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In the issue- 


.-Loyola-SGWU merger/page 7 

... Hemispheric Conference/pages 10 & 11 
... Urban renewal/pages 14 & 15 
...Poetry/page 6 of OP-ED. 












2 /the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 


DaRK OF 
THE Sur 
; PANAVISION’and METROCOLOR 


ROD T AYLOR 
YVETTE MIMIEUX 


“IN LIKE FLINT” 


JAMES COBURN & 
“MAIN CHANCE” 


3 FILMS 


STARTS THURSDAY 
FOR ONE WEEK 
yYittt h & \! CATHERINE ST W 


are you a 


HAIR 
SPLITTER? 


How unhappy your long 
hair looks when the ends 
are split. 

SINGEING will make it 
smile again. So, next time, 
show off a healthy headful 
without cutting - try a 
professional SINGEING at 
the 


ENTR’ACTE 
BEAUTY SALON 
Singe & Sham 
$4.50. 
(10% discount to Sir Geor- 


ge students for all hair 
care services) 


842-5031 


1110 Sherbrooke W. - 
at Peel 


COME FIND 


| CHRISTMAS 
SOUL 


AT THE 
ESQUIRE 


MERRY 
CHRISTMAS 
TO ALL 
GEORGIANS 


ESQUIAE 





The Debating Union is hold- 
ing a Novice Training Pro- 
gram for members. It will 
be held at 7:30 P.M. 


KKK 
WEDNESDAY DEC. 11 


The Young Socialist Club 
is holding a business meeting 
in H-1234 from 12:00-1:00 
P.M. 

There will be a meeting of 
all persons interested in the 
co-op student-run camp on 


TEEN BURGER 
PEDDLES LSD 


(LOTSA SESAMY 
DUMMY) 


ey mamniememnnennn™ 
COFFEE SHOPS 
maene 


| 
Ge MGiil College _@® 





ON-CAMPUS 
RECRUITING 


JANUARY 8 


BELL CANADA... 


1970 POTENTIAL GRADUATES IN 
ENGINEERING & SCIENCE (SUMMER) 


MONTREAL ENGINERRING... 
ENGINEERING 


JANUARY 9 


BELL CANADA... 


197) POTENTIAL GRADUATES IN 
COMMERCE (SUMMER) 


MONTREAL ENGINEERING... 
ENGINEERING 


JANUARY 10 


MOLSON INDUSTRIES LTD... 
COMMERCE 


INTERVIEWS WILL BE BOOKED AT THE 
CMC STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE, 
ROOM H-440, HENRY F. HALL BUILDING. 


FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SEE 
PLACEMENT BULLETIN BOARD. 





10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 


BLOSSOM CORNER 


1455 ST. CATHERINE 


Atwater Florist 


Alexis Nihon Plaza 


(CORNER OF MACKAY) 


842-3508 


Metro Level 














Wednesday at 5 p.m. in H333- 
3. THIS IS AN EXTREME- 
LY IMPORTANT MEETING. 


KKK 


THURSDAY DEC. 12 


There will be a collection 
of any good articles, books, 
and records, as well as art of 
Fine Art students, on Dec. 10th 
and lith, in bins on the mez- 
zanine and 5th floor. An auc- 
tion will be held on Dec. 12th 
at 1:00 P.M. on the mezzanine. 
The proceeds will go to start 
art classes for the Weredale 
Boys Orphonage. 


wa 


FRIDAY DEC. 13 


The English Departement 
is sponsoring a poetry read- 
ing with James Wright at 9:00 
P.M. in H-635. 


The Georgian Film Society 
is holding its Main Series and 
will present L’Avventura (An- 
tonioni) instead of The Doll. 
It will be shown in H-937 
at 6:30 and 9:30 P.M. 


KKK 


SATURDAY DEC. 21 


The Geographical Society is 
holding its annual Xmas Bash 


DONOVAN’S 


ST. CATHERINE W. of GUY 


ONLY to SGWU 
STUDENTS 


PRESENT THIS 
AD AND RECEIVE 


10% orr ON ALL 
0 


PURCHASES 


DONOVAN’S MENS SHOP 
1608 ST. CATH. ST. W. 


PIPE STANDS in teakwood 
from $3.50 


FIGURES IN TEAKWOOD 
with pipe cleaners from $1.95 
CIGAR CASES 

IN LEATHER from $2.50 


TOBACCO POUCHES 
IN LEATHER from $1.50 


TOBACCO JARS from $3.95 


HENRI POUPART LTD. 
(Since 1905) 
1331 St. Catherine St. W. 
Corner Crescent 


842-5794 


from 8:00 P.M. on. The cost 
is $1.50 per person which 
covers food and drink. Put 
your name in at the Geography 
Lab in N-409 and give your 
money to the Lab Attendant. 


KK 


FRIDAY DEC. 27 


The Young Socialists are 
holding a conference at the 
University of Toronto from 
Dec 27-29. For further detail 
phone Judy Koch at 331-5853 
or Wendy Mill at 849-2601 
or 849-1727. 


The SGWU Winter Carnival 
Committee is looking for no- 
minations for Carnival Queen 
anytime between Dec 5/68 and 
Jan 6/69. Nominations forms 
are available at the reception- 
ist on the 3rd floor and should 
be handed in to the Carnival 
office. The applicant must be 
a female day student and no- 
minated by 15 male students. 


An open and public discus- 
sion will be held on Dec. 11 
in H-685 at 1:00 P.M. with 
the purpose of clarifying 
the issues which have arisen 
out of Professor Miller’s pre- 
sentation during the Nov. 27th 
Festival of Violence. 


444 4 
FHS UNDERERGUTIL 


FILM CENTRE 


presents 


THE EAGLE 


with Rudolph Valentino 









His greatest success accom- 
panied by a rare short with 
BUSTER KEATON. 





At the REVUE THEATRE, 
1858 Blvd Maisonneuve & S?- 
Marc, SUNDAY at 2 4 6 @ 
10 pm. Phone: 523-2816 937- 


FOLK 
SINGERS 


NOW APPEARING 
DIRECT FROM IRELAND 


THE SONS 
OF ERIN 


SING-A-LONG 


Cover, Minimum or 
Admission Charge 


NO 
970 St. Cath. W. 


Res.: 866-0935 
STARTING DECEMBER 16th 


POOR CHARLIE’S 


BLUES BAND 
FOLK-ROCK 














CLASSIFIEDS 


RATES: Classified Advertising rates for re- 
gistered students are ?5¢ far one insertion 
and $1.25 for the same insertion in twa con- 
secutive issues. Rates for non-students is $1.25 
per -insertion. The ward limit is twenty (20). 
Cash musi accompany all ads. Advertising dead: 
lines are “Wednesday noon for the Friday issue. 
and Friday noon. for ithe Tuesday issue. Ads 
may he submitted anly to the Advertising De- 
partment. Room 639 of the Half Building. 


FOR SALE 


PHANTAMAGORIA Record Shaop/ Listening 
Den. 3472 Park {near Milton). Lowest Prices: 
New Beatles & Progressive Rock LP's. Open 
Noon-9:30. > 

BOGAN 40. echochord jazzmaster, gibson 
electric guitar, 175 watt amp. with range expand- 
erand 2-15's. Cheap 671-6257. 

PLYMOUTH Belvedere 1961 sedan, 6 cylinder, 
automatic. Very good working condition. Excel- 
lent body. Completely winterized, block heater. 
Mileage 45,000. $325. 342-0499. 

Blissard Epoxy metal skis 210cm jong. Tyrolia 
Rockett step-in bindings. Mens ski boots-size 
10. Perfect condition 692-9902. 

Excellent Xmas gift-CCM 28°” bicycle in perfect 
condition. Cal] 722-2142 (AM) or 727-5813 {after 
8pm) $40 or reasonable offer. 

KASTLE Metallics 185cm combination skis, 
marker toe and ecko-kastel cable bindings. Very 
good condition. Must sacrifice $75. Day 486- 
4055, evenings 738-3055. 


WANTED 


LADIES: Eam $100 per week in your spare 
time demonstrating Holiday Magic Cosmetics. 
Na door to door sales. Call Giles at 935-3043 
after 4pm. 

SCIENCE of engineering student over 20 to 
share 2% room apt. $45/month. 2 min. from 
SGWU. Contact 1637 Maisonneuve Blvd. Apt. 15. 
MAKE money in your spare time selling Home 
Care Products. Call 256-8701 for appointment. 
MALE to share 3% room APT. in Cote’ des 
Neges area-transportation to Sir GeWge_in- 
cluded. $75 monthly. Please call 733-5513. 
STUDENT with knowledge of keypunching. Work 
within university in your spare time. Call 879- 
4462 of Room 639. 

DRIVER(S) wanted to drive car to Miami. 
Leaving Dec. 15, one way, gas supplied) Mr. 
Croll 737-2041, 735-1323. 

QNE or two males tao share modern § room 
duplex. furnished, NDG. Quiet region. ne&® buses. 
Cali 489-6911. 

SKI shack in townships 1 week at Xmas. 3 
bedrooms, fireplace. will pay $200 Call Carol 
634-0794 after 6 pm. 

ORUMMER and singer wanted for blues orient- 
ed group. Musz be serious and have good equip- 
ment. Call Marty 739-5895. 


ACCOMODATION 


DOUBLE bedroom -_ kitchen’ privileges near 
Atwater Subway. 932-6343 Mme Mercier. 


HAPPENINGS 


DISCOVER whats happening in music as Phan- 
tasmagoria Record Shop/Listening Den. 3472 
Park {near Milton) Lowest price on new Beatles 
Album. Open till 9:30. 


SERVICES 


good education, 
lified, specializing theses. term papets, tech- 
nical, stencils, correspondence, professional 
work, reasonable rate. 272-1083. 


EXPERT typist, highly qua- 


WOULD like to type notes and papers. 25 cents 
a page. East-end 352-0141. 

TYPING done at home. Reasonable tates. Ex- 
perienced in typing theses. Mrs. M. Binda §22- 
0289. 

TYPING service 481-2512. From 25. cents 
per page. Fast, accufate. Theses, term papers. 
essays, stencils, letters, reports! manuscripts, 
notes. 











isa? 








One of the most patently 
biased and _ over-estimated 
and perhaps over-esteemed, 
by some people at least, 
phenomenon to-day, is the 
rage of the university student, 
especially the colourless kind. 
By colourless I mean for those 
who don’t know, the wasp, the 
roman catholic, the white jew, 
and colourless people of any 
other variety one can find on 
the face of this good earth. 
Obviously, as opposed to the 
colourless people, one has the 
colourful people, who by sheer 
contrast need no description 
or definition. 


The rage of the university 
student, qualified as that of 
the colourless kind, is provok- 
ed by anything in his limited 
spectrum, ranging from the 
price of coca-cola, an out- 
standing symbol of his culture 
and heritage, to discrimina- 
tion of colourful people es- 
pecially people whom he now 
very kindly calls negroes, etc. 
or the war in some faraway 
place called Vietnam, where 
he has never been, whose 
people he never understood, 
and whom he still does not 
understand, except of course 
what he has read in books 
written by eminent products 
of his social structure called 
Theologians, Historians, So- 
ciologists and Psychiatrists 
and of some of the fantastical- 
ly inarm? press of this very 
structure of his. 


This rage of his, sometimes 
reaching grandiose propor- 


WE HAVE A VAST 
DISPLAY OF 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 
Box Cards Solid Packs 
and Over-Seas Cards 


SABERTONS LIMITED 
1477 St. Catherine W. 
(Between Mackay & Guy) 
10% Discount to Students 
with ID’s 


(Greeting cards excluded! 
















CAFE ANDRE 


FOLK SINGING 7 DAYS A WEEK 
* RINGS and THINGS 


& WATCH FOR 
THE RAFTSMEN 
COMING DEC. 16 
Kitchen open all night 
Fully licensed 
2077 VICTORIA STREET 
849-5038 (NEAR EATON’S) 





|HAPPY HOLIDAY, GEORGIANS 
THE 


PraM.pAy 


16 DIFFERENT KINDS 


OF COFFEE 
FULLY LICENSED 


_-_-- - - - - hl hU 


1425 Stanley Av 8-3090 





tions, is recurrently crucified 
by the structure towards which 
he is directed, and of which 
he will inevitably be a shining, 


if not a glamourous component. 


And subsequently, the seeds 
are sOwn....... the seeds of 
ignorance, the seeds of ir- 
relevant values like hate, 
jealousy, insecurity, psychia- 
trists fees, camarros, blon- 
des, coca-cola, pepsicola, 
wrigleys chewing-gum and 
friday night beer. Seeds of 
protection, of vested _ inte- 
rests, and slowly but surely 
the seeds of oppression. Op- 
pression of the very peoples 
his rage is directed towards 
his leperous culture, heritage, 
and most powerful of all, his 
Economic structure meting 
out oppression, and of which 
he is now an eminent member. 
Peoples he never knew,, whose 
hunger, love, motivations, and 
life never he will never know, 
even in his exclusive, epitaph- 
ed stone hell, where he will 
lie forever rotting like a 
self-poisoned poisonous snake. 

And thereby hangs a tale... 

The University affords the 
basic spectral elements which 
combine to present the dazzle 
of the neon-light, under which 
lies the naked ugliness. 

A comprehensive example 
of this, is the colourless stu- 
dent belonging to the engineer- 


GETTING 
ENGAGED? 


ENG AGEMENT 


RINGS MADE TO 
ORDER AT 


RETAIL PRICE 


MR. KAFRI 
1255 Phillips Square 
Room 710 
845-397 | 





ing faculty, the commerce 
faculty and the computer 
centre of this University. 
This colourless student has 
no rage, if any emotions at all 
some putrid hatex already 
showing its ugly penis or va- 
gina in full poisionous glory. 
As for the other’ variety 
belonging to the “humanita- 
rian” faculty, he is slow to 
accept the seed which is wait- 
ing to be fertilised but will 
nevertheless do so eventually. 

Putting together, therefore 
these elements namely the 
colourless student and _ the 
administration we have the 
obviously scented -arm pit- 
swamp ready to fertilise the 


The enginneer the com- 
mercial conveyor-belt pro- 
ducts vent their castrated 


fear by bringing out toilet- 
paper like “The Paper’’ beat- 
ing up and smashing up centres 
of the colourful people and 
complaining to their irrele- 
vant faculty administrators 
that these~ colourful people 
who, sometimes take on the 
fruitless job of educating 
them, some to class either 


the georgian, Wed: esday, December 11, 1968/3 


drunk or ‘unprepared’. And ‘Christian stand. 
the just administration in all Merry Christms. 
its orthodox and impotent glory Ramesh Ahooja 
takes a truly ‘fair’ or Physics Dept. 


