovery is noL true; 
I^ tru, it is noi new. 

Have bot, l.,„tine. variations of ^r,u ,». of ^^''""' 

^ set of Canons, Often 
scarred by the broadsides of th. ^ u 

b^aes 01 the aduinbrationist, Wiiii^^ r 
^-self to describe "the cl^sMc . '"^^'' 

first ., . ''' "' " '^^°^^'^ ^-eer... it i, 

first "attacked as absurd; then it i. . -. * 

^ , ^nen it is admitteu to be true but oK • 

insignificant; finally it is se^n to h ''"' '"' 

—^at they the.selves disc' ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ -adversaries 

-jufaexves discovered it." 



Reference, Sferton: ,%olal Tbeo 



ry and .Social Structure; p.,,. 



/ / Enclosed is $2.00 for which please send me a copy of Technocracy's 

7 5-page ILLUSTRATED, easily-understood booklet "TECHNOLOGICAL 
SOCIAL DESIGN" - prepaid. 



SEND TO 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



COr/IMENTS : 



.r'jhilPvictims hotlv protest adumbrationism, historians of science 
coollv observe it, bo, i/eorge oa.x. uuxi, , . , + 

the wrlQ*s historians of science, observed that 

.violent objection to a discover., especially to one ^f^f^^l^l^f^^^^^^ 
.« u ic ^e.t. generally passes through two sta^-es. The fir^t s^aLe is 
II . i^^?«l bP^represented by the Parisian an^i-circulators: 
that of denial, besl. represeuueu u^ „^„-^v,-p etc V/hen that position 
Harvey's theory is wrong, it ,^%Pl^^" "°^!f ^^J^^^^eove;" is all right, 
becoi.es untenable, the second stage ^J^^^^^ ^^^^'i^Sore him.. .It 4as 
but Karvey did not laake it; it -^l^ffJ/Jl^lZt^^^^^ his day, to 

Van der Linden's originality, as the f.^^^^^^J;. ^^:°^^^^ ^rculation of the 
Ilai.... "There canno. be the shadow oi ^ -^^^^f Jj,^^^, S.^^.^ff ?he 
blood was known to Hippocrates I' This is '^ e^^^^^-^^J^ , 
philological Bind at work, mistaking words for realitieo. 

ibid: p,^<i. 







.-5^ "■.. 



^^." 





^^^^^^^n^^^^^3^^?^^^^vnwj^2^^Zl 




iHi 








DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE 

MINUTE SHEET 


SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 




FILE NUMBER 

TD 


REFERENCE 


DATED 


REFERRED TO 


REMARKS 

(TO BE SIGNED IN FULL SHOWINO APPOINTMENT, TELEPHONE NUMBER AND DATE) 



lilt' 













c-^ 



'^^J^LAUtCL(y7 -^'^i A^X 



DND 317 
7530-21-582.7241 






t^:X'-\-y 




■ixV' 



'^■^j/: 



>*>n 



h. 



*->■-. . 



:^- 



P-'.'>':^-i 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 
from "Technocracy! Technological Social Design"" 



/^fii&f^ ? 



CONCEPT AND ORGANIZATION (pp 55-59) 

(Questions in this section deal with the body of thought of Technocracy 
itself and with the organization formed to fill the need of disseminating 
that body of thought to all North Americans.) 



1, What is Technocracy? 

2, How did Technocracy originate? 

3, What are the conclusions of Technocracy? 

4.. Could either Canada or the United States operate a Technate without 
the other? 

5» What are the social implications of Technocracy? 



^ollf'tiJ? 6. Is the Technocratic movement a political party? 

^1) S0lt'f9 V. What would be done with the people whose present jobs, like banking, 
j'oJfS ? would cease to exist in a Technocracy society? 

8. What are you going to do with the people who are not interested in 
Technocracy? 

9» Is not Technocracy very similar to socialism or communism? 

10. Did not Technocracy state in 1937 that the Price System would be over 
by 19427 If so why do we still have it? What happened? 

11. What can one do as an individual to bring about a better system? 

12. What are the duties and obligations of a member of Technocracy? 

^^T* ^*^'* 13. What do Technocrats mean by social change? Their use of the term 
cA'i'^ip seems to differ from that of the popular understanding, 

ftloMAD. ^» What is your symbol called, and what is its significance? Would it, 
with the gray field, be the flag of the Technate? 



^. O 



r 



n> 



t 



.S-7 



)p, rf 



^, 5rfr 



■ THE PRICE SYSTEM p. 60 

(This is a somewhat shorter section than expected, bat if repetition is 
a reliable guide it answers the main questions that people appear to be 
concerned about with regard to the present social mechanism.) 

gUfrB/y^ ^ !• What does Technocracy mean ty a Price System? 

2. What does Technocracy propose to substitute for the Price System? 

/* i/c^fiigy 3« Does Technocracy envisage the collapse of the Price System in the 
(^fiUf^^it . ^^^^ future? 



/- 



.hxO . 



f3 



4. What percentage of the North American population, demanding social 
change, would be required to put an end to the Price System? 



5, What can we do to stop the terrible waste of oiir natural resources 
and still keep the Price System going? 






■^4 




A-*. 




wv^wv>-«4nimnH^- ^ • 'rir- 



jjl: 



.i^'-^>f.'-.'r .T •';■-■ 



Q & A 



p. 2 



DESIGN FOR ABUNDANCE p.6l /^' ^ 7 

(How would a Technocratic society deal with various problems, the solutions to 
which are so difficult in a Price System? This section outlines some of thf 
ways in which such problems might be quite easily solved when the artificial 
barriers of finance and politics are removed.) 

/?/?£/) . ^* What geographical area would the Technocratic society cover? 

/^. A fftJU^ 2. Why is the Technate restricted only to North America? 

r?^» What would happen if one or more countries on the continent refused to 
K^fU^^^ -join the Technate? 

l^.p.^. A. What do the numbers 123A9-1 mean? / 

Af r-y^oJ^'^^' W*^^^^ Technocracy put an end to private ownership? 

/yio/<J(C^? 6, What does Technocracy propose to substitute for money? 

fipcr/^/^^'t 7. How would the Technate conduct its international affairs? 



/*». ^ 3 



h-^'^ 



"Tf^fil/IlL ^ 8. In travel aborad what would be used for money? 

.^^ j^ K /r ■> 9 . How would we secure from other countries the goods that could not be pro- 
' ' duced in this continental area? 

_ . y -. ^^//Vr^LO , What is this blueprint that Technocrats are always talking about? 

^11, How could a Technate operate its technology and still have less pol- 
f^lkOT^Ott ' lution than there now is? 

cfj^fiS^^ 12. Why does Technocracy use energy as the means of controlling the flow of 
^jDtilO-^ ''' goods and services? 

P^t^/CB. : 13« Would there be a police department under Technocracy? 

^jyrirf^fiOS^^* How will education be handled in a Technate? 

AAfifCiA^^^^^^* ^°^ will agriculture be conducted in a Technate? 

-<"> /9^^i?^?l6, How do the Technocrats propose to come into power? 

itT? ^^'t/^/ "^^* ^°®^ Technocracy have a specific plan to implement when and if the 
^4>LfiN, Price System finally and completely breaks down? 

Aj,f^fi\9{^f^'sf^1^» What is your plan to impro-je the efficiency of the automobile? 

ii ^\//VL ^e ") 19. Are you suggesting that ever body have the same amount of consuming power' 

^jt.0^^20. Why does Technocracy consider its continental hydrology plan so important? / ' 

^ 21. How would a Technocracy society select its leaders? How lopg would these 
<^i/5^^'*'^^^<- >leaders hold office? 



JS^ 






--i^?_,.>i 



■'- ^' 



■•C>r 



Q & A. 



P.3 



THE TEGHNATE. p. 67. ^^'^7 

(Many people are interested in what style of life might be expected in 
North Amerlria after a Technate is established. Without committing the 
citizens of the Technate to preconceived patterns we can give some 
general impressions of what life in such a society might be like.) 

'fjj-f'^j/^tc. ^ ^» Sow will Technocracy change human nature so as to make the system work? 
Qf4U^ ^'>2. Is there room only for engineers in the Technocratic organization? 



What would be the first chore of Technocrats when they take over? 
What would we do with our leisure time? 



) 13. In a Technate will there be large cities like New York with its teeming 
millions, or will there be smaller self-sufficient units? 



«.)CUf?S ^^* ■^^ machines are doing all the work, what will people do with themselves? f'^'^ 

r»iik!n)fiS? 6- Is there a place for culture in your proposed type of society? 

enfiftt^ ^ 7. Would a Technate feed and clothe the hungry and needy in the rest of 
A 19 ? ^^« world? 

^T7^^^^)^* What will be the status of women in Technocracy? 

ihOChi ? ^* What will become of children and the home under Technocracy? 

) tided'? ^^* ^^^I there be divorce in a Techaate? 

^^ J — Kjf 

TifL^^^ ' ^^* ^°" would a Technate solve the serious problem of drug trafficking? I ' 

/• /? |/7?£ . 12. How will serious offences be handled? Will there be capital punishment? 

/^aa-f^il . H» What is the gre atest obstacle to the advent of Technocracy? 

^ ^ ^ a "7 15. How would Technocracy handle the race problem? 

^^^^ • B'T^ 

jkiro^^^ 16. What might the level of income be in the planned Technate? / 

riiL'T^^^ 17. What would be the goals of individuals in a Technate? 

18. F»ople are not createdBpixi equal. This being the case, what would a 
.»! ? Tecjjnate do about such things as personal drive, motivation and initiative? 
jAii^t^^ ' S°" would it reward people materially for outstanding effort and achieve- 

' ment? 

^ o.^« ?• ^"^* ^®^ ^^^ describe specifically how a Technate would operate? 

^_ ^y2.0. Would there be any special consideration given to wfs people working _ 

cJ^'^^y"'** in dangerous or unpleasant occupations? 

a citizen found he didn't like 1 
allowed to leave it for some other part of the world? 



pfK^^^^ 



^^ 



A»' 



*'^2]7. If a citizen found he didn't like living in a Technate, would he be 
^ '• allowed to leave it for some other part of the world? 

/^. -7/ 

22. Some people, like surgeons, are just approaching the peak of their ' 



<i/Of^f^^^ abilities by age A5, and yet they would be retired at that age in a 
f^tpff'^* _, K^. Technate. Does that mean that society would lose the advantage of th 



eir 



advanced knowledge? 



"ir 'ii:-^ 






^-?*i^--'^anviSTrkMr-^''^g^>'"^'''-'"-"'^''*'-''*'-^ 



■4^ 



,iv,. 



Q & A. 



p.A 



The Technate (continued) p,7ll 



/'■•T/, 



23,' It seems that people will have considerable time to themselves in a 
^ 7 Technate, and yet many don't know what to do with the much-less free 
^jiCfr^^ ' time they have now. Would any provisions be made to help people make 
^^^^ satisfactory use of their free time? 

s 2A» How would Technocracy handle communications, and what media would be 



|5o 



'y2S> .Would the North American Technate isolate itself from the rest of the 
xf^<\Ot^ ' world? 



MI3CELUNY p.7^ 

(As the title suggests this sectio n deals with a wide variety of subjects 
which cannot be definitely categorized under any of the previous headings. 
In some cases the questions would fit quite aptly under two or more of the 
othe r categorie s.) 



T^ 



ve 



D^^< 



,cA^/i. 



Does Technocracy believe in the use of democratic methods? 



^,/j^'^./?2. Will Technocracy take political action? 

_^/,/?'t'3. What would become of political government under Technocracy? 

^ .gi/Sft'^^. What check would there be against the abuse of power by the engineers? 

p^\}i^^ 



T7« 



^: 



)5» What is Technocracy's proposal for operating during a crisis or trans- 



f-y 



ition period? 






1^0 






^ 6, What about the individual who refuses to work? 

7, What is Technocracy's attitude toward religion and the church? 



lii 4^^ ' What is Technocracy's attitude toward immigration? 



-c 9. Technocracy only thinks of science and ^echnoldgy. Why not also think 
Ul^ ^M °^ living better? 



fi^^i 



b>.yu 

^^/lO, You say the politicians don't know the answers to our problem, but ap- / ' 
iCfi * parently we can't vote for you. Who, then, can get us out of the present 
mess? 

- PfiL/^T'^'^ • 11. Is there such a thing as optimum population? 

12, We live in a finite world ^ If we expand our technology to create the 
xrftQ^^'^^^^ . abundance of which Technocracy speaks, will this not hasten the end of 

^^'^ xiur finite resources? 

13. What is your rexplanation for the lack of attention to Technocracy as 
ftP^Ti^y » fi viable answer to our social problems? 

14.. Considering the deteriorating trend of current events and the still wide- 
•^^If./'f'y • spread public apathy, are not Technocracy's present efforts an exercise 
^"^ in futility? WrT<^ 

15. It sound like you're up against a pretty big re-educational problem. j '/«? 
jJ-jjVaJ • How are you going to do it? 












i -v 



'^'?*i.' 









Q & A. p. 5. 



Miscellany - continued, p. 75 



A0^"P^i2 • 16. What do you mena by load factor?? 

/Lit yl?. Techiiocracy keeps talking about function. Do we need any mora 
^^o& $. ' functional, ugly buildings downtown? 

18, It has been said that physical considerations make T^^chnocracy 
^ti,iS\.^'^ inevitable. Is this a correct statement? 



/'• 7rr 









■y- ' 



iJ,-^* .' , «.., 



VOL. 1, NO. 3 



JANUARY , FEBRUARY , 1 983 



SELF-SUFFICIENT 

SURVIVAL 'TE^a^ir 

A NEWSLETTER FOR ECONOMIC AND PHYSICAL SURVIVAL 



PHASE THREE - A "SURVIVAL" MODE 



In looking at the di-f-ferent approaches by various 
organizations one wonders which way to go. You have the Bomb 
Shelter advocates, then there are certain survival ist groups 
that build their membership into an armed camp. At Phase 
Three we try to copy the best o-f what we can -find in all o-f 
them, trying to maintain the peaceful 1 and cooperative 
approach in all areas. 



This leads us to an interesting question. 



Are human beings motivated solely by sel-fish interests? It 
would seem that many people believe this, and, as a result 
these same people are extremely suspicious o-f a cooperative 
view. Cooperation threatens their "Vested Interests". 

It seems certain that people will doubt this or any other 
organization that is based on a cooperative principle. 
Culturally we seem to live in a "Whats in it -for me Society" 
so the cooperation principle seems suspicious. 

Phase Three is using the cooperation principle as a basis -for 

all it's member programs. We think that there is no 

comparison -for what we receive -from the members regarding the 
sharing o-f ideas and cooperating in this newsletter. 

At Phase Three it is our "Common View" that this society must 
at once begin to cooperate or we will experience universal 
-f ai lure. 

Become a member of Phase Three and gain all the cooperative 
benefits of the programs outlined in this newsletter. 



' ^'^a*™™'™"^^"^^. i-^-w^^ 



hSMUHH 




Sel-f Su+^^icient Survival January/February 1983 



BULLION BITS 
A lOOX RETURN ON YOUR INVESTMENT, CONSERVATIVELY! 



^U 



Since June 21 silver has risen +rom «4.88 an ounce to «10.41 
(Dec. 9th). The total increase *5.53 or a return of 1137.. But 
did you realiz^ that the break even cost (which is now 
conservative) to mine silver is between *17.-»21. (US) which 
^eans that this, price range must be reached in order -for 
production to be maintained. Analysts predict that within the 
next 12 to 18 months this price level will be reached if not 
surpassed, and to quote Scott D. Dial, "I-f historic trends 
continue, look for silver prices to soar to over ♦170.00 per 
ounce by 1986." If this occurs, which seems highly probable, 
your average annual return on your investment would be over 
4007. ! 



A look at gold reveals an equally viable investment opportu- 
nity where the price could go as high as ♦3500.00 per ounce 
by 1986 if the inflationary cycle continues along the route 
it is presently proceeding. For an explanation of why this 
plateau may be reached we look at the American economy. 

For the past couple of years the perception of the investing 
public was that Reagan would bring the nation's economic mess 
under control. He was cutting spending, taxes, and most 
important of all, the rate of inflation. In reality, Reagan 
is the biggest spender in history. It seems clear that the 
budget deficit for Reagan's four years will predictabley 
outstrip the total for the entire 206 years of the United 
States ex i stance before he took office. The U.S. national 
debt now exceeds ♦1,000,000,000,000. The maturities extend 
out 30 years! But they are so heavily weighted toward the 
short term that the Government must refinance about half of 
the debt every year. That means 500 billion dollars, on top 
of the new debts being incurred, must be refinanced. 

To do this the whole inflationary cycle will be reborn. And 
the failure of Reagan's ant i -inflationary program will mean 
the cycle will be far stronger than ever before. INFLATIONARY 
EXPECTATIONS WILL SOAR! 



If you dont forsee your investments turning in a 1007. return 

over the next few years, please feel free to inquire through 

the club. 

Information as to how you can get into the bullion market, at 

refinery cost can be found on the back page on the CHERING 

listing. 






^ • '^■■ 






'ja^^is^iisss&^ib^iesmmtm 



itaomti 



Self Su-fficient Survival January/Hebruary 1983 



I AM TECHNOLOGY 



my 



I was born before the recorded history of man, but 
greatest advance has been made in the last fifty years. 

I am the gigantic industrial system of North America. 

I am the great transportation system which moves men, 
equipment and resources across this great continent. 

I am the mighty hydroelectric plants and the central 
steam plants which generate electricity for the needs of the 
Continent. I am the giant foundries, the great furnaces and 
the sprawling factories of your many cities. I am the planter, 
the tiller and the harvester of the abundant creeps from North 
America's fertile soil. 

I am the electric light, the telephone, the radio and 
the all seeing eyes of television.! am the printing press, 
the automatic textile loom, the giant X-ray machine. I am the 
more than 2,000,000 machine tools and the nearly 
2,000,000,000 installed horsepower of prime movers in North 
America. 

I, North American Technology furnished the bulk of the 
fuel and the weapons for the most devastating war the world 
has ever known. 

It was I who made possible the precision bomb sight, 
radar detection, jet planes and even the terrible atom bomb. 

I, Technology, could just as easily be made to turn out 
goods for peaceful living, but I do not dictate how I oper — 
ate. For, although I am designed and developed by the 
scientists, technologists and technicians, I am the chattel 
of American business, and I am imprisoned within the frame- 
work of the price system. I have solved the problem of 
production and, were I permitted to do so, 
problem of distribution. 

If you, the people of North America, want 
abundance of goods and services to all 

every individual security from birth to death, I can 



I could solve the 

me to turn out an 
North Americans, 



you! 

like to see your North America free from 
charity, chicanery, chiseling and profit. 



giving 

do it. It's up to 

If you would 
beggars, crooks, 
it's up to you! 

If you would like to see your children grow up in a land 
of equal oportunity, free from discrimination against race, 
color, or creed, it's up to you! 

If you will set me free from the price system by insta- 
lling technological social controls in accord with the physi- 
cal laws by which I must operate, I will build, right here on 
the North American Continent, the greatest civilization ever 
known to man - a society organized and operated for the prime 
function of living! I can do it, if you want me to. It's up to 
you ! 



I AM TECHNOLOGY from The TECHNOCRAT July 1948 



SeH^ Sufficient Survival January/February 1983 



Following is the second in a series on Social Engineering 
■from our member Jim Davidson. We invite all members to 
participate in the production of this newsletter in order to 
express themselves in an open forum such as this. For further 
information in this regard see "Editors Notes" on the back 
page. 

SOCIAL ENGINEERING 

versus 

THE PRICE SYSTEM 



The significance of the proceeding commentary can not be 
overstated. Read it several times and keep it on hand for 
future review. Although it was printed in 1948 it still 
points to the most important social development that has come 
about in the history of Mankind. It has had, and is still 
having, inexorable social impact and consequences 
particularly on this North American Continent. These social 
consequences are shaping our society whether we like it or 
not. The effects are being felt in a physical manner and 
there can be no compromise with the unidirectional social 
trends that result from the accelerating introduction of 
science and technology. 



The days of 
gone forever 



the horse drawn cart and the hand held plow 
in North America. 



are 



For thousands of years man has dreamed, hoped and prayed for 
an abundant life free from toil and strife with ample time 
for cultural pursuits; hoped that he might sometime find 
security elsewhere than in the insecurity of his fellow men. 
these benefactions are now at hand here on this North 
American Continent. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY HAS MADE THEM 
POSSIBLE. 



EVERY CITIZEN on this continent could have all the goods and 
services he can use from birth until death. We have the raw 
materials, the energy, and the means to produce them. So, why 
not? 

Machines have been developed to do the work on this Continent 
and man could be free from toil and anxiety. Well, why not? 

Every child on this Continent could be given every 
opportunity to become educated to the full extent of his or 
her capacity and desire, including preperation for the job of 
thier choice and ability, and for liesure time activities. 






Self Sufficient Survival January /February 1983 



Every person on this Continent could be permitted to chose 
the type of employment for which he or she is best fitted- 
There is ample diversity of functions to provide suitable 
employment for all types of personality and talents. So, why 
not? 

Every person could have full freedom of belief, speech, 
religion, and personal activity, according to his or her 
desires (subject only to the minimum of regulation, which the 
welfare of all requires); and the practice of this freedom 
would in no way endanger one's standard of living or right to 
consume. Well, why not? 

Every person could have an equal right to decide what kind of 
goods and services would be produced. For who should decide 
this, if not the CONSUMER? 

IN A POWER AGE, political controls, with their corruption, 
innef iciency, incompetence and waste, must be supplanted by 
functional controls whose only criteria of operation are 
efficiency and quality of production. This MUST be accomplis- 
hed before an effective means of distribution can operate. 
Again, why not? 

These questions are a challenge to the people of North 
America. A challenge to unite and take intelligent non- 
violent action against the status quo with its enforced 
scarcity, malnutrition, slum housing and crime. Advancing 
technology is dictating social change and sosial change, if 
directed upward, can mean an abundant life for each and every 
citizen on this great and bountiful Continent. Continued 
attempts to frustrate social change by politico— economic 
manipulations can end only in chaos. 

If you wish to learn about the Technological Social Design 
that has already been engineered for this better and more 
benificial social operation of this country and the whole of 
North America please send a self addressed stamped envelope 
for free information. there is no obligation. Simply send your 
request to: 



SOCIAL ENGINEERING. Cont.N. A. 
Jim Davidson 
P.O. Box 266, Station "A" 
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3K 2A1 



-:*; rr 



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>^-^JtC'"VP.«»':.!g?t::^~^--^^:--^-:>y-r..yr«>^^-'-w« 






Sel-f Sufficient Survival January/February 1983 



Food Reserves 



An Important Investment. 



WHY FOOD STORAGE? 

The early pioneers of this nation always used times o-f 
abundance to prepare -for times of scarcity or unavailibi lity 
in their food supply. Phase Three has incorpoated a Food 
Storage Program as one of it's special Member Programs. In 
using the finest foods available at wholesale prices to 
members. An investment in good food that will store safely 
for years could be the best investment you ever made. 

A FOOD SHORTAGE? 

It is certainly possible. Many Canadians are just starting to 
realize the fact that this land of "surplus and plenty" is 
short in many areas on essential stockpiles and reserves of 
food. They now realize that transportation strike could cause 
havoc in the food supply system, not to mention riots, 
droughts, blackouts, snowstorms, floods, are ANY national 
disaster could quickly wipe out the small inventory of food 
currently stocked in supermarkets and homes. 

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY! 

As a family secures fire, liability, health and life 
insurance to protect against possible disasters, food 
insurance is now becoming important for families and 
individuals alike. Protection against the projected inflation 
in food costs alone can justify investing NOW in the Phase 
Three Food Program. 

HOW MUCH SHOULD I STORE? 

Phase Three is recommending a minimum of six months for each 
family member. For more information on this program call a 
Seminar Co-ordinator at 255-3418 in Winnipeg. The Seminars 
Are free. ACT NOW! 



The SIMPLER LIFE 



Self Suf-ficient Survival January/February 1983 
FOOD HELPS 
GRANOLA, HOMEMADE STYLE 

5 Cups mixed triticale, wheat, rye, and oat -flakes 

1 to 2 cups mixture of seeda and/or chopped nuts 
1/2 cup unrefined oil 

1/4 to 1/2 cup raw honey or maple syrup 
5 cups wheat flakes 

2 cups raisins or chopped dried fruits 

Stir first five cups of flakes , seeds, nuts oil and sweetener 
together. Spread thin on cookie sheets- Bake at 325 degrees 
in oven until lightly toasted about 3-6 minutes. Stir in 
balance of recipe to cool and keep from lumping. Cool 
completely and store in air tight containers. 

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ 



DID YOU KNOW?. 



AN AVERAGE CANADIAN will consume over 50 tons of food during 
his lifetime. 

MANY OF THE FOODS you eat today will not be available by the 
end of this decade. Me can no longer afford to put 7 to 12 
units of protein into a four — legged animal, then kill it to 
get one unit of protein for food. 



THAT OVER 25 MILLION Americans live below the poverty 
and are undernourished. 



line 



IT IS BETTER to look ahead and "Prepare" than to look back in 
"Despair". (Read first line Hebrews 11:7) 

ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT is the largest room in the world. 

HOW BIG ONE TRILLION IS - it's taking the weight and mass of 
the Great Pyramid of Cheops multiplying it by one trillion 
and geting the total weight and mass of THE EARTH. Now you 
know that when Government debt in North America exceeds this 
amount which most reputable economists now beleive, no wonder 
our society is collapsing economically. 

THAT PHASE THREE offers seven programs for members at present 
and are the Discount Program, House Check, Garden Lot 
Program, Bullion Program, Food Reserve Program, Information 
Service Program and a Seniors Program. All this from a non- 
profit community service corporation all for only 425. per 
year. JOIN NOW! Call 255-3418. 



=*•? z- 



-4 



■?-•-- -■- 



■^-v.,-:^; . , -.■ ■ '■■ .-T)m|j^^fflffiN,-< 



VOL. 1, NO. 3 



January /February 1983 

SELF-SUFFICIENT SURVIVAL 



"EDITORS NOTES" 

We will publish articles approved by the Board of Governors 
o-f Phase Three submitted by our Members. Articles will not be 
returned. Poetry and Recipes will be accepted. You are invited 
to SHARE with us. Mail to Self Sufficient Survival, 628 
Church Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba. R2W 1C8 



X%>S.X-w>N.X-v> 



Enquiry regarding GOLD and SILVER bullion and CHERING please 
call ARNIE KROTOWICH at 582-4777 in Winnipeg. 



IF YOU INTERESTED in becoming a member of Phase Three 
Community Services Inc. call 255-3418 in Winnipeg and a 
seminar co— ordinator will introduce you to the various 
programs available to members. Membership is $25.00 per year 
for families, and includes the newsletter Self Sufficient 
Survival. Golden Age, 60 years and older is $25.00 for 
lifetime membership. 



LEARN TO SHARE and cooperate in these coming hard times for 
us all through the medium of Phase Three Programs. Free 
Seminars are being held on a regular basis, 
for times. 



Phone 255-3418 



rf^v«v .-N. ^X >•% X% X-w .- 



HE WHO HESITATES IS LOST, Damned and doomed at heavy 
cost, never let your will power waiver. Follow leads in "THE 
MONEYSAVER". We highly recommend this timely publication from 
The Canadian Money Saver, P.O. Box 370, Bath, Ontario, Canada 
Postal Code KOH IGO . A newsletter devoted to saving you 
money. $15.00 per year. 



SELF SUFFICIENT SURVIVAL IS AN EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATION FROM 
PHASE THREE COMMUNITY SERVICES INC. 628 CHURCH AVE. , WINNIPEG, 
MANITOBA, CANADA. R2W 1C8 AND IS SENT FREE OF CHARGE TO ALL 
MEMBERS OF PHASE THREE. 






8 



'■- .-'-. .-X .-^ v'-. .-'•. .'% .'■ 



THIS ISSUE CONTAINS SPELLING 

AND GRAMMATICAL ERRORS. 

LIST THEM CORRECTLY AND 

MAIL TO PHASE THREE FOR A 

PROMOTIONAL GIFT. 



(]!oiiil»at IJiiliiiiiiofI 

THE LIFE-SIZE WAR GAME 




Now you can 
Participate in 
Realistic Battles 
in our Outdoor 
Combat Zone! 



TRANSPORTATION • BATTLEFIELD 
WEAPONS • GEAR 



By nature man has always been both hunter and warrior. Now you have the opportunity to 
pit these instinctive skills against the enemy's in a natural environment. For the flat rate of 
$30.00, our chartered buses will transport you to our private battlefield. There you will be 
equipped with our exclusive CO2 weapons which fire projectiles (gelatin capsules) 
containing a soluable marker dye. As a member of the unit to which you are assigned, your 
objective for the entire day will be simple — KILL OR BE KILLED! 

. . . EXPERIENCE THE ULTIMATE CONFLICT. 

Whether Armchair Strategist or Soldier of Fortune 

Test your Courage on the 

FIELD OF HONOR 

For more information, please contact us 4 - 10 p.m. daily. 



4$1-054S 



Charters Leaving Daily Starting 
MAY 15th, 1983 

(NOW ACCEPTING ADVANCE RESERVATIONS) 



■ uaa v7M^sw.ia«MBK.wx.w;->*kMr»gT>^ 




,».^«r^ ....... .-■.v»«^>,..»«7^M^.-.j^.^ .-^ft -^^ 



r^ ^LiuD 7(7] - 









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Hi Walt: 



John Taube (707) 795-84^2 
1^00 East Cotati Avenue //4 
Rohnert park, California 9^928 
February 14, 1981 



Received your letter of February 2nd and do indeed 
appreciate its contained information. 

I have taken the liberty of making some copies and 
am sending to some local Technocracts here. Per- 
haps some of the comments you made on page one will 
have some results and maybe not, 

I also sent a copy to Ray Segars in Long Beach and 
perhaps Southerm California may take up your idea 
of contacting Catran, 

Again, I am not in a hurry for the return of the 
book, when your group is through with it, re- 
turn it then. And again, if someone wants it, 
just mail me the cost of the book. 



Regards 




John Taube 






I -? 



ioq;. 



11515 39 Ave., 
lidimnton, Alts, 

2 Feb 81 

John Pr-ube, 

1^00 K. Cotflti Ave., /4., 

llohnert p?-tc, CA. 9/^92B. 

Greetings John: 

I H"VE IlED the book you .^-ent and had better make an attempt at 
commenting on it before I lose track of it and default entirely. It 
seems I havo a lot of thinfjs to keep me busy, one way and anoth-;r. 

But first I am sure you have heanithat John Sheldon died, on 13th 
J^nu-'-ry it wrs I believe. I learned sbout it yesterday when John Waring 
ohoned me from Washington, D.G. Its a jolt, both to me, and to the 
organization. I knew John casually in Winnipeg, before he went to HQ, 
And I visited HQ 3 times, so became f?iirly well acquainted with him and 
his work. I cannot assess what this loss means to Technocracy, It will 
be severe, to say the least. He was Scott's Man Friday, his alter ego 
almost, for many years. The brain tumor that almost got him when Scott 
was still alive, finally felled him, I understand. Technocracy does not 
have martyrs in the sense of being victims of persecution nnd rbuse, as 
far r-s I know. But it has martyrs in the sense of individuals who have given 
up their entire lives to a selfless devotion to the cause, Sheldon was 
one such. 

It seems that this organization is being virtually deciraited by 
deaths lately and not much response from new generations of the public 
to carry on. i-'n more than one occasion Sheldon asked for suggestions 
on how to revitalize the organization. I suppose suggestions were made 
but nothing much was accomplished. It seems we need new organizational 
leadership and techniques of the highest calibre if we are to survive, ^ 
Somehow we seem to be a remnant of the past. Somehow I dont seem to see Ai>yiiuJ"QJl. 
i>h*t4 coming from HO alone. Nor from the scattered remaants of units in 
the Field, '>^ould strategy sessions do any good? Would the injection of 
rubstrmtial amounts of money help? Would a concerted program of institu- 
tionalizing the organization be appropriate? Would an advertising or 
nrnmotional campaign by professionals be considered. Would a sm^ey of 
our- 'market' give us any information on how the public regards us, and 
how we can re.'-ch the public? 'lould local, regional, national and con- 
tinental planning sessions help? Should we have more of an hj^ierarchical 
structure? Whatever it is that we are doing, it doesnt seem to be working. 

le now find ourselves in the midst of times of crisis and challenge. 
We a'^pro^ch the 'moment of truth' for which we have been waiting. Is our 
job already over? Is the struggle lost? Or is it just beginning? I seem 
to exist in a vacuum with hardly anyone to talk to or reason with. And 
yet what we have to say is urgently required to be said. Who else will 
say it? 



i& 







«-.'-': 



-J*-.. 



■m 



- 2 - 



7 feb ai 



p. 



Now about that book; "Is There Intelligent Life on Sarth?", by J«ck: 
C-^tran. Catran se^ns to have 3 main themes that he 1== pushing. l)He is trying 
to rhoot down the UFOlogistsj the i±lfex±nxQiAiiix ph lLQS onhers who want to 
nontulote and look for I^nteli igent _Life in Outer _Spa :ej and all the managerie 
of Science Fiction devotees and writers, V/hile I sympathize to large degree 
with his purposes in this regard, I dont think it is worth the attention he 
gives it. He is including some legitimate research activities along with 
the fantasies, And he is not technically competent to make final judgements. 
There is nretty good evidence that organic^fiSlecules do occur widely in the 
cosmos and that carbon is the keystone of life. The immense variety of en- 
vironments throiighout the universe allows a creditable possibility of life 
arising elsewhere than on earth, and that basicu.ly similar evolutionary 
influences ^jfould prevail. The search for the chain of life goes on here 
on earth as well as tentatively jn soace. The continuity of evolution is 
being raoidly filled in. All that is legitimate science. '^xxt it shoi Id 
not be overemoharized at the expense of other intiatives. The speculntion 
that t'lere is 'j^ntelliprent ' life elsewhere and that we c?'n make contact 
with it is a projection of a higher;, order and a lower probability. If 
we accept that the earth is some 'i^-^bil-l-ion years old hnci that our intelli- 
gent tyoe ci^ril i^sation is but a very recent develop;t^raent, we have a 
me-'-sure of the time it takes for the whole course of evolution to take 
p"'ace. Remembering that most of the cosmos is millions of light years 
removed from us, ue may be looking much too far back on the time scale 
of the universe to expect to find anything so sophisticated as 'intellli- 
gent' life, even if it were to exist at this time, 

A second pre-committment that Catran has made is to endTse B.F.Gkinner's 
Bahaviourism in toto, and to discard all other constructions of 'human 
n-'ture ' and acti'-'ity. I --im advised by ac^defnios hero that Skinner is 
indeed a very important psychologist, nerhaps the greatest in the recent 
oevelooment of the discioline. But it is by no means agreed that he 
dirplaces all other concepts which v;e find useful. In some ways it boils 
down to a oointles?^ argument in the area of semantics - the definitions 
and m'-^nin^i,o'^ words, Catran wants to avoid words such as: 'puroose, ad- 
jo vanced , intelligence , man's superior farcin , communic'- tions , words without 
^ correlates in the real world'. He condemns the nhIL03o^^hers for using some 
^ords iiicRv ' race , alien civilizations , interstellar communications f t^' tAns- 
mitting ther bir^tory and knowledge , thejp a.-]vanr;od cultures , are woo 11}'^ 
herded thinking, u'-ing distortive non-scientific language whinh has no 
meaning in the real v;orld.'. (p. 29). Fu'ther, on page 4^: 'Extraterrestrial^ 
Dossess intelligence , skills , intentions, abil itio^. , reason , n will to 
live, attitudes , knowledge , sihM wisdom, drives , beliefs , and a desire to 
comnunic- te . In the modern view, those terms do not even apnly to man,' 
-g^in nn na^f^ '^0: ''Je must disc.';rd all our old nation- of Intolligence , 
moods , fantasi.;- . thoughts , mo '.iv- tions . skills , beliefs , defense.-. , offenses , 
s^.iblimation , elation , memory , ins t inct , desire . ext£cvert, introve rt, ego . 
id , conflict , wi_n_, anprehension , anxiety , 'iepression , schi~ onhrenia , and. 
libedo. It seems to me that Catran has gone off the deep end, trying to 
destroy concepts that wil"" only have to be replaced by ne-; words with 
corn; r^ible meanings. I dont know much about behaviourism, iDMi nor the 
oarticular words ^nd me- rings which it introduces. Few peo-^le would know. 
In the meantime, until no-./ words and concepts work their viay into the 
l?ngu--e'e and '-re sur>"Orted by their v;idely accepted utility, then ';e 
me.y •• s well use tbe on'^- in hand. I -'m tempted to say of Catran: 'A 
little knowledge is a d.'>n 'erou.'-: thing'. 



iV-. 



m 



- 3 - 



The third theme pushed by Gatran is the ' f-,eo1;nocratic ' one. He has 
indeed stolen much of the body of thought that we rcco^-nize as Howard Scott's 
'Technocracy', even dovm to the 'energy certificate'. I say stolen because 
he exnounds'' it as his own, and very obscurely gives some indirect credit 
for unsnecified material to Howard Scott, Hilton Ivy and Technocracy. 

Considering his total presentation in this book, I am further tempted 
to echo Scott: " We would rather be recommended by our enemjds than con- 
demned by our friends.". In this case, if Gatran is a Triend he has sure 
muddied up his propent'-^tion with a lot of irrelevant mr;tcrial that is both 



distorted and poorly present'^d. 



As you say 



"The book isn't that good". 



Yo'.i sDPoifically asked about Gatran 's classification of Newton's 
Classical Physics as Myth, now yeilding to the 'Liberating Tool' of 
Einstein's ReL-tivity." (page 1^'3) . Just to check and confirm my o\m 
view o'' this, I contacted the Head of the I hysics Dept. here at the 
University of Alberta. We were in agreemf^nt that Newton 'r physics i^dcoO^ 
were still perfectly valid within their fram'- of reference - -: framework 
that Includes most of our technology and the mocro-^hysics of the world 
that we normally live in. The Einstein frame of reference is sub-atamio; 
an extension of physical science beyond the Newtonian, not displacing it, 
Nev/ton is still regarded as one of the greatest minds of science, allow- 
ing for the limitations of his time, 

Cetran's 'Catalog of Myths' is full of distortions, errors, etc, which 
is not surprising, considering the rest of the book. On the Jacket of the 
book, Gatran is described as "a scientist with manj^ years of oxoerience in 

the aerospace industry where he specialized in the design of life support 

and man-ma^ne systems". I question whether he has any acceptable credits 
as a conventionally qualified scientist/. His woW: does not show it. I 
would guess he is a practical type of man, very skilful, and very intelligent, 
but only partially knowledgeable. But notably ego-centric, and does not 
hesitate to prescribe his mode of thinking for everyone. Fortunately 
it is a nersonnl book and a personal statement, and only that. 



spect. 



I gues<^ I so!ind pretty antagonistic to Gatran and his book. l.x\ retro- 
though, I am inclined to be more indulgent and allow that hit: book 
is a thrust in a generally constructive direction, I discussed the book 
at one o^ our meetings. The fev; merabei's present seemed quite interested 
and a couple v;ant to read the book. Jack Gregory, the engineer, thought 
Gatran vshould be encouraged to write a book about Technocracy, and sug- 
ger:ted I write him to that effect, I sidestepped that assignment by saying 
I would suggest that you peo'^le in California are more favorably dituated 
to aoproach Gatran if you think it a worthwhile idea. In any case, there 
is the suggestion. r / p 

^[^^^^^ 
I'm sure I've said enough on this subject, ,vnien I dont want to set 
mysel^ up as any kind of an authority or judge. As with Gatran, it is 
just my O'/zn tentative opinions^ that I've set down here, for v/hat -^-#»«5f=«f«»e 
worth. 



tTxO 



p.'^ J^ d^w ^'^--^"^ 



V/alt 'Vyerr. J 




f'-' . 



-' «-> 



Protiramj 'A Briefing on PrOt^ress*. News reports in depth. 

1. Progress is not a change of governments, leaders, taxes, pay rates, 
price levels, stock market;^ values, crime ann punishment, nor any of 

the other usual news maicers. Sometimes these have a secondary association 
with progress, 

2. The real evidence of progress is physical change. And this is the 
real story of Canada, But it is not being told, with the depth, breadth 
and continuity that its importance would justify. 



3. Here's to a program that will tell the story of contemporary progress 
in a way that most everyone cim understand. 

4, The nucleus of every item mil be a phj'sical event of .ddespread effect 
and lasting consequence i first ship through a ne^v canal; first tr ain 
over a new track; a nine starts operation^ a city centre is re-built; 
new suburbs; new power plants or increased capacity; new factories; 

new products, esp. tools and nmchines; a faster train, or car, or teletype, 

5. Some of these of course appear briefly in the news, but not in depth. 
For instance: ''icebreaker opens shipping lanes on Go, Lakesi^ Shot shows 
icebreaker plunging along in sea of ice. The unanvswered questions: do 
the gt. Lakes freeze over entirely in the v/inter, or is the problem just 

a fev,- chaimelsf is all-year shipping possible now or in the futur e? ^ 

to Montreal? to, Toronto? to Lak,eHead? etc, etc. S<J 't^cgi n ^^pjA^y_^c£.^i4X4j^cC. 

6, Documentaries aiaiHs handle some of thj.s material - the bigf_:,est sxt eumx 
stories, ih a big way - if you happen to be listening. But documentaries 
are not news. They are reports, Progress is a lot of lesser happenings 
tliat take place every day. They need the imnediacy of a nevf item, but 
more background and weight than a news flash. Bort of a briefing on the 
'mission' of the day - or a post-briefing, perhaps. 



'■. -V 



■vc^^-^ 



■:>■■', --^^.'-V-Zi ■• A'T>:\'-V'i',''-»Viru1i-?,-*H>it.iWL^ 



The current popular discussions by scientists an«^ sociologists 
on the role of science in society aBsbased, I submit, on a faulty 
premise: the cont nued r.urvival of the North toerican Price ."ystem; a 
system which even now is in a state of incipient collapse. The result 
of this restricted thinkin^j is a concept of science and technoloj^y sub- 
servient to business and politics, instead of anticipatint; a pre-eminiH<^nt 
position at the center of society, 

A Price System is defined as any social sy.'stem v/hatsoever that ef/ects 
its distribution of goods and services by means of a system of trade or 
domnerce based on commodity v&lu.tion ano. employing any form of debt 
tokens or money, 

ILll present ana past socie'oies are thus variations of price Systems , 

rfowever, price and value depend on the maintenance, by natural or 
artificial menas. of a general condition of scarcity. Abundance - over- 
production - destroys exchange values. Therein lies the rub, '"e have 
exceeded, in our physical operations, the coiiditions and restraints neces- 
sary for a Price System, ana values are accordingly threatened. Contem- 
porary economics, in league with business an--! politics, is engaged in 
frantic manipulations to maintain the basic value structure. Social 
factors ani^. the potentials of science ana technology are peripheral con- 
siderritions, 

iviodern society must now be regarded as an elaborate energy consuming 
device. In common with all organic creatures, survival depends on the con- 
tinued accessibility and conversion of energy. Guided by science and 
technology our society is relentlessly increasing its conversion of energy. 

The concomittant of high energy conversion is abundant production, ^ 
abundant transportation, abundant coranunicr^tions, in short a society of 
abundance. Attempts to restrict this progression in order to maintain 
scarcity, aWK monetary values, hhi* special property rights, establishment 
privileges, inherited traditions, and cjlCilitural anachronisms will merely 
lead to some form of fascism fine increasing confusion and dissent. 

Science can ana will supply its own dir^-ction an^ its ovm control 
without the intervention of business and politics. 



'-■v. 









• • ■:^:IiJ 



The many branches of science are being steadily integrated by huge 
cross-discipline problems, such as pollution. Scientifets, technologists, 
engineers are gaining in group identiry and glinm.erings of broad social 
conecieusness, Nev/ organizations of the.:e profe..:sional3 are being set 
up with avowed social objectives - such as SCITFC in Canada, and even the 
Science Council of Can,;da, They still circumscribe their scope vdth 
nationalistic objectives conceived in Price System terms and will be 
generally just one more ineffective voice in the babel. But the attempts 
by such groups to identify apart from politicians and businessmen is 
noteworthy, 

A s you may 'j;ather from all this I am committefi to Technocracy and its 

objectives, Ifoward Scott and his work have been central in my life for 

54 years, even though I have been inactive in the organization which he 
created, 

I want now to start picking up some of the threads of contacts 
that I used to have, I have subscribed to the magazines a^ain, I propose 
nov/ to become an MAL, about 6 months hence, I will be 58 years and close 
to a pensionable option. 

And when I can I will visit you, as a gesture of acknowledgement of 
the unique hsiiisx historical person who delineated our future - Howard S cott. 



I believe that history will record that he did not live, or die, 
in vain. 




•..Kf": -'' '■<* 






ETMlNTON 

C. Arthur Cairns, 10521 - 106th Ave. ph. 429-2363. (machinist, 38 yrs.) 
% , John Gregory, 6511 - 124th 3to ph. 43.^-5053. CAlta. Research Council, 5Q1 yrs.)| 
M. J. Humen, 9749 - 101 ^to ph. 4^2^-3523. (Rgfrig. eng, 6l yrs.) 
0. Geo. Lunde, S370 - 120th 3to ph. .^33-0836. (former Birector; in sheet 
M. Maximchuk, 10849 - 117th St», ph. 452-1829. (retire!^poste!^c!ifft,%y^7rL) 
Nicholas J. Melnyk, 10838 92nd St., ph. 422-3242. (retired, 70+ yrs.) 
Robert Taylor Jr., 103^^0 - 135 Sto, ph. /^52'/^A9S, (City of Ednontonj 30 yrs.) 
Thos. E. Spencer, Box 121, Wetaskiwin, Alta. (retired CP Engineer, BB yrs.) 
Art Shaw, Valleyview, Alta* (farmer, 65 yrs.) 



\ 






:^u*^n 





r" 



* rr^ 



^y^T'^y^i^l^f 



Box 13-8, 
Medle^r, Alta. 

9 Mar 70 



Editor, 

Letters to. the Editor, 
Time Kag^zme ' 

1155 Dorchester Blvd., ^^^est. 

Suite 2300, 

Montreal, Qiievec, 

Sir: 




^.-i^ 









I have been surprised and puzzled - and I'm . 
sure others have been too - at the seeming stability, >o>n/'' ^^vrMLvuAu 
or perhaps indifference - of our North American society 
in the face of onslau'rhts of violent dissent, protest, 
even destruction. There is no final confrontation. 
No great rallyin'^; cry. Dissent is not defeated. The 
Establishment neither falls nor flourishes. 

Somehow after each convulsion the tempo re- 
sumes j the milk is delivered, the planes fly, the cars 
are gassed, the slot machines are serviced. 

On reflection, it appears we have had a change 
in Establishment. No longer is a wealthy minority at once 
the politically powerful, the economically priveleged, and 
the arbiters of sll social values, Ae now have an Establish- 
jnent oj ^onsumerB - the large majority of the population , 
J^y^^ft^ the only Establishment that now matters. Its only 

dictum is Operate - Produce_^_^Dis tribute .<^ The-T^t is juat 
words, words, /^^^^f^"" ^^^^ui^^ Ap.Cc:^^/)^ 

So what are value s?';^ They are consumers' choice i 

Wit^ supremacy of the consumer, technology bee mes 
the de f?c1^ Administration, and Science, the Low. Technocracy, 
it seems, is at hand. 

Via It Fryers, 



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3ohn A. Taube (707) 795-8^42 
1400 Last Cotdti Avenue H 
RohncrL Park, California 94928 
October 8, 1981 

To: Some Technocracy Sections and Members 

Currently we arc witnessing "Reaganism" and many people are dis(justed with this 
"ism". Certainly those in the lower income bracket will find ttiat they are the 
major victims of this "ism's" austerity. Actually this ism is not presenting 
any major change -- all president's activities, including and since Roosevelt, 
have been strictly for keepincj the "Price System" intact. They all, including 
the present president, have been and are playing "follow-the-leader" ! Reacjan's 
approach, while basically the same, differs a bit. All presidents previously liave 
been wsincj external factors to lirace-up the "Price System, and using a metaphor -- 
tfiey were applying band-aids to a mortal wound. Reagan differs in that he is re- 
movinq these band-aids. TliQ. Rl^ult.j iOill Ed CcUxutAOpk-ic! 

At no time in its historv lias Technocracy been a "protest group;" neitlier in re- 
ference to particular individual or group activities, nor on such matters as environ- 
mental or other issues. A point in question: Earth Day was celebrated April 22, 
1970 as an all encompassing "protest group" declaring its intentions to promote en- 
vironmental improvements. Big l)U5iness, civic groups, and all environmental organi- 
zations were represented in tfiis "protest group;" engaging in rallies, marches and in 
demonstrations, declaring how ttiey were going to achieve this environmental improve- 
ments. We in Technocracy elected not to participate realizing the futility of sucli an 
endeavor in our "Price System." Our position was the same in the environmentalist's 
Sun Day, again noting the futility of good endeavors in the "Price System." 

Technocracy's stand on nuclear energy is quite clear -- there is a tremendous risk 
factor in nuclear plants as they are currently operating. However, that doesn't 
preclude investigating its many aspects and perhaps some will find the enclosed ar- 
ticle of value. 

I pass this informatioi"! on to you. merely as a member of Technocracy, not in any of- 
fical capacity. 




'^* 



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The speech below was given by John H. Fremlin, professor of radiology at the University of 
Birmingam (England), at the European Symposium on Fast Breeder Reactors in London, 
May, 11 - 12, 1981 , under the title The Plutonium Economy (we have added the subtitle), and 
published as a press release by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, June 9, 
1981. It is reprinted here by Access to Energy as a service to its readers (other readers, please 
note that this is not an issue of Access to Energy). 



The Plutonium Economy: 
Terrorism and Proliferation 



Prof. J.H. Fremlin 



The first point I want to make is that the description 
of a major contribution to our electricity supply by 
breeder reactors as a "plutonium economy" is 
misleading. The amount of plutonium outside reactors 
is already much larger than it would be if breeders form- 
ed our main nuclear source. 

Thermal reactors differ somewhat in their yield of 
plutonium, but their annual output is in the region of 
200 kg per giga watt-year (electric). Collectively, British 
thermal reactors must have produced over ten tons of 
plutonium since the program began and are adding to 
this nearly a ton a year. Only a small fraction of the total 
has been used in the fast neutron reactors so far con- 
structed at Dounreay [location of British breeder in the 
far north of Scotland, AtE], though an unpublished 
amount has gone into bomb construction. In a mature 
nuclear power system, the only plutonium outside reac- 
tors would be that in spent fuel and depleted-uranium 
blankets awaiting reprocessing, plus comparable 
amounts in the pipeline between reprocessing and reac- 
tor use; largely in the form of fabricated replacement 
fuel-elements in power-reactor stores. 

These could already have been given a day or two's ir- 
radiation before shipping from the fabrication plant, 
which would render them far too radioactive to be 
handled without remote handling facilities and hence 
immune to theft by terrorists. There would be extra 
financial cost in producing the needful remote-handling 
equipment at the reactors for introducing as well as 
removing spent fuel elements, but this would not repre- 
sent a significant percentage of the cost of the plant. 

When alternative sources of energy have made further 
fission reactors unnecessary, breeder reactors can rea- 



dily be rebuilt to bum more than they produce, simply 
by reducing the "fertile" uranium blanket. 

In passing, if there ever should be even a partial 
degree of nuclear disarmament, there is at present no 
other quick and acceptable way of getting rid of the 
plutonium bombs that have been banned than to burn 
them up in a fast-neutron reactor — a perfect modern 
example of turning swords into plowshares. 

TERRORISM 

Terrorism is the most difficult of all hazards to 
predict. There is a huge difference between the actual 
objective risk to the public and the subjective risk 
perceived by the public. Terrorist behavior itself 
depends on a perceived probability rather than an actual 
one, and the would-be terrorist's perception may be no 
closer to the truth than is that of ordinary people. In- 
deed, since terrorists are pretty unusual people their 
perception may also be unusual. 

All that I can do is discuss the probable actual conse- 
quences if they should try. 

Terrorists do not seem to want to kill many people at 
a time. This can be very reliably deduced from the fact 
that they very rarely kill even a dozen together. High- 
capacity pumps and lengths of four-inch hoses fitted to 
stolen petrol or Calor gas tankers could have killed a 
spectacular number in most conspicuous ways any time 
in the last twenty years and it hasn't happened. Nobody 
has fired rockets at the Canvey Island stores of liquefied 
natural gas. Nobody has stolen a tanker of chlorine or 
any of the other dangerous chemicals that run up and 
down on our roads. The reason is clear: such an act 
would be counter-productive. Terrorists want to draw 






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attention to their cause and to their real or fancied 
grievances, and they may want to get rid of particular 
opponents, but they don't want a whole population sear- 
ching with blood in its collective eye for anyone con- 
nected with their cause and demanding that Government 
should give them some real grievances to worry about. 

It would not, therefore, be sensible for terrorists to 
plan a nuclear disaster. Nevertheless, we cannot know 
just how stupid they might be and they might try to do 
so or, more probably, threaten to do so, so it is worth 
discussing what they could or couldn't do. 

I will start with power plants. History has shown over 
and over again that a band of determined men with 
good information and training, and prepared to accept a 
high casualty rate, can surprise and break through any 
routine defense. It is unlikely, but not impossible that 
they could eliminate the site and building guards quickly 
enough to reach the control room without warning and 
shoot the operators before they could "scram" [quickly 
shut down, AtE\ the reactor. 

Their problems arise after that. 

They would not be able without much effort, skill, 
and more time than they could afford, to get at the 
automatic control rods which would shut the reactor 
down before its temperature reached a dangerous level. 
They could wreck the cooling system, but with the chain 
reaction no longer operating, the residual radioactivity 
would cause only a slow rise in temperature, taking a 
matter of hours to melt the cladding in a Magnox type 
reactor and never reaching a temperature at which any 
large part of the fission products would be released. 
Even more importantly, the terrorists have still to 
breach the reactor containment — a steel shell and four- 
teen feet or so of reinforced concrete — and they can 
hardly combine speed and silence with the introduction 
of the weight of explosives needed for this. 

To produce a large-scale release — in the right 
weather conditions to prevent the hot radioactive gases 
from going uselessly high and blowing out to sea — may 
not be absolutely impossible. It is however so likely, and 
so obviously likely, to kill a lot of terrorists without kill- 
ing an appreciable number of the public that one could 
almost wish they would try. 

A more serious possibility is a similar attack on the 
Windscale plant with the object of blowing up the 
water-cooled tanks, each containing a thousand 
megacuries or so of waste fission products in solution. 
After blowing a hole in such a tank a further bomb 
might be introduced, though it is not certain that anyone 
could approach the hole closely enough without dis- 
abling his central nervous system by radiation before 
this was achieved. If it could be achieved, a large part of 
the site would be lethally contaminated, but such an ex- 
plosion would liberate only a tiny proportion as air 



borne activity in the micron-sized particles needed to 
travel any great distance from the site and which would 
be efficiently retained in the lungs. If the weather were 
right, many people living near the plant might never- 
theless be killed, but fewer than would be killed by an 
attack on a chlorine store. For the terrorists there would 
be a far greater risk of failure and the certainty of many 
casualties. Even if the attack went to plan, the direction 
and strength of the wind would have to be right; few 
people would suffer if the wind were blowing out to sea 
or over the hills inland. 

The relatively simple and safe destruction of the cool- 
ing supplies for the tanks would not be an efficient way 
of kilUng people. It would take an uncooled tank some 
three days to boil itself dry, and then it would have to 
overheat itself to around red heat to liberate such 
moderately volatile materials as caesium, leaving plenty 
of time for effective emergency measures to be eslab- 
Hshed. 

The next possible target for attack is spent fuel or 
Plutonium nitrate in transit. The former is set in 14-inch 
thick steel "flasks" weighing forty tons or more, and 
each carrying a couple of tons of spent fuel elements 
after they have been "cooled off for six months or more 
in a storage pond at the power plant site. 

It would not be difficult to steal a road carrier vehicle, 
but it would be difficult to avoid subsequent capture; 
the carrier is incapable of a speed over about 15 mph 
and is necessarily confined to the road. 

A field gun firing a solid steel missile might punch a 
hole in a 14" steel shell and release the cooling water or 
Plutonium nitrate, but neither is volatile, and the hot 
spent fuel would take several hours to warm up enough 
to evaporate any serious amount of activity; during this 
time a fire engine and a few tons of water could limit the 
effects of local spillage, more easily cleaned up than 
many chemical spills, until specialist units could be 
assembled to cope. Again, one cannot be absolutely cer- 
tain of the success of containment and the terrorists 
therefore cannot be absolutely certain of failure, but 
they can be quite sufficiently sure to look somewhere 
else for a target. 

The plutonium nitrate could also be made too 
radioactive to handle and the difficulty of spiriting it 
away to an undetected destination equipped with major 
chemical, metallurgical and engineering facilities is at 
the limits of possibility. I could continue to detail the 
difficulty the terrorists would face in building the highly 
sophisticated structure to make an effective bomb, out 
of reactor grade plutonium of unknown isotopic pro- 
portions, without destroying the bomb and themselves 
in test assemblies. This is unimportant. Britain has a 
large stock of actual bombs. All we have to do is to use 
the same transport and escort system for plutonium 



>>.-'-i" 



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shipments as we do for finished bombs. No terrorist will 
face the long delays and uncertain outcome of fresh con- 
struction if all this could be avoided and no greater dif- 
ficulties faced by stealing an actual bomb. 

PROLIFERATION 

A country with the necessary chemical and engineering 
resources cannot be prevented from building a 
plutonium-239 or uranium-235 bomb except by military 
occupation. A considerable number of countries have 
already, or soon will have, these resources. None of the 
"bomb-countries" found any difficulty in obtaining 
uranium, and we cannot count on other countries finding 
it impossible. The decision whether to build bombs or not 
is therefore a political one. 

There is no need to start with a nuclear power plant; in- 
deed, such a plant is far more difficult to build than are the 
facilities for bomb construction; all of the countries v.'ith 
nuclear weapons built successful bombs five years or more 
before they were able to build even a small power plant. 

It is generally assumed that proliferation of nuclear- 
bomb construction is a bad thing. Since all of the states 
which already possess nuclear weapons claim that these 
weapons are essential as a deterrent and that they have for 
decades successfully prevented a major war, it is a little dif- 
ficult to see the logic behind their dislike of proliferation, 
natural as this dislike is for supporters of CND [Controlled 
Nuclear Disarmament? AtE\. It is hardly to be expected 
that a country which has managed to make a few A-bombs 
will risk an attack on any of the countries with huge 
arsenals of H-bombs. However, even if Tweedledumia 
builds a bomb purely for the purpose of dropping it on 
Tweedledeeria, this would kill a lot of people and 
destabilize further an already far from stable world. I 
regard the proliferation of Soviet and American bombs as 
more dangerous than the spread of bomb-capability to 
new countries, but I accept that we would try not to make 
this spread more likely. 

The question of relevance to this Conference is whether 
this spread, which is what is normally meant by the term 
proliferation, will be made more or less likely by the 
building of nuclear power plants for electricity production. 

We have of course to distinguish sharply between: 

(1) the effects of building more nuclear power plants in 
countries which already have them — especially those 
which have bombs as well; 

(2) the effects of selling power plants to countries which 
certainly have the capacity to build bombs if they decide to 
do so — such as Italy or Czechoslovakia; and 

(3) the effects of selling nuclear power plants to coun- 
tries which do not yet have this capacity. 

In Case (1), there is absolutely no sense in blocking the 
building of power plants; their nuclear industries are more 



likely to try to dodge export controls if they are under- 
used and the more electricity they produce the more 
chance there is for coal to be available for export and 
the less urgent will be the need for other countries for 
nuclear power. In Case (2) there is again no sense in 
blocking development of civilian nuclear power. No ad- 
vanced country will make bombs of unrehable perfor- 
mance from reactor grade plutonium secretly and il- 
legally abstracted from a power plant when it is far 
easier to produce military-grade plutonium secretly 
from scratch. An air-cooled natural uranium reactor to 
produce military grade plutonium is much easier and 
cheaper to build than is an isotope enrichment plant for 
uranium 235, but the fuel processing is much more dif- 
ficult and dangerous. The construction needed, would, 
however, be easier to hide than that for the isotope- 
enrichment route. 

