Skip to main content

Full text of "The Slogan 1946"

See other formats


THE 

BRANKSOME 
SLOGAN 




SLOGAN REPRESENTATIVES 



EDITORS-IN-CHIEF: Shirley Baker, Joan Neilson, Claire Dibble, Anne 
Burton, Gloria Lyons. 

REPORTERS: Gina Baker. Barbara Chisholm, Anne Blake, Judith Living- 
ston, Janet Sinclair. 

PICTURES: Joan Crosbie. TYPIST: Janet Sinclair. 

ADVERTISING COMiMITTEE: Jean Wilkinson (chairman), Joan Vipond, 
Carol Chelew, Carol Henderson, Margot Murray. 

ALUMNAE REPRESENTATIVE: Ainslie McMichael. 



The Branksome Slogan 



3 



CALENDAR 1945-46 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



Oct. 5th 



12th — School re-opened. Dec. 

14th^Clan Games. Dec. 

19th— Portia White. Jan. 

21st— Picnic— Farm. J an. 

3rd— B. Ball Old Girls vs;^ Jan. 

=~ — Present. Jan. 



Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct 

Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 

Oct. 

^Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



Thanksgiving Week- Jan. 
end. J^^' 
10th — Rev. Maurice Flint ;f(Feb. 
(speaker, morning Feb. 
prayer service.) 
11th— B. Ball, B.H. vs. 
H.L.C. 

15th.— 3. Ball, St. Clements 
vs. B.H. 

'The Student Prince" 



B.H. 



vs. 



H.L.C. 



18th— B. Ball, 

B.S.S. 
19th — Ramabai. 
23rd— B. Ball 

B.H. 

24th— Installation of Pre- 
fects. 
26th — Masquerade. 
30th— B. Ball, St. Clements 
vs. B.H. 
2nd— B. Ball, B.H. vs. 

H.L.C. 
2nd— B. Ball, B.H. vs 

Clements. 
9th — Form V plays. 
13th— B. Ball, B.S.S. 
B.H. 

19th— B. Ball, B.H. vs. St 

Clements. 
22nd — Jennie Tourel 
23rd— ''Rose Marie" 
3()th — Ice Capades. 



St. 



vs. 



Feb. 

Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



Mar. 
Mar. 

vs. 

Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
June 



2nd— Dr. Fish. ^June 
3rd — Baltimore Orchestra. J une 
14th — Christmas Dinner. June 



16th — ^Carol Service. 
19th— nSchool Closed. 
10th — School re-opened. 
12th — ^Marian Anderson. 
18th— Skating Party. 
20th — "Pilgrim's Progress" 
28th— Heifitz. 
30th— Alex. Templeton. 

1st — The Dance. 

3rd — Bible Society. 

9th — Hockey — ^Maple Leaf 

Gardens. 
10th — ^Madame Faltaczek. 
15th— ^Week-end. 
22nd— B. Ball, at Maple 
Leaf Gardens. 
U.T.S. "Henry IV". 

1st — Form II Pleys. 

3rd — Miss Jenkins. 
I.V.C.F. 

7th — Oscar Peterson. 

7th — Opera Singers. 
15th— Week-end. 
22nd — Form I plays. 
27th — Professor Lennox. 

5th — ^Senior Operetta. 
10th — ^School closed. 
23rd — School re-opened. 
30th— Gym Display. 

4th — Alumnae Dinner. 
10th — ^Sr. iSwimming Meet. 
14th — Jr. Swimming Meet. 
24th — Long Week-end. 
25th — Jr. Sports Day. 
28th— Sr. Sports Day. 
31st — Fashion Show. 

7th — Strawberry Festival. 

9th — Graduation Dance. 

9th — Closing Service. 
11th — Prize Givins;. 



FIELD MARSHAL VISCOUNT ALEXANDER OF TUNIS 
Canada's New Governor-General. 



EDITORIAL 



Exactly one year agO' to-day people throughout the world rejoiced 
over the arrival of V-E Day. The news of victory in Europe was rec- 
eived with mixed emotions, because we realized both how difficult, and 
yet how promising, the period of transition from war to peace would 
be. 



In Canada, for this time of hope and reconstruction, we are privileg- 
ed in having as our Governor General, Viscount Alexander, one of the 
leaders whose strength and foresight led us through the dark days of 
war to final victory. With great pride we welcomed him to our country 
with the traditional ceremony in the Senate House, which was attended 
with much of the pre-war pomp and splendor. During his term of office, 
may many more pre-war customs and activities be revived, and may 
many new and beneficial ones replace those which have been outmoded 
by the war! 



In Branksome the year 1945-46 has been marked by the resumption 
of some traditions and by the introduction of innovations. One of partic- 
ular interest is the sending of a Branksome girl on the Canadian Youth 
Group of the Canadian Overseas League to England and Scotland. 



We are renewing our connection with Shei^borne School by having 
a Sherborne girl come from England to Branksome for the first time 
in peace years. We feel it is significant that applications for enrolment 
are coming in greater numbers than ever before from girls in countries 
outside Canada. 



Our hope is that people everywhere are beginning to realize that 
there is One World and that future peace and good relations lie only 
m a spirit of Brotherhood and Sisterhood. A golden opportunity lies 
ahead of us and, at Branksome, our share of the task is made easy be- 
cause we are a Cosmopolitan School. Let us uphold our old and new 
traditions ! 



THE EDITORS. 



5 



Prayer for Peace 



Psalm 85 

Used by the School as their Psalm for the year 

ZORD, thou hast been favourable unto Thy land 
Thou hast brought back the captivity of Jacob. 
' Thou hast forgiven the iniquity of thy people, 
Thou hast covered all their sin. 
Thou hast taken away all their wrath: 

Thou hast turned thyself from the fierceness of thine anger. 

'Turn us, O God of our salvation, 

'And cause thine anger toward us to cease. 

'Wilt thou be angry tvith us for ever? 

'Wilt thou draw out thine anger to all generations? 

'Wilt thou not quicken us again: 

'That thy people may rejoice in thee? 

'Show us thy mercy, 0 Lord, 

'And grant us thy salvation. 

'I will hear what God the Lord voill speak: 

'For he will speak peace unto his people, 

'And to his saints; 

'But let them not turn again to folly'. 

Surely his salvation is nigh them that fear him; 
That glory may dwell in our land. 

Mercy and truth are met together; 
Righteousness and peace have kissed each other. 
Truth shall spring out of the earth; 
And righteousness shall look down from heaven. 

Yea, the Lord shall give that which is good; 
And, our land shall yield her increase. 
Righteousness shall go before him; 
And shall set us in the way of his steps. 



6 



OUR HEAD GIRL 



Appointments 



1 



8 



The Branksome Slogan 



Prefects 

HEAD GIRL 




Position : Head girl ; Honorary President 
of Opheleo. Honorary President of Beta Kappa. 

You Notice : her sincerity, her ability for leader- 
ship ; her frank geniality. 

She likes: telling her school to be quiet after 
the whistle blows ; eating chocolates in the 
movies. 



Frances Chase 



Position : President of the Beta Kappa. 

You Notice : her energy, her school spirit. 

She Likes: gym (especially marching) ; finger- 
ing her beautiful kilt; organizing school dances; 
being lucky; Kay was chosen as one Canadian 
Representative to go to England last month. 



Kay Deacon 




Positions: Editor of the Slogan; Treasurer of 
Beta Kappa. 

You Notice: her ability in class; shy smile; 
those pixie glasses. 

She Likes: playing the piano for Miss Shaw; 
taking fourteen subjects. 



Position: Library Assistant. 
You Notice: her favourite expression; ''that is 
to say". 

She Likes: collecting library fines for Miss 
Shaw, looking wise and profound; being a pillar 
of the school. 




Eileen Stinson 



The Branksome Slogan 



9 




Position : Chieftain of Douglas Clan. 

You Notice : her accent ; her short kilt. 

She Likes : looking out of the window in class ; 
asking Miss Claxton questions; being Douglas 
Chieftain; dramatics. 



Erica Cruickshank 



Position: Member of Opheleo. 

You Notice: her brisk efficiency; her smile. 

She Likes: reading more about microbes; 
quieting fifth form in Prayers; Spanish letters 
from home; wearing her summer uniform. 



Marian Dugdale 




Positions: Member of Opheleo, member of 
Slogan Committee. 

You Notice: her happy laughter; her friendli- 
ness. 

She likes: talking to Erica; Fellowship. 



Gina Baker 



Positions: Treasurer of the Opheleo; Student 
Symphony Council Representative. 



You Notice: her vim and vigour; her music 
books. 

She Likes: standing behind first form lines in 
Prayers; asking Miss Sime to explain the part- 
itive ''de": dashing off to the Conservatory. 




Barbara llarKralt 



10 



The Branksome Slogan 



Prefects 




Position : Chieftain of the MacAlpine Clan. 
You Notice : her soft voice ; her gay smile. 
She Likes: hunting for mem'bers of her Clan; 
playing tennis. 



Mary Barnes 



Positions: Head of dish-washers and war- 
workers brigade; in charge of snap-shots for 
Slogan. 

You Notice: her glossy dark hair. 
She Likes: "Newfie— John"— also the U.S.A.; 
reading; music — the classical kind. 



Joan Crosbic 




Positions: President of the Opheleo; President 
of the Inter-School Christian Fellowship. 

You Notice: her demure manner; her short 
crop. 

She likes: to reach her objective in any Opheleo 
appeal (she always manages it too) ; Trinidad 
(home sweet home.) 



Judy Millar 



Position: Secretary of Beta Kappa. 
You Notice: her correct speech; her band-box 
appearance. 

She likes : ''Newf ie" her Native Land ; to build 
castles in the air; studying algebra! 




Maureen O'Reilly 



THE SUB-PREFECTS 
Front Row: J. Ross, E. Wilson, M. Kyle, S. O'Reilly, A. Cawthra. 

Second Row: J. Wilkinson, C. Dean, J. Hutchesoyi, C. Shields, J. Rumley, E. Gerniav. 
Third Row: B. Chisholm, J. Sinclair, G. Murray, J. Palmer, D. Miller, H. German, P. 
MacGregor. 



THE CLAN CHIEFTAINS 
Back Row: A. James, S. Craig, M. Craig, M. Watson. 
Front Row: J. Aitken, D. Windeyer, C. Catto, B. Chisholm. 



12 



The Branksome Slogan 



APPOINTMENTS 
Head Girl — Frances Chase. 

HOUSE PREFECTS 
Joan Crosbie, Marion Dugdalc, June Miller, Maureen O'Reilly. 

DAY PREFECTS 

Gina Baker, Shirley Baker, Mary Barnes, Kathleen Deacon, Barbara Hargraft, Aileen Stinson. 



SUB-PREFECTS -(House) 

Judith Palmer, Joan Rumley, Eleanor Wilson, 
Joan Ross, Shcilagh O'Reilly, Patricia MacGregor, 
Catherine Shields, Joan Hutcheson, Doreen Miller, 
Gerda Murray, Janet Sinclair. 



SUB-PREFECTS— (Day) 

Joan Aitken, Diana Beck, Catherine Catto, 
Barbara Chisholm, Ann Cawthra, Cynthia Dean, 
Margaret Kyle, Mary Watson, Jean Wilkinson, 
Elizabeth German, Helen German. 



BETTA KAPPA SOCIETY 

President — Kathleen Deacon. 
Vice-President — Barbara Chisholm. 
Secretary — Maureen O'Reilly. 
Treasurer — Shirley Baker. 



Committea: Diana Beck, Hli/.abeth Glerman, Joan 

Hutcheson, Ruth Mitchell, Joan 

Rumley, Joan Southam, Ann 
Harpraft. 



HIGH NEWS REPRESENTATIVES 
Anne Burton, Erica Cruikshank, Peggy Deachman. 



OPHELEO SOCIETY 

OFFICERS: June Miller, Gina Baker. Marion 
Dugdale, Barbara Hargraft. 

COMMITTEE: Gerda Murray, Joan Neilson, 
Sheilagh O'Reilly, Eileen Scott. 
• Mary Watson, Lorna Tolmie, Ann 

Cawthra, Helen German. 



I.V.C.F. 

President — Gerda Murray. 
Vice-President — Gretchen Gaebelein. 
Secretary — Jean Reid. 



CLAN CHIEFTAINS 

Scott — Mary Watson. 
Campbell — Catherine Catto. 
Ross — Joan Aitken. 
MacAlpine — Mary Barnes. 
MacGregor — Mary Craig. 
McLeod — Anne James. 
Douglas — Erica Cruikshank. 
McLean — Diana Windeyer. 



SUB-CHIEFTAINS 

Anne Thobum, 
Janice McColl, 
Ann Blake, 
Barbara Chisholm, 
Sally Spence, 
Jean Winston, 
Sheila Craig, 
Catherine Shields. 



LIBRARY ASSISTANT— Aileen Stinson. 

LIBRARY REPRESENTATIVES:— Joan Neilson, Jane Bankier, Ruth Jennings, Eleanor Wilson, 
Judith Godfrey, Jane Keslick, Nancy Edmonson, Louise Walwyn, Susan Leach, Virginia Leishman» 
Sandra McLean, Nancy McFarren, Pauline Cole, Irene Farrell. 



President 

Form VA — Joan Hutcheson 

Form VB — Judith Palmer 

Form VSp. (Com.) — Virg^inia Wood 

Form VSp. (H.E. )— Carolyn Massey 

Form IVA — Anne James 

Form IVB — Antoinette Echlin 

Form IVSp. — Janet Saylor 

Form IIIA— Evelyn Howden 

Form IIIB — Barbara Keeler 

Form IIA— Sally McGouirk 

Form IIB — Alicia Eager 

Form IIC- Margaret Currie 

Form lA — Naomi de Lang-ley 

Form IB — Joanne Moore 



FORM OFFICERS 

Vice-President 

Jean Winston 
Elizabeth German 
Louise Park 
Eleanor Wilson 
Catherine Shields 
Anne Thoburn 
Shirley Dodds 
Muriel Joy Stewart 
Patricia Currie 
Cathleen Cherry 
Charmion Boothe 
Jocelyn Wright 
Esther Tumbull 
Sally Langford 



Sec-Treasurer 

Joan Ferrabee 
Jane Mack 
Barbara Flemming 
Constance Cunningham 
Carol Henderson 
Josephine Willliams 
Peg'gy Little 
Sally Dalton 
Rosemary Hutcheson 
Alison Zimmerman 
Mary Lou Porter 
Frances Fair 
Joyce Dibble 
Frances Snetsinger 



Legamu 




14 



The Branksome Slogan 



Tradition in My Country 

.Peru, far to the south, is a land steeped in the folklore of its native 
people, the scions of the Inca Empire. Down through the ages of dom- 
ination by the Cuzco monarohs, the Indian vassals were fed on tra- 
dition. Their ruler was of supernatural origin, since the founders of the 
dynasty came out of Lake Titicaca in response to an order from their 
father Inti, the sun. Thus the sun was their chief diety and was wor- 
shipped daily by millions of followers throughout the empire and was 
brought into every phase of national life. This state of affairs lasted 
for many centuries and became second nature to all of these American 
natives. 

Then came the conquest, when Pizarro and his Spanish soldiers took 
advantage of the civil war between Huayna Capac's two sons to sub- 
jugate the empire. Thus Spain came to claim all the western half of 
Soutih America and the Pope duly gave them territorial rights with 
the condition that the natives be taught the Catholic Religion. Now 
the Indian brought up for centuries in the belief in the Inca's divinity, 
was forced to change his creed. This proved to be extremely difficult. 

The new Christian saints, for them, became different forms of their 
ancestral gods. Gradually the distinction between pagan and Christian 
became less acute as the two intermingled to form a new type of Cathol- 
icism. The country on the surface was Christianized, but the old tradi- 
tions still remained deeply (buried in every Peruvian heart. By this time, 
they no longer constituted a religion, but rather a group or collection 
of myths, which was looked upon as a great national heritage. 

The freedom typified in these ancient stories began to stir up the 
thoughts of educated people throughout the country and finally incited 
them to revolt and eventually to achieve independence. They now had a 
nation in the true sense of the word and in its organization tradition 
again stepped in. Take as an example the Peruvian flag. It is said 
that one night the ''Liberator," San Martin, saw in a dream, a large 
flock of red and white sea-birds flying over his camp. As he watched 
they formed themselves into three bands ; two red bands, one on either 
side of a white band, and in this formation flew out to sea. On awaken- 
ing, the Liberator felt that this was an indication of what his new 
country's flag should be. He issued a decree to this effect. 

The same influence is noted in the National Anthem. The forti- 
tude and strength of the Indian forbears are extolled although nothing 
is known directly about these qualities. The inspiration came from 
the old traditions. 



The Branksome Slogan 



15 



The importance, either conscious or subconscious, given to the 
legends finds expression even in the present day. The Indian farmer 
still keeps his Inca holidays although the object of veneration is no 
longer the sun. The Peruvian child begins the history of his country 
at an early age by learning about his traditional forbears. Even when 
he reaches the higher studies of Peruvian literature, he is brought back 
to the Inca classics. In his studies of more recent works, his chief book 
will be ''Peruvian Traditions," by Ricardo Palma, a collection of stories 
which have come down through the ages. 

Surely Peru is really built on tradition. It forms a chain which binds 
all Peruvians together with a feeling of pride and unity. 

MARION DUGDALE, 
Form V. 



The Douvenir 

The night was clear and cool, the sea slightly choppy due to a ris- 
ing wind. As the stars appeared, they twinkled approvingly while look- 
ing down upon the barren waters, but, had they been able to see below 
the waves, a different sight would have met their eyes. Fathoms down, 
in the midst of strange fishes and other marine life, a huge, dark o^bject 
lay, slim in outline and too motionless to ibe alive. It was a submarine. 