Conservatory of 
Cinematographic Art 


Jeudi - 12 décembre 20 heures - PARIS 1900 G. Meliés 
Thursday - December 12 8 p.m. - PARIS LA BELLE, LIBERATION DE PARIS 
Vendredi - 13 décembre 20 heures - CAIN 1930 L. Poirier 
Friday - December 13 8 p.m. - ON PURGE BEBE 1931 Jean Renoir 
Samedi - 14 décembre 20 heures - MELIES ET LE FANTASTIQUE: A la 
conquéte du Pole 
Saturday - December 4 8 p.m. - LES NOUVEAUX ARISTOCRATES F. Rigaud 
Lundi - 16 décembre 20 heures - LE RIRE (documentaire) 
Monday - December 16 8 p.m. - LA BELLE ET LA BETE 1947 J. Cocteau 
Mardi - 17 décembre 20 heures - PETITS METIERS DE PARIS 
Tuesday - December 17 8 p.m. - EDUCATION SENTIMENTALE 
Mercredi - 18 décembre 20 heures - MYSTERE PICASSO 1956 H.G. Clouzot 
Wednesday - December 18 8 p.m. - 
Jeudi - 19 décembre 20 heures - LE TEMPESTAIRE 1938 J. Epstein 
Thursday - December 19 8 p.m. - TIRE AU FLANC 1928 J. Renoir 
Vendredi - 20 décembre 20 heures - UN AMOUR DE PEYNET (documentaire) 
Friday - December 20 8 p.m. - TESTAMENT D'ORPHEE J. Cocteau 
Samedi - 21 décembre 20 heures - OPERA MOUFFE 1960 A. Varda 
Saturday - December 21 8 p.m. - LES VISITEURS DU SOIR 1942 M. Carne 
LES SEANCES AURONT LIEU DANS L’AUDITORIUM H-110, EDIFICE HALL, 
BISHOP ET DE MAISONNEUVE. 
The SHOWINGS WILL TAKE PLACE IN AUDITORIUM H-110, HALL BUILDING, 
BISHOP AND DE MAISONNEUVE. 
ENTRFF: Adultes .75¢ 
Etudiants .50¢ 























ADMISSION: Adults .75¢ 
Students .50¢ 














‘brewed in Quebec by Molson” 


o for -VIolson 
The beautiful ale 


‘MO LSON | 





GOLDEN ALE 


didon, 


ok soul. 





ee 





4/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 





University Council opened its meetings to the masses 
last week and to those who attended, it became obvious 
why the Council had stalled on implementing the open 
meetings proposal of the Communications Committee. 


The people on the University Council waffle. It’s a 
more sophisticated version of waffling than is to be 
found at S.L.C. meetings but it is, nevertheless, waf- 
fling. For instance, the UNIVERSITY’s highest aca- 
demic decision-making body deliberated over the choice 
of a location for their next meeting for half an hour. 


It took double that amount of time to explain to Re- 
gistrar Donald Peets that the University couldn't for- 
mulate some definitive policy for admission of 1969's 
Freshmen because they didn’t know what plans the go- 
vernment had laid for the operation of an English 
CEGEP. 


Donald Peets was also upset over the “pressure tac- 
tics’’ of the Students’ Association in opening up the 
U.C. meetings. He even moved that the meeting be ad- 
journed because of the prescence of students. But, he 
showed everybody what a great guy he is by voting for 
open meetings once his original motion had been defea- 
ted. Yea, great guy that Peets! 


But, the most upsetting thing of all was the response 
of the students. The night before the U.C. meeting, the 
S.L.C. had recognized the need for making public the 
decision making process at the university. 

Twenty up-tight ‘student leaders’’ vowed that they 
were going to open up those meetings no matter what, 
and that students were finally going to find out how the 
big boys plot the course for this great big institution of 
higher learning. 


At three o'clock the following day, a couple of dozen 
of these same, concerned students assembled outside 
the doors of the University Council chamber and moved 
into the room en masse. Two hours later, most of those 
students had left and the U.C. hadn’t even started dis- 
cussing one of the most important items on the agenda, 
Sir George’s policy regarding the institution — of 
CEGEP’s next year. Donald Peets must have had a 
good laugh. He needn’t have wasted his energy by mo- 
ving that the meeting be adjourned. Their initial cu- 
riousity satisfied, the students left secure in the know- 
ledge that the University was safe in the hands of people 
like Registrar Peets and company. 


The conclusions you reach are pretty depressing. If 
members of student government haven’t got the interest 
or patience to sit through a reasonably short meeting 
of the University Council, then there’s not much to be 
expected from the great mass of unwashed who plod 
through the halls day after day flitting to and from 
classes. 


Perhaps we should forget about the whole thing, pack 
up and go home. That’s been suggested before but now, 
it might be an idea to give it serious consideration. 

Merry Christmas. 


the georgian 

The geoigian is an edstoually dutanamous we .-pape: published ty the Communications Board 
of the Students A-sociathor of Su George Wilhams University Montreal Authouzed as yecoud 
clas. mail by the Po.t Office Oepatmert om Otlana for payment af postage in cash The 
editutial office. ae located m Room. 648 and 649 of the Henny F Hall Building, 1455 de 
Maisonneuve. Montreal 25. Quebec Telephore 8794585 Telex 01 26383 The Advertising 
Vices ate located Roum 639 Mest Ho..a'd Krupp Morus Rosenfeld and Leon | 
2revsman (local) Tel 879 4462 


















Editor-in-chief....... rte, so David A Bowinan 
Managing Editar.........cncscccereeassersnsveen Staley UYiman 









Business Managel.. ........ccccccccccc ee. Al S Zweny 
Op-Ed Editon... age scicincsscescs ucts Witton Petotay 
News Editor. 0... . Anne Mclean 
Photo Editois...... _. Lenny Rittes 
dain, Clamen 
Sports Editor ‘Z Steve Halper 
Desk Edita tsi. .:scoea ee teen - George Bibb, 
Sunune Riawas 





Members of Canadian University Press Presse Etudiante Nationale 
Unned States Student Press Assac 
Typeset aud litho: JOURNAL OFFSET INC, 


231 Beniamin-Hudon, Montreal 9, - 331-9721]. 






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aster 


‘Letters to the Editor 


anyway ! 





Letters to the Editor of the georgian must be submitted, preferably fieeeame ieee to Room 
H-649. All letters must beur the name, faculty and year of the writer. The qeorgian reserves 


the right to abridge lengthy submissions and correct grammar where necessary. 





Track trials and 


tribulations 
Editor, the georgian; 

Mr. Halperin took upon him- 
self to be the georgian sports 
editor this year (bless his lit- 
tle heart) and in my opinion, 
has done a rotten job. Events 
such as curling, golf, rowing, 
fencing, track and field, wo- 
men’s athletics, and intramu- 
rals have seldom if at all, 
been covered properly. 

I am concerned primarily 
with one sport-track and field- 
and if you have failed to catch 
Mr. Halperin’s one line in the 
Nov. 22nd georgian; “the 
Georgian track team captured 
the OSLIAA championships 
for the third straight year, 
Nov. Ist’’. Yes nov. 1st! 

Iam a member of the Geor- 
gian Track and field team and 
proud of it and I know of 19 
other guys around Sir George 
who feel the same way. The 
football team was belted this 
year; the basketball and hoc- 
key prospects could look bet- 
ter; yet 20 guys-19 athletes 
and a coach (sorry an athlete 
too) put many hours of dedi- 
cated training and spirit to- 
gether to produce a champion- 
ship team. Mr. Halperin saw 
fit not to cover this sport this 
year but because ‘the boys’ 
brought home the champion- 
ship this year, I feel they de- 
serve some recognition. 

As Mexico ’68 proved, track 
and field is exciting, dramatic 
and challenging. If you are 


sincerely interested in being 
a good sports writer Mr. Hal- 
perin, forget your editorial 
garbage on football hockey, 
and basketball scene and con- 
cern yourself with all sport 
activities. Are you scared of 
visiting the Athletic Offices 
for some concrete information 
or are you frightened of de- 
dicated physical education 
personnel. 

As my views on the sports 
editor must be confined to this 
page, I hope the students will 
use it as an introduction to the 
article on the track team which 
will appear on the sport pages. 

Bill Peel 
Arts [V 


Sir George ‘helps’ 
Editor, the georgian; 

The Sir George Williams 
University’s 25th Annual 
Blood Drive, held this year on 
the mezzanine of the Hall 
Building from the 3rd of De- 
cember to the 5th, broke all 
records for the amount of 
blood collected in any Cana- 
dian University for a given 
period of time. An average of 
69.8 pints of blood were dona- 
ted per hour, as opposed to 
the record 68 per hour, set 
last year by Sir George. 

On hand at the opening ce- 
remonies were Miss Marie 
France Beaulieu, this year’s 
Miss Canada, 
seau, John Ferguson, Floyd 
Curry and Marc Cloutier of 
the Montreal Canadiens, Prin- 


Bobby Rous-- 


cipal R. C. Rae and Mrs. 
Johnson. The chairmen of the 
Blood Drive ’68 were Eddie 
Rosenthal and Mira Maislin. 

Although the drive was ham- 
pered by bad weather, a total 
of 1955 pints of blood were 
collected in a period of only 
28 hours, whereas last year, 
the clinic was open for a total 
of 31 hours and the pints do- 
nated were 2070. The Inter- 
Faculty Trophy was won by the 


Engineering Faculty, in close 
tie with the Science Faculty. 
To close off the Drive, the 
Levve Loungers and Ben E. 
King appeared in concert in 
H-110 at 12:00 Friday, with 
the auditorium overflowing all 
through both shows, which en- 
ded at 4:00. Both groups were 
brought over by Norm Silver 
of “Your Father’s Mousta- 
che” and “The Esquire Show 
Bar.” 
Robert Nessrallah 
External Publicity 
Co-ordinator 


Beetlemania? 


Editor, the georgian; 

I would like to add my sup- 
port to those agitating for im- 
proved Cafeteria service, ha- 
ving just found what appeared 
to be the rear end of a slug or 
beetle in some Cafeteria cof- 
fee. 

Yours truly, 

Christine Freeman (Miss), 
Secretary, 

Department of Sociology 
and Anthropology. 


fi 














§ 


- 

















Letters cont d... 





Gullible people 


Editor, the georgian; 


I read the latest issue of 
the georgian which calls for 
a strike. The cause of that 
is “Sir George is to become 
the second French language 
university” next fall. And this 
information came from an 
“informed source.”’ 


Does this “informed source 
have any official representa- 
tion whatever? What is the 
name of the person who said 
that? What is, the position 
of that person with the actual 
provincial government?  Per- 
sonnally, I do not believe that 
there is such a person. It 
is a political gimmick. For, 
look at it this way. The mo- 
ment the georgian went out 
with this information from 
the “informed source’, it 
placed the government in an 
awkward position. Since most 
newspapers have their atten- 
tion focused around the elec- 
tions, any comment on the 
issue (Sir George to become 
second French language uni- 
versity) would spread like fire 
on an oil patch. And if Mr. 
Bertrand or Mr. Cardinal 
would ever say anything about 
it, it would turn against them. 
Because they could only say 
they are “for’ or “against.” 
If they say they are ‘‘for’, 
they might lose the election 
in Bagot and if they say they 
are “‘against’”’ they might lose 
the election in NDG. I am 
surprised that no-one thought 
of that before the publication 
of the present issue. It is 
a very bad publication espe- 
cially at the time of the mid- 
term exams. 


Etienne Laurial 
Eng I Evening division 


Diversified interests 


Editor, the georgian: 


The Hemispheric Confer- 
ence to End the Vietnam War 
has ended. It may not be 
fashionable in this sophistica- 
ted and cynical age to mention 
the stirring scenes which were 
created by this gathering of 
people from the 10,000 mile 
length of the Americas as 
well as from other parts of 
the world. People of all ra- 
. ces and many languages were 
present. Again in this sophis- 
ticated and cynical age it is 
usual to suspect sinister ulte- 
rior motives behind every- 
thing, but there were many 
statements made and positions 
taken at this Conference that 
express only the best of the 
human spirit. An American 
Indian woman nearly broke 


down as she described data 
which showed that for a re- 
cent year during which al- 
most half a million U.S. sol- 
diers were in Vietnam, it 
was safer to be one of these 
than to be an American In- 
dian at home, due to the very 
high death rate caused by 
poor living conditions and lack 
of medical care. The young 
men who turned in their draft 
cards to the Vietnamese dele- 
gation will no doubt be univer- 
sally castigated, but they were 
simply expressing their dee- 
pest feeling that they do not 
hate the Vietnamese people 
and hence have no intention 
of helping to kill them. 


Thus we found some value 
in the Conference. We were 
not disturbed by the some- 
times heated difference bet- 
ween various of the attendees. 
We were not disturbed by the 
discussions that often contai- 
ned more wishful thinking than 
concrete plans for human bet- 
terment. But we were greatly 
distrubed by the absence of 
leadership from the conferen- 
ce organizers in not inserting 
into the program even the 
briefest reference to Cze- 
choslovakia and other coun- 
tries where the hand of Rus- 
sia might is just as heavy 
as is the hand of American 
might in Vietnam, Guatemala 
and elsewhere. Surely in all 
the hours of debate and spee- 
ches there would have been 
room for a moment’s conside- 
ration of the plight of the 
people of Czechoslovakia, and 
of the fact that in our imper- 
fect world the big countries, 
whether communist or capita- 
list, are able to force their 
will on the small countries. 


Henry E. Beissel 

Associate Professor 

Sir George Williams Univer- 
sity. 


Edward J. Farkas 
Assistant Professor 
McGill University 


Poli Sci protestors 


Editor, the georgian; 


We, the undersigned, wish 
to take exception with several 
of the points’ made in the 
editorial of November 26th. 


You state that the brief 


of the ‘Committee for the 
Advancement of Political 
Science” was “rejected in 


toto”. Bullshit! The proposal 
was not rejected at the meet- 
ing of the Political Science 
Society nor has it been re- 
jected by the Department of 
Political Science. In fact, it 
has not been submitted to 
the Department, nor will it 
be until the Political Science 
Society ad hoc Committee has 





made its recommendations. 