Case (3) remains. The processing plant would be 
needed just as much to get low-grade plutonium from 
spent fuel illicitly removed from a power reactor as to 
get high grade plutonium from an easily built military 
reactor. It would not be sensible therefore to risk detec- 
tion by stealing spent fuel elements from the reactor. 
Many tons of fuel elements would have to be taken, 
which would really be quite difficult without a large 
number of people knowing, but it is not absolutely im- 
possible; Tweedledum was not always sensible. A mix- 
ture of bribery and intimidation could neutralize an in- 
spection team, and the acquisition of power reactors 
would unavoidably give assistance by allowing Tweedle- 
dumia to train a lot of specialists in nuclear know-how. I 
do not believe myself that a Case (3) country could ac- 
tually make a bomb undetected; it would certainly need 
an extreme level of optimism to expect to do so. 
However, I might be wrong. If I am, Tweedledumia has 
still a litle problem. If it has successfully defeated the in- 
spection team and made the bomb, is it not possible that 
Tweedlederia has also succeeded in making two bombs? 
Better not use it for the time being. 

Given all this, there remains a risk. But there is a risk 
in not carrying out the positive part of the Non- 
Proliferation Treaty, which committed us to supplying 
the non-bomb nations who need them with civilian 
power plants. If we refuse to do this, and continue 
ourselves not to disarm — also promised in the treaty — 
we are creating a fair excuse and a strong incentive to the 
other signatories of the NPT to denounce it. Recent 
manoeverings round the Middle East by the USA and 
USSR underline the strains that may develop in the next 
two decades as the oil runs short. Shortage of world 
energy supplies could lead to greater dangers than pro- 
liferation. 

Especially for us. 



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Mr. Jolin Spitlcr, Contincnt.il Director 
Technocracy Inc. 
Savannah, Ohio 4^1874 

Greetings: 



John A. Taubc (707) 795-8^^2 
1400 Last Cotati Avenue W^ 
Rohnert Park, California 94928 
October 5, 1981 



I have been giving some thoucjht for a representative of Tectinocracy appearing on 

a local television program as a guest interviewed by a host. I present two methods: 

1. A letter is sent on official stationery informing such a [)rogram that a represen- 
tative of Technocracy is available, etc. (I don't like this method; it has limited 
possibilities) . 

2. A member calls and speaks to the program director and inquires if they would wish 
for a Technocracy representative on their program? If they say no, that ends it. In 
most cases, I feel that they will ask "What is Technocracy or they will request Tech- 
nocracy literature. Literature is sent along with the enclosed letter; this letter 
was drafted by Burton "Bo" Bogardus and myself and is offered as a format. If no 
reply is forth coming, the member again calls the station. The member merely in- 
quires if a guest appearance is forth coming. If the program director asks questions 
concerning the concepts of Technocracy, the member must then reply tliat it would be 
better if an authorized member (one appointed by the Board) meet with them. 

I favor the second method as it sets up a one-to-one relationship and such a relation- 
sfiip is more productive. I see great possibilities in this endeavor. Locally, there 
are about 8 such programs and the minimum will be 8 people who are introduced to Tech^ 
nocracy. The maximum -- I won't speculate on that. 

This matter was brought up at the October 4th Board Meeting and permission was granted 
for me to correspond with CHQ. 

I made two further suggestions: (1) In regard to our monthly public meetings -- tfiat 
we be flexible and if we appear on a television program, that we have a public meeting 
within ten days of the appearance so that we can utilize the television for publicizing 
the talk; (2) that we explore the possibility of having Roger Werner, who is one of our 
young members, as the Technocracy representative. 

I am sending copies of this letter with the enclosed letter to 12349-1 ,, 12247-1 , 118332 
-2 and to Stan. Bartlett. It might be of interest to them. 

The next Board meeting will be November 1st or 8th, and if we could have a reply before 
then, it would be beneficial. 

Cheers, 



John A. Taube 



9 cc: Roger Werner, Alfhi Green, 12237-1. 



j'lft-r''-- ^ '■ ' '^/J- 




Mrs. Shirley Dibalos, Program Director, 

A.fl. San Francisco 

Television Station KGO 

277 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, Calilornia 9^10? 

Dear firs. Dibalos: 



John A. Tauhe (707) 795-8^4? 
1400 L.ist Cotati Avenue //4 
Rohnert Park, C.ilifornia 94929 
October 3, 1981 



This letter is in response to a phone conversation with your office incjuiring if 
you would consider a representative of Technocracy Inc. on your program. 

Technocracy was incorporated as a sociological research, educational, non-profit or- 
ganization in 1933, and its concepts are as valid today as then. A significant point: 
along with other cities' demonstrations, 260,000 demonstrators recently marched in 
Washington, O.C. and demanded more "Dobs!" -- WE WAfJT JOBS! These people fail to 
realize the tremendous impact of sophisticated, robotic automation and the extent to 
which "Jobs" are eliminated. To further exacerbate this matter of "Jobs," -- our 
esteemed pundits are opting for retirement to be changed so that it commences only 
some time after a person's 65th birthday. Certainly serious attention must be given 
to the lack of jobs for the youth entering the labor field, and the subsequent tremen- 
dous growth of crime. The enclosed article "Unemployment and crime go hand in hafid" 
touches on this point. 

Study of this matter of "Jobs" establishes that our problems are not basically tech- 
nical in nature, but are strictly one of attempting to make "money" serve for conditions 
beyond its capabilities. Our monetary, merchandising "Price System" lacks the capacity 
for a viable solution to the problems implicit in our technological age. Technocracy 
has stated for many years that the Morth American Continent is too complicated to be 
administrated by a political/business hegemony. Please note the article EllP--AilOTI-|[iR 
THREAT in the enclosed Horthwest Technocrat magazine. Also enclosed for your perusal 
is Technocracy's Technological Social Design. Kindly note tfie contemporary question 
and answer section which starts on page 55. 

Indeed, Technocracy has developed a program compatible with our modern society that must 
be brought to the attention of all concerned people. If you concur with tfiis thought, 
and would care to have a representative of Technocracy on your program, kindly contact 
fir. Reo tIcCaslin, Director, Technocracy Inc., 3243 fialboa street, San Francisco, Calif- 
ornia 94121. Phone: (415) 752-8569; 921-2470. You may also call the above number. 



Respectfully, 



Johfi A. Taube 



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John A. Taubc (707) 795-S4'^2 
3Qhn Spitler, Continental Director l'4-OO East Cotati Avenue //^ 

Technocracy Inc. Rohnert Park, California 9^928 

Savannah, Ohio '^^874 October 9, 1981 

Greetings; 

Enclosed is a ten-minute tape I heard on the radio. It concerns a copyright and 
it brings to mind tlie term Technocracy. As I understand it, the term Technocracy 
is copyrighted by our organization, ana implication the term Technocrat, and any 
use of it could be constituted as "diluting and destroying a trademark", an ex- 
pression used on the tape. 

When was the first time the term "Techocracy" used? I know of a publication in 
J919 that used the term. However, the term is stil I copyrighted and as I under- 
stand it, in 1933. 

The cjuestion remains -- Are people infringing on our copyright and/or are they "di- 
futing and destroying" it? The point I am getting to -■- when various publications 
use our copyright, can we not send them a letter? Can we not, in general terms, 
mention the implications of a copvTiglit and explain to them that a short description 
of Technocracy Inc. in their pubJication would prevent any consideration of a law- 
suit and beside such an article would be of interest to their readers? I realize that 
a lawsuit from us would be guite useless -- I don't think we have much grounds to 
go on, but such a letter could be very productive. Right now there are three pub- 
lications that have used the term "technocrat" recently -- (I) Fortune, (2) The 
Nation, (3) Wall Strce Journal. The Nation carries our advertisement; they might be 
inclined to print something. At least, many publications will know we exist! 

Such a letter on CHQ stationery, could be used for many publications and once the 
letter is drafted, then subseguent use of it would be quite easy. I have recently 
received an article by Walt Fryers of 11353-A and if time is pressing at CHQ, per- 
haps Walt could take on this assignment. 



Cheers, 



John A. Taube 



cc: 12237-1, 11353-A 







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DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

TELEPHONE (403) 432-3274 




THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 
EDMONTON, CANADA T6G 2H4 



May 30, 1973 



Walter R. Fryers 
Meteorological Projects Officer 
P.O. Box 1308 
Medley, Alberta 

Dear Fryers: 

Fina 1 ly , after two weeks being away from the office, I have 
looked at your technical note. It presents to me some interesting 
applied climatology. I have noted on your manuscript (which I am 
returning) some places where I think the wording could be improved. 

There are two suggestions. You speak about break-up being 
caused by a storm. Can you give evidence from specific years? 
What of the final dates in Table 2? 

Also, can you add some notes on the causes of some of the 
changes - the changing albedo of the land;,and of the lake cover 
as it changes from snow to water-covered ice to clear ice? And 
the influences these have on the changes you describe? I recognize 
you have no observations to substantiate your hypotheses, but they 
still might make an interesting couple of paragraphs. 

I think you could submit your paper to the American Meteorological 
Society for their evaluation. It may draw a blank, but I doubt it. Try. 



Sincerely yours , 




Jl^pt4^ ^ 



Richmond W. Longley, 
Professor. 




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WORLD SYNERGY INSTITUTE 

P.O. BOX 24252 • LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 • U.S.A. 



May 4, 1983 



Jim Davidson 
749 Sturgeon Rd. 
Winnipeg, Manirooa 
CANADA R2Y 0K8 



Dear Jim: 



Thank you so much for your two recent letters, 
and for your interest in my general system's 
article . 

I have enclosed a master copy for any reproducing 
you find appropriate. By far, the most economical 
way would be for you to have it copied locally. 

The article is actually a copy of the speech I 
will be giving at the International General 
Systems Conference on World Problems, to be held 
in Detroit later this month. 

Its purpose is to enroll systems m.odelers to 
detail how we would distribute and manage abundance 
onto a computer simulation model. This would then 
give credibility to Technocracy et . al. to the 
scientific comm/anlty internationally, and be the 
second in a series of half a dozen steps that could 
implement an economics of abundance in less than 
five years. 

Please let me know what feedback and results you 
generate from your use of the paper. Sounds like 
what you have in mind could help its implementation 
even fasterl 



Warm best wishes 
John Holmdahl 



I't,'"^^-*.*;.. 




SOLVING THE WORLD'S PROBLEMS WITH SYSTEMS LEARNING 
John Holmdahl & William Golden 

World Synergy Institute 

P.O. Box 2U252 

Los Angeles, California 9002M-0252 



ABSTRACT 

Broad-based interdisciplinary 
researchers often stumble across the 
realization that unexpected solutions 
already exist for all our world's 

•^^•^V^O'w* H»i^ ^V^^v /»/*w»A f*T»r\w« A ^ <•«^r^^ ^r^ttc 

outside the area of expertise of the 
specialists normally assigned to work on 
the problems. These unexpected solu- 
tions combined with current understand- 
ing of the dynamics of emergent systems 
now make it possible to piece together a 
methodology and a process for implement- 
ing post-Industrial systems capable of 
uplifting all humanity to a higher stan- 
dard of living than anyone has ever 
enjoyed. 

This paper describes how an Inter- 
disciplinary systems group, such as the 
Society for General Systems Research, 
could creatively help to end hunger, 
poverty, war, the threat of war, crime, 
disease, etc., and steer humanity into a 
world of leisure, optimism, creativity 
and abundance. 

INTRODUCTION 

Global systems modelers have made 
great strides in approaching a methodol- 
ogy that could manage all the variables 
which create our global condition, its 
problems and its possibilities. It Is 
now possible to recontext this interdis- 
ciplinary resource base to provide "un- 
expected" solutions for our enormously 
complex world problems. 

In 1979 Dr. Richard Ericson, then 
President of the Society for General 
Systems Research, expressed that "there 
is a demonstrable Indeed almost obvious 
worldwide need for a conceptual frame of 
reference in order to articulate and in- 
tegrate the world's disparate social, 
economic, and political systems whose 
convergence must be facilitated as mac- 
rosystems are welded Into a world system. 
....What is lacking... is a vehicle which 
will bring systemic coherence and arti- 
culation to such efforts." 

This paper offers several Insights 
which substantiate that the creation of 
a global preferred-state system Is an 
elegant, viable and realizable way to 
use systems learning for solving the 
world's problems. A research action 
agenda or critical path for Its Imple- 
mentation is then outlined. 



OPERATING PREMISES 

Our entire history of science and 
invention has been the ability to do 
what was previously considered unreal- 
istic or Impossible. The radio, tele- 

on the moon were all widely dismissed as 
pie-in-the-sky fantasies before their 
accomplishment. We continually do the 
impossible because of our ability to 
utilize and discover universal princi- 
ples with the resultant ability to do 
more with less: to perform ever more 
effectively per each pound of material, 
erg of energy and second of time. 



Por example, global modeler and 
Presidential Medal of Freedoir. recipient 
Buckmlnster Puller (1981) asserts that 
The human-powered Gossamer Albatross 
(weighing only fifty-five pounds, with 
a wlngspan of ninety-six feet) was 
able -to fly across the English Channel 
because the structural materials of 
which it was built were many times 
tensllely stronger than an equal 
weight of the highest-strength air- 
craft aluminum. The tensile strengths 
of the Albatross's structural materi- 
als were sixty times stronger per 
equivalent weight than the strongest 
structural materials available to 
Leonardo da Vinci for realizing the 
design of his proposed human-powered 
flying machine = . * 

A one-quarter-ton communication satel- 
lite is now outperforming the previ- 
ously used 175,000 tons; of transatlan- 
tic copper cables, with this 700,000- 
fold reduction in system-equipment 
weight providing greater message- 
carrying capacity and transmission 
fidelity, as well as using vastly few- 
er kilowatts of operatlanal energy.... 
The human pedal-powered airplane and 
the communication satellite are only 
two out of hundreds of thousands of 
Instances that can now be cited of the 
accomplishment of much greater per- 
formance with much less material. 



Also, we have learned from our 
understanding of systems that all prob- 
lems are interconnected and that they 
cannot be solved as if they existed In 
isolation from other problems or from 
the larger system In which they are an 
integral part. Insti'.utlonal struc- 



. 2 - 



tures, divided disciplines, special 
Interests and bureaucratic Inertia pre- 
vent people from working together to 
understand and solve problems-as-a- 
whole. World Game global modeler Medard 
Gabel (I98O: 17, 217-8) points out that 
Planners need to treat the whole sys- 
tem, not the disemboweled systems of 
their special Interest versions of 
that system.... We are all on the same 
planet, we use the same energy sources 
with the same technology and know-how, 
and we are members of one amazingly 
complex species. Viewing the problems 
and making decisions from this per- 
spective does not make them more com- 
plex, but in a rsal sense slspllfles 
them enoxnnously. It simplifies our... 
problems by putting them In their true 
functional relation with the Earth's 
total llfe-sustalnlng biosphere, and 
all of humanity's shared experiences 
as one species. Such a perspective 
leads to solutions that are consider- 
ate of all the world, Its people, and 
Its delicate ecology. .. .Without deal- 
ing with the larger, global system, 
the local systems' "solutions" degen- 
erate into mere treatments of symp- 
toms; "home remedies" for warning 
si«5ns rather than cures or preventive 
medicine for systemic disorders..... 
Conversely, the paradoxes, cul-de-sacs 
and Intractable situations of local 
problems and their proposed solutions 
can often be eliminated by the syner- 
gies of a global solution. .. .The fun- 
damental. . .problem is not what is 
popularly depicted in the newspapers 
or on television; the basic problem is 
not the price of gasoline or fuel oil 
or gas deregulation or... oil imports 
or windfall profits or nuclear prolif- 
eration. It is also not nuclear vs. 
...solar; or "hard" vs. "soft" energy 
paths; or depletable vs. non-deplet- 
able energy sources. Izi some sense it 
Is all of these, but most fundamental- 
ly it is quite simple: how do we get 
enough energy to everyone on Earth to 
meet all their life-support', needs? 
How do we harness enough energy so 
that 100* of humanity — those alive to- 
morrow as well as today — have all the 
energy they need to have optimally 
functioning' life-support facilities? 
How do we get the energy that is need- 
ed to feed, clothe, shelter, educate, 
furnish health care and recreational 
opportunities, and insure social well- 
being? And, how do we do this in the 
cleanest, safest, and quickest way? 
And, last but not least, how do we do 
all this, not at the expense, dlsad- 
vantaf^e, or coercion of anyone, but 
ideally, through spontaneous coopera- 
tion? The complexity of all the 
world's problems. . .demands a new level 
of awareness in our dealings with 
these problems. .. .We are all part of a 
larr.er system, and it is the larger 



system that has the problems. .. .What 
is needed is to emphasize certain 
things, to develop new structures to 
coordinate existing processes into 
synergistic totals, and to coordinate 
the whole system towards goals that 
are beneficial to all of humanity. 

Another fundamental error made In 
trying to solve world problems has been 
the attempt to solve them within the 
context of our current obsolete economic 
systems. Capitalism and socialism, the 
two major economic systems of our times, 
are survival economics, built on the 
age-old premise that there is a scarcity 
of energy, food and resources. Both 
economic systems share a common price 
system in which the value of a commodity 
is defined relative to its limited 
availability. If a commodity becomes 
too abundant, its price will fall below 
the profit margin necessary for its con- 
tinued production. So governments and 
producers are forced to create artific- 
ial scarcities to maintain prices. 
Fifteen million people starve each year 
while food is intentionally destroyed 
and farmers are paid not to produce 
crops. 

The assumption of a lethal inade- 
quacy of life-support underlies the 
world's power structures' race to amass 
weapons ," because they assume it eventu- 
ally has to be us or them, not enough 
for both. As Buckminster Puller (1981: 
xxlll) points out 

That is why (1) those in financial 
advantage fortify themselves even 
further, reasoning that unselfishness 
Is suicidal. That is why (2) the 
annual military expenditures by the 
U.SoS.Ro, representing socialism, and 
the U.S.A., representing private en- 
terprise, have averaged over $200 
billion a year for the last thirty 
years,. . .making a thus-far total of 
six trillion, UOO billion dollars 
spent in developing the ability to 
kill ever-more people, at ever-greater 
distances, in ever-shorter time. 

After thousands of years of inven- 
tion and discovery — of understanding 
ever more universal principles and 
learning how to do increasingly more 
with less — humanity has now achieved the 
technological ability to provide an 
abundance for all people. That thres- 
hold was crossed in the early 1970 's 
according to the conclusions of Buck- 
minster Puller's World Game, a 20-year 
global systems modeling research 
project. After inventorying all our 
planet's resources and our technological 
capabilities. Fuller (198l:xvlil,xxv-vl) 
asserted that there is now hard evidence 
we have 

an alternative to politics and its 
ever more wasteful, warring, and 



- 3 - 



Inherently vain attempts to solve one- 
sidedly all humanity's basic economic 
and social problems. That alternative 
was through Invention, development, 
and reduction to the physically work- 
ing stages of mass production proto- 
types, of each member of a complete 
family of Intercomplementary arti- 
facts, structurally, mechanically, 
chemically, metallurglcally , electro- 
magnetlcally, and cybemetlcally de- 
signed to provide so much performance 
...as to make It eminently feasible 
and practicable to provide -a sustain- 
able standard of living for all human- 
ity — more advanced, pleasing, and In- 
creasingly productive than any ever 
experienced or dreajned of by anyone In 
all history. 

Another way Puller (198l:xvlll, 
xxv-vl) has said this Is that 

Technologically, we now have four 
billion billionaires onboard Spaceship 
Earth who are entirely unaware of 
their good fortune. Unbeknownst to 
then, their legacy is being held In 
probate by general Ignorance, fear and 
selfishness. .. .Humanity now— for the 
first time in history— has the real- 
istic opportunity to help evolution 
do what it is Inexorably Intent on 
doing — converting all humanity Into 
one harmonious world family and making 
that family sustainingly , economically 
successful. .. .Ninety-nine percent of 
humanity does not know that we have 
the option to "make It" economically 
on this planet and in the Universe. 
We do. It can only be accomplished, 
however, through a design science 
initiative and technological revolu- 
tion. .. .Neither the great political 
and financial power structures of the 
world, nor the specialization-blinded 
professionals, nor the population in 
general realize that sum-totally the 
...invisible revolution in the metal- 
lurgical, chemical, and electronic 
arts now makes It .. .feasible to take 
care of everybody on Earth at a 
"higher standard of living than any 
have ever known." It no longer has to 
be you or me. Selfishness is unneces- 
sary and henceforth unrationalizable 
as mandated by survival. War is 
obsolete. It could never have been 
done before. Only ten years ago the 
more-wlth-less technology reached the 
point where it could be done. Since 
then the Invisible technological- 
capability revolution has made it ever 
easier to do so.... And with that 
universal abundance, the warring, 
official and unofficial, will subside 
to Innocuous magnitude. With that... 
accomplishment, humanity may, for the 
first time in history, come to know 
the meaning of peace. 



Interdisciplinary futurist Robert 
Anton Wilson (199l:'«3) capsullzes our 
current situation: 

At this time when (after thousands of 
years of invention and discovery) real 
scarcity has at last been vanquished, 
we are maintaining artificial scarcity 
because of sheer Ignorance. .. .In short, 
humanity has already achieved, tech- 
nically, the total success all 
Utopians ever dreamed of; our problems 
now are entirely due to wrong thinking. 
We are in the traglc-comlc predicament 
of two crazed men dying of thirst , 
fighting over a teaspoon of water In 
the middle of a rainstorm. We cannot 
see the rainstorm because we are 
hypnotized by emergency-reflexes fix- 
ated on the teaspoon. 



There is as yet no 
economic system based on 
our collective capacltle 
to recognize that we are 
a classic paradigm shift 
more profound than the s 
omy 300 years ago or In 
ago, we come to see that 
asking entirely new ques 
from entirely new premis 
for entirely new goals. 



adequate socio- 

the reality of 

s. As we begin 

in the midst of 

In economics, 

hlft in astron- 

physlcG 80 years 

we need to be 
tlons, operating 
es and aiming 



Interdisciplinary futurist P.M. 
Esfandiary (1977:10.112; 1973:110-15) 
captures i glimmer of the new perspec- 
tive and the new opportunities now open- 
ing up for us: 

The world is moving toward an entirely 
new economic order.... The new econom- 
ics is not capitalism or socialism or 
even the mixture of the two. The new 
economics is the new teletechnology — 
abundance — global Ism — liberated 
values.... In developing fields such as 
the space program — world tourism — 
world transportation — International 
hotel services — credit card systems — 
construction. .. fewer and fewer people 
are handling more and more work 
through extensive telecomputerlzatlon. 
This technology could be used In many 
other fields: the development of un- 
limited solar energy — the production 
of unlimited foods — global education. 
...If we mobilized this new teletech- 
nology we could within ten or fifteen 
years do away with poverty In the 
world. If we mobilized our new tech- 
nology we could within five to ten 
years free millions of people rich and 
poor alike from the slavery of perpet- 
ual work Nothing can any longer 

help replace the Jobs which automation 
and cybernation are taking over. It 
has become Imperative to decrease 
work. This Is not only sound econom- 
ics, it is also a liberating move. 
This is a time to free people of work. 
Rather than rack their brains to 
create employment, economists should 
now work out plans to create leisure. 



. 4 . 



We must work out entirely new defini- 
tions of supply and demand~productlv- 
Ity— capltal~dlst^lbutlon~consump- 
tlon— employment— leisure. . . .The 
relaxation of our primitive work 
habits will not In any way limit our 
drive to higher standards of living. 
On the contrary we can now quantum- 
leap into a world of Abundance Crea- 
tivity Leisure by working less and 
letting our efficient tireless 
machines do the work. 

The time has come for a fundamental 
reevaluation of the human condition In 
light of the monumental breakthroughs of 
this late 20'ch century. We now have a 
choice between fighting over scarcity 
or spreading abundance. We have the 
option, the opportunity, the resources 
and the responsibility for designing 
and implementing a preferred-state 
global economic system. 

Much of the work has already been 
done for us. Research groups like the 
World Game (cf. Gabel, 1979, 1980; 
Brown, et. al., 1978) and Technocracy 
(1975), and the works of best-selling 
futurist Edward Bellamy (1888, 1897) 
have already detailed how such a system 
might operate. Their models are 
different facets of a dynamic, viable 
and comprehensive gestalt. Visionary 
economists, cybernetlcists, systems 
designers, social scientists and 
psychologists can now work together to 
Integrate, refine and Implement the 
new preferred-state systems. 

THE "HOW" OP IMPLEMENTING 

When I talk with people in govern- 
ment, most admit that our current system 
Isn't working, that problems are getting 
worse every day, that there don't seem 
to be any real answers within the 
present Industrial context , and that the 
only reason they hold onto the present 
system Is that systems designers haven't 
articulated with enough detail and 
enough clarity a more efficient and 
effective alternate system. Then they 
would have a choice and could say, "Oh, 
we can do things this way!" 

If the creation of a new age of 
leisure, optimism, creativity amd abun- 
dance is now within our ability, the key 
question becomes, how do we actualize 
that potential. There are literally 
thousands of orgamizations Involved in 
projects to :nake the world a better 
place. Just waiting for a context or 
system Inclusive and synergistic enough 
to transform tneir differences into 
additional resources, for the achieve- 
ment of a common goal. General systems 
experts would ask, what action agenda of 
all the possible options would be the 
Isomorphic equivalent of the process that 



results In the origins of hierarchical 
levels in natural systems: a process 
which would form aggregates that feed 
hierarchical evolution, which is a self- 
organizing, self-referencing cyclical 
strategy involving successive events of 
"emergence" from one level to another, 
accompanied by developmental prolifera- 
tion of variants within levels (cf. 
Troncale, 1979a, 1979b). This strategy 
would there-by facilitate the natural 
evolutionary process and be the one 
moat worth pursuing. 

The overall guidelines might be 
similar to the purpose of Puller's World 
Game (Fuller, 1981, 1983) which is 
To make the world work 
Por lOOJ of humanity 
In the shortest possible time 
Through spontaneous cooperation 
Without ecological offense 
Or the disadvantage of anyone. 

As described in Ho-Plng: Pood for 
Everyone, by Medard Gabel (1979), 

The World Game Is a method for dealing 
with crucial problems In holistic, en- 
vironmentally sound, and resource 
efficient ways. In contra-dlstinction 
to the "War Games" that are played by 
the generals and admirals of the Pent- 
agon, Kremlin, and all other nation 
states and their alliances to figure 
out the best strategic and tactical 
military moves and countermoves and 
counter-counter moves In hot and cold 
war situations, the World Game con- 
cerns Itself with strategic and tacti- 
cal moves that will make lOOS of 
humanity successful. .. .The World Game 
deals with the whole world's resources 
and "llvingry" technology in ways that 
attempt to make everyone a winner. The 
World Game asks and answers the ques- 
tions: "How can the world's resources 
aiid know-how "ue used and reused so 
that everyone on Earth Is better off? 
How can the world be made to work for 
lOOJ of humanj.ty In environmentally 
sound and rescurce efficient ways?" 
....The World Game. . .attempts to 
illustrate and use a new paradigm for 
viewing our world and its problems.... 
The approach Is anticipatory in that 
It does not seek to deal with problems 
Just in their crucial state but before 
they reach a crisis. And perhaps more 
Importantly It is a design approach, 
that is, it attempts to deal with the 
whole Earth and all of humanity with a 
long range evolutionary perspective, 
paying attention not to Just what is 
wrong or what shouldn't be, but with 
what is and what should be, and how to 
get from here to there as well. We 
have to ask ourselves, "What Is need- 
ed?" not only, "What is wrong?" 

The first step toward actualizing 
our potential as four billion billion- 




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- 5 - 



aires on this planet Is to design an op- 
timal world system, based on the reality 
of our enormous potentials. As formula- 
ted by Medard Cabel (1980) of the World 
Oame: 

In designing anything It is best to 
•tart from scratch; to design the 
Ideal system as if the existing system 
did not exist, and then to work back 
from this preferred state to the pre- 
sent by identifying those things in 
the present system that could be 
changed or that need to be developed 
or phased out to bring about the pre- 
ferred state. We need to start with 
what we want, not what we think the 
" inv^ 2fLw2>9 *^3irii'' is '^oin*^ to do ^' — X^- 
The opposite approach, that of start- 
ing with the present-day, problematic 
situation, limits possibilities amd 
prejudices the problem-solver to deal 
with the difficulties of the system 
instead of its possibilities. As was 
said earlier, dealing with the prefer- 
red state and working back is dealing 
with the behavior of the whole system; 
dealing strictly with the problems of 
the present system is dealing with 
parts. 

Technocracy is a social design for 
living engineered for the distribution 
of an abundance for all. Technocracy is 
also an educational organization that 
deals with social phenomena in the 
widest sense of the word; this Includes 
not only actions of humam beings, but 
also everything which directly or indi- 
rectly affects their actions. Conse- 
quently, the studies of Technocracy 
(1975) embrace practically the whole 
field of science and industry. Biology, 
climate, natiiral resources, and indus- 
trial equipment all enter into the* 
social picture. 

Technocracy has been developing and 
refining an abundance management model 
for the past 6o years. Its strategy for 
labor, commeisurate with our emerging 
post-industrial world, offers another 
conceptual f'.'amework for recontexting 
and actualizi.ng our potentials: 

Throughout all human societies, up 
until almost yesterday, the provision 
of goods ar'.d services was accomplished 
mainly with the energy of human mus- 
cles. The processes of applying this 
human energy had little appeal, as 
such, to human beings, for most of the 
work was irksome, monotonous, and 
fatiguing. Consequently, in order to 
get any sizable quantity uf work done, 
it was necessary for the masters of 
production to impress other human 
beings into the labor forces— as 
chattel slaves, as indentured servants 
or as low-paid hirelings. 
In order to sustain a degree of morale 
among the human work engines, above 
that of hunger and the whip, it became 



expedient to invent the Morality of 
Toil. Work became ballyhooed as a 
virtue and idleness as a sin except 
for the few. 

During the past 150 years, most of the 
chattel slavery of the world has be- 
come outmoded. However, the freeing 
of the slaves came about, not from in- 
creased respect for the dignity of 
man, but because science and technolo- 
gy had provided more efficient and 
less costly engines to do the work. 
No human slave, no matter how strong 
and efficient, could compete on a 
cost-accounting basis with an engine 
operated by extraneous energy. It was 
only when practical engines, usln? 
coal, oil, gas, or electricity, came 
into use that reforms against the 72- 
and 8U-hour work-weeks could be con- 
sidered as socially feasible or 
desirable. 

So effective has been the replacement 
of human toil with technological 
devices that, today (on the North 
American Continent), less than two 
percent of the energy used in the man- 
ufacturing industries is derived frcm 
human muscles, while previously some 
98 percent was contributed by the 
human work animal. No industrial na.n- 
ager who is conscious of production 
costs would consider the use of human 
labor when he could have a non-human 
devic? installed to do the work. As a 
consequence, the day of the factory 
without men is dawning. At last, the 
human being is due to be liberated 
from toil and from working for a 
living. Technology is so far develop- 
ed that, if it is to be operated con- 
tinuously. . .a fraction of the people 
working at constructive employment 
will be able to produce an abundance 
for all. . . . 

When man did 98X of the work he did 
not have enough goods and services; 
now, when he does only 2!! of the work, 
technology produces so much he doesn't 
know what to do with it (under a Price 
System, of course). These trends will 
continue. They cannot go back; they 
are unidirectional and irreversible. 
....Can you realize the magnitude of 
the change in the methods of produc- 
tion which has taken place in the last 
half century?... Why, then, must some 
of our citizens go without sufficient 
food, clothing, homes, medical care, 
and other necessities that would 
guarantee, to all of us, security and 
a high standard of living...? 
It is because we are living under a 
"Price System" which can only operate 
under conditions of scarcity. That 
system broke down in North America . 
about fifty years ago with the 
"threat" of abundance. Price System 
politicians try to keep adding "props" 
by destroying, or by giving away... our 
food and resources. .. .Even the tre- 



- 6 - 



mendous rise In public and private 
debt has not been sufficient to main- 
tain stability In the economy. 

Technocracy goes on to develop a 
model for managing our new abundance 
which could be Integrated with the World 
Oame model, the works of Edward Bellamy, 
P.M. Esfandlary and all others who have 
operated from the premises of our new 
conditions. 

After a comprehensive, alternative 
system has been Integrated from the best 
available sources, we would then Invite 
others to participate In role-playing 
the managerial tasks of the new system. 
This would provide feedbacks refinement 
of operations and give a sense of 
reality to entirely new concepts and 
vocations. When general agreement as to 
the workability of the new system occurs, 
we would Invite In well-known people to 
participate with us, so they would 
experience the viability and advantages 
of an alternative preferred-state system: 
one that utilizes full-scale computeri- 
zation and cybernation in an economic 
context where increased automation 
creates abundance and leisure, not unem- 
ployment, dislocation and despair. 

Ilya Prlgoglne has pointed out that 
when a system Is unstable, a single 
point of stability has profound effects 
on the unstable system and can rapidly 
catalyze reorganization and higher order 
In the midst of Instability and uncer- 
tainty. For example, putting a string 
Into a saturated salt solution will cat- 
alyze crystal formation. Without that 
point to Initiate order, the ions remain 
random and the system unstable. We can 
apply this to our unstable and increas- 
ingly unmanageable social systems: a 
coherent, comprehensive, viable alterna- 
tive can also catalyze higher order 
stability. 

Next we can inform- the mass media 
of the project and the implications it 
ha:» for solving the world's problems and 
for freeing humanity from its precarious 
situation. The media would report that 
well-known personalities, competant 
scientists and technologists are now 
modeling an alternative system which 
solves the preponderance of world prob- 
lems. Positive global interest and 
response would be remarkable. 

Now we invite the large numbers of 
Interested people who respond to the 
media coverage to understand and also 
participate in training for their 
potential post-industrial vocations. 
This would still be done at the theo- 
retical or "mythical" level, in computer/ 
video linked world-wide telecommunica- 
tions centers, open to all people and 
all special interests, and. designed so 
that people have fun participating. 



Aa present systems continue to in- 
crease in over-complexity, unmanageabll- 
Ity and stress, and continue to disinte- 
grate because they are based on obsolete 
assumptions, there would now exist a 
popular, viable alternative ready to 
come on line. The model would become 
reality as government leaders and the 
general public see the vastly increased 
workability and desirability of a system 
that resolves our critical problems and 
offers the opportunity for each person 
on Earth to live at a billionaire's 
standard of living. 



These thcjses and strategies need to 
be understood as one interdependent, 
mutually enhancing system of actions. 
Some of these ideas and action-steps are 
bound to strike some people as radical, 
idealistic, impractical or uneconomic. 
Taken alone, they are Just that. Any 
individual aspect would be difficult to 
accomplish without the others. This 
plan should be viewed as a synergistic 
sum. Its parts have full meaning only 
In relation to the whole. 

CONCLUSION 

Because of global telecommunica- 
tions, international trade and all 
levels of world interaction, we are 
already .well on the way toward becoming 
a unified humanity with a one-world 
interdependent system. The persistent 
conflicts of our present feudal/indus- 
trial systems have distracted us from 
investigating the potential of opera- 
ting from the premises of the realities 
of this late 20th century. 

We now have the opportunity to do 
for global problems and the delight of 
humanity what Copernicus did for astron- 
omy and Einstein did for physics = ?hl3 
is a classic paradigm shift with its 
fundamental reevaluation of basic prem- 
ises, the recontexting and redefining of 
all content, and the subsequent resolu- 
tion of paradoxes, problems, overcom- 
plexltles and unmanageabllities. 

Interdisciplinary futurist Barbara 
Marx Hubbard (1980) asserts that 

The history of the entire human race 
has been moving to this moment. West- 
em civilization has a profound sig- 
nificance In that it has created the 
tools to bring on the end or a new 
beginning. .. .If we don't make the 
choice, the choice will be made for 
us, for the self-centered state of 
consciousness is not viable in an 
Interdependent world with the powers 
now available. 

Today we are at the crossroads of 
our destiny. The correct turn will take 
us to a higher level of life than has 



- 7 - 



ever been experienced In world history. 
Any other road will lead to suicide. 

To paraphrase Edward Bellamy (1888): 
Successfully creating a system that 
provides for all of humanity's needs 
Is far from an ultimate attainment, 
but, In the long term. Is only a pre- 
liminary to anything like real human 
progress. We will be only relieving 
ourselves of a needless harassment 
which has hindered our race from 
undertaking the real ends of exis- 
tence. To wonder at the rapidity with 
which the transformation will be com- 
pleted after Its possibility Is first 
entertained, Is to forget the Intoxi- 
cating effect of hope upon minds long 



accustcr.'.ed so despai: 



The 3 unburst 



after so long and dark a night is 
already having a dazzling effect. 
Here at last Is a cause compared with 
which, the grandest of historic causes 
is trivial. What a historic moment to 
live, when heroes are bursting forth 
the barred gate of the future and 
revealing to the gaze of a hopeless 
race, a vista of progress whose end, 
for very excess of light, will forever 
hold us In awe. Ah, ray friends, who 
will not take a part In this under- 
taking, when the weakest contribution 
Is a lever to whose touch the centu- 
ries tremble. 

It Is obvious to many of us that 
the Society for General Systems Research 
can actively play a central role In this 
effort. We can learn to play an "all- 
win game" rather than an "I wln-You lose 
game." We must take self-government on 
Its next step toward synergistic demo- 
cracy, cooperating now to build a future 
of unlimited possibilities based on the 
full spectrum of personal, social and 
technological capacities. In fact. It 
is vital now that we focus on processes 
that will assist these fragmented parts 
In cooperating and interacting effi- 
ciently and constructively within the 
whole. Synergy is the kuy because the 
whole is always greater t:han the sum of 
Its parts. 



In closing, a quote from P.M. 
Esfandlary (1973): 

Centuries from now these very decades 
will be rembered as a time when the 
world broke out of eons of scarcity 
and entered a whole new age of abun- 
dance.... Our entire planet is now 
conceptually in a new age. We ur- 
gently need visionary technological 
councils— visionary planning — and 
massive mobilization of efforts and 
resources to up-wing swiftly to the 
marvels of the Age of Telespheres 
(the world beyond the age of indus- 
trialism)." 



REFERENCES 

Bellamy , Edward 

1888 Looking; Backwards . Reprinted 

19bO. New York: The New 

American Library. 
1897 Equality . Reprinted 1916. 

New York: D. Appleton and 

Company . 

Brown. H. , Robert Cook and Medard Oabel 

1978 Environmental Design Science 
Primer . New Haven, Connecticut: 
Advocate Press, Inc. 

Erlcson, Richard P. 

1979 "S.O.S.R. At Twenty-Pive: What 
Agenda for Our Second Quarter- 
Century." Prsslciential Address 
to the SGSR, Houston, Texas 
(January 5). 

Esfandlary, P.M. 

1973 Up-Wint^ers . New York: Popular 

Library. 
1977 Telespheres . New York: Popular 

Library. 

Puller, R. Buckminster 

1981 Critical Path. New York: St. 



Martin's Press. 
1983 Crunch of Giants , 
Martin's Press. 



New York: St, 



Oabel, Medard, with the World Game Lab- 
oratory 

1979 Ho-Ping: Food for Everyone . 
Garden City, New York; Anchor 
Press/Doubleday. 

1980 Enert^y, Earth and Everyone . 
Garden City, New York: Anchor 
Press/Doubleday . 

Hubbard, Barbara Marx 

1980 "The Future Human" and "Future 
Education." First Global 
Conference on the Future, World 
Future Society, Toronto, Canada. 

Technocracy 

1975 TechnO':racy; Technological 

Social "Design . Savannan, Ohio : 
Techno<rracy , Inc. 

Troncale, Len Raphael 

1979a "Metacrescence — Origins of Hler- 
archicfil Levels: An 'Emergent' 
Evolutionary Process Based on 
Systems Concepts." Pomona, Calif- 
ornia: Institute for Advanced 
Systems Studies. 
1979b "The Emergence of Meta-Humans. " 
Pomona, California: Institute 
for Advanced Systems ttudles. 

Wilson, Robert Anton 

I98I "Doomsday May Be Cancelled." 
Future Life #26 (May):K3. 

Author: John Holmdahl 

World Synergy Institute, P.O. Box 2U252 
Los Angeles, California 9002'4-0252 



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The high-tech job threat 



MACLEAN'S/MAY 16, 1983 33 



By Linda McQuaig 



The timing could hardly have been 
worse for federal Economic De- 
velopment Minister Donald 
Johnston. When the minister presented 
Parliament last week with an inspiring 
vision of Canada's economic prospects, 
his optimism was abruptly contradicted 
by an internal document prepared by 
economists on his own staff. The confi- 
dential analysis was clearly out of tune 
with Johnston's claim that the govern- 
ment's new technology policy would 
"restore our ability to confront the de- 
mands of the 1990s with a healthy, pro- 
ductive and vigorous economy." In- 
stead, the 15-page document — a copy of 
which has been obtained by Afoc- 
Zean's— painted a bleak picture suggest- 
ing that by 1991 between one million 
and two million Canadian jobs will be 
lost due to technological and structural 
change. 

y The secret analysis, first revealed in 
the Toronto newspaper The Globe and 
Mail, predicts that a quarter to a half of 
existing jobs in manufacturing and up 
to 25 per cent of business and financial 
jobs could disappear by 1991— and 
many of those positions will not be re- 



32 



placed by new ones. The authors of the 
paper wrote, "In order to keep unem- 
ployment down to reasonable levels (10 
per cent or less) at least two million 
jobs will have to be added to total em- 
ployment over the next eight years"— a 
task that the authors suggest will be a 
! tough one. Then the document, which 




Johnston was refusing to release at 
week's end, concluded: "There is a 
strong likelihood of sustained 
unemployment." 

Z' The gloomy predictions are particu- 
larly embarrassing to the Liberal gov- 
ernment, which has recently promoted 
technological development as the eco- 
nomic hope of the future. The emphasis 
on technology has become particularly 
pronounced in the past year, in the 
wake of the collapse of Liberal plans to 
bring about recovery through resource 
megaprojects. In his budget last month. 
Finance Minister Marc Lalonde allo- 
cated $700 million for technological 
development. 

/ Johnston stressed that technological 
advances are essential if Canada's 
goods are to remain competitive. He ar- 
gued that technology will indeed elimi- 
nate certain jobs, but that new ones will 
be created. "This has happened in the 
past in Canada and it's bound to happen 
in the future," Johnston told Maclean's. 
As proof, the minister pointed to the 
past decade as a period when many jobs 
were lost to technology, but at the same 
time a net total of 2.8 million jobs were 
created. Still, the confidential paper 
specifically discounts that argument. It 
points out that while this was true in 
the 1970s, the situation is different 
now. 

y In the past whenjobswere lost, they 
were often replaced by new jobs related 
to manufacturing the new technology, 
the report contends. A farm laborer 
who was replaced by mechanized farm 
machinery might be able to get a new 
job manufacturing that machinery. But 
the new technologies are not likely to 
create as many new jobs because the 
highly advanced systems do not require 
the creation of large new machinery. 
"The new technologies are both labor 
saving and capital saving," the paper 
argues. 

Xt Still, Johnston believes that more 
jobs will be created than are lost. For 
one thing, he said, if Canadians have 
more leisure time because they are 
working less, there may be a new de- 
mand for, and new employment oppor- 
tunities in, leisure activities such as 
windsurfing and videogames. But his 
staff report is less optimistic. "Even 
with a generous allowance for multi- 
plier effects, it is difficult to see these 
creating the 3 to 4 million new jobs that 
will be required," the authors reason. 
Johnston himself concedes that there 
may well be a net loss of jobs. But he 
argues that it is important not to be 
"spooked" by this possibility. Instead, 
Canadians should regard future devel- 
opments as a challenge. "I think this is 
a very exciting age that we're in," he 
declared. 

>^ Johnston acknowledges that when 
workers are replaced by robots "they're 



not going to be satisfied with the kind of 
rhetoric I'm offering you." As a result, 
in order to overcome workers' fear of 
the effects of the new technology, the 
federal government plans to spend $1.5 
million on an "awareness" campaign to 
educate the public. 

John Lang, secretary treasurer of the 
Confederation of Canadian Unions, for 
one, believes that workers' fears are 
well-grounded. "I think what this 
means is that in Canada we're moving 
rapidly toward a structure similar to 
that of Latin America, where the five 
per cent at the top are very affluent, 40 
or 50 per cent are employed in some 'de- 
skilled' jobs at low wages and an equally 
large number are on ihe fringes of the 
work force— unemployed, living on 
some sort of welfare," he says. Lang is 
also alarmed by the government's ap- 
parent acceptance of a continuing high 
rate of unemployment. Says Lang: 
"From the point of view of the labor 
movement this presents a crisis of im- 
mense proportions." 

/^ Even if jobs are lost, Johnston says 
the ultimate effect of advanced technol- 
ogy will be to improve industry's effi- 
ciency, increasing Canada's overall 
wealth in the process. The problem 
would then become one of how to dis- 
tribute the new riches— a dilemma that 
Johnston says the federal cabinet is 
now examining. Lang says he fears that 
governments are not prepared to redis- 
tribute wealth, and the net effect is that 
despite the growing unemployment 
around them a small group of Canadi- 
ans is becoming increasingly affluent. 
At the same time, the confidential pa- 
per sees a different set of problems 
stemming from the chronic widespread 
unemployment that it predicts. "This 
creates a wide range of social problems, 
including alcoholism, vandalism, crime 
and family breakups," the report says. 
The paper identifies young people, par- 
ticularly those of native descent, as 
those who will be among the hardest 
hit. 

One of the real advantages of technol- 
ogy, according to Johnston, will be the 
replacement of boring, repetitive jobs- 
many of which have traditionally been 
done by women— with interesting, more 
highly paid work. But critics of that 
theory say that the elimination of low- 
level jobs will not necessarily open up 
higher level opportunities. 

For Johnston, the march of techno- 
logical progress is an imperative that 
cannot be ignored. But just what that 
progress will bring remains unclear. In 
his address to Parliament last week he 
presented an exciting glimpse of the fu- 
ture. But the leak of his own ministry's 
confidential report suggests at least 
that the problems ahead may be consid- 
erably more challenging than Johnston 
has so far acknowledged. <5? 






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Technocracy is science in 
the social field. Encyclopedia 
Americana says:... Technocracy 

is the only program of social 

and economic reconstruction which 
is in complete intellectual and 
technical accord with the 
age in which we live. 



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9 



TECHNOCRACY INC. 
TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN' 



'■^ ■,jtfrJ»v 



TO: All North Americans 

SUBJECT: The Only Alternative to the Status Quo. 

Technocracy Inc. is an organization with a scientific 
design for the operation of the North American Con- 
tinent in accordance with the scientific facts. The social 
dilemma of North America will be resolved not through 
wars, tax juggling, debt creation, reform politics, private 
enterprise, or more piety, but only through instituting a 
simple, efficient, and equitable method of distributing 
on abundance to all citizens of the Continent. 

Technocracy is that method. It is in your interest to sup- 
port it. Technocracy's social program stands ready for 
use, but it will depend upon intelligent, decisive action 
by North Americans for its implementation. Never 
before in history has a people been so unprepared for 
what it has to face. 



Free literature available: write to 



^ykx/nv 



/fcfet|Ad^!,^a^7t/ 



p. O. BOX 266, STN. "A" 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
R3K2A1 



Ho sutement of policy Aall be binding upon the organization unlets issued horn Continental Headquarters of 

Technocracy Inc. at Savannah, Ohio, 44874. 






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(A 



WORLD SYNERGY INSTITUTE 

P.O. BOX 24252 • LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 • USA. 



May 4, 1983 



S c 



Jim Davidson 
749 Sturgeon Rd. 
Winnipeg, Manitoba 
CANADA R2Y 0K8 



•a o 



Dear Jim: 









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Thank you so much for your two recent letters, 
and for your interest in ray general system's 
article. 

I have enclosed a master copy for any reproducing 
you find appropriate. By far, the most economical 
way would be for you to have it copied locally. 

The article is actually a copy of the speech I 
will be giving at the International General 
Systems Conference on World Problems, to be held 
in Detroit later this month. 

Its purpose is to enroll systems modelers to 
detail how we would distribute and manage abundance 
onto a computer simulation model. This would then 
give credibility to Technocracy et . al . to the 
scientific community internationally, and be the 
second in a series of half a dozen steps that could 
implement an economics of abundance in less than 
five years. 

Please let me know what feedback and results you 
generate from your use of the paper. Sounds like 
what you have in mind could help its implementation 
even faster I 



5 



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Warm best wishes, 
John Holmdahl 



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b o nn ie-^e bh a r d t 

;/8 - 308 Cedar Crescent 

Calgary, Alberta 

T3C 2Y8 



April 24, 1963 



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urvb 



Greetings; 

The day I expected to oe writing this letter was the day that my son and 
family insisted on taking us to Falcon Lake to have th_ first visit to our 
cottage. ..e ar-. both popular with the grandchilde-m sn<^ the youngest even 
mana ed to stay over night with us prcbor to ,p;etting up to go. It 'was a good 
trip and we found everything in order. The i-.ounted r'olice are patrolling 
the whole cotta'vr. area all year round, ihey even came oast about an hour s 
after we roiled in. It is very reassuring to have them' around. 

It was good to hear from you. I am disturbed aoout /our cou/zh. I would 
sug est that you find a good i(.ef leaologists . ihese are special technique 
cniropractors ^-ho use preseue and kneeding on certain ar-eas of the feet. 
It is truly amazing what they fiud and the relief tnat tney can or-ovidG. 
This does not incur -^ny drugs ana ol'ten you may be aole to provide some 
sell' relief at home with a lit Lie study .vhicn can be had from booKs on the 
subject. 

Action in Technocracy is really picking up. I have recieved about six letters 
from .Earl Randall_ Cor baley since Taube -'-ave him my name about three weeks 
ago. He~Ts~a professional who has been engaged in 50 years of national 
promotional activity. He KI^^Oi'.S this field. He has a number of excellent 
ideas and suggestions. I think that he may be able to 'spur' some action 
from an organization that has been on 'hold' for many years. He is also 
\/illing to advance the messa -^e of Technoci-acy to others and their organi- 
zations. I refer to it as' oiggy-back' uromotion. There are now several 
new and recent organizations that are 'ripe' for biie messa<^'e. Just a week 
ago one was formed here in Winnipeg. Itw is the Union of the Unemployed. 
I have contacted the founder (the next day after it was formed) and 1 
exi)ect to have a usefull meeting with nim anc his co-founder and others 
\ no have now become functioaal officers of this new organi-,ation. 



h \r recently been printed and put out by ihe world ; 
have written Joh n Ho lm.dahl who is one of the author: 
BaifHu'ww several cooies, unnierked, so that I may send 



LoSt Vy/eek both Tuabe and Uandall sent me a copy oi' an amazing report that 
h \r recently been printed and put out by The world S.ynery Ins.titute. I 

• " ' ,,,,,-,, . r. ^^. authors. I am expectinp; to get 

one to you and Fryers 
jnd ivildav^ etc. I have asked permission to have this report orinted in 
volune. If this is granted I want to send it to all the mer.ibers in tl'e house 
of Commons and many other persons. I think it should be widely publiziced 
and popularized. 

Last Thursday 1 was at a small gathering of the i^ianitoba Progressive Farty. 
i-;/ lawyer, Sydney Green, is the president and founder. tX this last meeting 
our mayor u'as "the guest speaker. I collar--d him after the meeting and asked 
±ov a tentative appointment with him. lie gave me the name and phone to bis 
private secretary since I told nim j. wanted a closed and private meeting 
dealins; with a very special matter of great social significance. *'e was most 
obliging aid eaa;er to hear from me. I am awaiting for the Synery report 
before 1 i-hone him. 

i-iy Technocracy campaign in the Unitarian church has slowed with the coming 
of good spring weatlier. I h ve three 'live' contacts to date. In the r'all 
I expect to be conducting an 'Adult ;'rcgram' unaer the auspices of the 
church on Tec nocracy. To that end 1 have been preparing some of the boarr 
members and have found good acceptance for this undertaking. 






:-Hi'- 



, />' 



I seem to often be scattered when my schedule Tor letter writing- is 
disturbed with the intervention of small chores th^^t oreak the continuity 
of my thought pati^erns. however 1 am sure you have come to recoenize 
that this is evident in many of my letters to you. 

AS is usual I get a good steady flow of communication from Tuabe. Wow 
Corbaley has been added to this list of volume correspondents. 1 do en^joy 
this reved up activity in matters of interest to fechx.ocxats . 1 hear 
much less often from Kryers ./ho is now phasing out his involvement that 
has been so steadfast for about six years. Family matters call on his time 
and his committment is now over. This means I have no one that I can really 
appeal to in i^dmonton since I do not know the people who \v'ill be rwyjwil/wibicng 
replacing vjalter. Louis Kildaw has also dimi:.ished his corr.-soondence to 
me and I now only hear from him on ra, e occasions. 

Ky involvement in advocating Technocracy will not aiminish. wy chief concerri 
is to have a reliable source of Technocracy material, ihe report from the 
'.-orld Synergy Insitute indicates that much rUTUxth. rriaterial may well come 
from non Technocracy sources. This means that we must'all be on t he alert 
and scan other publications and keep a watchfull eye on now and existing 
organizations as they move with more vigor into fields of commons social 
problems, wi, .dlu.. that Technocracy Inc. is the grand-daddy of ,^11 these 
splinter groups. Technocracy addresses Ai_L these concerns 'under one roof 
as it were, hence this idea ol" ' oig y-oack' in regards to man^y existing 
and nev;ly forming organizations may very well comoerisate foi^ the relative 
lack of riiembcrs and organization in Technocracy both in Canada and the 
iJtates. I have been reading and scannin." every publication that comes into 
my hands for yecirs. Corbaley and Taube have found theruselves doing the same 
thing. Technocracy OhCji had a very act iye_ue search Department out no more. 
Events are-- moving VHihY rapialy. liobo lics is'the^hottest^present topic that 
journalists have found. Everythihp points to permanent massive technologic- 
al disemployment in every modern country in the world. 

Hay i strongly suggest that you write to 'world Synergy Institute' c/o 
John Holmdahl at P^_ju_^_box_242^2 in Los Angeles, California 9^^ 24-^252 
and ask them to se.^d you a copy or copies (c.o.d.j of their iteport called 



ivJL,\/Il\lG TH - WurtL.D'J i^tUbLbi'id ..ITM 



dT 



report may be" bur best 'tuol' just now. 
v^ry well written and researched. 



It carries 



I '^hink that this 
-•reat weight ana is 



1 aiii going to enclose some other recent material that you may find of use 
when you are speaking to 'fjotential' members for Technocracy, .ish I could 
do raore. i^uch of the time Technocrats must leel very inadequate when they 
viev/ the ignorance and the minuless uublic so totally conditioned to a 
state of social moronity. However the pressure of social events and trends 
has ilways been known to be the most inexorable force that will aid us in 
our v/ork. That If coming aoout now very rapidly. The organization mui:t now 
pull out all the stops and use every effective method to get the messac'-e 
tu 'effective' people everywheres. This is often a selective process as 
we muse not waste our resources on tn^ee who can not be made to understi^nd 
Technocrcicy. They will simply 'fol.LOv-' as they do now. wnly a small percent- 
a":e of people are 'movers' in any society. ..e belong to that rare type. 

liest of retards from here. I do nope that you will find a source of relief 
lor you health problems. Xememb-r , no active Techno rat is exoenoible. .^e 
want you around to celebrate the arrival of the Technate. It is now very 
close at hand or we are noar the terminal society that many ignorant and 
noi--positive people thing is also near at hand, we will remain optimistic. 
Cood to hear from you. iveep i;. touch. 



Happy Landings 



/ 



o ri . r •! r> ti o 







I 1! 



y^J' 










.>«?::* 






*<fM,-. 





fA\\^ 




MYESS FIMMCE 



1940 



§ EMBGY 




BilllBMilllMMll 




LET THE TRUTH BE TOLD 



SUITE 310 PEYTON BUILDING, SPOKANE, WA 99201 AN ECONOMIC COMMENT AR'^ 



No. 352 



IN OUR 17th YEAR 



June 30. 1983 



OUTLOOK 
THE RECOVERY ■ is holding for now. but weak 
compared wit'i other recoveries, undercut by 
t'undamentais, as it strives to survive the loss of:- 
COMPETITIVE SUPREMACY - lack of which 
has closed 200 steel plants since 1974 as workers 
hold firm at SZ3 an hour compared to world 
average of Sll an hour, while productivity in 
Japan swamps the .American base at a cost 
advantage of at least S 100 a ton • while Japanese 
autos roll off at least SI, 000 cheaper than 
American cars, and a million Japanese motorcy- 
cles sell in .America, while the former world 
leader, Harley Davidson, .makes a meager 50.000 
a year, as shoes, electronics, radios, sporting 
goods, push most US made products to the 
back shelf because the USA is no longer competi- 
tive - and doesii't look Like it will be - 

SO, a vigorous ECONOMIC RECOVERY 
is nonsense, hyped by propaganda drums ■ 
precluding any possibility that:- 
GOLD - could be restored as a US monetary 
standard - as it would simply be gobbled up by 
continuing and nsing US deficits abroad, until 
US once more becomes competitive 'aa reduced 
wages and greatly lowered living standard. .And 
this wdl involve:- 

A PAINFUL TRANSITION - that wiU last tan 
years, probably longer • producing an enormous 
social and economic upheaval as:- 
HIGH TECH ■ sets off a revolution, hardly 
noticeable, but already well commenced, render- 
ing droves of unemployed workers unemployable 
• turning out to be a job-killer on a big scale 
{CM's robots will reach 14.000 and will work 
around the dock without complaint.) 
THE DOW JONES - went on a dream trip last 
.August it S65 without any economic backing: - 
BUT THE T.AIL DOES .NOT WAG THE DOG • 
and what we see now is ILLUSION. 
THIS ILLUSION - will fade and we shall see that 
the dog has really been wagging the tail and that 
will bring the crash. How soon, I don't .know. 
STAY SAFE! 




GETTING A JOB 



Time .Magazine reports that the current crop of 
graduates are having real trouble getting jobs. The aver- 
age starting salaries for liberal arts graduates are down 7% co S 14.250. 
Pay for computer scientists is only up about \% from last year to 
S23.172. and accountants also average a rise of only Ifc over last year. 

Well, let me tell you a story about a job. 

In 1932, still 19, eager, wide-eyed, and ready to cut the mustard. I 
held in .Tiy hand the Gold Medal (real gold, mind you) for Geology. I felt 
sure that by fail I would put my profession to work. 

But that was not how it worked. 

I had chosen geology as my specialty when I returned second year. 
One of the reasons (apan from the fascination of subject) was that the 
government of Canada was using geology students of second year to go 
out on field surveys in the Northwest Territories. I could see romantic 
summers in the open chipping away at rocks, and maybe dodging black 
bears. Wall, when I took second year, the federal government had 
stopped using second year students, beginning only with third year. 
When I was in third year, they eliminated third year students, usmg only 
fourth year. When I was in fourth year, they eliminated fourth year using 
only graduates. When I took a year's graduate wori:. tney eliminated tr.e 
surveys altogether. There was nowhere else in the Dominion of Canada I 
could get a job as a geologist. 

So I worked my dad's farm m the summer and took School oi 
Education the next year, qualifying as a high school teacher in Alberta. 
But when I went to get a school, the rural school boards were not im- 
pressed. ""Why," one of them said, "we've got kids in our Grade 12 that 
look older than you. You could never handle it." Most of the school 
boards demanded teaching experience. And there were plenty of teachers 
who had expenence to take those jobs. I travelled far and wide and on 
about the 25th oi .August I was offered a job at Sentley to take over 135 
pupil room teaching grades 9 to 12. inclusive; salary S500 a year. I cold 
them that .Alberta had just lost one hell of a good teacher and I never 
taught school. 

I took a job selling washing machines on commission. If you can 
imagine that occupation in the severe winter weather of .Alberta in a 
community where half the people were on relief, you can imagine my 
degree of success. But I still managed about $60 a .month - a little better 
than the teaching job. That would be worth maybe S250 or S300 today. 

I had a connection at a packing plant. The salary was set at S 60 a 



^V.>-^^1 



,-■(1' 



Page 2 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30. 1983 



month. I didn't have to worry about commissions. I went in as a 
shipping clerk. At the receiving end of the telephone, I took 
various orders whether for two pounds of hog liver, ten pounds 
of bacon. 60 pounds of tripe, 40 pounds of pork chops, and I 
would write these all down for this particular butcher shop and 
throw it in the out basket. But I kept on getting the items 
mixed up and some butcher shops got sausage instead of bacon 
and tripe instead of pork chops. It was a nightmare and the 
word spread around the Myers couldn't cut the mustard. So 
they moved me from the shipping office onto the shipping 
floor. There I became a shipping boy. A barker sat at a high 
desk with the shipping orders in front of him and barked 
out the amounts to each of us 12 boys, mostly grade ten to 
twelve, as we lined up continually all morning and all after- 
noon. I ran from one end of the plant to the other, upstairs, 
downstairs, weighing and svrapping. Hog liver had to be "A^apped 
in wax paper first, and brown paper over it. At this job I got S5 
more a month than on the other job. I got S65. 