Inside it was hot and oppressive, for the craft had not surfaced for 
some hours and the crew was restless. They were clean-cut, average 
looking young men, alert, and trained to the peak. The mate came on 
with a message from the lieutenant, their senior officer. 

"Get a good rest, men; our target won't be along until dawn, 
and the lieutenant doesn't want a tired crew. In about half an hour 
coffee will be ready. Try to relax." 

There was a small buzz of conversation following the announcement 
and the sailors went to their bunks. A game of cards started, but the 
players were unenthusiastic and soon they, too, went to the bunks. A 
few desultory remarks were made and, after drinking the promised 
coffee, all were still. A few slept. 

Alone in his quarters the lieutenant was nervous and unsettled. 
Before his men he had kept up a bold front, yet he was anything 
but their calm and collected commander. It was his first duty in charge 
of a "sub". He paced the floor, his mind racing over the possibilities 
that dawn might bring. The target was an unconvoyed enemy ship, pre- 
sumably a heavy cr'uiser. Head-quarters had briefed him concerning 



16 



The Branksome Slogan 



his station — the ship was expected to pass very near the submarine's 
position, sometime around 5.00 A.M. Success would mean the rank of 
a commander, and, mayibe a captaincy, for this was no ordinary mission. 
He lay down, his mind pondering over success, then failure, until he 
fell into a fitful sleep. 

Some hours later, he awoke hearing a knock upon the door; it was 
the mate with the information that the time was 4.30 A.M. 

''Thanks, Kramer. I'd better look through the periscope, even if 
it is a bit early. Start to surface; I'll be right with you." 

''Yes, sir." 

"Oh, Kramer, how is the weather?" 

"Stander says its choppy, sir, and a slight wind is blowing." 
"Very good; the periscope won't show so much. I only hope we'll 
get a good view of them. That's all." 
"Yes, sir." 

The lieutenant splashed some water on his face, straightened his 
uniform, and went outside. He instructed the mate to call the crew, 
who awoke readily glad that the time for action was near. 

Out of the water rose the periscope; the lieutenant eagerly looked 
through it. The horizon was clear in the early morning light, but, 
as the small waves rose and fell, something was discernable in the west. 
He felt cold and numb. Was this it? Was this the heavy cruiser? Was 
this the target that meant so much to him? The crew sensed something 
of what he was feeling and (became silent. The periscope was turned 
twice, taking in the whole horizon for a second time. Then the lieuten- 
ant ordered the mate to fix a certain position and look for himself. After 
dbserving the object, he turned around. 

"It appears to be a heavy cruiser, sir, travelling unescorted." 
"Here, I'll look again." He looked. "Yes, Kramer, you're right." 
He turned to his crew. "Men, this is our target. I don't want any mis- 
takes made, for if we complete this mission successfully there'll be bon- 
uses for all. It's a big job ; I've got to have all of you behind me. Now, 
get to your places." 

The air was electrified; the quiet commands were given. The tor- 
pedo crews could be heard while the mechanical work of sighting, aim- 
ing, checking depth, and position went on. At five minutes of five o'clock 
the cruiser was in range and the submarine ready. The lieutenant had a 
low voiced conversation with the mate. 

"If they've heard our engines, they've not had time to chart our 
position. If they haven't, then they're totally unawares. Either way, 
they're unprepared. This is a great mistake of their commanders; a 
ship of that size cannot safely travel unescorted in these waters. 
All right, find out if the crew is ready and proceed." 



The Branksome Slogan 



17 



The orders, and their repetitions, by the non-commissioned officers, 
could be heard echoing. The lieutenant was tense; the torpedo men 
sweating. 

''Check your aim!" ''Check your aim!" 

"Ready!" "Ready!" 
"Torpedo 1,2,3!" "Torpedo 1, 2, eS!" 
"Fire!" "Fire!" 

Through the periscope, the lieutenant watched the proud, arrogant 
cruiser making her stately way through the waves, when, suddenly, an 
explosion rocked both "sub" and ship — then another, and another Three 
towering flames shot into the sky; superstructure crumpled, wreckage 
was hurled into the air, and the mighty ship sank. 




Ojf for a Canter 



With less excitement, the command to surface was given and the 
thin craft rose through the waves. Boats were launched to pick up any 
survivors, although the undersea craft had completed its task so thor- 
oughly that the procedure was hardly necessary. 

"Be quick aibout the business, for you never know what might 
come along," said the lieutenant. He turned to Kramer. "War is hell ; 
what if that were us? Enough, it is kill or 'be killed. Look! There's 
the ship's flag. However did it escape being blown to shreds? Get it; 
a souvenir like that isn't found every day." 

Kramer pulled the flag over the side, the flag of the torpedoed 
enemy ship— the Stars and Stripes. 

GRETCHEN GAEBELEIN, 
Form V. 



18 



The Branksome Slogan 



THE RO 

I was dusting, cleaning, sweeping. 
Working hard from morn till even- 
ing, 

On the front door came a rapping. 
Pausing for a moment only, 
I left my brooms and left my 
dusters. 

Walking to the door, and peering 
outward, 

I spied a brazen, shiny figure, 

Standing, gleaming in the sunlight. 

Feeling faint, I grabbed the door- 
knob. 

And stood amazed at this object. 
Gathering up my courage slowly 
Read its dangling, hanging, label, 
''Hope this saves you time and 

trouble." 
On and on I read the message 
Claiming it a useful Robot, 
A servant Robot from my mother 
For to scrub and scour the wood- 
■ work. 

Make the beds and do the cooking. 
Beat the rugs and wash the win- 
dows. 

Clean the cupboards, do the dust- 
ing. 

Oh, dear Mother, how I thank you 
For this badly needed helper! 

In I brO'Ug'ht it from the dooirstep. 
Wound the handle, set the gadgets 
So to make my bed and tidy 
All my room and all my clothing. 
I lay down upon my divan 
Waiting, watching o'er my Robot.. 
Working hard throughout my bed- 
room. 

Resting, dozing, sleeping, dream- 
ing. 



3T MAID 

A thundering, crashing, rumbling, 
rolling. 

Ripping, crushing, bolting, shak- 
ing. 

Woke me from my deepest slum- 
ber. 

I started, stared, and jumping up- 
ward, 

I dashed towards the vicious mon- 
ster, 

Tried to stop it from its break- 
ing 

And destruction of my vases, 
Of my pictures; of my tables. 
Of my clothes and of my wood- 
work. 

Picking up my silver hairbrush, 
I smote the Robot on the forehead. 

Down it fell — the engine stopped; 
Out the door I cast the Robot, 
For the salvage, for the junkman. 

Oh, dear Mother, if you only 
Knew how helpful was the Robot 
(To the salvage, to the junk- 
man!) 

I can tell you, I will never 
Want to use another Robot. 
Never! Never! Never! Never! 

BEVERLEY RUSH, 
Form IV. 



M. Watson: "Hullo, is this the 
City Bridge Depart- 
ment? 

Answer: ''Yes." 

M. Watson : "How many points do 
you get for a little 
slam?" 



The Branksome Slogan 



19 



CUTHBERT CATERMOLE 

With steady tread, he roams at 
will 

From room to room and takes his 
fill 

Of sweet repose on downy spreads, 
And sheds his fur on feather beds. 
His piebald fur, grey, white and 
brown, 

Is wiry fur, not silky down. 
And he, a common alley-cat, 
When not in quest of mouse or 
rat. 

Fools not, but plays a haughty role 
Befitting Cuthbert Catermole. 




Broad in the beam, his shoulders 
wide 

With bowlegged spread, his feline 
stride 

Resembles more a bull dog gait 
Than any cat less blessed by fate. 
Imperious and proud, no fool — 
Without degrees he owns the 
school. 

Oh, why must we both fret and 
strain 

With French and Spanish, wrack 
our brain. 



When cats can win in such a role. 
As that of Cuthbert Catermole? 

MARY CRAIG, 
Form IV. 

AUTUMN 

The trees are aflame with barbar- 
ous hue, 

Brilliant sunlight drinks up the 
dew. 

I pick up the leaves as I go past 
And rejoice that Autumn is here 
at last. 

Wind-swept skies are high and 
new; 

White canvas sails on a sea of 
blue ; 

Arrows of geese in honking flight, 
Bugle the coming of Winter's 
might. 

I stand on a hill in a thoughtful 
trance. 

Thankful of having this wonderful 
chance 

To drink in the glories of Autumn's 
morn. 

And watch new beauties of Nature 
born ! 

ELIZABETH McCARTHY, 
Form V. 

A WISH 

If only I a nymph could be 
Then I would go beneath the sea, 
I'd walk among the tangled weeds ; 
From pearls I'd make a string of 
beads. 

From shells a tiny crown. 

And from the foam, a bed of down. 

ANNE GODSALL, 
Form III. 



20 



The Branksome Slogan 



Black Magic 

A bitter wind swept over forest and field. Here and there a stray 
leaf, torn from an already bare tree, was borne along in the wake of 
the gale. Tufts of yellow grass bent in patient submission against the 
earth. Sombre banks of clouds ranged themselves on all sides, forming 
an impenetrable grey blanket, covering the sky. Outlines of far away 
hills stood out in blank silhouette, a tracery of wildly waving limbs and 
branches on their summits. The countryside lay bleak and ravaged. 

The wind moaned through the tossing elm trees and swung the 
weathervane wildly. The gust flung bits of straw in mad arcs and 
capers across the barnyard. It swung open the partly closed barn door. 
Dust, dead leaves, pieces of hay, and old newspapers whirled inside. 

The horse, spent and disease-ridden, stood weakly in a corner of 
the stall, head down, legs braced, as if in attempt to thwart the inevitable 
end. His coat, a lusterless dull black was stretched thinly over the shriv- 
eled frame; mane and tail hung lifelessly. The barn door burst open, 
rattling and banging. The horse started, faltered, and slowly slipped 
to the ground. Then all was still but for the wind moaning softly out- 
side. 



Anyone is sad at the death of a friend — sadder still if that friend is 
an animal, dependent on one for life and comfort and happiness. The 
man stood, staring down at the horse, unbelieving. He had known that 
death must come — gangrene of the lungs, the veterinary had said, 
shaking his head ominously. He had known that one day, near or far 
away, he would find the animal lying there, dead. He had known what 
the reward of long months of fruitless toil against infection would be. 
And yet he could not believe it. The sightless, sunken eyes, the stiffen- 
ing limbs ; the tangled swirl of the tail ; the huge helpless blackness of 
the body lying in a tumbled heap on the golden straw — all seemed like a 
fantasy, frightening, but unreal. 

Memories floated before him ... the little colt in the meadow, 
bucking, and shying at clumps of yellow, waving buttercups . . . sunlight 
gleaming on the pitchy-dark coat .... his pricked ears, flaring nostrils, 
and proud spirited carriage ... the joyous gallops after hounds .... 



The Branksome Slogan 



21 



the arrival home, windblown and tired ... the soft, friendly, nicker of 
comradeship . . . and then the Jong sickness, the infection . . . and now 
— death. 

In the dim light he could read the name plate over the horse's stall. 
''Black Magic," it said. ''Black Magic," repeated the man slowly, ilt 
would take more than that now . . . "Black Magic" .... He looked at 
the dead horse, sprawled weirdly on the ground, legs askew, neck twist- 
ed. "Nothing can save you now^ . . . ." a meaningless laugh. "Good only 
for the glue factory." A grim joke it was ! this horse, his friend, immor- 
talized by a bottle of glue ! The man laughed again, a little woodenly. 
The raw, chilling wind moaned and sighed outside. It began to rain. 



The clouds, as if drawn by some invisible hand, closed over the earth. 
Rain tore and lashed the land. At intervals lightning pierced the gloom ; 
thunder broke the ghostly stillness. 

The man, driving fiercely, was indifferent to the raging of the 
elements which washed the country on all sides. Behind him, in the 
truck, the great bulk of the black horse slipped and lurched as they sped 
onwards over almost impossible roads. The rain splashed against 
the windshield, and ran down in sheets of rippling water. 

The gale howled past the windows "Nothing can save you now!" 

wind and water beat out and screamed "Nothing can save you 

now!" they shouted in ridicule. A shaft of lightening rent the sky, 
mocking him. The man bowed his head, insensible to all but the fateful 
words, pounding, surging, bursting through his head, written, seared, 
as with a red-hot iron, before his eyes .... 

The truck hit the telephone post at full speed ; but the noise of the 
crash was deadened by thunder. A second streak tore through the 
heavens, lighting up the wreckage. In the van, the black hulk of the 
horse had slid up against the backboard in a grotesque heap and re- 
mained there, quivering. 

In the cab, a figure lay crumpled over the steering-wheel. The 
broken windshield, cracked, and spattered with blood, told its tale. 
Through it the man stared with unseeing eyes. He was quite dead. 



ANNE BURTON, 
Form IV. 



22 



The Branksome Slogan 



Woman with a Candle 

'This painting, ladies and gentlemen, is the original work of de 
Prsto, donated by Lord Bendal in 1860. It is entitled Landscape of 
California and is considered one of his finest works." The straggling 
group of onlookers round the art-gallery quide were bored. A few walk- 
ed away. One or two polite ones remarked, ''How delightful!" or "Is 
that so?" The guide moved on to the next picture. 

"And this, ladies and gentlemen, is a most remarkably beautiful 
piece of work. The artist is unknown. Note how lifelike, how finely 
done it is. Note how the eyes follow one round the room when one 
moves." The group obediently "moved" and, true enough, it was amaz- 
ingly human. Entitled simply Woman with a Candle, it was the portrait 
of a beautiful, dark-haired woman with a heavy wrap drawn round her 
shoulders. A lighted candle was in her hand, the fitful light of which 
threw into bold relief her fine features and the folds of her gown. Her 
narrow white fingers tapered into long nails and her position was grace- 
ful and poised, but what struck one immediately, and lingered after in 
one's memory, were her weird, staring eyes. Their colour was not clear, 
ibut there was a little ring of white around them lending an expression 
of terror, and giving a touch of mystery to the whole picture. The sight- 
seers were very impressed and paused to wonder before moving on. One 
man remained, gazing at the portrait as if puzzled, amazed. He was a 
thin, foreign-looking man, with his hat drawn down. A jagged, white 
scar ran down one cheek. For a moment he stood rapt, motionless in 
front of the picture. "Strange, . . . strange," he muttered, shaking his 
head, and quickened his pace to join the guide, who was now pointing 
out the merits of a still-life painting. 

That night the watchman at the art gallery was confronted by the 
stranger. 

"I left my umibrella here this morning," he said. "Would you let me 
in so that I can get it?" 

"Why can't you come in the morning?" grumtoled the sleepy watch- 
man, but nevertheless, he took out his great bunch of keys and opened 
the door. He paused, with the flashlight pointed on the man's face. "Tell 
me as soon as you come out, see? I'll be right here. No funny stuff, 
mind you !" 

Petri, for that was the foreigner's name, entered, and with no diffi- 
culty found his umibrella. He was turning to go when he remembered 
the picture — the picture of the dark woman. As if by a magnet, his 
footsteps were drawn down the dark echoing hall, up the three steps. 
He switched on the light and approached the portrait. Woman tvith a 



The Branksome Slogan 



23 



Candle — author unknown — so said the little l^bel ibeneath. It was just 
as he remembered. It filled him with amazement, as it had that morn- 
ing. But this time he did not wonder ; he was sure. That heavy, silky 
hair, the long tapering fingers, but most of all, those weird, crazy eyes — 
it was she — it was Marie d'Artise — it was the woman he had murdered ! 

It had been very long ago, and now the wound was healed. He had 
loved her, but she had found out his secret — and that could not be. Gaz- 
ing at the picture, he thought of that eventful night when he had ap- 
proached her. "Marie, you know what I have to say. You are the only 
one who had found out. You must die. It will be very rapid." Her eyes 
had been dark and wild then, and she cried out as his fingers closed 
round her slim, white throat. ''Oh, Petri, you will be so sorry!" Then 
those eyes were closed — forever. Forever? But here they were, lifelike 
and terrified, staring down at him. Bah! He should not try to remember 
that night. 

He snapped out the light and turned to go, finding his way by the 
street-light, which shone through the window. Then something happen- 




24 



The Branksome Slogan 



ed that stopped him dead in his tracks. The picture turned its eyes and 
watched him. His heart pounded in his ears. Nausea filled him. It was 
' no trick of the eye. The portrait had moved. Fascinated, he watched it. 
The candle in the hand was glowing with a real light flickering now as 
a gust of wind came in through the window. Then the woman turned 
her head, pursed her lips and blew out the flame. The darkness closed 
round him in a sudden wave, but he could see the woman put her 
hand against the frame and move towards him out of the canvas. He 
was rooted to the spot. He could not scream, could not run. The appar- 
ition dropped the candle stick, but it made no noise. She was close to 
him. She raised her hands, and suddenly swooped at him, her ghastly 
eyes staring. He staggered back with her cold hand tightening 
on his throat, her long nails cutting deep into Jiis flesh. He 
clutched at her gown but there was nothing there. As he let out a 
strangled cry she seemed to smile. '*It will be very rapid," she whis- 
pered. He could not get his breath. Darkness was welling up round him 
and the room was reeling dizzily. The two staring eyes were the last 
things he saw as he sunk into crushing, agonizing nothingness. 

They found Petri in the morning, lying strangled and 'bloody on the 
floor of the art gallery. There was no clue, no foot-prints save his own. 
It was not until a week later, when the guide was once more taking a 
group of sight-seers around the gallery, that an observant individual re- 
marked upon something curious about The Woman with the Candle, 
artist unknown. Her candle had gone out, and her long pointed nails 
were bloody. 

ROSALIND WILLIAMS, 
Form III. 