Secondly, we would like to 
comment on your remarks 
regarding the Chairman of 
the Department (whom for so- 
me reason you choose not 
to name). Political Science 
211 is not intended to be a 
course in current events and 
even if it were, a professor 
cannot be expected to be om- 
niscient like the georgian pre- 
tends to be. Political Science 
today is of necessity divided 
into specialized fields, and 
Professor Quinn is an expert 
in his chosen fields of spe- 
cialization. If, however you 
wish to condemn any political 
scientist for not being an 
expert on American politics, 
well, that’s your bag, baby! 


We believe that much of 
the information upon which 
you based your editorial was 
second-hand and obviously er- 
roneous. We demand that you 
verify any information you 
intend to present in your edi- 
torials. It is your responsi- 
bility to do so. 


Ian Smith Arts H 

David Tarasofsky Arts I 
Peter Lymberiou Arts I 
Vaughn Dowie Arts I 
Irwin Rubin Arts I 

J. MacLellan Arts IV 
Larry Sinray Arts II 
Gordon Simons Arts IV 
Jerry J. Kambites 


Misinformed student 


Editor, the georgian; 

At the time of registration 
this year, evening students 
were each hit with an extra 
$12.00 fee for student acti- 
vities. 


A substantial percentage of 
evening students do not have 
the time to take part in any- 
thing but their classes and 
assignments. Work and family 
take precedence. 


With this twelve dollars, 
not even tax deductible, we 
are supporting the luxury of 
two student newspaper each 
competing and devoting space 
to petty arguments on edito- 
rial policy and content. 


This extra $12.00 assess- 
ment is unwelcome and un- 
necessary to many evening 
students. An option of direct- 
ing the twelve dollars to as- 
sist students in under-deve- 
loped countries, or other 
worthwhile causes should be 
available. This option would 
give the evening student the 
opportunity to share good for- 
tune with a needy group, ra- 
ther than by subsidizing a 
minority group with a subs- 
tantial amount of money. 


A. Govier 


(Ed. note: Evening students 
do not contribute financially 
to the publication of the geor- 
gian.) 


















the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/5 


+ DEE + 





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which Means XMAS, 
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money, thus 
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lapinette mails early, 


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the manacer then 
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6/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 





Students “‘crash”’ 


University Council 


by Anne Maclean 


All meetings of the Univers- 
ity Council, the highest deci- 
sion-making body in the Uni- 
versity, are now open to the 
entire academic community 
following a meeting November 
29 which was “crashed” by 
some 25 students. 

The students entered the 
Board Room as the meeting 
was being called to order, 
and stood in a solid line along 
the walls surrounding the 
council table. Members of the 
Council continued sedately to 
go through the preliminary 
formalities paying little atten- 
tion to the silent group of 
onlookers. 

After a while a Council 
member brought the presence 
of the students to the atten- 
tion of Council, after which the 
students were officially ‘“no- 
ticed” and the question of 
what was to be done with 
them came under discussion. 

Although one or two Coun- 
cil members voiced disappro- 
val of student “pressure tac- 
tics’, a motion presented by 
Registrar Donald Peets to ad- 
journ the meeting and re-con- 
vene elsewhere was defeated. 

A recent report of the Uni- 
versity Communications 
Committee to the Univers- 
ity Council had recommended 
that meetings of all governing 
bodies be made open, but the 
Council had tabled the report 


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pending and investigation into 
how the mechanics of open 
meetings were to be handled. 
At the November 29 mee- 
ting Council decided finally 
to go through with the move. 


Minutes of the meetings will 
be posted in the georgian and 
in the library in the Norris 
Building. 

The Arts Faculty Council 
has also opened its meeting. 


Five year program 
to be given in ‘69 


Sir George Williams University will commence a new 
five year program next fall to coincide with the opening 
of the first English language CEGEP, Dawson College. 
The first two years of the program will correspond to 
the two-year CEGEP course and the latter three years 
will be offered as a university-level curriculum leading 


to a degree. 


A number of crucial questions remain to be answered 
regarding the new program. Firstly, will the curriculum 
be identical to the one offered at Dawson College and 
the ones offered (if any) in other English-language uni- 


versities in the city. 


. Another question is the problem of fees. Students attend- 
ing Dawson will not be paying tuition fees and presumably 
the same setup would apply at SGWU. However, no decision 


has been announced as yet. 


The availability of teaching staff must also be considered. 
A number of applications have been received by Dawson 
College officials for positions at that school but no ar- 
rangement has been made for Sir George’s CEGEP equi- 


valent. 





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Brief proposes two senates 


Seven members of the Stu- 
dents’ Association have pre- 
pared a brief on student go- 
vernment which, if adopted, 
will lead to the establishment 
of two senates at Sir George. 


The brief will be submitted 
to the University Council on 
Student Life for possible mo- 
dification. Allan Hilton, one 
of the authors of the brief, 


told the georgian that the brief 


as it now stands is only a ten- 
tative document subject to im- 
provement. 


Only one half of the total 
report has as yet been written: 
that dealing with the Student 
Affairs Senate. The second 
senate would be known as the 
Academic Senate, and propo- 
sals concerning responsibili- 
ties and composition, etc. will 
be dealt with in the next brief. 


The present proposal on the 
Student Affairs Senate was 
drawn up in response to what 
was seen as a need to “con- 
sider the fusion and re-orga- 
nization of the areas in uni- 
versity government of student 
life and students services.”’ 


Such re-organization would 
entail the dissolution of the 
Students’ Association, the E- 
vening Students’ Association, 
the Athletics Councils, and 
the University Council on Stu- 
dent Life. The functions of 
all of these separate bodies 
and their various committees 











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would all be incorporated in- 
to the proposed Student Af- 
fairsSenate, which would have 
power enough to put its poli- 
cies into effect. 


The problem with the pre- 
sent set-up has been that the 
presence of so many small 
associations and committees 
has led to the fragmentation 
of resources. Hopefully the 
new Senate, by consolidating 
the different branches of stu- 
dent government, would cons- 
titute a more effective go- 
verning body. 


The proposed Senate would 
consist of 44 voting members, 
comprised of 4 members of 
administration, 2 from the 
board of Governors, 6 fa- 
culty, and 28 students inclu- 
ding the chairman, the Pre- 
sidents of the various Facul- 
ty Associations, six Evening 
students, and 12 Day students. 


Some points have not yet 
been decided upon, such as 
the question of whether the 
Chairman would be elected 
by the elected students of 
the Senate or by the students 
at large. 


The Student Affairs Senate, 
subject to the authority of 
the Board of Governors, will 
be “responsible for the stu- 
dent life of the University.” 


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Sir George Williams and 
Loyola College have agreed to 
negotiate -- that is the present 
stage of the talks between the 


Negotiations to open over Loyola 


to enter the negotiations with 
a complete merger of the two 
institutions in mind, repre- 
sentatives from Loyola have 


two institutions. been silent on their goals. 


Although Sir George has pu- A statement issued 
blicly announced its intention 


last 


week aba acknowledged 





Magical Mystery Tour 
coming to Sir George 


The exclusive, the sole, the first, and the only showing to 
the top half of North America of the Beatles’ film, MAGICAL 
MISTERY TOUR, will be presented in Montreal by Logos. 

The film was given to Logos for a benefit for five days from 
December 31st to January 4th. 

John Lennon arranged for the London Office of APPLE, 
the Beatles’ distribution Company, to fly the film to Montreal. 
Lennon decided to release the film after hearing of the legal 
and financial difficulties Logos was undergoing. The editors 
of Logos have been charged with obscenity in their seventh 
issue and publishing false news in their latest issue, the 
spoof on the Gazette. Logos vendors are also forbidden to 
sell the newspaper on the streets. All cases are now pending 
before the courts, with the obscenity trail set for December 
12th. Logos hopes that the benefit will pay the legal fees and 
enable them to put out another issue. ° 

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR will be shown at the Sir 
George Williams Auditorium, starting on January lst, with 
a special New Year’s eve preview at 12:30 A.M. and continuing 
until January 4th, after which it will be sent to Toronto. Ma- 
tinees will be shown at 12, 2, and 4 o'clock, and evening 
showings will be at 7, 9 and 11 o’clock. Advanced tickets 
can be purchases at the Record Cave and at Mansfield Book 
Mart. 


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Loyola’s participation in the 
talks, saying that they would 
enter into the discussions with 
an open mind. 


But many people feel that 
Loyola is not at all pleased 
with the prospect of merger. 
It still holds out a desire for 
a university charter, and even 
though the current political 
climate rules out any such 
possibility, Loyola adminis- 
trators seem to feel that the 
advent of a fourth French 
speaking university (which the 
government is committed to 
have operable by September, 
1969) will enhance their op- 
portunity for a charter. 


Quebec politics, however, 
will likely dictate otherwise. 


The possibility of merger 
with Loyola is generally vie- 
wed favorably at Sir George, 
but the most reticence comes 
from faculty members. They 
point out that much of Sir 
George’s attraction is based 
on its location -- a downtown 
university in a large metropo- 
litan center. Merger with Lo- 
yola might necessitate the 
moving of some departments 
to the west-island site, and 
this is not looked upon well. 


Another factor, some facul- 
‘y members say, is that Lo- 
yola doesn’t shape up well 
academically, and thus a mer- 
ger might lessen the value of 
a Sir George degree. Some of 
Loyola’s departments are on 
a par with their counterparts 
at Sir George, but it is true 
that others lag behind consi- 
derably in excellence. 


the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/7 


Sir George merger 





The Loyola Campus 


The Possibilities 


There are three possibili- 
ties that may emerge as a re- 
sult of the talks. 


First, there can be a com- 
plete, total merger of the two 
institutions, either under the 
name of Sir George, or as part 
of a newly named institution. 


Second, the two institutions 
could operate under a charter 
which would see the creation 
of federated colleges which 
would have a single governing 
body, but would nonetheless 
be semi-autonomous colleges. 


Third, the two institutions 
would maintain their present 
forms of university govern- 
ment, except that Loyola 
would operate as a college of 
Sir George. This possibility 


is much the same as Loyola’s 
current situation with the Uni- 
versity of Montreal. Loyola’s 


contract with the U of M, 
however, expires in 1970. 


SA Endorses Negotiations 


The Students’ Association 
of Sir George has released a 
statement which “enthusias- 
tically endorses” the decision 
of the University to proceed 
with the negotiations. 


The statement points out 
that the possibility of a com- 
plete merger would enhance 
the caliber post secondary 
education in the province by 
avoiding duplication in course 
content, and thus permitting 
a greater variation in the 
courses offered by each disci- 
pline. 


The SA also feels that the 
move would be a financial 
breakthrough as it would eli- 
minate duplicate spending in 
basic expenditures as well as 
lowering capital outlays. 





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8 /the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 





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Oxfam campaigns for funds 


Oxfam of Canada will re- 
turn to Sir George since one 
year ago as the campaign on 
the lobbies topped all expec- 
tations. The Montreal Oxfam 
committee received four hun- 
dred dollars ($400.00) and 
claimed to have sold some 
of the highest numbers of 
Xmas cards at Sir George. 
The cards will once again be 
displayed on tables placed in 
the lobby on Wed. and Thurs. 
with collection boxes and en- 
velopes. 

Oxfam has been active or- 
ganizing aid deliveries of food 
and medicine in the Biafra 
situation long before the po- 


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pular press made the fami- 
liar headlines in Canada. As 
a result of all this Oxfam 
of Canada has received two 
hundred and forty thousand 
dollars ($240,000) for Biafra 
from Canadians. 


Oxfam of Canada has al- 
ways taken a special interest 
in the difficulties of African 
states and this is the main 
appeal of the present cam- 


paign. 


Oxfam is a fund raising 
organization which distribu- 
tes to various international 
channels making projects of 
running institutions such as 
hospitals or irrigation works. 
Like any other organization, 
volunteers are the main re- 
source that keeps Oxfam of 
Canada going. Hence an es- 
sential part of the Sir George 
drive for funds is to request 
some willing and able students 


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On Thursday December 
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Arts Students’ Association 
present Tommie Smith 
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tend. 

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the georgian, Wednesday; December 11, 1968/9 


acres 





iis ‘by Phil ¢ en m 


Whether we want to admit it or not, many of 
the social problems the world faces today are 
racial as well as economic and no part of the 
world, white, black or whatother is truly divorced 
from the problem. We no longer smirk and scoff 
at the mention of an “Armageddon” -- an all 
consuming global race war. Canada, America’s 
in-law and member of the Commonwealth which 
includes several black nations, is in a particularly 
precarious position as a historically “independent” 
and “liberal” country. U.S. current events clearly 
show the results of too much mythical sentiment 
and too little basic knowledge -- and history does 
not absolve anyone for volitional ignorance in the 
face of social destruction. In view of such, black 
students in colleges and universities throughout 
the U.S. have instituted programs of Black Studies 
to the avid reception and participation of the cam- 
pus communities. 

In view of Canada’s social ties and involvement, 
the black students at SGWU felt such Black Studies 
programs were urgently needed here. Consequent- 
ly a Black Students Association was formed with 
the help of Prof. C. Davis (Education) to begin 
such a program (as well as the seconary in- 
terests of combating campus racism). The initial 
stage, the Informal Black Studies Program was 
finalized with the cooperative funding of the Co- 
curriculum Committee. 

Beginning in January, guest speakers rang- 
in interests from Jazz (Archie Shepp and Leroi 


Jones) to Political Science (Charles Hamilton) 


will be presented every week at Sir George. 
Schedules and recommended preparatory readings 
will be posted prior to each program. Occasionally 
during the year, the black students will be spon- 
soring their own collective programs. The Black 
Students Association hopes this will spur the early 
incorporation of pertinent formal courses on black 
thought and culture at SGWU. 


INFORMAL BLACK STUDIES PROGRAM 

, SCHEDULE 
DATE SPEAKER AND INTEREST 
Jan. 9-10 Bob Hamilton (Poet, editor of Black 
Univ.) Black Poetry 
Jan. 9-10 Bobb Hamilton (Poet, editor of Black 
Caucus) 
Jan. 27-28 James Turner (Prof. of Sociology, 
Northwestern Univ.) 
Sociological developments in the Black community. 
Feb. 6-7 Charles V. Hamilton (Chairman- Political 
Science Dept., Roosevelt Univ.; co-author with 
Carmichael Black Power) 
Feb. 27-28 Robert Browne (Prof. of Economics, 
Farleigh-Dickenson Univ.; author of The Case 
for Black Separatism) 
(Final dates have not been arranged at this time 
for the following speakers, but they have given 
assurances of their participation. ) 


Lerone Bennett, Jr. (Black Historian, Senior Edi- 
tor-Ebony; author of The Negro Mood, Before 
the Mayflower.... , 

Leroi Jones (Contemporary black poet, playwright, 
jazz historian) Black poetry and the development 
of jazz. 