But I had flat feet and working from 7 to 1 2 and from 1 
to 5 or 6 each day became so painful that I could hardly make 
my way home. I used my spare time to read about the chem- 
istry of the packing plant, and maJcing use of the chemistry I 
had taken Ln geology, I presented them with a scheme for a 
chemical lab. It was approved. I set up the chemical lab and 
they were very happy with the results. Now I received S80 a 
month. 

I was married with a child. We ate a lot of hamburger 
and I rationed myself to two packages of the "makings" a week. 
In case you don't know, that's raw tobacco which you roll into 
cigarettes. Each package cost ten cents. 

.A friend of mine worked for the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Co. and he told me he thought I might get a job there 
for Si 20 a month. Of course, I would have to have a car and 
pay my car expenses. Even so he thought I'd make SI 50 and be 
quite a bit better off. I had to wait nine months for that job. I 
took it and sure enough I did make up to, and sometimes more 
than. SI 50 in a month. But it was pretty meager even for those 
days. I disliked the work immensely. I had to keep accounts 
which is almost beyond me. Nevertheless, I made the Star 
Salesman Qub, ail the time wanting and trying for a job that 
would put my education to work. I'd always wanted to be a 
writer, even before a geologist. 

I read some books on writing and one master, Thomas 
H. Uzzeil said: "When you have written a million words, you 
will be competent with your craft." So I said to myself OK. I 
will write a million words. I bought a second-hand typewriter 
and an instruction book for the touch system and quickly 
learned to type. I then started in on my first million words. 
I wrote some dozens of short stories aimed at every kind of 
magazine you could imagine. Not one of them sold. But I knew 
I had to write a million words, so I wasn't too discouraged. I 
then wrote a novel. It didn't sell. I wrote more short stories. 
They didn't sell. But soon I calculated that I had e.xceeded a 
million words and I was pleased to percieve the writing I was 
doing was vastly superior to my beginning efforts. 

I tried the newspaper for a job repeatedly through the 
yean. Never a bit of ancoungement. The editors usually said: 



•'We don't have openings, but when we do, we try to give our 
cub reporter openings to our well-established delivery boys." 

.At that time the United States Army was building a 
pipeline across northern Canada to Fairbanks, Alaska because 
the Japanese were threatening to invade the .Aleutian Islands 
and the U. S. had to have an oil supply. There was oil at Nor- 
man Wells on the .Ajctic Circle. I got a job with an American 
company, starting right in at S250 a month and rising quickly to 
S300 a month. I was expediting personnel back and forth from 
the north. But the whole deal only lasted about 18 months and 
at the end the private contractor wanted to send me north to 
expedite personnel out of the north. But the Army Corps of 
Engineers would not agree to reimburse the travel expense on 
the grounds that "this man is a non-conformisr. " (But that's 
another story.) 

The private contractor refused to fire me unless instruct- 
ed by the Army engineers. That was beyond their authority. It 
was a stalemate so I sat idle in the office. I decided to make use 
of idle time and in three weeks I had put together a booklet 
called "Oil To .Alaska" using numerous'photographs of the great 
hardships of the project and giving its history, aH in about 2i6 
pages. It was my first writing effort. I borrowed everytliing I 
could on my insurance and from anywhere else I could get it 
and published 1 ,000 of the books. At Si a piece, they sold like 
hotcakes. I published 5,000 more and they also sold quickly. 
The contractor himself bought 1 ,000 copies. I knew it was a 
success. I knew people would read my writing. 

But that didn't put me any closer to a job. It was 1944 
- 12 years past graduation. I still hadn't had a proper job. 

In southern .\lberta there had been a couple of oil 
discoveries. The newspaper, THE CALGARY HERALD, was 
very excited about it. There were daily stories about the poten- 
tial for oil in western Canada. I didn't know anything about 
that, but I just went in to see their editor for a job and he 
brought up the subject of the oil. I told him I was a geologist 
and that I understood petroleum geology. That attracted his 
interest immediately. "Yes," he said, "but you geologists can't 
write. We have tried tiiree or four fellows here - because we 
really need somebody who understands about oil - and these 
geologists can't write. Can you write?" 

Out of my back pocket I pulled a copy of "Oil To 
Alaska." He opened the book, glanced at two or three para- 
graphs on one page, opened it halfway, glanced at another 
page, closed the book and said: "Come in and see me at noon 
tomorrow." .At noon I walked into his office and he said: 
"You are hired. Beginning Monday morning you are oil editor 
for THE CALGARY HERALD." 

That's where I got staned. That was in 1944, I was 32 
years old, twelve years past my graduation, past the wide-eyed 
expectations with a gold medal in my hand. 

Well, you're graduating. If you get a chance for a job 
that's one percent less than last year - or tlve percent less - 
or ten percent less - let's not haggle. If you can get into the 
line of work you want, fd even offer to work for meager pay 
to get my feet planted in the soil. 



MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



BIH 



June 30. 1983 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



Page 3 



UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS FOR GOLD 

THREE QUESTIONS ILLUMINATE THE TRUTH 

(1) WHAT MADE IT POSSIBLE FOR THE U.S. TO DICTATE A GOLD EXCHANGE ST.AiNDARD 

AROUND THE WORLD? 

(2) WHAT CAUSED THE DETERIORATION AND FINALLY THE COLLAPSE 
OF THE BRETTON- WOODS STANDARD? 

(3) WHAT REAUSTICALLY PREVENTS THE RETURN OF GOLD? 



Power is not given. It is not the result of compromise. 
It has nothing to do with cooperation. No one gives you power; 
you take it. It is simply there, stark raw power. 

Tne country that woula dictate a monetary standard for 
the world - in this case a gold standard - or a modilled gold 
standard - must tlrst of all have the raw power. That means it 
must have a huge amount of gold. It must be the bossman in 
gold. 

.Ajid that is the answer to question number one on top. 
Before and during WW II the gold of the world fled to the 
(Joited States. It had a massive pile of gold that surpassed all 
the other known gold holdings of official governments. It was 
at the same time the unquestioned economic giant of the world. 
It only had to raise the club to make others comply. It never 
really had to strike. 

With the United States in this position of unchallenged 
and majestic force, it could devise a standard for the world and 
tell the world what to do. That was what happened at Bretton- 
Woods, .although the plan was worked out by Britain and the 
U. S., there was never any doubt that the BOSS was the U. S. A. 
The U. S. had the clout. 

By that agreement ail currencies related to the U. S. 
dollar at a rate fixed by the conference. The value of the U. S. 
dollar was l/35th of one ounce oi gold. The U. S. had so much 
gold that it was in a position to buy or sell gold to anyone who 
came to the '.vindow. If the U. S. had deficits with other count- 
ries, and if they wanted gold, they needed only to ask for 
it. It reduced the U. S. hoard a litiie bit, but as long as the U. S. 
dollar was that powerful, there was no great demand for the 
actual gold. The dollars were good enough. 

Every country had to keep its currency on the interna- 
tional e.xchanges at the fixed value with the dollar. If these 
countnes amassed big deficits by importing more than they 
could afford, they were obliged to go out - using their gold 
hoard, if necessary - and certainly their dollar hoard, and buy 
their own currencies on the market to keep the value constant. 
This stopped a lot oi runaway nonsense - and certainly was a 
block against any great mtlation. 

That's the answer to the tirst quesuon. 

WHAT CAUSED THE DETERIORATION .AND 

FINALLY THE COLL.-^PSE OF THE 

BRETTON-WOODS STANDARD? 

That all worked fine until the U. S. began overspending 
itseif. It had not learned that no matter how nch you are, you 



can go banlcrupt if you spend more than you've got. 

The U. S. scooped out money generously after the war. 
-Vll of the money it scooped out became claims on U. S. gold. 
All 01 the foreign goods bought became claims on U. S. gold. .-\5 
its surpluses in world trade began to be trimmed, there were 
places here and there where claims were accumulating on the 
U. S. gold pile. 

In 1 967 I learned, to my amazement, that the U. S. was 
bankrupt. TThad at that time about Si 2 billion in gold (S3 5 an 
ounce), and it had claims against it. if my memory serves me, of 
about S28 billion. No one seemed to pay any attention to the 
fact that the Q. S. was bankrupt any more than they pay 
attention today to the fact that the biggest banks are virtually 
bankrupt. Everything had been going on smoothly and it was 
assumed in all quarters. Wall Street included, world economists 
included, that this situation could go on. But when I heard oi it. 
I knew the U. S. was bankrupt. I knew that the system could 
not endure unless (A) there was an increase in the price of gold 
or (B) the U. S. could suddenly turn trade derlcits into trade 
surpluses. 

The second did not seem Likely, but I did believe in 
those days that there would probably be an increase in the price 
of gold. Since the deficits were between two and three times the 
size of the U. S. gold pile. I figured in those days that gold 
would have to be worth S75 to SlOO an ounce. That concept 
marked the birth ox .MFE and the unwavering perseverance in 
that belief diat gold would overcome all the authorities in the 
worid trying to hold it down. 

But the history of it is instructive because the basic 
reason that there is no gold standard in the world today was the 
continuing and growing practice of U. S. intemanonai deficits 
around the world. The money scooped out tor Viet Nam made 
this begin to look like a crisis. 

^Vhen the countries of the worid saw that there was only 
Sll billion in the bank and aoout S37 billion of claims against 
it. they too began to e.xpect that the U. S. dollar v/ould have to 
be devalued, and they began to accelerate their claims on the 
U. S. gold pile. 

In 1970 and I9"'l this reached runaway proportions ana 
-Nixon was obliged to close the gold window. The bank could no 
longer pay! .And that's the answer to question two. 



MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



sr-t-f: 






Page 4 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30. 1983 



WHAT REALISTICALLY PREVENTS THE 
RETURN OF GOLD? 

•Ail of this is so asionisiiingiy simple it maJces one won- 
der how thinking people can clamor for the re'/ival of the gold 
standard when the exact conditions that forced the end of 
it still persist. U. S. deficits are far from disappearing. If the 
L'. S. were foolish enough to reinstate the gold standard, even at 
a liigh price, claims would build again on U. S. gold. It was 
e.\actly the adverse deilcit position which led to the end of the 
standard. Just raising the price of gold wouldn't solv« it be- 
cause under the system it would raise the price of all currencies 
accordingly to the value of the dollar as expressed by gold. 

Once again here are the reserves of the leading official 
gold owners of the world. 



United States 

IMF 

West Germany 

Switzerland 

France 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

Japan 

.Austria 

Canada 

United Kingdom 



264 .0 .Million Oz. 
103.0 Million Oz. 

95.2 Million Oz. 

83 .3 MUUon Oz. 
81.9 iVmUonOz. 
66.7 Million Oz. 

44.0 Million Oz. 
44.2 Million Oz. 
24.2 Million Oz. 

21.1 Million Oz. 

20.2 Million Oz. 
19.0 Million Oz. 



Now what sense does it make? If the U. S. took the 
exchange rates as they exist next .Monday morning and sud- 
denly announced that it would buy or sell gold at a new price 
svhether that price be S500 or SI, 000, we would immediately 
see the beginning of the deterioration of the U. S. gold posi- 
tion as the detlcits continued. 

So the only way the U. S. could do that would be 
to absolutely stop foreign deficits. Well, come on now. Who 
believes that? How can that be done under the circumstances 
ot the world today? Be realistic. 

I tell you it's a dream - it cannot be done. 

.Another Way 

I used to think there might be some way that the 
countries could get together and establish an international 
currency based on gold. 1 no longer believe this. Until chose 
countries are one and the same, their dealings with one another 
inust be in money, which records the value of the international 
trade that takes place between them. So until they are one 
country, how could they pool all their reserves to make one 
currency' 

Only when some country in the world once again has 
the power - and has the gold - can the gold standard be intro- 
duced. 



PRICE .MIGHT GO UP .ANYWAY 
Yes. ^old ini'ght go up anyway. If there is a tremendous 
thundering new mtlation. 

.As confidence in the currencies got less and less, maybe 
gold would just go up fantastically on the open market. 
But 1 wonder. 

MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



.Are the governments ot' these countries about to let that 
happen. Is the government of the U. S.. for instance, apt to con- 
cede profits of thousands o: percent to people who now have 
gold? I don't Uiink so. I think that long before gold ever reached 
any S3 .000 an ounce, a new law would burst out ot Washington 
not dissimilar to FDR's law tliat demanded the surrender ot the 
gold. The government was smart enough to demand the surren- 
der before it raised the price. Is there a good reason to believe 
that the government would not be just as smart again? 

Would your gold be made illegal? 

« « >K « « 

I'm not trying to run down tlie case for gold. No one 
was ever more pro-gold than MFE. but the circumstances have 
changed. What was possible yesterday is not always possible 
today. Sometimes what was possible yesterday is even unthink- 
able today. 

For people to march in front of the U. S. Treasury 
shouting; "We want to return to goidi" would be tantamount 
to mobs marching in front ot an empty warehouse shouting: 
•"We want bread!" 

* nf * m m 

.VIFE subscribers got out of gold beginning around S670 
and sold the balance at prices ranging below S5S0. Except for a 
week or two, we have never been back in it again. I got side- 
tracked for a week or two at the gold S500 mark last February. 
But I saw instantly 1 had been wrong. I think subscribers who 
bought in at around S485 plus had ample opportunity to get 
out later on - as I had suggested - on the rally up to S440. 

But basically I have found gold uninteresting in the last 
two or three years, and in view of the conditions in the world, 
of the impotence of the U, S. to impose a money standard on 
others, and in view ot the unlikelihood that the government 
would allow wild prices like SI .000 to S3 ,000 per ounce. I have 
to remain pessimistic on gold. I don't say it will go down a lot. 
although I do believe the chances for a failing gold price exceed 

the chances for a rising gold price. 

« « * « « 

•All this is not to say that you should sacrifice your 
carefully collected gold coins, whether In quantity large or 
small. Gold always retains the characteristic that it is real, 
and no man has a claim against it. It is freehold money. It's 
value is not subject to any political manipulations. BUT, the 
threat ot' conrlscation in case of a wildfire infiation is a real one. 
In other words, you might want to hoard your coins - and I 
think you should - but I do not think that your rbrtune should 
be contained therein. 

So gold is not a buy. I regard it as unintelligent to con- 
tinue to amass gold on the dream that some day you will sell 
it to a government at 53.000 an ounce. 



COULD CONFISCATION RETURN? 

When ths chips are down governments, whether demo- 
cratic or authoritarian, act very much alike. Unjust, unjustifiable 
and authoritarian measures are taken with as little qualms by a 
so-called free government as by any other. Witness Roosevelt s 
repudiation ot the gold clause in all contracts before 1934. The 
contract was as solemn a document as anv, But when Roosevelt 



June 30. 1983 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



Page 5 



wanted to raise the price of gold to increase the amount ot"" 
money, and when he saw that tiiis required government owner- 
ship of most of the gold, he had no hesitation in outnght 
repudiation of contract and confiscation of goods. Can you 
think of a good reason why some other president later on. under 
the same circumstances, wouldn't use the same answer - citing 
the precedent of FDR? 

Although the naturalized Japanese, by all the principles 
and codes of the United States, were fully and 100% qualified 
citizens with all the rights of an American-born on a homestead 
in Wyoming - nevertheless, these people were suddenly made 
secondary citizens; their rights were taken away and they were 
herded into concentration camps. There's nothing to promote 
the belief that a current day administration would never do 
what Roosevelt did. To think so is naive. 

Now the governm.ent does not come out with unpopular 
laws and oppressive regulations unless motivated by a very 
pressing circumstance. And what would a pressing circum- 
stance be? 

When The Chips Are Down 

One pressing circumstance would be to shore up the 
international monetary strength of the U. S. A. It could come 
as a result of war or threat of war on the military front relating 
to allies, or as a result ot war or threat of war on the economic 
front. 

Gold owners who expect to sell their gold for S3 ,000 an 
ounce should ask this question: Will the government publically 
inviie all gold owners to bring their gold in at whatever price the 
soaring free market should offer? Remember that the FDR gold 
owners received the pre-up-valuation price (S22 - not S55). 
Remember that Hitler not only demanded the delivery of 
all gold, but asked all Germans to pull off their wedding rings, 
even remove the gold fillings from their teeth and turn them 
in to the government. 

United States money may not be directly connected 
with gold, but gold does exert a refiection on the condirion of 
the money. Do you believe the United States government will 
stand by and watch gold owners cash in at 1.000% over current 
pricas? If you believe that, then maybe you are justified in fol- 
lowing the .-^den Sistars and all tliat whole group who see gold 
at a price that mortal men hardly dream. But if you don't be- 
lieve that, you better continue to critically analyze this whole 
gold situation. 

i will tell you my own belief. It is that long before gold 
reaches any fantastic heights, the U. S. government will throw 
up enough roadblocks that it will either scare or obstruct pur- 
chases of gold. 

CASTING A LONG SHADOW 

The shadow may be already cast. Under a law passed 
two years ago all coin dealers July 1 are required to officially 
repon every purchase of gold, silver and platinum, as well as the 
purchase of all bullion coins, as well as the purchase of obiects 
which might be melted down for their bullion value. 

For the moment numismatic coins are not included, 
but the definition ot numismatic coins may be adjusted by the 
IRS to suit its own purposes. If they get to the point where chey 
are only talking about "rare oollections " not many coins will 
escape the reporting process. 



Who will have to report? Virtually everyone doing a gold 
business; anyone who regularly buys commodities which include 
bullion and bullion rype coins becomes a •broker" and must 
report every purchase. 

Beginning January 1, 1984, all reports must be made 
by electronic media. 

This places a chest of names in Big Brother's computer, 
listing every citizen in the United States who will have bought 
gold. It wouldn't be surprising if a little later on this rule would 
be extended to every person who sells gold. 

Other horrifying bills are making the rounds in Wash- 
ington. One of them would even require fingerprinting of 
people who buy or sell gold. 

These will probably not pass, but there is no doubt 
about the regulation July 1 outlined above. It became law 
in 1982. It's provisions are a bit vague now, but the IRS will 

soon nail them down specifically. 

« « * « « 

This might not be reason enough for you to sell your 
gold, but it has to be reason enough for you to expect that in 
order to operate legally, your coin dealer will have to notify 
Uncle Sam of any purchases from you from now on. includ- 
ing your name, address, social security number. 

I don't care what kind of graphs are prepared by the 
Aden Sisters or how reliable they were in the past, in my 
humble horse-sense opinion, generated out here in the barnyard. 
I just don't believe you are ever going to cash in on gold at 
S3 .000 an ounce. Si, 500 an ounce or maybe even much over 
S500 an ounce. 



S6,000 GOLD 
AW, COME ON NOW! 

If gold reaches S6.000. a cup of coffee will cost you 
S7 and a modest small car will cost S 100.000. Inflation will 
be totally out of control, running unbridled across the world - 
unstoppable - headed for the Gotterdammerung. 

When gold sells for 56.000 an ounce. I can easily see 
SI 2.000 an ounce or S20.000. or Si 20.000, because the fact 
will be that the monetary system ot" the w(jrld is in a sham.bles, 
a hapless ship at sea. breaking apart on the waves. 

So S6,000 means infinity. It is. in fact, so extreme that 
it means nothing. In the conditions ot multi-thousands for an 
ounce of gold, there is no monetary meaning left in the wodd 
and your S6.000 wiU not do you any good - if indeed the gov- 
ernment has allowed you to hang on to any gold at all. 

Even 33.000 an ounce by 1985 or 1986 means the 
collapse of the economic system of the western world. 

In that case. I would feel safer from the clutches of the 
government with silver than wuh the gold. That's because there 
IS not enough silver to make it a meaningful monetary metal. .-^lS 
a precious metai. m an overall solution it wouldn't be worth the 
government bothering with. 

As for the predictions ot Si 50 - S200 an ounce silver, 
they're just as wild as the gold predictions. But I can see silver 
at S30 an ounce because of the underiying fundamentals that 
have little to do with money. 

.-^nd I think it may be reasonable to began - I emphasize 
begin - an accumularion ot the white metal. .VIore of this later 



•MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



Page 6 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30. 1983 



To tell you the truth. I believe we had the greatest 
investment bonanza of the century in the Seventies when gold 
rose from S3 5 to S800 an ounce. I don't think this is going to 
occur again. I've never seen anything like this happen twice. 
.And I just think it's ail over. 

Now there could be bulges; there could be inflationary 
scares; there could be military scares. So nothing can be ruled 
out in the short term. But I think the big picture on gold has 
lost its glamour. One of the biggest reasons is a concerted attack 
by government right now to strangle gold and gold holders. 

A FIERCE ATTACK 

It seems that powers in Washington are mounting the 
fiercest attack ever made by any government on gold. Already 
coin dealers are requried to give the name, address and social 
security number of every purchaser of gold, and every coin 
dealer is required to place this information in the hands of 
the government. Very shortly all of this information will be 
computerized so that all gold buyers can be identified any time 
in the t"uture. 

House of Representatives Bill No. 1783 would now 
make it also a requirement to give the name, address, date of 
binh and right thumbprint of all sellers of gold. It will be 
illegal under this act to pay for precious metals except by check 



or money order. Apparently, real cash (greenbacks) is still too 
heavy on anonymity to suit anti-gold legislators. 

Coin dealers would be responsible for the accumulation 
of this data on all transactions. The sales data would be impor- 
tant to the IRS even if you bought gold years ago. 

Bill No. 1821 would cancel out the capital gains advan- 
tage on ail non-productive items - namely, gold, silver, collecti- 
bles, antiques. Profits would be subject to taxes paid out at 
the regular tax rate. Your guess is right when you conclude that 

all of this is aimed really at gold - not tax evaders. 

« * * * • 

In the face of such a flood of legislation all of a sudden, 
one can only conclude that it is well planned and, therefore, a 
dangerous thrust agamst both .American gold owners and 
would-be gold owners and provides an instrument tor later 
confiscation. One must assume that this legislation is coming as 
a result of a brainwave high up in the administration. House 
reps wouldn't normally think up such an organized storm them- 
selves. We are probably looking at Treasury-sponsored legisla- 
tion. 

It will take a mighty effort to stop this legislation but 
you can enlist your voluntary efforts with the America Com- 
mittee for Tangible Assets, Ste. B-1, 314 East Capital St., 
Washington, D.C. 20003. 



RECOVERY HOLDING FOR NOW 



Since our last letter, May housing stans have been re- 
ported at an annual rate of 1,791 ,000. .April starts were revised 
to 1 .504,000. The May starts are in excess of, but very close, to 
the rates of January and February - with lower rates in March 
and April. But overall residential construction was barely up 
at all - 2%. 

There's quite a difference of opinion on housing pros- 
pects for the rest of the year. Some of the experts believe the 
construction wUl hold up to make 1983 the best housing year 
since 1978. Others say that any appreciable increase in interest 
rates would choke the housing industry down, and many indus- 
try analysts believe that those who could afford a house at the 
lower interest rates this year, have pretty weO completed the 
buying. That is, that those with the money have moved in and 
that the housing stans will fall off. 

Deceiving Report On Cars 

U. S. car sales for the first 20 June days are reported 
42% above the June rate of 1982. That will make headlines in 
all the press, but it's hardly that exciting - because June sales 
are actually lower than .May sales. 

The June rate is 621 .948 cars and that is 8.000 less than 
tne C)30.044 sold in May. 

So the June boom only really shines when compared to 
June 1982, one oi the worst months m Detroit's turbulent 
history. 

June and May recovery figures are a deadheat. 

On Course 

Other reports indicate the recovery is still on course. 
Retail sales posted a third consecutive monthly increase 



CO 

o 



PRIVATE HOUSING STARTS 
ANNUAL RATE 




JAN 



rising 2.1% in May over .April. 

Industnal production rose 1.1% in .May, a considerably 
smaller performance then the 2.1% increase in April. 



MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



June 30. 1983 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



Page 7 



Personal income rose 1.2% for May, the largest mcrease 
since July 1981. 

But factories showed little difference, operating at 72% 
capacity. 

The U. S. economy in May grew at a 6.6% seasonally 
adjusted annual rate after inflation. 

Negative Signs 

A Wall Street Journal survey shows unemployment re- 
maining 10% in 1983 and only a slight improvement in 1984 - 
bad news for more than 11.3 million unemployed workers. The 
reason given is heavy cost cutting by industry and slow econ- 
omic recovery. 

U. S. companies will cut spending on new plants and 
equipment, according to a McGraw-Hill survey. Although it's 
only a 1.3% reduction, this is the first time since World War II 
that capital outlays will have decreased for two consecutive 
years. 

The Commerce Dept. reinforces the stingy spending out- 
look which will be, it says, 3.1% behind the capital outlays oi 
1982. That compares with a 0.2% drop in 1981 and a 5.5% drop 
in 1982. Downhill all the way for three consecutive years. 

That's not surprising in view of earnings: a WSJ survey 
ot 569 major U. S. corporations showed earnings down 8% 
during [he first quarter of 1983. That is the sixth consecutive 
quarterly decline for major U. S. corporations, small motiva- 
tion for capital spending. 



Consumers pulled back on installment buying in Apnl 
by 7.9% after March had blossomed to an increase of 7.9%. 

International Harvesior Co.'s French farm-equipment 
subsidiary must receive an emergency loan from the French 
government or its 1 1 lenders, or else fall into default. The .\mer- 
ican-based farm equipment maker has been plagued by the 
European recession and cost overruns. 

"Regardless of the statistics showing how able the 
consumer is to buy, he isn't going to buy unless he has confi- 
dence," said the chairman of Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.. 
J. J. Nevin, responding to the WSJ's query about economic re- 
covery. .Adding to this pessimistic note he said; "Savings that 
appear adequate in normal times won't seem adequate if the 
consumer is afraid of unemployment." 

Officials from 39 medium-sized banks were told by 
Morgan Stanley &. Co. that they can e.xpect operatmg earmngs 
CO plunge by more than a third this year compared to 1982. 
Reasons presented: higher operating expenses, and less net 
interest income resulting from higher loan-loss provisions. 
***** 

Republic Steel faces a second quarter operating loss 
similar to us 35 1.3 miUion first quarter loss, with the tirst half 
loss exceeding the total net loss of S85.3 million last year. 

Business failures in the tlrst four months of 1983 were 
up 40% from 1982 - more than twice as heavy as the failures 
in the severe recession of 1973-74. 



MISREADING THE RE CO VERY 

A MINOR TURBULENCE IN A TIDAL WAVE OF CHANGE 



Sure, there is a recovery. Whether it will endure for a year or two or whether it will fizzle sooner really doesn't 
make much difference. The reason is that we are caught up in a fundamental social revolution, and this has been 
brought home by hard punches to the economic solar plexus in the last couple of years. 

The whole mass of American opinion, and especially the media, are treating this recovery as if it could be the 
commencement of a brand-new era of prosperity just like our old folks used to have. Factories humming, little white 
cottages springing up everywhere, two cars in the garage and a boat at the lake. 

But even if we gave this recovery high marks, we would still be wrong if we thought it meant business as usual 
on down the line. Like all past recovenes, it will caper off - and what then? 

The answer lies in what caused the slump. It was cng- 
gered by the energy crisis of the mid-Seventies. But it would 



have come anyway. The fact is that technology was rising to 
overwhelm our way of life. Mow the automobile factories may 
have a 6 million car year, which will be one of the poorest on 
record - although better than 1982 - but that won't mean very 
mucn. The fact is the auto industry will never be the same again. 
The bulk oi the 300.000 employees now laia off will probably 
never return to the assembly Line. 

.As the agncultural revolution in the beginning sucked in 
hoards of hunters to work in permanent locations on the land, 
the industrial revolution sucked in hoards from the land to the 
cities. Now [he electronirlcation of industry and the scope of 
Iiigh tech are coming into full gear, undercutting both white and 
blue-collar masses clustered around an increasmgly obsolete 
industrial core. 



It cook the agricultural revolution a long time to coax 
the hunters onto the land. It took the industrial revoluclon a 
few hundred yean to bring the farmers to town, but it will aoc 
take so very long for the new high tech to change the face o( 
our social order. Things move much faster today. 

The greatest mistake today is to jump to the conclusion 
that a tledgling recovery is going to take us back to the familiar 
prosperiry of the Sixties and early Seventies. 

The individualistic nature of the high cech industry 
threatens to enormously weaken, if not destroy, the power- 
ful labor unions around the world. The greatest blow of che 
revolution, now in progress, will be co employment. 

It's altogether likely that more production will be 
obtained in che face of unemployment of 20% than was ob- 
tamed previously with nearly full employment. The social 
revolution will hinge around what these unneeded people are io- 
MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



. . ■.^^I.a^v^r.^^,-^>rv;Y.^;-J«^v«lKlai 



Page 8 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30, 1983 



ing to do, or what society is going to do with them. And this 
will be the real REVOLUTION. 

We have to know where the money is coming from to 
feed them. We have to know who has the most right to the 
available jobs. Is the growing army of unemployed to be treated 
as sub-citizens? 

The forward movement of the revolution is irresistible. 
Like a steam roller it doesn't care what it crushes beneath it. 
The problem will be for the pygmies in its way to organize 
themselves for orderly flight as best they can. 

On the face of it, it looks like bad news for free enter- 
prise. It also looks like bad news for capitalism. Neither are 
gomg to disintegrate tomorrow. But the commencement of the 
disintegration has begun. We can't get ready for something we 
can't envision, can't even imagine. But we can be ready up to 
the point that our vision takes us. 

Our vision means that the monetary system of the world 
will be transformed. I doubt that the most overworked word in 
the language ""inflation" will be used very much by the year 
2000. It's likely that the bogy of inflation will have burned it- 
self out long before. 

The deflationary period into which we shall enter will 
force the economic changes upon the world. They won't take 
place through the wisdom of great leaders. They will take place 
in the nature of an inundation of a beach community as a tidal 
wave advances. 

m * * m * 

When you think o( it ail from this angle, you realize the 
flimsy and almost totally insignirlcant nature of the present 
so-called ""recovery." A recovery to what? 

This recovery will fade. What we need to be looking 
at today is what it will fade into. 

It takes time to tell. It was in 1967 that I wrote the 
piece about dinosaurs in relation to the automobile industry. 
But only today, 16 years later, has the truth become a visible 
reality. The steel mdustry as it exists in the United States is 
obsolete. "'Smokestack America" is a very apt term because it 
accurately loretells the fall of the assembly line and the mass 
production which has characterized this century. 

OVERSEAS SMOKESTACKS 

Smokestack .America is moving overseas. Steel wages 
are S3 an hour in South Korea. SI 2 in Japan S8 in England 
and S22.iO in the U. S.. and are scheduled for S25 an hour in 
1986. Even Japan has 5100 a ton labor advantage. 

.Auto workers wages are SI 2.60 in Japan and S21.50 in 
the U. S. 

Overall, average manufacturing wages are way beiow 
the U. S. standards. .Average labor rates are: U. S. S7.53 an 
hour. South Korea SI. 53 an hour and Taiwan Si. 48 an hour. 
Realists, have to know we face the loss of millions of jobs or we 
will have to retreat mto a dull and dismal world of protection- 
ism - thus allowing the poor countries to become poorer — m 
effect denying them their own industrial revolution, which is 
just now coming of age. 

That won't happen. What will happen is that massive 
amounts ot half finished goods will be imported, will displace 
our raw materials industry which will dve way to more sophisti- 
cated, but less labor intensive, industries. 



-And so, from a practical standpoint, the young need 
to be giving very serious consideration to their focus on jobs - 
because of lot won't get jobs; there just won't, be enough to 
go around. 

.MAJOR UNEMPLOYMENT FOR YEARS 

As computers take over the functions of banking, of 
grocery shopping, of hospital laboratory technicians, even to an 
increasing extent the jobs of teachers and the numbers of 
schools, the necessary travel will keep shrinking. The day of the 
gas guzzler, despite status revivals, is gone and the economy car 
is here to stay. 

We have ample evidence to conclude that the jobs in 
the manufacturing plants of North America will continue to 
shrink - also evidence to conclude that a large segment of 
service jobs, like clerks in stores, even of doctors - as com- 
puters take over diagnosis - will disappear. Just as service 
station attendants have been pushed out by self-service gas 
pumps, so will the ranks of a large segment ot' the servant 
industry enter on an era of increasing shrinkage. 

It's not hard to envision unemployment ot 20% or more. 
In fact, once this new revolution gets rolling, it's likely to be 
more. 

Education Outlook 

So what's the future for those now in high school, or 
even those entenng college? 

One thing seems fairly certain; a degree in liberal arts 
won't be worth much more than the cost of the diploma - 
unless the student is aiming at a job as a writer, speechwriter. 
a slot in communications generally. That means that it is unwise 
for students to go to college just for the sake of a degree. 
College should be focused on specific opportunities. First in line 
comes, of course, electronics and the computer. That is e.xcel- 
ient tor those who are ready to go into that work right now. But 
I'm fearful that this will become the cure-all answer to such an 
extent that this field will become completely overcrowded later 
on - say, seven years. In view of the fact that u will not be a 
mass employment industry, the field could be seriously over- 
balanced by 1990. 

Lab technicians will tlnd their jobs eroding year by year. 

There will still be a big field for doctors, but probably 
not as big as now. Nurses, of course, are indispensable because 
of the human contribution involved. The ranks of teachers will 
be chinned, and the most mgenius invention of man will never 
be able to replace an .A-1 secretary - and they will always be 
scarce. 

Lawyers should be a growmg and promising proression 
as all kinds of disputes arise out of the dramatic changes m 
society, the changing rules and mores. 

Engineers in high tech will be in demand, but a little 
later on that field will become crowded because of the under- 
pinning of huge unemployment elsewhere. 

Carpenters, plumbers and electricians would have a 
more favorable choice for employment than many because 
modern American youth deems those occupations below its 
potential. .Also lower cost foreign labor cannot compete in 
house building in the U. S. 



MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 



June 30. 1' 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



Page 9 



But for the most part the conventional education we 
have seen will be of shrinking value. 

We have arrived at a time when the job market should 
be seriously considered before launching on a specific educa- 
tional program. 

In view of major social dislocations and discontent, the 
forces oC law and order will have to be beefed up and there wUI 
probably be room for more policemen. Court work and trials 
will be intensified. .As a result o( the emotional problems, psy- 
chologists and psychiatrists ought to be in increasing demand, 
many o( them under the employ of local or federal govern- 
ment. 

THE TRANSITION 

Hie major trouble will come at the time o( transition. 
If this recovery could be counted on as the beginning of a new 
bull market which would bring us a repeat of the I9b0's and 
1970's. we wouldn't need to worry for a long time. But the 
current recession or even "depression" that we have been 
through has not happened by accident. It is the ine.Korable 
forward movement of basic factors that has produced this 
reversal in the economy, and these same ine.xorable factors are 



whittling away even as we enjoy a temporary respite in the 
form of a recovery. 

Only short-sighted people can believe that the current 
tlush in the Dow Jones offers even a tlimsy answer to our pro- 
blems. .As the transition wiierein we work out adjustments to 
changing conditions advances, the unrest will niove toward 
a final cliina.x that will cause wrenching changes in our social 
t'ramework. Until that time, we must be prepared to meet 
changing conditions as they arise, but by conventional means. 
That is why .VIFE has recommended, and continues to insist, 
that your resources be in a state ot liquidity. That means 
that you could call on them any time to move them in any 
direction that you might choose - and without loss. 

I'm sorry that I can't agree to put you in the stock mar- 
ket. But I'm sure chat if you should go into General .Motors it 
S75 or Chrysler at nearly S30. somewhere down the line you 
will live to bite your nails and you will say to yourself; "I 
should have known that that kind of an increase on such •small 
evidence had to be a trap. I fell into it." 

Prices may go higher meanwhile, but the present realities 
cenainly do not foretell a new period of prosperity for the auto 
industry, the steel industry, or, in fact, most ot the industry 
we know today. 



HIGH TECH- THE ADVANCING WAVE 

A SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC REVOLUTION 

In the short term, things can look good for awhile. But we have enough evidence now to confidently predict 
that not only will the job requirements change drastically in the ne.Kt few years, but the total number of jobs will 
keep on shrinking. 

That means that a lot of people now out of work will not get back to work. How can a 50 year old man from 
the assembly line, a ten or twenty year veteran, compete for new jobs in the computer industry with current college 
graduates - or even high school graduates. 

But Che high tech industries, and especially the computer industry, cannot absorb all the kids coming otit of 
college or high school. There is. m fact, a danger that altogether too many of the upcoming graduates will find chat 
they comprise a surplus that will leave many of their ranks in the unemployed. The very first part of it will be all 
nght. but as the thousands swing to high tech. the later entries will go begging employment. Present day press propa- 
ganda tends to take our eye off the ball. But what you really face is this. 



.A NEW ERA 

Smokestack .America is m its death throes - right now. 

.A few offer the pablum that all we need to bring back 
the ■•good old days" is more capital and better trade restric- 
tions. But they are missing the big picture; .America is enterina 
an economic revolution which wiU leave its manufacturing in- 
dustry a cnanged and smaller creature. Alvin Toffler calls it 
■'The Third Wave." John Naisbitt /Megatrends/ calls it "the 
megashift from an industrial to an information society." 

Whatever the label, the implications are clear. The ad- 
vancing wave oi high technology foretells a profound change in 
world economies. It's quite clear right now that smokestack 
America is being overtaken by Third Worid industry. Countries 
like Brazil and South Korea, enjoying cheap labor and tne early 
stages ot their own industrial revolution, are makin" huge in- 



roads in manufacturing. .Already they have usurped .America's 
predominance in steel, rail, and ship building. 

The proof: In 1950 the U. S. accounted for 15-1: or 
worid manufactunng. Today our share amounts to [5~n. In 
1960 .Amencan companies produced 9S70 of the autos. steei. 
and consumer electronics for domestic use. Today. .American 
companies account for only 72% o: the autos. 82% ot the steei. 
and 45% of the consumer electronics in the U. S. market. 

To filer I The Third Wave' pinpoints the beginning. 
■"From the mid-1950's it became mcreasingly apparent that 
these industries (coal. I'ail. textile, steel, auto, rubber, machine 
tools) were backward and waning in the industrial nations. 
These old-tashioned industries began to be transferred to so- 
called developing countries, where labor was cheaper and 
technology less advanced." 



MYERS FINAxNCE & ENERGY 



.1.^^ 






^ammm 



Page 10 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30. 1983 



John Naisbitt (Megatrands) sees ihe same picture: 
"The Uniied States and the rest of the developed countries of 
the world are on their way to losing their dominant positions m 
industries that include, steel, automobiles, railroad equipment, 
machinary, appliances, textiles, shoes and apparel. By the year 
2000. the Third World will manufacture as much as 30 percent 
of the world's goods." 

This transformation is already taking its toll on U. S. 
employment because of an unalterable reality - heavy industry 
is labor intensive, and any decline is followed by a correspond- 
ing decline in biue-coUar jobs. 

In 1956, for the first time in U. S. history, white collar 
exceeded the blue. Today, only 27 years later, there are more 
than three times as many white coUar workers as blue (65 mil- 
lion vs. 20 miUion). 

Since 1967 the number of steel workers has fallen 36% 
from 555,000 to 350,000. During the same period employment 
for the domestic auto industry declined 38% from 341,000 to 
210,000. Railroads likewise. Less than 10 years ago this former 
giant employed over a million people. Today they employ less 
than -MDO, 000. 

Conversely, service and information industries have 
boomed. Since 1967. finance, insurance and real estate employ- 
ment has grown by 71% from 3.12 million to 5.35 million. .A.nd 
during the same period, computer-related employment grew by 
255% from 98,900 to 351.000. 

Unfortunately for blue-collar America, the situation will 
not improve. Even with economic recovery now underway, 
unemployment will remain near 9% through 1985, according to 
conservative forecasters such as Data Resources. The major rea- 
son for the gloom - high tech industry: The third wave, by its 
very nature is a destroyer of jobs. 

The new economic order depends on expertise, not 
masses. Mundane, repetitive work (the guts of the industrial 
revolution) is on the verge of widespread replacement by high 
tech. .Already rmcro chips can do everything from medical diag- 
nosis to underground mining. And according to all sources, the 
industry is only now beginning to take off. 

For example, in 1980 GM used 300 robots. This year 
the auto giant is expected to use 2,300 robots. By 1990 it is 
projected that GM will employ 14,000 robots - each of which 
has the potential to work around the clock without a complaint. 

The protundity oi this change cannot be shrugged off. 

The implications on employment are immense. ""The 
potential of microprocessors is awesome." says John Maisbut 
iMegarrends). "The automation oi factones and offices, once a 
futuristic pipe dream is becoming a reality. . . . Computer tech- 
nology is to the information age what mechanization was to the 
industrial revolution: it is a threat because it incorporates func- 
tions previously performed by workers." 

Nobel Laureate Wassily Leontief, director of New York 
University's Institute tor Economic .Analysis, goes further: 
■'Man, as a factor of production, has only two aspects: physical 
and mental. Both are being replaced. . . . Human workers will go 
the way oi the horse." 

Even Tofiler. the optomistic futurist asks: '"Where will 
the jobs of tomorrow come I'rom?" 

Some argue that tlus new wave will create more oppor- 



tunities than it wUl erase, but that is hard to see. Huge expan- 
sion in electronics and bio-genetics exist for the purpose of 
reducing human participation. 

Who will train the blue-collar workers of today for 
tomorrow's jobs? If they remain untrained (as a great many 
will), where will they work? 

This much is certain - this advancing third wave wdl 
exact heavy human costs, economic dislocation, followed by 
social upheaval. 

Prepare now, for tomorrow is already here. The condi- 
tions under which we lived are passing into a traumatic phase - 
the death convulsion of industrialiasm. 'Ws the industrial age 
passes into history, a new age is born," says Alvm Toffler. 
It's the birth pains we now face. 

POLAND WANTS 20 YEARS 

Poland is now asking its creditors to reschedule its S25 
billion debt over the next 20 years, and to e.xtend an eight-year 
grace period on the tlrst principal installment. That comes on 
the heels of an already rescheduling by 500 banks last year giv- 
ing Poland a four year grace penod and a seven year reschedul- 
ing on its 1982 debt. Which brought on.WSJ's understatment of 
this year: This new request "may upset a lot of bankers." 

Polish debts falling due to western banks this year are 
estimated at Sl.l billion, with S2.4 billion due over the next 
two years. 

Being major creditors, western governments - which 
have broken off debt talks with the Poles since the proclamation 
of martial law - are expected to face the same demands as 
the banks. 

At this point only one thing is clear: It's going to be a 
long time before any of the creditors see their money! 

YUGOSLAVIA VERGES ON DEFAULT 

Yugoslavia's S2 billion bailout remains unratified and 
may fall apart because of a rift with its major lender. .Manufac- 
turers Hanover Trust. Manufacturers Hanover, with over S3 bil- 
lion tied up in Yugoslavia, is insisting on loan guarantees before 
putting up another necessary S600 million. Yugoslavia dismissed 
this as outriglit interference with its internal affairs. The situa- 
tion is now so senous that the U. 5. State Depanment has in- 
volved itself. 

It seems to be getting increasingly harder to .keep things 

from coming unstuck. 

« « « « « 

Somewhere along the line, sooner or later, a debt con- 
vulsion vvill grip the monetar/ world, because it is an a.xiom 
that: The snake under the rug does not simply go away. He just 
remains hidden - until he comes out. We have a huge snake 
under the rug. 

With oil of this in mind, we must emphasize SAFETY 
while at the same time we strive for a leg on the future. 

LOWER GASOLINE SALES 

Oil prices are likely to decline funher as a result oi 
OPEC price cheating and increased production outside OPEC. 
said Deputy Treasury Secretary R. T. .McNamar. 

And the oil industry ;an't count on the .Ajnencan 
motorist to pull it out oi its slump, says Ted Eck. chief econo- 
mist for Standard Oil of Ind., because better car mileage will 



MYERS FINAiNCE & ENERGY 



June 30. 1983 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



Page 1 1 



more chan offset the predicted 2% increase in driving this sum- 
mer, resulting in a demand fall of 1% from last year's depressed 
levels. 

ENERGY PRICES WONT RISE 

Don't expect energy pnces to soar again this decade. 
.-According to a Texaco study, energy demand will rise by a 
meager 2% per year tiU the year 2000, while oil demand will 
only increase by 1%. 

The reason: that conservation measures instituted in the 
late 1970's were of a permanent nature. Already OPEC has seen 
its production faU from 31 mb/d in 1979 to about 17 mb/d 
presently. 

OIL TO FALL - MEGAPROJECTS STOP 

This year OPEC income will fall to Si 54 billion — down 
from SI 93 billion m 1982 and from S274 billion at the peak. 
And there will be an OPEC trade deficit of S35 billion plus, 
according to a study by Morgan Guaranty Trust. 

Result • megaprojects are few and far between. The 
world economy will no longer support multi-million dollar 
projects, says Jack Bernard, Bechtai vice president, and there 
is a growing doubt among the construction giants whether mega- 
projects we saw in the Seventies wiU ever return. 

Scarcity of projects, says Fluor Corp., is leading to 
ferocious competition and shrunken profit margins, as firms 
struggle to keep people on the payroll. Cancelled megaplans 
already include Indonesia, Venezuela, Algeria, and even the 
"untouchable" Saudi Arabia, aU to the dismay of giant Ameri- 
can contractors faced with growing job erosion, already 10% or 
more. 

Big corporation executive are beginning to fear lower 
trending prices even as economists are still preoccupied with the 
inilation bogy, and in the face of growing opinion that oil prices 
wiU keep falling. 

OPEC - great inflation engine of the Seventies - is stal- 
ling. It's world market share has fallen from 60% to 35%. Maybe 
it wiU nse this summer, say expens, as much as 3 mb/d to 
20 mb/d. But after that the future looks static. So OPEC has 
been "de-homed," one might say, and its power over future 
pnces sharply trimmed. 

We are looking, and will continue to lock, at the demise 
of the expanding billions that arose out of OPEC. 

An of this looks like DEFLATION to me. 

LET IT BE SILVER 

For those impatient for some kind of action, and still 
uncomfortable with just money - I think you could reasonably 
begin a slow accumulation of silver. I say this even as I am 
prepared to see silver prices drop. I am suggesting now just 
getting your feet wet with silver coinage or silver bullion - 
buying modest amounts month by month. The future of silver 
will become clearer to us as time goes on. But if it strengthens 
to SI 2.50 or CO SI 3.00, more should be bought with prospects 
of a rise to S18.00 

I can quite easily see future silver at S3 5 an ounce - and 
maybe considerably more. But that could be two or three years 
from now. Do not buy silver if you will find yourself disap- 
pointed to see the price go down. 



These prices have been and probably will continue 
volatile. 

But you must be prepared - if we get the deflation that 
I forecast - to see the price drop substantially - and for some 
time. 

This would give you a hedge on the future if my defla- 
tion forecast turns out to be wrong. 

BUT MARK THIS - IF silver ever breaks below SIO. you are 
most likely looking at S7.50 again. A crash in gold below S400 
would mdicate S300 — and such a development would, in my 
view, indicate stiver's fall belovv SIO. 

SO • unless you are absolutely impelled, it would be 
better not to enter the stiver market yet. 

READERS WRITE 

Dear Editor: 

I have been a subscriber to your "Myers Finance dc 
Energy" for the past three years. As an outcome of reading 
the results of your studies and investigations. I have followed 
your advice and experienced a turn-around in my investment 
performance. For this reason. I am deeply grateful to you and 
am becoming increasingly dependent upon your guidance. 

However, there is one disturbing issue which you seem 
to have disregarded, namely, the ever-increasing national debt. 
Recently, when learning that it had grown to 1.3 trillion dollars, 
I became aghast Your book, "Money and Energy," elaborates 
on the road to financial ruinations of excessive government bor- 
rowing. 

I believe your readers would very much appreciate 
receiving your well thought-out wisdom pertaining to the con- 
sequences of these current on-going massive increases in the 
national debt. Will these increases cause another wave of double- 
digit inflation? 

To read your disclosure on the huge increases in govern- 
ment borrowing would help alleviate my mental tensions, and. 
I feel confident, the minds of many other faithful followers 
of the Vem Myers financial strategy. 

WDB 
Columbia, OH 

Dear Subscriber: 

1 well understand your concern over the eventual conse- 
quences of the breathtaking size of the federal debt. And I 
understand your concern that I have not specifically dealt 
with that. There are two reasons why I have not addressed 
this problem up to this time: 

(1) U. S. government obligations are still the safest 
investment in town. If we are to rule out the safety factor 
involved in the U. S. Treasuries, we might as well go to the 
mountains and dig a cave. Certainly the government treasuries 
of other countries are not more safe. Certainly the countries 
bordering on Russia are not more safe. Switzerland is a long way 
away and we do not know what restnctions might occur on the 
international movements of money. Cenainly real estate is not 
more safe, in my view. Gold and silver are notoriously volatile. 
I regard the stock market among the most dangerous 
investments. Think of it. General Motors at S70 when it has not 
been that high in a dozen years - and with all those great years 
behind it, and ail those fat earnings; and now even if the U. S. 



MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 






Page 12 



THE GLOBAL CONCEPT 



June 30. 1983 



industry has a 6 million car year, it will prove to be one of the 
most sorrowful in a decade. But General .Motors at S70! Chrys- 
ler, which is barely crawling out of the woods, is at a price that 
already concedes vigorous and astonishing growth into the 
future. 

Well. I realize that the growth of government debt is 
serious. But a collapse of money as a result of this debt is no- 
where yet in sight. If they don"t get it under control in a couple 
of years, we will have to face this problem. But right now 
nothing is more safe than U. S. government debt. 

You might say that silver is more safe. In the long run 
you might be right. But sUver has proven that it can move 
erratically forward and disastrously downward without much 
provocation - at SI 1 I could not rate it as more safe. 

(2) The second reason 1 have not dealt with the ominous 
consequences of goverrunent debt is that at this stage it is not 
necessarily inflationary. Now you know that the German econ- 
omy prior to WW II was an inflationary house of cards. Wages 
were high. Prices of essentials were reasonable. People, however, 
could not really SPEND their money. This was controlled by 
rationing. So while the government fed huge amounts of money 
into the economy, they controlled the inflation by creating 
conditions which led the public to deposit all their surpluses 
in the banks - on the prospect that they would all own Volks- 
wagens at the end of the war - and thereafter ride high. 

The key to the control was that inflation was prevented 
because the money did not get into the marketplace. Now in the 
case of the U. S. Treasury most of the deficit ii being borrowed 
from the people. In other words, it is not newly manufactured 
money. So I don't think that these big borrowings by govern- 
ment are comprising an environment of inflation. They may 
well do so later on. 

Overall, the question you have to ask yourself is how 
much debt can the U. S. absorb before it creates an inllationary 
storm. I thought at one time that half a trillion was too much, 
then that a trillion was too much ; now we head for one and a 
half trillion. Where is too much? As long as the lid is kept on 
- by some means - as Hitler did in Germany, it well may be 
that the government debt can grow much higher. 

In net analysis. I just know this: That of all the possible 
places to put your money, the safest at this time is the U. S. 
Treasury. That means cash (greenbacks), or Treasury notes 
(essentially a call on cash) and probably out to about 1990. 
I don't like any longer terms because it may be thai the govern- 
ment debt will catch up one of these days and the longer term 
bonas would suffer the most. 

No matter where you put your money, you must remain 
alert because there are no pat answers and what seems to be 
absolutely safe today may not be safe tomorrow. We can only 
go by currently known circumstances, and for the time being, 
Treasur/ secunties stand at Lhe top. Silver has a potential to 
become Mo. 1 but at present it is still subject to speculation 
orgies. But I do think that if you want to move a pan of your 
wealth out of government securities. SILVER is about the only 
other place to go. (See story Page 1 1. J 



Dear Mr. Myers: 

Your monthly letter has more honest information and 
accuracy than the other leading three letters I subscribe to. I 
await each issue for the valuable inform.ation to guide me. Keep 
up the excellent job. 

HH 

Vancouver, BC 
Dear .Mr. Myers: 

My father died in New York in 1976 . . a self-made 
multi-millionaire. 

His repetious never-v;avering prediction was. . . 

"Bobby, youll pay the "piper" for this government 
debt . . . ni be dead, but you'll pay the 'piper'." 

.A.S a former NYSE member I can attest to what happens 
when the bids are pulled. . . panic. 

When finally the world's debtors realize there is no more 
money, and their politicians race to save their hides ... if not 
their lives ... all the smooth talk at the luxurious meeting 
places will turn into hysteria. 

You are "doing something." You're keeping us safe. 
Once the fiat balloon coUapses.. . . and collapse it must 
. . . and bank assets (?) are truly reflected on the balance sheets, 
sitting in safety with cash •Mill have your subscribers rlooding 
your mailbox telling you how smart they were to do nothing 
sitting in their "Sears Roebuck Sure-Thing Safety Tents." 

Robert P. Lazear 
Dear Mr. Myers: 

Your analysis of the market of 1929 and 1983 is a 
masterpiece. It should be read by the thousands. 

I was very active in the 1929-32 market. Wrote a maga- 
zine article advising people to get the hell out. None that I knew 
of paid any attention. Only a few of my immediate clients 
followed me. 

Finally with a few dollars I had those days I went 3hort 
when the time came and made S27.i00 in the tlrst four days. 
One stock. Standard Gas, lost over 100 points. 

I believe we are facing the same situation in the present 
market. There svill be no improvement that will justify pre- 
sent or higher prices. 

Keep up the good work. .\t 88 years old I am about 
finished. 

A. R. Towner 
Hollywood. FL 

An invesrmenr and political counselor for members of 
Congress, governors, presidential nominees and corporate 
executives throughout a long career and rhe author of "Tne 
.Angel of Democracy. " 



DJ 1213.74 
GOLD $414.85 
SILVER SU.43 



SUMMARY - Harr/ Schultz sums it oil up: "The market has 
been climbing on a wall oi v/orr/ and I am thinking gold is 
falling on a wall of optimism." 

Weak underpinning oi the recover/ is underscored by a 

May trade dellcit of S6.9 bOlion. history's largest (56.3 billion 

In .\ugusi '82). and is expectea to top S70 billion thas year. 

nearly doubling previous record £42.7 billion last year, proving 

the U. S. has priced itself out of world mar.kets — and wages 

must fan - which undercuts hopes of any orolonged recovery. 

MYERS FINANCE & ENERGY 

Suite 310 Peyton Building, Spokane, WA 99201 

Subscriptions: 14 Issues S200.00— 7 Issues SllO.OO 



Next newsletter • July 29 






OYOPm m QgLIUIUII: 
THE PEIOSPECTS 

R. Bucktninster Fuller 



*■«''" •«>„ 






*«■» vo»*" 
A HATIONAL OENE&AL COMPANY 



conrenrs 



DTOPU OH oblivion: the prospects fob humanity 

A Bantam Book / published December 1969 

2nd priming ... .September 1970 

3rd printing April 1971 

4lh printing November 1971 



Introduction 

1. A Citizen of the 21st Century Looks 

2. The Music of the New Life 

3. Prevailing Conditions in the Arts 

4. Keynote Address at Vision 65 

5. Summary Address at Vision 65 

6. The World Game— 

How to Make the World Work 

7. Geosocial Revolution 

8. How to Maintain Man 

as a Success in Universe 

9. Utopia or Oblivion 

10. Curricula and the Design Initiative 

11. Design Strategy 

12. Epilogue 
Bibliography 



Back 



« 
1 

12 

80 

114 

134 

157 
162 

207 
265 
293 
300 
343 
365 



iwry. 



Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 74-98972 

All rights reserved. 

_ , . Copyright © 1969 by R. Buckminster Fuller. 

IMS book may not be reproduced in whole or in part, by 

mimeograph or any other means, without permission. 

ror information address: Bantam Books, Inc. 

Published simultaneously in the United States and Canada 



Bantam Books are published by Bantam Books. Inc.. a National 
(general company. Its trade-mark, consisting of the words "Bantam 
v?°.. ^. 'p' portrayal of a bantam, is regUtered in the United 
B .' a"', '^f'^' ""^ '" otf^er countries. Marca Regtstrada. 
Bantam Books , Inc., 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10019. 

PSINTEO IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMEHICA 



"I made a bargain with myself that I'd discover the 
principles operative in the universe and turn them over 
to my fellow men." 



R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER . 

Comprehensive designer, inventor, engineer, mathema- 
tician, architect, cartographer, philosopher, poet, cos- 
mogonist, choreographer, visionary— celebrated for 
developing principles of synergetics, tcnsegrity, ephcm- 
eralization, tetrahedronality— famous for geodesic 
houses that fly and for dymaxion ways of living. 

R. Buckminster Fuller's recent honors include the Royal 
Gold Medal for Architecture, awarded by Her Majesty 
the Queen, on recommendation of the Royal Institute of 
British Architects, and the 1968 Gold Medal Award of 
the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Mr. Fuller 
has been a Research Professor at Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity since 1959. In 1968 the Board of Trustees ap- 
pointed him Unhrersity Professor, the second faculty 
member to be so honored in the University's history. 

Mr. Fuller was nominated for the 1969 Nobel Peace 
Prize, 



Introducfion 



It should be apparent that this is one of the most important 
books to come out of America. 

"What if our urgent work now is, not to act at any price, 
but rather to lay in a stock of light for our difficulties?" This 
was Matthew Arnold's point some hundred years ago. Today, 
a significant answer, or set of answers, is provided in the 
work of Buckminster Fuller; and much light for the diflBcul- 
ties of our time is to be found in this volume. 

I^iller is one of the few men in history who have systemat- 
ically put in order the data of their experience, who have set 
out to see the world whole and see it constantly; and of these 
few he is singular in having available the technology of 
quanta, nucleonics, and computers. His work thus reflects an 
extraordinary gain in techno-economic leverage. 

Since the Renaissance, the great innovators, with few ex- 
ceptions — such as Leibniz, Newton, Kant — have tended to be 
specialists, each exploring a local domain, each a provincial 
in speculation. None has combined a comprehensive social 
philosophy with the technological insights that could provide 
blueprints for maximized abimdance. The recent centuries 
have had their speculative phUosophers, their pure scientists, 
their social reformers, inventors, technicians. But nowhere 
^as the purview that embraced Utopia as an immediately at- 
tainable state of affairs, that measured the connections and 
uiterconnections of science and society and joined them in a 
Junctional gestalt. 

Philosophers have seen the maximal development of man 

an individual activity stemming from cumulative reflection 
nr^*^!!:^/' ^^y ^^^^ ^^^° ^ *^eal society as an evolving 
ref^Jl? °f^ 'deepened men— Plato's philosopher kings. Social 

lormers have urged radical changes in the rules by which 
couniinrT'' ^'^ according to which it does its economic ac- 
^d inrinc, r°^°'! ^°^ engineers, in concert with investors 
*^^ "jdustriahsts, have concentrated 



on product and market. 



IX 



A 



y 



X UTOPIA OR OBLIVION 

assuming that social welfare follows naturally from erc^ 
tional product. These several groups have not combined?" 
orchestrate the human situation. On the contrary their!- ** 
petitive themes each hymning local self-interest. h°av' 
sounded the clashes of Armageddon. And before us lie w "I 
hunger, nots; the global waste of lives and effort: the ne^ ' 
tent threat of the fanatic use of the H-bomb ^"' 

To Fuller the wealth of nations is their progressive dem-P 
of accomplished employment of energy by £,ow howl^f^r 
degree of mastery of the physical bf the metaphy^^^T p ' 

s-s Ts Tu^hr^ow^evrtab^" r ^^ 

solar power enables pLTt^gr^oVsy t eSHr cSt 
produce the substance of cereals and fibers/water Towe ' 

w mat Sn't'o' '°' °^'". ^'^^^^y ^^--^ translr the 
form^fon hn '^ommerc.al products. Mediate in the trans- 
InZT' ,"'''■• •' •°f°'-'nation. technological knowledl 
^^uln^^L'^lZ'J ?' •^"°"'^''^^ --« -Sable fn 3ed 
Uona centu^es the '""i^^f^'^^^ worlds, even the transi- 
S-were t ~, ' ?'" '^'^' ^^"'^^"t^rites. and 

SbeTscarcitv n^oH . '" u ''y- ^"°°^" ^^'^ '""^^Is were 
difre^nr^^etref^^^^^^^^^^ -^ Remediable 

ci Jw^rTd^cameUV t" '°H '"" ''' '°^''"'^'- °^ '^^ -- 
develoornenf^f , "'°''^™ explosion of knowledge, the 

ntut^fr"iorn?re"w;:ht:r^^,toth''T^ °' '^^^- 

e^ge'is rtcuL^ed tr° "^'"^ *°"^^^"' ^^ more'knowl- 
Atomic reactor, ?n L '"°'' '•' '"^' additional knowledge, 
fuel tian the^ ' '^°' ""' ^ "^e- breed more fissionable 
a^d economic anX"'?'- ^5"' "'^ development, distribution, 

stored^f comnuTet ' '°"f ' '^'^^'^^^^ "^^ ^^^^ information : 
and package commc;dir '^°?'''" '^^ '"^^^"^1^' '"^'^^ine ' 
the w'orld tf the poTn7^;:rgiur' '"'^^^ ^'^ P'^^'^^' °^^^^ °f ' 

stru'^tirraVilotn'can"''f*"^; ^ ^"""'^ ^-'^ geodesic i 
ter. transpomHnn r^H '°'^e ^he problems of human shel- 

cessity for scIrcYtieTnn^n "'' °°^f ""^ functional ne- 

havenots; no Wr a m Sn^ '' ?°^ ^"^"^'^^''^^ f^'" ^aves and 
^, no longer a rationale for national boundaries, poUt- 



Introduction 



U 



,^ aggressions, monopolistic controls of obsolescent sources 
S^w materials and fossQ fuels. 