Meet the Atomics 

Presented by the Branksome Broad^n.sting System 

ANNOUNCER: The makers of ''Smoke ;:3Kreen" cigarettes present 
'The Atomic Family," the story of an average Can- 
adian family, facing the trials of the times with 
patience and courage. We shall hear more of the 
"Atomics" in a minute, but first, here is Zeke . . . 

ZEKE : Does smoking irritate your throat? Does it make 

you cough? Does it make your eyes water? It 
doesn't? Well, you haven't tried "Smoke Skreens!" 



The Branksome Slogan 



25 



"Smoke Skreens" are guaranteed to have the black- 
est and thickest smoke of all cigarettes. And if you 
like to make smoke rings, ''Smoke Skreens" are for 
you, because the smoke from these ivonderful cigar- 
ettes is soooo thick that it is practically solid, and 
therefore the rings stay round and firm. Another 
desirable feature of "Smoke Skreens" is that if you 
wish to get rid of a visitor, you have only to take a 
puff of a "Smoke Screen," and we guarantee that 
the visitor will leave immediately! Try a package 
of these marvellous cigarettes today, and I am sure 
that you will never be satisfied with any other 
brand. 

ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Zeke. And now — ^back to our story. 

Yesterday, you remember, we left Cosmic Atomic 
in the hospital under the care of his uncle. Doctor 
X-ray Atomic, who was plotting to kill his nep- 
hew because his father's brother-in-law's wife's first 
husband had left a fortune to Cosmic, and nothing 
to his own son, Alpha. As our scene opens, we 




Successful? 



26 



The Branksome Slogan 



X-RAY 



UR. ATOMIC: 

X-RAY : 
X-RAY : 
UR. ATOMIC: 
X-RAY : 
ANNOUNCER 
UR. ATOMIC: 



VIOLET : 



BETA: 

VIOLET : 
BETA : 
VIOLET : 



GAMMA : 

DELTA: 
ANNOUNCER 



find X-ray preparing the instruments, with which 
he is about to operate on Cosmic. 
Let me see — ^which one of these is sharper. I won- 
der if I should kill him immediately, or make it a 
slow death. 

(A knock is heard at the door) 
Come in. Oh, hello. Uranium. 

Hello X-ray, — how's my son? The nurse said his 
temperature had gone down to 100.2. 
You must have made a mistake. It is 100.1. 

(Raising his voice) No. It's 100.2! 

(Also raising his voice) 100.1! 

(Yelling) / said it tvas 100.2 and Vm right. 

(Flying into a rage) You're crazy! It's 100.1! 
We now leave X-ray and Uranium Atomic, and 
turn to a scene in a small house on Cannibal 
Street — a nice quiet little street — the home of 
Uranium Atomic. In the little kitchen, his wife, 
Mrs. Violet Atomic, is having some trouble with 
her oven. Her daughter. Beta, is standing watch- 
ing with bated breath. 

(In a sudden burst of rage) Why didn't Uranium 
have this oven fixed when I told him to! I knew 
this would happen. Wait until he gets home! I'll 
divorce him! 

But mother, you can't divorce him again. You've 

already done it six times! 

(In a snappy voice) Seven times. 

NO mother, that was your other husband. 

(Screamingly) Seven times! 

(A loud crash is heard as Gamma Atomic rushes 
in, followed by Delta Atomic) 

We broke Mr. Volcano's window, and he's chasing 
us! 

With a shot gun! 

Is Cosmic Atomic's temperature 100.1 or 100.2? Will 
Violet divorce Uranium? Has she divorced him six or 
seven times? Will the oven work? Will Mr. Vol- 
cano shoot Gamma and Delta? If there is anjrthing 
left of your radio when this programme is over, 
tune in again tomorrow, some time, some station, to 
find out the answers to these vital questions. We 
will then present another episode in the life of 
those nice, quiet people, the Atomics. 



The Branksome Slogan 



27 



ZEKE: This is Zeke Chimpanzee signing off for ''Smoke 

Skreens," those wonderful cigarettes with that 
delightful aroma that simply knocks you out! 'The 
Atomics," was written especially for radio by 
Theodore Bombshell. We'll see you tomorrow. Until 
then — Goodbye. 

JUDY SHOEBOTTOM, 
Form III. 



Nocturne 

Too tired even to eat Peg and I crawled into our sleeping (bags just 
at dusk. Thirty miles ! We decided belatedly that it had ibeen far too 
great an undertaking for the first day of our canoe trip. 

We had made camp on a small island in Lake Singing Waters. A 
graceful fringe of silver lace which the evergreens made on the western 
shore contrasted with the majestic forms of the Hillory mountains, 
silent witnesses to centuries of beauty, on the east. 




At the School Farm 



28 



The Branksome Slogan 



The water lapped against the rocky shore of the island and, together 
with, the scent of pines and blueberries, it lulled our senses into a 
trance 

The goddess of night stepped shimmering along the ridge of evening. 
On the highest mountain peak she stopped — the most exquisite being 
I had yet seen or visioned. Her hair was like a calm sea at midnight and 
her hands like delicate carvings of purest wax. The gown which shroud- 
ed her graceful form in vapoury whiteness might have been fashioned 
from baby clouds at dusk, so soft and light it seemed. 

From a silver pitcher she poured the moonlight which filled an ebon 
world with golden radiance. Taking a sparkling needle in her hands she 
pricked a million pin-holes in the sky. Points of light danced on the 
velvet blackness of the lake beneath. 

As her lovely form faded into obscurity she threw a silver kiss to 
the world and the symphony of the night began. It surged from clammy 
coves in the depths of the waters and soared to the silver summits of 
the mountains. Even its crescendos blended with the quiet of the night, 
for when they ceased momentarily the silence became so profound that 
the air seemed to have lost its power of conveying sounds. 

Presently a lighter theme crept into the music and a small light be- 
gan to bob up and down above the eastern horizon. As it neared the 
earth I could perceive that it illuminated the wizened face of a very old 
man. His small, wiry frame was bent almost double by the weight of 
paint pots and brushes suspended from a yoke across his shoulders, 
but there were centuries of happiness etched upon his countenance. He 
was setting out for the morning ritual of his eternal task of keeping 
the flowers' colours clear and bright. 

Just as he reached the eastern horizon, the painter tripped on a 
silver ribbon stretched between two mountains. His lovely colours flow- 
ed across the sky in a mad profusion of colour. With one loud chord the 
music fell silent. The whole world seemed standing on tip-toe, breath- 
less and dumb. 

''Lazy bones sleeping in the sun, 

How do you think we'll ever get the days work done?" 
Peg's hoarse chant, very much off-key, transported me to reality. Wrig- 
gling half way out of my sleeping bag, I hurled a convenient pine cone 
in her general direction. 

As we sat on a rocky point eating our breakfast, the sparkling 
''Singing Waters" and the purple Hillory mountains beckoned enticingly 
to us. 

CAROL HENDERSON, 

Form IV. 



The Branksome Slogan 



29 



Feast on Two Burners 

As the sun completed its downward curve and buried its face for 
another day in choppy blue and white St. Lawrence river, the sailing 
craft ''Lotus" anchored for the night. The surrounding country was 
serene and peaceful, but aboard the ''Lotus" confusion reigned. On 
board the clatter of pots and pans was mingled with a profusion of nau- 
tical oaths. This was the moment for which ration books had been 
mutilated, grocers had been coaxed and ibutchers flattered. For now a 
meal, nay, not a meal, a feast was to be created. 

The captain of the three man crew leaned against his tiller, his 
hat cocked at a jaunty but somewhat weary angle, and roared out in- 
structions and criticisms. The greater part of these were ignored by 
the crew, which strove and laboured mightily in the galley. Cartons 
were unpacked, bags unearthed and cans discovered in various unlikely 
places. At last the pre-culinary arrangements had been made. All that 
remained was to light the stove, cook and devour the meal. Then the two 
galley slaves would lounge in luxurious comfort while the captain did 
the dishes. 

To the unknowing landlubber preparing a meal may seem compara- 
tively simple, but alas, the sea-going or nautical stove does not consist 
of a system of ingenious buttons that turn on harmless electric coils. 
On the galley stove, it is found necessary to provide a certain degree of 
pressure. The above pressure must be provided by a series of small 
hand pumps. If the pressure is too high, the galley 'becomes thoroughly 
seared and the cook becomes as well done as the steaks. If the pressure 
is too low the results are far less dramatic — in fact, nothing happens. 
Thus it might be ascertained by the discerning reader that a great deal 
of precision and experience is necessary in the art of nautical cookery. 
Unfortunately these requirements were not among the many attain- 
ments of the crew of the "Lotus." 

The stove fizzled — the stove exploded! The once neat and compact 
galley became blackened and charred. Potatoes floated about in the 
bilge, pots were blasted over the side into the depths, and various cans 
of vegeta)bles were mixed with the guilty coal oil. The first cook, 
recoiling from the shock of the explosion, reached behind her for sup- 
port. Unfortunately raw steak on a slippery board does not afford the 
best of support! Cook number two beat a timely but unpremeditated 
retreat to the wash room. 

The reader might at this point think the crew of the "Lotus" would 
become discouraged. This was the case. Vows in blood were taken on 



30 



The Branksome Slogan 



the spot ; never again under any circumstances would they attempt to 
cook another meal aJboard. 

At this particular moment the captain of the crew entered, fresh 
from an invigorating swim and enquired as to the source of the delay. 
Mutiny is a strong word but compared to what ensued, it lacks vigour 
and force. The captain's personality, the desirability of the boat, and 
the slave labour problem were gone into to great and most uncompli- 
mentary lengths. 

The captain was a man of discretion. Did he drive his mutinous 
crew below, did he threaten them in the time honoured manner? He 
did not. With diplomacy born of long acquaintance our commanding 
officer suggested a meal ashore. 

In a time too short to mention, Mother, Dad and yours truly were 
entering the hotel to do irreparable damage to the best on the menu. 

JEANNE GARROW, 
Form III 

A Good Day's Hunt 

The stable smells fresh — the air's snappy to-day; 
The horses are stomping and sniffing their hay. 
In a moment the master walks in. At last 
He jumps on his hunter, ''White Gallant," so fast. 

The horses are prancing and sniffing the air ; 

One shies at old ''Bellman" and young "Lady Fair". 

The huntsman cries "Come on ! Away let us go ! 

For there's a fox to be hunted, come rain, or come snow!" 

The old hounds start casting, the young hounds run gay — 
''Yoo-ee," cries the huntsman, "over there, he's away!" 
Old "Bellman" gives tongue, and the field follows after — 
Even Josephas Gray on his horse, "Happy Laughter!" 

Over jumps, over creeks, over ditches and hollows, 
Over fence, over hedges, and sand dunes they follow; 
First a check, then away again, over and through — 
The fox dodges and tries all the tricks he can do. 



The Branksome Slogan 



''He can't last much longer," the master says now. 

"We've been going six hours — to the hounds he must bow." 

But still the tired horses steadily pound, 

'Till at last there's a break — ''he's gone right to ground!" 

The hounds are all raging in front of his den ; 
There is grunting and cussing from master and men. 
"Bring the terrier! Do something!" they earnestly plead; 
"We can't leave it like ihis;" the huntsmen concede. 




They send for the farmer, a round jolly man; 

He brings the terrier in a little green van. 

"Rob" snuffles and burrows ; The field gives a shout, 

"Good little fellow! He's dragged the fox out!" 

Mask and brush, to the foremost pair in the field ; 
"Blooding" to newcomers who reluctantly yield; 
To leave at the last, there's a feeling of sorrow ; 
But 'twas an adventure to talk of to-morrow. 



SHIRLEY MANN, 
Form T. 



32 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Ultimate 

The Condemned 

The gray light of early morning seeped through the high, narrow 
slit of a window which lit his prison cell. Its dreary light was almost as 
unbearable as the enveloping darkness of the night he had thought would 
never end. In the space of one sleepless night he had reviewed his entire 
brief existence. Every emotion, each fear, hope and dream had faded 
into the material world of memories, this, now, was reality. His senses 
were dulled, he went limp at the thought of what tie must face that 
morning. Into the few hours of life he had left he must cram thoughts 
of happier days — happy, sad, gay and silly, pitiful fragments of a broken 
life. He must treasure each memory, and force away this overpowering 
consciousness of the Verdict. He would try to forget that in a few 
hours they would take him away to be executed for a murder he had 
not committed. He fought against a bitter hatred towards the un- 
known guilty man in whose place he must die. 

He wondered if his wife would be allowed to say goodbye, if she 
would come. It would be hard to die without a last memory of her. A 
wave of depression settled upon him. 

The Guilty 

There was another sleepless man in the city that night. Even a man 
sunk low in crime has a semblance of a conscience, even a murderer. For 
this was the guilty man, facing a decision. 

He lit another cigarette with shaking fingers. He was no coward, 
that was impossible in his business. His carefully constructed plan had 
miscarried, now another life, that of an innocent man, was at stake. 

It was almost daylight now. The misty gray sky was fused with a 
rosy glow. Here in his apartment he was safe from everything but his 
conscience. If he left the building and found himself on the street, 
could he stop himself from making his way, eventually, to confess his 
crime? 

He must not drive himself into such a state. He must get away be- 
fore his nerves snapped. Perhaps a few months abroad— he must make 
some arrangements immediately. He flung himself onto the bed and 
slept. 

When he awoke it was mid^morning. There was no doubt in his 
mind now as to what he must do. He dressed slowly and fortified him- 



The Branksome Slogan 



33 



self with a strong drink. He placed his hat carefully on his head and 
rememibered to lock the door carefully after him. 

He was out on the street. Ahead of him was the city hall. Now he 
was crossing the street. 

The Woman 

She, too, had watched nervously for the dawn. It was her husband 
who must die that day for a crime she knew him incapable of commit- 
ting. Her mental agony was intensified by the thought of the ordeal she 
must face that morning. 

It was time to leave now, to say goodbye to her husband — forever. 
In a few hours he would be only a memory. She would have to go on 
living alone. 

She flung a coat over her shoulders and hurried outside. A moment 
later, seated in her small convertible she was speeding through the city. 
She drove mechanically, nerveless now, numbly limp. 

There must be no tears at this, their last moments together. She 
remembered other goodbyes, sad but not heartbreaking. Somewhere 
there must be a guilty man! She wished she could hate him, yet all 
emotion in her was dead now. They must let her see her husiband. She 
drove faster. 



She was driving past the city hall. She did not see the man crossing 
the street. His walk was slow, deliberate, his eyes were fastened on 
the bleak symmetrical pile of stone ahead of him. She did not see him — 
until it was too late. She did not know she had killed two men, one 
of them — her husband. 

JEAN ROSCOE, 

Form III. 



Mary had a little swing 

It wasn't hard to find. 

For everywhere that Mary went 

The swing was just behind. 



First Mosquito : **What are you so 
excited about? 

Second Mosquito: "I just passed 
my screen test.'' 



34 



The Branksome Slogan 



SNOW-FIGHT 

See in winter all the children, 
' Having snow-fights in their snow- 
forts, 

With each captain calling round 
him 

All his stoutest, sure-hit cohorts. 

Some are ibusy packing snow-'balls, 
Stocking up with ammunition ; 
Some are adding to their snow- 
walls. 

Making stronger their position. 

Now the battle's tempo rises. 
Snowballs fast and plenty flying; 
Each side gets a few surprises ; 
Feints, and threats, and tricks, all 
trying. 

When the order, ''Charge!" is 
shouted, 

Clamor, yells and wild confusion! 
Finally the foe is routed, 
With cheers to mark the fight's 
conclusion. 

JEAN GILLANDERS, 
Form III. 




LOVERS 

She opened the front door coyly ; 
She almost seemed afraid; 
He stood there looking shyly ; 
A darling couple they made. 

She asked him in; they entered 
Through the living room door; 
And shyer still, he kissed her; 
And silently looked at the floor. 

Then suddenly mother descended 
The winding staircase long. 
Saying, suppose you're dear 

Cousin Albert, 
Though I know I could be wrong." 

So you see they weren't really 
lovers, 

But cousins who'd never met, 
And you thought there was some- 
thing personal ! 
So there, we fooled you, I'll bet! 

PEGGY DEACHMAN, 
Form III. 

GOODBYE! 

He said goodbye and he left. 
It was sad; he was manfully 
brave. 

We had never been parted before; 
He turned at the gate and I waved ; 
Then he left and I saw him no 
more. 

''Goodbye, Johnny." I said in my 
heart, 

"Don't worry, I'll see you soon. 
Your first day at school won't be 
long; 

I'll be there; I will fetch you at 
noon." 

ERICA CRUIKSHANK, 
Form V. 



The Branksome Slogan 



35 



IN PRAISE OF THE COUNTRY Oh ! IVe lived in Delhi, and lived 

in Rome — 

Oh! rve travelled o'er the bonny Every capital has been my home, 
blue sea ; j,^^ 1^^^^^ feasted by Emperors and 



I've visited France, Spain and 



kings- 



• J? i.u 4-u I ve never had time for simpler 
rve seen the remains ot the Farth- 

thmgs. 

enon, 

And the Hanging Gardens of my heart's in the land native 
Babylon. 

But these wonders do not thrill The ever beautiful English 

me country. 

Half as much as the quiet country. For the country is a wonderful 

For the country is a wonderful place, 

V^^ce, Trees and blossoms wave with 

Trees and blossoms wave with grace; 

Fragrant flowers blue, white and 

Fragrant flowers blue, white and ^^^^ 



Smile up at you with a tiny wink 



pink, 

Smile up at you with a tiny wink ; 

Quaint little cottages sit by ^^^^^^ ^'^^^^ cottages sit by 

streams. streams. 

The country is the land of my The country is the land of my 

dreams. dreams. 