Archie Shepp (Noted jazz musician, composer, 
playwright, composer-in-residence, Buffalo State 
Univ.) Jazz dynamics. 

Sterling Stuckey (Historian of Black folk-culture, 
Northwestern Univ.) 

(Several other speakers have been contacted but 
‘ are not included in this list before their definite 
acceptances. The list therefore, is subject to 
expansion to include more interests. 


THE FORMAL BLACK STUDIES PROGRAM 
AT SGWU 
The following is an example of the kind of prog- 
ram currently being formulated by the Black Stu- 
dents Association for future presentation to the 
Curriculum Committee at SGWU. 


; 
Cis o — re 0 S : ci SD at Bes of rs 
SS By ; awer oF at go Bias Sscaeante 


ENGLISH: 
I The Literature of Negritude-Poetry, Novel, 
Essay, Drama 

The poetry, essays, novels, short stories and 
plays of Hughes, McKay, Brown, Bontemps, Tol- 
son, Hayden, Brooks, Jones, DuBois, Locke, 
Senghor, Cesaire, Drake, Allen, Wright, Ellison, 
Baldwin, Kelly, Fair, Himes and others. 
Il. Black Journalism 

The development of black journalism from the 
abolitionist papers to the present, their’ similari- 
ties and differences vis-a-vis the white press. 


HISTORY: 
I. The African in the Caribbean and South America 

A general survey of blacks’ participation in the 
development of Latin American nations with parti- 
cular emphasis on Haiti, Mexico, Brazil, Jamaica, 
Trinidad, Barbados, the Bahamas and Cuba. 

II. Survey of the History of the African in North 
America 

A joint study of the U.S. and Canada including 

(a) The Atlantic Slave Trade -- the impact of 
the trade on West African cultures, the New World 
and the Industrial Revolution. 

(b) Civil War, Reconstruction and Containment 
-- the reaction of blacks to the Civil War, the 
rise and decline of Reconstruction Governments 
and the systematic repression and containment 
of blacks during the last quarter of the 19th Cen- 
tury. 

(c) The Black Man in the 20th Century -- the 
DuBois-Washington controversy, the emergence 
of the Niagra Movement, the NAACP program, 
the Garvey Movement, the Harlem Renaissance, 
and conditions facing blacks during and since 
the Depression. 

III. The Histories of the Modern Black Movements 

The NAACP, CORE, SNCC, SCLC, Urban 
League, Muslims, Trade Unions and contemporary 
organizations (Panthers, Deacons for Defense, 
RAM, etc.). 

IV. Great Men and Women of Color 

The study of the life and times of Sundiata, 
Musa, Tshaka, L’Ouverture, Henri-Christophe, 
DuBois, Delaney, Walker, Tubman, Turner, Vesey, 
Toure, Truth, Blyden, Casely-Hayford, Chilemb- 
we, Bibi Amima, Garvey, Nkrumah, Fanon, Car- 
michael, Forman, Shirley Graham, etc. 

V. African Civilizations 

A study of the African Civilizations from 
Egypt and Ethiopia to Zimbabwe, the Songhay 
States, Benin, Mali, Dahomey and the Zulu nations 
of the south. 


LANGUAGES: 
I. Swahili 
II. Linguistics 

Analysis of the dialects of the ghettoes, the 
American South, the Caribean with emphasis on 
sociological and cultural roots. 


MUSIC: 
I. Black Folk Expression to “Jas” (seminar 
course) - 

A focus on the Spirituals, Seculars, Ballads 


and Work Songs of North American slaves and 
the comparison of these to West Indian musical 
expressions with emphasis on the question of 
African survivals in these forms. The develop- 
ment and impact of these early forms on Blues, 
Jazz, “Soul” music and contemporary ‘Rock.’ 


PHILOSOPHY: 
I. Black Philosophical Thought 

A study of the development of Negritude, Pan- 
Africanism, Soul and Blackness from the 18th 
Century to the present. Included is the case of 
Integration vs. Separation and the American, Ca- 
ribbean eric ii Rep 


ee 


ane. —_. 
. a a“ 4 [S c “> 
ig a ; 
og ys ans 7 
tahoe 90 Sy ~~ 5 (ma ie MO Neder aka Oa 
Nm + eT ~, OS. ey 
ey 


ey Cs a 
Bey ON 


a 


POLITICAL SCIENCE: 
I. The Politics of Developing Nations 

A contemporary study of the methods and ideo- 
logies of developing nations and their leaders 
with respect to ethnic, geographical, historical 
and social ties. 
Il. The Third World 

A study of the Afro-Asian bloc, their political 
histories and the motivations and environment 
which created it. Analysis with respect to future 
projections. 
III. Colonialism 

The politics of colonialism and its impact on 
the political development of the master and ser- 
vant nations. 
IV..The Politics of Minorities 

A study of the political reasoning and methods 
of minorities in securing their wants. Particular 
emphasis on India (Ghandi), England, Algeria, 
Ireland, South Africa, Rhodesia, Kenya, the United 
States and Canada. 
V. The History and Literature of Pan-Africanism 

The evolution of Pan-Negro and Pan-African 
thought in America and the West Indies. Readings 
and analysis of Delaney, Blyden, Crummell, Tur- 
ner, DuBois, Garvey, Padmore, Nkrumah and 
others. Included is a comparison of the earlier 
variants of Pan-Africanism to more recent thought 
plus the connection between Pan-Africanism, theo- 
ries of the African personality and Negritude. 


PSYCHOLOGY: 
I. Readings in the Psychology and Strategy of Op- 
pression and Resistance 

The developments and effects of racism on the 
thinking habits of blacks and whites with emphasis 
on programs of corrective solutions. 


RELIGION: 
I. Black Religion in North America 

A historical examination of black religion in 
Worth America from slavery to the present. Iso- 
lation of the points at which black religion is 
similar to and different from the Christianity 
of the larger society. Contributions of blacks to 
Christianity (Biblical Black men, the Black Popes, 
the Black Madonna, etc.). Consideration is given 
to black religious music, the role of the black 
religious exhorter and to the ambiguities which 
characterize the history of black religion vis- 
a-vis white America. Included is a survey of 
the black religious movements -- Muslims, Fa- 
ther Divine, Daddy Grace, Garvey, SCLC, Rev. 
M.L. King, Jr. 


SOCIOLOGY: 
I. Racism in North America: Pathology Within and 
Without the Ghetto 

A focus on the genesis of racism in North 
American institutional life -- including its re- 
ligious, political, economic, educational, legal, 
social and cultural manifestations. This will be 
related to the situation and thought of the black 
man particularly in the ghetto -- from Watts 
to Halifax. 
II. American Indigents 

The status of African, Puerto-Rican, Mexican, 
Indian and white-indigents. Attention given to le- 
galeconomic, political and social problems fac- 
ing these groups. 
II]. White or Black-Apartheid, Segregation and 
Partnership 

An examination of white attitudes towards blacks 
before and since slavery with special attention 
to the writings of white “creative” artists, scien- 
tists, politicians, journalists and educators. Em- 
phasis on the effects of racist thoughts and prac- 
tices on white personality development. This is 
coupled with a cross-cultural study of the evolu- 
tion of racist thought and practice in the Union 
of South Africa, Rhodesia, England, Australia, 
and North America (Canada, U.S. and the Carib- 


| bean). 


ee 





10/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 


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Starting January 11th. 


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An unidentified delegate to the recent ‘Hemispheric Conference to End the 
the torch of burning draft cards. On his right stands the Minister of Culture « 
blic of Vietnam, Hoang Minh Giam. On his left stands Brother Ron of the Black 


by Prof. Léandre Bergeron 


Professor Leandre Berge- 
ron teaches in the French 
Dept. at SGWU. He was a 
delegate to the recent Hemi- 


spheric Conference to End 
the War in Vietnam and, in 
this article, gives his impres- 
sions of the Conference. 





The Hemispheric Conference To End 
the Vietnam War was a victory. For 
the Vietnamese first of all, and second- 
ly, for all true liberation movements 
across the hemisphere. 

It was victory for the Vietnamese 
people, for both the Democratic Re- 
public of Vietnam and the National Libe- 
ration Front. Both were represented 
by full-fledged diplomats at a Conference 
attended by more than 2000 participants 
a few hundred miles from the capital 
of imperialist America. Victory belongs 
to the Vietnamese if their represen- 
tatives can come and burn American 
draft cards on the doorsteps of the 
aggressor. Victory is theirs when 2000 
delegates raise a clenched fist while 
listening motionless to the national an- 
them of the National Liberation Front. 
Victory is theirs when the same feeling 
of solidarity burns in the hearts of 
White Radicals, Black Panthers, Que- 
becois, Colombian revolutionaries, 
Third World fighters, Puertoricanos, 
native Americans, Mexican student lead- 
ers, Chilian progressives and Canadian 
pacifistScresssxndsveesccabees 


- 
(<6 ~« 


It wasn’t an easy conference. Because 
it wasn’t a staged conference. The whole 
spectrum of progressive people across 
the hemisphere had been invited. With 
such a list of delegates there was bound 
to be tension and flare-ups. It wasn’t 
the intention of the organizers to have 
a nice big comfortable conference with 
a series of platitudinous speeches, pa- 
nels and workshops on peace to relieve 
the conscience of a few liberals ‘“shock- 
ed” by the atrocities of an immoral 
war. 


It was hoped progressive people 
from across the hemisphere would come 
together to exchange experiences and 
see how they could make a step together 
in understanding this war and seeing 
what means could be taken to defeat 
the agressor. No change is brought about 
without some conflict. No awakening is 
brought about without some shock. Many 
delegations came with their particular 
hang-ups, their particular screens 
through which they see the world and 
its struggles. Many delegates thought 
their interpretation of the Vietnam War 
was the absolute one. Many came with 
their own Vietnam war on their shoulder. 















The Black Panthers felt they had been 
tricked by the organizers into coming- 
without their leader and rightfully de- 
manded that this be corrected. It was 
corrected. Bobby Seale was there th 
next day. The Latin Americans f 
ill at ease because they were few 0 
legated representing millions of pe 
They were given the opportunity. 








Conference - a victory 






ae aa? ‘ 


JY Le Fe 


ww 
a 







———— 


Photo: Guy Borremans 


War in Vietnam’, holds 
f the Democratic Repu- 
anthers. 


“fort the millions they represented. The 
Quebecois felt they had been left out 
@uc soon found out that the door was 
ope: Lor their full participation. 


Saturday morning tensions were so 
high that some felt the breaking point 
had been reached, that the whole thing 
was about to fall apart. And yet nobody 
left because everybody was sure that 
in spite of the apparent chaos there 
was a common cause that cemented the 
delegations together. Everybody held 
on, fighting it out in strong words. 


Frustrations were de-fused, particu- 
larities were recognized as such and 
compromises were reached. Divisive- 
ness waned. Heads of delegations rea- 
lized that what united them was a lot 
~preater than what tended to divide them. 
Solidarity with the Vietnamese in their 
st.uggle against US imperialism. So- 
lidarity with all the struggling people 
in the hemisphere. A common enemy: 
the U.S.A. Everyone realized that his 
struggle is particular, his conditions 
‘specific but that the objectives are fun- 
damentally the same. 


Sunday was the climax. The plenary 
sessions were electric. Energies that 
had turned white-hot through conflict, 
concentrated together and fused in the 
thunderous applause that rocked the 
auditorium when young American draft 
dodgers rushed on the platform to burn 
their draft cards and show by this 
gesture their complete solidarity with 
the Vietnamese. struggle: for liberation. 


—— a © 





Resolution adopted by 


the Hemispheric Conference 
to End the War in Vietnam 


The Hemispheric Conference to end the United States War 
in Vietnam held in Montreal from the 28th of November to 
the Ist of December 1968, after hearing speeches made by 


the delegations from the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, - 


the delegation from the South Vietnam National Front for 
Liberation and the delegations from various countries in the 
Western Hemisphere, has unanimously passed the follow- 
ing resolution: 

-- Sternly to condemn the criminal war the U.S. govern- 
ment has been carrying out over the last fourteen years 
against the Vietnamese people. 

-- Wholeheartedly to support the heroic Vietnamese 
people’s struggle for their fundamental national rights, i.e. 
independence, sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity. 
To consider the struggle of the Vietnamese people as a 
great contribution to the common cause of the peoples of the 
world for independence, freedom, peace and social progress. 

-- The fact that the U.S. government has had to stop 
unconditionally its bombing of the whole territory of the 
Democratic Republic of Vietnam and to hold talks with the 
N.F.L. of South Vietnam on questions of concern to South 
Vietnam is a big victory of the Vietnamese people and of the 
people in the United States, the Western Hemisphere, and of 
all mankind dedicated to peace and freedom. This victory 
is also an eloquent expression of the force of justice in our 
times. 

It is however an initial victory because at present the U.S. 
government still continues to intensify its war of aggression 
in South Vietnam, daily committing barbarous crimes 
against the Vietnamese people there and to carry on its 
acts of encroachment on the sovereignty and security of 
the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. 

The Conference highly appreciates the contribution 
made by the people in the United States and in the Western 
Hemisphere to the common struggle of progressive mankind 
for peace and social progress and their resolve to oppose 
the U.S. warin Vietnam. 

In face of the present situation the conference calls on 
people in the Western Hemisphere and those in the United 
States to mobilize all forces for the struggle for a total 
end to the U.S. war in Vietnam. It calls on all strata of 
people in the Western Hemisphere to give the Vietnamese 
people moral, political, and material support in the most 
diverse and effective form to organize a week of solidarity 
with the Vietnamese people in all the countries of the 
Western Hemisphere on the occasion of the anniversary of 
the founding of the N.F.L. of South Vietnam on December 20, 
actively to support the stand of Vietnam embodied in the 
statements respectively issued on the second of November, 
1968 by the government of the D.R.V., on the third of Novem- 
ber, 1968 by the South Vietnam U.F.L., and on the seventh 
of November jointly by the South Vietnam N.F.L. and the 
Alliance of National, Democratic and Peace forces of 
Vietnam on a political solution to the Vietnam problem. The 
Conference calls on the broad opinion in the Western 
Hemisphere to sternly condemn the U.S. government for its 
continued war of aggression in Vietnam and to demand that 
the U.S. government put an end to all acts of encroachment 
on the sovereignty and security of the D.R.V., withdraw all 
U.S. and satellite troops, all U.S. war material from South 
Vietnam, and liquidate all U.S. military bases from South 
Vietnam: let the South Vietnam people settle their internal 
affairs themselves in accordance with the political program 
of the South Vietnam N.F.L. and the Vietnamese people in 
both zones decide by themselves the peaceful reunification 
of Vietnam without foreign interference, 

The best way for the oppressed people to support the 
Vietnamese people is to fight imperialism in all its forms 
according to their own conditions. The Conference is firmly 
confident that with their tenacious and valiant struggle, with 
the active support of the peoples in the Western Hemisphere 
and the people of the world, the Vietnamese people will 
surely accomplish their glorious struggle for their funda- 
mental rights and thus make a great contribution to the 
common cause for peace and freedom of mankind. 