In short in a world of maximum abundance, the manipu- 
l.tioo of obsolescence is itself obsolescent. And politics is the 
obverse of design initiative; the poUtician in the modern 
^rld is like a determined driver of a twenty-mule team 
goading his mules along a six-lane highway on a Sunday af- 
ternoon. He may be skilled, ruthless, traditional, revered; but 
be has no viable solution to the problems of supply in a 
world of jets, pipelines, and nuclear fission. 

This is not the place to review Fuller's own accomplish- 
ments; his designs, struggles, domes, transports, city plans, 
living techniques, mathematics, have been catalogued else- 
where. This introduction is intended simply to call attention 
to the freshness, comprehensiveness, and philosophical impor- 
tance of his essential ideas; and to place them in historical 
perspective. There is, in my opinion, no one writing today 
who has more important things to say, no one whose ideas 
are more directly pointed to the attainable goals of a free and 
abundant life, no one more functionally attuned to the struc- 
tural symbiosis of science and society. 

It is to be noted that the papers collected in this volume 
are based on talks given by Fuller over the past several years 
to specialized academic or professional groups, or on articles 
prepared for specialized journals. For this reason there are 
references, occasionally, to local concerns; and there are ex- 
pected inconsistencies in time references. Moreover, in the in- 
troduction of certain key concepts there occurs in some 
places an inevitable repetition of biographical detail. These 
elements could have been removed by incisive cutting, with 
subsequent editorial bridging of the developmental gaps. In 
the opinion of the editor, however, changes of this type 
would violate the integrity of Fuller's expression and distort 
the functional perspective of his work. 

ROBERT W. MARKS 



1 . A Citizen of the 2 1 st Century Looks Back 

I was bom cross-eyed. Not until I was four years old was 
it discovered that this was caused by my being abnormally 
farsighted. My vision was thereafter fully corrected with 
lenses. UntU four I could see only large patterns, houses, 
trees, outlines of people with blurred coloring. While I saw 
two dark areas on human faces, I did not see a human eye or 
a teardrop or a human hair until I was four. Despite my new 
ability to apprehend details, my childhood's spontaneous de- 
pendence only upon big pattern dues has persisted. 

Most children Uke to collect things. At four I started to 
coUect documents of my own development as correlated with 
world patterns of developing technology. Beginning in 1917 
I determined to employ my abeady rich case history, as ob^ 
jectively as possible, in documenting the life of a suburban 
New Englander, bom in the Gay Nineties (1895)— the year 
automobUes were introduced, the wireless telegraph and the 
automauc screw machine were invented and X-rays were dis- 
covered; having his boyhood in the turn of the century; and 
matunng during humanity's epochal graduation from the 
inert, matenahstic 19th into the dynamic, abstract 20th cen- 
»ury. I named my documentation the Chronofile 
live fnr "^ °^ ^'/^"^ ^'^°^ ^°^ed into greater perspec- 
a^rateir^/Vfi'M'^^" f "^^ Chronofile, it became more 
aoci^rately Identifiable as that which, on the one hand, termi- 

i^dW ^d !f ^T°°\ °°"^^"y "^t '^''" world of myr- 

•^aS^Betas anTh '^ ''°^T^' ^^^"'^ ^'^'^^' to which 

i^ormSy •^^ri^fT'J ^.^.' °° ^he other, opened Einstein's 

•^w,^ has c?'™S ^°°^-"»tegrating worid culture to which 

*^ convt^cedTha? ZT "^°^"^^°^iJy inevitable. By 1917 I. 

i^-atcr enviroomen'taJ iZfr^^.^^ '°>' ^"^o^ty, a much 

r:-*« in our generatfon^s^unfiS'''°° ^'' ^^^^^ *° take 

'^^^. for instance hptt^ experience than had oc- 

»^-«-grandfaihe 's and 1^/.? ""^ ^^'^''''' grandfather's. 

' ^^ ^eat-great-grandfather's successive 



2 UTOPU OR OBLIVION 

generations. Their writings contain glimpses of their lives in 
their successive undergraduate days in the classes of 1760, \ 
1801, 1840, and 1883 at Harvard. They tell of day-long trips 
walking or driving from Cambridge to Boston via Watertown 
Bridge. 

As in 1913, in Fair Harvard's "Age that is past/ surrendered 
her o'er [once more]/ to the age that" was "waiting before," 
I felt intuitively in our freshman year that the subway, which 
then opened to connect Cambridge and Boston by a seven- 
minute ride, was harbinger of an entirely new distance-time re- 
lationship of humanity and its transforming environment. It 
seemed to me that the science-quaking fact of our boyhood 
was that light has a speed. Though fantastically fast, its 700 
million miles per hour is not as absolutely fast as Newton's 
"instant imiverse." Newton's foundation was experimentally 
unrealistic. Light was real — but 99% of reality's electro- 
magnetic spectrum was invisible. We could no longer pilot 
with our physical senses. We had henceforth to rely upon in- 
tellect and its power to invent and navigate with the instm- 
ments which could tune and scan the vast ranges of non- 
sensorially tunable reality. This called for intellectual confi- 
dence in the fundamental but nonobvious trends, and disre- 
gard for the only momentarily spectacular news. 

Average lifespan expectancy for our classmates bom 
circa 1895, as then calciilated by the life-insurance actuaries, 
was 42 years. During our lifetime, the average life expec- 
tancy in the United States has increased to 70 years. Up to 
the time we were bora, the average total distance covered by 
a member of humanity in his all-time, average lifespan of 27 
years, was 30,000 miles. My total travel to date, by land, sea, 
and air, is a hundredfold that distance. It aggregates more 
than 3,000,000 miles and now, at 72 years, I find my work 
often taking me annually several times around the world with 
many lesser to-and-froings. This is in no wise a unique rec- 
ord. It is average for ever increasing millions of humans 
who have responsibilities in the vast frontiers of technology, 
business, and statecraft of a swiftly emerging spherical world 
city. Today's air hostesses far outtravel me, and Gemini as- 
tronauts outdistanced my 3,000,000 miles in one week's orbit- 
ing. Quite clearly, a complete transformation of human ecol- 
ogy in universe is occurring. It is not surprising that man. 
burdened with obsolete "knowledge" — his spontaneous rcfle** 
ing conditioned only by past experience, and as yet unable to 



A Citizen of the 21st Century Looks Back 3 

realize himself as being already a world man — fails to com- 
prehend and cope logically with the birth of Universe Man. 

By 1927 I felt that three big questions were posed by what 
the Chronofile as then' made visible by the foregoing type of 
information. 



First, what could society, backing up into its future, with 
eyes fixed only on the ever-receding and less adequate securi- 
ties of yesterday, do to make this evolutionary process a grat- 
ifying rather than a painful experience? 

Second, what could the average intelligent and healthy, 
moneyless individual best contribute, singlehandedly, toward 
bringing the earliest and happiest realization of advantage for 
society in general through taking and maintaining the com- 
prehensive, anticipatory design-science initiative — in the face 
of the formidable axiomatic errors and inertias of academic 
authority as well as the formidable economic advantage of 
the massive corporations and their governments and mutually 
shortsighted foci of resource and capabDities exploitation? 

Third, assuming that by competently reforming only the 
environment instead of trying to reform man, a favorably de- 
signed environment can be realized which will both permit 
and induce man to accomplish the same logical degree of 
physical success in universe as is manifest, for instance, by 
the hydrogen atom, how then can the economic and techno- 
logical capabDity of all humanity to enjoy freely all of its 
world be accomplished exclusively by design science, without 
any individual interfering with another and without any indi- 
vidual being advantaged at the expense of another, with a de- 
sign that will also induce its spontaneous adoption by world 
industrialization's managers? 

• • * 

Id 1917, in the U.S. Navy, as I studied these questions the 
Chronofile disclosed a technological-environment-regenerated 
acceleration of technical evolution. This concept of accelerat- 
ors acceleration, which had been discovered by Galileo and 
*^» later identified with gravity by Newton, had not been 
i^^^r^*^^ " accelerating social evolution. During 1922-1927 
WrS /°°°^'^-^^° disclosed a trend of comprehensive ephe- 
fc>tt '*'^"^"~*-^' ^e doing of ever more vnXh. ever less, per 
»- ^ rc^uicG umts of pounds, time, and energy. Ephemeraliza- 
tioa was vastly augmenting the standards of living of 
mcreasmg numbers, but only inadvertently, as fallout fro ^^' 
defense-subsidized preoccupation of science with a we^^^."^ 
supporting industriahzation. *^*=apo6rj 

Ephemerahzation was also accelerated by ever-incre. ■ 
quantiUes of invisible energy events of universe, detoured 'J' 
human mtellect from their previously only cosmicaUy fl^l^^^ 
patterns to flow through engineered chamiels and imS 
upon mteUect-invented levers and thereby to vastly aSem 
the work accomplishable by mankind's muscles in reaS^°' 
mg the energetic environment events to more effectively sul" 
tain the metabolic regeneration of human life 

Ephemeralization which constantly does more with visibly 
ess-as does, for mstance. the one-quarter-ton commu^ ca! 
Uons satelhte outperform 150.000 tons of transoceanic S 

^s?d1n n'rinf' ^^^\^l'^^^y ^^olated, recognized, and dis- 
cussed m print as such by any economists. Until economists 
hVZ^^^ It, ephemeralization cannot be popularly compre- 
hended and be adopted in pubUc policy formulaUons. 

However, as the years have gone by the combined effects 
n L'n '/'°^ acceleration and ephemerahzation account 
primarily for the technical and economic augmentations 
which are now overwhelming man-trying to make him a 
success in umverse despite his age-old Malthus-supported 
convictiOEi that humanity, regardless of its composite signifi- 
cance and fate. is. with but a few exceptions, destined to 
aemonstrate personal economic failure and premature death 
i^bUc policy the world around as yet assumes that Malthus 
was nght— ergo, the vital necessity of Defense in view of the 
mexorability of the next Great War. 

My Chronofile gradually disclosed the invalidity of that 
great ^upersution. It showed, for instance, that the metals in 
«0% of aU of yesterday's obsolete mechanics and structures, 
contran^ to popular conception of their "exhaustion," have 
been recovered, refined as "pure metals." and put to work 

r!^y-JrT'' '''' '' '''' ^"-''-^ -i-'l metals wii; be 
world [nit? T '°'° '^^ recirculating-metals bloodstream of 
covlf^^^f"^^fT'' ^ ^^ S° competenUy into the sea to re- 
S7 war" n/en '^'' ^°'' '^'^^ ^""^ cargoes-in particular, 
of ad^lf^ f munitions vessels. But the rate of discovery 
of^additional metal ores is slower than human population Z 

muiea or unmmed and materials in general have continuaUy : 



^ ia rauo to each individual. At this moment the cu- 
•^^^l^to^ ormetals-mined and refined by man through- 
■f hiI'oS-i» whoUy employed in machines or structures 
*^ii i^rating at full design-Umit capacity, can successfully 
"ttn^^y 44% of living humanity. TTierefore, no exclu- 
•*^*^^ «nlitical act of any poUtical system can make the 
rrfJ',C;"ies tike care' of more than 44% of humanity. 
!^f Sic overall mechanical efficiency of the extant machmery 
Ld structures is only 4%. An overall efficiency of 20% is en- 
tuiceringly feasible at present. It could go to 80% someday. 
A design-science revolution could solve the problem. 

Despite the constant increase in human population and 
constant decrease of materials per person, between 1900 and 
1965 the number of people attaining economic and physical 
lucceas— by full participation in the highest standard of living 
progressively developed by world industrialization — rose 
steadily from less than 1% to 40% of all living humanity. 
This is a personal standard of living and health superior to 
that ever enjoyed by a pre-20th-century monarch. The 40% 
of humanity thus surprisingly grown successful, despite con- 
stantly diminishing material resources per capita, can be ex- 
plained only by accelerating ephemeralization. 

Paradoxically, the self-accelerating doingrmore-with-less 
invention revolution has been generated thus far almost ex- 
clusively by the technology of the world's weaponry race, 
whose ultimate objective has always been to deliver the great- 
est blows the farthest, most accurately, and most swiftly with 
the least effort. Evolution seems intent upon making man a 
success despite his negative fixations. The doing-more-with- 
less economic success of 40% of humanity, accomplished in 
only half a century, cannot be attributed to any political doc- 
trine. Technology has flourished equally under exactly op- 
posed ideologies. 

Take away the energy-distributing networks and the indus- 
trial machinery from America. Russia, and all the world's in- 
dustrialized countries, and within six months more than two 
billion swiftly and painfully deteriorating people will starve to 
death. Take away all the worid's politicians, all the ideologies 
and their professional protagonists from those same coun- 
tries, and send them off on a rocket trip around the sun and 
leave all the countries their present energy networks, industrial 
machinery, routine production and distribution personnel, 
and no more humans will starve nor be afflicted in health 
than at present 

Fortunately, the do-more-with-less invention initiative d 
not derive from political debate, bureaucratic Ucensing '^ 
private economic patronage. The license comes only frotn' t^ 
blue sky of the inventor's intellect. No one licensed the invc^ 
tors of the airplane, telephone, electric light, and radio to -v, 
to work. It took only the personally dedicated initiative tx 
five men to invent those world-transforming and world, 
shrinking developments. Herein lies the imexpectedly swift 
effectiveness of the invisibly generated and inexorable de. 
sign-science revolution. PoUtics is, inherently, only an accej. 
sory after the fact of the design-science revolution. Despite 
this historically demonstrable fact, world society as yet per- 
sists in looking exclusively to its politicians and their ideolo. 
gies for world problem solving. 

Within all the foregoing concepts and in view of the low 
technical advance in everyday dwelling facilities as compared 
to transport and communication developments, my 1927 Dy- 
maxion House was invented to function in due course as a 
prime instrument in an air-deliverable, mass-producible, 
world-around, new human life-protecting and -nurturing, 
scientific dwelling-service industry as the preferred means of 
transferring the scientific do-more-with-less capability from a 
weaponry to a livingry focus. I saw that a technology which 
produced total economic success for humanity could elimi- 
nate the fundamental causes of war, i.e., "you or me to the 
death— on behalf of yours or mine — for there is not enough 
to sustain us both": the seemingly scientific fact established 
by Thomas Malthus and later fortified by Darwin's survival- 
only-of-the-fittest. All else that I have done since then has re- 
lated to these design-science considerations. 

Thus in 1927 I embarked on a lifelong undertaking whose 
earliest possible realization lay a quarter of a century ahead, 
i.e., in 1952 (the year the Ford Motor Company acquired my 
first large Geodesic Dome) with full-scale, world-around in- 
dustrialization of the livingry-service industry to be realized 
only half a century ahead in 1977. I predicated the econom- 
ics of my grand strategy upon my own superstition-free con- 
cept of wealth as consisting exclusively of integrated intellect 
and energy. Since science's Law of Conservation of Energy 
states that energy may neither be created nor lost and experi- 
ence shows that every time intellect experiments with energy 
it learns more, wealth can only increase. 

Despite their negatively accounted cost and theoretically 
incurred debt and wastage of more than a trillion dollars, 



\ 



A Citizen of the 21st Century Looks Back 7 

_.. Wart I and n and subsequent cold warring have ren- 
*'■'.. he United States ever more vastly wealthy, despite the 
•*^ 3\ hundreds of bUIions of doUars lend-leased or given 
*^'''*'vVhy? Because those wars required ever more auto- 
***ij tool-up to harness more universe energy to do ever 
"^continuous work on an earth whose total industriali- 
"^•j percentage of strictly killing tools has become a 
"tjinrssively negligible minor fraction. The harnessed energy, 
production, distribution, communication tools, and techno- 
^entific literacy thus inadvertently established — all of which 
c^ produce peace-supporting prosperity — is the wealth. 

Tbere are two prime sources of energy to be harnessed and 
ocpended to do work. One is the capital energy-saving and 
itorage account; the other is the energy-income account. The 
fossil fuels took multimillions of years of complex reduction 
and coDservation, progressing from vegetational impound- 
ment of sun radiation by photosynthesis to deep-well storage 
of the energy concentrated below the earth's surface. There is 
vast overabundance of income energy at more places around 
the world, at more times to produce billionsfold the energy 
now employed by man, if he only knew how to store it when 
it is available, for use when it was not available. There are 
gargantuan energy-income sources available which do not 
stay the processes of nature's own conservation of energy 
within the earth crust "against a rainy day." These are in 
water, tidal, wind, and desert-Impinging sun radiation power. 
The exploiters of the fossil fuels, coal and oil, say it costs less 
to produce and burn the savings account. This is analogous to 
saying it takes less efifort to rob a bank than to do the work 
which the money deposited in the bank represents. The ques- 
tion is cost to whom? To our great-great-grandchildren, who 
will have no fossil fuels to turn the machines? I find that the 
ignorant acceptance by world society's presently deputized 
leaders of the momentarily expedient and the lack of con- 
structive, long-distance thinking — let alone comprehensive 
thinking — would render dubious the case for humanity's 
earthian future could we not recognize plausible overriding 
trends. 

The only visible means of converting the momentum of 
negative employment of the physical principles operative in 
Universe into making man a lasting success is in the design- 
science invention revolution, which fortunately may be joined 
by individual initiative founded on comprehensive intellectual'., 
integrity. 

Whether all of my assessment of our historical posit; 
correct and whether my grand strategy may be winnin*^" * 
not may possibly be readable in statistics that reflect the ^ ^ 
den surge of attention to and application of my idea^ in^' 
past five years. Though for more than half a century I u ^ 
been purposefuUy disregarding the "earning of a living-*^ 
"moneyraaking" in my occupational deliberations, my effo*^ 
sustaining but only incidentally accruing income, the mcoi!^ 
—low and slow at first — has steadily increased to ever mo 
eflfective magnitude. 

What, if any, is the significance of this upsurge? It seems 

to say that the generalized principles governing world indus. 

trialization which I seemed to discern, and the evolutionary 

events which they seemed to make predictable, are now tend- 

ing to be confirmed by unfolding events. My activities' upl 

surge also probably reflects the fact that my worid-around 

buUdings are enclosing 30-fold the clear-span interior space 

per pounds of material of any known alternative clear-span 

engineering systems designed to withstand the same hurricanes, 

snow loads, and earthquakes. It also reflects the recent years' 

experimental confirmation in various regions of science of 

nature's use of the mathematical coordinate system which I 

long ago discovered and developed. 

The upsurge probably further reflects the growing realiza- 
tion by worid youth that its desire for success for all human- 
ity can never be accomplished by politics, which is inherently 
divisive and biased and, to be eflfective, must eventually have 
recourse to its ultimate tools of warmaking; and that funda- 
mental world peace probably can be accomplished only by a 
design-science revolution which can and may realize the fea- 
sible potential by upgrading the performance per units of re- 
sources to provide 100% of humanity with an ever-higher 
standard of living. 

The upsurge probably reflects as weU the realization of in- 
creasmg numbers of the worid's youth that world peace prob- 
ably can be accomplished 20 years faster by a deliberate de- 
sign-science revolution than by waiting for the inadvertent 
^U-years-later fallout into the standard-of-living-advancing 
commerce of the accelerating ephemeralizaUon, as originally 
?n S"ifK 'f ^^ °°^y ^ ""'^^ ^^"^^ o^ basic fear motivations. ? 
in^Th?!^ I'T'"'' "t '^^ ^elf-protective worid-munitions rac- } 
be ihe Hiff ^u"'^ '"'"""^ *b^* *^« 20-year difference could ' 

The n^'°'',''''^"°^"™^°'ty^^"<='="so'- extinction. j 

Ihe upsurge also probably reflects the support I am receiv- 



. trcm industry ^^ '^ '^^ ^^ t^ose who say, "Why don't 
^..^^truuon m ^V ^^^^^^ -^^ to the moon and spend 
^ »top spending b'll»o°s i s 6 problems!" My answer is, 
^-''"^TL^TCve de^lpedVhigh level of technology 
^ ^ *:" °° ..^cesshillv sustain all of the games-preoccu- 
^ which to successfuuy ^ ^^^ ^eck of the Good 

^ ^^"^un'tT^^'^^e totd^^^^^^^ Physical, and medical 
^P ^d techTolo^y the task of understanding the success- 
^coce a°^J^''*^°3„7^„ regenerative metaboUc processes 
'^Z^:T^Z.IT^o. p'roSd periods, remote from the 

r Ciir;"inti:^:?ec:^^^^^ -ntent of a lit.e 
black box weighing about 500 pounds and requiring replen- 
<hment only yearly Only by the stark, resourceless condi- 
•ons Ls tpS' upon Venmental science wiUhumamty 
^forced to transcend its erroneously conditioned earthian 
reflexes which would otherwise continue to frustrate it with 
worthless opinions, politics, and war after war. . 

The upsurge in the accrediting of my functioning is also 
probably related to my 40-years'-earUer forecast of the last 
decades' admission by worid-around science that Malthus is 
wrong and, granted removal of aU political boundary restric- 
tions that the physical resources of earth can support all ot a 
multiplying humanity at higher standards of living than any- 
one has ever experienced or dreamed. 

The upsurge further reflects the recent enthusiasm of 
scholars and natural scientists for my definition of umyerse as 
the cumulative aggregate of all humanity's nonsimultaneous 
experiences, all of which are finite 'and mclude both the 
ponderable physical and the imponderable metaphysical; witn 
the entropic, increasingly disorderly expansion of physical 
universe counterbalanced by the increasingly orderly contrac- 
tion of antientropic, metaphysical universe. 

The scholars have also commented favorably on my philo- 
sophic observaUons that the omni-interacting, weightless, gen- 
eralized principles apparenUy governing universe— discovered 
only experimentaUy and progressively by human-mteUect-di- 
rected science — disclose an a priori, anticipatory, amorphous, 
and only intellectuaUy conceivable omni-integrity of umverse. 
By virtue of this integrity the generalized intellectual prma- 
ples governing physical universe interactions and transforma- 
tions never fail to provide an orderiy set of consequences for 
any of its interacting events or for our own arbitrary or a,- 
dental experiments. We are thus confronted by a univerv: -. 
which an intellect such as Einstein's could hypothetically tii^ 
the measure of the physical energy universe, a measure whici 
atomic fission later verified experimentally, thus demonstrii! 
ing intellect's embracing and equating the in^grated and dif. 
ferentiated energy of physical universe as E=mc'. There ha, 
not been, however, either experimental evidence or intuitive 
suggestion of the reversibility of those conditions and resultj 
whereby physical energy might take the measure of mtellect, 
equate and inscribe the integral and differential equation of 
intellect and the metaphysical universe. 

No scholars have published refutations of my widely publj. 
cized conclusion that all of the foregoing brain-recorded, 
mind-sorted, and comprehended experiences clearly disclose 
an mfinitely greater a priori, omnianticipatory, intellectual in- 
tegrity embracing and permeating universe than that de- 
monstrable or suggested by any known capability of any indi- 
vidual human intellect — nor of the integrated, cumulative ca- 
pabilities of all of history's human intellects — to control total 
imiverse in such a manner as to account for all the foregoing 
experimentally evidenced, omni-integrated, complex behav- 
iors of universe. Wherefore the comprehensive, superhuman, 
nonanthroporaorphic, Universal Intellectual Integrity thus al- 
together manifest to man by the integrated discoveries of ex- 
perimental science may be spoken of as God, for that is the 
most economical term thus far intuitively formulated by hu- 
manity to identify such a macro-micro, human-capability- 
transcending, anticipatory, embracing, and inspiring relation- 
ship. 

What intellect invented the integral of all the only intellec- 
tually conceivable, weightless, generalized prmciples discov- 
ered by science to be omnioperative as governing every physi- 
cal experiment? Until man can answer that question he will 
have to accept an a priori intellect greater than his own. 

I am convinced that neither I nor any other human, past 
or present, was or is a genius. I am convinced that what I 
have every physically normal child also has at birth. We 
could, of course, hypothesize that all babies are bom geniuses 
and get swiftly degeniused. Unfavorable circumstances, short- 
sightedness, frayed nervous systems, and ignorantly articu- 
lated love and fear of elders tend to shut off many of the 
child's brain-capability valves. I was lucky in avoiding too 
many disconnects. 

■n,.r« U luck in everything. My luck is that I was bom 
^Vc(L was ejected so frequently from the establishment 
^TTi 'was finally forced either to perish or to employ some 
S^ihose faculties with which we are all endowed— the use of 
hich circumstances had previously so frustrated as to have 
lUt them in the deep freezer, where only hellishly hot situa- 
Sons could provide enough heat to melt them back into usa- 
bility- 



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Technocracy is science in the social 
field. Encvclopeda Americana says: 
...Technocracy... is the only program of 
social and economic reconsti'uction 
which is in complete intellectual and 
technical accord v«th the age in which 
we live. 

Without prejudice, a reward of 
$9,749.78 has heen offered since 1978 
for irrefutable evidence that any 
political 'administration knows how to 
effect solutions to major social pro- 
blems. History does not record that 
political governments have ever .soKod, 
basically most social problems. Think 
About It! 

•(Request more information) 




i..(:iywhere on Earth the Price System 
is in conflict with the modern Age of 
science and technology. Enormous .social 
problems are engendered and exacer- 
bated by our adherence to the Price 
System. No amendments or harassments 
of incumbent governments is basically 
effective. Social violence harms both 
society and the participants. 

Now a method of social operation is 
available for the asking that can ensure 
that all people may ha\e the benefits of 
the technologically achievable abun- 
dance. That solution is Technocracy's 
Technological Social Design. 

Become involved with the Social Solu- 
tion rather than the social confrontation 
movements. Investigate Technocracy 
now before it is too late. 



749 Sturgeon red. 
^i-innipeg, i-ianitoba ii2Y 0K8 
September 20/83 
Ph: (204) 632 6442 

Vtf'alter Fryers 

c/o Technocracy Inc. it.D. 11353 

9203. S - 112th Street 

ii-dmonton ToG 205 

Greetings; 

Thanks for the communication. I ^m returning, signed, the two forms and a 
small cheque to help cover mailing costs, 'k^e are very disturbed to learn 
that you may loose your fine and well established location. The Price System 
seems always to hit below the belt. 

Please provide me with either an alternative address to yourself and the 
iiidmonton Unit or inform me where I can reach you and the members who are 
active in the promotion of Technocracy. I did_mail out copies of the «'»orld 
Synergy Institute report months ago. To date I have not had any acknow- 
ledgement or evaluation, xeed-back and communication between the still few 
active members and advocates seems to me to be more vitalthan ever. 

I am sorry to learn .that you have had health problems in addition to other 
cares and work load, however I think you will not be able ever to sit back 
and become inactive. I Know that I have tryed to divorce myself from my 
activity twice and found that i simply could not remain dormant. 

Bill Olements, the (vi.^nipeg organizer, lost his wife this summer, rie and 
Harry moore who is Treasurer are the only members left here. I have good 
rapport with both. This morning riill Clements delivered 3000 Briefs to my 
door, i-qual numbers of jt26 -29 - 50. I have quite a good stock of briefs 
now as well as gray-backs. However my interest now includes more emphasis 
on the major revelation made known by the .vSI report. This should give a 
new impetus to Technocracy, vvhy does the organization not oick up on this 
mijor development and endorsation of Technocracy? itihat oetter stimulus 
could be found? 



Best regards from here. Jr'lease keep in touch into the future. Extend my 
regards to the others who are active in Edmonton. /I ^ ^ 

Yours for social engineorinn- '^.^^-^i^t j^^x^-^/^t^^--^^^'^ 



■v^ 



fc»27tL'T'C".''V'^A'<' 'TT^^jrt.gi'gfffgt'^rrc' 



9 




I I 353-A 
TECHNOCRACY 

INC. 

12 Sep 83 

Mr. JiE Dtvidson, 7ii9 Sturgeon Rd., Wii ipeg, Man. R-:r 0K8 

Greetings Jizit 

You must excuse ir.e for not keeping up a correspondence properly, 
I si.nply cant cope. Bonnie phoned me the other dey and suggested I put 
you in the picture in respect to our latest problem - we are being evicted 
from our long-time (6r^ years) office in The HUB Hall here at the U of Alta. 
Of course ve are fighti.ig it, as you will see from the attachment, hit we 
Jiave little hope of success. Landlords have absolute legal daninance here. 

Our case Is resting on our special appe&l be the President of the U. 
We have some faculty support. The Students' Union and the Gateway paper 
may look at our case. Ve ore looking to other media too. We can hardly 
see our selves wiped out without a whimper, I estimate the accumulated 
value of our six years of effort (volunteer manhours included) at at least 
$100,000, And our significance, beyond *price', 

Walt Fryers, Treas, 

Address: 11353 A, Technocracy Inc., 9203. S 112th St., Edmonton, Alta. T6G 205 

Nc stalcrunt of policy shall be binding upon the organization unless iMucd from Conllnental Headquarters of Technocracy Inc 






z-:4 



Boca Raton News, Boca Raton, Florida -- December 1* 



1960 



Discard U, 



To the Editor: 

,' The unflattering opinions ccnerning America 
iexpressed by Moslem students at Florida Atlantic 
University, as reported origmally in the Boca Raton 
News, were recently printed in the Sail Francisco 
Chronicle and Examiner. Tiiis letter wiH ignore the 
remariss relevant to Islaaa and the Islamic countiies; 
tiiey have their problems and however they address 
them, it remains their concern. 

Although some of the remarks of the Moslem students 
about the deteriorating conditions existing here on this 
continent were basically correct, they vvere obviously 
exaggerated for dramatic eftect, ■ However, 
Technocracy, Inc., an educational research 
organization, constantly calls to tba sttsrition of our 
fellow Americans- th.at riie potentials of this continent 
cannot be equaled anyvi-here. Any time we so desire, we 
can absolutdy and totaJ.h- reverse the current direction 
of our d8terioratin.g social conditions. 

Briefly, Technocracy Inc. proposes that we discard 
our present social structiire land ijistaii in its place the 
Technological Sociai Design. This is basically an 
orchestralicn of this continent's entire resources and 
Dcrsonnei hiio 3 one-;init -function, and iiUrodtJces the 



structure 



Dubiic forum 



■i?***'^'.'. 



Rnprc 



i.nerg>^ Certificate t6 replace money as the sochif 
determinant. : 

It ends the use of all debt tokens — money, personal' 
checks, etc. ; also banking, insurance and taxes cease ts . 
esist. It banishes unemployment, poverty and sIuhh. 
Students having to work to attend school become arcL:.; 
of yesterday. (Students don't need this burdfn 'ifi 
addition to their studies ! ) 

Though the design h3.s rso basis in nitere -"b?otfesriy 
love." or any philosophical abstraction, its physkial 
features insures people beir^ considerate of eacti i5li.?r 
in a truly free and functional society. ••-'■'' 

It brings to mind a thought hi Jacob Brono^^^'s 
Ascent o£ Man: a good moral life is not based cri 
material things, but without material things, it is tofelh 
impossible! From the Donner Party to today's ghs-' 
deprivation is a prime cause of unsocial behavior! 

John Tr 
RohnertPark.CiiJu. 




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Mr. R.E. Cremer, President 
Montgomery Ward Enterprises, Inc. 
1^00 West Greenleaf 
Chicago, Illinois 60^626 

Dear Mr, Cremer: 



John Taube (707) 795-84^2 
1^00 East Cotati Avenue //4 
f-(ohnert Park, California 9^928 
January 2, 1981 



The other day I received a package of mail from your company. It contained 66^8 
square centimeters of paper, most printed on both sides. Unquestionably, your 
company is of a high caliber and astute in merchandising and your letter is not 
unusal, it is typical! However, letters of this nature are worthy of consideration 
from another and important aspect. 

Members of Technocracy Inc., an educational research organization, question if our 
wonderful nation can tolerate the tons of resources that are wasted in the insatiate 
drive for profits? Yes, literally, can this wa-jte continue or do we reach a point 
that our affluent society ceases? It is not a question of — is our corporate struc- 
ture, by its very nature evil and manned by harmful executives? It is merely a 
question of depletion of resources and national welfare. 

Consider the amount of resources in your latest advertisement, consider the amount 
of energy required to produce them, consider also the amount of man-hours involved 
in their manufacture — could this Continent render a high quality of life to its 
citizens in another type of social structure that would conserve our precious re- 
sources instead of depleting them as we do today? Technocracy finds that it can and 
must if our technological age is to survive. 

Put another way — If America does not produce a group of people sufficiently able 
to understand that our current procedures are perilous, and today's paths are in- 
fecting and retarding our common existence, tomorrow will find America just? another 
relic, companion in dust with other scarcity civilizations. Its evanescent glories 
will adorn the impotent pages of world history replete with the pathos of human 
failures. 

Technocracy literature is available upon request to Continental Headquarters, Tech- 
nocracy Inc., Savannah, Ohio 4^87^, or to Technocracy Inc., 32^3 Balboa Street, 
San Francisco, California 94121 or to the above. 

I shall be indebted to you for a reply to this letter commenting on its concepts. 

Respectfully, 



John Taube 









^ 






Robert and Donna White 
P.O. Box 1928 
Coca, Florida 32922 

Dear Mr, and Mrs. White: 



John Taube (707) 795-8^^2 
HOO East Cotati Avenue //^ 
Rohnert Park, California 94928 
January 2, 1981 



I enjoyed your publication THE DUCK BOOK that you so kindly sent me at your own expense. 
I found it extremely informative and it prompts the writing of this letter. 

There are literally hundreds of individuals and groups caught-up in the everlasting mis- 
fortunate of attacking symptoms, not the causes of our national problems. Most are sin- 
cere, some are not. Included in these is the Progressive magazine and Barry Commoner and 
other environmentalists cannot be slighted as they also are co-companions. 

Those who attack the Trilateral and its parent organization, The Council of Foreign Af- 
fairs have not attacked root-causes. These multinational associations are astute op- 
portunitists, but their elimination would still leave intact the fundamental causes of our 
wonderful nation's problems. 

Perhaps standing alone is Technocracy Inc., an educational research organization, who 

has investigated causes and has devised a solution compatible with the day and age in 

ed 
which we live. When causes are research, one realizes that our social structure is archaic 

and dangerous. Technology has invalidated any type of merchandising, any type of a 

"Price System" on the North American Continent. Briefly Technocracy's proposed design of 

social operation is an orchestration of this Continent's entire resources and personnel 

into a one-unit-function, establishing the Energy Certificate as the social determinant. 

In this design, merchandising gives way to the efficiency of a technological method of 

production and distribution. This results in conservation of Ameria's precious resources, 

and since pollution is arrested, it increases the guality of life of every individual. 

If America does not produce a group of people sufficiently able to understand that our 
current procedures are perilous and today's paths are infecting and retarding our common 
existence, tommorow will find America just another relic, companion in dust with 
other scarcity civilizacions. Its evanescent glories will adorn the impotent pages of 
world history replete with the pathos of human failures. 

Technocracy literature is available upon request to Continental Headquarters, Technocracy 
Inc., Savannah, Ohio 44874, or to Technocracy Inc., 3243 Balboa St., San Francisco, CA 
94121, or to the above, 

A copy of this letter is going to the contributors of THE DUCK BOOK and I shall be in- 
debted to you aud all others if each will drop me a note with comments on the contents of 
this letter. 



Respectfully, 



3ohn Taube 






-A'^ 



f»»*.f5;l:-c^';^H. , '.•> i'',?*f.)J3:.'» .Iri*, 




"— — - — — — ^ — -^-a^^--- ■"■• I »-■,-■ - • , • , * 



clo^e to a D8W class of poor — 
t' '"-aged vorkers who 

f' from -their Job? by, 

abrupt piaut closiires ami cannot t: 
find ne-iv ',/ork, £ state Senate \] 
CommiUea hearmgin Saa Fraacis- 
<po was toid yestei'day. ' A 

^< •■ ■ ' ■ , •■ ■' i'- 

•^ "They are notiour disadvan-l- 
iagsd or the hard-core ynemployed. - r 
tThoy bave been a pait of the work I, 
force ail of their lives, and yet they, J"; 
firn in djra n«ed of help," saidv 
§eii5tor Bill Greeae, P-Los Angeles. '; 

i l-Iei5Cbairmajio.f theinvestiga-^ 
tioa iuto ways the stats cay aidf 
KKUyidua!?, commiuiities and busi-i. icent benefits. 



■^W^ 



m'i Department, concurred v/ith 



pesiGS that are aifected by the j 
Ivorrhcme cJosings of auto and j • 
olher mstAufitCturing plsinis. " -.' 

•A. '.v 

Douglas X..Patmo, director of i> 
t.^ state Employ aient Develop- il 

^■: 

.t in some ways, these "new I" 
-or" have worse problems than ) J. 
Mse generally perc^iv^ as poor, }■ 

' ecoiioiiijc vief iiiis, '■ 
, ^ipated fully iij the f 
^,..G:er iociotj", now have. b;f ' ; 
Ttfiagcs and other bills to pav ' 
Jhe same time that they are cut c 
if rem accustomed 'income, modi-' 
insurance and pension prospects, j 

Patino said studies show these 
people suffer incredibly high inci- 
dence of ulcGrii, hea):t attacks, 
strokes, diabetes, psychological 
breakdowns, marital problems, sui- 
cide and alcoholism. Cooimunlties 
iwhere mass layoifs occur suffer 
^reased crirr;e, child abuse aad 
:£r violence, he added. , ;; "' 

an Eissell, deputy director of 
Paijao's department, said a recent 
Calif oi-aia study indicates that high- 
paid worhers with specialized 
lis and considerable seniority 
ve the greatest difficulty in 
■ler fniding naw jobs or finding 
j3 at wages equivalent to those 



said '^ employee? ■ *?iroifi1 

^.sma^Jimis do marke.djy better m\\ 

getting new jobs atT comparable. j 
^ pay. ' ■; ■;'■ """ ^ " ■ ■•-"«-' • . i^' 

'. Patino also said there are large? 
.disparities between governriient as-'i 
sjstance available to workers'affect-i ; 
ed by shiitdowns. Those '^'Tvhosei' 
layoffs are attributed diro^y tot 
competition from foreign irfiports|j 
may — for a time, anyway — | 
quaJify for retraining programs i 
and pay approaching 95 percent of f 
their ofd wage. Others iiiay geti, 
nothing more than bas,5c unecnploy-j 

Patino a;ad other officials in,| 
the Brown administration who 7 
were at yesterday's hearing put- 1 
lined solutions that iiiclude better J, 
coordination of existing aid pro- 1« 
grains, devdopment of an "eany i 
warning" system for closings -v so | 
attempts caa be made to assist the > 
ailing firm or accelerate recycling 
of its plant for other industry 'H- j, 
and development of more effective 
retraining programs. 



M 



Oohn Taube (707) 795-84^2 

1^00 East Cotati Avenue //^ 

Rohnert Park, California 9^928 

Not muGrh to add to this article. This 
group represents a considerable por- 
tion of the labor force; the age of 
the group averages 35-^5 years. To 
retrain them is fine but their age 
will work against them when seeking 
employment. For them to maintain their 
standard of living is very bleak. An 
after thouaht — the education o^ the 
children of this group will be in 
jeopardy. 

It is perhaps rjatural to have a feeling 
of sorry and sympathy for this group. 
However, viewing society in total, how 
appropiate is the words of the late 
director-in-chief of Technocracy Inc., 
Howard Scott "Never in history has a 
country been so unprepared for what it 
has to face." 



iLe layoffs — V .Itobej 

'heavier industti^ . ; ciUCcr, | 

• aad tire aianaiacturin | 

■i 'nirb?!r — Zi'f.rit ma'. :i [: ; 



aticularlyi 

,„..... ^ . . .^,.^\ (.. ,.^ ,, ^:;.i, appear to ' 
^bave mor6 dilfieulty in getting new 
/jobs at con?' • ' ' ■ - • 



i'-'- ;^. 






--v:.^-i( 



S.F. Sunday Examiner & Chronicle Nov. 23, 1980 

Demoralizing miseducation 

HE CONFESSES himself demoralized. In his mid^Os, he's 
worried about his 16-year-old daughter. On paper it has 
worked out well. He holds two college degrees, has his own 
business and is raising a family in Marin County. He moved 
his family over there because of a dream — of outdoor living 
balanced with suburban civility. 

The little Marin County tovm where his daughter goes to 
school is lined with eucalyptus trees and graced with quaint 
architecture. Ten years ago, there was a popular song in 
which school kids from the town sang about their home 
They sang about a happy, smiley place. Those kids are her 
age now, 16, and perhaps they are going through the same 
ordeal. 

Not that she, at 16, sees it as an ordeal; but he, her father, 
certainly does. The whole situation seems to mock his 
aspirations toward upward mobility, his desire to clear out a 
higher plateau for himself, higher than the place he started 
from, and from that higher plateau to see his children move 
beyond bis boyhood hopes. 

But it isn't happening, not there, not at the high school 
adjacent to the big parking lot, where she is being misled 
and miseducated by her peer group, by her culture, and (so 
he fears most of all) by herself. The high school, the father 
believes, is a terrible place. 

There is, I repeat, a big parking lot out behind the school 
because in Marin County many high school kids have their 
ovra cars. The school has an open campus system, which 
means that the students are free to come and go as they 
please, depending upon their class schedtiles. just as one 
would in college. 

It sounds good on paper, he says, but actually there is a lot 
of dope and a significant amount of sex that goes on in the 
parking lot Kids from rural areas bring home-grown pot to 
school to seU, and cocaine is not unknown. A few of the more 
avant garde specialize in a type of hallucinogenic mushroom, 
which is very Marin County, being organia Bacardi nun is 
big, during the schoolday as well as in the evening and on 
weekends. 

THERE SEEMS TO BE what he considers an ovoxlevel- 
oped intensity of sexuality (much of it occurring in the 
parking lot during the schooklay) even if one grants the fact 
that suburt>an teen-agers are more active in this area than 
they were in his time. He's especially disturbed by the 
reports of the older dropouts. 19- and 20-year-olds, preying on 
the younger girls, and even more frightening reports of girls 
exchanging favors for cocaine. 

There's open warfare, moreover, between some white 
kids and some black kids from a nearby project His 
daughter has been the victim of an extortion attempt and 
thefts of anything not nailed down are common. Coats, 
books, sweaters, lunches — you name it — aU disappearing 
in an orgy of theft that expresses underlying social 
resentments. 

He's worried, moreover, that the street culture is 
infecting her, the cherished datightar of the aspiring middle 
class. Her language, he says, is abominable, every other word 
being m— f— and m— f— that And vvlien he confronts her 
about this or that infraction, or possible malfeasance, he 
notices that she also is beginning to get that cokl hard stare 
in her eyes — that look of boredom, hostility and cynicism — 
that characterizes so many of her classmates. 

Those stares haunt him when he wakes up at night, 
worrying about his daughter. They are not the looks he 
expects in the eyes of the sons and daughters of affluence. 
They're hard looks, tough looks, knowing looks — and there 
seems no touch of softness, or fancy, or innocence in the 
kids' eyes he remembers seeing in the wee hours of the 
night No remorse, he tells me, no tenderness as they stare 
down adults, to include their parents and their teachers. 

Frightened, outraged, certain concerned parents con- 
front those teachers and are met so he tells me, with a 
certain laid-back detachment that masks, on the teacher's 
part, a defense against what they consider the futiUty of 
interference. We can't be in loco parentis, teachers and 
counselors tell him and other parents wh^n they come 



TECHNOCRACY 

INC. 

Do we have bad teachers, bad schools, bad children? 
Or is it that our social structure is archaic, devastating 
and dangerous, completely inadequate in our day and age? 
Can we continue with our stupidity in relying on "band-aid" 
approaches to social problems? 

Man has never devised a culture that is permanent. We 
must recognize that basic physical changes have occurred, 
and that it is necessary to adopt a social environment 
appropriate to them. The children in the attached article 
are not under-privileged. There is abundant evidence that 
today's society lacks the basis for providing direction for 
the youth of even the affluent class. 

Technocracy Inc., educational research organization, 
proposes the Technological Social Design. One top priority 
in Technocracy's design is the harmonic relationship of 
youth as well as adults to our physical environment. The 
concepts of Technocracy can be the vehicle that reverses 
the deadly direction in which we are headed. 

Technocracy literature available upon request to 3243 
Balboa St., S.F. CA 94121. Contact the same address for 
information on speaking engagements, 

asking why their laos are noi aomg weu, uui u^ua,ut^, 
showing no signs of connecting with the best possibilities of 
themselves and the world around them 

THE TEACHERS ARE good in a technical sense, he tells 
me; but they lack authority. They lack control over the 
kids, the sort of control he remembers his own teachers 
having 30 years ago. The open campus system is based on the 
premise of granting the individual student as much 
autonomy as possible, in the belief that such autonomy is an 
absolute necessity with today's sophisticated hi gh school 
kids. His daughter and her friends, however, seem to use the 
freedom to cut classes (a fact which is not reported until the 
end of the semester, if at all) or to goof off back at the 
parking lot. She's getting C's and D's. he tells me, wtdch isnt 
college-level work; and it hurts him because she was such a 
good student in grammar school. His son, by contrast, goes to 
a private high school where there are small daases, no free 
periods, total accountability of students to teschers, two to 
three hours of homework every night, and where the poUcy 
is to call parents at home or at work the minute their diild 
does not show up at class or misses a hcnnewOTk aasignmeDt 
His son's school demands that its students make a promise of 
no dope, no booze, no sexual behavior on campus. His sm is 
getting straight A's in solid subjects. 

His daughter refuses to leave her high school She's got 
friends there whom she's been with since kindergarten. 
They've all grown up in Marin County together. He's begged 
her to attend the school her brother attends; but she wont 
have it He's talking of forcing her into a boarding school, at 
great financial sacrifice to himself. Other parents, he teOs 
me, are seriously talking about fmning a Vigilance 
Committee to patrol the parking lot before, during and after 
school hours. 

'I fed defeated," he says. 'It's not working out" 



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Also printed in the 
Henderson Home News, 
Boulder City fJevvs, 
Chico Hews and Review 



^December 3. 1980 
ROHNERT PARK-COTATI CLAR ION 

MGM FIRE LESSON 

Dear Editor: 

What can we say in reference to 
the MGM Grand Hotel fire? Cer- 
tainly, accolades are in order to the 
heroic firemen, the services who 
supplied helicopters, the 
magnificent response of various 
individuals and groups who gave 
assistance to those injured in this 
tragic event. 

Of course, now will come the 
investigations. Responsibility for 
the tragedy will probably be kicked 
around like a football. Certainly 
changes and improvements will 
ensue. 

But why should California have 
the best fire code? Why should not 
all states have the best fire code? 
Are not artifical state boundaries 
obsolete? Do the physical con- 
ditions of 200 years ago still exist 
today? Since we certainly can 
agree they don't, can we not agree 
that political boundaries have long 
been obsolete? Would those un- 
fortunate people who died in the 
tragedy be alive today if our in- 
stitutions were modern and 
compatible with the day and age in 
which we live? 

Technocracy Inc., an educational 
research organization, proposes 
the Technological Social Design 
which does just that-synchronize 
our social structure with our 
technology so that we live in a 
society compatible with the in- 
tegrated lifestyle of our day and 
age. Divided as we are today into 50 
states is as obsolete as the horse 
and buggy and high-button shoes, 
and merely provides a good living 
for sv^'arms of useless politicians! 

If we are to take full advantage of 
our day and age, if we are to insure 
our well-being and safet)', we have 
to make certain basic changes such 
as the unifying of our continent. 
The concepts of Technocracy can 
be the vehicle for those necessary 
changes. Technocracy urges your 
investigation of its concepts. 

Sincerely, 

JohnTaube 

RohnertPark 



• '-^ ♦'v 



\ 



, « 



ll'ill 

Mill 



f! 




'^i^^. 



;^,- 



DMNE«TPABKcoT/.T,- Thurscjay, December 18, 1980 

TIMES 



LETTERS 



to the 
TIMES 



Endangered farms 

As a member of Technocracy, I 
found your Nov. 20 article "Farm- 
land on endangered list" extremely 
timely. The People For Open Space 
quotes a Soil Conservation Service 
official as saying "Ten years from 
now, Americans could be as con- 
cerned over the loss of the nation's 
prime and important farmlands as 
they are today over the shortages of 
oil and gasoline." Indeed, the loss of 
one o| our most precious resources, 
farmland, is criminal. 

What we have already lost is 
tragic; but according to the article, 
in the next 15 years we most proba- 
bly will lose in the Bay Area alone 
an additional 375,000 acres. Think of 
it — a loss of 20 percent of present 
farmland in addition to the tremen- 
dous amount already gone. The 
farmland to feed our unborn chil- 
dren decreases daily. We are urban- 
izing and asphalting the most pro- 
ductive land on this planet! 

Do you remember a short while 
back the city manager of Rohnert 
Park stating that approximately 30 
percent of our urbanites commute to 
the Marin County daily? While com- 
muters do not raise the quality of 
their life with exasperating travel- 
ing, they most assuredly are adding 
greatly to pollution with their urban 
sprawl. 

In the Technological Social Design 
of Technocracy Inc., an educational 
research organization, these anti- 
social activities cease. The integra- 
tion of the North American continent 
as a one-unit-function takes into 
account people's desire to vacate the 
deteriorating metropolitian areas, 
and provides an engineering solution 
which minimizes the loss of farm- 
land. 

Up-in-the-air housing is the solu- 
tion! Before you jump to a conclu- 
sion, stop and consider the alterna- 
tives and you will find none! Proper 
housing with each unit over looking 



some aesthetic vista also proviaes 
the proper conditions for a truly 
workable mass transit system. 

John Taube 
Rohnert Park 






'■ ':t*. 



, :•:*'. ■ 



-">^'- 



o 



SECTION 1 R.D.12237 



TECHNOCRACY 



INC. 



RUSHING INTO OBLIVION!!— 

Once embarked on the course of urban expansion, Rome was 
in a losing race. The larger the city became, the more energy 
inputs were required. The more energy flowing into the city, 
the greater the resulting disorder. The greater the disorder, the 
larger became the institutional infrastructure to deal with the 
various types of chaos. The process simply could not be sus- 
tained indefinitely. The energy supply lines maintained by the 
army became stretched so thin that the military absorbed more 
energy than it returned to the city. The agricultural system 
began to experience diminishing returns because of the intensive 
abuse of the soil. Slaves became too expensive to feed and house. 
The city's bureaucracy grew so big and costly that it could not 
be supported. Eventually, the overbloated city collapsed from 
within and without, returning after its military conquest to eco- 
logical equilibrium with its energy environment. After its fall, 
Rome claimed just 30,000 inhabitants.* 

THE SEEDS EOR THE DESTRUCTIOrJ OF F^OME WERE AN INHERENT PART OF BOTH ITS 
FOUNDATION AND ITS WAY OF LIFE. THE INHABITANTS OF ROME NUMBERED 1,000,000; 
BUT DEATHS, MANY TIMES VIOLENT, REDUCED THAT NUMBER TO 30,000. 

ONE OF OUR CITIES OF 1,000,000 (SIMIEAR TO ROME IN POI^ULATION) REQUIRES 
DAILY ^,000,000 POUNDS OF FOOD, 9,300 TOtJS OF FUEL, 623,000 TONS OF POT- 
ABLE WATER AND REQUIRES THE REMOVAL OF ^,000 TONS OF GARBAGE DAILY. 

THE SEEDS OF OUR DESTRUCTION COULD QUITE CONCEIVABLY BE AN INTEGRAL I^ART OF 
OUR ECOtJOMY AND OUR WAY OF LIFE. 

UNLESS OUR "PRICE SYSTEM" GIVES WAY TO TECHNOCRACY'S TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL 
DESIGN, OUR FUTURE LOOKS VERY BLEAK! INFORMATION ON TECHNOCRACY AVAILABLE 
BY WRITING TO TECHNOCRACY INC., 3?43 BALBOA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 9^121. 
^Copied from "Entropy, Entropy, Entropy" by Geremy Rifkin, 



over 






i» -:»■?•{ 



12^ 



Energy for Survival- by Wilson Clark, page 

The population problem ^yJSpierica lies at the heart of the energy 
crisis. With dwindling suppoBs of fossil fuel energy and an increasing 
population accustomed to the luxuries of that energy supply, the 
civilization confronts its oldeSt and most persistent problem: carrying 
capacity. Consider, for example, the lesson of the American economic 
depression of the 1930s: The toppling economy forced the return of 
many people to ±e farms from which they had emigrated. In 1930, 
more than half the American people lived in rural areas. Today, 
less than 20 percent live in rural areas, and fewer than 5 percent on 
farms. ^*- If an economic depression were to occur now, there would 
be no natural agricultural system "buflfcr" to fall back on, and food 
sources would dry up.f An abrupt change in the economic structure — 
perhaps brought on by energy shortages — would reduce the agricultural 
system in America to a shambles and would create widespread misery 
and possibly star/ation. 

The environmental crisis is nothing more than a mirror in which the 
accelerated use of energy is reflected by accelerated entropy. The 
continuing injection of increasing amounts of energy to support the 
American lifestyle will inexorably exact the price demanded by the 
Entropy Law: increased pollution, waste heat, solid wastes, and social 
instability. As the society exerts more artificial "control" over nature 
in the name of convenience and prosperity, the society suffers the 
risk of greater disorder. 

Looking Ahead 

There are two possible courses for the development of energy policy 
in the United States: Either (1) the continuation of the present high- 
energy economy, with its inherent waste; or (2) the substitution of 
other lifestyles and methods of getting and using energy. A look into 
the future wall indicate the folly of continuing the full development of 
the cancer without treatment and changing life patterns required to 
restore health and direction to our societal organism. 

Yes, indeed, ^ub^titatyinQ cinothQA li{\(l^tiiie as the author 
suggests! That's what Technocracy is all about. Let's disre- 
gard those who are opting for doomday. Let's disregard all those 
who propose "patching up" our present archaic, dangerous life- 
style; they offer nothing but "band-aids" for a mortal wound! 

Technocracy's Technological Social Design places man and 
his technology in harmonic balance with nature, integrating this 
Continent's entire resources and personnel into a one-unit-func- 
tion. Opting for efficiency, it results in the conservation of 
resources and the arresting of pollution. It also ends the use 
of debt tokens -- money and personal checks; banking, insurance 
and taxes also cease to exist. It banishes poverty, unemploy- 
ment and slums. It replaces money with the Energy Certificate 
as the social determinant, an energy-cost-accounting-system. 

Yes, indeed. Technocracy is a radically different lifestyle 
offering survival. Who object^ to survival? Technocracy litera- 
ture available on request to 32^3 Balboa St., S.F. CA 9^928. 



over 



Mr. Richard Oliver, Vice President 
National Home Life Insurance Company 
Valley ^orqe, Pennsylvania 19^9^ 

Dear Mr. Oliver: 



3ohn Taube (707) 795-8^^2 
1^00 fast Cotati Avenue H 
Rohnert Park, California 9^928 
December 12, 1980 



The other day I received a package of mail from your company. It contained 3865 
square centimeters of paper, most printed on both sides. Also enclosed was a plas- 
tic card of ^6 square centimeters. Unquestionably, your company is of a high cali- 
ber and astute in merchandising and your letter is not unusal, it is typical! How- 
ever, letters of this nature are worthy of consideration from another and important 
aspect. 

Members of Technocracy Inc., an educational research organization, question if our 
wonderful nation can tolerate the tons of resources that are wasted in the insatiate 
drive for profits? Yes, literally, can this waste continue or do we reach a point 
that our affluent society ceases? It is not a question of — is our corporate struc- 
ture, by its very nature evil and manned by harmful executives? It is merely a 
question of depletion of resources and national welfare. 

Consider the amount of resources in your latest advertisement, cdnsider the amount 
of energy required to produce them, consider also the amount of man-hours involved 
in their manufacture — could this Continent render a high quality of life to its 
citizens in another type of social structure that would conserve our precious re- 
sources instead of depleting them as we do today? Technocracy finds that it can and 
must if our technological age is to survive. 

Put another way — If America does not produce a group of people sufficier/tly able 
to understand that our current procedures are perilous, and. the paths today are in- 
fecting and retarding our common existence, tomorrow will find America just another 
relic, companion in dust with other scarcity civilizations. Its evanescent glories 
will adorn the impotent pages of world history replete with the pathos of human 
failures. 

Technocracy literature is available upon request to Continental Headquarters, Tech- 
nocracy Inc., Savannah, Ohio ^A-87^, or to Technocracy Inc., 3243 Balboa Street, 
San Francisco, California 94928 or to the above. 

A copy of this is going to Mr. Glenn R. Carlson, Manager, Bankcard Sales and Market- 
ing, Crocker National Bank os he had an enclosure in your package. I shall be in- 
debted to both of you for a reply to this letter commenting on its concepts. 



Respectfully, 



John Tdube 



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NEW SOLIDARITY April 6, 1981 



To the Editor: 

Your editorial, Feb. 25 made the 
following statement, "Riots are 
not a sociological phenomenon," 
but organized by the same forces 
that coordinate international ter- 
rorism." 

Be so kind as to explain the 
group or groups responsible for the 
'60s riots and what was their 
purpose? 

John A. Taube 
Rohnert Park, Calif. 

The 1960s riots were the culmi- 
nation of a British intelligence 
project that dates back to Lord 
Bertrand Russell's 1920s proposals 
for achieving mass social control 
through use of drugs and a cultist 
youth culture (see the book New 
Dark Ages Conspiracy, by Carol 
White published by New Benjamin 
Frankhn House, 1980). The early 
1950s initiated MK-Ultra project 
involving RusseU disciples Aldoas 
Huxley and Aleister Crowley, 
among others, prepared the way 



for introduction of marijuana, LSD 
and other mind-altering drugs onto 
those campuses which became the 
spawning ground for the student 
riots. 

The ghetto rioting of the 1960s 
was also a planned and organized 
phenomenon. The case of Newark 
riot organizer Imamu Baraka is 
exemplary. From the time of his 
conversion from beat poet LeRoi 
Jones to black nationalist, Baraka 
was a bought-and-paid-for asset of 
the Prudential Insurance Co., a 
part of the ghetto counterins'ur- 
gency apparatus that includes the 
Rand Corp. and the Ramsey Clark- 
hnked Community Relations Ser- 
vice of the Justice Department 
These are the same agencies tied 
into current efforts to foment ra- 
cial confrontation over the Atlanta 
killings. 

At the top, the ghetto riots and 
student riots were coordinated by 
the same British intelligence con- 
trollers or their U.S. associates 



who are themselves merely assets 
of the European nobilitv's family 
funds. 

Ban the Bomb Movement 

The 1960s drug seeding of cam- 
puses intermeshed with another 
Bertrand Russell project, the 1956 
founding of the Ban tne Bomb 
movement. Russell operatives 
were among the first active in the 
early anti-Vietnam war movement 
The intermeshing of Russell-de- 
ployed forces with the Socialist 
International youth group Student 
League for Industrial Democracy 
led to the 1963 founding of Stu- 
dents for a Democratic Society. 

Though largely composed of 
well-meaning students and youth 
the purpose of the dr'ug-and-rock- 
culture-infested antiw?r move- 
ment, from the standpoint of its 
controllers, was to nurture the 
hard-core terrorist capability that 
has since evolved into today's en- 
vironmentalist-terrorists. 
Not only was the terrorist capa- 



bility itself created from the out- 
side, but, as with most such oper- 
ations, the environment itself was 
a fostered one. The U.S. involve- 
ment in Vietnam came about as a 
result of anglophile agents within 
the State Department and other 
relevant agencies manipulating an 
at-first unwilling John Kennedy 
and then the Johnson administra- 
tion. 