36 



The Branksome Slogan 



When my work is done and all is 
oe'r 

' From the outside world I'll shut 

my door, 
ril find a house where the fields 

are green, 
And there I'll live, by the world 

unseen. 

For the thing that means the most 
to me 

Is to end my days in the good 
country. 

For the country is a wonderful 
place. 

Trees and blossoms wave with 
grace ; 

Fragrant flowers blue, white and 
pink, 

Smile up at you with a tiny wink ; 
Quaint little cottages sit by 
streams. 

The country is the land of my 
dreams. 

BETTY SOUTHGATE. 

Form III. 

LORDS AND LADIES OF 
BRANKSOME 

The Lords in ancient Branksome 
Hall, 

In olden days of yore; 

Wore armour to each Castle Ball, 

The Ladies dressed in moire. 

The Ladies of our Branksome 
Hall 

Now swamp the school in hoards; 
The ladies now, they scream and 
call, 

But tell me, where are the Lords? 

JOAN HEISE, 
Form IV. 



SPRINGTIME 

Spring is the time of joy and, 
mirth, 

When nature strives to bless the 
earth 

With beauty, gentleness, and song ; 
With birds that chirp the whole 

day long; 
With flowers blooming radiantly. 
And bursting buds in every tree 
ANNE BLACKWELL, 
Form II. 

ON FIRM FOUNDATIONS 

High upon a rocky crag 

A lonely pine tree stood. 

And bravely waited for the storm. 

Its gnarled branches worn and old 

Trembled, but its heart was bold. 

And fear did not o'ercome it. 

From jocund youth to youthful 
age. 

It watched the changing drama 
pass. 

And with each tempest gathered 
strength 

And faith to meet the next great 

storm 
And stand undaunted. 

And like the tree Gerat Britain 
stood 

For one long year — alone ; 

Her limbs were weak, her heart 
was bold, 

She fought with faith and forti- 
tude 

On firm foundations. 

SHEILA CRAIG, 
Form IV. 



38 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Hostases 

The sun was 'beating down warmly on the narrow cdbbled streets 
of a small village in Southern Brittany. At the first glance the small 
stone houses with their green doors and shutters seemed to be the same 
as before those dread days of June, 1940. On looking closer, however, 
there seemed to be something missing — where was the usual crowd of 
browned fishermen drinking their red wine before the inn? Where 
were the grubby children rolling in the dust of the village street with 
their equally grubby dogs? Where were the women in .their starched 
white caps, knitting and gossiping around the white- washed doorsteps ? 

Where, indeed! You may ask the German — ''sale Boche" as the 
once laughter-loving Bretons call him. Most of the ablebodied men over 
sixteen were working their hearts out in the filthy factories of Ger- 
many. The women were waiting in a long queue in front of the grocery 
store, waiting patiently and often in vain for the meagre rations they 
were given each month. The grubby children, now thin and emaciated, 
were grovelling in the garbage cans and dumps for anything edible to 
swell the family dinner. A few men, all old and disabled, were sitting 
inside the inn, making the most of their skimpy litres of wine. 

Into this scene — calm and peaceful by German standards, crept 
little Jean, who, like all the children, resembled a pitiful skeleton. To 
all the groups along the street he whispered a few words, words which 
caused the men to place their half empty glasses on the table, the 
women to pale. These words, 'Two German soldiers have been found 
dead outside the village," meant that death and tragedy would follow 
swiftly. 

Tramp^ — tramp — tramp — ^the sound of hea\T German boots on the 
cobbles, the clatter of German arms, shouted orders, and in a few min- 
utes the square is full of grey clad soldiers. Women are hustled from the 
queue, men are pulled roughly from the inn door, even children are 
rounded up from the garbage cans. A hard-faced German officer takes 
the centre of the stage and barks out, "Men of Loisanne, a terrible crime 
has been committed against the Fatherland by some swine from this 
village. If you do not at once tell me what you know of this outrage, 
and the names of the dogs who dared to raise their hands against sol- 
diers of the Third Reich, revenge will be very swift." 

A silence, broken only by the shuffling of German boots, falls over 
the square until the German officer bellows, "All right, you murderers ! 
Heimrich, take every third man out to the orchard and shoot him." 



The Branksome Slogan 



39 



The men are lined up against the brick wall at one end of the square 
and a soldier struts down the line pointing, ''You, and you, and you,'" 
Dry-eyed and pale, the women watch, their eyes fixed on the line of their 
menfolk. 'There goes little Jean, just sixteen, there Henri, the once 
merry village baker, old Jeanneret with one leg, Guillaume, the story- 
teller, the white-haired Abbe and several more." There they go, ibetween 
two lines of grim Germans, up the hill to the orchard. 

Among the apple trees they were lined up, little Jean, L'Abbe and 
the rest. The machine gun was set in position, the women in the vil- 
lage below bowed their heads, when suddenly — above the sounds of the 
countryside rose the strains of the Marseillaise. The machine gun chat- 
tered — but the song was taken up by the women below, it rose above 
the gun, to the heavens above — the song of a people unconquered !. 
"Allons mes enfants de la patrie, le jour de gloire est arrive — !" 

ANN PLUMMER, 
Form IV. 




Lunch Hour 



Triumph Over Adversity 

When we think of greatness in respect to the achievements of wo- 
men, we are all too apt to fasten our attention on some person who has 
won public notice by a notable contribution to public welfare, or to the 
arts, or to science. Yet there is another kind of greatness — that which 
triumphs over handicaps or adversity in one form or another. To reach 
a goal that may never seem important to the world at large is still tri- 
umph if it takes greatness of spirit and courage to achieve. 

This is a story of a young woman whose name may not be given be- 
cause she is unaware that this is being written. But every word of it 



40 



The Branksome Slogan 



is true. Twenty odd years ago she was iborn in Western Ontario without 
hands or legs. Her arms ended at the elbow, and her legs above the 
' knees. One would naturally suppose that a person so handicapped would 
grow up a helpless and hopeless cripple. Today, because of her indomit- 
able will power, she leads an almost normal life. She wears artificial 
limbs and hands and walks with only a slight sway, without support 
of any kind. Stairs are no obstacle for her. She can sew and do all those 
small personal tasks so necessary to a young woman. 

Her most remarkable achievement, however, is a comparatively 
recent one. I do not know when she first felt the urge to paint or first 
realized that since she could handle a needle she might be able to work 
with pencil and ibrush. But start painting she did. Most of us would 
assume that she would learn to master the technique of painting with her 
artificial hands. She preferred to discard them and use her elbows. In 
this amazing manner she began to work. About a year ago her relatives 
were so impressed with her work that they arranged to send her to 
Toronto to study in earnest. 

For weeks last fall she worked in the studio of a well known Tor- 
onto artist. She had done some landscape painting, but she was put to 
painting still life and flowers — a far more exacting type of painting 
for a person so handicapped. Here in the studio with other students 
marvelling at her skill she turned out within a comparatively short 
time paintings that were far above amateur level — in fact, in sheer 
craftsmanship they excelled the work of students who had had years 
of training. With charcoal held between her elbows she drew beauti- 
fully intricate studies and with equal skill turned out complete paint- 
ings. With only her elbows she handles and mixes her paints, cleans her 
'brushes, and generally does all the little jobs that painting involves. 

Up to the present her teacher has not permitted either display or 
sale of her work, but in the near future, perhaps, Toronto art lovers 
will have an opportunity of examining and valuing the work of this 
extraordinary woman. 

BEVERILEY HAMM, 
Form II. 



Miss McNiece (to J. Godfrey who 
is ready for a swim) : Judy, 
did you take a shower? 

J. Godfrey: Why, is there one 
missing? 



J. Heize: What is that ^awful 

odour in the library? 
J. Livingstone: The dead silence 

Miss Shaw keeps in 

there. 



The Branksome Slogan 



41 



HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH 

We come to school and learn in 
Lit., 

That the ibooks we read must have 

been writ 
By Shakespeare, Hardy, or men 

like them — 
And so in protest I lift my pen. 

Instead of Shakespeare every year, 
MacBeth the Henries, and King 
Lear — 

How about something modern, 
new, 

By someone who lives in the age 
we do? 

Instead of seeing that everyone 
learns 

Of Tennyson, Browning, Robert 
Burns, 

Let us read some amusing trash — 
Robert Benchley and Ogden Nash. 

For English texts that are slow 
and dry, 

I've taken a census, and nine- 
tenths ask why 

Don't we have even one day a 
week 

Poems not resemibling old Roman 
or Greek. 

And how about once just letting 
us read 

A poem, or tale of a valiant deed 
Without knowing or caring about 

the theme? 
Ah me! It sounds like a beautiful 

dream. 

ANN PLUMMER, 
Form IV. 



WIND 

I spring from the edge of a stormy 
cliff; 

I float with a gull on the swell ; 
I whistle a tune to the song of the 
sea 

Like a ghost in the middle of hell. 

I tear the skies with the ruthless 
hand 

Of a murderer laughing at love ; 
Then I slip through the delicate 

fingers of light 
And kiss the wings of a dove. 

I laugh with the thunder; I weep 

with the rain ; 
I rumple the beard of St. Pete. 
I'm a dream; I'm a song; I'm the 

bad little elf 
That tickles the angels' feet. 

ERICA CRUIKSHANK, 
Form V. 



CHRISTMAS IS OVER 

I'm really awfully worried, 

I don't know what to do. 

For Santa brought me everything, 

I wrote and asked him to. 

Soon I will have my birthday, 
And I don't know any more 
Nice toys or books or other things 
To ask my parents for. 

PAULINE COLE, 
Form I. 



The Branksome Slogan 



45 



The Passins Parade 

From our vantage point at the end of the term of 1945-46, look 
back at all the dozens of events that have kept us hopping throughout 
the year, at all the hard work and groans and midnight oil, and think of 
the fun we have had. Fun? I should say! Clan games, recreational 
dancing, skating, ^basketball, the Masquerade — any number of other 
activities — have brought us (breathless and laughing through exams and 
rainy days alike, and left us at last, wishing for many more such good 
times in another year just as perfect. 

This year has seen two old traditions reinstalled — the Carol Service 
and the Gym Demonstration. Carols, in St. Andrews Church, were 
lovelier than ever before. A brand new touch was given to the pageant 
in the solos by Carol Chelew and Wilma Muirhead. 

The Gym Revue paraded by, to the strains of the bagpipes. Long 
hours of practising resulted in an almost perfect display of precision 
gymnastics, folk dancing, and marching, plus the Sports Parade and 
the Clan Games, additions to the regular features. Probably the mo«t 
popular number was the performance of the Cumt>erland Reel and 
the Rye Waltz by a special group of fourth formers and boys from St. 
Andrews College ! 




The Operetta Cast 



46 



The Branksome Slogan 



Form plays, too, were especially well done. We all thoroughly en- 
joyed following- the sailors adventures in **^nkey Serenade", beating 
time to the slapstick songs in 'The Cotton Pickers" minstrel show, and 
laughing at the antics of ''Elmer." The operetta, ''Jewel of the Desert" 
was aibly performed under the direction of Miss Shaw. Judy Humph- 
ries as Caesar and Carol Massey as Cheeko nearly stole the show. The 
Arab chorus and the various dances lent added colour to the realistic 
acting and splendid singing of the cast. 

The Beta Kappa deserves congratulations for the wonderful 
Christmas dance and the "At Home." Decorations were colourful 
candy canes, roly-poly snowmen, and a real live Christmas tree ; carica- 
tures of prominent "girls about school" adorned the gym walls during 
the big dance, in addition to large stands of enormous make-believe 
flowers and the usual red, green, black, and white streamers. Best of 
all, we "went formal" again at this first peacetime school dance; gay 
colours and full, floating skirts were the order of the night. In spite 
of certain difficulties, such as manoeuvring stairways with ease, we all 
agree that the "At Home" was really tops! 

This year, when Good Posture Week rolled around, the ominous 
sign, "Watch out! 'G.P.W. is coming!" carried no threat. For to us G.P.W. 
is now no sinster villain lurking in a dark corner, but the signal to 
straighten up and step out. And through the week we were reminded to 
keep erect by the song "Are You a Camel?"; by red posture ribbons 
given to all, which, if lost through faulty posture, were pinned to the 
picture of a camel fastened to the bulletin board ; and iby warning signs 
and placards. Pasquale D' Angel o gave a talk on posture. 

Courtesy Week was another movement in the school this year, which 
advocated politeness and good manners. Those found guilty of lack of 
courtesy were tried and convicted every morning. Two extremely inter- 
esting talks on this subject were given by Mrs. Brown and Jan Chamber- 
lain. 

Broadcasts over the "Trans Corridor Network of the Branksome 
Broadcasting System" were presented on "Design for Listening." 
Through the year we were entertained by many varied stories, educa- 
tional programmes, and music. 

Our first and second 'basketball teams had a new experience when 
they went to Whitby to play the Ontario Ladies College in Branksome's 
first out-of-town game. Now that gas is once more unrationed. Clans- 
dale Heights, the school farm, welcomed us for the form picnics, and 
eager skiers spend many Saturdays and weekends there, shooting down 
trails and laboriously "herringibone-ing" up the steepest hills. 



The Branksome Slogan 



47 



The bulletin-boards, decorated each month in turn by the clans, 
have displayed more and more new and colourful ideas. In fact ''they 
get better each time!" 

Though the school year is almost at an end, other milestones appear 
ahead to urge us on — the Fashion Show, the Graduation Dance, the 
Spring Festival, and the Prize Giving. We have sped, working and 
playing through event-crammed days and weeks and months, and we 
know that it is fun to be busy! Fun? I should say! 

ANNE BURTON, 
Form IV. 



BASKETBALL 



This fall, as in previous years, 
the Branksome girls' fancy lightly 
turned to basketball. Not so light- 
ly, as a matter of fact, for there 
was hard work to be done. And 
work they did! It was not easy 



making the grade with so many 
competing, but those who were 
finally picked to represent 
Branksome in the 1945-'46 inter- 
school series were well rewarded. 
Although at the beginning of the 




THE FIRST BASKETBALL TE{AM 
Standing: J. Ross, L. Park J. Ferrabee, A. James. 
Sitting: D. Windeyer, M. Craig, S. Svence. 



48 



The Branksome Slogan 



season the scores were not what 
the teams had hoped they might 
be, the girls came through with 
' flying colours. The four teams 
made a fair showing in the final 
count. 

Two events of special interest 
outside the series were the ''Brank- 
some Old Girls' Game" and the ex- 
pedition of our first and second 
teams to the Ontario Ladies Col- 
lege at Whitby. For the first time 
in many years the school team 
was victorious in the match with 
the ''old girls." It was the most 
exciting game of the year. At 
Whitby the spectators saw two 
evenly matched teams fight it out. 
It was only after a hard battle 
that Branksome's girls took the 
honours for both games. 

As well as the inter-school com- 
petitions there was also inter-clan 
and inter-form basketball for en- 
thusiasts. The Ross Clan was vic- 
torious in the inter-clan and inter- 
form games. 

First Team 
Forwards — A James, 

D. Windeyer, 
M. Craig, 

L. Park, 

E. Scott. 
Guards — J. Ross, 

J. Ferrabee, 

S. Spence, (captain). 

Second Team 
Forwards — A Hargraft, (captain) 

A. Hatch, 

H. DeNike. 
Guards— S. Dalton, 

C. Catto, 

P. Marlow, 

N. Inglis. 



SKIING 

Every Saturday morning as 
soon as the first flake of snow had 
fluttered down on Summit, Grey- 
hound buses, loaded to the racks 
with eighty enthusiastic skiers 
jolted up to Clansdale Heights. All 
thoughts of Latin and French soon 
vanished, for, after we had donned 
our skiis and tumbled down the 
first easy slope, we . discovered 
the horrors of Banana Skin Bend, 
Chien Chaud, Brown's Folly. 

Several hours later, nearly fam- 
ished, we directed our unruly 
pieces of hickory towards the farm 
where we were greeted with hot- 
dogs and steaming cups of cocoa. 
After lunch the day-girls struggled 
bravely up and down hills, through 
trees and bushes, until at last, ex- 
hausted but happy, they fell into 
the bus and headed back to civili- 
zation. 

Sixteen house-girls, however, 
had a different story, for they re- 
mained at the farm for the whole 
week-end. Dinner over, if stiU in 
one piece, we armed ourselves 
once again with the necessary eq- 
uipment and sallied forth — ^but 
this time we pulled toboggans. 
Sunday at 7.00 A.M. the fires were 
replenished and by 7.01 A.M. all 
were astir. We devoured our break- 
fasts and hastily set out to try, 
once more, our luck on the hazard- 
ous slopes. At four we packed our 
bags and bid farewell to Clansdale, 
silently vowing to master Mac's 
Misery the following Saturday — 
or die in the attempt! . . . And so 



The Branksome Slogan 



49 



our ski parties continued for eight 
jubilant weeks! 

P.S. And then of course St. 
Andrew's used the trails too! 



SWIMMING 

Swimming is always a favour- 
ite sport during the first and third 
terms. Would-be Branksome mer- 
maids were picked for the team. 
The meet was held at B.SjS. 

The inter-clan meet was a great 
success. The clothing obstacle race 
and the candle race added to the 
hilarity of the afternoon. Mac- 
Lean was the winner 



SPORTS DAY 

June 6, 1945, was a gala day for 
the more athletic Branksomites. 
That day our Annual Sports 
Day competitions were held. The 
spectators were very enthusiastic 
over the high jumping and broad 
jumping. Races, straight and form 
relays, held their own and pro- 
vided keen competition and fun. 

Our special guests for the after- 
noon were from The Home for 
Incurable Children. 

Practice for iSports Day, 1946, is 
well under way. 




THE SWIMMING TEAM 
Back Row: J. Ross, C. Catto, M. Dugdale, M. Senior, F. Dafoe, G, Li/ons. 
S.tting: D. Windsyer, A. Zimmerman, E. Cruikshank, T. Steivart, S. Spence. 