Montreal, November 30, 1968 





the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/1 


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12/the georyian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 








The following is an extract. of the 
minutes of University Council, held on 
Friday, November 29, 1968: 


1, The Chairman read a letter from 
Mr. Manny Kalles, President of the 
Students’ Association, in which he 
informed him that the Student Legisla- 
tive Council had decided that students 
should attend the meeting of University 
Council. There were several dozen stu- 
dents present at the meeting. 


Following considerable discussion, 
the University Council approved a 
motion ‘that the observers present at 
the meeting be invited to attend’ so that 
the Chairman formally indicated this to 
those present and the meeting continued. 


2. University Council, after consi- 


derable discussion, approved the 
(new) B. Sc. Honours degree prog- 
ramme in Economics and, _ subse- 
quently, approved the rest of the 


Science Faculty course-change mate- 
rial including two amendments to the 
Biology and Chemistry sections of 
that material. 


3. University Council, after discus- 
sion of the Arts Faculty course-change 
material, formally approved the recom- 
mended changes, including various 
amendments to the original material. 


4. University Council considered, at 
considerable length, a five-part recom- 
mendation submitted to it by the Chair- 
man of Council which follows: 


(1) He would recommend that the 
January meeting of University Council 
be held us an ‘open’ meeting in Room 
H635 on an experimental basis with a 
limited number of tickets of admission 
available to the meeting. 


(2) He would recommend that there 
be provision at the meeting for a ques- 
tion period from the floor. 
























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(3) While it was impossible to pre- 
pare and publish the final agenda of 
Council meetings seven days before 
each meeting, given the fact that many 
items on the final agenda only appeared 
during the days preceding the meeting, 
he would recommend that the tentative 
agenda of each Council meeting be 
published a week before the date of the 
meeting. 


(4) He would recommend that copies 
of the University Council minutes be 
deposited in the libraries and in the Stu- 
dents’ Assoc’ns Office where they would 
be available for scrutiny by any in- 
terested students or staff-members. 


(5) He would recommend that Univer- 
sity Council recommend to. other 
Council, Committees and Boards, that 
they hold ‘open’ meetings. 


After a lengthy discussion on each of 
these points, the University Council ap- 
proved them and, in addition, approved 
an amendment to them which added the 
following asa 6th item: 


‘a precis of the minutes be prepared 
and published, as soon as possible, after 
each meeting with the understanding 
that this precis had no legal status since 
the minutes themselves would only be 
validated by action of Council at its next 
meeting’. 


[In addition, Part 4 was amended and 
approved to include the Communications 
Committee to the list of recipiens of the 
minutes. 


With regard to Part |, it was agreed 
that there would be a dual booking of 
both the Council Room and some other 
larger room as un alternative meeting 
place, should the attendance prove too 


large for the Council Room. In this 
respect the meeting would be ex- 
perimental. Future arrangements 


would be determined by the atten- 
dance at this meeting. 


With regard to Part 3, it was agreed 
that an effort would be made to up-date 
the tentative agenda each day up to the 
actual meeting day as additional items 
appeared, during that final week, for 
inclusion on the final agenda. 


With regard to Part 4, it was agreed 
that it might prove possible only to 
deposit a copy of the minutes in the 
main library rather than in both it and 
the Science-Engineering Library in the 
Hall Building. This would remain to be 
determined. 


With regard to the meaning of ‘open’ 
meetings, it was agreed that this was 
to be interpreted as open to the Univer- 
sity community, students and staff. but 
not ‘open’ to the general public. 


With regard to the time of the January 
meeting, 4 motion that this should be 
held on Friday, January 24th, at 6:30 
P.M. was defeated and it was left to 
the Chairman and the Secretary to 
determine the day and time of the 
January meeting (by formal motion). 


5. It was agreed that further consi- 
deration of a possible reorganization 
of the structure of the Board of Go- 
vernors be deferred to the next or a 
subsequent meeting. 


6. (a) It was reported to Council 
that the search for a new Dean of 
Graduate Studies was in progress with 
the Search Committee considering 
some nominees in detail. 


(b) [t was reported that the Search 
Committee for a new Vice-Principal 
(Academic) had concluded its work and 
the matter was now in the hands of the 
Principal who could be expected to make 
anannouncement shortly. 


(c) It was reported that the Search 
Committee for a new Dean of Engineer- 
ing was at work, with progress being 
made but it was not possible to indicate 
when a decision would-be made. 














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. It was reported that the Commit- 
2 on the matter of Limit Loads for 
Evening Division students in the Sum- 
mer Session was in the process of 
preparing a report which would be 
forwarded to Council in the near fu- 
ture. 


8. It was reported that the Commif- 
tee on Co-curricular Activities had 
not yet submitted its report and it was 
agreed that the Secretary should re- 
quest this report by the next meeting 
if this was at all possible. 


9. A brief report concerning the re- 
signation of Assoc. Prof. Byers from 
the University Communications Com- 
mittee was submitted by the Secretary 
who indicated that the resignation had 
been occasioned by this member’s 
disagreement with what he considered 
to be the Committee's undue haste in 
dealing with matters before it. 


10. Concerning an Arts Faculty 
Council resolution ‘that the University 
Council be asked to consider again this 
Council’s proposal for the adoption of a 
Grade Point Average system, in time 
for implementation in 1969-70", it was 
reported that the Commerce Faculty 
Council was opposed to the adoption of 
a G.P.A. system as was the Science 
Faculty Council. The Engineering 
Faculty Council had not yet come to a 
conclusion concerning it but was asked 
to submit its decision as sooon as 
possible. 


ll. It was agreed to defer the mat- 
ter of ‘the proposed organization of 
the Instructional Media Office and its 
relationship to the Faculty of Arts’ for 








‘Minutes of the Nov. 29th University Council Meeting 


two or three months so that the matter 
could be considered in greater detail 
by the Arts Faculty Council and its 
appropriate Sub-Committee. 


[2. It was agreed that consideration 
of the Engineering course-change 
material should be deferred to the 
next meeting of Council. 


13. University Council gave lengthy 
consideration to ‘a proposal for a 
Transitional Programme during the 
inauguration of — English-speaking 
CEGEPs’ and finally approved a 
motion ‘that it is recommended that if 
Dawson College is operating in 1969-70, 
and if proper financial arrangements can 
be made with the Province to obtain the 
staff required, the University offer, 
commencing in ‘69-70 a five-year pro- 
grimme, the first two years of which 
would parallel] the CEGEP programme, 
and the last three would fit the Univer- 
sity programme”. 


{4. University Council approved a 
resolution from the University Library 
Committee ‘that the University Council 
be requested to amend the constitution 
of the University Library Committee so 
that the membership of the Committee 
could be extended to include one day 
and one evening student as an interim 
measure until new University govern- 
ment is implemented’. 


15. University Council was inform- 
ed that the Sub-Committee of Council 
on the matter of a ‘Study Week’ would 
be submitting a report by the next 
meeting of Council. 

R.A. Fraser, 
Secretary 








After ten days of occupation and 
strike action, classes have resumed 
in the McGill Political Science De- 
partment as a result of a negotiating 
session held last Wednesday at which 
the faculty finally yielded to student 
demands. 


Exams, originally scheduled for 
last week, have been postponed for 
a few days. 


Three hundred McGill students wat- 
ched the proceedings over closed 
circuit television Wednesday after- 
noon. The following proposals were 
agreed upon by both students and 
faculty: 


1/3 student representation on the 
Political Science Section, which at 
present is comprised of all Political 
Science faculty members. 

1/3 student representation on the 
curriculum committee. 

1/4 representation (2 of 8) on the 
appointments committee. 


one Ph.D. student on the Ph.D. 
dissertation committee and one M. 
A. student on the M.A. dissertation 
committee. ‘These committees ap- 
prove the choice of topics and final 
thesis of post-graduate students. 


In addition, faculty conceded to 
student demands that Section has 
final decision-making powers on the 
question of appointments. Constitu- 
tional changes in the section will 
be effected by double majority -- 
i.e. a majority of the faculty and 
a majority of students on the sec- 
tion will be required to make cons- 
titutional reforms. 


Arnie August, student head of the 
negotiating team, called the outcome 
a victory for the Political Science 
Association, but added that Poli. Sci. 
students will continue to push for 
parity of representation in their de- 
partment. 





McGill Poli Sci occupation ends 


“The spirit and intellectual en- 
vironment of the Leacock 4th floor 
(where strikers have been occupying 
Political Science offices and holding 


| 
Arnie August, (right) chairman of the Political Science Association is interviewed 
after strike action by students was terminated. 





History faculty to receive brief 


A brief presenting the specific 


recommendations of History students 


at Sir George will be submitted to 
the History faculty before January 
10. 

A meeting of the History Society 
which represents these students will 
be held «mn January 7 in order that 


the proposals set down in the brief. 


may be discussed. 


What is to be achieved by the 
History Society will have a profound 
effect on all students registered in 
that faculty. Oddly enough, the most 
serious problem faced by the society 








= 
_— 


the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/13 


educational seminars) must be car- 
ried into the classroom,” August 
stated. 


%. 





is the lack of student participation 
especially of those enrolled in the 
evening division. Despite the fact 
that meetings have been held on 
Saturdays when the majority is able 
to attend there has been surprisingly 
little response. 

The History Society has been suc- 
cessful in gaining student represen- 
tation on the department committee 
as well as on certain sub-committees 
and now has the promise of future 
co-operation from the faculty. Their 
present proposals involve an increase 
in the requirements for honours and 
majors programmes. 


ERRATUM 


Re: ‘“The Government of SGWU: the need for change’’, 
(Nov. 29th edition of the georgian) the fourth installment 
of Bert Young’s series on Social Change at SGWU. Mr. 
Young’s recommendation for the new Senate should have 
proposed a composition of 25% students, 25% adminis- 


trative officers, and 50% faculty. 


ee ee ee a ee ee a 


"7". = = eee ee eee eee eee ee © ies 


Notice to Political Science Students 


The Ad Hoc Committee of the Political Science Society 
is now receiving submissions from all interested Po- 
litical Science students in its investigation in advancing 
the discipline of Political Science. 

The Committee is interested in all views on any aspect 


of this discipline. All written material should be de- 
livered to Miss Pat Lewis, Secretary, Department of 
Political Science, 6th floor. 


* os ees e's © 6 * © 6 © © 6 © © 6 4 4 # 8 © 8 6 4 © 8 4 6 8 ooo oe Oe Oe ee ee ee ee ee ee ee 8 6 8 ee ee © 8 ee © 6 eo ee a se es eee ete ee ee ee ete ee ete ete ete ec eee ete a ste a ctctat ata act ctatet ete ate a %e*%s*.*.".".".".".*.*,*,*.*.*.*.*.*.%.*.0'0" 






FOR 










Requirements: 





CARNIVAL QUEEN & PRINCESS CONTEST 


12th ANNUAL WINTER CARNIVAL 1969 


Nomination forms’‘may be picked up N O W at the 3rd 
floor receptionist Nominations close January 6th, 1969. 


Female member of the Day Division of S.G.W.U. 
Nomination form must be signed by fifteen (15) male 
students Picture of the nominee must be attached to 
each form and must have the candidate’s signature. 





S.S.A. 
president 
resigns 








Colin Wheeler 


Colin Wheeler president of the 
Science Students Association finding 
himself, “a pawn in a thankless ga- 
me,” has resigned. 

A paper submitted by a member 
of the Science Student’s Association 
stated that Wheeler had not been 
fulfilling the position of president 
““Wheeler was there only for the 
glory of the position.” His enthu- 
siasm along with that of the Science 
Student’s Association was short lived. 

Science Week was to end by renting 
the Playboy Club. Although there 
was a two week cancellation clause 
in the contract, Wheeler signed a 
$2000 agreement 4 days prior to 
the event. He submitted a 50% deposit 
when 25% was sufficient. 

Wheeler had many goals and res- 
ponsibilities. “The Playboy Club is 
only one instance of his incompetent, 
inefficient and irresponsible leader- 
ship.” 

The SSA now feel that “can work 
as a unit and in harmony with the 
students.” 


































DEC. 22/68 
7 P.M. 
SCIENCE HAPPENING 
THE SCAN 


WITH 
THE MUNKS 
AND SWEET LORRAINE 
DOOR PRIZES 


BEER 50¢ LIQUOR $1.00 
(tips included ) 


1183 CRESCENT 


ADMISSION 50¢ 
TICKETS IN RM. 341. 


Peuturing Ser ee 













14/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 


urban renewal I 


The Jeanne Mance Housing Project 
was completed in 1957 and stands on 
19.7 acres of land on Boulevard Mai- 
sonneuve, near St. Urbain. 

The Project is easily recognizable by 
its twenty-eight yellow brick apartment 
buildings, which stand out in sharp con- 
trast against the dingy brown flats of 
the surrounding neighbourhood. 

Jeanne Mance is Montreal's only ope- 
rating low-rent housing project. Itis 
Jean Drapeau’s kind gift to the silent 
poor of this city, who comprise one-third 
of the population and live in some of 
the worst slums in Canada, under the 
shadow of Place des Arts, Place Ville 
Marie, and the rest of Drapeau’s pre- 
cious monuments to himself and his ad- 
ministration. 


by Anne McLean 





Of the 796 families 


now living in 
Jeanne Mance, approximately one-sixth 
are on welfare. The monthly income 


of the average tenant family is $235, 
while the average monthly rent is $45-46. 
Rents are scaled according to family 
income, and are adjusted on a monthly 
basis, so that if for instance a man 
manages to augment his regular earnings 
for a month, he will find that his rent 
for that month has been raised accor- 
dingly. 