This war, which in no way 
served U.S. interests in Southeast 
Asia or elsewhere, created the 
climate in the United States and 
Western Europe for launching an 
enraged" youth movement. From 
that movement, the more unstable 
and manipulable members were 
then channeled into the hard core 
terrorism of the 1970s. 

Today these same elements- 
Bertrand Russell Tribunal, Social- 
ist International, Yippies, and the 
tainted elements of the Reagan 
administration, exemplified by 
Alexander Haig-are at work cre- 
ating a new "climate of violence " 



4^ •.■ *'»''i? 






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The Strategic Raw Materials Shortage Is a Hoa 



)^ 



by Richard Freeman 

The noise coming from Secetary of 
State Alexander Haig, Central Intelli- 
gence director William Casey, and their 
friends in the British Commonwealth oil 
and raw materials corporations about the 
"military economic importance" of stra- 
tegic raw materials in the southern zone 
of Africa is an elaborate hoax. 

For the last two months, these agen- 
cies have been spewing forth a strategy 
that dates back to Rome's losing imperial 
policy: that to be militarily strong, and 
economically sound, the United States 
must pursue an "international resources 
strategy." This means, the argument 
goes, confrontation with the Soviet Union 
in southern Africa over "raw material 
access routes." 

Now, a list of 18 critical raw materials 
upon which the United States is import- 
dependent is circulating in the Defense 
and State Departments, the CIA, the U.S. 
corporate elite, and the press. 

But there is no objective reason for 
the United States— or the Soviet Union— 
or any of their client states or allies to 
prepare for a showdown over raw mate- 
rials. The United States and the Soviet 
Union are the two most mineral-rich 
nations in the world— with the exception 
of South Africa— with years of reserves 
still stored under the ground, untapped. 

The Soviets possess gigantic reserves 
in the Urals and Siberia, to name but 
two regions. The United States has 
stupendous reserves in the far west and 
Alaska. 

The Hoaxsters 

The argument for a raw materials 
resource war can be traced back to the 
companies centered in the British Com- 
monwealth—Britain, Canada, Australia, 
and loosely affiliated South Africa— and 
in Belgium, Genoa and Venice. These 
firms have "long memories" going back 
several centuries, when they formed the 
corporate nexus for British and Hapsburg 
imperial resource looting. 

Today, these firms are fairly tightly 
organi2ed into a Minerals Cartel, com- 
prised of Rio Tinto Zinc, the Oppenhei- 
mer, Rothschild, and Bronfman groups, 
and the Seven Sister oil multinationals, 
led by British Petroleum and Royal 
Dutch Shell— the last two being owned 
by the Royal households of the Nether- 
lands and Great Britain. 

Their strategy is threefold: shut down 
U.S. mining; force the United States to 
become dependent upon resources from 
southern Africa, itself under the control 
of the Minerals Cartel; and buy into the 
United States, so that U.S. mining capac- 
ity comes under its cartel control. 

Organizing for this perspective came 
to public view in Pittsburgh last June 
under the strange billing: "The Resource 
War in 3 D— Dependency, Diplomacy, 
Defense." The conference was organi2ed 
by the American Mining Congress, com- 
prised of all U.S. mining firms and 
controlled at the top by the Minerals 
Cartel; the National Information Strategy 
Center; and the Pittsburgh World Affairs 
Council. 

Herbert Meyer, associate editor of 
Fortune magazine, summarized the re- 
sults of the conference. The proceedings 
were printed in a booklet that was mailed 



to every member of Congress and the 
Reagan cabinet. Using terminology lifted 
straight from the Genoese and British 
diplomacy of the 16th or 19th centuries, 
Meyer conjured up a global showdown 
between the United States and the Sovi- 
ets over raw materials. 

The United States is short of key 
strategic minerals— cobalt, chromium 
and platinum, Meyers said, and must get 
them from the southern zone of Africa. 
The presentation was embellished with a 
map showing Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, the 
Republic of South Africa, and Zaire, 
which have large minerals resources, and 
Mozambique, Angola, and Zambia, al- 
leged to be Soviet client States. 

According to Admiral William Mott, of 
the National Information Strategy Cen- 
ter, "Alexander Haig is the leader of this 
policy outlook" in the Reagan adminis- 
tration. As for CIA director William 
Casey, Mott said, "During the presiden- 
tial campaign. Bill helped make the 
resource war an issue. A question on this 
policy was put to all the presidential 
candidates. Only Reagan, vwth Casey's 

aid, answered it correctly. Casey is also 
responsible for setting up a Resource and 
Minerals Task Force in the new admin- 
istration." 

The task force is chaii'ed by Don 
McMichael, president of the Pittsburgh 
World Affairs Council, and includes 
among its staff Robert Keating, a spe- 
cialist in Third World population educa- 
tion. 

Mott also noted, "I am working with 
groups internationally. There is the 
Monde Et Enterprise group in France, 
the AIMS group in England, and the 
Konrad Adenauer Stifftung in Germany 
who are coordinating with me to make 
the resource war strategy work." 
The Hoax 

Even from the standpoint of defense, 
the claims of the Mineral Cartel are a 
hoax. Militarily, while raw materials are 
important, they are a third-rate consid- 
eration. Right now, the United States has 
neither the weapons output, the techno- 
logical commitment, nor the industrial 
base to carry out a war-winning strategy 
against the Soviet Union. 

Second, under depressed global eco- 
nomic conditions, arising from the Fed- 
eral Reserve's credit policy, minerals 
demand has plummeted and will con- 
tinue to fall. , 

Nevertheless, it is claimed that the 
U.S. lacks raw materials and is import- 
dependent to a very high degree on the 
following raw materials: manganese, 98 
percent; cobalt, 97 percent; bauxite, 93 
percent; chromium, 91 percent; colum- 
bium, mica, strontium, 100 percent; and 
so forth. 

But the U.S. has stopped mining and 
refining many of these raw materials- 
thanks to environmentalist restrictions 
and the oil hoax shutoffs of 1973-1975 and 
1979-1980, which this news service has 
documented was run by the same indi- 
viduals that comprise the Seven Sisters 
Oil companies and the Minerals Cartel. 

After the 1973-1975 oil hoax, the envi- 
ronmentalists and their friends in Con- 
gress succeeded in pushing restrictions 
that combined with the inflated price of 
oil to force a shift from using zinc for 
axles to the lighter material aluminum. 



This produced a downturn in the world 
zinc price; U.S. zinc mines and refineries 
were shut down as unprofitable. Since 
lead is mined in tandem with zinc, lead 
mining was likewise condemned to col- 
lapse. Thus, the United States— with the 
largest combined lead and zinc reserves 
in the world— now imports 57 percent of 
its zinc and 13 percent of its lead! 

The story is the same for copper. The 
U.S. has one-fifth of the world's 500,000 
tons of reserves. But in the last five 
years, one-fifth of U.S. copper production 
has been shutdown, and the U.S. is now 
an importer, rather than an exporter, of 
the metal. 

The United States has 12 percent of 
the world's cobalt resources of 6 million 
tons, second only to Zaire. Then why 
hasn't the U.S. produced any cobalt since 
1971? 

According to Dr. Daniel Fine, of the 
MIT Mining and Minerals Research in- 
stitute, who spoke at the "Resource War 
in 3 D" conference, "There is a glut of 
cobalt. This is true with many of the 
strategics like chromium and platinum, 
i Therefore, the price isn't high enough to 
justify mining investment in the U.S." 

Not only does the U.S. have gigantic 

cobalt deposits in Idaho and Minnesota, 

; but it has platinum group metals in 

: Montana and chromium reserves in 

I Alaska and Montana. 

Four Steps to Solve the Problem 
Step 1: New tehnologies are fast 
reducing the demand for some strategic 
mateials. Ceramics can substitute for 
cobalt alloys in airplane turbine discs. 
Ceramics use a lot of the rare earth 
metals, of which the U.S. has more than 
five-eighths of the world's 5 million tons 
of resources. 

And the U.S. Defense Department has ■ 
developed a ."rapid solidification pro- 
cess," which reduces the temperature of ' 
superheated metals very fast. This en- 
hances the mechanical properties of i 
certain metals, while allowing them to ' 
use less strategic metals. 

Step 2: The United States also has an 
international strategy open to it for the 
develpment of strategic metals. Mexico 
and Brazil could alone provide half of , 
the U.S.'s foreign supplies. 

Mexico is the world's largest supplier 
of strontium and has vast reserves of 
- flourine, zinc, selenium, gypsum, barium, 
and titanium. Brazil has the world's 
largest reserves of manganese and is a 
supplier of columbium and tantalum. ' 
What is required is a foreign policy from 
Washington that would deal with these 
countries on a raw-materials-for-technol- 
ogy basis. 

Step 3: It is time to free more than 100 
million acres of Western lands currently 
sequestered by the Department of Land 
Management of the Interior Department 
and lift environmentalist restrictions. 

Step 4: The United States can carry 
out the North American Water Project 
(NAWAPA), which would bring Arctic 
water into the U.S. through Canada. This 
would create enormous hydropower po- 
tential and water supplies for irrigation 
and industrial use— two preconditions for 
efficient mining. The plan represents a 
$.5 trillion internal improvements pack- 
age for the U.S.A. 



> 
•a 



To anyone receiving this article: I would appreciate your comments on it, 



John A. Taube 



:'i, •. ■ -.. 



/64W- ^^y^ 




^ 



Members who require overnight lodging for the Area New Year 
Activity in Everett Washington March 19 and 20, 1977 should 
let us know AT ONCE so we may make proper reservation for 
them. 

We need to know the number in their party and the kind of 
accommodations sequired, ( double, single, twin ) 

It is also necessary to make the reservation by name so the 

to submit the request to the proper desk and the individuals 
may then check in for their reservation. 



Section 1,. R. L. 122^7 
TECHNOCRACY INC. 
1919 Hewitt Ave. 
Everett, WA 98201 




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rtpril 29, 19B3 






/ vvalter Fryers 








/ c/o Technocracy inc. 








' It. D. 11333 








9203 3 - 112th Street 








iiidmonton, Alta. ToG 2J5 









Greetings ; 

Thank yiu for the two receipts and excellent copy of the advertisment of 
the nublic meeting at tiie HUd. If I ever have occasion to advertise in 
this area for a similar need I think that 1 will 'borrow' much of the 
wording and formate all of which I think are high quality. This hawever 
is remote because of my status within the organization. But where there 
is the will there is often the '."way' as well. 

Presently I am xDromoting interest in Technocracy in the members of the 
Unitarian Jhurch vvhich I have been attending with r'if;ularity since last 
October, ihese people are very interested and often active in many elements 
of social concern such as the Cruise i-iissile and Disarmament. Of course 
they enerally follow the conventional method vvhich is 'Protest inarches 
and submission 
where s. 



oi' names and s.milar ineffectual apnroaches in vogue else- 



Recently here in ..innipeg a Union of the Unemployed has been formed. I 
have after raoj e than a week been aole to nail down an appointm.ent with 
one of the founders. This v>;ill be on i-iay 3rd at 2 p,m. This ne.v movement 
has recieved (juite a oit of publicity and if properly nurtured may become 
a force that must be reckonedwith. There are 54,000 known unemployed and 
many of them are union members or were, uthers may join if this movement 
gathers some strength. In any case it is one more group that I shall try 
"■ try to 'piggy back' on since I have no other choice. 



to 



At a recent gathering of the wanitoba Progressive Party of whom my lawyer 
is the presicient, I was able to button hole tne quest speaker •;ho happend^ 
to be the i^ayor of ^»innipeg, 1 have set up a tentative provate meeting 
as soon as I get unmarked copies of the xieport v^ihich I am enclvso'ag to you. 

I have written the world bynergy institute twice requesting several copies 
of this super report. To this date they have not sent me any reply ana I 
have appe-ied to John Taube to try to expidite matters so 'chaz I may have 
unm.arked copies and permission to reprintfe an circulate it in great numbers 
to persons and groups that should be mace awart; 01' this amazing research. 
You may possibly wish to v;rite to this Institute and enquire. One of the 
authors, John nolmdahl, happened to attend a nieeting at w. ich John Taube 
was the speaker. I knovm nothing about tnis institue and can only assume 
that it is what it calims and that they have conducted a fairly compJree 
hensive investigation and research oefore printing this paper which seems 
to endorse Technocracy's position so forcably. I am thinking of trying to 
get some of the oooks that are listed in the referrence. 

I g-nther tnat itoger v'»erner's book on Technocracy may oe out as soon as 
next month. He has been working on this project for more than two years 
and I -xpect that it may De further support lor the promotion of Technoc- 
racy, lioger -^erner has great ability as a writer and the only thing in 
some doubt may be the inclusion of extraneous subject matter. I ami looking 
forward to getting a cooy for myself as soon as it is available. 



Best regards from here. Try to Keep in to 




pieasef. 




A^^-^cc^JUlilyQ^ 



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3^ TzchnocAacif Inc., R.t?. 11 353- A 
920 S. 112th St. 
Edmonton, Atta T6G 0U5 

HziLo tkiAe,, aJUi yon loJUioM TzchnocA£iti> '. 

It uoai> g^2jCLt to Kzc^vt youJi Jomioaij, 19S1 , Hm&tojttoA.. And congnjoutitoi- 
tion^ on ijouA OLcklzvtng UnXX 6tatLi6l It u}cu aZ^o good to koxui that you, 
hi Edmonton, oAZ contimUng to "hang In thoJiz" - and making a {^ew dent6 
heAZ and thoAz. 

EncXoiitd l& my pzn^OYwJi chtqu^ln the, amount o^ $10.00 -- to oZZoia) you 
to buy a f,ew 6tamp6'. ^ 

I am 6tA.tt typcAtZttying thz mateAAJxt ion. the, Te,chnocAacy Digest, and am 
mo6t happy to be dotng a nzce^6an.y function ion. thz on^anlzcution. I took 
ionwand to beJjig able, to do Ao Into thz tndzllnJXz iutixAz. I izeZ veAy 
iontunate, to be i^JonJilng ion. a man who aZtom mz thz pnyivitzgz oi uilng Ivu 
CompuianJXzn. Junlon. to 6zt thl& matzntaZ. I pay km $3S.OO ion. zach Zi>6uz 
that J 6zt, and donatz tliat to Thz Vtgz&t. T aJUo donatz iohat It zo6t{> mz 
to -6 end zach batch oi type^zt matznAjot to Thz Vtgz&t - SpzcMxt VeJUvexy , 
to makz 6un,z it gztA thznz oi iast a& oun. &lgw_pq6tat ^eAvZcz can get It 
to \Jancou\)zn.. I juiit 6znt a batch oH today: poiitcJi chan.gzii $1.74. 
I'm not n.ztatA,ng thu In on.deA to get pn,ali>z -- I think tt l& a loay oi 
apologizing ion. sending you oniy $10.00'.'. But I knon) zvzny tlttZz bit 
heZp4>t 60, a llttZz natheA than nothing. 

A lettzn in.om Ant Thommaizn, oi Vlctonta (T^.P. 1234S-B] Inionms mz that 
thz Unit Intzndi, to havz a booth In thz Junlon. Chambzn. oi Commzn.cz Vaoi 
again thU yzan {6omz ttmz Im ^ay, hz Aay^] , and hz wantb to knoif) li I 
uJouZd be [MlUUng, and abtz, to help man thz booth onz oi thz 6lx dayjb It 
loUZ bz on - aji T. did la6t yzan,. Mt/ an^Mzn: SUHEi 

Comz Labon. Day Axza. ActA.\jltLZi> , In \Jancouvzn., tluji yzan., T took ionwand 
to Azzing -6ome oi you Edmontonlan^ thznz. 

Bz^t i/)l6hzi> - and much TzchnocAotlc 4acce64 - to att oi you, 



O^-^-u, 7/^ >77^oc-cy-<^-^ 



(Qj^uu-hi" Obr'' 






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1400 E. COTATI AVE., #4 

ROHNERT PAim, CA 94928 

(707) 795-8442 



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1400 E. COTATI AVE., #4 

ROHNERT PARK, CA 94928 

gOTX 795-8442 



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ACCESS TO ENERGY 



J;j yOCTOBER 1981 (Vol.9, no.2) 



A Pro-Science, Pro-Technology, Pro-Free Enterprise Monthly Newsletter 

Box 2298, Boulder, Colorado 80306 ® 1981 by Access to Energy 



Slaves to Fashion 



This month's issue mentions two famous biologists, 
Konrad Lorenz and J.B.S. Haldane. Here we would like to 
recall a third internationally renowned biologist, Lancelot 
Hogben, who was elected to the (British) Royal Society in 
1936 at the then stunning age of "only" 41. 

Were it not for Hogben, you might not be reading this 
newsletter; for this writer was first attracted to science and 
^mathematics as a teenager by his book Mathematics for, th e 
Million. It was published in 1937 and translated into most 
European languages other than German: it was verboten in 
Nazi Germany, for it contained little remarks like "If you 
remember that the theory [of spherical trigonometry] was 
worked out by the colored conquerors of Spain when the peo- 
ple of Britain and Germany were barbarians, living in mud 
huts, ruled by ignorant priests and robber barons, it will clear 
your mind of the sort of cant chanted by . . . the pundits of 
German national socialism." 

The company that published Hogben's book was W.W. 
Norton & Co. of New York, and in 1937 it took some social 
courage to stand up to barbarism. 

In 1981 it still takes some courage, but W.W. Norton & 
Co. has not only lost it, it has joined the barbarians. To its list 
of antinuclear books it is about to add The nuclear witnesses 
by some woman who has interviewed the same old tired 
names — the three ex-GE salesmen, Gofman, and the others 
who make a living by smearing nuclear power, down to the 
inevitable Khelen Keldikott; needless to say, strict censorship 
is imposed on the reports of the National Academy of 
Sciences, the A.M. A., and the testimony of the overwhelming 
majority of radiologists and health physicists. 

Had the predecessors of the present crew at W.W. Norton 
been as fashionable in 1937, they would have published books 
on the superiority of the Aryan race and on the FUhrer's quest 
for lasting peace. 



Nor is Norton & Co the only slave to fashion. A few 
months ago, McGraw-Hill ("Serving the Need for Know- 
ledge") published Secret Fallout by Ernest Sternglass. Alice 
Stewart, Arthur Tamplin and other antinukes have recoiled 
from this charlatan, and not even John Gofman, testifying 
under oath, could bring himself to endorse his concoctions. 
But at McGraw-Hill ("Serving the Need for Knowledge") they 
stomached them in serving the need for improved cash flow. 

In bookstores, pro-nuclear books are virtually unob- 
tainable, though they are often well-stocked with antinuclear 
propaganda. This is so with the ACE-paperback edition of 
The Health Hazards of NOT Going Nuclear* and word has 
reached us from Australia that John Grover's Struggle for 
Power [/lr£ Jan 81] ran into an organized campaign to make 
it an "unbook" — the antinuclear media decided not to 
dispute, attack, or even smear it, but just never to mention it. 
Only recently have attempts been made in the South 
Australian Assembly [state legislature] to purge it from 
school libraries. In the US, you can buy do-it-yourself guides 
on theft, arson, bomb making and terrorism, not to mention 
books explaining that what's really wrong with you is insuffi- 
cient practice of homosexual incest; but books on a more 
benign energy source? That's where good taste draws the line. 

Sour grapes? People wouldn't buy it anyway? Then what 
happened to Overload or The Spikel Both were on the na- 
tional bestseller list for months. Try and find it at an airport 
bookstand among the other bestsellers of long ago. 
Overload! Spikel Well, they don't usually order that kind of 
book. It would offend the more refined people. 

The ones who want the broadest possible interpretation of 
the First Amendment. 



• The editor (James Baen) who initiated its publication is no longer 
with ACE, which has apparently ceased to promote it. Original edition 
available for $5.95 from Golem Press, Box 1342, Boulder, CO 80306. 



ECOLOGY 






Ecology, before its name was stolen to denote a state of mind, 
was a respectable science, and one which was made accessible to 
laymen by some of the world's greatest scientists. This writer, as 
a young man, used to enjoy the writings of the Austrian 
zoologist Konrad Lorenz (b. 1903, awarded a Nobel prize in 
1973) and British biologist J.B.S. Haldane (1892-1964), who dif- 
fered from today's "ecology" operators and "Ecoscience" priests 
in academia not only by being a great scientist, but by his in- 
tellectual honesty in refusing to let science serve an ideology — in 
the early 1950's, he let himself be expelled from the Central 
Committee of the British Communist Party rather than accept 
the pseudo-genetics of Stalin's chief charlatan Lysenko. 

But as shown by progress, liberty, free market and aspirin, 
you can't put anything out of business just by stealing its name; 
and ecology, its name smeared or not, remains a respectable and 
exciting science. It deals with the interrelation of living things 
and their environment, and like all other sciences, it is bent on 
seeking truths in order to generalize them. 



It is also a science in which energy plays a significant, 
though by no means a simple role; works like Morowitz's 
Energy Flow in Biology^ need a hard and thorough 
knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and thermodynamics, 
and are in no way comparable to Mickey-Mouse texts called 
"Ecoscience." However, there are also popular books by 
genuine ecologists, such as Why Big Fierce Animals Are Rare 
by P. Colinvaux ^ professor of zoology at Ohio State Univer- 
sity. It starts out as it should: "Ecology is not the science of 
pollution, nor is it environmental science. Still less is it a 
science of doom. . ." 

The reason for the rareness of big fierce animals, inciden- 
tally, is thermodynamic. A pound of biomass, whether plant 
tissue or animal flesh, is caloric fuel to the next animal up the 
food chain that eats it. The Second Law, as explained last 
month, would not allow all of the energy in the food to be ab- 
sorbed; so even if nature were efficient (which it is not), and 
even if animals needed energy for no more than body- 
building (and not for heat, motion, and other things), the big- 
ger animals would still need more smaller animals to feed 



on than would correspond to mere multiples dictated by weight 
or volume. Less and less energy becomes available as it moves up 
the food chain. 

Colinvaux's book is highly readable and gives many insights 
— why it is a mjlh that nature's balances are "delicate" or that 
algae are more efficient solar-to-food energy converters than 
wheat or rice (how did our forefathers guess?), and many more. 
Colinvaux's ecology, we trust, is correct, though it is only fair to 
add that our confidence in the author has been shaken by his 
venture into history: The Fates of Nations^ tries to explain all of 
history as pure Darwinism, predictably resulting in poppycock, '* 
but we lack the space to follow him there. 



* (I) Academic Press 1968; reprinted Ox Bow Press 1979. [2] Princeton 
University Press, 1979 ($5). 13) Simon & Schuster, 1980. [4) For ecological in- 
fluences on human history, see W. McNeill, Plagues and Peoples, Double- 
day, 1976, and The Human Condition, Princeton U. Press, 1980; but always 
beware of authors who think the influence they are studying is the only one in 
the world. 



FIERCE, YET NUMEROUS 

There is, of course, one animal that is not at all rare, yet fairly 
big, and fiercer than any other — killing for food, killing for 
fun, and killing even his own species, homo sapiens. But it does 
not invalidate the reason why (other) big fierce animals are rare. 
Like other living things, homo extracts negentropy from his en- 
vironment for himself and his structures (houses, cities, roads, 
bridges, industries), pushing off the increased entropy (and 
disorder) onto the more distant inanimate environment, as ex- 
plained last month. But unlike any other living organism, homo 
has the ability to adapt to his environment immediately and 
radically, and what is more, adapt the environment to himself 
("change his niche," the ecologists say).* 

A beaver prevented from building dams cannot get his (food) 
energy and must perish; a man prevented from building a dam 
(most often by pseudo-ecologists) can find other ways of getting 
his (electrical) energy. 

It was this unique ability of "changing his niche" that enabled 
man to multiply far beyond the limits allowed by the calories he 
had been "allotted" as a berry-picker and hunter. He increased 
not just the number of his species more sucessfully than other 
predators, but — and this is important — he was able to increase 
his concentration in members per unit area of feeding ground. 
Not, of course, by breaking the unbreakable laws of physics; but 
by hauling in more energy instead of letting his numbers be 
limited by the original supply. 

Typically, only man tamed fire, a revolution (an energy 
revolution!) whose significance is sometimes misunderstood. It 

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^ NUCLEAR MADNESS by Helen Caldicott (Khelen Keldikott). 
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gave man warmth, yes; but if it had done nothing else, he would 
not have needed it in low latitudes. Its real importance was 
ecological: It vastly increased man's food supply by disinfecting, 
detoxifying, and just plain softening foods that had been germ- 
infested, toxic, and physically inedible. It made more energy 
available per unit feeding ground than "allotted" to the original 
human animal. [The Fate of Nations leaves out fire and jumps 
straight to the second ecological — and energy — revolution, 
herding animals and growing plants. What a thing for an 
ecologist to miss!] 

But on to a more important point: energy density. 



* The word niche is used by ecologists to denote a suitable position or activi- 
ty allowing a plant or animal to survive in its environment, and for an ex- 
planation they refer to its meaning in the sense of the French la niche, a 
recessed space in a wall for holding the statue of a saint — if you call that an 
explanation. It seems to us that the language to go to is German, the "scien- 
tific" language of the 19th century (Latin before that, English now); in Ger- 
man, die Nische means a crack, a nook or a cranny — in which a living thing 
seeks security as it struggles to survive in a hostile world. 



ENERGY DENSITY 

As man increased his numbers per unit area, the laws of 
physics demanded that he use not just more energy, but more 
concentrated energy; and without the benefit of planning com- 
missions or departments of energy, history obliged. The history 
of energy is one of increasing energy concentration: from sun 
and wind to wood to coal to oil to uranium. 

Sun and wind, abandoned for good reasons in the industrial 
revolution, provide 50 W/m^ or less when averaged over time in 
moderate latitudes; uranium ore, as now used, contains 46 kWh 
in each pound of ore (even for a breeder-opponent who throws 
99% of it away), and some 50 megawatt-hours per pound if you 
use your head and a breeder. 

The concentration of energy in an industrial society is not sub- 
ject to ideological reveries, but is dictated by simple arithmetic. 
In urban areas, the spatial energy consumption is about 10 watts 
per square meter (7.5 in Germany, 12 in India, as high as 30 
W/m^ in individual cases). Even if the world's population were 
suddenly to stop increasing, and even if it did not want to live 
better than it lives now (what absurdities we are conceding!), it 
could not use "soft" sources to reach such densities. The densest 
of them, thermal solar space heating, yields an average flux of 
less than 1 1 W/m^ and that is only low-grade heat. The rest are 
worse (wind with 4 and heat pumps with 2 W/m^ are next); there 
is nothing left for transportation or industry. 

"Soft" technology can support a rural society with energy 
fluxes below 1 W/m^. The industrial revolution had to turn to 
coal. 

Energy density is the reason why Lovins' gospel is funda- 
mentally flawed; the individual details of his blunders range 
from errors of the order of 1,000 (i.e, 100,000%) in his figures 
for the energy expended in manufacturing "soft" energy sources 
to breath-taking imbecilities like the claim that energy and 
capital can be saved by shutting down a nuclear plant that has 
already been built. Simple arithmetic precludes his Utopias, no 
matter how wishful the thinking of his audiences. 

The fact that Lovins has no earned degree (his Oxford 

"degree" is of a type that is handed out as a formality to keep 

university administrators happy) does not, in itself, speak 

against him, for there have been many brilliant scientists without 

a formal degree, and to the contrary, we all know plenty of 

morons with Ph.D's. Yet the halftruths and inuendos with which 

he palms himself off as a "physicist" in his personal resume fit 

in well with his pseudo-scientific distortions, and above all with 

his dishonest masquerade as a free-marketeer as he rejoices over 

nuclear plants canceled or kept inactive by coercion, criminal 

trespass, violence and witch hunts. 

[More: Spatial energy densities taken from W. Sassin, "Urbanization and 
the energy problem," Options, (IIASA Austria); for some details of Lovins' 
pseudo-theories, see Why "Soft" Technology Will Not Be America's Energy 



Salvation, $2 from Golem Press, Box 1342, Boulder, CO 80306; Lovins testi- 
fying under oath about his unearned degrees, see Cross-Examination of 
Amory Lovins during Pa. Public Utility Hearings on Economics of Limerick 
Generating Stations, Phila., Pa., 30 March 1981, but more damaging 
evidence on these points has been collected by Mark Hugo, Nebraska Voice 
of Energy, 852 S. 15 Ave., Omaha, NE 68105, tel. 402/346-6572.] 



THE WASTRELS 

In a report by James Daglish, editor of the British /I /om (July 
81), we found two interesting points. First, he has the guts to say 
per caput which is good Latin for "per head;" capita is the 
plural, which is fashionable, but makes no sense. We will 
emulate. 

Second, he reproduces a chart showing the GNP per caput vs. 
the per caput energy consumption for 33 countries of the world. 
We picked out the industrial ones, computed the ratio, and what 
did we get? A double portrait: The right side shows the 
wastefulness of capitalist anarchy, the left the efficiency of 
socialist planning. (Note particularly the two otherwise so com- 
parable Germanics.) 










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IVE SHOULD HA VE KNOWN BETTER 

In the Radiation Bogey we noted that the correlation between 
background radiation and cancer incidence over the 50 states of 
the Union was significantly negative (-39.09'yo) — the more 
radiation, the less cancer. At the time we thought it an amusing, 
but immaterial statistic: only 1% of all cancers are radiation- 
induced, and a correlation is not a cause-effect link. For ex- 
ample, the high radiation states are the mountain states where 
the environment tends to be healthier than in the crowded, in- 
dustrial East, whereas Florida, with the highest cancer incidence 
and low (sea-level) radiation background, is a "retiree" state — 
and cancer, predominantly an old man's disease, could have 
crept into the statistics by Florida's age distribution rather than 
by its environment. 

Another time we remarked, tongue in cheek, that since man 
has never been without radiation since he appeared on this 
planet, we have no proof that he can live without it. 

Boy, were we wrong! 

About the tongue in cheek, that is. We should have known 
better when we received a paper given by Dr Jerry Cohen of the 
Lawrence Livermore Lab at the 5th Congress of the Interna- 
tional Radiation Protection Association in Jerusalem in March 
of last year. Cohen also ran correlations, and though he con- 
ceded that the idea of low level radiation being beneficial was 
merely speculative, he asked the all-important question: What 
right have you to neglect such a possibility? 



Wait a minute! Have not the sick for generations flocked to 
the spas of Jichymov and Piesfany in Czechoslovakia, Bad Gas- 
tein in Austria, and other spas where the water is unusually 
radioactive?* And have not people, by instinct and experience, 
often found health benefits long before science proved them 
right (lime juice against scurvy, avoidance of pork with its in- 
visible parasites)? 

OK, some of the titles in the spoof ad on the opposite page are 
hoaxes; in a sense, all of them are. But we are deadly serious 
about the book described below. It deals with a phenomenon 
called hormesis. 



* Some other points of interest about Jdchymov, whose rich uranium 
deposits have now been completely depleted for the Soviets by slave labor of 
political prisoners. This is where Marie and Pierre Curie got their pitchblende 
froTi; there also used to be silver deposits there, and from the 16th century, 
coins were minted in the town, whose German name was Joachimstal. The 
corns were called Joachimstaler, and later only Taler, which in colonial 
America became the word dollar. Small world? 



HORMESIS 

is an expression used in physiology, derived from the Greek hor- 
mo, to excite, which refers to a phenomenon stated by the so- 
called Arndt-Schuiz law: Small doses of poisons are stimulatory. 
The law has been recognized for chemical and biological toxins; 
for example, minute doses of germicides will increase fermenta- 
tion of bacteria, and small doses of antibiotics will stimulate the 
growth of relatively dormant bacteria that they were supposed to 
kill. 

One of the internationally recognized experts on hormesis is 
Dr T.D. Luckey, professor of biochemistry at the U. of IVlissouri 
at Columbia, who in 1945 discovered hormesis in dietary an- 
tibiotics. In 1969, he was intrigued by data suggesting that 
Japanese who received 11 to 120 roentgen in the 1945 atomic 
bomb explosions appeared to live longer than those who were 
exposed to larger doses or to no dose at all. This, he knew, 
would place man in conformity with ample, but widely scattered 
evidence observed in other living organisms; as early as 1898 a 
scientific paper reported that algae exposed to X-rays grew faster 
than non-irradiated controls. Luckey then set out to investigate 
whether the Arndt-Schulz law could be generalized from 
chemical and biological toxins to ionizing radiation. 

What he found was a tremendous amount of uncollected 
literature supporting his hypothesis; the book that he published 
1 1 years later is a scholarly work likely to remain the standard 
reference for many years to come. Hormesis With Ionizing 
Radiation (CRC Publ. Co., Boca Raton, Fla., 1980, 222pp.; for 
a price-gouging $59.95) lists some twelve hundred references, 
and meticulously systemizes their results. A table listing merely 
results on gamma ray hormesis stretches for more than 20 pages, 
from 1957 to 1975, and lists experiments performed on 
organisms from viruses, bacteria and fungi through the plant 
and animal kingdoms all the way to vertebrates. 

An interesting section of the book deals with "nine reasons 
why radiation hormesis has not been pursued diligently, nor ex- 
ploited practically;" one of them is "disbelief in the results due to 
small numbers, poor or no statistical evaluations, and emotional 
inability to believe the differences are real." 

Luckey seriously raises the question whether ionizing radia- 
tion is essential for life and states "Experiments by students in 
my laboratory indicate that radiation is essential for optimum 
reproduction." Moreover, based not merely on empirical 
statistics, but on well reasoned physiological arguments, he finds 
"Ionizing radiation levels somewhat above ambient should be 
beneficial for many physiological functions." 

His conclusions are carefully worded, supported by over- 
whelming evidence, and unambiguous. For example, "Radiation 
hormesis denies the validity of straight-line extraF>olation from 
known harmful doses to zero. The argument that low doses give 
harmful effects in proportion to the dosage is invalid. . 



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"Radiation hormesis can provide more efficient use of 
resources, maximum production of grains, vegetables, and 
meat, and increased health and longevity." 




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This button $1.50 
postpaid from Golem 
Press, Box 1342, Boulder, 
CO 80306. 



NUCLEAR NOTES 



• Correction! Diablo Canyon will replace 20 million barrels of 
oil per year, of course, not per day. An oversight by our over- 
worked staff, for which we are very sorry. We don't intention- 
ally exaggerate — mainly because we don't need to. 

• The California fruit crop could still be saved by strong gam- 
ma irradiation as done in other countries (South Africa, AtE 
Apr 79), now that FDA regulations approve of foods irradiated 
by gamma rays below 100 kilorads as wholesome and safe for 
human consumption. (Gamma rays cannot induce radioactivity 
in other matter.) Isomedix, Inc. of N.C. is already in the 
business of preserving food and sterilizing products by radiation 
{Fortune, 4 May 81, pp. 201-207). Prof. Leona Marshall-Libby 
(Manhattan Project, Uranium People, see AtE Dec 79), widow 
of Nobel Prize winner Willard Libby, suggests passing fruit on 
conveyors through steel shells housing a source of cobalt-60, 
borrowed from hospitals and National Labs, killing the medfly's 
eggs and larvae. She estimates the cost at 2.5C/lb and proposed 
the method in a telegram to the governor in Sacramento. No 
reply from Jerry Medfly Brown-out. 

• Most antinukes simply evade the safety comparison of coal 
and nuclear, but three have (sort of) mentioned it. Nader, in the 
opus advertised on p. 2, weasels round the point with lawyer's 
tricks. Gofman is opposed to "random murder" by coal just as 
he is opposed to "random murder" by nuclear; what he ap- 
parently is not opposed to is the use of electricity. ("The NRC 
has decided that people in this area [of Diablo Canyon] are ex- 
pendable," said the bodily remains of this ex-scientist last 
month.) John Holdren, who with his mentor Paul Ehrlich 
recently performed an outstanding feat in ideological data 
reduction [AtE Jan 81), has now counted the ways in which 
energy risks can be befuddled (Amer. J. Pubi Health, Sept. 81), 
supplying a superb example of how energy risks can be befud- 
dled. . . Typically, he alleges that modern nuclear plants are be- 
ing compared with older coal facilities (poor pollution control), 
and elsewhere he is more specific, alleging that the Brookhaven 
Natl. Lab. Report on coal was mostly based on plants operating 
in 1975, whereas new plants, with 80% sulfur control, produce 
so many fewer deaths per quad that the total hardly increases 
from 1975 to 1985. A footnote referring to the OTA's Direct Use 
of Coal (GPO 1979) is provided by this scholar, evidently in the 
hope that nobody will look it up. For the BNL report assumed 
80^0 sulfur control for existing sources, and 85% for new ones; 
and it is this very study that gives Holdren's "whereas" data: The 
annual deaths do indeed increase ortly slightly from 1975 to 1985 
- from 48,100 to 49,500. If you can't beat the rebuttal, hide it in 
the reference "supporting" your argument. 



• The good news: Bradford is quitting as NRC Commis- 
sioner; the bad news: not until late winter. 

• Dr Henry Hurwitz continues to alert the public to the high 
levels of radioacti/ity in energy-efficient homes, which can ex- 
ceed the level allowed as an occupational hazard (itself 10 times 
the level allowed for the public). His letter comparing this far 
greater hazard with the low-level rad'ation used as a scare by the 
Science scribblers [AtE Sep 81] was rejected by Science editor 
Dr P. Abelson. (Abelson is himself not antinuclear, but you got- 
ta weigh truth against expediency. . . See editorial.) Hurwitz is 
now trying to get the point into the record of the New York State 
Energy Master Plan, and has hired a lawyer for the purpose — 
for his own money, as is usual with actively pro-nuclear scien- 
tists, who get nothing from the liberal foundations and do not 
use money stolen from the taxpayer. Contributions welcome, 
827 Jamaica Rd., Schenectady, NY 12309. 

GOOD READING 

• Science: Good, Bad and Bogus by Martin Gardner, $18.95, 
Prometheus Books, just out. Worthy of Gardner's genius. 

• Energy Alternatives (Nucl. Power & Environment, Book 4), 
$4, ANS, 555 N. Kensington Ave., La Grange Park, IL 60525; 
as excellent as Book 1 (2,3 not yet published). 

• Investigations of reported plant & animal health effects in 
the TMI area. Report NUREG-0738 (NRC & EPA), Oct. 1980, 
from NTIS, Springfield, VA 22161; excellent de-Sternglassant. 

• Uranium Mining & Radiation Safety, Proc. Conf . at Mich. 
Tech. Univ., Sept. 1980, 175 pp., $13.50 ppd., Action U.P., 706 
Sheldon Ave, Houghton, Ml 49931. Very instructive on radon in 
mines, etc.; particularly useful for countering Coughlin, 
Caldicott, Wald, and other racists fomenting hatred of "white" 
(?) mining companies among American Indians. 

• The nuclear power phobia," Business Week, 7 Sept. 81. 

• "Containing nuclear waste," by our favorite author. 
Reason, Sept. 81, is a shortened and detoxified version of Golem 
Press' Different Drummer no.7; but will reach 30,(XX) readers. 

• A superb periodical for $2/year? Two of them: Imprimis 
from Hillsdale College, MI 49242, you already know; but also 
The University Bookman, Box 3070, New York, NY 10017, a 
quarterly. Try L. Cranberg's "A Socratic Oath for the 
Academy?" in the Winter 1981 issue for starters. 

• Be quite sure not to miss "Supreme Irony" by P. Brimelow 
and S.J. Markman, Harper's, Oct. 81. 

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"The Russians are OK to work with. . . 
The US has many military bases round the 
world, whereas Russia does not." 

Helen Caldicott 

Berkshire Eagle, 
Pittsfield, Mass., 27 Aug. 198^: 

For more interesting quotations see her book adver- 
tised on p.2, also Izvestiya, 30 July 1980, and Pravda, 
1 December 1980; both newspapers available near 
Soviet military units, naval bases and anchorages in 
Angola, Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, 
Estonia, Ethiopia, Guinea, Hungary, Latvia, Libya, 
Lithuania, Mozambique, North Korea, Outer Mongolia, 
Poland, South Yemen, Tanzania, and Vietnam. 



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ACCESS TO ENERGY 

is published by Access to Energy, Inc. Publisher and editor Dr Petr 
Beckmann, professor of electrical engineering at the University of Colorado, 
independently of the University or any other institution. Subscription $ 1 8 (or 
$1 in pre- 1965 US silver coins) a year for 12 monthly issues, overseas $25. 
Order from Access to Energy, Box 2298, Boulder, CO 80306 (no billing, 
please). Past issues $1 each. Cumul. index Sept. 1973 to August 1981, $12. 







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TECHNOCRACY INC. 
6561 Phinney Ave.N 
Seattle, WA 98103 



Dear Educator: 

Young people today are quite aware the social system in America 
is in turmoil. With the relentless bombardment of conflicting 
statements, political rhetoric, and business propaganda there is 
good reason for youngsters to be confused. Are they not entitled 
to know what causes the dilemma of poverty, malnutrition, unemploy- 
ment, inflation, crime, disease, pollution, war, in the richest 
most highly developed nation on earth? 

Changes are occurring rapidly. Survival depends on intelligent 
action that can come only from an informed people. Our youth 
are America's greatest resource. 



Let us 
social 
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help you provide your students with the solution to America's 
problems. Let us present for their analysis a design for 
operations that puts America's vast technology, natural 

ces, and trained personnel in harmony with the 20th century. 

sent facts not opinions. Technocracy Inc. is an educational, 

ch organization. We are not a political party or a business, 
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ne, from Washington State to Florida. 



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There 



Please contact us for further information. 



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mmatm 



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R. D. 11353 

TECHNOCRACY 

9203S-112 STREEI 

EDfViONTOM, ALBbUrA 

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I I 353-A 
TECHNOCRACY 

INC. 

13 Feb 85 



Greetings Jim: 



Herewith a long delayed receipt for the $20/00 donation that you sent 
us beck in Septemoer 1983 1 Sorry for the delay. I plead bus;^ess and the 
most urgent priorities that cant seem to wait, 

I take this opportunity to enclose a recent paper that T prepared and 
sent around to se veral members and units, CHQ sent it b^ck for major re- 
visions, Spitler doesn't seem to understand the thrust of the paper at all, 
or doesn't want to, I will not be revising it in accordance with his suggestions. 
Not that it is perfect. Rut the subject stands mostly as written. Others did 
like it and the Digest at Eancouver seems to have in mind publishing it. 
The point of the paper is that we have had our '1929' crash and we should be 
cognizant of that fact. I have almost finished another paper - long enough 
to be appmphlet, I think, on "The Big Bank Bail-out", It will support the 
first paper and will be distributed similarly. 



Still at it I Walt BYyers. 



Address: 11353 A, Technocrocy Inc ., #307, 8540 109 St,, Edmonton, Alta. 



T6G 1B6 



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ACCESS TO ENERGY 

A Pro-Science, Pro-Technology, Pro-Free Enterprise Monthly Newsletter 

NOVEMBER 1981 (Vol.9, no.3) Box 2298, Boulder, Colorado 80306 ® 1981 by Access to Energy 



•♦• 



Sack the flaks 



Environmentalism and pacifism often occupy the same heart; 
a heart which frequently harbors distaste of abundant energy 
sources as well. 

They share other traits. Both have universal appeal: 
nobody wants a polluted environment, and nobody wants 
war. 

Both have leaders who have succeeded in duping their 
numerous followers: they preach love of nature when they 
mean de-industrialization; and they preach peace when they 
mean surrender. 

There are other similarities, but one stands out painfully 
above all others: They are winning the hearts of the young. 

They are winning them for two perverse reasons. 

The first is that their followers believe themselves morally 
superior; that they want pristine nature and lasting pieace, 
whereas industry prefers green cash. Their belief in moral 
superiority makes them virtually immune to facts. 

The second reason is even more perverse: business and in- 
dustry half believes in its moral inferiority, too. Browbeaten 
into absurd guilt complexes because they are shamefully ig- 
norant of the ideological and moral strength of capitalism, 
their public relations departments put out smooth drivel 
about "balancing" environment against economy, and risks 
against benefits. They lack the courage, the knowledge, and 
often the sheer common sense to tell the misled public that the 
environment never had a better friend than property rights 
and free enterprise (see some examples in this issue); or to tel! 
them that if you want peace, prepare for war. 

Balancing environment against energy is Carterite gib- 
berish. To maintain a healthy and beautiful environment, you 
need more energy, not less (consult history and the Third 
World for counter-examples). How do you balance two 
benefits on the same side of the scales? 

Balancing risks against benefits is more gibberish. How 
many dollars to a human life? 



Nader and Lovins have no stauncher ally than the business 
executive who says "Your morals are admirable, but we gotta 
make a living." 

Yet it is in the field of morality, the very field where in- 
dustry is losing, that the deindustrializers and defeatists are 
most vulnerable; not because their moral principles are 
wrong, but because their stand is diametrically opposed to the 
very values they cherish. 

You want to put human lives over dollars? Then support 
nuclear power, for its cost in human suffering is smaller than 
that of any other source of electricity yet invented. You want 
to be incorruptible in matters of health? Then expose the 
cover-up of the radon issue, and unmask Ralph Nader's 
health groups promoting a policy of higher radioactivity for 
infants on the breast than for uranium miners on the job. 
You want social justice? Then fight the National Resources 
Defense Council's policy of stifling growth to protect a 
power-hungry elite from the upward mobility of the little 
man. You want to stop those who would befoul the en- 
vironment? Then stop the Sierra Club, which pollutes the air 
by lobbying for amendments to the Clean Air Acts that will 
clearly increase air pollution as long as they fulfill the more 
"important" purpose of bankrupting the utilities.* You want 
gentleness, not brutality? Then stand up to the most brutal 
tyranny that ever threatened your country. You want decen- 
cy? Then remember those who died to protect you from past 
tyrannies and secured gentleness over brutality for you. 

Sack the fiaks who know how to peddle laxatives, but who 
are ignorant of the ideology of freedom; who know that 
capitalism produces more goods more efficiently, but not 
why it is morally superior. 

Those who would fight the system of free producers by ap- 
pealing to love of nature and by painting the horrors of war 
are begging to be defeated on their own moral grounds: How- 
ever well motivated, the environmentalists damage the envi- 
ronment; however well motivated, the pacifists promote war. 



B. Ackerman, Clean Coal/Dirty Air, Yale Univ. Press, 1981. 



>«-» 



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COMPELLING EVIDENCE 



We take it that one of the things that you are not overly wor- 
ried about is why Lake Kivu in East Africa has 50 million tons of 
methane dissolved in it. 

Yet this is one of a goodly number of strong indications that 
may point the way to a vast, world-wide reservoir of natural gas, 
and that may change the energy industry's approach to prospect- 
ing for it. 

Conventional theories say that hydrocarbons — coal, oil, gas 
— are of biological origin; plants stored the carbon during their 
photosynthetic absorption of solar energy, and when a forest 
was buried before it could oxidize, it gradually turned into fossil 
fuel. 

That theory is not disputed by Cornell astronomy professor 
Thomas Gold and his research assistant Steven Soter; but they 
propose an additional, and probably "more important, 
mechanism: methane (natural gas) of non-biological origin deep 



in the interior of the earth. It seeps to the surface in certain 
places, and it is liberated during an earthquake. 

Lake Kivu is one of several places with much methane in it 
without any organic rock to explain it. And there are other such 
places: the permafrost region of the Arctic, and the mid-ocean 
ridge of the Pacific. 

But there is more. There is a high correlation between the 
locations of gas fields and those of seismic activity (including 
past activity evidenced by deformation belts). Moroever, Gold 
and Soter*s hypothesis of gas lifting the sedimental blanket 
above bedrock during an earthquake or causing a tsunami 
(earthquake-caused, destructive sea wave) gives satisfactory 
numerical agreement where former theories led to energy values 
that were way out of whack — by factors of 10,000, or four 
orders on the Richter scale. 

Then there is less hard, but more piquant evidence: sheets of 
flame seen on the rocky sides of the Inyo Mountains in the 
California earthquake of 1872, and in other earthquakes that oc- 
curred at night; reports of the sea "boiling" over a 300-mile range 



in the great Chilean earthquake of 1960; the strange behavior of 
canaries, dogs and other animals just before an earthquake 
(presumably reacting to "bad air" invading their habitat - 
methane is odorless, but probably brings up other earthy smells 
as it begins to bubble up); fishkills (caused by the hydrogen 
sulfide associated with methane); and other such pointers. 

And then comes the clincher: our old friend radon gas. As we 
reported earlier [Sept 79], the Japanese, and now others, 
measure the radon concentration in deep well water. If it sud- 
denly increases, an earthquake may be imminent. But radon has 
a halflife of only 3.8 days, so that it could not by itself diffuse 
very far upward before it decayed into its (solid) daughters. 
Evidently the radon is merely a tracer for a much more abundant 
gas that sweeps it along while it remains itself undetected. 

Three guesses which one. 

The whole fascinating story is told by the two scientists in 
"The Deep-Earth-Gas Hypothesis," Scientific American, June 
1980; and in the 14 months for which it lay in our "This Month" 
file (displaced by matters we considered more urgent), we learn- 
ed about the work of Dr Harmon Craig of California's Scripps 
Institute of Oceanography, who found that in the methane-rich 
regions of the Pacific Ridge, the concentration of helium 3 is 
also extremely high (3,000 times higher at Lake Kivu than in or- 
dinary river water). Helium is rare, inert, and helium 3 is not 
produced by radioactive decay. It is another primordial gas tag- 
ging the primordial methane. 

(Astronomers will, quite rightly, call me an ignoramus in their field, but 1 must 
confess that I never believed the craters on the moon were made by meteors. 
True, they look like the crater made by a meteor in the Arizona desert; but for 
every large meteor there are zillions of small ones, and there is no lunar at- 
mosphere to burn them up. If the big ones made craters, the small ones would 
have mashed it to dust; yet the astronauts hopped around on good solid rock. 
What the craters always did remind me of were the rings that you see on the sur- 
face of mud when gas bubbles up through it. . .) 

SO WHAT? 

So plenty. 

If the hypothesis proves right, prospectors will not confine 
their exploration for gas to organic-rich strata; they will look 
elsewhere, and mainly deeper. Most of it would be deep down i 
beyond economically feasible recovery; but who needs "most of ' 
it" when what might be within reach is a vast amount? 

"If methane has been a significant contributor [to the enor- 
mous quantities of methane associated with the carbon degas- 
sing of the earth]," write Gold and Soter, "even the fraction 
residing in the high-pressure domain on the way up may still be 
very large compared with all other reserves of fuel." 

The nitty-gritty: You have to drill for gas at depths of 15,000 
to 30,00 ft. But you don't drill dry holes at such depths — you 
have to know that the gas is there. 

How? By more research: in the first place, by investigating the 
migration paths of non-biological methane along fault lines to 
high-pressure pockets, and perhaps by using tell-tale tags — 
radon, and trace elements like mercury, vanadium, and nickel. 

Until methods are worked out that will virtually prevent dry 
holes, wildcatters would have to be nuts to drill at such depths. 

But then, there is something that drives them both nuts and to 
greater depths: government regulation. Not primordial methane, 
but primordial mindlessness made the 1978 Natural Gas Policy 
Act deregulate gas only from below 15,000 ft. That is where 
drilling can cost $15 million a hole; and it makes explorers drill 
past the cheaper gas in shallow zones. "Like giving farmers a 
bonus to raise corn in New Mexico while keeping prices low in 
Iowa," says Natural Gas Association President David Foster. 

Indeed, controlled gas at 25C per million BTU is the 
equivalent of $1.50 for a barrel of oil — a legacy of Dingell, Ot- 
tinger, Metzenbaum, and the others with energy conservation in 
their mouths but not between their ears. 

On the other hand, deep gas, in BTU's, is the equivalent of oil 
at $57 a barrel, and a recent well drilled in Oklahoma at a cost of 



$6.5 million paid for itself in seven weeks. But such gas wells are 
exceptions; the rule is to go for oil, where profits are maximized 
more easily. The number of new oil wells drilled has risen 
drastically since 1978 (41% over last year in the first half of 
1981), but the number of new gas wells has declined; for what do 
wildcatters know about oil and gas? Dingell and Metzenbaum 
know what's good for them. 

Congressman Phil Gramm (D-Tex), whom we are proud to 
have as a subscriber, has introduced a bill to decontrol gas prices 
for all wells drilled after Jan. 81 , phase out controls of gas prices 
over three years, and abolish demand restraints. 

Meanwhile the wildcatters are drilling deeper. "Three quarters 
of the nation's remaining gas-bearing sediments lie below 15, OCX) 
feet," says Robert A. Hefner 111, as his rigs drill for gas 5 miles 
under the Oklahoma plains. 

He could be quite wrong. 

If the primordial gas hypothesis checks out, the fraction is 
much larger. 

[More: A. Stuart: "The blazing battle to free natural gas," Fortune, 19 Oct 81; 
"Gas decontrol looks more like a winner," Business Week, 31 Aug. 1981] 

THE ENVIRONMENT . . . 

"We don't sue or picket or preach," says the brochure. "We 
simply do our best to locate those spots on earth where 
something wild and rare and beautiful is thriving or hanging on. 

"Then we buy them." 

Signed: The Nature Conservancy. What a relief from the 
power-hungry incitations by the Friends of the Earth, the En- 
vironmental Defense Fund, and the other despoilers of the en- 
vironment! 

Though the Nature Conservancy does not say so explicitly, it 
is a fact that the environment has no better friend than 
capitalism and private ownership. Who do you reckon takes bet- 
ter care of their forests, Weyerhaeuser or the US Forest Service? 

The suggestion to preserve wilderness areas by deeding them 
in perpetuity to environmental organizations has recently been 
made by John Baden and Richard L. Stroup of Montana State 
University ("Saving the Wilderness," Reason, July 81, pp. 28-36; 
issue $2 from Box 40105, Santa Barbara, CA 93103). Amusing- 
ly, but not surpringly, the Audubon Society lets three oil com- 
panies pump oil and gas on their Rainey Wildlife Sanctuary in 
Louisiana, and in general manages its own land responsibly and 
with multiple use, in the very way for which they would hang, 
draw and quarter Jim Watt. 

Except for mistaking the Sierra Club for an environmental 
organization (in a minor place), this is a brilliant paper recom- 
mended to every genuine environmentalist (and there are many 
of us left!); it also discusses the mining of strategic metals on 
public lands and gives some interesting historical insights. 

. . . AND ITS ENEMIES 

The same two authors have also edited a book Bureaucracy 
vs. the Environment (Michigan Univ. Press, $15), a collection of 
13 essays by economists on the environmental costs of 
bureaucratic governance; for example, how collective ownership 
of sheep pastures on the Navajo Indian Reservation (under the 
auspices of the Bureau of Indian Affairs) has led to severe 
overgrazing. 

Students of energy will particularly appreciate E.R. Habicht's 
"US Natural Gas Policy: An Autopsy," which starts off by 
recalling the tax and regulatory incentives to the predecessor of 
today's energy industries, the whaling industry. As early as 1645, 
in Southampton, Long Island, a bounty of five shillings was 
paid to anyone who located a stranded whale, unless he found it 
on the Sabbath, in which case he got nothing. 

A drastic example (not in the book) of what property rights 
can do for the preservation of wilderness comes from Africa. 



..«:>■■■,', -. -1- ,- , »• 



sL 



The hunting grounds of Kenya and other countries under 
socialist management are close to "shot out" by safaris and 
poaching expeditions. In South Africa, many ranchers found 
they could make money by fencing lands and charging entrance 
and head fees for hunting wild animals, without having to 
bother with vaccinations and other care demanded by cattle. 
And who is a better guardian of leopards, lions, their prey, and 
their natural habitat than the owners of such wilderness parks? 

But the best writing on environmentalism that we have read in 
a long while is The Environmental Battle, a series of eight ar- 
ticles by Ron Arnold, a media consultant and film producer in 
Washington State. They were originally published in Logging 
Management, Feb. 79 — June 80, but reprints are available for 
$15 (and well worth the price) from Vance Publishing, 300 W. 
Adams, Chicago, IL 60606. 

The fact that the articles deal with the forest industry rather 
than with energy production is, of course, quite irrelevant; the 
issue is destruction of industry, not of which branch. 

To win the battle against the irrational redistributors, says Ar- 
nold in so many words, you have to be sure of your facts; but 
you will lose if you think that is enough. 

RADON IN THE WILDERNESS 

Radon, as we reported earlier, is a radioactive gas formed in 
homes by the natural decay chains of uranium, itself present in 
building materials, the ground, and the water piped into the 
home. Its daughters are solid, lodge in the lung, and have been 
identified as a source of lung cancer {1% of all lung cancers ac- 
cording to a British govenmient study). The concentration of 
radon is rapidly increased by energy conservation measures in- 
volving insulation unless ventilation via expensive heat ex- 
changers is undertaken. [AtE Jun 80; H. Hurwitz, The Indoor 
Radiological Problem, GE Report 81 CRD025, Schenectady, 
N.Y., Feb. 81, and literature cited there.] 

Measurement of doses due to radon in homes requires special 
methods. A very successful, sensitive, and coi iparatively cheap 
detector has been developed by Terradex Corporatioa, which 
markets it under the name of Track Etch®. The tracks left by 
alpha particles as they penetrate a special plastic are made visible 
by etching and counted under a microscope; the dose is propor- 
tional to the number of tracks per unit area. 

Track Etch® will measure the total alpha exposure to radon 
and its alpha-emitting daughters (or by a simple modification, of 
radon only), and Terradex has made extensive, worldwide mea- 
surements of radon concentrations. A recent study involved 
almost 26,(XX) track detectors in US, Canadian and Swedish 
homes, and below we have tabulated some of the results to make 
our editorial charge against Ralph Nader stick. His Health 
Research Group, Inc., petitioned OSHA that the exposure to 
radon of uranium miners be limited to a maximum of 0.7 
WLM/yr (units used in the mining industry) corresponding to 7 
picocuries per liter (pCi/1; write for Energy Data Sheet, p.4, 
listing units of radioactivity). That level is noted as the 
"Ralph level" below; you might call it the level of Nader's heart- 
rending concern for public and occupational health. 

A later report, given by Terradex president H.W. Alter at the 
Inteml. Symposium on Indoor Air Pollution at the U. of Mass., 

Oct. 13-16, is available to 

AtE readers from Mr. Alter ^^^°" concentrations in homes (pCi/1) 
at Terradex Corporation, ^^^' ^^' 

460 N. Wiget Lane, Walnut 
Creek, CA 94598. 

Nader's "health" group is 
not, of course, the only one 
to brush the health hazards 
of energy conservation under 
the carpet. The July 1980 
issue of the National Wildlife 
Federation, Wildlife Digest, 



N. Calif. 


0.5 


2.7 


Houston, Tex. 


0.4 


2.7 


Eastern US 


0.3 


3.6 


RALPH LEVEL 


_ 


7.0 


E. Penna. 


2.4 


91 


Maine 


1.1 


133 


Canada 


3.6 


34 


Sweden (spr./summ) 


4.1 


106 


Sweden (winter) 


10.0 


466 



bristles with exhortations to energy conservation, and contains 
an article on the deadly dangers of radon from uranium tailings 
— both he kind of subjects that the National Wildlife Federation 
is naturally all about. (Terradex measured the radon concentra- 
tion at a uranium mining and milling complex for one year: 4 
pCi/1 on site, and 1 pCi/1 at a distance of 1 mile; which is pro- 
bably less than at NWF headquarters.) Along with a drawing 
showing radon diffusing into the air from a tailing pile, one 
Susan M. O'Connell describes the horrors of radon: cleaning up 
22 abandoned disposal sites, she says, would avoid some 339 
cancer cases over the next 100 years. What Susan does not tell 
her readers is that the indoor radon from energy conservation by 
insulation of buildings as promoted by the Carter administration 
would cause at least 10,(XX) additional fatal cancers in every 
single year [B.L. Cohen, "Health effects of radon from insula- 
tion of buildings,//eo///7 Physics, Dec. 1980, pp.937-941. But if 
the Terradex indoor samples are accepted as representative for 
all of the US, then the number of conservation-induced cancer 
deaths in every single year is 32,400.] 

. . . AND ANOTHER RADONIC IRONY 

Virtually all of EPA's former research on the health effects of 
radon in indoor pollution have been cut from the 1982 budget, 
contrary to recent recommendations by a National Academy of 
Sciences committe, and under protest from many scientists and 
several Congressmen.* 

Well, don't expect this newsletter to squeal and object to 
budget cutting. 
But frankly, we would have expected a little more political sav- 
vy from Mr Stockman or Mrs Gorsuch, or their advisors. For a 
few hundred kilobucks (peanuts in Washington, especially com- 
pared to the solar subsidy in tax breaks), they could have sat 
back and quietly chuckled as the very Hon. Richard Ottinger 
and his subcommittee on energy conservation sweated it out 
whether to abandon environmental protection, or condemn 
energy conservation, or cut the budget, or admit that the majori- 
ty of his committee helps give the conservation-minded citizen a 
radiation dose that he would get from 10,000 nuclear plants 
within 50 miles of his energy-efficient home. 