50 



The Branksome Slogan 



SKATING 

Our main winter sport is skat- 
ing. Twice a week Varsity Arena 
is thronged with Branksomites 
doing ''figure eights" and twirls. 
We had two colourful clan ice- 
meets with the clan standards 
marking the ends of the rink. A 
very special event in the second 
meet were solos, well executed by 
Tony Stewart, Mary Binnie and 
Maureen Senoir. 



the clan bowling series, MacGreg- 
or came first with Douglas second. 
In badminton many excelled. The 
inter-clan tournament was a round 
of exciting matches. Ross Clan 
came first in both the doubles and 
singles. The inter-school meet was 
a big event of the year with Haver- 
gal, B.S.S., St. Clements, and 
Branksome competing. 



BADMINTON AND BOWLING 

Badminton and bowling at St. 
Paul's this year has been very pop- 
ular. Many girls went over to 
practise for the tournaments. In 



VOLLEY BALL AND ARCHERY 

We took up Volley ball seriously 
this year; the inter-clan games pro- 
ved exciting. MacGregor was first 
and Ross came a close second. 

Archery was a favourite recrea- 
tion. Many Robin Hoods turned 




THE BADMINTON TEAM 
Left: D. Windeyer, J.Williams. Sitting: J. Ross, J. Ferrabee 
fRight: J. McColl, J. Hamilton. 



The Branksome Slogan 



51 



out and were all set for a tourna- 
ment, but the weather prevented 
it twice. They are hoping for bet- 
ter luck this term. 



TENNIS 

The tennis courts have been a 
scene of great activity in this the 
third term. The singles' tourna- 
ment had many exciting matches. 
Joan Ross is this year's champion. 

The doubles' have not been com- 
pleted yet. The title is 'being 
keenly contested. 



LETTERS FROM HOLLAND 

During the long drag of the 
winter term, and on through the 
spring, Form IV A has plunged in- 
to an absorbing new activity — 
none other than correspondence 
with a group of Dutch high school 
students! When the first let- 
ters were sent on their long jour- 
ney to Holland, we had but vague 
recollections of wind mills, dykes, 
and tulips, Hans Brinker and Wil- 
liam of Orange to associate with 
that country. What a lot we have 
learned ! 

Everyone knows of the hard- 
ships Holland suffered under 
German rule and of the splendid 
spirit of the Dutch people, resist- 
ing their enemy in every possible 
manner. One boy wrote : 'Winter 
1944-45 was a bad one, a very bad 
one. We had no food, no clothes, 
no light, no fuel, nothing at all . . . 
and our fathers and brothers and 



we had to work for the Germans. 
But we did not so. We fought to 
them underground — ^suddenly a 
German fortress disappeared, an 
officer was murdered, or a car de- 
stroyed. The Germans tried to 
punish us . . . but we went on, cold 
and hungry, but full of enthus- 
iasm." Such courage and forti- 
tude under such conditions are 
truly great. 

Those who think they are heavy- 
laden and staggering with school 
work, listen to this : "I have, how- 
ever, little time for things like 
that (sports), for I study Mathe- 
matics, Algebra and Geometry, 
Mechanics, Physics, Chemistry, 
Botany and Zoology, History, Geo- 
graphy, English, French, German 
and Dutch." Any more com- 
plaints? 

Do not think, however, that life 
in Holland is just one continual 
round of study — it is not! As in 
Canada, there is a great interest 
in both classical and popular music. 
Dancing, festivals, and activities 
of all kinds, from gardening to 
photography make things hum. 
Bicycling is the vogue, (and also 
the chief means of transportation 
these days) . In spite of their old 
world background of windmills 
and wooden shoes, all the Hans' 
and Jans' are as up-to-date and 
modern as any Sinatra fan. 

And this international corres- 
pondence has more than one side. 
Dutch students are, in turn, learn- 
ing of Canadian life, gaining a 
practical knowledge of the English 
language, and perhaps more im- 



52 



The Branksome Slogan 



portant, adding to the strong feel- 
ing of amity and good will that 
exists between our country and 
theirs. As the months pass, and 
the friendly letters are exchanged, 
may welcoming voices cry out 
many times in many homes. 

^^Es is un brief von je nit Can- 
ada!" — 'There is a letter for you 
from Canada!'' 

ANNE BURTON, 
Form IV. 



FLUFFY SUDS! 

Do you know that there is a 
soap shortage? No? Well, there is I 
The Household Science classes 
thought they would like to remedy 
this condition, so one day they 
made "Fluffy iSuds." 

Ask VSP. if you want to know 
anything aibout them. Is there free 
alkali? But definately! Don't be 
embarrassed with lily white hands. 
Use Fluf fy iSuds and they'll turn a 
bright pink ! 

(Tune — Jingle Bells) 

Fluffy suds, fluffy suds, 
Make your hands bright pink! 
Use them on the dishes when 
You wash them in the sink! 

Fluffy suds. Fluffy suds. 

Use them every day ; 

Take a beater, beat them fast 

You'll have fluffy suds that stay! 



Suds so white, hands so pink, 
Undies dirty grey — 
Use fluffy suds to wash your duds. 
They're sure to melt away ! 




Fluffy suds, Fluffy suds. 
Fluffy morn and night; 
If your girdle doesn't fit 
And it is snug and tight. 

Use Fluffy suds, fluffy suds, 

Morning, noon and night; 

And you will have a three way 

stretch. 
That'll never fit you right. 

V SPECIAL 



Miss Claxton: Soot is a good re- 
ducing agent. 
J. Louden : I must try it sometime. 



The Branksome Slogan 



53 



FELLOWSHIP 



One of the Branksome extra-cur- 
ricular organizations is the Inter- 
School Christian Fellowship, com- 
monly known as the LS.C.F. This 
group meets one afternoon a week 
at No. 16 Elm for discussions and 
to hear speakers. 

Our special speakers this year 
have been varied and interesting, 
among these were: Miss E. M. 
Read, who opened our first meet- 
ing; Mr. Piltz, a Jewish Christian 
worker originally from Spain; 
Miss Cathie Niohol, leader of Pion- 
eer Camp ; Miss M. Fish from Van- 
couver; Miss Marjorie Windsor, 
who spent four years in a Japan- 



ese Consentration Camp ; Miss Dee 
Jenkins fom Texas; and Miss 
A. Doherty, who was sponsor of 
the LSjC.F. last year. 

At Christmas the whole group 
got together, some bringing their 
friends, and had a most enjoyable 
party. Miss Read, Miss Dee Jen- 
kins, and Miss Nichol were present 
and spoke briefly. The warm wea- 
ther was welcomed with a joint 
tea party of the LS.C.F. of four 
schools, and the summer with a 
picnic in North Toronto. 

GERDA MURRAY, 

President. 



O P H E L E O 

During the early years of the school the collections of the Opheleo 
were contributed to mission work in India. The first contributions went 
to the Ramabai Mission. Then we undertook the support of an orphan 
at Manmad, later on a teacher, and after that the maintenance of a 
Branksome Hall bed t the Women's Hospital at Ludhiana. 

However, it will be noted by the following report of the treasurer 
that we are now sending our donations over a much wider area — to 
China, to Africa, to Europe, and South America as well as our gifts to 
the underprivileged in Canada. This is in keeping with the changed 
character of the school as our girls now come from so many different 
parts of the world. 

We have found that assisting in missionary work in all the con- 
tinents has been of the greatest value to the Opheleo, indeed to every 
girl, and feel confident that in the years that lie ahead of us the girls 
will want to continue in this good work. 



JUNE MILLER 



54 



The Branksome Slogan 



0 P H E L E 0 



Treasurer's Report: 

Cash Received: 

Ramabai week $ 300.00 

Carol service _ 226.00 

Relief for Europe 20.00 

Lenten Collections 269.00 



Cash Paid Out: 

To Ramabai Mission $ 200.00 

To Shalini, Indian orphan 50.00 

Clarabai, Indian teacher 50.00 



815.00 



300.00 



To University Settlement, 

Nathaniel Mission, 

Salvation Army, 

Soldiers', Sailors' and 
Airmen's Assoc. 

Individual gifts 226.00 226.00 

To Mme. Falticzek 

(relief for Europe) 20.00 20.00 

To Ludhiana Mission 50.00 

Africa 25.00 

China 25.00 

South America 25.00 

Europe 25.00 150.00 

$ 696.00 $ 696.00 

Balance $ 119.00 



We expect to take in $100.00 for summer 
holidays for underprivileged children. 



BARBARA HARGRAFT, Form V. 



The Branksome Slogan 



55 




56 The Branksome Slogan 

Form V Horoscope 

NAME YOU NOTICE 

Joan Aitken shiny black hair, smile 

Ruth Barnett that quizzical expression 

Nancy Benjamin her new frat pin 

Catherine Catto her pep 

Anne Cawthra sweetness 

Barbara Chisholm wide-eyed interest 

Joy Cleg-g earnestness 

Cynthia Dean her tricky pen 

Joan Ferrabee her curly hair 

Gretchen Gaebelein a surprised expression 

Jane Hamilton her big eyes and goggles 

Joyce Hassard naturally curl}^ hair 

Joan Hutcheson her trim figure 

Magaret Kyle the twinkle in her ej^es 

Doreen Miller her laugh 

Joan Neilson that she is always around 

Wilma Nugent a long baby cut 

Joan Ross i..the smile that will get her anything... 

Jane Bankier that she loves tea parties 

Patricia Carrington earnestness 

Patricia Durrell those rubber cheques 

Helen German her curly hair, natural too ! 

Ruth Howison that she comes from ''Markham" 

(north of Toronto that is) 

Jane Mack her gorgeous hair 

Mary Millar -her "Dynamite" nail polish 

Ruth Mitchell her squeaky laugh at 7.15 a.m. and 

11.00 p.m _ 

Gerda Murray her Jamaican accent 

Joan Myrdon her Navy pin _ 

Judy Palmer the snap-shots on her mirror 

Martha Ryerson her paddy green shoes 

Nora Stratford her good natured laugh 

Lorna Tolmie short black hair 

Joian Warden her scholastic ability „ 

Mary Watson her grin 

Pat West her gentle smile 

Mary Liz White her absence 

Jean Wilkinson her black shiny hair 

Jean Winston her long lashes 

Virginia Carroill ''Who's got some cards?" 



The Branksome Slogan 57 
Form V Horoscope 

SHE IS PROBABLE FUTURE 

fun Indian Princess. 

always laughing Commedienne. 

always with M. L. White Rockette. 

a basketball fiend Physical Ed. 

doing what Barbara is doing Owning dogs and tweeds. 

a tennis whiz Marriage. 

always teaching tennis fox-hunting. 

always playing bridge matron in a boy's school. 

athletic enthusiast Ski champ. 

a Trig, expert President's wife. 

happy-go-lucky soap-box opera. 

a crack bridge player Trig, teacher. 

from Huntsville, of course! tax collectoT. 

Miss Craig's handyman artist. 

maths, fiend ballet dancer. 

explosive in chem journalist. 

always dreaming house-wife. 

energetic and so cute re-organizing, world affairs. 

always chatting physchologist. 

veiry talkative teacher. 

possessed with nixies a good time. 

lots of fun nurse. 

always popping buttons sewing buttons. 

quiet, at times working her way to Vancouver. 

blessed with curly hair Life with T.N.T. 

ever so full of energy occupational therapist. 

polite and kind ... biochemist. 

quiet but fun sailor's mate. 

understanding and charming Mrs. Bailey. 

always on the phone a giacious hostess to their friends. 

a grand girl ! research ! 

clever at school Toronto Symphony Orchestra. 

steady Latin teacher. 

happy-go-lucky (''How much wood 

would a wood-chuck chuck") novelist. 

where Margie is . ..Principal of a school. 

always letter-WTiting letter-writing. 

effiGient business executive. 

depending on Latin research work. 

warbling a new song hit hard working house wife. 



58 The Branksome Slogan 

Form V Horoscope 

NAME YOU NOTICE 

Claire Dibble cute sort of chuckle 

, Mary Dease that bee - -oo - - ti - -f ul diamond 

Elizabeth German "Hi! kiddo" 



Jean Hill ../'Well kids, here's where I fail" 

Marjorie Hill "I'll just die if I don't get my French.. 

Elizabeth McCarthy the way she throws that volley ball 

around - 

June Pemberton "I'm sorry Miss Edmison, I'll bring it 

to-morrow" 

Audrey Ross her dashing to Queen's 

Joan Soiutham her winding herself around a chair 

Inez Ritchie those darling little dimples 

Rosemary Hanna _ "You can't go out in that thing!" 

V Commercial 

Diana Beck the way she sticks up for what she 

wants - 

Bobbee Fleming that light in her eyes ... 

Judy Humphreys Mi31 Smile 

Ruth Jennings her marks 

Louise Park her red hair and what goes with it 

Betty Roiberts her voice 

Joian Rumley the nightly calls from Freddie 

Eileen Scott her nail file _ 

Janet Sinclair that yearning for the East Coast 



Barbara Stewart "Stew" 

Joan Walker her quiet and sweet nature 

Virginia Wood her, period!! 



V Special 

Constance Cunningham her exceptional height 

Nancy Anne Featherstone that catchy laughter 

Carol Massey that Jarvis pin 

Sheilagh O'Reilly those hand-knit sweaters 

Mary Robertson that red hair 

Eleanor Wilson those bright blue eyes 



The Branksome Slogan 59 
Form V Horoscope 

SHE IS PROBABLE FUTURE 

fond of egg diets and T.C.S soap box orator. 

bound to beat Culbertson at bridg-e ..wedded bliss, 
reminding you not to leave till 

yoiu've finished cleaning the 

room diet of exhaustion. 

always woirking in slacks and 

sweaters trying to solve Einstein's theory. 

knitting sweaters for all her 

friends and relations seeking French scholarships. 

always ready and willing to lend a 

helping hand poet. 

lugging that suitcase everywhere...keeping her irons hot. 

always the belle of the ball social butterfly. 

agin' skimpy kilts McGill's the place for her. 

quiet as a churdh mouse a little mother to the others. 

&*!!?? a second Sarah Bernhardt. 

V Commercial 

just one of our girls soap box in Hyde Park. 

sweet and shy marriage. 

VC's problem child fat boy's inspiratio'n. 

sure and steady M.P. 

in love but oh, so in love a sailor's wife. 

friendly, a good pal a singing secretary. 

trying in vain to get rid of him promoter for 'her Pop's business 

(undertaker), 
a good kid manicurist. 

"Stinky!" Sinclair's Successful School for slim- 
ming. 

the life of our party The west a nest and? 

industrious a good mother. 

the last straw in Mrs. Phelps 
hay stack a stenographer? 

V Special 

always on the go cowhand. 

always worrying about her cakes Hollywood. 

always scattering her possessions, running Schiaparelli out of business. 

alv/ays on the telephone librarian. 

always taking her time head of Mothercraft. 

always on the run Discovering the cure for cancer. 



The Branksome Slogan 



61 



Juniors 



62 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Adventures of a Mouse 

Father Tittle faced his family of young mice wearily. "Children," 
he said ''Your mother and I are getting old. I can't provide for you, 
and Matilda," (with a glance at his wife), ''feels she can no longer 
sew, knit, and cook." 

"Yes," Mother Tittle joined in, "and I am afraid, dears, that, young 
as you are, you will have to go into the wide world and earn your living." 

Timothy, the youngest of the family, was very surprised when he 
heard this. He knew that little mice must, at some time, leave their 
home, but he had not known that they left when they were as young 
as Timothy. When he told his mother this, she said that he was young to 
leave home, but, as his father had told them, Timothy's parents could no 
longer provide for him. 

So the next morning, Timothy packed his bag, said "Goodbye" to 
his parents, and away he went. 

He wandered about the city, trying in many places for a job. After 
a day or two, he came to a school. Timothy said to himself with a gasp, 
"Why, I haven't learned to read and write yet. I must enroll here at 
once." 

He found his way to the principal's office. He knocked at the 
door. Someone said, "Come in." 

Timothy walked in, stood in front of the principal, and said, "I 
want to learn to read and write." 

The principal, (Mr. Short-ears), asked him what his name was. 
Timothy replied, "Timothy Jacob Long-tail Benjamin Tittle." Mr. 
Short-ears gravely wrote this down. 

The next morning the little mouse arrived early at school. A gang 
of older mice came up to him. One of them, who seemed to be the leader, 
said, "Look here, you new guy, you've got to learn our ways at this 
school. One of them is that you have to oibey my gang." He pointed to 
the boys behind him, then continued, "Do you understand? You have 
to obey us," he repeated. The bully would have explained more in de- 
tail, had not the bell rung just then. The crowd of 'boys raced to class, 
Timothy with them. 

In school the little mouse tried to think why the boys wanted him 
to obey them. He finally concluded that it must be because his obedience 
would perhaps come in handy when the gang wanted to do something 
underhand. They might make Timothy do something they were afraid 
to do. 



The Branksome Slogan 



63 



After school that afternoon Timothy found out that other mice of 
his age had also been forced to obey the above-mentioned gang. 

''They think they're the big fellows around here," one grunted. 

'Well, I have a plan," said Timothy. The little fellow then pro- 
ceeded to tell the others of the plot. 

That night, Timothy, with a dozen other mice, appeared at the 
school. (Jim, the leader of the gang, was a boarder at the school.) 

In a breathless hush, five mice, Timothy included, crept through 
Jim's window. They were wrapped in sheets. They quietly awoke Jim. 
After stopping him from squeaking, and his tail from thumping, the 
''ghosts" spoke to him in ominous voices, saying that if he did not re- 
frain from his evil deeds something terrible would happen to him. 