A municipal clinic islocated in the 
Administration building, and there are 
laundry facilities in the basement of each 
of the adartment buildings. A group of 
nuns, Les Petites Soeurs de _ |’Assomp- 
tion, provide nursing, cleaning, and some 
counseling service for tenants. There 
is a youth club, as well as a sewing 
club for housewives, and a “Golden Age” 
club. 

Daniel Marsan, Administrator of the 
Jeanne Mance Housing Corporation, a 
private body which operates the Project, 
tells you all of this in a wary, defensive 
manner. A former bookkeeper, he dis- 
plays a certain matter-of-factness and 
a lack of close involvement in the lives 
of his tenants. 

He seems, however, honestly convinced 
that the situation at Jeanne Mance could 
hardly be better. He points to the low 
incidence of alcoholism and juvenile de- 





linquency and says, “We don’t have too 
much trouble here. The police force 
doesn’t have to come too often.” Security 
police are on duty twenty-four hours a 
day. 

University settlement 

Not far from the Jeanne Mance Project 
is the University Settlement, a neighbour- 
hood house in the district which also 
serves as headquarters for the Urban 
Social Redevelopment Project. We talked 
with Claire Arseneau, a case worker 
and community organizer on the staff 
of the Institute of Mental Hygiene, who 
now works in conjunction with the Set- 
tlement and with a local action group 
called the St. Jacques Citizenship Com- 
mittee. : 

Mrs. Arseneau was considerably less 
enthusiastic than Marsan about the con- 
ditions at Jeanne Mance. 

“Jeanne Mance,” she said, “is a pole 
of attraction for low-income, multi-prob- 
lem families. a ghetto of multi- 
problem families.” 

She feels that the people of Jeanne 
Mance lack many necessary services and 
facilities. She emphasized that poor hous- 
ing is only one component of what she 
termed a “vicious circle’ of poverty. 
As long as there is widespread unem- 
ployment, and schools remain unequal 
to the task of providing an education 
for children from disadvantaged neigh- 
bourhoods, then to set up subsidized 
housing is to treat only a fragment of 
the whole problem. 

As an illustration of the need for a 
more integrated, all-encompassing prog- 
ramme of social assistance, Mrs. Ar- 
seneau cited the case of one woman 
whom a social worker from the Institute 
of Mental Hygiene had found to be un- 
dergoing a severe nervous breakdown. 
The woman was given moral support 
and the Institute supplied her with special 
drugs. Her condition began to improve. 
But the drugs increased her appetite and 
she couldn't afford to buy the amount 
of food that she now needed. She was 
forced to discontinue use of the drugs. 
At that point there was nothing that the 
Institute could have done, since this par- 
ticular matter was out of their “juris- 


diction.” 
Little researched information is avail- 
able on whether or not the children 


from the renewed area are doing any 


-Jeanne 


better at school. Mrs. Arseneau said 
that the evidence seems to indicate that 
not much has changed, and that they 
are still meeting the same _ problems. 

Our schools reflect the value system 
of the dominant middle class, and there- 
fore contribute to the high drop-out rate 
among slum children. A child from a 
poor family can adapt only with difficulty 
to a classroom atmosphere which is 
set in a suburban Dick and Jane world 
having little relation to his own knowledge 
of what is real on the outside. In many 
instances, the child lacks basic verbal 
skills and has a vocabulary which is 
quite different from that used by his 
teacher. Specially trained teachers are 
needed to work with these children. 


Half-hearted effort 

Compared with what needs to be done 
in the field of urban redevelopment, Mont- 
real’s efforts are half-hearted and myo- 
pic. Apparently content with having e- 
rected twenty-eight apartment buildings 
on land which once supported a slum, 
the City has let the situation rest there. 
The Jeanne’ Mance Project employs no 
social workers of its own and provides 
no counseling services for the families 
living there, apart from the work of a 
few nuns from a nearby convent. 

A community centre has not yet been 
built, although one has been planned. If 
tenants want to meet together, they must 
use the maintenance hall, a small one- 
storey building measuring about 30 by 
40 feet, with a Coke machine, a_ tiny 
office, and an adjacent room large enough 
to accomodate a small group of people. 

For a while a community action group, 
the St. Jacques Citizenship Committee, 
was quite active in the St. Jacques area 
of which Jeanne Mance is a part. Last 
year the Committee held a demonstration 
at City Hall to protest the rent system 
and certain regulations at les Habitations 
Jeanne Mance. 

Many people feel that the practice of 
adjusting a tenant's rent to every rise 
in his income tends to be destructive 
of incentive. When we brought this up 
in the interview, Director Marsan told 
us that although there may be some -room 
for criticism of the system, “once you 
have adopted a system, you have to keep 
to it.” 

Another objection raised by tenants 
at the time of the demonstration was 
over eviction regulations. Leases at Jean- 
ne Mance are renewed on a monthly, 
rather than a yearly, basis. Residents 
can be evicted on three days’ notice. 
To date this year, however, there has 
only been one eviction. 

The City Administration paid little at- 
tention to the demonstration. According 
to Marsan, the St.. Jacques Committee 
is no longer active at Jeanne Mance, 
the leading instigator having settled down 
to pursue a more peaceful life at the 
Project with his wife and seven or eight 
children. 

Marsan 
of the governing 


smiled at this manifestation 
force of the Universe. 


On s‘habitue a tout. 


“When our volunteers go into a com- 
munity, they must not bring ‘solutions’ 
to the local problems. They must 
believe that the people should decide. 
Essential to this is our belief that the 
‘underprivileged’ are worthy of respect 
and we have much to learn from them. 
Our concept of ourselves and the com- 
munity is not that of a doctor-patient 
relationship. A more apt analogy might 
be a catalyst which seeks to initiate or 
speed up a process.” 

(Aims and Principles, the Company of 
Young Canadians, 1967.) 





Ideal? 

The Director of the Jeanne Mance 
) Housing Corporation calls the project 
“ideal.” 

A community organizer in the area 
says it is ‘a ghetto of multi-problem 
families.” 

The Director tells you there is a 
wonderful community spirit among the 
families in the project; the organizer 
talks of the “institutional atmosphere” 


and the repressive regulations. 

You start your investigation equipped 
with preconceived notions about parti- 
cipatory democracy and _ re-establishment 
of the community. You seek out repre- 
sentatives of the Establishment and the 
anti-Establishment, ask them all the glib 
questions, and evenare mildly surprised 
to find that their answers contirm your 
pre-conceptions. ke 

The Director of the Housing Corpora- 
tion reluctantly admits that ninety per 
cent of the original slum inhabitants 
never applied for residence at Jeanne 
Mance after their homes were demolish- 
ed, but assures you that this is because 
“some people don’t like to live in a 
clean house.” You naturally assume that 
the Director is covering up, because 
you have just spoken to a social worker 
who said that a study had shown that 
the expropriated families were never 
made aware that a housing project was 
being constructed in place of their old 
homes. 

And you watch a few children playing 
in the nursery school at the University 
Settlement. You explore St. Urbain near 
Pine, see the bent old people in black, 
the sagging old brick buildings, the gar- 
bage lying in the alley ways. You stare 
horror stricken at the monster yellow 
brick high rises of les Habitations Jean- 
ne Mance. 

And with these heroic images packed 
away inside your brain, it’s back to the 
University, great factory of truth, where 
you discuss urban renewal and decide 
that yes, the poor are getting screwed 
and yes, the poor must be organized. 

But all along you have failed to un- 
derstand that you are playing the same 
manipulation game, because unconciously 
you view the poor as an instrument for 
acting out your own. political hallucina- 
tions. You, just as willingly as the bu- 
reaucrats at City Hall, would disregard 
their real 
visions of how it ought to be. 


- 





needs to preserve your little — 








b 


LG 


| 


ual, 


a 









wr 





Petite Bourgogne, the latest of, and 
most ambitious of the City’s undertakings 
in the area of urban renewal seems 
at first glance to represent a welcome 
antithesis to all that is repellent in 
the Jeanne Mance Project. 

“Little Burgundy comes from the peo- 
ple’, Mrs. Arseneau, a case worker at 
the University. Settlement, told us. And 
one cannot fail to be impressed by what 
has been constructed on St. Martin Street. 
One block has been renewed by reno- 
vating as opposed to the old method 
of demolition and reconstruction. What 
was beyond saving has been replaced 
by modern one story attatched dwellings. 
Each home has a front and back yard. 
The interiors are not spacious by any 
means but have been completely revamped 
so as to enable a family to function, 
if not in an easy convenient fashion, 
at least with some semblance of dignity 
and efficiency. 


by Jill Ross 


That is what we saw immerging from 
the mud on St. Martin and so we floated 
away nodding our heads. A few of the prob- 
lems we had encountered at Jeanne Man- 
ce seemed to have been dealt with if not 
in their entirity at any rate in part. 
The towering antiseptic apartment blocks 
had been replaced by the single unit 
dwellings. The renewed area had been 
rebuilt in its original surroundings with 
no attempt being made to create a se- 
parate island apart from the community. 
There were no fences yet apparent, no 
signs that the community to be would 
be anything but a vibrant functioning 
and contributing part of a society which 
was at last fulfilling its responsability 
to it as a less fortunate segment of 
that complex mosaic called the city. As 
Jeanne Mance had stood for an attempt 
by the City to hide the poor under a sham 
of respectable housing, to isolate them, 
hold them captive and render them power- 
less, all under the guise of paternal 
protection, so we hoped that Little Bur- 
gundy would prove a sort of sociological 
milestone, a modern city coming to terms 
with itself, by itself. All unadalterated 
bull shit. 

“Little Burgundy comes from the peo- 
ple” 


Naive statement 

The C.Y.C. people we met in the area 
could only smile politely at what they 
considered Mrs. Arseneau’s naive state- 
ment. 

Grace Lee, one of the Company who 
has worked with the citizens formally 
inhabiting St. Martin St. block, that is 
before expropriation for the renewal pro- 
ject had forced them out, to told of how 
the citizens of the area had been harried 
two years in advance of actual expro- 
priation. What frightened them was a 
sudden interest in them an the part of 
the City manifested by the presence of 
an alarming number of litthe men with 
tape measures, calculating frontage and 
asking family statistics, and more par- 
ticularly by the hitherto seldom seen 
grave looking executives (in pin striped 


suits no doubt) all of solemn mein and 
stroking their respective chins thought- 
fully. 


Many people moved out then to beat 
the scramble for what little low rent 
housing was available in other areas, 
being able to preceive from experience 
elsewhere that expropriation was in the 
air. Others stayed and organized in an 
almost unprecedented effort to maintain 


Little Burgundy- 


themselves and their homes and especial- 
ly their autonomy as homeowners and 
taxpayers against an Establishment which 
displayed such a sudden and arbitrary 


desire to help. The citizens committee 
formed was soon able to confirm their 
fears as being well grounded in fact 


The City did indeed plan expropriation. 
When they had planned to actually tell 
those most affected by their action (that 
is the residents) of the plans somehow 
all got lost in the embarassed hems 
and haws which emanate from City Hall. 

So the myth was exploded. All lovely 
dreams of the Administration answering 
a citizen-initiated request for help were 
squelched. 


Who got chosen? 

Which brings up the question of how 
if the citizens did not ask for aid, and 
in fact were the last to learn of the 
“gift to be proffered upon them by 
the benevolent City Fathers, was the area 
pinpointed for urban renewal in the first 
place? How was it selected to be the 
lucky one from numerous other poverty 
“pockets” which afflict the city? All of 
which naturally yields to the question, 
who gets what out of urban renewal? 
ls it the poor who benefit by, at the 
whim of the City, being turned out of 
their homes, only to, should they return, 
be subjected to loss of autonomy, having 
forfeited their rights as free self de- 
termining citizens by partaking of the 
“company store’, as it were. Meanwhile 
what about the original landowner, slum 
landlord, or speculator from whom the 
land was purchased by the City in the 
first place, or the contractor who was 
awarded the contract to develop the area, 
and the sub-contractors who actually work 
on the site. And how about the City who 
munificiently runs the project on a de- 
ticit? Who really does benefit? 

One of the main wishes voiced by 


‘LET THEM 
EAT CAKE! 


the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/15 


the people living within the bounds of 
the renewal area is their desire to pre- 
serve their autonomy, an_ impossibility 
under the present system of public hous- 
ing by which urban renewal is adminis- 
tered. Jeanne Mance has effectly silenced 
any virulent outcrys by strict enforce- 
ment of eviction laws and by the intro- 
duction of a rent system based on in- 
come. This allows those on welfare to 
exist in the project at a phenomenally 
low rent rate. No person experiencing 
the joys of living in an almost rent 
free environment under the protection 
of Father Jean, is likely to risk his 
position by passing critical judgement. 
He would automatically endanger his po- 
sition by stating that perhaps the interests 
of the tenents are not being served by 
the development. 

Little Burgundy will be the same. 
Despite pleas and pressures brought to 
bear on the City by the citizens com- 
mittees the project will be run on a 
public housing basis. This system will 
inevitably destroy the community set up 
in the area although it is one of the 
oldest parishes in Montreal no thought 
seems to have been given this fact. This 
willingness to destroy cohesive elements 
within the community represents a flam- 
boyant disregard for the traditional as- 
pects of an established environment. 


Citizen participation 

R.T. Affleck in his article “Urgent 
need for urban change”, The Montreal 
Star, August 17,/68, commented on the 
problem in the following terms, “One 
of the most striking aspects of this ex- 
perience to date has been the almost 
complete absence of citizen  participa- 
tion in the process. Generally speak- 
ing, the needs and desires of the people 
living in the designated renewal area 
have been ignored, as have those of 
the population groups that the renewed 




















KE : | i AP - 
tity 


re 





it 


urban renewal 2 





facilities are supposed to serve. This 
high-handed process has generally ma- 
nifested itself in the harshness of ex- 
propriation and relocation procedures, 
as well as in the creation of new en- 
vironments that are often more up- 
propriate to middle class notions of pro- 
priety, than to the life style of the re- 
sidents for whom the project is sup- 
posedly designed”. 