* "Indoor Hazards," Nature, 10 Sep. 81; "EPA radon-hazards funds cut," 
Physics Today, Aug. 81, p.9 

CRACKS AND CRACKPOTS 

So another nuclear disaster threatens: The metal pressure 
vessel, several inches thick and housing the core, could crack 
when the hot water leaks out and the cold water of the emer- 
gency cooling is injected. The NRC has listed 13 plants where 




"It's called the 20-cent stamp!" 

It's not just the postage that is driving our mailing costs sky-high, but the 
large amount of newsletters returned as "undelivcrable," forcing us to search 
for the subscriber by telephone. Quite often, if we reach hun, there is 
nothing wrong with the address. Please let us know immediately if you don't 
have your Access by the first of the month. 



CONVERSIONS 

I mj • i.a)s)oiiki<n 

I alcKM* • 4.IM)caki 

/ rftk/mr • I mi (W) 
I to-Hpom (HP) • 746 W 
I n-K</MC • l)»W 
I BTIJ/houi • o.tni W 

* OOI of • 'Auihlionftr 
cti'int. 



ENERGY DATA SHEET 

This fhect is ivulabic for a sump«l, sclf-tddroscd envelope from 
ACCESS TO ENEaCY. »n 22M. »niMer, CO MM* 



Pnin* y flwrgy fric- 
Hdw: co»l 20 5%. 
|w 26.9%. oti 44. »«^. 
hrdio 4%. nw.i. ).S*i; 
M« Qu4d Tabk cotumn I 




kilo III 
mesa- (M) 
SIS'- ICj) 



RESIDENTIAL- 
V COMMERCIAL 



?y INOUSrniAL 



TRANSPORTATION 



An Energy Data Sheet giving US energy flow in BTU's and %, energy 
equ valents, conversion of units, units of radioactivity, radiation doses, inter- 
national comparison of costs of electricity, and others, is available for a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope, from us at Box 2298, Boulder, CO 80306 

precautionary measures must be taken, and the great anti- 
nuclear humanitarians are once more fervently hoping for the 
Grand Catastrophe to arrive at long last. 

But once more, they drool in vain. 

It has been known for decades that metals become brittle in 
years of irradiation by neutrons. By 1970, the AEC issued Safety 
Guide 2, Thermal Shock to Reactor Pressure Vessels, ordering 
data collection, research, and surveillance programs to make 
sure the pressure vessel would not crack if cold water had to be 
injected. 

There have been no surprises in the way metals are gradually 
embrittled by years of irradiation; the new point is that in some 
reactor designs the neutron flux out of the core (at the points 
where it is not "screened" by fuel bundles) is greater than ex- 
pected, causing faster aging of the metal in the places exposed to 
it. Thus, the injected water would have to be ever warmer (over 
the years) to keep above the point where thermal shock might 
embrittle the pressure vessel in an emergency. 

For future reactors, the remedy is simple: absorbers for the 
stream of neutrons where too many leave the core. 

As for the present, even if nothing were done, it would simply 
mean a shorter useful reactor life. But there are remedies. The 
heat transfer in those 13 plants will be measured and analyzed to 
see whether operating conditions must be changed. If so, the 
reactor can be run in conditions (of temperature and pressure) 
that will avoid brittleness even with cold safety injection water. 
Alternatively, the injection water can be kept warm. And finally, 
the entire core could be removed during an extended outage, and 
the pressure vessel annealed with infrared heat to restore the 
metal's ductility for another 15 to 20 years. 

Annealing was, in fact, a solution suggested in the AEC's 1970 
safety guide. The trouble is its cost, which is mainly the cost of 
the replacement power the utility has to buy during the three 



: : 

: A breath ; 

: CONSERVED \ 

I Is a breath • 

: Inhaled : 



i KNOW i 
1 NUKES : 



i : 

: PROTECT the ! 

: POSTAL • 

: MONOPOLY • 



e 



: STOP : 

: BREATHING • 

• • 

•••••••••••••••••• 




# 



They're safer 
than fossils 



'•••••••••••••••••«• 



from • 

: FREE : 

: ENTERPRISE • 

: : 

••••••••••••••••••• 



Pacifists Prosper • 



These seals on green, orange, 
and yellow gummed paper avail- 
able for S2 per sheet of 50 from 
Golem Press, Box 1342, Boulder, 
CO 80306. 



because 

: Free Men Fought • 



months or so of the overhaul (the type of cost inflicted on 
utilities by antinuclear litigation and regulatory delays). 
Do we solve problems or use them for propaganda? 

SUBSCRIBERS 

• We deeply mourn the death of subscriber William Loeb, 
who many times reprinted editorials and other items from this 
newsletter in the New Hampshire Manchester Union Leader. In 
his last letter to us, he explained that newspaper publishers have 
no control over the Parade Sunday supplement and thought ours 
was the right answer to their plutonium lie. 

• Subscriber Dr Leo Yaffe, professor of chemistry at McGill 
University, Montreal, and president of the Chemical Institute of 
Canada, has won the coveted American Chemical Society 
Award for Nuclear Chemistry for 1982. Congratulations! 

• The Midnight Economist, alias subscriber William R. Allen, 
professor of economics at the U. of Calif, at Los Angeles, strikes 
again, this time in a 295-page book of selected short broadcasts, 
with a preface by Milton Friedman {Midnight Economist, 
Playboy Press, $13.50). This is an educating, entertaining, ex- 
hilarating book, from subjects like the preservation of whales to 
the reason why "there's no such thing as an uncoerced bad deal." 

• Subscriber Marshcill Bruce, M.D., chewed us out about 
iodine 131, Enough of it (30 to 40 mCi) will destroy the thyroid 
gland; but it is a myth that it will cause cancer of the thyroid. 

• Subscriber Petr Beckmann (he subscribes to keep tabs on 
the bulk mail boys) was severely reprimanded by the publisher, 
editor, and printer of this newsletter for sloppy typesetting. The 
address for information on Amory Lovins' tactics in palming 
himself off as a scientist [AtE Oct. 81] is Mark Hugo, Nebraska 
Voice of Energy, 852 S. 35 Ave (repeat: 852 South thirty-fifth 
Avenue!), Omaha, NE 68105, tel. (402) 346-6572. And this time 
it was proof-read by the chief advertising officer, computer pro- 
grammer and circulation manager. 

• That same subscriber has an article "Nuclear Malpractice" 
on Gofman, Wald, Caldicott, and other doctors opposed to 
health in the October issue of the American Spectator ($2 from 
Box 1969, Bloomirigton, IN 47402). 



**4^¥** THE BALONEY ALLIANCE 



Many of those arrested at Diablo Canyon seem to 
see thennselves as the heirs of those arrested in the 
60's In civil disobedience exercises led by the Rev. 
Martin Luther King and others. But the comparison 
libels those who were willing to risk jail to open up 
the very political system the Abalone Alliance seeks 
to close to all but Its members . . . 

In contrast, the antl-nuke crowd has never been 
barred from the polls, or from running its own can- 
didates. It has simply been overwhelmed by the 
great mass of Americans, Including blacks, which 
doesn't share the antl-nuker passion of freezing in 
the dark. 

The Abalone Alliance isn't fighting to open up the 
democratic process to the people — It's fighting to 
overrule the will of the people. In that sense, it is the 
heir not of Martin Luther King, but of Horst Wessel 
and the Nazi Brownshirts. 

The Denver Post, 24 Sept. 1981 



* 

* 

¥ 

■¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



ACCESS TO ENERGY 



is published by Access to Energy, Inc. Publisher and editor Dr Petr 
Beckmann, professor of electrical engineering at the University of Colorado, 
independently of the University or any other institution. Subscription $18 (or 
$1 in pre-1965 US silver coins) a year for 12 monthly issues, overseas $25. 
Order from Access to Energy, Box 2298, Boulder, CO 80306 (no billing, 
please). Past issues $1 each. Cumul. index Sept. 1973 to August 1980, $12. 










John A. Taube (707) 795-8^42 
1^00 East Cotati Avenue //^ 
Rohnert Park, California 9^928 
October 23, 1981 

To: A few member of Technocracy 

I subscribe to this publication because it has 
valid information. f1uch of it is mere Price 
System quarrels of which I have not time for. 

If any of you would drop me a note with your 
thoughts of it, I would appreciate it. 



Oohn A. Taube 



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To: C^ljif' Date: 

Subject: Attached item: "Why the Purchasing Power is Not Maintained". 

This paper is intended to be educational support to the Study Course, which deals 
with the same subject, but without the diagrams. I have used this material in various 
stages of development since before 1972. I would like to submit it now as being possibly 
usefijl in classes or even as a pamphlet for the public, as it is a core subject for a lot of 
people these days. 

I have labelled it as '1st draft'. I would like to keep it as simple as possible but 
adequate to the subject. I have attached an 'Addendum' which I think may not be 
necessary or even accurate enough to be included. Discussion and criticism would be 
welcome. 



Walt Fryers. 
11515 39 Ave., 
Edmonton, AB 
T6J 0M5 



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4510 - 50th SW 
Seattle, WA 98116 

14 Feb, 1977 

W.R, Fryers 
3807 117 St. 
Edmonton, Alta 
T6J 1S8 

Dear Walt: 

Received your letter of Feb. 5 today and we were happy to hear from 
you. Because I joined the ranks of the retired this past Friday, I 
find I have time to answer you promptly. Terminated my employment at 
the newspaper after 10|- years, at age 60. because of the uncertainty 
of the future condition of my remaining good eye. At last visit to 
the Doctor on Feb. 1st he said the repair made to the retina looked 
good. He was satisfied with the progress in scar tissui^ that had 
formed and I need not see him again for six months .... unless unusual 
symptoms develop. We are hoping for the continued stability of that 
eye. We can only take it one day at a time and hope for the best. 
I will receive a very small pension from the newspaper and will not 
be eligible for Federal Social Security' till age'-62. However, we did 
apply for a disability pension under the Social Security Act today. 
If it is granted, will get same amount that I would get if I worked 
to age 65. We will not know what their decision is for 60-90 days. 
If I am denied the disability pension, there are a couple of avenues 
for appeal. Pauline and I have' figured our living costs and we can 
manage to live on savings (assuming inflation does not go too far), 
until I am eligible for regular social security at age 62. Meanwhile 
we hope that the disability pension comes thru. 

We appreciate the disruption that you are experiencing in your move 
to Edmonton as we have moved across this country three different 
times. And house hunting!; We certainly don't envy you. It seems 
that housing is getting beyond the reach of people in all circumstances 
in all parts of the Continent. 



Sorry you had to pay duty on the last pkge of slides. Of course 
there will be fewer sent at one time in the future. We wanted to 
get all those to you as early as possible, because we thought they 
might be useful in your new place in Edmonton. Thank you for the 
$50 check. As for the balance, Walt, send it when you can .... please 
do not feel that is is an urgent matter. You no doubt have encountered 
unusual expenses in your move to Edmonton, and in renting the Hub office 
space. The balance on the vu-graphs can wait. 

The section in Everett, WA will host the Technocracy New Year's event 
this March. The dates are Saturday and Sunday, March 19-20. Saturday 
will be an Area Membership meeting and a dinner in the evening. Sunday 
is a public meeting. Florence Huntting, Director of Section 1,12247 
in Everett has told me the public meeting will not be a lecture in the 
usual way. She plans to have 4 speakers. She has asked if I will 
participate, I do not yet know just how she plans to do this. 



•tfUMiMiiWiliiM^ 



Jll '--i-il AJ1K7 



.( 



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(2) 



We have wondered if you plan to attend. With your activities in 
Edmonton, we thought that you probably would not be able to make it. 
If you do come, we shall be happy to provide sleeping accommodations 
for you. If you cannot make it for March, we certainly hope that we 
get together sometime this summer. 



In d 

just 

your 

two 

Bruc 

Joe 

spen 

hydr 

He i 

If y 

to e 

Plea 

I me 

I th 

out 

dOE' 



eveloping the material for your "Access" series, we do not know 
how you will proceed. You may want to write the entire series 
self. Or you may want help. It occurred to me that there are 
other Technocrats that my be of gceat assistance to you. Donald 
e in Vancouver is an authorized speaker and an excellent writer. 
Gibson who lives in Victoria is an excellent writer. Joe has 
t a great deal of time developing an up-to-date record of the 
o resources of Canada, . .Both developed dam sites and undeveloped, 
s sem-retired. He spent many years in the Canadian Air Force, 
ou do not know Joe, I am sure that you two could be quite helpful 
ach other and of course it will also be beneficial to Technocracy, 
se don't think that I am trying to tell you how to do this job... 
rely thought you would need all the help you can get. Personally, 
ink that an undertaking as big and as important as this may turn 
to be should be directed by CHQ...,but as you know, . .we just 
t get that kind of help from CHQ on anything. 



Regarding the vu-graph on "Flow of Goods and Money", we think it 
indeed is a slide that will be very useful. When you get time to 
reply to our suggestions and sketch, we'll go on from there. We 
are working on several new ones for the study course. 

Well, Walt, I guess I have rambled enough. Write when you can. 
We always are glad to hear what is happening up your way. We 
were happy to get the Dec., '76 Prairie Area News, sent from Calgary 
a few weeks ago. 



Salutel 




Arvid J, Petersen 
Sec. 3, R.D. 12247 



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3807 117th St., 
Edmontoi., Alta. 
T6J 1S8 

_ _ 5 Feb 77. 

Greetings Arvid and Pauline (notice equal billing) 

You v?iil notice that we are now at our new address - a temporary 
one, lor Februory and March, as it now stands. We came here 
on triday 28th January. I had planned to write y ou before we 
left Cold Lake, but we were extremely busy and I did not get 
to it. ^ven now things are quite hectic. The move itself is 
disruptive. Now here, I find it a problem Just to get paper 
and typewriter together, for instance. This i s a nice home 
we are occupying, but takes some adapting on our part of course. 
The owners - our friends, the Sandilands - have gone to the 
coast and prefer to have the house occupied while they are 
away. So here we are. i4rs, Peggy Sandilands attended Grade 
twelve in riinnedosa, Manitoba, at the same time as I did, in 
iiJ£ 1931 - so w e are friends of some 46 years standing. 

Aaxk About the VU-graph slides. Two of the parcels arrived 
at Cold Lake without interruption. The large one with 25 
slides however was detained by Customs here at Edmonton. 
As I ;v as coming down here anyway, I waited to pick them up 
personally on 3 Eeb. They i-;anted to levy duties, but I 
explained that they were in the nature of a person-to-^erson 
gift. The maximum value for such a gift, they a^id, is S15. 
;do they charged customs on the remaining $10 - wh: ch amounted 
to $2.32 - not bad. I'll be sending you re-imbursement in a 
couple of installments over the next month. 

In respect to the one that I proposed ~ ihe How of Goods and 
the Plow of Ar,ney, I started a reply (bn that subject but it 
seems I may have left it in Cold Lake. Well, we will be making 
an inspection visit about every £ or 3 v.'eeks back home, so I 
can pick up the pieces soon and will reply then. This is 
certainly a hectic existence for us right now. e have a 
number of friends and relatives here in Eamonton, so we have 
a fairly busy social life too. 

Much of my time lately has been devoted to getting established 
in an office here. I think I may have mentioned it. V.'e are 
now tenents in a small office in the HUB (Housing Union Bldg. ) 
Mall, of the University of Alberta. 

6 Feb 77 y.S\m.) 

To continue, we have t e 
space but now must furnish it, and staff it, however briefly, 
and pay the costs, etc. Its something of an experiment, with 
just a handful of members to carry it and hope for results. 



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. 7 Feb 77 (/lon.i) 

Another activity ti at has been taking up time is house hunting, 
V/e are continuing a survey that we started quite a long tiae ago 
for housing in Edmonton. A move is a poL-i:ibility, but hardly 
a probability in the face of the prices we encounter, 

I will enclose a copy of a write-up on HUB, titled "Elephant", 
which mentions Technocracy as one of the new tenants of tne Mall, 
This appeared in the Student newspaper "Gateway" on 20 Jan 77» 
before I knew that our application for space had been accepted. 
Apparently the manageiient of the University property had examined 
the literature that I submitted with my application and decided 
we were acceptable tenants. They have told me ti.at they have 

ne had trouble with various contending groups - political, religious, 
foreign, etc. In fact the Mall is sojb times called the "HO Chi 
Min Trail" because of the many Chinese students thronging about. 
However I dent anticipate any trouble. We are not planning any 
confrontation tactics with anyone. To us, it is simply the 

1 , cheapest office space we could find to centralize our activity, 
which will be the quiet presentation of our program whenever 

111 and wherever we get the chance. You will see from the article 
t- at the Mail hao not been very successful in a commercial sense. 
They are almost desperate for tenants. 3o they r.re giving us 
a pretty good rate, i think, (Tentatively, the rent has bevn 
mentioned as *90 a month for about 250 square feet of space, 

St; starting on March 1st, The office is bi-level, so stairs take 
up some space, leaving us aoout 150 squ. ft. of useaole space,) 

3. 

or There are soae advanta-jes to the location that appeal to me, 

th( There are many commercial services along the Mall, such as 

eati .g places, a *pub', a Bank, a mail room, stationery supplies, 
barbers & hairdressers, dry cleaner & laundry, book and newspaper 
shops, travel agency, plant shop, optometrist, lawyer, etc. etc. 
There are several open lounges, but at the moment we have not 
discovered suitaolo meeting places for groups. Perhaps the 
best feat-i.re for me i3 that tae viall is connected by an overhead enclosed 
«ie¥a^©4 wiiicway to the main University library. It is also con- 
nected to the Humanities Bldg, and centraliji to the whole campu^, 
and, in fpct, is handy to city centre. I hope^ w^e^make a go of it, 

I will write yea again on the subject oi the draft Vu-graph slide. 

Salute I 

re sone of the purchasing pow* 

T itself w Walt Fryers, Org. 11553. 

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15 January, 1977 

; ' ^V f ^ J. ■- 



FLOW OF GOODS AND MONEY 



Dear Walt: 

Enclosed is a rough sketch with some suggested changes in your 
"Flow-Thru" chart. Let's chew this one over a bit before making up 
a final vu-graph. I think the general idea is fine, we definitely 
need a picture of the flow of goods and money in the P.S. 

Examine the sketch, read the suggestions and send me your comments. 
You may or may not agree and my additionally may suggest other changes 



1. I woyld prefer to develop this as a single frame with overlaps. 
The wide slidethru type (such as the energy chart) is somewhat awkward 
in making presentations. 

2. One basic rule in vu-graphs is to keep them simple. This one 
contains about the maximum number of elements and words, but I believe 
that in using overlays the view/listener can be given the material in 
stages that will be comprehensible. 

3. The basic chart shows only flow of goods. This can be explained 
orally in great length or very briefly, whatever is appropiate for 
the particular audience. 



4 . Flap no, 
include peopl 
could almost 
still have mi 
etc. Consume 
small circles 
consumer box 
not suggestio 
in a Technate 
portrays phys 
strictly P.S. 



1 adds flow of money. But i 
e in all fields of activity, 
be used to show flow of good 
nes, farms etc. manufacturin 
rs in a functional society w 
--the functioning personnel 
at bottom depicts the youth 
g that this is the best way 

but merely pointing out tha 
ical phenomena, whereas the 

interferences. 



t also show that consumers 

Up to this point the chart 
s in a Technate since we will 
g plants, distributing centers 
ould include those in the 
(25-45 yrs. old) and the 
and retiree groups. I am 
to illustrate "flow of goods" 
t this portion of the vu-graph 
remaining overlays are 



5. Flap no. 2--Here some of the purchasing power is diverted from 
the flow lines and this in itself would tend to disrupt the system. 
But of course savings etc. are not simply hoarded in shoe-boxes or 
mattresses so we go to flap no. :3. 

6, This is the real hitch in the system. We are not trying to show 
the myriad of complex price system manipulations but to simply lump 
them all as forms of debt creation. The continuous expansion of debt 
both private and government does not help the flow but just adds to 
the forces of dislocation. The big arrows coming from the private 
enterprise and government segments are to demonstrate that debt is 




-* . -V-i ,<1 



FLOW OF GOODS AND MONEY 



page 2 



merely created out of thin air. The two big arrows marked "x" will 
require explanation orally. The idea is to show that only a trickle 
finds its way back to the consuming public. The "x" arrows could 
lead into an additional chart. 

Let me know what you think, Walt. 

Your "Count Down" idea is unique. I would prefer to set it aside 
at present in order to finish the "Flow" chart and to catch up on 
some other projects. 

Because we still are not certain about the status of my vision, I 
will be undertaking thees things rather cautiously. 

Write when you can. 



Salutel 



Arvid J. Petersen 
4510-' 50th S.W. 
Seattle, WA 98116 



12247-3 



^.stmrntt^gmummiiSi^t 



\ 



ACCESS 






Dear Walt: 

We were thrilled to receive the copy of your proposal to ACCESS, 
Alberta. That is just the type of activity that we had hoped 
Technocrats would get into... all around the Continent, That is what 
got us started on vu-graphs. 

In reading and re-reading your statements, I think you did an excellent 
job in specifying your proposal. It is direct, brief, accurate acd 
certainly should get positive response from ACCESS. 

We realize that should ACCESS give you the go-ahead it will require 
a great deal of effort and time to prepare. We certainly shall 
give you all the assistance we can on graphic materials. 

Several questions come to mind immediately: 

1. ACCESS probably will ask for or suggest the number of lectures 
irj the series. Do you now have in mind how many there would be? 
Do you anticipate 15 minute, ^ hour or 1 hour presentations? 

2. Are you planning to develop this as a "study course" type of 
series or is each segment to be somewhat self-contained or 

>■■! ' conclusive? 

3. Do you have any notion of a schedule? that is, when ACCESS will 
want to introduce the series (summer, spring, fall)? We feel 
that the entire series should be pretty well worked out prior 
to the initial telecast. For example if the series ran 6 or 8 
or 10 installments and they are telecast one each week, it 
would be very hectic if not impossible to prepare the material 
concurrently with the telecasts. 

A. Do you agree that the material should be developed in such a 
manner to make it appropriate for use in any area of Canada or 
U.S.? That is, avoid references to specific areas that might 
regionalize the program. Of course ACCESS, Alberta is directed 
to the citiaens of that Province, but don't you agree that it 
should be structured in such a manner to be appropriate for 
all audiences? 

5. I suspect ACCESS will pre-record this on video-tape. Maybe 

this is preipature, but will copies of the video-tapes be available? 

6. Will you be getting much help from Technocrats in your area? 
We will help if we can. My experience on developing vu-graphs 

not much assistance Jfrom local Technocrats. 

7. We hope the above questions are not out of order. Whatever 
your thoughts may be, we are interested in hearing more on 
the subjects. 



Salute! 



CM- 



:V^,-.:\ 



-' 'TW • 'C^- 



J^^g^g^ 



imam 



misM 




7( 






B t • T^ 



^■:>->:*^ 



H-^ 



'•>. 



M 



15 January 1977 



RESTATEMENT OF TECHNOCRACY BASICS 



(lor^ 



1 6 ^j*-. 



Dear Walt: 

In your little NOTE marked personal, to Arvid Petersen, the second 



sentence reads 



'I seem to have touched a sensitive nerve!" 



Touchel 

I, too, have been slapped on the wrist a couple of times by CHQ. I 
am not too sure just who I_S CHQ? 

Regarding your "Basics" paper, I agree their is no reason to change 
your position or your statement. But of course if CHQ says it is 
not suitable for publication I do not wish to get involved in a 
hassle over it. 

Personally I am just a little weary from criticism that is generated 
simply because we do not use exactly the IDENTICAL language that some 
one else in Technocracy used in ;years past. I refuse to accept the 
idea that all members must talk or write like trained parrots. 

Your "Basics", in my view, is well written. Just because your language 
is not exactly like my language does not make it incorrecti I consider 
the development of the theme in your paper to be nicely organized, and 
correctly stated. I fail to find "a number of misstatements, a few 
near misses and some faulty wording". 

^Nuff said! 

We can talk on this when we meet again. 



Salute! 



Qm^ 



Arvid Petersen 



P.S. There is a little anecdote about the late William Randolph 
Hearst Sr., founder of the Hearst newspaper chain. It seems the old 
guy was not very well educated. He once wrote a piece and misspelled 
the simple word "BIRD". He wrote "BURD" and someone called him on it. 
He roared "If B-U-R-D doesn't spell bird what the hell does it spell?" 



iiiiiiiHBHHil 




YV 



,'-::^i 



.•::-?*^ 



,.^ 



15 January, 1977 

-■■-1 XV '^ 



FLOW OF GOODS AND MONEY 



Dear Walt: 

Enclosed is a rough sketch with some suggested changes in your 
"Flow-Thru" chart. Let's chew this one over a bit before making up 
a final vu-graph. I think the general idea is fine, we definitely 
need a picture of the flow of goods and money in the P.S. 

Examine the sketch, read the suggestions and send me your comments. 
You may or may not agree and my additionally may suggest other changes. 

1. I woyld prefer to develop this as a single frame with overlat^s. 
The wide slidethru type (such as the energy chart) is somewhat awkward 
in making presentations, 

2. One basic rule in vu-graphs is to keep them simple. This one 
contains about the maximum number of elements and words, but I believe 
that in using overlays the view/listener can be given the material in 
stages that will be comprehensible. 

3. The basic chart shows only flow of goods. This can be explained 
orally in great length or very briefly, whatever is appropiate for 
the particular audience. 



4 . Flap no , 
include peopl 
could almost 
still have mi 
etc. Consume 
small circles 
consumer box 
not suggestin 
in a Technate 
portrays phys 
strictly P.S. 



1 adds 
e in al 
be used 
nes, fa 
rs in a 
--the f 
at bott 
g that 

but me 
ical ph 

interf 



flow of money 
1 fields of a 

to show flow 
rms etc. manu 

functional s 
unctioning pe 
om depicts th 
this is the b 
rely pointing 
enomena, wher 
erences. 



But it also show that consumers 
ctivity. Up to this point the chart 

of goods in a Technate since we will 
facturing plants, distributing centers 
ociety would include those in the 
rsonnel (25-45 yrs. old) and the 
e youth and retiree groups. I am 
est way to illustrate "flow of goods" 

out that this portion of the vu-graph 
eas the remaining overlays are 



5. Flap no. 2--Here some of the purchasing power is diverted from 
the flow lines and this in itself would tend to disrupt the system. 
But of course savings etc. are not simply hoarded in shoe-boxes or 
mattresses so we go to flap no. :3. 

6, This is the real hitch in the system. We are not trying to show 
the myriad of complex price system manipulations but to simply lump 
them all as forms of debt creation. The continuous expansion of debt 
both private and government does not help the flow but just adds to 
the forces of dislocation. The big arrows coming from the private 
enterprise and government segments are to demonstrate that debt is 



^i^jaoiaaam 



msam 



'■^:i'*.'- 



^4, 



FLOW OF GOODS AND MONEY 



page 2 



merely created out of thin air. The two big arrows marked "x" will 
require explanation orally. The idea is to show that only a trickle 
finds its way back to the consuming public. The "x^' arrows could 
lead into an additional chart. 



Let me know what you think, Walt. 

Your "Count Down" idea is unique. I would prefer to set it aside 
at present in order to finish the "Flow" chart and to catch up on 
some other projects. 

Because we still are not certain about the status of my vision, I 
will be undertaking thees things rather cautiously. 

Write when you can. 



Salute! 



Arvid J. Petersen 
4510-' 50th S.W. 
Seattle, WA 98116 



12247-3 






■^ 



r^: <a 







-ZiiJJH 



11 Jan. , 1977 

W.R. Fryers -^ 

Box 298 

Cold Lake, Alta TOA OVO 

Dear Walt : 

We received your letter of Dec. 31 and package last week, but did not 
answer immediately because we thought you'd respond soon to my letter 
of Dec. 27. ... received your Jan 6 letter today, and pleased to hear from you, 



Because the first vu-graphs arrived OK, we will 
in same manner. Mailed 2 pkges today via Parcel 
^'Educational Material ,, Not for Resale", One pkge 
and the other just one ..the double size one on e 
have all vu-graphs that have CHQ approval, with 3 
#28 & f , Number 26 is merely an announcement,.. 
Presents ,,.. lecture by A, Petersen", It would be o 
if you want one with your name on it, I certainly 
you. Number 28 is a cartoon about "Social Securi 
would mean little to Canadians. And number 30 is 
and water pollution in U.S.,.. data somewhat out-d 



continue to mail 
Post, marked 

contains 25 vu-graphs 
nergy. You will now 

exceptions #26, 

reading" Technocracy 
f no use to you, but 

can make one up for 
ty" in U.S. Probably 
a tabulation on air 
ated (1971). 



We were extremely happy to get your package and are quite interested 
in all the contents. Because we want to let you know the vu-graphs 
are en route, we are writing this letter. Our response' to the other 
items: "Access", Restatement of Technocracy Basics, and your suggestions 
for vu-graphs on the Flow of Money and Countdown will come in a few 
days. I shall write about each separately. Delighted to find a 
Technocrat who is "doing something about it", as It;.'oward Scott used 
to say. 

Also, I will fill you in on the "eye" situation later. Let us know 
when the packages arrive. Also, we"d like to know the date you leave 
for Edmonton, and that address. We hope to see you this coming March 
at the New Year's meeting in this area.... it has been held in Everett 
for the past several years. 



Salute! 




Arvid J. Petersen 
4510 - 50th S.W. 
Seattle, WA 98116 




'^■'."-'■*-'ct.'<^- 






Box 298, 

Cold Lake, Alta. 

TOA OYO 

6 Jan 77 



Arrld J. Petersen, 
4510 - 50th 3.W., 
Seattle, WA 9^116 

Dear Arrld J 



Tour letter of December 27 arrived today, I am devastatocl at your 
misfortune. It iw a misfortune for all of us, I beg you to take 
care of your right ey«, Dont let the demands of Technocracy im- 
pose on you, howeyor smch concerned you may feel in meeting than. 

By now you may have received my mailing to you and you will see 
pexixaps 8oii« reasons for iqy dftlay in responding to you. In the 
paokage I •nclosed a letter, a note, your prints, hqt item on the 
Basics of Technocracy, and vnj submission to ACCESS, It went by 
first olass mail on Tuesday i^th Jan, Oh, yes, ^ enclosed material 
on n^ previously mentioned idea for a vu^graph slide or slides^ 
illustrating the Flow of Goods and the Flow of Moneyi plus a 
sketch or cartoon item titled "Countdown". 

In the letter I mentioned that the slides arrived OK, They were 
marked "Cleared Customs - Edmonton" and there was no charge at all. 
Our Post Office says to continme the same procedure. Although no 
one here is an authority on Cust(»as, we thinks that 'Educational 
Material, Not for Resale" is normally exempt. If the same technique 
does not work next time, I can always appeal to customs for rebate. 

About your eye problem, again, I have read recently that a laser 
beam has been used to 'weld' detached retinas back in place. Was 
that considered; was it tried} did it fail? 

A friend and his wife have offered us the use of their house in 
Edmonton while they are away at the coast during February and March, 
This will give me a good chance to promote our Edmonton activities. 
I have a tentative eirrangment for office space on the University, 
in the Students •HUB» Mall, If we get it, it will cost us in the 
order of $100 a month I think - which will be a 8eve» strain on 
the small group that now exists in Edmonton. In fact I think abofct 
four of us will be cairying it initially. It would be in the nature 
of a test period - if we get it, 

I also hope to attend the next regional meeting in Iferch at Belling- 
ham, if all goes well. Maybe I will meettH you again there. 

Take care 1 1 1 
Wplt Fryers. 



-^. 




) '' 



) 



W.R, Fryers 
Box 298 

Cold Lake, Alta 
TO A OVO 



December 27, 1976 



Dear Walt : 

We wrote you a letter on Nov. 25 and also sent 10 vu-graphs via 
parcel post on same date. We have received no reply to either, 
and are wondering whether you received the above or has there been 
some other reason for no response? We certainly hope you are in 
good health. 



Regarding the package of 10 vu-graphs sent No 
later that you probably will be charged duty 
told the local U.S. post office the value was 
insurance value in case of loss in the mail, 
for tariff upon entering Canada. We don't kn 
remaining vu-graphs to you at a minimum of du 
government. Perhaps you could check with you 
determine the most economical way to ship the 
of the NWT magazine suggested we send them ab 
by first class mail and mark the package "Pho 
it seems to me, to be a rather expensive proc 
you to avoid duty charges at your end, it wil 



V. 25, we realized 
for the package. We 

$30.00 thinking of 
rather than the charges 
ow how to ship the 
ty to the Canadian 
r postal service to 
se. Florence Huntting 
out 3 or 4 at a time 
tographg". This, 
edure, but if it enables 
1 be worth it. 



As mentioned in letter of Nov. 25, I have had trouble with my left 
eye. Had surgery for a detached retina on Oct. 24. The operation 
was successful but five weeks later I suffered a new tear in the 
retina, which resulted in complete loss of vision in that eye. 
Doctors all agreed further surgery would be of little purpose. 
And now I am receiving treatment o6 the remaining good eye, hoping 
vision can be retained. 

However, in spite of the eye trouble, I have nearly completed all 
the remaining vu-graphs to give you a complete set. We shall send 
them as soon as we haar from you and determine best mode of shipment 

I plan to retire from my Price System job sometime in Jan. or Feb. 
and will be able to devote more time to Technocracy, as long as I 
retain vision in my right eye. 

Please let us hear from you soon. Hoping you had a pleasant Holiday 
and wishing you good health in the coming year. 




Arvid J. Petersen 
12247-3, Seattle 



> _ 



v'.Ttvf*-,,^i!; 



C 



1^ ^ 



^?^ 



f^ f** 



Box 298, 

Gold Lake, Alta. 

TOA OVO 

31 Do© 76 

Arrid J. Peteraen, 
J,510 - 50th SW. , 
Saattlt, WA 98116 

Greetings Anrid(and Pauline) 

Thanlai for your letter of 25 Nor. The 10 alides hare arrired in good 
order. They look great, and I hope they get good use and good results. 

Sorry though to hear of your eye triiuhle. Sounds pretty serious, especially 
for your line of vrork, both on and off the job. However I understand that 
recent technology in this direction is good. Such problena as yours and 
ny wife's, Edith, illustrates how critical is the advance of science on 
which we depend and how desperately some of us await to be rescued by it. 

I am enclosing sketches of my suggestion for a multi^-OTsrley slide. It is 
intended to illustrate Lessons 17 and 18 of the old Study Course, and parts 
of pages 17 and 18 of the 'TTSD' abridged version. It could be presented 
in 3 or 4 parts: The Flow of Goods j the Flow of Money (direct channels)} 
the Flow of Mon^ (Savings to Debt). It seems to me this would be a useful 
ohart in conducting study classes and in some^public presentations. It 
gets the stage for a discussion of the Debt Structure - the fatal flaw of 
the Price Systea. Tour chart No. 7 could be used as follow up mat^ried, 
and I have in mind further development of that theme. I originally pre- 
pared this chart lMsty|s»tVie«<t?dl3 ftbi many years ago. It didn't get much 
response. I had it re-draim in 1972 and a few copies made. I meant to 
develop a write-up to acconpany it, but have not done so as yet* I think 
your type of visual display material would be perfect for a complete presen- 
tation* However you may not agree. I can see many variations that could 
be made in the chart. The flow lines are sometimes proportional to the 
flow, and sometimes not. The "Savings" tap-off s are too large, I suppose, 
and particularly the chart doelS^lJidioati^the tremendous multiplication 
factor in debt created out of a given amount of savings. However the 
picture is intended to be more qt^itative than quantitative. I am sure 
you will see improvements that you will want to make. (The word "Con- 
sumers" is misspelled.) 

I am throwing in aiiother chart which might serve as the basis of something; 
Countdown. Pretty crude, though. 

Keep the slides coming. I wont specify which ones next. Just use your 
judgement or eonvenlenee* 

S-lttte for a great New Year 



Walt Fryer So 

P.S. The Flow Chart is so wide it may necessitate two slides with a 
visual overlap to maintain continuity. 






■:sm 



■ si-« ■ 



I'ri 



%• 



Arridt I am returning the prints of the special slides, as you requested, 
I take it that these were made up for a particular lecture, to help re- 
inforce concept* presented in words; sort of fillers. Some of these 
could be useful. If they are authorized and you make slides of them, 
you could include ones that you think are of general application. The 
pyramid one, however, seems too limited and special for general use by 
everyone. (The one with Democracy at the top, and various govenanental 
forms listed.) 

I am enclosing a copy of my subnission to ACCESS radio/TY in Ed- 
monton, This submission has been aporoved by CER, and I have had a 
letter from ACCESS saying they are considering it. If ACCESS accepts 
the proposal ^ will be in the market for lots of audio/visual supporting 
material, I dont know what help ACCESS proviaee. In fact I dont really 
know what I am getting into. Looks like a lot of work and the prepara- 
tion will take quite a long time I expect, because CHI will have to ap- 
prove each lecture in advance, itk I expect 1*11 be looking for help, 

Walt i-'ryers. 



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Box 298, 

Cold Lake, Alta* 

TOA OVO 

31 Dee 76 

Arrid J. Petersen, 
i4510 - 50th SW., 
Seattle, WA 98116 

Greetings Arrid (and Pauline) 

Thanks for your letter of 25 Nor. The 10 slides have arrived in good 
order. They look great, and I hope they get good use and good results. 

Sorry though to hear of your eye trouble. Sounds pretty seilous, especially 
for your line of work, both on and off the Job, However I understand that 
recent technology In this direction is good. Such problems as yours and 
my vdfe*s, Edith, illustrates how critical is the advance of science on 
which we depend and hov desperately some of us await to be rescued by it. 

I SB enclosing sketches of my suggestion for a niulti-overlcy slide. It is 
intended to illustrate Lessons 17 and 18 of the old Study Course, and parts 
of pages 1':^ and 18 of the 'TTSD' abridged version. It could be presented 
in 3 or 4 parts: The Flow of Goods; the Flow of Money (direct channels); 
the Flow of Money (Savings to Debt). It seems to me this would be a useful 
chart in conducting study clas: es and in sone^public presentations. It 
sets the sta:^e for a discussion of the Debt Structure - the fatal flaw of 
the Price System. Tour chart No. 7 could be used as follow up matftrial, 
and I have in mind further developcient of that theme. I originally pre- 
pared this ch?rt iBiekilixfckenXBfvAS flabi many years ago. It didn't get much 
response, I had it re-draxra in 1972 and a few copies made, I meant to 
develop a write-up to accompany it, but have not done so as yet» I think 
your type of visual display material would be perfect for a complete presen- 
tation. However you may not agree. I can see many variations that could 
be made in the chart. The flow lines are sonetimes proportional to the 
flow, and sometimes not. The "Savings" tap-off s ere too large, I suppose, 
and particularly the chart does^indieatk! the tremendous multiplication 
factor in debt created out of a given amount of savings. However the 
picture is intended to be more q<3(jj.itative than quantitative, I am sure 
you will see improvements that you will want to make, C^he word "Con- 
Bimera" is misspelled.) 

I am throwing in another chart which might serve as the basis of something; 
Countdown. Pretty crude, though. 

Keep the slides coming. I wont specify which ones next. Just use your 
Judgment or oonvenienee* 

S lute for a great New Year 



Walt Fryers o 

P.S, The Flow Chart is so wide it may necessitate two slides with a 
visual overlap to maintain continuity. 



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4 510 - 50th S.W, 
Seattle, WA 98116 

25 November '76 



W. R. Fryers 

Box 298 

Cold Lake, Alta 

Dear Walt : 



TOA OVO 



Received your letter of 15 Nov. and both Pauline & I were pleased 
to hear from you. As you probably surmised we are quite enthused 
with the use of graphics such as the vu-graphs in presenting 
Technocracy's story. We certainly are gratified that you, too, 
are interested in using them. 

We are sending via parcel-post a pkge of ten vu-graphs , numbers : 
2,4,7,19,21,22,23,29,33,37. Reason for the peculiar sequence of 
numbers is that we happened to have those on hand as duplicates. 

I shall be happy to make you additional duplicates of all the slides 
that I have already produced. I prefer to do them a few at a time. 
Prepayment is not necessary. It will be better that you send 
remittance after you receive further slides. 

Enclosed is an updated list of slides. The red circle indicates 
slides mailed to you. The list does not contain the seven special 
ones that I made specifically for my own lectures (as the one in 
Vancouver). Enclosed are photo-prints of these special slides. 
They also can be duplicated although I do not yet have CHQ approval 
for these. You may keep the list, but I would appreciate getting 
the photo-prints returned. 

Altogether it adds up to 45 in number. Pauline and I have 18 

additional slides in the developmental stage they are primarily 

for use in the new study course (4 or 6 sessions) that was worked 
out by the Long Beach Technocrats, These new slides are "quickies"., 
hand-drawn, hand lettered, hand colored. As we modify and improve 
tham after experimenting in our local study classes, we will make 
up finished products that can be duplicated. This will require 
many weeks of effort and approval from CHQ. 

I experienced a bit of misfortune last month. On Oct. 24 I had an 
emergency operation for a detached retina in the left eye. Spent 
one week in the hospital and 3 weeks at home unable to do anything 



You mentioned an idea for a new vu-graph. We shall be interested 
to get the details, though I will not be able to work it up right 
away. Thank you for the enclosed money order for $30.00. Will 
appreciate hearing if the package arrives o.k. You can order any 
further vu-graphs by number taken from the enclosed list. 








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3VEA & eVfltL LARGE 
PHONE 1-250-753-8493 
303-158 PROMENADE DR 
MANAIMO, B.C. V9R 6M7 



Walt Fryers 
11515 - 39th Ave 
Edmonton, AB 



T6j 0M5 



1(^03) 43^-4496 



Oct 19, 1998 



Greeting Walt, 

Thanks for OTTAWA report (Province plus Edmonton Sun-Sept I/98) 
FX)RCES TO GEAR UP FOR MILLENNIUM BUG & MILITARY PREPARING TO TAKE OVER 

AFTER 2000 BUG BOMB. 



When I took your E-Mail address over the phone I'm not stire 
how to put this into a typewriter. Please send me correct way it should be 
typed . 

Please see enclosed! 

July 7/98 Globe & Mail "Most firms battling Y2K bugt survey" 

Aug 21/98 " " "Treasury Board hires new millennium bug ctar" 

Sept 12/98 Times-Colonist "Task force urges Japan speed up Y2K programs" 

Sept 28/98 Globe & Mail "A tale of two leros" 

Oct 3/98 Vancouver SUN "Domino effect ignored Y2K analysis" 

Have a good January 1, 2000 



copy I GHQ 





^* .' ,y.-i\ 



Lila Wagner 
1808 - l6th St 
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 
U.S.A. 44223-1832 



8VEA & CYRIL LARGE 
PHONE 1-250-753-8493 
303-158 PROMENADE DR 
NANAIMO, B.C. V9R 6M7 



Oct 5. 1998 



DONATION I 8141-3 News DiRest 



Greetings Lila, 

1, We appreciate the efforts which go into your DIGEST production. It is 
information useful for our organiiation. Enclosed $100 U.S. funds 
($136,79 Canadian) to help with your postage. 

2, For myself I choose your type-set as used Sept/98 issue over this month's 
Oct/98 type-set. 

3, Has your DIGEST mentioned the Y2K bug - regarding year 2000 computer 
compliance 7 If so, which issue 7 

4, We requested our Nanairao Library to obtain "TIME BOMB 2000" -(1998) 
by Edward Yourdon ($30.00 Canadian) Prentice Hall PTR 

Upper Saddle River 
New Jersey USA 07458 

5, People concerned about Computers at 'year 2000' may also get concerned 
about Technocracy's Technological Design ? Helps the conversation. 

6, More information: E-Mail wfryers AO Free Net, Edmonton, AB. Can .«^:::: 

(home address) Walt Fryers, 11513 - 39th Ave 

Edmonton, AB T6J 0M5 phone 1 1 (403) 434-4496 

7, enclosed: Time Bomb 2000 (Preface pages XVI and XYll) 

y2K bug cancels Mountie holidays (Vancouver-BC SUN - Oct 3/98) 



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$30,00 Canadian 



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Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07^+58 

U.S.A. 



VANCOUVER, B.C. SUN 



Oct 3, 1998 



P-1 



Y2K bug cancels Mountie holidays 



SOUTHAM NEWSPAPERS 
and REUTER 

OTTAWA — Preparing for 
the worst, the RCMP has taken 
the unusual step of issuing a na- 
tion-wide ban on all vacation 
and leave to ensure the full 
force is available to fight the 
millennium bug. 

The ban, which stretches 
from Dec. 27, 1999. to March 15, 
2000, is part of the RCMP's 
emergency preparedness strat- 
egy to "expect the unexpected 



and work for the worst-case 
scenario," said Dave Morreau, 
who heads the RCMP's Year 
2000 project 

Most computer systems use 
two digits, not four, to denote 
years. This means that when 
2000 comes, they could read 
"00" as "1900," potentially foul- 
ing up or crashing any service 
that relies on computers. 

"I'm not Chicken Little saying 
the sky is falling, but we are 
likely to have problems so we 



have to make sure, as a national 
police force, that we are ready 
for whatever happens," said 
Morreau. 

Morreau said the RCMP isn't 
braced for a major disaster but 
"it's only prudent and precau- 
tionary" for the force to prepare 
for the worst with contingency 
plans to handle major disrup- 
tions to supplies of power, fuel, 
water, and communications. 

SEE MOUNTIES, A2 



MOUNTIESfromA2 



Time difference means New 
Zealand will warn of 2000 woes 



While nobody really knows 
for certain what will happen at 
the stroke of midnight on Jan. 1, 
2000, the calamity theories 
abound. Some believe the mil- 
lennium bug could cause minor 
disruptions, while others pre- 
dict it could trigger foul-ups in 
computers that control every- 
thing from hydro and financial 
systems to air traffic control. 
Some are calling for an eco- 
nomic slowdown, if not a full- 
blown recession. 

The RCMP's 29 computer 
systems are^ampp^t-hq so- 
called "mission critical" sys- 
tems the federal government 
says must be refiaired -by 206o 
to ensure the "health, safe'ty arid 
well-being of Canadians." Mor- 
reau says the force has already 



fixed and tested about 90 jp'eri 
cent of its systems, putting it 
well ahead of the readiness 'of 
most federal departments' andj 
agencies. 

In Washington, the head, of a 
U.S. Senate committee on^the 
Year 2000 problem said Friday 
he will set up a system to take 
advantage of the time diflerence 
in the Pacific to get early warn- 
ing of problems as 1999 end?, 

Republican Senator Bob hi^n- 
nett of Utah said a Year 2000 
"First Alert" system focused on 
what happens in New Zealand 
and other Pacific countries af- 
ter midriight Dec. 31, 15^99, 
would giVe the U.S. more than 
17 hours notice of how utilities 
and transport services may be 
disrupted. 



Vancouver Sun P-1 
Oct 3, 1998 

Not a red cent for 
Eron investors 

DAVID BAINES 

SUN BUSINESS REPORTER 

It has been one year since reg- 
ulators in British Columbia sus- 
pended Eron Mortgage Corp.. 
but so far none of the 3,200 in- 
vestors who sunk $222 million 
into 47 Eron-sponsored projects 
has recovered a cent. 

"It's a dismal day that pro- 
vides time to reflect on the hu- 

SEEERON.Ai- 
ERON from Af 

Investors will 
eventually get 
$40 miUion 

m.nn wrcck.ngc that w.ns created 
by the Eron collapse," said 
David Craig, chair of the Eron 
Lenders' Committee. 

"What comes home to roost is 
the enormity of the fiasco that 
has taken place, the difficulty in 
recovering people's funds, and 
the frustration of trying to hold 
the regulatory autnorities ac- 
countable." 

Judicial trustee Crai^ Bushell 
estimated Friday that mvcstors 
will eventually recoup $40 mil- 
lion after all trustee and legal 
costs. That works out to only 18 
cents on the dollar, on average. 

Yet to be determined is 
whether net proceeds will be 
distributed to investors on a 
project-by-project basis, or 
whether they will be pooled so 
that all investors receive the 
same percentage, regardless of 
which project ^hey invested in. 

Until this issue is settled, not 
a cent will be returned to in- 
vestors, many of whom have 
been made destitute by the 
firm's collapse. 

Meanwhile, the RCMP says it 
has established a seven-person 
team to probe allegations of 
criminal conduct by Eron presi- 
dent Brian Slobogian's and vice- 
president Frank Biller. But it has 
not yet sought or obtained a sin- 
gle document from the judicial 
trustee, who is in possession of 
Eron's books and records. 




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▼ COMPUTING Victoria TIMES-CX)LONIST 12 Sept 98 C-9 

Task force urges Japan 
to speed up Y2K programs 



TOKYO (AP) — Japanese companies should wind 
up iheir programs to counter the millennium com- 
puter bug problem by next June, a government pan- 
el set up to coordinate the efforts recommended Fri- 
day. 

The recommendation came in a report compiled 
by a special task force chaired by Prime Minister 
Keizo Obuchi called the Advanced Information and 
Telecommunications Society Promotion Headquar- 
ters. 

The report encouraged large firms to test their 
readiness for the potential tum-of-the-century crisis 
by staging mock exercises no later than June. 1999. 
Govcnimeni-nin computers which have a sub.siantial 
impact on people's welfare will be required to meet 
this deadline, it said. 

Experts say computers around the world could be 
\ ulnerable to systemic crashes on the first day of the 



2 1 st century. Many computers were programmed to 
recognize years by the last two digits, so they may 
mistake January 1 , 2000 for Jan. 1, 1900. 

Japan has faced criticism that it has been slow to 
deal with the so-called Year 2000 problem. 

The Tokyo Stock Exchange said last month that 
less than 10 per cent of 1,549 companies which 
responded to a recent survey said they had complet- 
ed their millennium bug preparations. 

The Japanese panel instructed government agen- 
cies and ministries to start compiling — and then 
make public — data tracking their internal progress 
in coping with the problem on a quanerly basis. 

Agencies and ministries will also be required to 
gauge the efforts of private companies in industries 
under their jurisdiction by carrying out spot checks 
every three months, the results of which will be pub- 
licly relea.sed, the report said. 



'Domino effect' ignored in 
Y2K analysis, survey says 



X 



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o 



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u 

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o 

c 



CANADIAN I'KtSS 

OTTAWA — With 65 
weeks to go until Jan. 1, 
2000. more and more busi- 
nesses are taking a serious 
look at how they're going 
to eradicate the mother of 
all computer bugs, but 
they're not spending 
enough time checking out 
plans of their partners and 
clients. 

Statistics Canada re- 
leased its final report Fri- 
day on a survey conduct- 
ed in May which provided 
good news for those who 
are jittery about the mil- 
lennium bug. 

About 70 per cent of re- 
spondents are doing 
something to update their 
technology to Y2K-ready 
status. 

And nearly all of them 
expect to be ready when 
the clock strikes midnight 
on New Year's Eve. 1999. 

But as the date draws 
nearer, businesses must 
begin to take a close look 
at how their partners, sup- 
pliers and clients are deal- 



ing with the problem if 
they plan to make a 
smooth entry into the new 
century. 

The survey suggested 
that close to three-quar- 
ters of respondents hadn't 
even broached the topic 
with others. 

"You do have to worry 
about the domino effect," 
said Prof. Jack Gorrie, co- 
ordinator for the Y2K plan 
at the University of Toron- 
to. 

"People can fix all the 
problems in their own 
area, but what they have to 
do is look outside too. 
Even though your plant is 
wonderfully set up, you 
could still be dead in the 
water." 

The millennium bug lies 
in computer codes that 
have kept track of the year 
using only two digits. If 
not nxed, those systems 
will show the year as 1900 
instead of 2000 as of Jan. 1. 

Some predict the prob- 
lem could lead to chaos in 
everything from elevators 



to bill payments to air traf- 
fic control, though many 
experts agree it's not likely 
to lead to the doomsday 
scenario originally pre- 
dicted. 

Of 2,700 respondents to 
the May survey, 18 per 
cent were using formal ac- 
tion plans to address the 
problem, twice as many as 
in a 1997 survey. 

The overwhelming ma- 
jority of those who imple- 
mented formal action 
plans were "almost com- 
pletely" or "completely 
confident" their systems 
would make the hurdle 
into the next century with 
ease. 

TTie survey found that 15 
per cent of large firms 
were already year-2000 
ready. About 27 per cent of 
them will be ready by the 
end of the year. 

About nine per cent of 
large firms either weren't 
taking any steps to reme- 
dy the problem or didn't 
know when they'd be 
ready. 









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ELIZABETH CHURCH 
» The Globe and Mail, Toronto 

Lome Williams is getting ready. 
He has two dehydrators so he 
can stockpile food. He has a 
house that is well insulated against 
the cold winters of northern British 
Columbia, and he has a wood stove 
to keep it warm. 

"My first concern," said the 
Prince George photocopier techni- 
cian, "is food, shelter and heat." 

He's thinking about buying a 
gun, too, but insists it would be 
only for hunting. 

"I'm not one of those survivalisl 
nuts armed to the teeth," said the 
45-year-old father of two. "My hope 
is that it won't come to that." 

Mr. Williams Is preparing for the 
first day of the new millennium — 
and the three months or so that fol- 
low. 

The way he and others like him 
see it, the Year 2000 computer 
problem isn't going to be solved in 
the next 15 months. So when the 
clock strikes 12 on Jan. 1, 2000, 
computers and the vast array of 
systems that depend on them to 
operate v^nll falter or fail completely 
— all because of two lousy zeros in 
the date (most computers use only 
two zeros, so 00 would be read as 
the year 1900). 

Some businesses have hired spe- 
cial computer experts to fix their 
systems; oilu-is have l)()Uj.;hl new 
t'HiiipMU-'fxl . Tht:- (Jjilner Group, ;i 
resjiccli'd C(i^i\\jLtttrr i oiiSiilfancy, 
estimates the global cost to fix the 
problem at $600-billion (U.S.). With 
the cost of litigation figured in, 
some estimates have gone as high 
asSl.S-trillion. 

What will happt'ti to computer 
programs thai are not fixed or even 
to ones believed to be fixed is any- 
body's guess. 

Some people say the glitch v\ill 
cause minor problems such as iso- 
lated blackouts or .some miscalcu- 
lated bills. lUil others, including Mr. 
Williams, are bracing for chaos — 
no power, no water, no bank ma- 
chines, no phones. Transportation 
systems could break down, they 
speculate, and food could disap- 
pear from store shelves. 

Think of recent television images 
from Russia, then apply them to 
Canada in the dead of winter. 

Some in this camp, the "nuts" as 
Mr. Williams calls them, are buying 
weapons and building fonified 
homes in the wilderness to keep the 
have-nots at bay. 

Internet sites are doing a brisk 
business selling survival kits and 
electric generators to people anx- 
ious to squirrel away supplies and 
make sure their lights stay on. 
Please see COMPl/TER on page A7 



Individuals aren't the only ones 
bracing for the big New Year's Day. 

Governments, corporations and 
utilities say they are working flat 
out to rid their computer systems of 
the Year 2000 glitch. Of course, the 
skeptics complain they are not 
doing enough. 

Most large organizations have as- 
sembled special Y2K teams to comb 
through computer codes and have 
promised them hefty payouts — at 
times more than half their annual 
salary — to see the job through to 
its end. 

While they are doing battle on 
the front lines, like the people buy- 
ing generators, they also are draw- 
ing up contingency plans. 
Committees have been formed, 
command centres planned and key 
personnel told not to make ar- 
rangements for New Year's Eve, 

1999 — their employer may require 
their service. 

Last month, the U.S. Federal Re- 
serve Board announced that it will 
have an extra $50-billion (U.S.) in 
cash on hand next year in case jit- 
tery consumers want more green- 
backs in their pockets — or under 
their mattresses — when the year 

2000 rolls around. 

A spokesman for the Bank of 
Canada said it is looking at the 
issue as well, though it thinks the 
risk is reasonably small. 

One doom-and-gloom scenario 
has bunks losing computer records 
of bank deposits. 

"Our expectation is that there are 
going to be bumps," said Mr. 
Burns, who is in charge of getting 
the Canadiim Imperial Bank of 
Commerce ready for tlie millen- 
nium change. 

Mr. Burns said the bank plans to 
have all its systems ready 12 
months in advance, but it will also 
take precautions, including putting 
critical staff up in downtown hotel 
rooms on Dec. 31, 1999, so they will 
be nearby if there is trouble. 



A veteran of Ottawa computer 
firm SHL Systemhouse Inc., Mr. 
Clark joined Ontario Hydro last No- 
vember to lead North America's 
largest public utility in its race 
against the clock. 

In the worid of Y2K survivalists, 
he is sitting in one avi^fully hot seat. 

Most hard-liners argue that the 
power grid is the weakest link in the 
chain. With its reliance on comput- 
ers to do everything from monitor 
transmitters to run nuclear plants, 
they figure there is no way the in- 
dustry will be ready for the date 
change. Mr. Clark has cruised the 
Internet. He knows about the pre- 
dictions. And he wishes people 
would settle dowrn. 



Ontario Hydro's shiny Toronto 
headquarters. "The last thing 
the economy needs is a run on 
the bank or people dropping 
out." 

Since his arrival at Ontario 
Hydro, Mr. Clark has assembled 
a team of 600 regular and con- 
tract staff to track down date- 
sensitive equipment and make it 
year-2000 compliant. He has a 
budget of $125-million and 
plans to have the utility ready by 
next June. The last six months of 
the year wall be spent scenario- 
planning and getting emergency 
response systems in place. 



A tale 
of two 
zeros 

Attitudes toward the 

Year 2000 computer 

problem range from 

concern to sheer panic 



Y2K ON THE WEB 

Here is a selection of Internet 
sites dealing with the Year 
2000 problem: 

♦ www.year2000.com/ Peter 
de Jager's Web site. Includes 
news, eirticles, conferences, 
links to memufactures sites 
with compliance information 
and updates on Y2K-sensitive 
stocks. 

♦ www.y2ktimebomb.com/ 
Westergaard Year 2000. 
News updates, reports on key 
industries, U.S. government 
activity and international de- 
velopments. 

♦ wrww.nerc.com/y2k/ North 
American Electric Reliability 
Council Links to U.S. govern- 
ment and industry sites as 
well eis several on-line maga- 
zines eind news stories. 



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Letters Editor, 
Edmonton Journal, 
Box 2421, 
Edmonton, AB. T5J2S6 

Sir: 



Edmonton beware! You are being bamboozled out of a priceless asset. 

It began with the big lie. Or at least with a crafty manipulation of the truth. You 
were told that you could lose the International Airport if you didn't give total preference 
to it for aviation traffic. Not so. The federal government sited, planned, and built that 
airport and operated it for years. It was a strategic unit in Canada's place in the aviation 
world. At worst, if necessary, it could and would revert to the Federal Government. 

Transportation comes in various sizes. There are big harbours and docks for big 
ships, smaller harbours and docks for smaller ships. So with other forms of 
transportation, including aviation. Other cities have smaller airports within the 
metropolitan area. Edmonton is most fortunate to have one. It is perfect for local and 
regional aviation needs, leaving the national and international traffic for the International 
Airport. 

Transportation is not a political ploy, a populist power play, or a contentious 
boondoggle. It is a system to be designed and operated by knowledgeable specialists, 
not by media writers, petty politicians, or power opportunists. 

Edmonton's midtown airport is an extremely valuable part of the transportation 
complex. It is should be protected and enhanced, not continually threatened with 
restrictions and even closure. 

Yes, I have a long association with aviation and have flown my plane in and out 
of many airports, large and small, on this continent. 



Walter Fryers 



29 Nov 03 



Note: I live at 1 1515 39 Av., Edmonton, AB. TK6J 0M5. My phone is 434 4496. 



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A1 8 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2003 / EDMONTON JOURNAL 



D 



EDITORIALS 



One airport 

has proven 

better than two 



In some ways, it is understandable 
that Peace River town council wants to 
reopen the debate over Edmonton's Qty 
Centre Airport. 

Northern communities lost the con- 
venience of most of those short-haul 
flights into the downtown when Ed- 
monton voted in 1995 to consolidate all 
regular-scheduled air service at the In- 
ternational Airport. 