Jim thought it was his Great-Grandfather's spirit with his friends. 
He, after being ordered, made a solemn promise never to be unkind to 
the younger mice again. 

So Timothy finished school in peace. 

EDITH THOMSON. 
Grade Six. 




Back Row: S. Mair, J. Jones, W. Meredith. 

Front Row: H, MaoPherson, J. Broughall, D. Walker. 



64 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Adventures of a Ten-cent Piece 

"Good morning, fellow passengers. Ouch! That was a big one. I'm 
sorry if I bumped you, because I am rather uneven on that side, owing 
to a large dint, which I received overseas." 

"Excuse me, sir, I hope I am not intruding, but, could you tell us 
how you received your — er — ^wound?" I was thus addressed by a very 
meek and humble halfpenny who was one of the many coins in the col- 
lection with me. "I am a Canadian ten-cent piece journeying over the 
Atlantic on my way home." 

"Well, "I replied, very flattered by the attention of the youngster, 
"It is rather a long story, but I will endeavour not to bore you." 

"Here we go again," remarked a surly looking German franc. 

"Hush, hush, do be quiet," remonstrated his neighbours, "your turn 
will come." 

Ignoring this interruption, I began. "I was given to a wealthy man 
at the bank and in his pocket book, with all the wads of bills, we were 
driven through the streets to a large, brilliant night club. He tossed me 
to a waiter, who had a pile of dishes, but the waiter didn't notice me, 
and I fell into a half-empty bowl of soup. I was very uncomfortable 
indeed, and hoped that I would soon be removed from my very damp 
quarters. Soon I heard a few rough words spoken and a sad little sniff. 
Suddenly the rather bedraggled little boy, who was doing the dishes, 
gave a little gasp of surprised delight. Quickly he slipped me into his 
pocket. As soon as he had finished the dishes he received his pay and 
hurried to a drug store to get medicine for his sick mother. I was 
used to pay for a box of cough drops that she needed badly. 

"I was in the druggists' cash drawer for many moons and had many 
interesting conversations. During a political discussion, I was taken 
out of the drawer and handed to a rather dirty but interesting tramp, 
who was begging at the door. As he was sauntering along the street, 
I could see ahead through a little hole in his pocket. I saw some rough 
village boys teasing and throwing stones at a poor little cringing dog. My 
friend, the tramp, rushed up and protected the dog, giving me to the 
boys to pay for it. The tramp could not afford to keep the little mon- 
grel, but at least he could take it to the Humane Society where it would 
be safe. 

"Fortunately, I was not long with the boys, owing to a large hole 
in the pocket into which I was dropped. I lay quite a while in the street 
before a little girl picked me up and put me carefully into her purse. 
When she got home, she presented me shyly to her older brother, 
who was leaving for overseas. 



The Branksome Slogan 



65 



'The trip to the fiont line was long and tiresome. I don't like to 
rememlber much aibout my war experiences. It was all shouts, sirens, 
din, and confusion. I do remember however, that in George's pocket I 
felt a sudden, sharp, pain in my side. How it hurts ! Later, I discovered 
it had been a small fragment of exploded metal, which caused quite 
severe flesh wounds. As I had been resting over the area of George's 
heart, you might say, that, in an indirect way, I had saved his life. 

''Soon after that, I found the rest of you in this box and now, on 
George's release from hospital, we are all on our way home again. 

How true are the words — 
"Home, sweet Home!'' 

HEATHER MoPHERSON, 

Grade Eight. 




The Greatest Scare I Ever Had 

In the 3^ear 1942 I was in Burma. One day I went out to do somo 
Christmas shopping with a Burmese school-mate. Her name is Violet 
Kebe-bor-nor. We went down-town in Daddy's car. The driver took us 
down-town, then he went back to Daddy's office. 

We soon heard lots of planes flying over us, but we still did not 
know what it was. Soon we saw something dropping, and all the people 
were shouting, running, crying-, and acting strangely. We thought it 



66 



The Branksome Slogan 



was so funny, but Violet said it might be Jap planes. Later we heard 
the air-raid siren and we knew it was Jap planes. 

We ran and jumped on the running board of a car, and we asked 
them to please take us out of town. He said that he would, and that 
was the manager of the South West Company in Burma. He let us off 
and we ran to hide in a zoo near the monkey cage by a big tree. After 
that we heard something make a queer sound. We were ready to run to 
another place because we were so scared that the tigers and lions 
would come out of their cages. 

The Jap planes dropped bombs for two and a half hours, and we 
had to hide three hours with the sun shining on us. So we took off our 
shoes and underwear, because it is just too hot to run with them on. 
But when we took our shoes off the ground was hot, we had to put 
them on again. In a little while we heard nothing but monkeys chatter- 
ing and tigers growling. We felt so scared, but then we heard the air- 
raid siren, and we knew it was over. 

We began to be hungry so we went to a drug store to phone Mummy, 
and she said for us to hide for one or two hours more because another 
group of planes were coming. After that we went back to get a drink and 
some sandwiches from the store free. They said we could take as many as 
we could carry so we took lots of them to feed the monkeys for a few 
minutes. Then the planes came back again and we still hid in the same 
place. This time the bombing was worse. All the houses and trees were 
burning. People were still crying and shouting. It looked very, very 
sad. We had two nice little dogs to keep us company at the zoo. 

The moon arrived and the skies were dark. Then the planes started 
to fly away again. We phoned back home and the driver drove the car to 
get us. On our way home w^e could see blood flowing on the streets just 
like rain on a stormy day. Parts of bodies were hanging all around on 
the trees and wires. 

We got home safely at last, but we did not have any Christmas with 
us. Many people came to our garden to hide because we had a huge 
garden, and lots of trees. We had guns and watchmen with us for the 
night. We only stayed there for three weeks more, then we went to 
Chungking because there are nice huge dug-outs there. They are made 
of mountains. 



MILLICENT HSIUNG, 
Grade Eight. 



The Branksome Slogan 



67 




JUNIOR SPORTS OF 1946 

The sports of 1946 were very 
successful and well organized. 
Everyone took part and enjoyed 
themselves. 

Each week the Clans Chieftains 
of the Robertson, the Grant, and 
the Bruce kept an account of the 
people going to games. At the 
end of the week the clan with the 
highest total had their name writ- 
ten on a shield in the gymnasium. 
This made each person try to help 
their clan by going to games. The 
clans were very close, sometimes 
only one mark which made the 
winning clan rejoice. 

The chief Autumn sport was 
basketball. A team was made up 
of Grade 7 and 8 girls to play 
other school teams. There were six 
forwards, Jane Bradshaw, Shir- 
ley Mair, Heather McPherson, 
Alison Roach, Daphne Walker, and 
Barbara Weiss. The guards were : 
Johanna Broughall, Eve Cassels, 
Ann Gilday, Geraldine Jephcott, 
Joan Macohin and Ann Russel. 
Our proctors, Anne James and 
Alma Hatch gave up much of their 



time to coach us and make basket- 
ball a success. 

The winter found everyone 
skiing and tobogganing at the 
Deacon's and skating at the 
Varsity Arena twice a week. This 
year there was a skiing expedition 
to the Branksome Farm at Sum- 
mit. 

Diana Windeyer gave classes in 
tap-dancing once a week and Judy 
Godfrey was in charge of the 
tumbling class. 

In the spring and summer other 
proctors from Forms II and III 
came over and managed softball, 
swimming, tennis, and broad and 
high jumping. 

We are going to enter the sports 
day contests and the swimming 
meet. The older juniors are prac- 
tising for the tennis tournament 
and the soft ball team. All had 
loads of fun this year at sports and 
games. 

DAPHNE WALKER, 
EVE CASSELS. 




68 



The Branksome Slogan 



JUNIOR LIBRARY 

~ Some very good 'books have been 
added to our library this year. 
They were donated by the folJow- 
ing: 

Heather McPherson. 
Nancy McCutcheon. 
Tanya Patterson. 
Jennifer Jones. 
Maureen Senior. 
Karol Fraser. 
Gwendolyn Hsuing. 
Jane Henderson. 
Adrienne Boone . 
Caroline Thornton. 
Jane Campbell. 
Elizabeth Richardson. 
Susan Richardson 
Judy Lovering. 
Wendy Rogers. 
Carol McGregor. 
Bonita Hsinng. 
Anne Gilday. 
Charlette Campbell. 
Jane Wilcox. 
Daphne Walker. 
Millicent Hsinng. 
Judy Silverman. 
Judy iStewart. 
Hugheen Cree. 
Hilary Warren. 
Wendy Meredith. 
Gail Purdy. 
Joy Cassals. 
Tony Stewart. 
Beverly Graham. 
Mary Barnett. 
Martha Clarke. 



THE BUNNY 

Silently as the night goes past 
A little bunny hops through the 

long grass. 
He's cute and fuzzy, round and fat, 
And his ears stand straight as a 

jaunty hat. 

He has a red nose that wiggles so 
fast 

And little white teeth that show 

when he laughs. 
His tail is round and short 

enough 

To be nicely used for a powder 
puff. 

He lives on grass, lettuce, and 
leaves 

And loves to chew the bark off 
trees. 

A hole in the ground is where he is 
found — 

He disappears fast when he hears 
you around. 

JOYCE WILSON, 
Grade 5. 




The Branksome Slogan 



69 



ALUMNAE 



Regular sewing meetings have been held during the year and thougn 
the attendance has not been large a good deal of work has been accom- 
plished under the able direction of Daisy Robertson Gall. 

A most delightful tea and sale, under the convenorship of Florence 
Kingsley Bastow, was held in November. In spite of a very wet day 
the Alumnae turned out in force and helped to make the event a success. 

Miss Read's annual dinner was held May 4th. The hig'hlight of the 
occasion was the presentation, by Daisy Robertson Gall on behalf of the 
Alumnae, of a lapel watch to mark the completion of Miss Read's for- 
tieth year at Branksome. 

Louise Jamieson who, as a nursing sister, sav/ service in South 
Africa and Italy during the war gave a very interesting account of her 
experiences. Dorothy Hoyle moved a vote of thanks to Louise. 

At the business meeting which followed reports were read by the 
Secretary, Delphine Burr Keens, the Treasurer, Rhoda McArthur and 
the Sewing Convenor, Daisy Robertson Gall. The retiring president, 
Gladys Simpson Brown, was in the chair and Grace Morris Craig moved 
a hearty vote of thanks to her for her splendid leadership. 

Nominations for officers for 1946-47 resulted in the election of the 
following: — 

Honourary President — Miss Read. President Madeleine Rogers 
Peers. First Vice-President — Grace Morris Craig. Second Vice-Presi- 
dent—Joan Peat. Secretary — Delphine Burr Keens. Treasurer — Rhoda 
McArthur. Sewing Convenor — Marjorie Evans Britt. Social Con- 
venor — Beatrice Martin Calvert. Slogan Representative — Ainslie Mc- 
Michael. 

DELPHINE BURR KEENS, 

Secretary 



70 



The Branksome Slogan 



Personals 

Miss Read gave a luncheon at the Windsor Hotel, Montreal, last 
Novemlber for the alumnae living in the metropolis. Those present 
were: — Helen Simpson Walker, Margaret Kingston McCombe, Rosalind 
Morley MacEwen, Ann Irwin Varcoe, Dorothy Strong Turner, Beatrice 
Rou'gih, Oharlotte Bishop Millen, Kathleen Wilson Leslie, Dorothy and 
Peggy Gait, Eilaine Enderby Fallows, Katharine Beach MacAdam, Betty 
Sparks Harriso'n, Grace Greer Grindley, Lois Rapley Floud, Daphne 
Hodgson, Margaret Drew Graham, Eleanor Mackay Coffey, Florence 
Drury Boucher, Marjorie Franklin Jones Bruce, Rosamund McCoy But- 
ler, Isabel Earl, who is at Macdonald College, Betty and Nancy Jack 
who are sojourning in Hudson, P.Q. and attending Macdonald, Jean 
Fleck Barclay whose daughter, Joan, was married to Mr. J. W. R. Drum- 
mond, in May. Ethel Twedell Cartmel, Lillian Mitchell Blair, Margaret 
Barrett Eldridge, Marjorie McLaughlin Sharpe who is living in Bea- 
consfield and Marjorie Apedaile Jack who is at home in Pointe Claire. 
Betty Williamson, Sally Pitfield, Noreen Emory, Althea McCoy, Hazel 
Parry, Mary Powell, Cherry MacGregor, Ruth Harris, Noreen Emory 
and Mary Hansen. The last ten are attending McGill, as are Marilyn 
Hogarth, and Jane Hill. Helen Gilmour Kydd also attended. 

Jean Plaunt and Joan Marlow are at the University of British 
Columbia, Joan Frankel is at the University of Washington, St Louis 
and Joyce Frankel chose to go to Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 
Dorothy Jennings is attending the Philadelphia School of Occupational 
Therapy, Helen Ingersoll is at Oarsan Newman College, Jefferson City, 
Tenn., and Cynthia Maxwell will eventually graduate from Wells. Mar- 
jorie Archibald is at Dalhousle and Elaine Goodeve, Margaret Hockin 
and Brenda Bruce are students at the University of Western Ontario, 
from which college Elizabeth Prudham will graduate this May. Grace 
Cawthra and Lois Landreth are at McMaster. 

The folio-wing have just completed their first year at the University 
of Toronto: — ^Mary and Dorothy Robinette, Joan Peat, Mary Ritchie, 
Nancy Charles, Margaret McKelvey, Virginia Tory, Nancy Trees, Mary 
Alice Burton and Ann Woodrow. Ruth Alison was in first year, pre- 
medical. Penelope Waldie is taking a librarian's course at this univer- 
sity and Elizaibeth Blackstock is a candidate in the course of art as 
applied to medicine. Those graduating include, Thelma Kerr, Jocelyn 
Hodge, Sheila MacQueen, Jean Seifert, Betty Sherman, Jean Sieveright, 
Elizabeth Falconer, Marion Cosford, and Alice Cochrane. Dorothy Man- 
sell is registered in the Physiotheraphy course and Brigit Gregson is 
at the school of Physical and Health Education. Orde Skeeles, who is in 



The Branksome Slogan 



71 



her second year in this course, won a scholarship last year. Audrey 
Joy Lyons, who was a Wren during the war years, is taking post grad- 
uate work in psychology at Toronto University. 

Elizaibeth Capener is at London University taking medicine and 
Margaret is at Exeter in the science course. Brigid Hayden entered 
Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford on a scholarship. Rachael Rutter is in 
Lyons, France, studying French and taking a course in Domestic 
Science. 




A Sewing Group of the Alumnae 



Sybilla Johnson passed the first year at the Ontario College of Art 
with hono'urs and won a prize. Joan Chalmers was also successful in 
passing in this same class. 

Muriel Sinclair is nursing in a naval hospital at Wilhelmshaven, 
Germany and Ruth Becker Hughes is a chemist with UNRAA in China. 
Helen Senneck is with this same organization in Washington in which 
city Gwen De Mont is a secretary at the British Embassy. Irma Brock 



72 



The Branksome Slogan 



Marik is also in the United States capital. Her huslband is at the Hun- 
garian Legation. Irma spent most of the war years in Hungary and was 
in Buda Pesth during the terrible seven weeks siege when that city was 
practically destroyed. 

Margaret Kroehle spent the winter in Dachau, Germany with the 
American Red Cross, she is captain of her group. An article written 
by her, aibout the change in Dachau conditions since the allied occupa- 
tion, was printed n a numlber of newspapers throughout the United 
States. Louise Stewart was in the nursing service of the American navy 
during the war, she is now at college in the States for further study. 
Margaret Baker Du Bois is assistant director of the Medical College of 
Virginia. 

Miriam Perry graduated last June from St. Joseph's Hospital and 
Maisie Mehlentoacher is a nurse in training at the Hamilton General 
Hospital. Mary Kinnear is a dental nurse, and Patricia Gundy is in a 
doctor's office in the Medical Arts. Nancy Watson has a position in the 
Military Hospital, Quebec City. Lois Sutton is a laboratory technican 
at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal. Sheila McCloughry is in train- 
ing in the radiography department of the Middlesex Hospital, England, 
and ElizaJbeth Busk is doing radio work at a Signals Research Depot in 
Great Britain. Helen Allan is an occupational therapist in a Vancouver 
Hospital. 

Bessie Storey Cole is living in Mexico City. Zillah Caudwell Mac- 
Farlane, Anne Wilks McGuire, Jane Ross Webster, Shurley Dickson, 
Helen Sutherland and Nancy Stirrett Renison are to be found in Mon- 
treal. Joan Romeyn Birnie and Barbara Powis Michell are living in 
Beioeil, P. Q. Carol Hendry Duffus is at home in Halifax and Patricia 
Whittall Weeks in Darmouth, Nova Scotia. Phyllis Becker is at pres- 
ent in Toronto with the Red Cross. Dorothy Pattison Forsythe and Grace 
Bone Collinson have joined the Ottawa Alumnae. Jean Lander Dick is 
in Sudbury, Mary Percy Wunker in Miners' Bay and Barbara Wheel- 
wrig'ht Gibson in Regan, Ont. Nancy Sparks Blower has moved to 
Streetsville. Adberta Lehm.ann Doan and Virginia Lee Prince are living 
in Winnipeg. Helen Plaunt Vollans is at home in Orillia and Lillian 
Kribs Mackenzie is now in Walkerton. Marion McLaren Armstrong has 
left Montreal to live in Oakville. Dorothy Apedaile Wyllie may be ad- 
dressed Corner Brook, Newfoundland. The following are living in 
British Columlbia: — Donna Tisdall Selkirk on Savoury Island, Marion 
Armitage Corless, Prince George, Mary Bankier Angas, Victoria and 
Ruth Running Tarbox, Vancouver. 