Silent get little 

The silent poor are interested in those 
things which more fortunate people take 
for granted: food, decent housing and 
work. They want the basics. They are 
not concerned with lofty social ideals 
that seem neither pertinent nor relevant 
to their situation. Only in terms of their 
immediate desires can any form of real 
social change be meaningful to them. 
However this is not to say that the 
poor do not see their problems is cos- 
mic terms. They have long recognized 
that urban renewal is not a_ problem 
of housing alone. It has been seen by 


them to be a circular problem which 
must be attacked from several points 
at once. Ht is of little use to improve 


housing conditions if one is not prepared 
to simultaneously upgrade education ci- 
ricula to suit their particular needs, 
and also to provide decent recreational 
and medical facilities. Indeed all aspects 
of the community require reorganization 
and complete revision. In the process 
of urban renewal, the prime concern 
should always be the general improve- 
ment of the environment for the good of 
the people. Who will decide the form of 
urban renewal? Only the poor people 
themselves understand the nature and 
extent of the problems facing them. The- 
refore, only the poor people can provide 
the solutions. We can all work to help 
them carry out their plans. But, the 
poor people must speak for themselves. 


Bel 


hi 
Pol 








16/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 





National title shot nears aS wu. 


Swimmers sock it_to Yanks 





Representatives from the 
mightiest swimming power in 
the world, the United States, 
were left bewildered this past 
weekend as Sir George swim- 
mers scored a stunning upset 
in the Cardinal Relays held 
at Plattsburg State Teachers’ 
College. This marked only the 
second time in the history of 
the relays that a Canadian 
team has been able to defeat 
the American universities re- 
presented in the meet. 

Canadian swimmers _as- 


tounded all the competition as 
they truly proved to the U.S. 





that Canadian swimmers are 
to be reckoned with and to 
drive this point home, last 
year’s defending champions, 
the University of Vermont, 
could place no better than 
third. The powerful McGill 
squad ended up battling with 
Sir George in the final relay 
in order to decide the meet. 
The final results were; 

1) Sir George-76 points (won 
because more firsts) 

2) McGill-76 points 

3) Vermont-70 points 

4) Plattsburgh-64 points 

5) Norwich-34 points 


Superb backstroker John Hawes 


6) Potsdam-28 points 

Although Sir George and 
McGill each had 76 points, 
Sir George had won more re- 
lays than McGill so the vic- 
tory was theirs. Between the 
two schools, however, they 
took all seven of the first 
places in the swimming events 
with only the diving going to 
an American school. 

Outstanding for Sir George 
was Clifford Barry who swam 
with his whole heart and soul. 
His time in the 100 fly was 
even better than the time he 
did in the nationals last year. 
And his blistering 100 free 
pulled the 400 free relay into 
an unexpected 2nd place. Other 
Sir George stalwarts who per- 
formed brilliantly were Bla- 
ckie Chase, Pete Cross, Doug 
Hogg and John Hawes. 


The Georgian win, even mo- 
re significant since they were 
the only school without di- 
vers, took a supreme effort 


since the four winning relays 


fielded had to break meet re- 
cords to win. Two of the re- 
lays even broke pool records 
and a third just barely missed 
breaking one. 


National honors? 


The Sir George swimmers 
have had a tremendous first 
half of the season winning all 
three of their meets against 
stiff competition. The first 
in the Quebec Cup series saw 





ions nt breaststroker Peter Cross 


them defeat arch rivals Mc 
Gill for the first time ever, 
along with several other 
teams. 

Their next meet was a dual 
contest against ever menacing 
Queen’s but Sir George was 
just too tough and Queen’s was 


‘crushed 62-41. 


With a full contingent pre- 
sent for their third and tough- 
est meet, the Cardinal relays, 
the desire and sheer fight of 
the Georgian squad gave them 
their third victory of the year- 
and their biggest. They had 
defeated the Americans and 
McGill in the same meet. It 


was a joyous day. 

The second half looks to be 
as tough as the first. The 
Garnet and Gold meets McGill 
several times and the Quebec 
Cup winner will be decided. 


They also face further Ame- 


rican competition. They are 
after their seventh consecuti- 
ve OSLAA Championship as 
well and it doesn’t look as if 
they are going to be stopped. 
Then there is the big one-the 
nationals. Las t_ year’s 
champs, Toronto is there a- 
long with British Columbia, 
last year’s runner-ups. AI- 
berta, Guelph and McGill are 
also there as well as the rest 
of Canada’s universities. It is 
going to be a great one. 


Of all the varsity teams at 
Sir George, it looks as if the 
highest hopes for top national 
honours in a college sport lies 
with our swimming team-if 
they can’t do it no-one can- 
and if they do pull through into 
the top three and even win the 
national crown, it will by far 
be the most significant Sir 
George athletic achievement 
of the year. 





Varsity pucksters inconsistent 








Blast C.M.R. 


by Robin Palin 





23-1, 





look sick at Laval 


The word around Sir George Williams lately was 
that the hockey team lacked scoring punch. This 
contention was blasted to kingdom come last Wed- 
nesday evening at St. Jean. 

In what Georgian hockey coach Dave Dies called 
“not even a good shinny match” the hockey squad 
broke three OSLIAA records .and crushed Col- 
lege Militaire Royale 23-1. 

CMR is the weak sister of the league and are 


incapable of defeating any OSLAA team and taking’ 


accidents into consideration, are not likely to post 
a win during the season. They were especially 
weak however on Wednesday evening and dressed 
only 12 players. 


Hit hard 

After having a rematch with the MacDonald 
Clansmen on Tuesday night cancelled, the Geor- 
gians hit with a vengence lacking in the early part 
of the season. They took advantage of the CMR 
weaknesses and hammered a record 14 goals be- 
hind the hapless CMR goaltenders in the second 
period alone. At one point they scored three goals 
in less than a minute. 


Goals-a-plenty 

Leading the goal-getters for Sir George was 
Jim Webster with six while Bill Ellyett chalked 
up five-adding five assists as well. Team cap- 
tain Toby O’Brien was high point-getter of the 
night with four goals and seven assists for a legue 
record 11 points in one game. 

Phil Scheur and Bob Phillip each contributed a 


hattricks to the effort while Larry Meehan and 
Greg Harmon scored one each. Meehan also picked 
up two assists. 


More points awarded 
Ray LeCouffe and John Murray were credited 
with four assists apiece with five assists going to 
Barry Cullen and two to Len Lewin. 





Photo: Gerry Klempner 


Toby O’Brien - Tops in O.S.L. 

Gary Thornton, Neil Fernandes and Mike Ban- 
koff all boosted themselves in the scoring race 
with one assist a piece. 

Out of a total of 63 shots on goals, CMR goal- 
tenders stopped 40 while Georgian goalie Tom 


Anderson managed to kick out 27. 


Back to earth 
Université de Laval brought the Georgians back 
to reality on Friday night as they pasted Sir Geor- 
ge 8-O in an exhibition Coupe de Québec tilt. 
The Rouge et Or fielded a big team this seasor 
with the average player tipping the scale at just 
over one hundred and eighty pounds. 


CEGEP falls 
Saturday afternoon the Georgians faced a Trois. 
Rivieres CEGEP which has applyed for entrance 
in the OSLIAA league next season and beat them 
7-5, in the second exhibition match of the weekend. 


O’Brien heads league scoring 

Team captain Toby O’Brien jumped ahead of 
former teammate Alex Mathew in the Ontario-St. 
Lawrence Intercollegiate Athletic Association sco- 
ring race. Wednesday evening, when he picked 
up four goals and seven assists. 

O’Brien now has ten goals and seventeen assists 
while Mathew trails with seventeen points. 

A fourth year Commerce student, O’Brien has 
been team captain for the past two years. Last 
year he scored 20 goals and 26 assists to place 
as the team’s third high scorer. 

Toby has done his share of work on two OS- 
LIAA championship teams in his three years at 
Sir George. It would be a fitting conclusion to 
a superb collegiate carreer if he can help the team 
to the league crown or win the individual scoring 
championship this season. 


a 
4 


, i 





by “Skoop”’ 


Tis the season to be jolly. 
For those of us around this 
place who give a damn about 
what happened in the past and 
what will happen in the future, 
there’s not much to be jolly 
about. I take this opportunity 
to wish a Merry Christmas to 
all you sport lovers, but I am 


afraid that as far as athletics 


goes here, it will not be a 
very happy New Year. I could 
go on about what I see wrong 
in the entire Varsity Athletics 
program, but Head Jock Steve 
assigned me football, so here 
goes. 

This is going to be brutal. 
For once we are going to tell 
it like it is and not spare any 
of the gory details. Maybe 
some of you apathetic slackers 
will finally pay attention. The 
football situation at this place 
stinks. There is no other way 
to describe it. The coaching 
is poor, to understate the 
case. Everything that will be 
said about Head Coach Frank 
Elk has already been said in 
the Jock Desk this year, but a 
little reminder wouldn’t hurt. 
Coach Elk has become the 
laughing stock of the team 
and the school, and likewise, 
the team has become the 
laughing stock of the school 
and the league. 

Coach Elk’s offensive plays 
are immature and unrealistic. 
They are inadaquate for pee- 
wee football. (That is no exag- 
geration.) His techniques of 
blocking and tackling are 
antiquated and ineffective. As 


players and has become the 
cause of dissention on the 
team. 

We have nothing personal 
against Coach Elk. It is 
strictly his coaching ability 
that is in question. His 
tremendous enthusiasm is o- 


ver-sShadowed only by his 
complete lack of football 
knowledge. 


If the athletics department 
can hire such an incompetent 
coach, does this reflect that 
the athletic department knows 
nothing about football? If so 
then why don’t they ask some 
players who they think should 
coach the team. 

Though the players see- 
mingly had much cause for 
dissatisfaction with the coach- 
ing that wasn’t the only thing 
they had to bitch about. How 
would you feel about having 
to travel 5 to 10 miles daily 
to attend practises. This was 
the situation as our athletics 
department could find no place 
closer to the Hall building then 
Verdun Stadium to _ hold 
workouts. The result was that 
on top of being forced to 
sacrifice two and _ one-half 
hours a day of valuable study 
time on the football field, 
players also had to waste two 
or three hours a day travelling 
to and from Verdun. 

It is easy to pass the buck 
and say that the only reason 
for the failure of the football 
squad was the lack of talent 
among the players. Let us 
keep one thing in mind. These 


appreciation from their fel- 
low students for the blood 
they sweat for the ‘‘Dear Old 
Garnet and Gold’. Looking 
up at empty stands does no- 
thing for a player’s morale. 





the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/17 


IF YOU CARE ABOUT FOOTBALL, READ THIS 


collegiate football has ever so 
much to offer this institution, 
but unless a complete change 
of attitude on the part of ad- 
ministration and_ students 


comes about, the seeds plant- 


who sweated their asses this 
year so that all of us could 
have something to cheer about 
on a brisk autumn Saturday 


will never reap a_ fruitful 
harvest. 


a unit, the team is very poor- 
ly drilled, very unorganized 
and completely unprepared for 
competition. Coach Elk com- 
mands no respect from the 


are not pro athletes. They 
receive no financial remune- 
ration for their efforts and 
nor do they ask for any. All 
they ask is a little bit of 


Intramural winter Schedule 


SKI CONDITIONING 
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. - Birks Hall 
Monday - 8:30 p.m. - High School of Montreal (Girl’s Gym) 







MODERN DANCE 
Tuesday - 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. - Birks Hall 







FENCING 
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. - Birks Hall 
Thursday - 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. - Birks Hall 









BADMINTON 
Monday - 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. - High School of Montreal 
Friday - 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 






INTRAMURAL HOCKEY 
Saturday - 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. - McGill Arena 






INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 
Monday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Wednesday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Friday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Y.M.C.A. facilities are available to students with ID. s: 


Monday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Wednesday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Friday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 


SQUASH 
Monday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Wednesday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 
Friday - 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Y.M.C.A. 



















CURLING 
St. George’s Curling Club 





You will say that it is not 
much fun to go out and sup- 
port a loser, but unless the 
spirit of our students im- 
proves, the Football squad 
will continue to be a loser. 
If the University of Southern 
California had a losing foot- 
ball season, only 65,000 fans 
would flock to the L.A. Co- 
liseum instead of 75,000. 


Let’s face it. This was our 
first crack at league foot- 
ball play, and it was anything 
but encouraging. But if we are 


going to get discouraged now, 
we might as well quit. Inter- 


ed by the thirty odd fellows 





AN 
f PY 
“a %y b- va T\ 
—iA A a 4 


THANKS FOR CARING. 





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~—< 


4 - 


an ‘ah 


P) 


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& 

Ve 
a 
' 7 
‘oe 
> 
Pod 


eo. 


Bench spirit was low, but better than spirit in stands. 





S.F.U. turmoil quietens 


by Allen Garr 


BURNABY (CUP) 


settling down. 


Students have exams in less than a week... 
The teach-in 
which was voted on, talked about, argued over 
and proposed, to get at the root of SFU’s 
structural problems, is not coming off very 


their heads are in their books. 


well. 

A faculty of arts meeting Thursday (Nov. 
28) voted in favor of a teach-in to take the 
place of regular classes. But there is a mo- 
vement in that faculty which will surface to- 
day to condemn the “minority” and “unre- 
presentative’”’ faculty members who supported 
the teach-in, “express deep regret” at Strand’s 
decision to call the cops, and request Strand 
work to get the charges dropped against the 
114 who were busted. 

But this “conservative” upsurge is in mi- 
crocosm what has been happening throughout 
the university for the last three years. 

That’s the way it is in this whole maple- 
syrup country. 

You tell some guy he’s not living right and 
he’ll say he is. 

You try to change him and he tries to stop 
you. : 

I could tell you the arts faculty who voted 
in the first meeting were in a minority, 75 
out of about 250. I could tell you the people 
who chose to occupy the administration buil- 
ding were in a minority, 200 out of 5,500 or 
SO. 
I could tell you the people who have been 
proposing change at this cement tomb since 
the day the body was put on public display 
three years ago are in the minority. 

The majority usually opposes, sometimes 
there is a compromise, and, a few times, 
this minority succeeds in swaying the furry 
middle. 

Democracy efficient 

My reservations in condemning a small 
but militant minority stem from my uncer- 
tainty about the efficiency of democracy --a 
democracy where everybody votes on every 
issue and everybody is heard and everybody 
is informed. I see this as no absolute panacea 
for the illness of the university. 

Many in the university community don't 
vote, don’t want to vote and don’t want to 
spend their time being informed. 


--Simon Fraser Uni- 
versity is a depressing place today (Dec. 2). 
For the past two weeks the mall, centre of 
the university’s physical structure, the gym- 
nasium and the administration building have 
been bubbling with activity. But now it’s all 


This is an age of specialization baby...dig 
it. 

Besides, some people like to be told what 
to do. And your arguments that say every 
man should be free to determine his own life 
are less based in fact that mine which conclu- 
de some animals are more equal than other 
animals. 