But let's recall why Edmontonians vot- 
ed with such a strong majority (77 per 
cent) for consolidation. Keeping two air- 
ports running was costly and hindering 
the city's economic development. The 
International Airport was losing ground 
to other western cities at an alarming 
rate as Edmonton was reduced to a 
feeder route for Calgary and Vancouver. 

The goals of consolidation were to halt 
that decline, improve Edmonton's con- 
nections to the world to strengthen com- 
merce and tourism, and to improve the 
city's ability to compete with other dties 
for investors in the global economy. 

Fortunately, consolidation has proven 
successful by several markers. The de- 
cline in passengers using the airport has 
been reversed: the number of 



In the two-airport days, Edmonton's 
was the only international airport in the 
West actually losing business. 

From 1983 to 1995, the number of 
passengers using the International 
dropped by six per cent while other 
western airports were experiencing 
double-digit growth — Calgary up 26 
per cent, Vancouver up 32 per cent and 
Winnipeg up 10 per cent. 

Since consohdation, passenger load 
has continually grown. International 
traffic is up 123 per cent from 1995 to 
2002. 

Domestic passenger load is up 60 per 
cent, and there's been a 33-per-cent 
increase in passengers traveUing to the 
United States. 

Two important documents also con- 
tribute to the debate. The airports au- 
thority next week will release its re- 
port reviewing its long-term plans and 
the role of the City Centre airport. Ed- 
monton's auditor general is also doing 
a report on the City Centre. 

Northern mayors are excited they 
have recruited Economic Development 
Minister Mark Norris to their cause — 






>. ^ 















flights to international markets has in- 
creased to 40 with 24 new direct flights 
added since 1995 ; and badly needed ex- 
pansion was undertaken at the termi- 
nal with fees from the growing pas- 
senger loads, (hi fact, the new central 
hall opens this week.) 

It's also important to 
note that service to 
northern commvmities 
has also improved 
since 1995 with cheap- 
er fares and many 
more flights. The num- 
ber of seats on the Ed- 
monton-Fort McMur- 
ray run from the Inter- 
national has increased 102 per cent, for 
instance. 

Overall, seat capacity between Ed- 
monton and the North has increased by 
three per cent a year since consolidation 
compared to a continuing dedine in ca- 
pacity in years before, according to Ed- 
monton Regional Airports Authority 
figures. 

No doubt, the airports authority could 
do more to make travel to and from 
the International more palatable for 
short-haul passengers. For instance, it 
has never followed up on proposals for 
a downtown check-in, or provided a less 
expensive, reliable means of trans- 
portation to the airport. 
■ But going back to the old days and ex- 
panding scheduled service at the City 
Centre airport should not be in the 
cards. 

In response to pressure from northern 
communities, the airports authority in 
1995 decided to allow hmited sched- 
uled service in small aircraft at City Cen- 
tre — even though the referendum gave 
the authority the right to shut down 
scheduled service altogether. 

The question now facing the authori- 
ty is whether to proceed with the plan, 
approved by voters in 1995, to shift the 
remaining limited service to the Inter- 
national. 

Those flights represent only five per 
cent of the travel between Edmonton 
and the North. 

The matter is worthy of a good pubUc 
debate, but one that must be conducted 
v\nth full recognition of the success of 
consolidation for the dty of Edmonton. 



^^ Service to northern 

communities has also 

improved since 1995 with 

cheaper fares and many 

more flights. ^^ 



Conservative Party," says Peace River 
Mayor Lome Mann. 

Norris, of course, wears several hats 
as Edmonton MLA and economic de- 
velopment strategist for the dty and the 
province. It's discouraging to see him 
jump so quickly 
on the bandwag- 
on of the Peace 
River council 
when Edmonton 
has so much at 
stake. 

Norris's call for 
another study of 
the economic po- 
tential of the City 
Centre Airport is misguided. If the con- 
solidation had failed to revive the In- 
ternational, Edmontonians would 
doubtiess join Norris is asking for a re- 
view. But that's not the case. 

Secondly, as Norris must know in his 
role as economic strategist, you can't 
study the economic impact of the City 
Centre Airport in isolation fi-om the In- 
ternational. What happens at one has a 
direct impact on the other. 

Improving air access to this dty has of- 
ten been identified as a necessary in- 
gredient for economic growth. In 2001, 
Edmonton's competitiveness strategy 
identified transportation as a weak link. 
Also, let's not forget that lots of north- 
em Albertans also benefit fi-om having 
better connections to the rest of the 
world that came with consolidation. 
Half of the travellers from northern 
Alberta are connecting to other desti- 
nations, and therefore benefit directly 
by being able to get on domestic and in- 
temational flights here without taking 
the extra hop to Calgary. 

Edmonton is juggling conflicting de- 
mands in its role as an economic hub. It 
must be able to compete with less re- 
mote Canadian dties for international 
investment. It must also support north- 
ern communities as they experience 
economic growth. 

The airports authority should take 
whatever measures are possible to ac- 
commodate northern travellers — such 
as improved transit and a downtown 
check-in. 

But going back to pre-consohdation 
days shouldn't be on the table. 




Cc/^, 



11515 39 Av., 
Edmonton, AB. T6J 0M5 

27 Jan 03 

Dear Freddie: 

I learned of Ted's death from Ken Sturrock, when he left a message on my telephone. 
And now I see the notice of his death in the Airforce Magazine. I want to take this moment 
to write you a note of remembrance. 

We served together in AETA in 7 Hangar for 3 or 4 years. Although we were in 
different Sections we often had morning coffee break together with Nick Zotoff and Ken 
Sturrock.. A highlight of the day. 

We served together in the Cold Lake Lions Club. He was president, I was Secretary. 
The group met for breakfast in the Roundel Restaurant regularly. There were Bingo's, and 
visits to other Clubs in the area and of course a Conference or two. A good memory. 

And we were light plane owners; his was a Cessna 170. Mine was a Cessna 120. 
A common bond. 

Especially, though, were the social times we had, such as the New Year's barbeque 
at your lakeside place. 

Memories. Not to be forgotten! And to you, Freddie, best wishes. 

0^r^^»t Flyers. 

To: ^---'-^ 

Mrs. T. Whipple, 

9249 47 Av. 

St. Petersburg, FL 37708 3810 



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Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 10:50:40 -0500 
From: Ed Yourdon <ed@yourdon.com> 
To : wf ryers@f reenet . edmonton . ab . ca 
Subject: Re: Your Message Sent on Sat, 

Walt, 




31 Jan 1998 16:59:15 -0700 (MST) 



Note that the language of the bank's statement does not use words like 
"guarantee" or "warranty". Words like "goal" and "committee" and "working 
toward" fall short of any legal obligation. 

Also, the situation in Canada is considerably simpler, in the sense that 
you've only got half a dozen national banks; we've got several thousand in 
the U.S., and it's the smaller ones that we're most concerned about. 

Best of luck, 
Ed 

Reply Separator 

> The Bank of Montreal has published the following statement: 

> 

>"We are committed to having our business operations run accurately and 

>without disruption before, during and after the calendar changes to the 

>year 2000. In fact, our goal is to be ready well in advance... we are 

>planning to have all changes complete 




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□[K> The Bank of Montreal has published the following statement: 

n[K> 

n[K>"We are committed to having our business operations run accurately and 

n[K>without disruption before, during and after the calendar changes to the 

n[K>year 2000. In fact, our goal is to be ready well in advance... we are 

n[K>planning to have all changes completed by the end of 1998 to allow time 

n[K>for testing our systems. We are also working toward Year 2000 solutions 

n[K>with our peers, our corporate and commercial clients, and other 

D [K>organi2ations whose systems interface with ours." 

□ [K> 

n[K> So - is there a crisis for Y2K in prospect, or not? Walt Fryers. 



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THE 

Citizens^ 
Agenda 

^ FUND 

June 26 1 998 Partners for a Caring Canada 

Mr. Walter Fryers 
11515 39th Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6J 0M5 

Dear Mr. Fryers, 

As you may have heard, the National Film Board of Canada has just released a new one-hour film 
about Maude Barlow. 

It's called "Democracy a la Maude" - in honour of our dear friend and leader, Maude Barlow. 

Maude can't say this herself (because she's in the film) but it's really a wonderful video - with lots of 
"behind-the-scenes" footage showing Maude at work in Council campaigns and strategy sessions. 

The film also gives a touching personal portrait of Maude - beginning with her life as a stay-at-home 
mother and following her rise as she becomes one of Canada's leading activists. 

I thought you'd enjoy seeing the film so I wanted to offer it to you - completely free, of course - as 
another way of saying thanks for being a member of The Citizens' Agenda Fund. 

If you'd like a copy of the film (on video tape), simply check the box provided and send it back 
to me in the enclosed envelope, I'll ship your video to you as soon as I receive your request. 

If you have comments or questions about the film please feel free to call our Citizens' Agenda Fund 
coordinator, Marilyn Chute, at 1-800-387-7177. 

Hope your enjoy the film and thanks again. 



Yours, 



Pdki^ 



Peter Bleyer 

Executive Director 

The Council of Canadians 



The Council of Canadians 

502-151 Slater Street, Ottawa Ontario KIP 5H3 



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Le 

CONSEIL 

DES CANADIENS 



June 11, 19 9 8 

Mr. Walter Fryers 
11515 39th Avenue 
Edmonton AB T6J 0M5 

Dear Mr. Fryers, 

Thank you for your generous donation of $200.00 on May 26, 1998 to The 
Council of Canadians towards the Campaign to Stop the MAI. Your generous 
contribution shows your commitment to a just and compassionate Canada. 

As volunteer national chairperson, I want to thank you so much for your 
on-going support. Members like you are the heart and soul of The 
Council, without you we wouldn't have an organization or the financial 
support to carry out our crucial campaigns . 

We have an enormous amount of work to do in our effort to preserve a 
caring Canada, especially given the recent assaults on our public 
pensions, health care and education. 

So it's not surprising our resources are right now stretched to the 
limit. We just don't have the funding that we need to continue protecting 
the Canada we cherish. 

If you would like to help The Council continue to expand its work for 
Canada, here's how you can help the most, please join our Canada Plan 

monthly giving club. 

I'd like to invite you personally to join the special group of Council 
members who belong to our Canada Plan. 

Joining the Plan is easy, you simply authorize The Council to deduct a 
monthly gift from your chequing account or credit card. 

Some Canada Plan members give $40 a month, while some give $3 a month. 
Most of our members donate between $8 and $12 per month. Whatever you 
decide to give, your gift is deeply appreciated. 

Since almost all our funding comes from individual Canadians like you, 
you can imagine how important regular monthly support is to our work. It 
reduces our administrative costs and improves our budgeting and financial 
planning and, because of this, we can devote more of each dollar you send 
to our vital campaign work. If you want to help make The Council more 
effective, this is really the way to do it. 



( >9-^.X.^>-*-». 



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502 - 151 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario KIP 5H3 
(613) 233-2773 toll-free 1-800-387-7177 



2336 



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As a Council member, you know what terrible threats our country faces: 
massive cuts to our public pensions, billions of dollars taken from 
Medicare and now the government is trying to bring in the Multilateral 
Agreement on Investment (MAI). The MAI could pave the way for a two-tier 
health care system and put our radio, TV and magazines at the mercy of 
U.S. entertainment giants. 

The Council is working day-in and day-out across the country to change 
all this -- to protect our pensions, to expand Medicare, and to ensure 
that Canadian culture receives generous public support. 

This kind of activism is terribly expensive and that's where Canada Plan 
supporters come in. Their monthly gifts provide the on-going funding we 
need to continue our work. 

Could you take a moment right now and join the Canada Plan? Whatever you 
can give monthly -- $25, $10, or $5 -- would be a major contribution to 
our work. 

Joining the Canada Plan is easy. Simply complete the attached enrollment 
form below and send it back to us with a cheque marked "void" or with 
your credit card information. From then on, your contributions will be 
paid automatically; there's nothing more you have to do. 

Joining the Canada Plan is risk-free. You can change or cancel your 
monthly gifts at any time for any reason simply by calling The Council . 

If you can't join the Canada Plan now, please consider making a special 
one-time donation to support our work and thank you again so much for all 
your assistance. 



With best wishes. 




^i^vA^-2^A^^uD 



Maude Barlow 

Volunteer National Chairperson 












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Citizens Concerned about Free trade 

National Office: P.O. Box 8052 Saskatoon, Sask. S7K 4R7 Canada (306) 244-5757 Fax (306) 244-3790 



8 June , 19 9 8 



e-mail: ab217@sfn. saskatoon. sk.ca 



Dear friend, 

I am writing to thank you for your past support to Citizens Concerned 
About Free Trade and to ask for your opinion. 

Over the past few weeks and since my last letter to you, I have been 
asked by some Conservative Party members if I would consider running 
for the leadership of that party which is now open. 

They felt the best hope for their party was to erase the Mulroney 
legacy and that that would be something I could do. They explained 
that for the first time the party had adopted a universal ballot 
whereby the leader would be selected not, as in the past, by 
delegates at a convention, but by a vote of each person who had paid 
their ten dollar membership fee. 

I believe that the best hope for the Conservative Party, and for the 
country, is if that party returned to its anti-free trade and pro- 
Canadian roots, as articulated by George Cartier, John A. Macdonald, 
Robert Borden and to some extent Bennett and Diefenbaker. (I'm 
enclosing an article I wrote on this topic some time ago.) 

I believe globalization can be resisted, that Canada is a country 
adequately equipped to do so and that a political party which opposes 
both globalization and devolution of the powers of the central 
government would receive substantial public support. 

Historically the Conservatives have often defeated the Liberals, not 
by outflanking them on the right but by coming up their left side, 
when they have moved too far to the right. I'm thinking of Macdonald 
in 1878, Borden in 1911, Diefenbaker in 1957 and 1958. The same 
opportunity exists, I believe, today. 

It seems to me that to stop Canada's slide to colonial status either 
a new political party must be created, something which usually 
requires a substantial triggering event, or an existing one 
transformed. I would value your opinion on whether the current 
opening of the Conservative Party might constitute an opportunity to 
do the latter. 



Sincerely, 



David Orchard 



P.S. I'm also enclosing, for your interest and your comments, a copy 
of a letter urging my entry into the race, a recent colximn on the 
topic by Dalton Camp published in the Toronto Star and sample 
comments from letters we are receiving in response. 

Toronto Office: #202 - 9 Bloor St. East Toronto, Ont. M4W 1A9 (416) 922-STOP Fax (416) 922-7883 
Vancouver Office: P.O. Box 4185 Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3Z6 (604) 683-FREE Fax (604) 683-3749 




''jiw«nwiy^>»/>: 



Section A -Jav 3, 1996 



Wit Xandon Jree J)re$$ 



Conservatives should ignore right wing 




John A. Mao- 
donald: defeat- 
ed American 
adversaries 




R.B. Bennett: 
fought free 
trade vvith the 
US. * 




John Diefenbak- 
en refused to 
support U^. 
bullying of Cuba 

*should be 



Americanizing the 
federal Tory party will 
not save it. It's time to 
look back into Canadian 
history for inspiration. 

By David Orchard 

The writer is the author of The Fight 
for Canada: Four Centuries of Resis- 
tance to American Elxpansionism, and 
chairperson of Citizens Concerned 
About Free Trade. He lives in 
Saskatchewan. 

SASKATOON — In the debate about 
the federal Conservative party's future, 
virtually the only question being asked 
is how far right the party should move. 
The party's history is being ignored as 
is any serious analysis of its past suc- 
cess and recent failure. 

John A. Macdonald created the Con- 
servative party. Facing threat of inva- 
sion from the United States, he brought 
together Canadian provinces that exist- 
ed separately for 2)i centuries before 
1867. In the next four tumultuous years, 
Macdonald cemented Confederation 
and expanded it continent wide. 

The Liberals fought against the 
terms of B.C.'s entry to Canada; a rail- 
way was too expensive, they said: "all 
the resources in the British Empire" 
could not build such a line and even if 
it could, what would it carry — "buf- 
faloes and Indians?" 

STRONG NATIONAUSTS: Mac 

donald. his eye on U.S. attempts to 
annex Manitoba, then B.C., drove the 
railroad through. He defeated his 
American adversaries and gave Cana- 
da the foundation for ^-eatness. The 
Liberals wanted American help to 
build an easier, cheaper line south of 
the Great Lakes, through the U.S. 
"Never," replied George Cartier, Mac- 
donald's French-Canadian co-leader, 
"will a damned American company 
have control of the Pacific," Under 
Macdonald, four mill i nn Canadians 
built one of the world's largest railway 
systems —.all Canadian. 
Borden not Bennett 



Against the Liberals' support of 
"provincial rights," Macdonald insist- 
ed on a strong central government and 
economic natioiudism — to secure 
Canada's independence. "Canada for 
Canadians" was his slogan. In the 
1880s, the Liberals called for free trade 
or commercial union with the U.S. 

Free trade, Macdonald replied, was 
the prelude to annexation: "They have 
as many aliases for their policy as a 
thief has excuses for his wrong doing," 
he thundered- "It has been commercial 
imion, vmrestricted reciprocity and lat- 
terly tariff reform: but there is another 
name by which it must be known, and 
that is annexation — which is treason." 

In the 1892 election, the old Chieftain, 
76, gave his all to defeat free trade. That 
victory caused the Liberals to drop free 
trade and adopt completely Macdon- 
ald's National Policy, and Canada en- 
tered its years of greatest prosperity. 

In 1911, the Liberals again proposed 
free trade with the U.S. The Conserva- 
tives forced an election and fought 
Robert Borden called free trade "the 
most momentous question ever submit- 
ted to the Canadian electorate." Lauri- 
er was calling for a greater C>anada, 
Borden noted, but is seemed to be a 
greater United States that the Liberals 
had achieved. The voters swept Borden 
to ofQce in triumph. 

Borden's successor, Arthur Meighen, 
advocated strong protection against the 
Americans; "Not a single country in 
the world requires a tariff so vitally as 
does this Dominion — competing as we 
do chiefly ^th the United Statsc" 

In 1932, R. B. Bennett's Conservatives 
created the forerunner of the CBC, now 
one of the worid's major public broad- 
casters, the Bank of Canada and the 
Canadian Wheat Board, the world's most 
powerful and prestigious marketing 
board. Bennett declared, "to my mind re- 
form means government intervention. It 
means government control and regula- 
tion. It means the end of laissez-£aire." 

John Diefenbaker refused to support 
U.S. bullying of Cuba. In 1963, standing 
almost alone against the American gov- 
ernment, he also refused to accept Bo- 
marc nuclear missiles. "We are a 
power, not a puppet ... I want Canada 



to be in confrol of Canadian soil. Now if 
that's an offence I want the people of 
Canada to say so." 

Newsweek magazine launched a 
cover story attack calling Diefenbaker 
a "sick and maniacal" character utter- 
ing "shrill cries of anti- Americanism." 
Constitutionally, Diefenbaker resisted 
the premiers* demands for more 
power; "provincial nabobs" he called 
them. 

In 1983. control of the Conservative 
party was seized by the president of an 
American mining corporation. Turn- 
ing the party against its historical 
roots, Brian Mulroney signed a sweep- 
ing continental integration agreement 
and attempted to weaken the central 
government The party's reward was 
annihilation at the polls in 1993. 

Those advocating further American- 
ization of the party, as David Frvun, the 
darling of Wall Street and his friends 
are currently doing, will ensure the 
party's demise. 

MULRONEY ABERRATION: The 

hope for the Conservative party, and 
for the country, lies in realizing that 
Brian Mulronesr's policies were an 
aberration and correcting them. This 
means a retmn to the historic and suc- 
cessful Conservative position of foster- 
ing a Canadian economy, Canadian in- 
dependence and a Canadian spirit This 
means reversing NAFTA. 

The Liberals cannot be defeated by 
trying to out-Reform. out-Mulroney, or 
out-Gingrich them. They canbe defeat- 
oH Kw outllanlcing them, not 5n *he 
right but on the centre left groimd 
which the Liberals have fatally aban- 
doned in their pellmell rush to embrace 
Mulroney's agenda — so thoroughly re- 
jected by the voters. 

This is not a task for Jean Charest 
who supported Mulroney's continental- 
ism, even less can it be achieved by the 
new Republicans and Reformers gath- 
ered at the Conservative party's 
sickbed. It can only come from new 
leadership which imderstands the 
lessons of history and is prepared to act 
with Macdonald's courage to reclaim 
Canada for Canadians. 



CITIZENS CONCERNED ABOUT FREE TRADE 

National OfTice: P.O. Box 8052, Saskatoon. Sask., S7K 4R7. Tel: (306) 244-5757 Fax: (306) 244-3790 

Toronto Office: #202 — 9 Bloor St. East. Toronto, Ont., M4W 1 A9. Tei: (416) 922-STOP Fax: (416) 922-7883 

Vancouver Office: P.O. Box -1185. Vancouver. B.C.. V6B 3Z6. Tel: (604) 683-FREE Fax: (604) 683-3749. 

e-mail: ab217@sfn.saskatoon.sk.ca. 



Harold C. Sisson, Q.C. 



To: Letters to the Editor, 
Globe & Mail, Toronto 



Fax 415 585 5085 



April 28, 1998 



Re: Progressive Conservative Leadership 

Recently, at the University of Victoria, 1 heard a speech by David Orchard, 
author of "The Fight for Canada", and Chair of 'Citizens Concerned About Free Trade' 
(CCAFT). The subject matter was the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) - to 
which most Canadians would say no, in that it would end Canadian sovereignty, 
further destroy our culture and public service social programs, create mors 
unemployment and lay bare the environment, all for the benefit of giant foreign 
corporations and banks, who finance our present passel of politicicins. 

David Orchard, a sincere and dedicated Canadian from Saskatchewan, is a 
dynamic speaker, a man of integrity and obviously weii-vers«d in new and sound 
economic ideas that would revive Canadian life by putting some moral fibre back into 
the government of Canada; so that we can get on with a rtew and decent life for future 
Canadians. He is not the type of man who would make definite promises in a political 
■ campaign, and then, iike has happened with the last several governments and Prime 
Ministers, proceed to do exactly the opposite a short time after being elected. Orchard 
is an articulate opponent of both Quebec and Western separatism, a defender of a 
strong federal government and of the French fact throughout Canada. 

The Tories are looking for a new leader to bring them back from the wiiderness 
of the Mulroney years. To become successful again the Tories have to rid themselves 
of the Mulroney aberrations of policy, get some new blood, some new ideas, return to 
their roots. New leadership is needed in Ottawa, who understand the lessons taught 
by strong nationalists like Macdonald, Cartier, Borden and Diefenbaker. The many, 
many, disgruntled and disillusioned ex-Consen/atlves across this great country, like 
myself, frustrated by the self-serving sleaze and broken promises presently evident in 
Ottawa, want leadership whom they know will foster the Canadian economy, 
Canadian independence and Canadian spirit. None of this will happen using 
retreads and ex-Mulroney fellow travellers. 

They need -look no further for their new leader than David Orchard, if they can 
convince him to enter the political arej 

Hal C. Sisson, Q.C. 
Victcna, B.C. 





!9^i 



'j% 



■ i-.i^« 



■4»-, 



Time for Tories 
to be courageous 
and elect activist 

Just 85 1 was yawning, and wonder- 
ing what could possibly, be more 
dreary than the Tory leadership race, 
I was suddenly electrified by DaJton 
Camp's June 7 column. 

Fanner activist David Orchard for 
prime minister? 

How exquisitely, utterly, surpris- 
ingly perfect. 

The very rightress of the idea 
makes one wonder why this didn't 
occur to us all a long time ago. 

Alas. I fear that Camp is correct: 
the corporate/media elite will merci- 
lessly marginalize Orchard to smith- 
ereens. 

How sad. It often seems that as Ca- 
nadians we never miss an opportuni- 
ty to miss an opportunity. 

This Canadian Is hoping that the 
Progressive Conservative Party of 
Canada \vill do the daring, coura- 
geous, unlikely thing and deliver us a 
miracle by electing Orchard its new 
leader. 

Orchard would turn the liberals 
into the Official Opposition and Re- 
form into a forgotten blip on the polit- 
ical landscape. 

I didn't think anything would con- 
vince me to vote Tory ever again, but 
this development throws a whole 
new light on everything. I will be ea- 
gerly scaruiing my paper for future 
news about this exciting scenario. 

Carole Hendrv 
Toronto 



Orchard may 
shape destiny 
of Canada 



Re Dalton Camp's heartwarming 
Jiine 7 column on the possibility of 
David Orchard running for the Tory 
leadership (Farmer activist trwy 
jump into Tory leadership race). 

Shakespeare defined the dilemma 
of human existence in six immortal 
words: To be or not to be. 

Thafs certainly the stark choice 
facing Canada in this fateful eleventh 
hour, when the winds of globaliza- 
tion — a euphemism for American- 
ization — are about to rip us irretriev- 
ably from our laboriously-fashioned 
moorings Into the waiting maw of 
manifest destiny. But decisive battles 
have been won at the last minute. 

Let's hope Orchard runs for the To- 
ry leadership, imleashes the frustrat- 
ed pent-up tide of Canadian patrio- 
tism into an effective political 
channel, and saves Canada for the 
unique and distinct destiny the whole 
world assumes is ours, for the benefit 
of all. 

Barry Brent 
Rexdaie 



Orchard idea brings 
spark of hope 

With Liberala. Tories, and Reform 
striving to outdo each other in their 
attempts to hold or gain power by 
promising cheap and dirty govern- 
ments, and with the NDP turriing to 
pragmatism and breaking away from 
its roots, I had given up on Canada. 

My conclusion was that Canadian 
politicians and policy advisers had 
created an extraordinajy power vac- 
uum that is being filled eagerly by 
transnationai corporations. 

Finally a spark of hope. My day — 
no, my year — has been made by Dai- 
ton Camp's column in The Simday 
Star (Farmer activist may jump into 
Tory leadership race, June 7). 

I thought I would never again be 
voting in Canada. Now, I know I will 
work my duff off in order to help Da- 
vid Orchard win the Tory leadership, 
and do my best to get the vote out in 
order that the Tories will form the 
next government of Canada. 

Russell T. McCARnrv 
Toronto 



o 

a 

o 
en 

Q] 

r-' 



a. 



00 



Saskatoon, Saskatchewan The StarPhoenix LOCAL A5 

Orchard 
dismissed 
as potential 
Tory leader 

By Leslie Perfeaux 
of The StarPhoenix 

The potential Tory leadership bid of 
a Saskatchewan farmer who fought ev- 
er}' major initiative of two federal Pro- 
gressive Conservative governments 
was quickly dismissed by party heavy- 
hitters Tuesday. 

David Orchard, the Borden farmer 
who was once detained by police for 
heckling former prime minister Brian 
Mulroney, says he's been asked by 
people "inside and outside the party," 
to run for the leadership. He pledged 
to return the party to what he called 
its anti-free trade and nationalist 

"This is the kook who was against 
the Free Trade Agreement, isn't it?" 
said John Crosbie, a former Tory cabi- 
net minister and failed leadership 
candidate. 

Crosbie debated Orchard and Liber- 
al cabinet minister Sheila Copps dur- 
ing the free trade debate in 1988. 

''He should run for the Liberals. He 
is not going to get any support from 
me, but I guess he can do what he 
likes," Crosbie said in an interview 
from his home in St. John's. Nfld. 

"He has no chance whatsoever. 
None. no. no. no. But if he wants pub- 
licitv'. I guess this is one way to get it." 



Wednesday, June 17, 1998 







1 


I y.T/'-.'y,.'- - i..<.^».:i^ ■•'•'*'•' ^/•^'' 


'Tvc been asked to consider this 


■ '(\ ,-'-1 '-'i^nUkMiiv 


position. I'm talking the requests 
seriously." 

—David Orchard, activist 






"He has no chance 




whatsoever. None, no, no, no. 


^■*— ^^\^*ri" ' y 


But if he wants publicity, 1 guess 
this is one way to get it." 

—John Crosbie, former Tory cabinet minister 





Bill McKnight, a former cabinet 
minister from Saskatchewan, didn't 
give Orchard much chance either. 

"Not any chance at all, not even for 
37 seconds. But that's never stopped 
him before," McKnight said. 

"David's mn out of things to do and 
he's looking for publicity." 

For more than a decade, Orchard 
has fought against constitutional ac- 
cords, including Meech Lake, and var- 
ious agreements to liberalize trade. 

Most were initiatives from the two 
Tory governments from 1984 to 1993. 
Orchard has also adamantly opposed 
privatization and the GST. 

More recently, he helped lead a cru- 
sade against the Multilateral Agree- 
ment on Investment 

All the Tory ideas of liberalization 
and giving the provinces more power 
went against the party's histor>-. Or- 
chard, 47, told a news conference 



Tuesday. 

"The Conservative party has a 100- 
year history of opposing free trade. 
John A. Macdonald fought free trade. 
In fact he called it treason," Orchard 
said. "It's only in about the last 15 
years that the partj' has taken a v.Tong 
turn." 

Orchard said the party also stood for 
a strong central government in the 
pre-Mulroney era. 

"I'm against the devolution of power 
to the provinces. That was another 
mistake that is now being followed by 
all the panics," he said. 

Orchard, who expects to make a de- 
cision by the end of June, said he 
wants the Canadian public to tell him 
if he should run for the party's leader- 
ship. 

■'I've been asked to consider this po- 
sition. I'm taking the requests serious- 
ly, " Orchard said. 



Citizens Concerned About Free Trade 

National Office: Box 8052, Saskatoon, SK, S7K 4R7. Tel: (306) 244-5757, Fax: (306) 244-3790 

Toronto Office: #202 — 9 Bloor St. E., Toronto, ON, M4W 1A9. Tel: (416) 922-STOP, Fax: (416) 922-7883 

Vancouver Office: Box 4185, Vancouver, BC, V6B 3Z6. Tel: (604) 683-FREE, Fax: (604) 683-3749 

e-mail: ab217@sfn.saskatoon.sk.ca web site: http://web.idirect.com/-ccaft/ 



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ENVIRONMENTAL 



4 February 1998 



Our File: Request for Assistance 



Walter Fryers 
11515-39 Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6J 0M5 



Dear Mr. Fryers: 

RE: MAI 

Further to our telephone discussion I enclose an article from the West 
Coast Environmental Law Association News on the MAI. You might also 
visit the following websites: 

< http://www.islandnet.com/ ~ ncfs/maisite/homepage.html > , 
and links at <http://vcn.bc.ca/wcel>. 

We have posted a notice of the February 5th meeting at the United 
Church. Hopefully someone from our office will be able to attend. The 
MAI issue is of great interest to us. 

Thank you for your call. 

Yours truly, 



Arlene J. Kwasniak 
Staff Counsel 




\enc 



Recycled Paper 
FAX: (403) 424-5133 



204 10709 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T5J3N3 TEL: (403) 424-5099 

' Alberta Toll Free 1-800-661-4238 E-Mail: elc@web.net Home Page: http://www.web.net/~elc 



-■->"' 




»' 



'li-' 






■"■"' '-■ • '' 



■*•-'-' 



public interest 



environmental law for british 

from West Coast 
Environmental Law 



Columbia 

Vol 21:04 

December 17, 1997 




An Environmental Primer on the 
MuStiSateral Agreement on Investment 



The MAI is an international treaty about 
foreign investment that is now being ne- 
gotiated under the auspices of the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation 
and Development (OECD). It represents 
a critical element of a larger strategy to 
codify the rules upon which a global sys- 
tem of production and trade depend. 
While this agenda is fundamentally the 
project of the worlds largest corporations, 
it also enjoys enthusiastic support by the 
Canadian government. 

Our government's support is founded 
on the faith that sustained market-driven 
growth will bring wealth and economic 
stability to the world community. In order 
to achieve this prosperity, governments 
need only allow market forces to operate 
unfettered by regulation or other govern- 
ment "interference." 

If this sounds familiar, that's because 
this global economic model is simply an 
amplification of the policies that have 
guided domestic policy for decades. 
Absent, as always, is any notion of eco- 
logical limits, or of the need to address 
how the proceeds of growth will be 
distributed. 

Also missing is any real evidence to 
support the grand claims of those 
promoting liberalized trade and invest- 
ment rules. In fact, e.xperience is that 
this grow-now, pay-later paradigm has 
been disastrous for most of the world's 
population. Whether measured in terms 
of wealth distribution, environmental 
impacts, or economic stability, the glo- 
balization of the world's economy has 
dramatically accelerated our course 



along a path that appears to be headed 
for an ecological dead-end. 

The most significant milestone in the 
efforts to establish a global economic or- 
der was the creation of the World Trade 
Organization in 1995. In many ways, the 
WTO represents the culmination of ef- 
forts that got underway more than fifty 
years ago to establish an international 
trade regime with strong enforceable 
power. In simple terms, the WTO's 
agenda is to promote international trade 
by dramatically curtailing the ability of 
all governments to regulate corporate 
activity in the public interest. To accom- 
plish this objective, WTO rules set out a 
long list of policies, laws and regulations 
that governments may not adopt or 
otherwise seek to implement. While os- 
tensibly limited to international trade, 
WTO rules effectively impose this agenda 
for deregulation upon virtually all aspects 
of domestic economic and environmen- 
tal polic)'. It is no coincidence that since 
the advent of free trade, environmental- 
ists spend more time fighting to preserve 
existing environmental initiatives than 
they do working to establish new ones. 

However, because developing, coun- 
tries maintained a united front, they were 
able to successfully resist concerted ef- 
forts to entrench investment rights in the 
WTO. For this reason the MAI remains 
the most important missing piece of the 
WTO puzzle. Consequently, and in re- 
sponse to continued pressure from 
corporate lobbyists, developed countries 
are now pursuing this investment agenda 
under the auspices of the OECD and 



APEC. Of these two, the OECD track 
has proven to be faster, and the current 
schedule will see an agreement signed 
next May. Once the MAI becomes a re- 
ality among the world's elite countries, 
its proponents regard inclusion under the 
WTO as inevitable. 

If this strategy succeeds, the MAI will 
fundamentally undermine the few re- 
maining prerogatives that governments 
have to regulate corporate activity in the 
public interest. It is difficult to overstate 
the seriousness of the challenges posed 
by this investment regime to environmen- 
tal and other societal goals, including that 
of democratic governance. 

See MAI on page 2 



Inside... 




Freedom of Information 
Law Threatened 


4 


Our Man in Kyoto 


4 


EDRF Update 


5 


Update on Recent Cases 


6 


Money's Mushrooms Guilty 


7 


Need help with a conserva- 
tion covenant? Call us! .. 


7 


Holiday Giving — what to get 
for the person who has 
everything (almost) 8 


WCEL Closes for 
the Holidays 


.8 



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WniinflTlTP'--"^-^-^^^^-^-'' ■'•• ■^■r^^AiiKT\-.w.-t-.?--i tjt 



MAI, continued from page 1 

The following assessment provides an 
overview of the essential components of 
this global investment treaty and de- 
scribes some of the ways MAI rules will 
undermine our work. 

National Treatment: All of 
the Rights, None of the 
Responsibility 

The first principle of the MAI is that of 
National Treatment, which prohibits gov- 
ernment policies or laws that favour 
domestic companies or investors. Un- 
der this rule, foreign investors and 
corporations must be given every right, 
concession or privilege that a government 
might extend to local companies or com- 
munities. National Treatment would, for 
example, prohibit: 

• policies that favour community land 
tenure or resource management rights; 

• citizenship requirements for those 
seeking fishing or woodlot hcenses; or, 

• subsidies to support commimity eco- 
nomic develop. 

It is fundamental to sustainable man- 
agement that the right to exploit a 
resource comes with the obligation to en- 
sure its long-term stewardship. The 
principle of National Treatment would 
permanently sever this fundamental re- 
lationship. 

Investor Rights: Special 
Status for Foreign 
Corporations 

Under the heading of Performance Re- 
quirements the MAI sets out a lengthy list 
of govermnent measures that cannot be 
imfMDsed on foreign corporations, even 
when these same controls apply to domes- 
tic companies and investors. In what 
represents a distinct departure from the 
principle of National Treatment, tliis pro- 
tection from government "interference" 
is accorded only to foreign corporations. 
Thus governments are prohibited from 
requiring transnational corporations, as a 
condition of the right to invest in Canada, 
to: 

• achieve a given level or percentage of 
domestic content, or to purchase goods 
or services locally; 

• transfer environmentally sound tech- 
nology; 



• supply local markets or value-added 
producers; 

• achieve a given level or value of pro- 
duction, investment, employment, or 
research and development; or, 

• hire locally. 

If we are to contain and reduce the rapa- 
cious rates of resource exploitation that 
are laying waste to once abundant and 
diverse ecosystems, we must work to es- 
tablish more diverse resource economies, 
promote local economic development, 
foster environmentally sound technolo- 
gies, and ensure "just transitions" for 
workers. MAI rules will make each and 
every one of these goals far more diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, to achieve. 

It is a central tenet of EC's natural re- 
sources policy that the right to access 
public resources comes with the obliga- 
tion to invest in local production and 
processing — the most recent example 
being the Jobs and Timber Accord. 
Moreover, access to public resoiu-ces is 
often restricted to Canadian citizens or 
companies. Now under MAI rules, the 
obvious conclusion for a Canadian com- 
pany to draw is that it would be better off 
carrying on business as the subsidiary of 
a foreign corporation. In effect, the MAI 
is a carrot enticing corporations to sever 
any ties they may have to domestic econo- 
mies. 

Expropriation: Entrenching 
Private Property Rights in a 
Global Constitution 

Under the heading of Investor Protection, 
the MAI provides that govenunents: 

shall not expropriate or 
nationalize directly or 
indirectly an investment ... or 
take any measure or meas- 
ures having equivalent effect 
(hereinafter referred to as 
"expropriation ") except ... 
accompanied by payment of 
prompt, adequate and 
effective compensation. 

It lias long been the goal of property rights 
advocates to have these private rights 
entrenched in Canada's constitution. 
Their campaign is primarily directed at 
Canadian law that has consistently as- 
serted that private property rights must 
give way, in certain instances, to the 



greater public good. Thus challenges to 
zoning bylaws and habitat protection laws 
as representing a "regulatory taking" of 
private property, have been consistently 
rebuffed by Canadian courts. But what 
has been unacceptable to the courts, and 
unthinkable in the context of Canadian 
constitutional reform, may now be ac- 
complished by the MAI, and on terms far 
more expansive than any contemplated 
by property rights proponents. 

Because the MAI defines "expropria- 
tion" in the broadest terms, its rules may 
well prohibit any government regulation 
that even indirectly reduces the profitabil- 
ity of corporate investments. It would be 
difficult to identify an environmental or 
conservation initiative that would not 
have this effect, at least on some inves- 
tors. In fact, there is recent evidence that 
environmental regulations are the most 
likely target of this prohibition against 
government "taking". 

The case in point is a law suit brought 
by Ethyl Corporation, a US-based 
transnational, now seeking $325 million 
in compensation from the Canadian gov- 
ernment because of the government's 
decision to ban the use of MMT as a fuel 
additive in Canadian gasoline. The suit 
is proceeding imder the investment rules 
of NAFTA, which served as the proto- 
type for the MAI. Ethyl claims that 
Canada's ban represents an expropriation 
of its business of manufacturing this 
neuro-toxic fuel additive, and that under 
NAFTA rules it is entitled to compensa- 
tion. The case illustrates just how 
profound the impacts of this "investor 
protection" may be. 

Investor-State Suits: The 
New Star Chamber 

Arguably, the most significant ambition 
of the MAI is to eliminate the role of na- 
tional governments as intermediaries 
when corporations wish to enforce their 
rights against another government under 
this multilateral agreement. Convention- 
ally, only national governments have 
standing to invoke dispute resolution 
processes under international trade 
agreements. For this reason, national 
governments liave often acted to constrain 
the appetite of their domestic corporations 

See MAI on page 3 



NEWS from West Coast Environmental Law 



.:J^W«aiCTCJ«JtP.-«gg..<rf^V>r3i, <B«W>»»irl.'-J^^^- JrJV<^ . 



MAI, continued from page 2 

to assail the policies and practices of other 
governments. 

But under tlie MAI, a corporation need 
no longer persuade any government of tlie 
legitimacy of its complaint before seek- 
ing enforcement under an agreement 
which, ironically, it was not even party 
to. Under MAI rules, foreign investors 
have an unqualified right to insist that any 
complaint be resolved under rules of in- 
ternational arbitration, a process so 
secretive that it would rival those of the 
Star Chamber Court abolished three cen- 
turies ago. 

h is precisely this process that Ethyl 
Corporation is relying on in its suit against 
the Canadian government. That case is 
now proceeding behind closed doors — 
without public notice, without access to 
the documents filed, and without partici- 
patory rights for any other party. To 
paraphrase a corporate lawyer recently 
quoted in the Globe & Mail, never be- 
fore have corporations had a more 
powerful tool with which to "harass" gov- 
ernments unwilUng to heed their lobbying 
efforts. 

Environmental 
Conditionalities and Other 
Greenwash 

In response to an environmental critique 
of the MAI, its defenders will quickly 
point to various provisions that appear to 
reflect some willingness to accept that 
investment rights respect some envi- 
ronmental limits. For example, MAI 
negotiators are presently considering the 
inclusion of the following provision: 

The Parties recognize that it 
is inappropriate to encour- 
age investment by lowering 
domestic health, safety or 
environmental standards or 
relaxing domestic labour 
standards. 

Taken from language in the Investment 
chapter of NAFTA, what isn't clear sim- 
ply from reading this provision is that it 
is unenforceable and for that reason, vir- 
tually meaningless — particularly in 
the context of a trade agreement that 
encourages countries to compete for in- 
vestment by allowing corporations to 



externalize environmental and other so- 
cial costs. 

Similarly, the performance require- 
ments noted above include an "exception" 
that would allow governments to regu- 
late where "necessary": 

• to protect human, animal or plant 
life or health: or, 

• for the conser\>ation of living or 
non-living exhaustible natural 
resources. 

Again, what isn't clear to those unfamil- 
iar with the esoteric rules of trade 
agreements is that this is identical lan- 
guage to that used in a general exception 
to WTO rules. In that context it has been 
given such narrow interpretation as to 
render it entirely ineffective in defense 
of a growing list of envirorunental laws 
that have been caught in the cross-hairs 
of international trade dispute resolution 
— an encounter that not one has siuvived. 

Exceptions and Reservations 

When it really matters, governments have 
been willing to create meaningful excep- 
tions to the MAI rules. For example, a 
broad and unequivocal exemption has 
been included, at the insistence of the US, 
for measures deemed necessary for the 
"protection of essential security inter- 
ests". But so far no govermnent has been 
willing to advance the notion that a simi- 
lar exception is needed to preserve the 
authority of governments to assure our 
ecological security. 

Instead, the federal government is of- 
fering critics of the MAI its assurance that 
it will "reserve" various pohcies and prac- 
tices from the full application of MAI 
rules. In fact reservations under NAFTA 
explain how Canada has sheltered such 
diverse programs as citizenship require- 
ments for commercial fishing licenses and 
our public health care system. 

There are, however, several reasons to 
dubious about these assurances. To be- 
gin with, the extent of reser\'ations that 
Canada may claim is a subject for nego- 
tiation and compromise. Moreover, 
environmental reservations aren't even on 
Canada's priority list. Secondly, MAI 
"standstill" and "rollback" rules preclude 
future policy or regulatory innovation 
even in areas subject to specific reserva- 
tion, while at the same time ratcheting 



back the limited protection accorded ex- 
isting measures. 

Finally, reservations which would be 
broad enough to provide meaningful op- 
portunity for progressive environmental 
reforms would undo much of what the 
MAI would accomplish. In seeking to 
entrench the dominant paradigm of mar- 
ket-driven growth by reducing the role 
of government's ability to regulate cor- 
porate activity in the public interest, the 
MAI is on a collision course with the 
bedrock principles upon which our envi- 
ronmental agenda is built. 

Wh;st Yow C«n Do 

The MAI isn't a reality yet, and a grow- 
ing number of Canadians and citizens in 
other countries are working hard to en- 
sure that it never will be. Here are a 
number of ways in which you can make 
you voice heard: 

• Learn more about the MAI — visit our 
web site at http://vcn.bc.ca/wcel for 
information and links to other MAI 
resources and materials. Contact our 
office for a reading list of materials 
that you can share with friends and 
neighboiu^. Write to the editor of your 
local paper. 

• Let your federal MP know that you are 
opposed to the MAI and insist that she 
or he declare their position on it. En- 
courage your MP to actually read the 
draft Agreement We believe that once 
MPs actually read the Agreement, they 
will be as opposed to it as you are. 

• Make sure that your organization or 
union is committed to assessing the 
impacts of the MAI and ensuring they 
are addressed. Join or organize a lo- 
cal group that can provide a focal point 
for public education and community 
action. 

• Arrange to meet with your local cham- 
ber of commerce and other business 
groups. Unless you are a large 
transnational corporation with busi- 
ness primarily based outside Canada, 
the MAI is very likely to be bad for 
business. 

Promoters of the MAI are counting 
on your complacence — 
Don't accommodate them. 

Steven Shrybman 



Vol 21:04 December 17, 1997 






CV-^',.S,ftJ.<«.7T;,- 



Technocracy is science in the social 
field. Encyclopeda Americana says: 
...Technocracy... is the only program of 
social and economic reconstruction 
which is in complete intellectual and 
technical accord with the age in which 
we live. 

Without prejudice, a reward of 
$9,749.78 has been offered since 1978 
for irrefutable evidence that any 
political 'administration knows how to 
effect solutions to major social pro- 
blems. History does not record that 
political governments have ever solved, 
basically most social problems. Think 
About It! 

•(Request more information) 




T T S D 



L\ t:i ywhere on Earth the Price System 
is in conflict with the modern Age of 
sci(nice and technology. Enormous .social 
problems are engendered and exacer- 
bated by our adherence to the Price 
System. No amendments or harassments 
of incumbent governments is basically 
effective. Social violence harms both 
society and the participants. 

Now a method of social operation is 
available for the asking that can ensure 
that all people may have the benefits of 
the technologically achievable abun- 
dance. That solution is Technocracy's 
Technological Social Design. 

Become involved with the Social Solu- 
tion rather than the social confrontation 
movements. Investigate Technocracy 
now before it is too late. 



749 Sturgeon Rot 
kunnipeg, Manitoba R2Y 
February 20. 19^4 
Phone; (204) ^32 6442 



0KB 



Technocracy Inc. 11353 'A* 
j5^307 - 5540 - 109 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1E6 

Greetings; 

My last communication from your area was a letter from Walter Fryers 
dated Septl2/83. This was a short note advising that the Edmonton Unit 
that he, with the help of a few others, had nursed diligently for 62 
years was being evicted. He enclosed an open letter I! I^OTICE TO VAOATE II 
(two copies) which was dated August 5/^3. 

I sent a small donation (cheque) and two signed forms that he sent. 

I also sent a short personal letter to Vv'alter Fryers expressing my sorrow 
at the lose of your location in the HUB and the news that he was in 
poor health and other family problems. I told him about the u'i;innipeg 
Organizer, Bill Clements, who lost his wife last summer after a long 
period of illnes. He is himself in questionable health and unable to 
take a very active role much longer. The Winnipeg Unit has been rather 
dormant for many years due to lack of public interest and the age and 
'pioneer fatigue' that has plagued the remaining members who have anwered 
'roll call' on the very few meetings that have been cilled for many years. 
I have been the only active advocate since 1972. The fact that I am no 
longer a member has not deminished my continued efforts to promote Techno- 
ci^acy nor do I intend to discontinue these efforts. 

Last month on January 23rd I handed Bill Clements three signed applic- 
ation forms. These were peoole that I had been dealing with for more 
than a year. I had been kept waiting for about 9 months for application 
forms. I have another young man who will join. He was on hold due to his 
mother dying rather suddenly. I expect there may be otheis as I am in 
touch with two mote who have indicated serious interest. 

For this reason alone it is urgent and vital that I hav a working cont- 
act and relationship with the Edmonton Unit. Please let me know with 
whom I can communicate. 




l^' -,t^, 



-y^.- 






If possible please provide me with the names of those who are active in 
your area so that I may send them items of interest and support. I am 
in a very isolated position here in vvinnipeg. My access to Technocracy 
literature is somewhat tenuous and I need to know that I can have a suply 
on hand as I do extensive activity in handing out literature and also 
contacting people and organizations by mail. I estimate that my work in 
this personal promotion of Technocracy costs me at least ^100.00 each 
month. 

Increasingly I am finding that people are showing readiness to invest- 
igate Technocracy. There is pronounced agreement that the Price System 
and the political administration is not able to cope raych longer. That 
the 'system' is about to collapse. My finances are somewhat weak at this 
time but I may have a turnaround in this condition any time. I have some 
property up for sale that will change this very much. 

The 'Change of Address Announcement' that I recieved in the mail this 
morning does not provide me with any name. I can only assume that 'Aalter 
Fryers is no longer active. I had a very good ^forking relationship with 
him. He understood my frustrating position with the organization. He also 
knew that I was a staunch promoter of Technocracy and he did come to my 
support when friends of mine asked me to ask for re-enstatement in the 
organization. These friends are active and dedicated members who have 
recognized my input and seem to be prepared to keep in touch with me 
and offer ^^vhat help they can to make certain that my efforts are not 
further thwarted in this area. I am asking you to continue to provide 
me with the same respect and support that has applied while Walter Fryers 
was at the helm in Edmonton. I may need more literature particularly if 
new Briefs or article reprints become available to the general member- 
ship. 

Bonnie Gebhardt has been very helpful but she is sometimes away out of 
the country. The connections that I once had in the east seem to have 
faded. The Winnipeg Unit may experience a new come-back if I am able to 
nurture the new members who will want to see some activity soon. To help 
to stimulate their interest I have personally subscribed to the very fine 
Section Newsletter that is published every month by Section 12245 - 3 
out of Battle Ground .i/ashingtan. I strongly recomment that you get in 
touch with Lois M. Scheel who is COS as ask her to send you this very 
excellent bulliten. They seem to have some very good writers and I do 
expect that it will develope into a new field magazine if interest in 
Technocracy picks up as I now think is certain. I have asked her to send 
a copy (subscription) to each of the new members who signed due to my 
efforts. As you know the field magazines are published only every three 
months. This is a long lapse and new members may loose interest if they 
do not have contact and stimulation on a more freq^ient basis. 

Thank you for your notice of address. I shall look forward to hearing 
from you soon so that I may maintain a useful linkage with Edmonton. 
Please express my regards to those who are carrying on with the work 
of promotion in your area. 

Yours for social engineering 




^ 



^yC^T^yO 




^-t^A^^^^W:^ 




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where Korea, China, Indo-China, the Philippines, and 
Malay all pro\'ide ready-made wars for us to jump into 
and exploit, ^'et, the boys in ^Vashington arc worried. 
Look at the vtiscalculntions they made about Korea. They 
could be wrong again. Besides, there is no advantage in 
getting stymied in any more 'limited wars;' this time, 
the\ want a general war, and no tooling. 

During the summer ot 1^51, there was an opportunity 
and some official desire to call off the Korean War 
under the pre\ ailing circumstances which wouKl ha\e 
given us an honorable out. But. at the first hint of a 
truce, there was such a let-down in war enthusiasm 
among the American people, including the men in the 
Armed Forces, that the truce negotiations were promptly 
stalled (and at this w^-iting they are still stalled), while 
the war-against-Russia propaganda was stepped up. It 
appears that any kind of a war is considered better than 



no war at all, at least until a bigger war can be started. 
But. where, when, and how to get another war started? 
Th.ir i> the bothersome (juestion. 

War or no war, the government now has abandoned 
rhe polic\ of balanced budget and is headed into deficit 
spending, parth to create more purchasing power and 
partly TO head off jiroduction that is now going into 
con'^umer channel^. If enough production can be diverted 
into war material, it is hoped that a deficiency of con- 
sumer goods will develop in the retail markers of rhe 
nation. This, along with billions of d(jnars of new debt, 
should permit the inflation spiral to proceed upward, it 
is reasoned, and with it brings gladness to the hearts of 
the political economists. The greatest fallacy of that 
theory is that it ignores the effects of modern technology 
on the system. It is a beautiful thcon', but it won't work. 
The administrators of the United States and Canada 



D^ 




'40 1850 I8E0 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 '50 

IRREVERSIBLE TRENDS SHAPE AMERICAS DESTINY 

PRODUCTION X MAN-HOURS PER UNIT = TOTAL MAN-HOURS , 



The TECHNOCRAT 



MARCH 1952 



"t'll-ifiif "Fr'-i 



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answer is simple. The ^Ish in that tank 
were fed enough and fed regularly. 

/ Is It any wonder that we cut each 
others throats? Perhaps not literally 
with knives and sharp instruments, but 
no one can deny that we cheat, steal, 
rob, bribe and graft upon one another. 
Has there ever been a single period 
in the history of any nation A-^e" this 
was not so? If this is true, why do we 
blindly smash our heads against store 
walls trying to make silk purses out of 
sows' ears; trying to make loving, 
brotherly, friendly and considerate 
people of populations that cannot feed 
themselves three hearty meals daily be- 
cause of the perpetua: scarcities? 
When an animal scavenges and fights 
tor its food, we admire it. B'-t when 
a human does the same, we call him 
uncontrolled, illegal, and ostracize or 
imprison him. So long as those persc-s 
deprived of the necessities of life are 
below the intolerable majority level in 
number, we can get away with the 
practice of imprisonment and ostra- 
cism. But If those numbers Increase 
and pass the 50% point, watch out for 
the explosion. 

Without any effort, we could go to 
a thousand places in a single week's 
time, where we would hear sentiment 
of gloom and depression, because the 
war is over; where, by business com- 
pulsion, men are irresistibly led into 
talk of a third world war, against any- 
body, If that's the only way to keep the 
wheels of Industry running. It Isn't 
that these men are evil or more In- 
human than the rest of us. It s simp'y 
that, under this system, they need busi- 
ness in craer to survive. Strange talk, 
indeed, f'^cm businessmen, who only 
a year and a half ago paid for full page 
advertisements depicting a beautiful 
life of peace and plenty for -^he soldiers 
when they returned home — advertise- 
ments, by the way, paid for out of 
profits earned through the fighting and 
the killing of those same men. That was 
less than two years ago. What is the 
picture today? 

Our hous'ng situation he; reached 
the most deplorable state in the h'stcry 
of the country. What ever happened 
to those rosy plans for ore mil-icn 
homes in the first year after the war 
and 1.7 mi'iion in the second year? 
Evictions are at the highest level in 
ten years. Headlines in the nation's 
press indic3+e the seriousness of the 
situation: 

"Vets in Sacrameri+o Demanc $135 
Million Housing Aid." 



PEACE OF THE PRICE SYSTEM 

UNITED STATES— 1945 



Murders, criminal homicide 

Assaults with intent to kill 

Rapes, forcible and statutory 

Larcenies, i.e., thefts 
Burglaries, breaking and entering 
Automobiles stolen . . 

Robberies by violence and threats . . . 

Killed at work, factory, farm, mine, etc.. . . 
Injured at work, factory, farm, mine, etc. 
Killed by automobiles 
Injured by automobiles 
Killed while at home 
Injured while at home 
Killed by non-motor vehicle accidents 
Injured by non-motor vehicle accidents 

Killed by heart disease ( 1 944) 

Killed by cancer (1944) 

Killed by brain hemorrhage (1944) 

Killer by self destruction (suicides, 1944) 

Attempted suicides (estimate) 

Consigned to insane asylums 

Broken homes and families (divorces) . 

Property loss by fires 

Number of forest fires 

Acres of timber burned 

Paper tonnage wasted on advertising 



6.847 

59,807 

I 1.537 

865,521 

321,672 

241,491 

54,279 

16,000 

2,000,000 

28,600 

1,000,000 

33,500 

5,050,000 

15,000 

1,850,000 

418,062 

171,171 

124.250 

13,231 

100,000 

175,000 

502,000 

484,000,000 

124,728 

17,680,703 

1,500,000 



Top soil washed into oceans (tons) 1 ,000,000,000 

Net corporate profit $9,000,000,000 

While you read this (10 minutes) 30 major crimes took place; 2 people were 
killed in accidents and 190 injured; 8 people died of heart disease; 3 of 
cancer; and 2 of brain hemorrhage; 2 attempted suicide; 3 were put away 
in insane asylums; 9 divorces were granted; over $8,000 of property went up 
in smoke; 2 forest fires were started and 328 acres of forest land burned over; 
19,000 tons of top soil, equivalent to 19 acres of cropland, were washed into 
the oceans; 30 tons of paper were wasted for advertising; and corporate 
enterprise piled up a neat profit exceeding $160,000. 

THIS IS ONLY 10 MINUTES OF THE PEACE OF THE PRICE SYSTEM 

S:_';es; fede's'. Z~'eaj c" '-•■Si'' zf'cr; Ub'-c- Sa^e'v CcLnc' : 'J. S. 
S-3*'sr'cai Abifraz-' Porest Service; U. S. Soil Cc.'ersaticn Service; Ce-sus 
Bureau; Fede'el Secur -y Aaercv Consumers Ur'cr. 



Low-cost Housing 'r. Dagger. 

Hous'ng Outlook fc 1947: Dim. 
Quarter to Half-Million 'Jnits Shy for 
Year, With Most Vets S-^iH Waiting." 

Ex-Cailfornians Ma'ke Cozy Home 
in Cinder Cave.' 

.V.e'' formerly in the Armed Services 
are passing time at college courses, 
which a^e practically worthless, be- 
cause that is the only way in which they 
car. stay on the governmental pavro'I 
a'^ter they are thrown out of the '52-20 
Club.' 

Ou-- crilllaf^t political economist: srir 
uf: 3 'e"'f"c lather about reducing gcv- 



ernme'^t expenditures (as rhcugh that 
is really the aim) and then in one fell 
swoop, they grant terminal leave pay 



ex-GI 



As 



a rewara 



? Of 



course 



not! Merely to pump money Into the 
streams of purchasing ocwer. (They 
don t call it a 'bonus any more. That ; 
an ugly word!) 

Juvenile delinquency and crime are 
skyrccke'Ing. Police forces are +o+ai:y 
inadequate to cope with the rising tide 
of crime. Again the headlines are Ir- 
dicative of the trend: 

"Woman Found in Road Ditch Bru- 
tally Slain." 



'he TECHNOCRAT . . . MA^ 1947 



%-, :;'.., •v%T.l 




Ottawa. 



Kl^ O^l 



GOVERNMENT HOUSE 

SESIOENCB DU OOUVEBtNEUR GENERAi. 



25th April 1979 



Dear Mr. Davidson/ 

It is only recently that we have had time to 
review the many messages of congratulation which were sent 
to us in Winnipeg, therefore please forgive the delay in 
replying. My wife and I do appreciate your good wishes and 
your thoughtfulness in writing. 

Yours sincerely, 




Governor General of Canada 



Mr. Jim Davidson, 

358 Ainslie Street, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
R3J 2Z8. 



fs. 



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their young at certain limes, and vegetation sprang 
up, blossomed, went to seed, and withered away 
with consistent regularity. It was thus that he be- 
came aware of^ those two divisions of time which 
have astronomical siqnificance, the day and the 
year. 

(Two other time intervals in our present calendar 
have no such significance — the week and the month. 
The week could just as well have had five or nine 
days; it wouldn't matter. Moon calendars have 
been used in every part of the world at some time 
or another.) 

Later on, as a herdsman and an agriculturist, 
man learned the importance of a calendar by which 
to time his. stock breeding and his planting. 

The Egyptians were apparently the first to recog- 
nize the relationship of the year to the sun and to 
compute time by it rather than the moon. In be- 
tween the moon and the sun calendars, for a short 
period a sidereal or star calendar was used, but this 
was not accurate enough to be satisfactory. The 



Egyptians used the sun calendar aboul 35 centuries 
before the Romans used it. 

To Julius Caesar goes the credit for the begin- 
ning of our present calendar, as he gave us the 
closest yearly division yet achieved. Between three 
and four hundred years later a big change was 
made in the calendar v/ithout altering its scientific 
accuracy when Emperor Constantino inserted the 
week of seven days into it. Such is our calendar of 
today, except for the later establishment of a 'leap 
year' by Pope Gregory in the interest of greater 
accuracy. It is now almost perfect in its time meas- 
uring construction, varying only one day in 3,866 
years. 

Each change of the calendar was met by opposi- 
tion. For example, the gregorian calendar of today 
'was not adopted in England until 1752, less than 
200 years ago, though the English were then 12 
days out of time with the seasons. But it was fought 
bitterly; v.-hy, we do not know. 