The Branksome Slogan 



73 



In Connecticut, are Barbara Martin Bensen in New Canaan and 
Mary Harrison Barnett in New Haven. Charlotte Deacon Alley lives 
in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Barbara Rawlinson Holwell in Springfield, Mass. 
Janet Garfield Brown is in Church Falls, Va. Cynthia Gooding is in 
New York where she has an interesting radio job with WOV. 

Margaret Eaton Dunn sailed in November for England where 
she will make her home in the capital. In that same month Katharine 
Whitehead Lamprey flew to Great Britain to join her husband in Swan- 
sea, Wales. Helen Anderson Magnusson is in Petia, Sweden, within 
the Arctic Circle. Sally Morton Monceaux came from Trinidad to spend 
the winter in Toronto. 

Friends of Kathleen Hinch will be glad to knoAv that her parents, 
who were interned in Singapore and Sumatra respectively, survived 
their ordeal. Mr. and Mrs. Hinch spent part of the winter in Toronto 
and sailed for Singapore in May. 

Laura Aitken Ramsay's son is Head Boy at Eton. 

Jean Stirling is teaching gymnasium at The Central High School 
of Commerce, Toronto, while Nancy Fairley is at the Hamilton Y.W.C.A. 
Helen Hawks has a position in a nursery school. Dorothy Hoyle is assoc- 
iate director of **Gay Venture," a camp for girls and young boys sit- 
uated at Lochlin, Ont. Mary Jean Hall is studying dress designing. 

Norma Whelan Coleman was recently elected vice-president of the 
Toronto branch of the Red Cross Society, and Jessie Wright Evans' ap- 
pointment as Commandant of the re-organized general detachment, 
Toronto branch, Canadian Red Cross Corps, was confirmed in March. 

Ethel Wadge Maclennan came from Fort William, last June to at- 
tend the Annual Meeting of the Girl Guide Association held in Toronto. 
Leonore Kinghorn was in Montreal in March representing the Beta 
Chapter at the anniversary banquet and dance of Alpha Omicron Pi Fra- 
ternity, McGill University. 

Grace Despard Grant and Diana Spencer figured in the New Year 
Hono'urs' list, the former being awarded the M.B.E. and the latter, a 
Wren, was commended. 

Mizpah Sussex Lithgow spent some weeks in California this winter, 
and Margaret Trott Pope and Marilyn Heintzman visited this same state 
in April. 



74 



The Branksome Slogan 



Lorraine WhaJen, w'ho is studying vocal in New York, made her 
first Town Hall appearance, April 27th, 1946. Portia Butt's contralto 
voice won second place in the division in which she competed at the 
Kiwanis Music Festival held in February. Aleen Erb Goetchius is on the 
board of the Washington (D.C.) National Symphony Orchestra. Jane 
Anne Rees took a leading part in the play 'Tobias and the Angel," 
which the Community Players produced in February. Lulu Colquhoun 
Bray who lives in San Francisco is writing under the pen name of 
Louise Kenton Bray. 

Margaret Wilkinson spoke to the girls now at the school aibout the 
work of Bolton Camp. 

S'hirley Halsted was with the Ice Follies of 1946 which came to the 
Maple Leaf Gardens in Fe»bruary. She and another girl did a ''pair". 
One newspaper critic said: — "In personal beauty, in speed, smoothness 
and grace these young skating stars skim through one of the most bril- 
liant pair numbers in the show." Shirley appeared also in two other 
numbers. Rosemary McDonald was presented with several prizes at the 
Skating Club in March, she is Junior Singles Ladies' Champion. 

Helen Borrett, Mary Jean Hall, Mary Percy Wunker, Helen Turner, 
Irma Brock Marik, Phyllis West Sutherland and Frances Chase are 
latest additions to the Life Membership List of the Alumnae Association. 

In the residence are the daughters of Madeleine Rogers Peers, Ali- 
son Bristol Vipond, Helen McAulay Wright, Beatrice Smith Donald 
Marion Stodart Smith, Trembeth Luke Doty, Evelyn Hearst Gilley, 
Audrey Hewitt Massey, Helen Hall Russell and Kathleen Cahill Bankier. 
In the day school are the children of Dorothy Rason Lyon and Gertrude 
McQuigge Thorn, and a kinswoman and kinsman of Miss Scott's. 

The following out of town ''Old Girls" visited the school, Agnes 
Campbell Heslip, Irlma Kennedy Jackson, Catherine Davison Rooke, 
Margaret Speers Murchison, Peggy Hodge Hand, Jean Campbell, Janet 
Brown Rumble, Betty Smith Tiller, Helen Jarvis Anderson, Hazel Wil- 
kinson Flavelle, Charlotte Ward Hardyment, Margaret Morton Light- 
bourn, Elaine Goodeve and Mary Lou Glenn. 



The Branksome Slogan 



Marriages 
1945 

Marion Armitage to John D. Corless, May 5th. 
Gwynneth Sinclair to Charles Wm. Powell, May 12th. 
Ann Irwin to Robert W. Varcoe, May 26th. 
Thoedosia Burr Pitman to James Schnepp, June 2nd. 
Kathleen Burroughs to John E. Gulledge, June 8th. 
C'harlotte Deacon to John L. Alley, June 9th. 
Patricia Hdbbs to John M. Dyke, June 9th. 
Ruth Stevens to John P. MacBeth, June 16th. 
Helen Shearme to William G. Kerr, June 16th. 
Mary Harrison to Thos. A. M. Barnett, June 19th. 
Kathleen Woodcock to Wm. Herbert Swetman, June. 
Lillian Mitchell to Robert Wm. Blair, June. 
Aileene Marks to Maurice J. Clausen, June. 
Christine Pearse to Gordon Mac C. Karn, June 30th. 
Mary Bankier to Ian Angus, June 30th. 
Brenda Cruikshank to George Reid, July 5th. 
Nancy Pattison to Ian Lorne Campbell, July 17th. 
Katharine Whitehead Harris to Glyn Lamprey, July 19th. 
Eleanor Lyle to Charles R. Somerville, July 24th. 
Barbara Wheelwright to Thomas Gibson, July 31st. 
Carol Hendry to Allan F. Duffus, August 3rd. 
Lois Fleming to Jack F. Hastings, August 4th. 
Frances Butterfield to William C. Price, August 10th. 
Margaret Drew to H. Campbell Graham, August. 
Margaret Muir to David W. Kennard, August 25th. 
Anne Wilks to Thos. Claude McGuire, August 30th. 



76 The Branksome Slogan 

Gwen Norman to John N. Poyser, Septemlber 15th. 
Marjorie Uglow to W. F. Kinnear. 
' Margaret Graftom to John G. Ross, September 22nd. 
Helen McGormick to Thos. C. Gordon, October 6th. 
Margaret Eaton to J. Hmbert Dunn, October 13th. 
Helen Plaunt to Morris H. Vollans, October 2()th. 
Frances Tresidder to John M. Read, Novemibe'r 1st. 
Stella McEvoy to Leslie Olivere, November 1st. 
Sarah Lee Moxley to Wm. Jas. Francis, November 10th. 
Phyllis Wright Watson to Alan J. Cullen, November 17th. 
Jane Ross to Donald Webster, November 24th. 
Nancy Stirrett to Geo. E. B. Renison, December 15th. 
Katharine Kemp to Michael R. Tidy, December 15th. 
Peggy Phair to Wm. Walter Drinkwater, DecemJber 15th. 
Elizabeth Matchett to John G. McClelland, December 15th. 
Mary Shields to Wm. John Shields, December 19th. 

1946 

Barbara Martin to Albert Van V. Benson, January 12th. 

Elizabeth Henry Dunn to John Chas. Boyer, January 12th. 

Barbara Rawlinson to Chas. Wm. Holwell, February 9th. 

Joy Ferguson to John G. Housser, February 16th. 

Georgina Sylvester Ellis to William J. J. Butler, February 18th. 

Ruth Running to John Wm. Tarbox, March 11th. 

Barbara Conway to John P. S. Mills, March 16th. 

Haldane Goodeve to Chas. Douglas Hutchins, March 23rd. 

Barbara Kennedy to Roy P. Pennington, March 23rd. 

June McBride to Keith D. McCord, April 6th. 

Diana Spencer to Kenneth L. Dyer, April 17th. 

Marnie Milner to David Jas. Kerrigan, April 20th. 

Johanne Lockhart to Joihn C. L. Annesley, April 20th. 

Dorothy Caley to Arthur 0. Klein, April 20th. 

Mary Kingsmill to Peter W. Spragge, April 24th. 

Margaret Earl to Andrew A. Wedd, April 27th. 

Gwendolyn Plant to Frederick A. Hambley, May 4th. 



The Branksome Slogan 



Births 
1945 

Peggy Moseley Robertson, a daughter, March 19th. 

Helene Pattison Boultfoee, a daughter, April 1st. 

Helen Laing Spinks, a daughter, April. 

Virginia Lee Prince, a daughter, April 26th. 

Margaret Beck Margeson, twin daughters. May 7th. 

Florence Downing Fleury, a daughter. May 9th. 

Katherine Dawson Warren, a son. May 11th. 

Sylvia Cayley Crosthwait, a son. May 13th. 

Sylvia Greenshields Blakeley, a son. May 15th. 

Grace Innes Plaxton, a daughter, May 18th. 

Joyce Caudwell Stewart, a daughter. May 17th. 

Jean McCormick Vanstone, a daughter, June 1st. 

Gwen Millar Berry, a son, June 1st. 

Margaret Mickle Allan, a son, June 1st. 

Nora Brown Kellam, a son, June 2nd. 

Jean Mcintosh Tamtolyn, a son, June 6th. 

Barbara Powis Michell, a son. 

Peggy Marshall Buchannan, a son, June 12th. 

Helen Hunter McQuigge, a son, June 14th. 

Gretchen Heyd Hancock, a daughter, June 23rd. 

Mary Gooderham Mathes, a daughter, June 24th. » 

Jean Mcintosh Swinden, a daughter, June 24th. 

Jean Sutherland Boyd, a daughter June 24th. 

Janet Davidson Omand, a daughter, July 9th. 

Jean Nathanson Levin, a daughter, July 9th. 

Arnold Gooderham Willoughby, twin sons, July 31st. 

Katharine Scott West, a daughter, August 7th. 

Joan Hutchinson Morcom, a daughter, August 10th. 

Helen Conway 0' Conner, a daughter, August 10th. 

Kathleen Wilson Leslie, a daughter, August 11th. 

Beatrice Johnston Lewis, a daughter, August 11th. 

Kathleen Rowe Anderson, a son. 

Nancy Dibblee McLean, a son, August 15th. 

Suzanne Sweatman McNeillie, a daughter, August 21st. 

Susan Davis Hunt, a daughter. 

Edith Merrill Sheppard, a daughter, September 15th. 
Helen Hendry Creighton, a son, September 18th. 
Gertrude McQuigge Thom, a daughter, September 20th. 
Lillice Read Le Roy, a son, September 26th. 
Frances Tilton Pattison, a daughter, September 28th. 



78 



The Branksome Slogan 



Jean Lander Dick, a son, Octoiber 5th. 

Lois Rapley Floud, a daughter, October 15th. 

Grace Wheelwright Keefe, a daughter, Octoiber 17th. 

Shirley Ross Goldsmith, a daughter, November 1st. 

Marion Lumbers Gibson, a son, November 8th. 

Margery Crawford Spratt, a son, November lOth. 

Wilma Bate Smith, a son, November 18th. 

Jacqueline Northway Ashdown, a son, December 10th. 

Elizabeth Alport Baby, a daughter, December 13th. 

Mary Holme Stewart, a son. December 15th. 

Barbara Ann Boland Hynes, a son, December 15th. 

Helen Spencer Hughes, a daughter, December 21st. 

Gwynneth Sinclair Powell, a son, December 24th. 



1946 

Florence Eraser Drew Smith, a son, January 11th. 

Margaret Sorenson Rayner, a daughter, January 15th. 

Daphne Mitchell Savage, a daughter, January 23rd. 

Betty Earl Groff, a son, January 23rd. 

Constance Pringle Wright, a son, January 23rd. 

Dorothy Clark Robb, twin daughters, January 27th. 

Marjorie Apedaile Jack, a daughter, January 30th. 

Leone Comstock Northup, a son, February 11th. 

Mary Morley Anderson, a son, February 26th. 

Helen Holmes Gadban, a son, March 4th. 

Amy McLean Stewart, a son, March 6th. 

Kathleen Burroughs Gulledge, a daughter, March 7th. 

Mary Clare Moss, a daughter, March 8th. 

Helen Shearme Kerr, a son, March 8th. 

Cathleen Clark Hooper, a daughter, March 10th. 

Patricia Whittall Weeks, a daughter, March 22nd. 

Neva Jones Watson, a son, March 30th. 

Elaine Enderby Fallows, a son, April 1st. 

Betty Flavelle Love, a son, April 5th. 

Dorothy Hewetson Leonard a daughter, April 8th. 

Marion O'Hara Crysdale, a son, April 30th. 



The Branksome Slogan 



79 



Deaths 
1945 

Beverley, daughter of Betty Rutherford Ward, June 19th. 
Son of Jane Ryan McDonald, July 8th. 

Frederick S. L. Lane, husiband of Esther Eddis Lane and father of 
Eleanor Lane Adams, August 28th. 



1946 

Frederick Baker, husband of Nancy Macleod Baker, January 15th. 
Alex. Bell Thomson, husband of Frances Wiser Thomson, February 
28th. 



STAFF 

Births 

To Mr. and Mrs. K. D. C. Haley (Miss Charlotte CoonDbs), a son. May 
28th, 1945 

To Mr. and Mrs. Adelibert Chipman (Miss Betty de Witt), a son, July 
1945. 

To Mr. Justice and Mrs. Keiller Mackay (Miss Katharine Macleod) a 

son, December 20th, 1945. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Kennedy (Miss Winifred McEvoy), a son, 

January 21st., 1946. 



M iMemonam 

Jean Stark Trees, August 7th, 1945. 
Dora Adams Hare, Septemiber 13th, 1945. 
Millicent Boyd Rdbson, October 4th, 1945. 
Lois Howard Armstrong, February 11th, 194G. 
Joan Knowles, April 17th, 1946. 
Jean Morton, May 5th, 1946. 



c4u tog^raplt^ 



80 



cAu tog^rapliA 



82 



The Branksome Slogan 



83 




c4u tog^rapk^ 



84 



The Branksome Slogan 



85 



HAPPY MOTORING WITH 

ESSO 

THE NEW GASOLINE 

AT NON- PREMIUM PRICE / 

Esso is Canada's newest gasoline, 
the highest quality anti-knock gaso- 
line ever sold by Imperial Oil at 
regular, non-premium price. It's on 
sale now at Imperial Oil dealers 
everywhere in Canada. It will give 
outstanding peformance in most cars 
on the road today. See for yourself . . . 
Fill up with Esso next time. 

(imperial) 

\^ DEALER y 



IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED 



86 



The Branksome Slogan 



An 

INVITATION 

to 

EX-SERVICE 
PEOPLE 

CANADA welcomes you home I You 
stand on the threshold ol the peaceful 
future for which you fought. 

And naturally, you have decisions to 
make. For example you may be wondering 
how to use j^our Rehabilitation Grants to 
best advantage ... a matter on which this 
Bank is prepared to help you nith friendly, 
practical advice. 

Gratituties and Money Grants, Business 
Loans and Land Settlement, University 
Education and Technical Training offer 
new opportunities, open many possible 
courses of future endeavour. 

The Bank of Nova Scotia wants to help 
you chart YOUR course. Why not come into 
one of our Branches and talk it over with 
the manager? He is ready and anxious to 
advise you regarding your problems. 

%e-BANK of 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Over a Century of Banking Experience 



The Branksome Slogan 



87 




Seven floors of ^ashioru 



£,OVABLE 
'^UBBABLES 

that stay fresher . . . 
Longer 

Super through and through are 
these cool, crisp Cottons that 
never lose their daintiness 
through sudsing. 

Ginghams, seersuckers, cham- 
hrays, spuns, linens, that take 
every moment of your full life 
of work, study, and fun in their 
stride. 

Huge selection in all sizes, col- 
ours and patterns. 



JOHN NORTHWAY 
AND SON LIMITE:D 
240 Yonge Street, Toronto 



88 



The Branksome Slogan 



When 
You Want 

GOOD MILK 
HAVE 

BORDEN'S 

SERVE you 



THE BORDEN CO. LTD. 

TORONTO DIVISION 

Kl. 6151 



The Branksome Slogan 



89 



You Always 
Buy With Confidence 
At The Sisn 
Of The Bis B-A 



BTA 



THE BRITISH AMERICAN OIL 
COMPANY LIMITED 



90 



The Branksome Slogan 



IF IT'S PRINTING 

you DESIRE . . . : 



WE CAN DO IT! 

Our craftsmen are skilled 
and our service unexcelled. 

PUBLICATIONS 
CATALOGUES 
FOLDERS 
PROGRAMMES 
CIRCULARS, Etc. 

* 

^he rriacoomb 

PUBLlSHinq COMPATiy LTD. 

TOROnTO 

36a-370 Richmond St. TDesl - EL. 1216-7 



The Branksome Slogan 



91 



On Saving Money 



It is important that early in life we 
learn the lessons of thrift. We should 
learn how to save regularly, and system- 
atically,, so that we shall have reserves in 
the future. There is no better method of 
saving than through a life insurance policy 
which protects your dependents as it 
creates a cash reserve for you through the 
years. 

A Mutual Life representative will be 
pleased to arrange a savings policy for 
you. 



The Mutual Life of C anada 

Head Office: Waterloo, Ontario 
Est, 1869 



The Branksome Slogan 



93 




Quality is the H.R. Tradition 
. . . and H.R. Quality costs no morel 

HOLT RENFREW 



YONGE AT ADELAIDE 



The KEY to the FUTURE 

Is in YOUR HANDS . . 