My ideas on that might change. For now, 
however, I think the mass middle must be 
manipulated to achieve social change. 

Education first? Education is just a nice 
word for manipulator. 

Now if, in my opinion, minorities have the 
right to lay their trip on the majority, that 
means the radicals at SFU are right in at- 
temping to convince the malleable and des- 
troy the rest... for the good of mankind. 

They might have been right in occupying 
the administration building and bringing about 
confrontation that way. But they were stupid. 

They underestimated the opposition, Strand. 

He is cool. 

He lost a bit of face by calling in the cops 
but the main complaint with that move is a 
lot of kids may end up with criminal records. 


Peace reigns 

The campus is calm now, students have 
packed the library to study and most pro- 
fessors are conducting business as_ usual, 
with the consent of their students. 

Students in the library admit they are un- 
der the final-exam gun. As for the teach-in, 
an arts type said: ““We’ve talked about the 
issues for the last week, in and out of class. 
I want to get back to work”’. 

On calling the cops, he, like many, felt 
Strand should have waited a few more days. 
“The occupiers would have soon realized that 
other students were opposed to their action 
and would have pulled out.” 

Should an administration call in cops to 
bust up a student occupation? The radicals 
reject the “ivory tower’ definition of the 
university. They say the university should 
not be divided from the rest of the world. 
It is an integral part of that world. 

“We have democracy off campus, we want 
it on campus,” they say. 

When radicals want support at SFU they 
call up members of the NDP and labor lea- 
ders. They use political pressure to make 
their point; so, by their example, should the 
administration. 

And the most bare-assed example of poli- 
tical pressure is 150 cops clearing out a 
building. 





18 /the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 


by Gord Pickle 
It could be said that the Varsity 
Basketball team has not enjoyed a 
terribly successful season thus far 
as they now stand in fifth place in 
the O.S.L. 
The Georgians have won two and 


cheer them on, the Georgians could 
quite possibly have gone on to win. 

One of the most disappointing as- 
pects of basketball at Sir George this 
year has been the lack of fan support 
for the team. A fast head count at 
the last home game revealed the fact 


Jim Aitken, Duncan Rayside, Kevin 
McCarthy, Chris Countess, Dave Ivey, 
Ed Keeler, and Wayne Hawkins put as 
much drive and spirit into their game 
as does any Varsity regular. The ‘“B” 
team is undefeated this year. 

The Georgians face a tough schedule 





Hockey 
Standings 














lost four in league play, but their re- that there were 26 people in the stands, for the rest of the season. The team TEAM PW T PTs 
cord does not tell the whole story. most of whom were relatives of the travels to Macdonald and R.M.C., two Scie. 53028 ra 
The only game in which they were players. The team deserves much teams which are noted for their ins- Gola 5 302 8 
outplayed was against the powerful better support than this. pired play on home court. Bishop’s Reindeer 5 212 6 a 
Loyola squad presently running away A solid team effort rather than an and Loyola will both be met at Mont Komets 5 2 1 2 6 
with the championship. individual star has provided the spark St. Louis. The squad is finished with ae 2 : : : 
The other games have ended in close for the Georgians. Chris Vidicek and the University of Sherbrooke for this = gall 5 13 13 
decisions, such as. the Georgians’ Rod Ward have shared the scoring year, having won one of the two games Green 5 05 0 0 
64-61 win over Macdonald, and their honors and have shone defensivly. Ter- played against the Frenchmen. = 
62-61 loss to the University of Sher- ry O’Brien has been particularly ef- The Georgians can certainly improve 
brooke. Apart from the Loyola contest, fective on the boards for the Garnet on their record as it stands now. The ~ 
the Sir George squad could have won and Gold. team should be able to bounce Bishop’s 
all their games, had a few breaks Wilf Jackson has done all that can and a really concentrated effort could 
gone their way. be expected of a captain as he has mean a victory over Macdonald. R.M. 
That the Georgians are real com- fed his team in every sense of the C. will probably be tougher and every- ‘= 
petitors has been clearly illustrated word. His defensive work has been one knows what Loyola is like this 
in several games so far. It was seen impressive and the 57” guard has year. However, if the squad can find i GILL ARENA F 
in Sherbrooke, when the Garnet and also been prominant in the Georgians’ the hoop when they really need to, Sir C 
Gold came back from a twelve point socring. George could very well find itself in 
half-time deficit to win the contest. Ken Davies, Dave Wilding, Mike the championships. 
The Sir George squad again played Dawson, Preston Jennings, and Mike COURT SHORTS: Dave Wilding VARSITY HOCKEY 
the role of comeback kids as they Russo have all had a chance to come wins the prize for marksmanship...one = 
fought to overcome a sixteen point off the bench and each has performed of his warmup shots missed the back- 
margin which R.M.C. was able to build well. board and picked off a clock on the VS . 
up. Though the Georgians managed The cagers also have a ‘“‘B’ team Mont St. Louis scoreboard.. look out, 
to tie the score, they lost the game made up of players who don’t normally Loyola... Georgians’ next home game 
61-57. Had there been more than a get a chance against league competi- is on Jamuary 11... opposition will be OLD TIMERS 
handful of spectators at the game to tion because they lack “experience. Bishop’s University Gaitors... _ 
BLACK BOTTOM JAZZ : 
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— = 


the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968/19 


Christmas Jock Desk 


- teh 
_~ 


* Seb 


SPORTS DESK STEVE HALPERIN EDITOR 


The Head Jock at that infamous desk 


Well, we finally cleaned out the Jock Desk ... though we 
usually get the contents of this column from the Thursday 
evening waste paper basket, we decided that there just 
wasn’t enough dope in the ‘“‘circular file’’ for our semester 
ending issue ... after finding, among other things, a stale 
salami sandwich, a rotten apple, a ripped up pair of loafers 
and a Mothers of Invention album, we did manage to salva- 
ge scads of info about the athletic exploits of Sir George 
Students over the first half of the year ... here’s a brief 
rundown on what happened what should have happened and 
what didn’t happen on the Concrete Campus Jock scene 
over the first term. 


ROOKIE GRIDDERS SADLY OUTCLASSED 

Those of us who were closely associated with the achieve- 
ments of this university’s first attempt at organized Cana- 
dian football would probably just as soon forget what trans- 
pired and look ahead to next season. The Frank Elk coached 
pigskinners played six Central Canada Intercollegiate Foot- 
ball Conference games and were decisive losers in each of 
them. After opening with a 27-7 loss to powerful Loyola 
College Warriors who were destined to win the division ti- 
tle, the Elkmen got weaker and weaker to a point where, in 
their last game of the scedule, a return engagemet with Lo- 
yola, the Margin of victory for the Westenders was sixty 
points. The team suffered from general inexperience and 
disorganized play, and were also hard hit by injuries. 
Among the bright lights were tackle turned halfback Jim 
Edge, defensive back Ron Pentecost, linebacker Rock Wol- 
fe and Quarterback Al Rafael. 


SOCCERMEN THIRD IN OSL 

The Varsity soccer squad fared a little better than their 
counterparts on the football scene, but it was still a relati- 
vely dissappointing campaign for Coach Ron Licorish and 
his team. After finishing in a tie for top spot in the Ottawa 
St. Lawrence loop last year, the team had to be happy with 
third spot this time around. The kickers collected their 
show money by winning five of ten games and tying another, 
and they were directly responsible for knocking Loyola out 
of a title win by holding the Warriors to a 1-1 standoff in 
the final game. Andree Farkas was far and away the best of 
our soccer players, and he received much support from 
Geoff Gelineau and Clive Licorish. Dave Mulaner was out- 
standing all season in goal. 


GOLFERS LOSE CONFERENCE CROWN 

Our defending OSL golf champions weren’t so lucky this 
time as they had to settle for second spot behind Bishop’s 
in the conference tournament held this year at the Bellevue 
club. However, all was not lost for the Georgian swingers 
as Bruce Weatherley of our squad was the low medallist for 
the thirty six hole affair with a cool 152. The Sir George 
team emerged from the Plattsburg invitational with top 
spot, and Weatherley was again the low scoring individual 
golfer in the event. In the Georgian invitational, sponsored 
by guess who, Wheatherley once again was the individual 
leader, though the team championship went to the group 
from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 


THINCLADS REPEAT AS OSL’s BEST 
Once again this year, Coach Doug Insleay’s Georgian 
Track team were successful in their quest for the conferen- 
ce title. The Garnet and Gold brigade barely nudged CMR, 


' 74 points to 73 at the annual meet held at Kingston, No- 


vember 1. Veteran star Bill Peel of Sir George was awar- 
ded the High Agregate total, as he won first prize in the 800 
yard, 1 mile and 3 mile runs. Other first place finishers for 
Sir George were Mike Russo in the high jump and 120 yard 


| hurdles and Al Cooper in the Triple Jump. The Georgian 


relay team were victorious in the 440 event. 


TENNIS SQUAD FINISHES FORTH 
The tennis ream representing this University wound up in 
a tie for fourth place in the OSL this past season. The only 
returnee from last years squad was Timmy Jones, so we 
can write this off as a rebuilding year for Georgian Tennis. 
Jones also coached the team, which also consisted of Doug 
Granger, John Niles and Hugo Preslod. 


WATER POLOISTS WIN FOURTH STRAIGHT CROWN 

For the forth time in as many years, The Sir George Wil- 
liams Water Polo team has proved to be tops in the OSL. 
The Garnet and Gold machine splashed their way to an un- 
defeated 6-0 campaign which was capped by a sizzling come 
from behind win over McGill, 13-12 last Wednesday eve- 
ning. Coach Jeno Ats was once again fortunate in having 
on his side Clifford Barry, who is called by any to be the 
outstanding Poloist in the nation. Others who contributed 
to the perfect season were Joe Roboz and Blackie Chase. 


SWIMMERS HEADED FOR SEVENTH IN A ROW 

Who ever heard of one team winning seven league titles 
in a row? The Sir George Varsity swimmers, that’s who. 
There seems to be no way that another OSL team can wrest 
the title from the secure hands of Insleay’s Aquamen, and 
then the team will try its hand at winning the national title. 
To date the swimmers have won a joint meet with Queen’s 
University and have taken a decisive lead in the Quebec Cup 
series after the first leg of this event was reeled off at 
McGill’s Sir Arthur Currie pool. Rookies Doug Hogg and 
John Hawes have been valuable additions to the already 
awesome lineup which includes Cliff Barry, Pierre Dus- 
sault, Blackie Chase and Steve Richman. 


WRESTLERS OFF TO GOOD START 

Harry Wolfson and Barry Nye, coaches of the Sir George 
Wrestling team, are optimistic about the team’s chances 
of taking a conference title, and participating in the Natio- 
nal Grappling finals, which will probably be held in Mon- 
treal some time in March. To date the team has split its 
opening two contests, losing first to MacDonald and coming 
back to dump Loyola. The team has been augmented by 
several members of the football squad but the man to watch 
is Gordon Birdie. Birdie is the fellow who just fell short 
of earning a spot on the Canadian Olympic team when he 
broke his arm during the tryouts. 


ICE, CAGE SQUADS START SLOWLY 

Elsewhere in this issue are in depth analyses of the hoc- 
key and basketball situations. Suffice it to say in this co- 
lumn that unless these two teams pick up their socks and 
start bearing down, they may find themselves sans a berth 
in the league playdowns next March. Neither of these teams 
are idle during the holidays. The Cagers travel out to Win- 
nipeg to take part in a Golden Ball competition on December 
27 and 28. The hockeymen have an appointment with the 
Georgian old-timers at McGill Arena on December 28, and 
then take part in the third annual Centennial Hockey tour- 
ney at the forum January 2 to 5. 


AS THE SUN SETS SLOWLY IN THE WEST... 

So now, the jock desk is clean ... I can vacate this inky 
establishment for a hard earned rest with a conscience 
clear in the knowledge that I have at least pleased all of the 
people some of the time ... Merry Christmas and all that... 
To faithful jocks Robin, Gord, Warren, Rick and Steve, 
thanks for making my job impossible ... Time to go home... 
Pll leave you with a few parting thoughts and hope to see 
you all in ’69 ... Adolf Hitler Was a nice guy ... Frank 
Zappa is a clean cut kid ... Frank Elk is a great football 
coach ... Ho, Ho, Ho... 


——————e 
_ Soccermen 
third in 


O.S.L. 


Champs on paper, chumps 
on the pitch. That about sums 
up the dismal season of the 
Sir George soccer team. 


SORTER RAH RTT 
COOLANT TAHA 


No other team in the six 
team league had so many se- 
cond and third year men re- 
turning; eight in all. To this 
solid nucleus came an impres- 
sive number of rookies. 


What, but a championship 
year, could coach Licorish 
expect with vetrans like Jim 
Robertson, Mark Wilson and 
Andre Farkas up front and 
captain (last years MVP) De- 
rek McGlauglin, Clive Lico- 
rish and Dave Mulaner ancho- 
ring the defense. Add to this 
Jeff Gelineau of the Trinida- 
dian national team, Ofkahn 
Dalli of a Turkish first divi- 
sion squad and Art Cory, 
Quebec National division all 
star, and the team was envi- 
sioning the cup in their pos- 
session. 


In the opener they were 
shutout 3-0 by Kingston. It 
took this game to jell as prac- 
tices were sparse and training 
facilities poor. After the ini- 
tial loss the team racked up 4 
straight convincing victories, 
and were on their way, so it 
seemed. Injuries to Gelineau, 
Farkas and McGlaughlin in the 
fourth victory left them weak 
for their arch rival Loyola. 


Although hampered by these 
injuries they put a_ strong 
fight and had a 1-0 lead till 
the last minute of the first half 
when goalie Mulaner was ki- 
cked unconscious and the game 
tied. From then on Loyola ea- 
sily went on the register a 
4-1 victory, and the Georgians 
on to lose an easy game 
against St. Jean. 


After that the only enjoya- 
ble moment for the team came 
in their return match against 
Loyola. Loyola needed the vic- 
tory badly to stay in conten- 
tion with Kingston for the 
crown. They were leading 1-0 
with 3 minutes remaining when 
Farkas lobbed a high ball that 
had a backspin and dropped 
behind the Loyola netminder. 


The tie was even sweeter as 
five regular members of the 
first string were missing. 


What next year? Who knows. 
One thing for sure, if there is 
to be a serious attempt for 
championship there must be a 
greater concentration on re- 
cruting. If not at least the bus 
trips will be again enjoyable. 


—_—- 








20/the georgian, Wednesday, December 11, 1968 


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