The calendar that was designed and perfected 



DAY OF YEA.< 


81 


82 


83 


84 


85 


86 


87 


88 


89 


90 


91 92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


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TECHNOCRACY CALENDAR 



.\ 



PLICATIONS •• PROCUCING EQUIPMENT V^ 

Provides for a balanced load on TRArJSPORTATION SYSTEM ; 

COMMUNICATION SYSTEM ! 

p^^TTX •• RECREATIONAL CENTERS 

DAYS DATED 1 to 364 Starting on the Vernal E<^uinox March Zlst 
DAY AND YEAR are periods of astronomical significance 

SCHEDULE •• 
41 WORK PERIODS 4DAYS0N 3 DAYS OFF (Rotating shifts) 
78 Succpssive day« vacation 165 Working days per year 

8 V THE NORTHWEST TECHNOCRAT 






mmm ' * > ii ^ K wmmamfm^ j fm \f«mmiiUJ.\,if !f f ^< f\ * f.\ ' m^.i!V ' J ' Jiy ^ '^ 



I Atm..^ '-■«»i. 







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REWARD 



ADAMS, (Bob) Robert 

Economic Consultant/ 
Conseiller economique 
NDP/NPD 



EPP, John 

Retired/Retrait6 

Liberal Party/Parti liberal 



$9749.78 

FOR 

IRREFUTABLE EVIDENCE THAT ANY 

POLITICAL*ADMINISTRATION KNOWS HOW 

TO EFFECT SOLUTIONS TO MAJOR 

SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

{J P.O. Box 266, Stn. "A" 

Winnipeg, Manitoba R3K 2A1 

• THE WINNIPEG SUN, Monday, hiowiiiiber 16, 1981 

$10,000 reward unclaimed 




JOHNSTON, Frank 

Province of Manitoba Cabinet Minister/ 
Ministre du cabinet-province du Manitoba 
Progressive Conservative/ 
ProgressiSte conservateur 



By John Bertrand 
Sun City Editor 

OK, boys and girls, here's the 
$9,749.78 question. 

Can you come up with 
irrefutable evidence that any 
political administration knows 
how to effect solutions to major 
social problems? 

No? That's not surprising 
because Winnipegger Jim 
Davidson, who has put up the 
$0,749.78 reward, doesn't expect 



an answer. 

He even sent a reward notice to 
all Manitoba's political leaders, 
none of whom responded. 

"If you think about it, no 
government has come up with 
solutions to problems like crime, 
pollution, slums and monetary 
stability," Davidson said. 

"I guess I'm not surprised I 
didn't hear from the leaders, I 
guess their workload is pretty 
heavy right now." 



Davidson says he has the an- 
swer in something called 
"technological social design" 
which promises a life without 
property, sales and income tax. 

The only problem is that 
Davidson wasn't too keen on 
revealing the details of this brave 
new world and he wouldn't leave a 
phone number. 

You'll have to track down Jim 
Davidson, technocracy, and the 
reward all by yourselves. 



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Technocracy's Scientific Approach 



CHART No. 9. — Earlier charts have depicted various phases 
of dynamic equilibrium and the flow of energy. We 
have demonstrated that social change is in direct pro- 
pcrtion to the per capita rate cf the conversion of energry. 
which for 7000 years was practically static en a scarcity 
level, under which the Price System was developed. During 
the moment of history since 1830 the fir?t fundamental 
change occurred, the change from scarcity to potential 
abundance on the North American Continent. This change 
spelled the doom of the Price System and all time-honored 
concepts of political government, economics, property, value, 
thrift, the importance and morality of toil and the stupidity 
of unequal consuming privileges. These concepts are not 
natural laws but exist only in the mind. They are intangible 
and represent only a world of agreement^. Men made these 
agreements and men can change them when they so desire. 

.Any social system that effects its distribution of goods 
and services by means of a syi'tem of comnrerce based on 
commodity valuation, and employing a medium rf exchange 
or any fomt of monetary debt tokens constitutes a price 
system, irrespective of whether the ownership in that social 
?"ystem is individual or collective. 

A medium of exchange has validity only in --elling the 
'carcity of a price sy tem: only a medium rf distribution 
can achieve the consumption of abundance. The two prime 
requisites of a price '■ystem are i .\) Scarcity, which main- 
taii\s value, (B) A flow of money sufficient to purchase 
goods produced.. In chart No. 8 we showed that advancing 



technology is destroying both requisites. The Price System 
is dying: 

Political government, a means of controlling people in a 
way favorable to a Price System, is striving frantically to 
save the system. It can't win I Political government em- 
ploys three major devices for killing the abundance that 
threatens the life of its pet, the Price System: it prevents 
the production of abundance by shut-downs; it destroys 
abundance: it ships abundance off the Continent. All three 
are incompi.tibie with the welfare of our entire citizenry. 
.\11 three are attempts to thwart social change.. Continued 
attempts can end in chaos. 

The record of the inability of a politically supervised 
Price System to distribute abundance is depicted by our 
chart showing the income levels in .\merican life. (See in- 
side front cover of c-ur issue No. 114, Vol. X). So far we 
have been following the analytical path of science, the fact- 
finding path. Technocracy proposes that these facts form 
the foundation of a new social system, for social change is 
upon us. 

Uninformed critics of Technocracy often -state that it 
does not consider human nature. Contrarily, Technocracy 
is the only organization that DOES deal with mass human 
nature, and does it scientifically. (See Let's Lock at Human 
Nature.' this issue). The above chart shows how human 
lehavior patterns are formed by physical environmental fac- 
tors. Change these factors and behavior patterns change 
automatically. 



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AM TECHNOLOGY 



wa> ocT'i oetcre tne recorae 



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ha? beer Tiao'e i'^ the last ■fifty years. 

I a"- The gigantic industrial system cf Ncrth America. 

I am the great transportation sys*em which moves me" eauipment and 
resource; across this great Continent. 

I a"- *he mighty hydroelectric plants and the central s'^ea"-: plants which 
, generate electricity for the needs o* the Ccntinen*. 

I a"" the giant foundries. *he g'ea* furnaces srd •^he so^aw'-a factories of 
your ma"^ cities. 

I an- The planter, the til'er a-d the harvester ct ♦■he ac^rcc'^^ crcc^ from 
No'"th /','^erica s fertile so''. 

I am, '■he electric i'ght. the te'epho'e, The 'acic ar.d the az-seeing eye; of 
televislo". 

I am 'he prin^^inc press. The au^'cmaT c Textile loom, the gia^^^ X-ray machine. 

I am, ^he more than 2,000,000 machine tools and the -ear y 2,000,000,000 
installed ""crsepower of prime movers in North Amei'ica. 

I, Ncrth American Technology, furnished the bulk of the fue and the wea- 
pons for the most devastating war the world has ever know-. 

It was I who made possible the precision bomc sight, rada'' detectic^, iet 
planes a'^^d even the terrible atom bomb. 

I, Technology, could just as easily be made to turn out gcocs for peaceful 
living, bu'^ 1 do not dictate how i must operate. 

For, although I am designed and developed by the scientis'l's, technologists 
and tech"icians, I am the chattel of American business, and I em imprisoned 
within the framework of the Price Svstem,. 



I have solved the problem of proouction and, we-'e 
could sc've the p'"oblem of distribution. 



ce^mi'^ed to dc 



If vc- the oeoo'e of North America, wart me Tc turn c^' 



abunoance of 
m 



ocods a^r services to a'! Nor^^'h Americans, o'ving every ina'vioua security f 
birth to oeath, I can dc 'i''. I'^ s up to you! 

If VOL, would like tc see your Nc^^n America free ■^'■cm ceogars, crooks, 
chari'f-v, c'~'canery, cniseiing and prof't, i^- s up to you! 

If yc_ wcu'd like to see your chilaren grcv/i.ng up in a :a'o C equa' oppor- 
tunity, f'ee from discim^natior^ against race, co'or or creed " s „c to yc;,! 

If yc^ will set me free from the Price Sys^f^e.m by installing Tecr-c oglcal social 
controls ■- accord with the physica' iaws by which I must 0De''a"e I w'll build, 
.-ight he'e on the North American Ccntlnen^!-, the greatest civ' 'za'^'O!" ever known 
tc man — a society organized and coerated for the crime 'j-c^^'on of living! 

I ca' do it, if you want me ^c. It s up tc yOu! 

I AV TECHNOLOGY! 



The TECHNOCRAT . . . JULY 1948 






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ECHNOLOGY is the social mechanics of the Power Age. The aspirations of human 
society on the North American Continent must be the projection oi the technological 
pattern of this Continent. The wish-fulfillment of the masses, the sincerity of the reformer, 
the enterprise of the politician, the vision of our intellectuals, the pathology of our econo- 
mists, are but gestures of futility, straws in the wind, in the face of the march of power. 
The soldier and the seer, the politician and the priest, the business man and the banker have 
ruled human society in every age until now. Technology in its march of power is serving 
notice on all of these, chiseler and sucker alike, that their day is passing, that a new order 
is clamoring at the gates. As technology moves up more power, the gates will go down 
and a new leadership of men and things will be given to the world. This leadership will 
spring from those of the trained personnel of this Continent who will have the courage, 
capacity and discipline to administer and direct the technological application of physical 
science to the conduct of human affairs on this Continental area. 

— Howard ScoH, Direc+or-in-Chief, Technocracy Inc., 
in Technocracy magaiine, Series A, Number 9. 



'V .'''t^.2!»!Ji'.-^.T"Trr' -rr-^in" 



THE TECHNOCRAT MAGAZINE 



AUGUST 1947 



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I 



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For thousands of years man has dreanned, hoped and prayed for an abundant life free 
from toil with ample time for cultural pursuits; hoped that he might sometime find security 
elsewhere than in the insecurity of his fellow men. These benefactions are now at hand here 
on the North American Continent. Science has made them possible. 

Every citizen on this Continent could have all the goods and services he can use from 
birth until death. We have the raw materials, the energy, and the means to produce them. 
So, why not? 

Machines have been developed to do the work of this Continent and man could be 
free from toll and anxiety. Well, why not? 

Every child on this Continent could be given every opportunity to become educated to 
the full extent of his capacity and desire, including preparations for the job of his choice 
and ability, and for leisure time activity. 

Every person on this Continent could be permitted to choose the type of employment 
for which he or she is best fitted. There is ample diversity of functions to provide suitable 
employment for all types of personality and talents. So, why not? 

Every person could have full freedom of belief, speech, religion, and personal activity, 
according to his or her desires (subject only to the minimum of regulation, which the welfare 
of all requires); and the practice of this freedom would in no way endanger one's standard 
of living or right to consume. Well, why rc/t? 

Every person could have an equal right to decide what kind of goods and services would 
be produced. For who should decide this, if not the consumer? 

In a Power Age, political controls, with their corruption, inefficiency, incompetence and 
waste, must be supplanted by functional ccrtrols whose only criteria of operation are effi- 
ciency and quality of production. This MUST be accomplished before an effective means of 
distribution can operate. Again, why not? 

These questions are a challenge to the people of North America. A challenge to unite 
and take action against the status quo with Its enforced scarcity, malnutrition, slum housing 
and crime. Advancing technology is dictating social change and social change If directed 
upward can mean an abundant lire for ea'-h and every citizen on this Continent. Continued 
attempts to frustrate social change by politico-economic manipulations can end only In 
chaos. 



— SECTION STAMP — 

PUBUCATIONS COUffMITTEB 
WCTION I, REGIONAL DFV. P'^'> 

TECHNOCRACY J^C 
il»W ST, P. Q. BCX 2073 
WINNIPEG, — MANITOBA 




THE TECHNOCRAT MAGAZINE 



AUGUST 1946 






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Ecclesiasticism 



BY ECCLESIASTICISM we do not mean religion. Let's look at the 
point closely. Religion is a feeling of deep reverence, of faith 
and belief in a superhuman power that is placeless and timeless. 
Churches are the social institutions evolved out of that feeling to ex- 
press that faith and belief. Ecclesiasticism, or clericaUsm, is the mis- 
directed behavior of the overlords of the church in general who sabo- 
tage religion by engaging in anti-spiritual activities. 

Ecclesiasticism meddles with and interferes in affairs of the tem- 
poral world with which (by its 



own declaration) religion can 
have no concern. Ministering to 
t h e spiritual needs of mankind 
does not license tampering with 
the physical reqiiirements of indi- 
vidual existence or with the ad- 
ministrative necessities of collec- 
tive existence. By the same token 
those who are charged with the 
operation of the physical and ad- 
ministrative facilities of society 
have no license to tamper with 
the spiritual requirements of the 
people. The two are separate 
fields. One is a question of be- 
lief. The other is a problem of 
measurement. 

A long-suffering humanity is 
still subject to illicit impositions 
by ecclesiastics who exercise po- 
litical and economic control out- 
side of their spiritual domain, in 
defiance of the tenets of religious 
faith. The Old World has been 
cursed with this social ulcer for 



ages. It is one of the most perni- 
cious characteristics of the Price 
System. When the New World of 
America was settled, a new prin- 
ciple was set forth. That was free- 
dom of religion combined with 
separation of Church and State. 
Today, religion is not free from 
economic pressures, and the State 
is not free from ecclesiastical 
pressures. Business and poUtics 
are increasingly submitting to 
and endorsing the obnoxious 
practices of clericalism. 

This triple oligarchy is the same 
unholy alliance which down- 
graded so many nations and peo- 
ples in the past. There is nothing 
sacred about these clerical sabo- 
teurs of humanity. They exploit 
the sanctity of worship and pros- 
titute the trust reposed in them by 
men. By conniving with business 
and politics, clericahsm betrays 
its own body of faith and belief, 



and the followers who support it 
and them. Religion is a social 
necessity for the spiritual side of 
man. Its function is to imbue him 
with tranquillity in the face of the 
hereafter, by adjusting the fearful 
uncertainties of the unknown to a 
belief in eternal verities. It has a 
vast, unconquered field of opera- 
tions there. 

Religion has never yet been 
free to perform its true function. 
The money changers have been 
driven from the temple a thou- 
sand times. As long as the Price 
System lasts, however, they will 
always manage to find their way 
back to set up business at the 
ancient stand. The formation of 
the Technate of North America 
will automatically remove both 
money and the money changers 
from the temple, and for the first 
time in human history rehgion 
will be able to fulfill its true func- 
tion. Not until that time will the 
religious leaders of this Continent 
be free to render unto God that 
which is God's. 

— From 'Method or Mythology,' 
in the Great Lakes Techno- 
crat, Jan. 1947, by George B. 
Conner, M. A. L. 



Encyclopedia Americana says: 'Whatever the future of Technoc- 
racy, one must fairly say that it is the only program of social and eco- 
nomic reconstruction which is in complete intellectual and technical 
accord with the age in which we live.' 



Technocracy is science in the social field. Technocracy states that 
a social crisis is piling up around us in North America. Technocracy 
interprets these conditions and factually states why they occur, and 
what we must do about them. 

Investigate, and JOIN TECHNOCRACY NOW ! 



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Tcchnoci acy is scicticc in llic sociiil 
field F.ncvclopecia Amcrlc.in.i sa\s 
...Tfrhnocracv... is the onK piogram ol 
social and economic recoiist ruction 
which is in complete intellectual and 
technical accord wTth the age in uhich 
we live. 

Without prejudice, a rcv\ard of 
$9,749.78 has been offered since 1978 
for irrefutable evidence that anv 
political 'administration knows liou to 
effect solutions to major social pro- 
blems. History does not record that 
political governments have ever solved, 
basically most social problems Think 
About It' 



•(Request more information) 




T T S D 



i. I . .v.lidc on f.arlh the: I'licc SvstiMi) 
is in contlict with the modern ,Agc ol 
SI icncc and technology. Knormous social 
pioblems are engenderid and exacer- 
bat(!d by our adherence to the Price 
System No amendinenis or harassments 
of incuinb(Mit governments is basicallv 
effective Social violence harms both 
societv and the participants 

N'ovv a nuMliod of social operation is 
available for the asking that can ensure 
that all [icople may have; the benefits of 
the te( hnologicallv achievable abun- 
dance That solution is lechnocracy's 
Technological Social Design 

Become involved with the Social Solu- 
tion rather than the; social confrontation 
movements. Investigate Technocracy 
now before it is too late. 



749 Sturgeon Rd, 

Winnipeg, i'^nitoba ii2Y 0K8 



OPEK LETTER TO POLITIOIAi\iS Ai^D OThExtS 



*Ve live in a Price System. A socio-phagous social structure. Though often 
called a Democratic Free Enterprise System, it is not free, not democratic, 
seldom enterprising and certainly not much of a system. In effect it is 
anti-social and anti-survival. It engenders all the socially undesirable 
patterns of behavior that are now common to both individuals and corpor- 
ations. These patterns or practices, in turn, give rise to endless pressure 
groups each demanding help for their special interests and in general con- 
frontation with society as a whole. 

Endless social problems arise from the preference given the "Price System 
since those interests are generally in conflict with the physical needs 
of the human components of society. This takes place concomitant with our 
demonstrable ability to produce an abundance of goods and services. 



Political institutions attempt to manage all this mess. They act as arbit- 
rators between the 'haves' and the 'have-not' factions. The P.O. oaj ty 






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supports the business interests. The N.D. party generally supports the 
have-not sector. The Liberal party seems to be everycnes mistress and acts 
on an 'ad hoc* basis to social crises. Wone attempt to rise above problem 
involvement, or the constraintive parameters imposed by the Price System. 
All are therefore, essentially, by virtue of these self-imposed constraints, 
merely pathophiles. None can attempt to deal, basically, in social solut- 
ions. The general public, conditioned to a state of social moronity, and 
with few exceptions, endorses, partakes of and supports political activity 
per se. The financial and religious institutions are either benign or part- 
ially supportive of the present social status quo (Price System; since they 
are, to a large extent, a product of it. 

The Price System thrives on the continuous clang of the cash register. It 
owes its existance to the practice of profiting by the effort of others. 
Capitalizing on calamities is a constantly profitable pursuit as well. All 
this activity bound to the dictum, 'Buy Low and Sell High'. 

Basically our society is composed of the Ghisellers and the Suckers. Given 
the opportiinity, the Suckers strive to become Ghisellers. And so it may be 
tru^y said of our present society that the hand of God, reaching down 
through the deepest mire, could not drag it up to the depths of degrad- 
ation. In its present form it is doomed to disentegrate and collapse due 
to our own self-imposed stupidity. All because we hold that the Price 
System is sacrosant. And so we remain, in effect, a society at war with 
ourselves, facing a terminal social future if we permit this insanity to 
continue much longer. 

Think About It. 



Yojl'i/s for s/6cVSilL engineering 




"^^l 



Technocracy is science in 
the social field. Encyclopedia 
Americana says:... Technocracy 

1$ the only program of social 

and economic reconstruction which 
is in complete intellectual and 
technical accord with the 
age in which we live. 



O 



TECHNOCRACY INC. 
TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN' 



P.O. BOX 266, SIN. "A", 
WINNIPEG. MANITOBA 
R3K 2A1 



52 Winnipeg Free Press, Monday, August 10, 1981 ** 



45 million Americans 
face robots' challenge 

Business 



Robots will replace most hiin^ans on 
United States plant floors by 1965 with 
manufacturers about to make a quan- 
tum leap into factory automation. Fac- 
tory and office automation will change 
45 million jobs, or 45 per cent of Ameri- 
ca's 100 million-member work force. 

That's the gist of a special report in 
the Aug. 3 issue of Business Week, 
which says "after years of false starts, 
America's manufacttirers are finally in 
position to make a stunning leap into 
total automation." 

Finally emerging is the solution for 
automating short production runs, 
which account for 75 per cent of all 



tne press, 




U.S. manufacturing. And after a dec- 
ade of losing ground to low-cost, high- 
quality imports, some executives fore- 
see the U.S. surp^assing Japan and 
Western Germany in the race to auto- 
mate by 1990. 

Estimates are industry will triple its 
automation spending to $5 billion year- 
ly by 1985. 

"The Japanese have awakened a 
sleeping tiger," says Frank T. Curtin, 
vice-president of Cincinnati Milacron 
Inc.'s machine tool operations. "We are 



The three-curve chart is a statistical 
record of physical events that have a 
direct bearing on human need and hu- 
man suffering. It says an emphatic no 
to all who claim that machines make jobs. 



not going to roll over and play dead any 

longer." 

Business Week 

Toronto on rise 

Toronto is being hailed as a boom city 
again. Following a late 1970s slump, the 



and Chicago and Boston and half of 
Philadelphia on the United States." 
Financial Timesspecial report. 
July 27 

Profits blooming 

Profits are blooming for United 






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IRREVERSIBLE PHYSICAL TRENDS 
SHAPE AMERICA'S DESTINY 
















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1830 1840 I8S0 I860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 

This Chart shows the greatest revolution of all time: The replacement of human work by 
technology, permitting production to rise while man-hours of employment decreased. These 
are the factors which ore determining North America's history: they ore creating North 
America's destiny. 

A graph of the U. S. total of energy produced from mineral fuel and water power would 
show a line almost identical with the 'Physical Production' line in the above chart. 



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SATURDAY NOV H 19<? 



THE WIKNIPEG TRIBUNE 



PA CI 5 



Advertisement 



TOTAL WAR 

Demands 

TOTAL CONSCRIPTION 

Of Men, Machines, Materiel and Money 

And Requires 

NATIONAL SERVICE FROM ALL-PROFITS TO NONE 



Our fascist enemies are waging total war against us. To smash 
fascism, we must install the strategy ofTotalWar NOW — or 
face disaster. 

Canada must efficiently install, at once, a complete mobilization 
of all the resources of its national entirety. 

This designed direction of tiational operations cannot be 
attained if Canada permits business methods and party politics 
to dominate the administration of pur war program. 



Canada must realize that, in this age of Science and Power 
Machmes. the methods and practices of history, cherished alike 
by the workers and the operators of business and party politics 
are incompetent to operate this country under the demands of 
total war. 

The structure of Canada's economy demands that we Canadians 
abandon the haphazard conflict of private and group interests in 
order that we may help win this world war, thereby defeating 
the enemies of Canada and winning the peace to come. 
Canada must abolish completely, for the duration, all "produc- 
tion for profit. "Production for Victory" must be substituted. 



"CANADIANS FOR VICTORY" ask: Hou, many more disasters must u^ 
suffer before we develop the cmectii^ intelligence to bring in Total Conscription? 



TOTAL COI^SCRII^ION 



•'CANADIANS FOR VICTORY" urge the immediate institution of Total Con- 
scription for Canada, namely, that; 

TheCovernment of Canada shall Immediately institute the total consfiptlon 
of all effectives, male and female, between the ages of 18 and 65, for naMonal 
service Icivillan as w/ell as military) . All citizens and the armed forces Snail 
serve on the same basis, with the same pay scales, the same standards of fool, 
clothing, and health protection, etc. 

Total Conscription calls for the suspension of all dividends, profits, interest, 
rents, union dues and taxes; and for a moratorium on all debt and litigation. 
The Government of Canada shall assume all financial obligations of all muni- 
cipalities, counties and provinces. 

The Government of Canada shall institutc^as part of this program, immediate 
conscription of all national corporate wealth and its attendant 
institutions, such as banks, trusts and insurance companies. 

The Government of Canada shall conscript all of the physical facil- 
ities and operating personnel of rail, bus, water and air transport- 
ation; all telegraph, telephone and radio communication systems; 
all public utilities and power producing and transmission systems; 
all of the manufacturing industries of the country: all of the oil wells 
and refining industries; all corporate enterprise engaged in mining 

The Government of Canada shall conscript all of the physical facili- 
ties and operating personnel of all export and import corporations. 

The Government of Canada shall be the sole exporfer'and importer. 

The Government of Canada shall conscript immediately all patents, 
inventions, and processes extant in our national domain whether of foreign 
or domestic ownership 




The Government of Canada, as a measure of national safety and national wel- 
fare shall limit the sale of spirituous beverages, w,nes, and liquors to govern- 
ment liquor stores and hotel dining-rooms. 

The Government of Canada shall prohibit the transfer of Canadian purchasing 
powerlntheformof currency, notes, drafts or money orders of all corporations 
and residents of Canada to any corporation or resident of any alien country. 

^11 branches of industry, mining, transportation, communications and other 
necessary Canadian operations, shall be managed as a unit, with all of these 
units under a single productive control. THIs entire productive control, and 
the entire armtd force command, shall bcfully co-oroi..-»„^ 

These specifications for Total Conscription to remain in force not longer than 
six months after the termination of the.war. 

"Canadians for Victory" strongly approve all steps taken by Canada 
in collaboration with the United States and other North American 
allies to co-ordinate our common defense under a single command. 

As further Immediate steps "Canadians for Victory" urge that the 
entire productive effort of the United States and Canada be Inter- 
locked under one direction; th«t all tariff barriers between the two 
countries be abolished; that the Canadian dollar be pegged at parity 
with the U.S. dollar; that joint highways be built not only to Alaska 
but also to Labrador, and that aid to our allies overseas be Increased. 

Canadians are willing and eager to make any sacrifice to win this 
war. If they know that every otherC«n»dian is making similar sacri- 
fices. Tottl Conscription is tneHnly method ol unifying the people 
o/ Canada into a tOfal war effort with service Irom all and proSis to none. 



Canada Must Liquidate Its Pro-Fascists At Home .. Before It Can Defeat Its Fascist Enemies Abroad! 



CANADIANS FOR VICTORY 
COMMITTEE 

"c'f .Si'iTs" 308 Tin,. Building. WINNIPEG "ri'cV.'HT 

Our Armed Forces Are On The Movg^ 

Victory Depends On Our TOTAL 
Etf ort^It^s Your Move, Canadians! 

This Advertisewent is Piid /<h by Donttions Irom Pttriotic Cintii.tns 



MAIL THIS COUPON TO 

CinidUnt for Victcfy CommiltM, 
P.O. ••< U3. 
WINNIPIC. ManiUba. 

/ am interested tn a totti Conscription ProgrMmrtie. Please torwtid 
fuither intormation tod literotare without obligation to me: 

NAME 

(Prlot In ■lack Ltt1«ri) 

ADDRESS 

CITY PHONE 



JIM DAVIDSON, TECHNOCRAT 

^ 749 STURGEON RD 
\ WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
CANADA R2Y 0K8 



REWARD 

$9749.78 

POR (since 1976) 

IRREFUTABLE EVIDENCE THAT ANY 

POLITICAL*ADMINISTRATION KNOWS HOW 

TO EFFECT SOLUTIONS TO MAJOR 

SOCIAL PROBLEMS 






HA >l 



P. O. Box 266, Stn. "A* 
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3K 2A1 



H/STORY DOES NOT RECORD THAT POLITICAL GOVERNMENTS 

HA VE EVER SOL VED SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 

THINK ABOUT m 

CRIME - POLLUTION - UNEMPLOYMENT - RESOURCE CONSERVATION 
MONETARY STABILITY - ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND CONSERVATION 
PRODUCT OBSOLESCENCE - POPULATION CONTROL - INCOME SECURITY 
FLOODS - MALNUTRITION - SHORTAGES - RISING TAXATION 
ESCALATING NATIONAL DEBT - ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE 
COMBINES - MONOPOLIES - SLUMS - SENIOR CITIZEN DEGRADATION 
INADEQUATE HEALTH SERVICES - COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWNS 
ADEQUATE CONTINENTAL MILITARY DEFENSE 
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COLLAPSE AND OTHERS 

* This challenging Reward is open to all individuals and all organizations. 
THERE IS ONLY THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTION. 

Due to the fact that Technocracy Inc. has the only program of Social and 
Economic Reconstruction that is in complete intellectual and technical 
accord with the Age in which we live, this Reward is NOT PAYABLE to 
that organization or its members or to others advocating Technocracy's 
TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIAL DESIGN. 

INVESTIGATE TECHNOCRACY 
Write for free literature. 



TECHNOLOGICALLY ACHIEVABLE N 



\- 



YOUR LIFE IN THE ' ULTIMATE SOCIAL SYSTEM ' 

1. As long as you live you would enjoy Security and the 
Highest Standard of living physically possible to provide 
all citizens. 

2. No Property, Sales or Income Tax. No Private or Public 
Debts. Crime and Social Problems reduced to near zero. 

3. Full Health, Housing, Educational, Transportation and 
other Social Services free of payment. 

4. Retirement with full Income at age 45. 

equivalent 

5. Each man and each woman would have a net Income of 
$50.00 per day. ($18,250.00 per year) This could be 
increased in the future. 

6. You would perform a service suitable to you for 4 hours 
per day for 4 days per week for 41 weeks per year. A 
total of 656 hours per year, starting at age 25 through 
to age 45 plus 78 full days of fully paid vacation time 
per year. 

7. No more Energy Shortages. No more Floods, No more 
scarcity of needed food, clothing, health care, housing, 
recreation facilities and leisure time enjoyment. 

8. No more 'junk' and shoddy goods. No more waste of 
our Resources. No more'buried' patents. Near zero 
pollution in our environment. 

9. An assured and safe Future for all the young, present 

and future generations. 

10. Write for free information about this ULTIMATE SOCIAL 
ORDER. It is possible to have NOW. It may be a matter of 
Your Survival. Rejection without investigation is moronic. 
THINK ABOUT IT. 



P.O. BOX 266, STN. 'A', WINNIPEG, MANITOBA R3K 2A1 



JIM DAVIDSON, TECHNOCRAT 

749 STURGEON RD. 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

CANADA R2Y 0K8 



SOLVING THE WORLD'S PROBLEMS WITH SYSTEMS LEARNING 
John Holmdahl & William Golden 

World Synergy Institute 

P.O. Box 2U252 

Los Angeles, California 90024.0252 



ABSTRACT 

Broad-based interdisciplinary 
researchers often stumble across the 
realization that unexpected solutions 
already exist for all our world's 
problems, but they come from disciplines 
outside tne area of expertise of the 
specialists normally assigned to work on 
the problems. These unexpected solu- 
tions combined with current understand- 
ing of the dynamics of emergent systems 
now make it possible to piece together a 
methodology and a process for implement- 
ing post-industrial systems capable of 
uplifting all humanity to a higher stan- 
dard of living than anyone has ever 
enjoyed. 

This paper describes how an inter- 
disciplinary systems group, such as the 
Society for General Systems Research, 
could creatively help to end hunger, 
poverty, war, the threat of war, crime, 
disease, etc., and steer humanity into a 
world of leisure, optimism, creativity 
and abundance. 

INTRODUCTION 

Global systems modelers have made 
great strides in approaching a methodol- 
ogy that could manage all the variables 
which create our global condition, its 
problems and its possibilities. It is 
now possible to recontext this interdis- 
ciplinary resource base to provide "un- 
expected" solutions for our enormously 
complex world problems. 

In 1979 Dr. Richard Ericson, then 
President of the Society for General 
Systems Research, expressed that "there 
is a demonstrable indeed almost obvious 
worldwide need for a conceptual frame of 
reference in order to articulate and in- 
tegrate the world's disparate social, 
economic, and political systems whose 
convergence must be facilitated as mac- 
rosystems are welded into a world system. 
....What is lacking... is a vehicle which 
will bring systemic coherence and arti- 
culation to such efforts." 

This paper offers several insights 
which substantiate that the creation of 
a global preferred-state system is an 
elegant, viable and realizable way to 
use systems learning for solving the 
world's problems. A research action 
agenda or critical path for its imple- 
mentation is then outlined. 



OPERATING PREMISES 

Our entire history of science and 
invention has been the ability to do 
what was previously considered unreal- 
istic or impossible. The radio, tele- 
vision, airplane, computer and lamjln^ 
on the moon were all widely dismissed as 
pie-ln-the-sky fantasies before their 
accomplishment. We continually do the 
impossible because of our ability to 
utilize and discover universal princi- 
ples with the resultant ability to do 
more with less: to perform ever more 
effectively per each pound of material, 
erg of energy and second of time. 

For example, global modeler and 
Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient 
Buckminster Fuller (1981) asserts that 
The human-powered Gossamer Albatross 
(weighing only fifty-five pounds, with 
a wingspan of ninety-six feet) was 
able -to fly across the English Channel 
because the structural materials of 
which it was built were many tines 
tensilely stronger than an equal 
weight of the highest-strength air- 
craft aluminum. The tensile strengths 
of the Albatross's structural materi- 
als were sixty times stronger per 
equivalent weight than the strongest 
structural materials available to 
Leonardo da Vinci for reallzinc the 
design of his proposed human-powered 
flying machine. . , 

A one-quarter-ton communication satel- 
lite is now outperforming the previ- 
ously used 175,000 tons of transatlan- 
tic copper cables, with this 700,000- 
fold reduction in system-equipment 
weight providing greater message- 
carrying capacity and transmission 
fidelity, as well as using vastly few- 
er kilowatts of operational energy.... 
The human pedal-powered airplane and 
the communication satellite are only 
two out of hundreds of thousands of 
Instances that can now be cited of the 
accomplishment of much greater per- 
formance with much less material. 



Also, we have learned from our 
understanding of systems that all prob- 
lems are interconnected and that they 
cannot be solved as if they existed in 
Isolation from other problems or from 
the larger system in which they are an 
integral part. Institutional struc- 



- 2 - 



7_ 



tures, divided disciplines, special 
Interests and bureaucratic inertia pre- 
vent people from working together to 
understand and solve problems-as-a- 
whole. World Game global modeler Medard 
Gabel (I98O: 17, 217-8) points out that 
Planners need to treat the whole sys- 
tem, not the disemboweled systems of 
their special interest versions of 
that system.... We are all on the same 
planet , we use the same energy sources 
with the same technology and know-how, 
and we are members of one amazingly 
complex species. Viewing the problems 
and making decisions from this per- 
spective does not make them more com- 
plex, but in a real sense simplifies 
them enormously. It simplifies our... 
problems by putting them In their true 
functional relation with the Earth's 
total life-sustaining biosphere, and 
all of humanity's shared experiences 
as one species. Such a perspective 
leads to solutions that are consider- 
ate of all the world, its people, and 
its delicate ecology. .. .Without deal- 
ing with the larger, global system, 
the local systems' "solutions" degen- 
erate into mere treatments of symp- 
toms; "home remedies" for warning 
sl«5ns rather than cures or preventive 
medicine for systemic disorders.... 
Conversely, the paradoxes, cul-de-sacs 
and intractable situations of local 
problems and their proposed solutions 
can often be eliminated by the syner- 
gies of a global solution. .. .The fun- 
damental. . .problem is not what is 
popularly depicted in the newspapers 
or on television; the basic problem is 
not Che price of gasoline or fuel oil 
or gas deregulation or. 00 ©11 imports 
or windfall profits or nuclear prolif- 
eration. It is also not nuclear vs. 
...solar; or "hard" vs. "soft" energy 
paths; or depletable vs. non-deplet- 
able energy sources. In some sense it 
is all of these, but most fundamental- 
ly it is quite simple: how do we get 
enough energy to everyone on Earth to 
meet all their life-support needs? 
How do we harness enough energy so 
that 100$ of humanity — those alive to- 
morrow as well as today — have all the 
energy they need to have optimally 
functloninff life-support facilities? 
How do we get the energy that is need- 
ed to feed, clothe, shelter, educate ^ 
furnish health care and recreational 
opportunities, and Insure social well- 
being? And, how do we do this In the 
cleanest, safest, and quickest way? 
And, last but not least, how do we do 
all this, not at the expense, dlsad- 
vantaf;e, or coercion of anyone, but 
ideally, through spontaneous coopera- 
tion? The complexity of all the 
world's problems. . .demands a new level 
of awareness in our dealings with 
these problems. .. .We are all part of a 
larr.er system, and it is the larger 



system that has the problems. .. .What 
is needed is to emphasize certain 
things, to develop new structures to 
coordinate existing processes into 
synergistic totals, and to coordinate 
the whole system towards goals that 
are beneficial to all of humanity. 

Another fundamental error made in 
trying to solve world problems has been 
the attempt to solve them within the 
context of our current obsolete economic 
systems. Capitalism and socialism, the 
two major economic systems of our times, 
are survival economics , built on the 
age-old premise that there is a scarcity 
of energy, food and rescurcss. Botli 
economic systems share a common price 
system in which the value of a commodity 
is defined relative to its limited 
availability. If a commodity becomes 
too abundant, its price will fall below 
the profit margin necessary for its con- 
tinued production. So governments and 
producers are forced to create artific- 
ial scarcities to maintain prices. 
Fifteen million people starve each year 
while food is intentionally destroyed 
and farmers are paid not to produce 
crops. 

The assumption of a lethal inade- 
quacy of life-support underlies the 
world's power structures' race to amass 
weapons," because they assume it eventu- 
ally has to be us- or them, not enough 
for both. As Buckminster Puller (1981: 
xxlli) points out 

That is why (1) those in financial 
advantage fortify themselves even 
further, reasoning that unselfishness 
is suicidal. That is why (2) the 
annual military expenditures by the 
U.S.S.R.,, representing socialism, and 
the U.S.A., representing private en- 
terprise, have averaged over $200 
billion a year for the last thirty 
years ,... making a thus-far total of 
six trillion, MOO billion dollars 
spent in developing the ability to 
kill ever-more people, at ever-greater 
distances;, in ever-shorter time. 

After thousands of years of inven- 
tion and discovery—of understanding 
ever more universal principles and 
learning how to do Increasingly more 
with less— humanity has now achieved the 
technological ability to provide an 
abundance for all people. That thres- 
hold was crossed in the early 1970's 
according to the conclusions of Buck- 
minster Fuller's World Game, a 20~year 
global systems modeling research 
project. After Inventorying all our 
planet's resources and our technological 
capabilities. Puller (198l:xviii,xxv-vl) 
asserted that there is now hard evidence 
we have 

an alternative to politics and its 
ever more wasteful, warring, and 



( 



JIM DAVIDSON. TECHNOCRAT 

-^ 749 STURGEON RD. 
\ WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
■ CANADA R2Y 0K8 



- 3 - 



Inherently vain attempts to solve one- 
sidedly all humanity's basic economic 
and social problems. That alternative 
was through invention, development, 
and reduction to the physically work- 
ing stages of mass production proto- 
types, of each member of a complete 
family of intercomplementary arti- 
facts, structurally, mechanically, 
chemically, metallurgically , electro- 
magnetically, and cybemetically de- 
signed to provide so much performance 
...as to make it eminently feasible 
and practicable Co provide -a sustain- 
able standard of living for all human- 
ity—more advanced, pleasing, and in- 
creasingly productive than any ever 
experienced or dreamed of by anyone in 
all history. 

Another way Puller (198l:xvlll, 
xxv-vl) has said this is that 

Technologically, we now have four 
billion billionaires onboard Spaceship 
Earth who are entirely unaware of 
their good fortune. Unbeknownst to 
then, their legacy is being held in 
probate by general ignorance, fear and 
selfishness. .. .Humanity now— for the 
first time in history — has the real- 
istic opportunity to help evolution 
do what it is inexorably intent on 
doing — converting all humanity into 
one harmonious world family and making 
that family sustainingly, economically 
successful. .. .Ninety-nine percent of 
humanity does not know that we have 
the option to "make it" economically 
on this planet and in the Universe. 
We do. It can only be accomplished, 
however, through a design science 
Initiative and technological revolu- 
tion. .. .Neither the great political 
and finauicial power structures of the 
world, nor the specialization-blinded 
professionals, nor the population in 
general realize that sum-totally the 
...invisible revolution In the metal- 
lurgical, chemical, and electronic 
arts noi* makes it. . .feasible to take 
care of everybody on Earth at a 
"higher standard of living than any 
have ev«r known." It no longer has to 
be you or me. Selfishness is unneces- 
sary and henceforth unrationallzable 
as mandated by survival. War is 
obsolete. It could never have been 
done before. Only ten years ago the 
nore-with-less technology reached the 
point where it could be done. Since 
then the Invisible technological- 
capability revolution has made it ever 
easier to do so....Ancf with that 
universal abundance, the warring, 
official and unofficial, will subside 
to innocuous magnitude. With that... 
accomplishment, humanity may, for the 
first time in history, come to know 
the meaning of peace. 



Interdisciplinary futurist Robert 
Anton Wilson (198l:'»3) capsulizes our 
current situation: 

At this time when (after thousands of 
years of invention and discovery) real 
scarcity has at last been vanquished, 
we are maintaining artificial scarcity 
because of sheer ignorance. .. .In short, 
humanity has already achieved, tech- 
nically, the total success all 
Utopians ever dreamed of; our problems 
now are entirely due to wrong thinking. 
We are in the tragic-comic predicament 
of two crazed men dying of thirst , 
fighting over a teaspoon of water in 
the middle of a rainstorm. We cannot 
see the rainstorm because we are 
hypnctissd by eT.ergeriOy-reriexes fix- 
ated on the teaspoon. 

There is as yet no adequate socio- 
economic system based on the reality of 
our collective capacities. As we begin 
to recognize that we are in the midst of 
a classic paradigm shift in economics, 
more profound than the shift in astron- 
omy 300 years ago or in physics 80 years 
ago, we come to see that we need to be 
asking entirely new questions, operating 
from entirely new premises and aiming 
for entirely new goals. 

Intei^lsciplinary futurist P.M. 
Esfandiary (1977:10,112; 1973:110-18) 
captures a glimmer of the new perspec- 
tive and the new opportunities now open- 
ing up for us: 

The world is moving toward an entirely 
new economic order.... The new econom- 
ics is not capitalism or socialism or 
even the mixture of the two. The new 
economics is the new teletechnology— 
abundance — global ism — liberated 
values.... In developing fields such as 
the space program — world tourism — 
world transportation — international 
hotel services — credit card systems- 
construction. . .fewer and iewer people 
are handling more and more work 
through extensive telecomputerizatlon. 
This technology could be used in many 
other fields: the development of un- 
limited solar energy — the production 
of unlimited foods — global education. 
...If we mobilized this new teletech- 
nology we could within ten or fifteen 
years do away with poverty in the 
world. If we mobilized our new tech- 
nology we could within five to ten 
years free millions of people rich and 
poor alike from the slavery of perpet- 
ual work Nothing can any longer 

help replace the jobs which automation 
and cybernation are taking over. It 
has become imperative to decrease 
work. This is not only sound econom- 
ics, it is also a liberating move. 
This is a time to free people of work. 
Rather than rack their brains to 
create employment, economists should 
now work out plans to create leisure. 



. 4 . 



Ve must work out entirely new defini- 
tions of supply and demand— productiv- 
ity— capltal~dlstrlbut lon~con3ump- 
tion— employment— leisure. . . cThe 
relaxation of our primitive work 
habits will not In any way limit our 
drive to higher standards of living. 
On the contrary we can now quamtum- 
leap into a world of Abundance Crea- 
tivity Leisure by working less and 
letting our efficient tireless 
machines do the work. 

The time has come for a fundamental 
reevaluation of the human condition in 
light of the monumental breakthroughs of 
this late 20th century. We now have a 
choice between fighting over scarcity 
or spreading abundance. We have the 
option, the opportunity, the resources 
and the responsibility for designing 
and implementing a preferred-state 
global economic system. 

Much of the work has already been 
done for us. Research groups like the 
World Game (cf. Gabel, 1979, 1980; 
Brown, et. al., 1978) and Technocracy 
(1975), and the works of best-selling 
futurist Edward Bellamy (1888, 1897) 
have already detailed how such a system 
might operate = Their models are 
different facets of a dynamic, viable 
and comprehensive gestalt. Visionary 
economists, cybernetlclsts, systems 
designers, social scientists and 
psychologists can now work together to 
integrate, refine and implement the 
new preferred-state systems. 

THE "HOW" OP IMPLEMENTING 

When I talk with people In govern- 
ment, most admit that our cuirrent system 
isn't working, that problems are getting 
worse every day, that there don't seem 
to be any real answers within the 
present industrial context , and that the 
only reason they hold onto the present 
system is that systems designers haven't 
articulated with enough detail and 
enough clarity a more efficieit and 
effective alternate system. Then they 
would have a choice and could say, "Oh, 
we can do things this wayl" 

If the creation of a new age of 
leisure, optimism, creativity and abun- 
dance is now within our ability, the key 
question becomes, how do we actualize 
that potential. There are literally 
thousands of organizations involved In 
projects to make the world a better 
place. Just waiting for a context or 
system inclusive and synergistic enough 
to transform their differences Into 
additional resources, for the achieve- 
ment of a common goal. General systems 
experts would ask, what action agenda of 
all the possible options would be the 
isomorphic equivalent of the process that 



results in the origins of hierarchical 
levels in natural systems: a process 
which would form aggregates that feed 
hierarchical evolution, which Is a self- 
organizing, self-referencing cyclical 
strategy Involving successive events of 
"emergence" from one level to another, 
accompanied by developmental prolifera- 
tion of variants within levels (cf. 
Troncale, 1979a, 1979b) « This strategy 
would there-by facilitate the natural 
evolutionary process and be the one 
most worth pursuing. 

The overall guidelines might be 
similar to the purpose of Puller's World 
Oaae (Pulle?, 198I, I983) which is 
To make the world work 
Por lOOX of humanity 
In the shortest possible time 
Through spontaneous cooperation 
Without ecological offense 
Or the disadvantage of anyone. 

As described in Ho-Ping: Pood for 
Everyone, by Medard Gabel (1979), 

The World Game is a method for dealing 
with crucial problems in holistic, en- 
vironmentally sound, and resource 
efficient ways=. In eontra-dlstlnctlon 
to the "War Games" that are played by 
the generals and admirals of the Pent- 
agon, Kremlin, and all other nation 
states and their alliances to figure 
out the best strategic and tactical 
military moves and countermoves and 
counter-counter moves in hot and cold 
war situations , the World Game con- 
cerns itself with strategic and tacti- 
cal moves that will make lOOS of 
humanity successful. .. .The World Game 
deals with the whole world's resources 
and "livlngry" technology in ways that 
attempt to make everyone a winner. The 
World Game asks and answers the ques- 
tions: "How can the world's resources 
and know-how be used and reused so 
that everyone on Earth is better off? 
How can the world be made to work for 
lOOS of humanj.ty In environmentally 
sound and rescurce efficient ways?" 
....The World Game. . .attempts to 
illustrate and use a new paradigm for 
viewing our world and its problems.... 
The approach Is anticipatory in that 
it does not seek to deal with problems 
Just in their crucial state but before 
they reach a crisis. And perhaps more 
Importantly It is a design approach, 
that is, it attempts to deal with the 
whole Earth and all of humanity with a 
long range evolutionary perspective, 
paying attention not to Just what Is 
wrong or what shouldn't be, but with 
what is and what should be, and how to 
get from here to there as well. We 
have to ask ourselves, "What is need- 
ed?" not only, "What is wrong?" 

The first step toward actualizing 
our potential as four billion billion- 



JIM DAVIDSON, TECHNOCRAT 

749 STURGEON RD. 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 

CANADA R2Y 0K8 



- 5 - 



aires on this planet Is to design an op- 
timal world system, based on the reality 
of our enormous potentials. As formula- 
ted by Medard Gabel (1980) of the World 
Oame: 

In designing anything It Is best to 
start from scratch; to design the 
Ideal system as If the existing system 
did not exist, and then to work back 
from this preferred state to t*he pre- 
sent by Identifying those things In 
the present system that could be 
changed or that need to be developed 
or phased out to bring about the pre- 
ferred state. We need to start with 
what we want, not what we think the 
"Invisible hand" Is going to do next. 
The opposite approach, that of start- 
ing with the present-day, problematic 
situation, limits possibilities and 
prejudices the problem-solver to deal 
with the difficulties of the system 
Instead of Its possibilities. As was 
said earlier, dealing with the prefer- 
red state and working back Is dealing 
with the behavior of the whole system; 
dealing strictly with the problems of 
the present system Is dealing with 
parts. 

Technocracy Is a social design for 
living engineered for the distribution 
of an abundance for all. Technocracy Is 
also an educational organization that 
deals with social phenomena In the 
widest sense of the word; this Includes 
not only actions of human beings , but 
also everything which directly or Indi- 
rectly affects their actions. Conse- 
quently, the studies of Technocracy 
(1975) embrace practically the wt\ole 
field of science and Industry. Biology, 
climate, natural resources, and indus- 
trial equipment all enter Into the 
social picture. 

Technocracy has been developing and 
reflnlni an abundance rnanagesssnt ncdel 
for the~past 60 years. Its strategy for 
labor, commensurate with our emerging 
post-industrial world, offers another 
conceptual framework for recontexting 
and actualizing our potentials: 

Throughout all human societies, up 
until almost yesterday, the provision 
of goods and services was accomplished 
mainly with the energy of human mus- 
cles. The processes of applying this 
human energy had little appeal, as 
such, to human beings, for most of the 
work was irksome, monotonous, and 
fatiguing. Consequently, in order to 
get any sizable quantity of work done, 
It was necessary for the masters of 
production to impress other human 
beings into the labor forces — as 
chattel slaves, as indentured servamts 
or as low-paid hirelings. 
In order to sustain a degree of morale 
among the human work engines , above 
that of hunger and the whip, it became 



expedient to invent the Morality of 
Toil. Work became ballyhooed as a 
virtue and idleness as a sin except 
for the few. 

During the past 150 years, most of the 
chattel slavery of the world has be- 
come outmoded. However, the freeing 
of the slaves came about, not from in- 
creased respect for the dignity of 
man, but because science and technolo- 
gy had provided more efficient and 
less costly engines to do the work. 
No human slave, no matter how strong 
auid efficient, could compete on a 
cost-accounting basis with an engine 
operated by extraneous energy. It was 
only when practical engines, using 
coal, ell, gas, or eieccricity , caune 
into use that reforms against the 72- 
and SU-hour work-weeks could be con- 
sidered as socially feasible or 
desirable. 

So effective has been the replacement 
of human toil with technological 
devices that, today (on the North 
American Continent), less than two 
percent of the energy used in the man- 
ufacturing industries is derived from 
human muscles, while previously some 
98 percent was contributed by the 
human work animal. No industrial man- 
ager who is conscious of production 
costs would consider the use of human 
labor when he could have a non-human 
devlc? installed to do the work. As a 
consequence, the day of the factory 
without men is dawning. At last, the 
human being is due to be liberated 
from toll and from working for a 
living. Technology is so far develop- 
ed that, if it is to be operated con- 
tinuously. . .a fraction of the people 
working at constructive employment 
will be able to produce an abundance 
for all. . . . 

When man did 98* of the work he did 
not have enough goods and services; 
now, when he does only 2i of the work, 
technology produces so much he doesn't 
know what to do with it (under a Price 
System, of course). These trends will 
continue. They cannot go back; they 
are unidirectional and irreversible. 
....Can you realize the magnitude of 
the change in the methods of produc- 
tion which has taken place in the last 
half century?... Why, then, must some 
of our citizens go without sufficient 
food, clothing, homes, medical care, 
and other necessities that would 
guarantee, to all of us, security and 
a high standard of living...? 
It is because we are living under a 
"Price System" which can only operate 
under conditions of scarcity. That 
system broke down In North America . 
about fifty years ago with the 
"threat" of abundance. Price System 
politicians try to keep adding "props" 
by destroying, or by giving away... our 
food and resources. .. .Even the tre- 



- 6 - 



mendous rise In public and private 
debt has not been sufficient to main- 
tain stability In the economy. 

Technocracy goes on to develop a 
model for managing our new abundance 
which could be Integrated with the World 
Oame model, the works of Edward Bellamy, 
F.Mo Esfandlary and all others who have 
operated from the premises of our new 
conditions. 

After a comprehensive, alternative 
system has been Integrated from the best 
available sources, we would then Invite 
others to participate In role-playing 
the managerial tasks of the new system. 
This would provide feedback, refinement 
of operations and give a sense of 
reality to entirely new concepts and 
vocations. When general agreement as to 
the workability of the new system occurs, 
we would Invite in well-known people to 
participate with us , so they would 
experience the viability and advantages 
of an alternative preferred-state system: 
one that utilizes full-scale computeri- 
zation and cybernation In an economic 
context where Increased automation 
creates abundance and leisure, not unem- 
ployment, dislocation and despair. 

Ilya Prlgoglne has pointed out that 
when a system is unstable, a single 
point of stability has profound effects 
on the unstable system smd can rapidly 
catalyze reorganization and higher order 
in the midst of Instability and uncer- 
tainty. For example, putting a string 
into a saturated salt solution will cat- 
alyze crystal foirmatlon. Without that 
point to Initiate order, the Ions remain 
random and the system unstable o We can 
apply this to our unstable and increas- 
ingly unmanageable social systems: a 
coherent, comprehensive, viable alterna- 
tive can also catalyze higher order 
stability. 

Next we can inform- the mass media. 
of the project and the Implications it 
hail for solving the world's problems and 
foi* freeing humanity from its precarious 
situation. The media would report that 
well-known personalities, competant 
scientists and technologists are now . 
modeling an alternative system which 
solves the preponderance of world prob- 
lems. Positive global interest and 
response would be remarkable. 

Now we invite the large numbers of 
interested people who respond to the 
media coverapr to understand and also 
participate in training for their 
potential post^industrial vocations. 
This would still be done at the theo- 
retical or "mythical" level, in computer/ 
video linked world-wide telecommunica- 
tions centers, open to all people and 
all special interests, and. designed so 
that people have fun participating. 



As present systems continue to in- 
crease in over-complexity, unmanageabil- 
Ity and stress, and continue to disinte- 
grate because they are based on obsolete 
assumptions, there would now exist a 
popular, viable alternative ready to 
come on line. The model would become 
reality as government leaders and the 
general public see the vastly increased 
workability and desirability of a system 
that resolves our critical problems and 
offers the opportunity for each person 
on Earth to live at a billionaire's 
standard of living. 



These themes and strategies need to 
be understood as one interdependent, 
mutually enhancing system of actions. 
Some of these ideas and action-steps are 
bound to strike some people as radical, 
idealistic, impractical or uneconomic. 
Taken alone, they are Just that. Any 
individual aspect would be difficult to 
accomplish without the others. This 
plan should be viewed as a synergistic 
sum. Its parts have full meaning only 
in relation to the whole. 

CONCLUSION 

Because of global telecommunica- 
tions. International trade and all 
levels of world interaction, we are 
already .well on the way toward becoming 
a unified humanity with a one-world 
Interdependent system. The persistent 
conflicts of our present feudal/indus- 
trial systems have distracted us from 
investigating the potential of opera- 
ting from the premises of the realities 
of this late 20th century. 

We now have the opportunity to do 
for global problems and the delight of 
humanity what Copernicus did for astron- 
omy and Einstein did for physics. This 
is a classic paradigm shift with its 
fundamental reevaluatlon of basic prem- 
ises, the reeontextlng and redefining of 
all content, and the subsequent resolu- 
tion of paradoxes, problems, overcom- 
plexlties and unmanageabilitles. 

Interdisciplinary futurist Barbara 
Marx Hubbard (1980) asserts that 

The history of the entire human race 
has been moving to this moment. West- 
em civilization has a profound 3ig=. 
nlflcanee In that it has created the 
tools to bring on the end or a new 
beginning. .. .If we don't make the 
choice, the choice will be made for 
us, for the self-centered state of 
consciousness is not viable in an 
Interdependent world with the powers 
now available. 

Today we are at the crossroads of 
our destiny. The correct turn will take 
us to a higher Isvel of life than has 



I 



JIM DAVIDSON. TECHNOCRAT 
-^ 749 STURGEON RD. 
\ WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
' CANADA R2Y 0K8 



- 7 - 



ever been experienced In world history. 
Any other road will lead to suicide. 

To paraphrase Edward Bellamy (1888): 
Successfully creating a system that 
provides for all of humanity's needs 
la far from an ultimate attainment, 
but. In the long term. Is only a pre- 
liminary to anything like real human 
progress. We will be only relieving 
ourselves of a needless harassment 
which has hindered our race from 
undertaking the real ends of exis- 
tence. To wonder at the rapidity with 
which the transformation will be com- 
pleted after Its possibility Is first 
entertained. Is to forget the Intoxi- 
cating effect of hope upon minds long 
accustomed to despair. The sunburst 
after so long and dark a night Is 
already having a dazzling effect. 
Here at last Is a cause compared with 
which, the grandest of historic causes 
Is trivial. What a historic moment to 
live, when heroes are bursting forth 
the barred gate of the future and 
revealing to the gaze of a hopeless 
race, a vista of progress whose end, 
for very excess of light, will forever 
hold us In awe. Ah, my friends, who 
will not t£ike a part In this under- 
taking, when the weakest contribution 
Is a lever to whose touch the centu- 
ries tremble. 

It is obvious to many of us that 
the Society for General Systems Research 
can actively play a central role In this 
effort. We can learn to play an "all- 
win game" rather than an "I wln-You lose 
game." We must take self-government on 
Its next step toward synergistic demo- 
cracy, cooperating now to build a future 
of unlimited possibilities based on the 
full spectrum of personal, social and 
technological capacities. In fact, it 
is vital now that we focus on processes 
that will assist these fragmented parts 
in cooperating and interacting effi- 
ciently and constructively within the 
whole. Synergy is the key because the 
whole Is always greater v.han the sum of 
its parts. 



In closing, a quote from P.M. 
Esfandlary (1973): 

Centuries from now these very decades 
will be rembered as a time when the 
world broke out of eons of scarcity 
and entered a whole new age of abun- 
dance.... Our entire planet Is now 
conceptually In a new age. We ur- 
gently need visionary technological 
councils — visionary planning — and 
massive mobilization of efforts and 
resources to up-wlng swiftly to the 
marvels of the Age of Telespheres 
(the world beyond the age of indus- 
trialism)." 



REFERENCES 

Bellamy , Edward 

1888 Looking Backwards . Reprinted 

1960. New York: The New 

American Library. 
1897 Equality . Reprinted 1916. 

New York: D. Appleton jmd 

Company . 

Brown. H., Robert Cook and Medard Oabel 

1978 Environmental Design Science 
Primer . New Haven. Connecticut; 
Advocate Press, Inc. 

Erlcaon, Richard P. 

1979 "S.O.S.R. At Twenty-Plve: What 
Agenda for Our Second Quarter- 
Century." Presidential Address 
to the SGSR, Houston, Texas 
(January 5). 

Esfandlary, P.M. 

1973 Up-Wingers . New York: Popular 

Library. 
1977 Telespheres . New York: Popular 

Library. 



Puller, 
1981 

1983 



St. 



R. Buckmlnster 

Critical Path . New York 

Martin's Press. 

Crunch of Giants . New York: 

Mairtin's Press. 



St. 



Oabel, Medard, with the World Game Lab- 
oratory 

1979 Ho-Ping: Food for Everyone . 
Garden City, New Yorx: Anchor 
Press/Doubleday. 

1980 Energy, Earth and Everyone . 
Garden City, New York: Anchor 
Press/Doubleday . 

Hubbard, Barbara Harx 

1980 "The Future Human" and "Future 
Education." First Global 
Conference on the Future, World 
Future Society, Toronto, Canada. 

Technocracy 

1975 Technocracy; Technological 

Social Design . Savannan, Ohio; 
Technocracy, Inc. 

Troncale, Len Raphael 

1979a "Metacrescence — Origins of Hier- 
archical Levels: An 'Emergent' 
Evolutionary Process Based on 
Systems Concepts." Pomona, Calif- 
ornia: Institute for Advanced 
Systems Studies. 
1979b "The Emergence of Meta-Humans. " 
Pomona, California: Institute 
for Advanced Systems Studies. 

Wilson, Robert Anton 

I98I "Doomsday May Be Cancelled. 
Future Life #26 (May):'»3. 

Author; John Holmdahl 

World Synergy Institute, P.O. Box 2U252 
Los Angeles, California 90021-0252 



1 



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JIM DAVIDSON, TECHNOCRAT 

^^ 749 STURGEON RD. 

\ WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
■ CANADA R2Y 0K8 




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WORLD SYNERGY INSTITUTE 

P.O. BOX 24252 • LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 • U.S.A. 



May H, 1983 



Jim Davidson 
749 Sturgeon Rd. 
Winnipeg, Manitoba 
CANADA R2Y 0K8 



Dear Jim: 



Thank you so much for your two recent letters, 
and for your interest in my general system's 
article. 

I have enclosed a master copy for any reproducing 
you find appropriate. By far, the most economical 
way would be for you to have it copied locally. 

The article is actually a copy of the speech I 
will be giving at the International General 
Systems Conference on World Problems, to be held 
in Detroit later this month. 

Its purpose is to enroll systems modelers to 
detail how we would distribute and manage abundance 
onto a computer simulation model. This would then 
give credibility to Technocracy et . al . to the 
scientific community internationally, and be the 
second in a series of half a dozen steps that could 
implement an economics of abundance in less than 
five years . 

Please let me know what feedback and results you 
generate from your use of the paper. Sounds like 

what you have in mind could help its implementation 
even faster! 



Warm best wishes. 



John Holmdahl 



^2 



1 



JIM DAVIDSON, TECHNOCRAT 

749 STURGEON RD. 
\WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
CANADA R2Y 0K8 




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