Remember . . . 

THE DOMINION BANK 

offers you the most convenient means of saving, forming 
the habit of thrift. Open a savings Account in The 
Dominion Bank, and put a little of your pocket money 
into it regularly. Your future independence will depend 
on the saviings habit. The sooner you start to form this 
habit that leads to success the better. 

The Dominion Bank 

N. J. O'FLYNN, R0SP:DALE BRANCH, 

Manager. Toronto. 



94 



The Branksome Slogan 




FOR SMART ACCESSORIES 
AND SPORTSWEAR AT 
MODERATE PRICES 

• • • 

EVANGELINE SHOPS 

6 STORES IN TORONTO 
LONDON :: OTTAWA :: HAMILTON :: ST. CATHARINES :: GUELPH 



COUNSELLORS IN 

REAL ESTATE MATTERS . . . 

Apairt from conducting our usual functions as Real 
Estate Agents, Property Managers, Appraisers and 
Mortgage Loan Brokers, we serve many clients as 
Expert Counsel in Real Elstate matters. 

Solicitors and executives of Trust Companies, commercial 
and industrial firms, and public bodies continuously call 
upon us for advice in solving problems beyond the range 
of their individual practice. 

From our comprehensive experience throug'hout Canada 
we are constantly finding solutions to the problems that 
are equitable and satisfactory to all concerned. 

We invite consultation when the need arises. 

W. H. BOSLEY & CO. 

TORONTO 1 

28 ADELAIDE ST. WEST — WA. 1031 



• Neckwear 

• Handbags 

• Gloves 

• Hosiery 

• Lingerie 

• Blouses 

• Sweaters 
© Skirts 

• Sportswear 



The Branksome Slogan 



95 



ENQUIRIES INVITED 

CUPS AND TROPHIES 
SPORTS PRIZES 
MEDALS AND PLAQUES 
COLLEGE AND CLASS PINS 
RINGS, LAPEL BUTTONS 
DANCE FAVORS, ETC. 

BIRKS - ELLIS - RYRIE 

Jewellers - Silversm, iths 
Yonge at Temperance 
TORONTO 




96 



The Branksome Slogan 




Clifton Limited 

Toronto 



It's Results 
That Count— 

When You Want to BUY 
When You Want to SELL 
When You Want INCOME 

S. E. LYONS Limited 

Business and Industrial Real Estate 
Building Managers Realtors 

347 Bay Street, Toronto AD. 3282 



The Branksome Slogan 



97 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 




ilttdurattce €omp«>nij 



GRADUATE FIRST 



. . an 



d tk 



en 



T)rain ^or a MuHne^i Career 

THE SHAW WAY 




Choose a Business Career. Make sure now that 
the period of reconstruction finds you ready and 
trained to step into your opportunity. Young 
people will be required to fill ofiice positions 
which lead to well-paid appointments as Business 
Executives, Secretaries, Accountants, Office 
Managers. 

We invite you to enquire about the various Shaw 
Courses in Business Training. 



Here are a few of the SHAW Courses : 

Shorthand Bookkeeping Banking 
Typewriting Higher Accounting Commercial 
Office Training Secretarial Law 



Phone, co// or wrife for FREE fioofc/ef — 'Vp with the Times" to 

SHAW SCHOOLS—Head Office. 1130 Bay St., Toronto Kl. 3165 



SHAW SCHOOLS 



98 



The Branksome Slogan 



Carnahan's ^'^'^^^ 

Toronto 

Prescription Specialists 

FINE PERFUMES AND COSMETICS 

Expert Photo Finishing 
• 

Main Store: 

741 YONGE ST., TORONTO (at Bloor) KIngsdale 1197 

Branch Store: 

2066 YONGE ST., TORONTO (Cor. Lola Rd.) HYiand 1145 

WONDER 

BREAD and CAKE 

Baked by 

WONDER BAKERIES LIMITED 

183 DOVERCOURT RD., TORONTO 3 
Lombard 1192 



The Branksome Slogan 



99 



Queeiisdale Tea Room 

FOR QUALITY 

We serve the best the market has to offer 
SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT 

The meeting place for Branksome girls 



401 BLOOR ST. EAST, TORONTO 
Phone Midway 0233 



Ask your retailer for 

WHYTE'S 

Bacon and Hams 

Cooked Ham, Weiners and Bologna 
Nulaid Eggs and Butter 
Picake Shortening 
Pure Lard of Finest Quality 

Meats put up under Dominion Government Inspection 

WHYTE*S PACKING COMPANY 

LIMITED 

78-80 Frant Street East 
TORONTO ELgin 0121 



100 



The Branksome Slogan 



I 

TELEPHONE: Midway 5252 

Whitewood's Riding School 

R. E. WHITEWOOD, Prop. - Late Sergt. -Major, 4th C.M.R. 

Rear 921 Yonge Street 
Toronto, Ontario 

- o - 

PRIVATE ROAD FROM STABLE TO RAVINE 
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

- O - 

Riding and Driving Taught by Competent Instructors 
Saddle Horse Training a Specialty 



CLEANLINESS 

WILL ADD SMARTNESS TO YOUR PROPERTY 

STERILIZED WIPING CLOTHS 
RUBBERSET PAINT BRUSHES 
MOP WRIN GERS 
FLOOR BROOMS 
CHAMOIS 

MOPS 
STEEL WOOL 
PAPER TOWELS, TOILET TISSUES 
ETSOL CLEANING COMPOUNDS 
LIQUID SOAPS AND DISPENSERS 
JOHNSON'S INDUSTRIAL FLOOR WAXES 

HAMILTON BROS. 

26 SOHO STREET - ELgin 7423 TORONTO 

Industrial and Building Maintenance Supplies 



The Branksome Slogan 



101 



HEINTZMAN 




Makers of 
FINE PIANOS 

for over 95 years 

SHEET MUSIC — REiCORDS 

HEINTZMAN & CO. 

195 Yonge St. - Toronto 



Jewellers 
for more thdn 
75 years 



Kents 



I T E D 



144 YONGE ST. 



Compliments of A Friend 



102 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Commercial Life 

Has A Plan 

Whereby A Part Of Everything 
You Earn Can Be 

YOURS TO KEEP 

Thousands of dollars may pass 
through your hand's between your 
first and last salary cheque. How 
much will you keeip — for your own 
security and for your oblig-ations? 
Many young- people have found the 
solution in a Commercial Life Re- 
tirement Income Bond. 

THE COMMERCIAL LIFE 

ASSURANCE COMPANY 
OF CANADA 
Head Office: 3.50 Bay St., Toronto 

J. W. GLENWRIGHT, E. S. H. SHAVER, 
Managing Director. Secretary. 



PITMAN 
SHORTHAND 



SIMPLEST 

SWIFTEST 

SUREST 




REINFORCED REFILLS 
4 TIMES STRONGER 

NO LOST NOTES 

NO TORN SHEETS 

SAVES TIME AND TEMPER 

MADE EXCLUSIVELY BY 

W. J. GAGE & CO. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



^staWtstjcb 1797 

COOLING 
GALLERIES 

FINE 
PAINTINGS 



Biiks-Ellis-Ryrie Building 

TORONTO 

92 New Bond Street 
LONDON 



The Branksome Slogan 



103 



Nadine Angstrom 

HAND WOVEN GOODS 

KNITTING WOOLS 

GIFTS 
• 

OAKVILLE - ONTARIO 
Tel. 260 



l^fje intercsitrng 

(NEAR RED CROSS HDQTS.) 

32 Bloor Street East 
• 

Do you want the unusual and in- 
expensive in Jewelry (especially 
earrings, pendants and bracelets)? 
Keep coming to the shop that has 
bloomed into fascination I 

Dependable Watch Repairs. 



Co 

WITH 
COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE VARSITY 
ARENA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

G. TAMBLYN 
LIMITED 

I 

45 Retail Drug Stores 
in Toronto 



Stores also in: 

HAMILTON— GUELPH— KITCHENER 
STRATFORD— BRANTFORD— LONDON 
ST. CATHARINES— WINDSOR 
CHATHAM—OSHAWA— NIAGARA 
FALLS—KINGSTON— OTTAWA 
PETERBOROUGH SARNI A— BARRIE 
CORNWALL and OWEN SOUND 



104 



The Branksome Slogan 



INSURANCE 

in the best British and Canadian 
Companies 



FIRE PLATE GLASS 

THEFT (Residence) 
BURGLARY 
AUTOiMOBILE LIABILITY 

TOURIST BAGGAGE 
JEWELLERY AND FURS 
ALL RISK FLOATERS 
Etc. 



Geo. R. Hargraft & Co. 

49 Wellington St. E., Taronto 
Telephone: ELgin 8101 



Compliments 
of 



S. Godfrey Ltd, 



School Furniture 

Blackboards and Accessories 

Maps, Globes and Charts 

Kindergarten and Junior 
Grade Materials 

Fine Art and Handicraft 
Materials 



— THE - 

GEO. M. HENDRY CO. 

Limited 

270-274 KING STREET WEST 
TORONTO 1, ONT. 



ROHER'S 
BOOK SHOP 



15 BLOOR ST. W. 



KI. 3425 



All the latest 
BOOKS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

FOUNTAIN PENS AND 
PENCILS 

COSTUME JEWELLERY 

GREETING CARDS 
For all occasions. 



The Branksome Slogan 



105 



A. M. SHOOK 
&CO. 

INSURANCE IN ALL 
BRANCHES 

Fire Liability 
Accident 



802 NORTHERN ONTARIO 
BUILDING 

Toronto, Ont. 
Phone AD. 3469 



Brug ^tore 

BLOOR and SHERBOURNE STS. 
TORONTO 

Phone RAndolph 4165 



Harry T. Munro 

FLOWER SHOP 
822; , YONGE STREET 

AT CUMBERLAND 

Toronto 

_ O -— 

MEMBER OF 
FLORIST TELEGRAPH 
DELIVERY ASSOC. 

— O — 
Phone: KIngsdale 1144-5 

— O — 
Residence: LOmbard 7000 



INVIGORATES 
NOURISHES 
and SUSTAINS 

ROBERTSON^S 

MALTED MILK 

CHOCOLATE 
BAR 

• 

ROBERTSON BROTHERS 
Limited 

TORONTO : CANADA 
Sole Manufacturers 



106 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of 
MRS. CHAMBERS 



FRESH FISH DAILY 



SEA AND LAKE FISH 
FIRST-CLASS FISH AND 
OYSTER DEPOTS 



One Delivery Daily 



307 DANFORTH AVE. 

(Cor. Bowden Ave.) 

Phone; GE. 1131 

BRANCHES: 
1841 DANFORTH AVE. 
Phone: GR. 6671 

1518 YONGE ST. 
Phones: HYland 1113-1114 

651 ST. CLAIR AYJE. WEST 
LA. 3143 



Distinguished 
Appearance 



■ • • 



The distinguished ap- 
pearance of custom- 
tailored clothes is not 
accidental. It is the 
natural result of master- 
designing, precise indi- 
vidual fitting and superb 
workmanship. 



SKITCH CLOTHES 

9 ADELAIDE ST. E. 
ELgin 4763 



CLUB COFFEE 
COMPANY 

COFFEE ROASTERS 
TEA BLENDERS 



240 Church St. Telephone : 
Toronto ELgin 1161 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

WRIGHT'S 
MEAT MARKET 

631 ST. CLAIR WEST 
TORONTO 



The Branksome Slogan 



107 



THE CAMP FOR JACK AND JILL 

• • • in the Caledon Hills 

For Boys and Girls between four and nine years of age 

Phone or write to Camp Director: 

MISS OLWEN WILLIAMS 

July 1 9 - August 3 1 st, 1 946 Kindergarten Teacher, Branksome Hall 

or Two Periods of 3 weeks. 24 Elm Ave., Toronto Ml. 0842 



helen miller's 
Beauty Salon 



Stylists in Permanent Waving, Finger Waving, 
Marcelling and All Beauty Culture 

368 BLOOR EAST <Near sherboume) Latest Equipment 

RA. 7273 New Appointments 



Winona flowers 



413 BLOOR ST. EAST 
Phone RA. 2303 

Member of the F.T.D.A. 



The Gift and Toy Shop 

96 BLOOR ST. WEST 
TOYS GAMES BOOKS GIFTS 

Specializing in Dolls' House Furniture 
Cards for All Occasions 
MARION C. GAIRNS M. DONALD SMELLIE 



108 



The Branksome Slogan 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

George Rathbone Lumber 

Company Limited 

10 NORTHCOTE AVENUE — TORONTO, ONT. 
FINEST QUALITY FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

S. LIGHTFOOT & SON LIMITED 

Established 1873 

Summer Months COMMISSION MARKET Winter Months 

Fruit Market EL. 7120-7017 82 Colborne St. 

ST. LAWRENCE MARKET, EL. 7128 - FRUIT FARM, CLARKSON. ONT. 



Telephone: OX. 1105-6 92 Blantyre Ave. 

B. A. ROBINSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING, LTD. 

TORONTO 



FOR CAREFUL, RELIABLE EYE SERVICE 

E. F. DeFOE, R.O., D.O.Sc. 

OPTOMETRIST 

488 Bloor St. West TORONTO Phone MElrose 4801 



The Branksome Slogan 



109 




FOR GIRLS 
Five to Fifteen 

FOR BOYS 

Five to Eleven 
In the Highlands of Haliburton 

For illustrated booklet, jylease ivrite : 

CAMP DIRECTORS:— Mr. John Hoyle, B.Paed., M.A.; Miss D. W. Hoyle, B.A, 
50 BERNARD AVENUE, TORONTO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE COPP CLARK CO. LIMITED 
495-517 Wellington St. West 



TORONTO CANADA 



CANADIAN MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION SECURITIES 

F. H. DEACON & CO. 

Business Established 1S97 

Members Toronto Stock Exchange 
197 BAY ST. — TORONTO — ELGIN 3401 



Our Century of accumulated experience is at the 


service of 


every Bride in or out of Toronto. 




George COLES Limited 




Catering — Weddings — Banquets 


Our dining rooms are noted for home cooked 


foods 


for fussy people. 




719 YONGE STREET 


RA. 1163 



110 



The Branksome Slogan 



UPTOWN NUT HOUSE 

Nuts from All Parts of the World 
FRESHLY ROASTED and BUTTERED 
Peanut Butter- made while you ivait 
806 '/2 YONGE STREET, TORONTO 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

HARMONY GRILL 

"Good food is good health'^ 
259 Yonge Street Next to Imperial Theatre 



Compliments of a Friend 



(F) 



The Branksome Slogan 



111 



Compliments of a Friend 



112 



The Branksome Slogan 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

PAGE PAGE 



Nadine Angstrom 103 

B 

Bank of Nova Scotia 86 

Baker-Ashdown, Ltd 92 

Birks-EiHis-Ryrie 95 

Borden's 88 

W. Hu Bosley Co 94 

British-American Oil Co. Ltd 89 

C 

Carnahan's 98 

Mrs. Chambers 106 

Clifton Ud 96 

Club Coffee Co 106 

Geoirge Coles Ltd 109 

Commercial Life 102 

Coolings 102 

Copp Clark Co., Ltd 109 

Compliments of a Friend 101 

Camp for Jack ,and Jill 107 

Camp Gay Venture 109 

D 

F. H. Deacon & Co 109 

E. F. DeFoe 108 

Dominion Bank .: 93 

Dominion of Canada General Insur- 
ance Co 97 

T. Eaton Co (Inside Back Cover) 

Evangeline Shops 94 

G 

W. J. Gage & Co., Ltd 102 

Gift and Toy Shop 107 

S. Godfrey 104 

H 

Hamilton Bros. 100 

Geo. R. Hargraft & Co 106 

Heintzman Pianos & Co 101 

Holt Renfrew & Co., Ltd... 93 

George M. Hendry Co., Ltd 104 

Hooper's Drug Store 105 

Harmony Grill 110 

I 

Imperial Oil Limited 85 

Interesting Jewelry Shop 103 

K 

Kents, Ltd 101 



S. Lightfoot & Son, Ltd 108 

S. E. Lyons Limited 96 

M 

Macoomb Publishing Co 90 

Helen* Miller's Beauty Salon 107 

Harry T. Munro 105 

Mutual Life of Canada 91 

N 

William Neilson, Ltd 83 

John Northway & Sons, Ltd 87 

P 

Pitman Shorthand 102 

Q 

Queensdale Tea Room 99 

R 

George Rathbone Lumber C, Ltd. 104 

Robertson Biros., Ltd 105 

B. A. Robinson 108 

Roher's Book Shop 104 

S 

St. Andrew's College 95 

Robert Simpson Co., Ltd 81 

Shaw Business Schools 97 

A. M. Shook & Co 105 . 

Skitch Clothes 106 

T 

G. Tamblyn Ltd 103 

U 

Uptown Nut House 110 

V 

Varsity Arena 103 

W 

Whitewood's Riding School 100 

Wright's Meat Market 106 

Whyte's Packing Co., Ltd. 99 

Winona Flowers 107 

Wonder Bakeries 98 



When you shop at these stores tell them 
that you saw their advertisements in 
"The Branksome Slogan." 




Your EATON 

Junior Fashion Councillor 

PUTS US WISE! 

Ann and the sixty other Hi gals and Hi guys on our Toronto 
Junior Councils 1 They tell us all the news 'n* views of the 
Hi Crowd . . . the clothes you favour For your busy rounds 
. . . your fads 'n' fancies . . . and we take it all to heart I 
They keep us wise . . . that's why you'll find just what you 
want (classroom classics to datin* duds) at 



E ATO N'S 7^ Stone ^ Ifwutf C^xh4uU