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134S 



THE 

BRANKSOME 
SLOGAN 



Landmarks in Our History 



1903 — School established at 102 Bloor East. 

1910 — School moved to 592 Sherbourne Street. 

1912 — School purchased and moved to 10 Elm Avenue. 

1917 — Harrogate House bought. 

1921— Scott House bought. 

1924 — Gymnasium and Senior Class Rooms built. 

1926 — Swimming Pool completed. 

1927 — Main Building Common Room added. 
1935 — ^Clansdale Heights Farm bought. 

1937 — No. 16 made Principal's residence. 

1938 — Junior School Class Rooms added to Harrogate House. 
1942 — Sherborne House purchased for Senior residence. 
1948^ — No. 2 Elm Avenue secured. 

This last addition to our property consists of six acres of land 
adjoining Sherborne House grounds, a large part of which is in process 
of being made into a fine playing field for School games of all kinds, 
such as tennis, basket-^ball, soft-ball, archery, track events, etc. Facing 
the south and sheltered by the hills which form the ravine, this area is 
admirably suited for games at all seasons of the year, while the hills 
afford opportunity for skiing and tobogganing. 

We feel that we have been most fortunate in being able to secure 
such a large area in the heart of the city, and in acquiring for the use 
of Branksome girls an estate which has been a Rosedale landmark fo) 
so many years. 

At the annual Alumnae Association dinner this year, on February 
14th, it was moved by Shirley McEvoy and carried unanimously that 
the new property be named ''Readacres" in honour of Miss Read. 



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The Branksome Slogan 



EDITORIAL 

We live precariously in turbulent days when once again the im- 
mediate future seems none too bright. The world is in the throes of 
many changes — radical, gradual, vast and minute changes — and each 
change has its individual importance, its relative effect towards ultimate 
destruction or ultimate security and peace. Nations and' countries, cities 
and towns, factories and schools alike are affected by this metamor- 
phosis, whether it be good or bad. Branksome, too, takes her small place 
in this changing stream of life. 

Some changes seem small and insignificant at first, but they soon 
become a part of the tradition and background of the school. Branksome 
is justly proud, therefore, of a momentous change in the addition of the 
new property. Six new acres and a wonderful new^ residence are indeed 
a change in Branksome's world. They will provide modern class rooms, 
new art facilities, etc., as well as promise a more extensive sports pro- 
gramme. The future is very bright for up-and-coming Branksomites. 
They only have to know the envious thoughts of the graduating students 
as a proof that Read Hall is a change that is greeted with unhesitating 
enthusiasm. 1947-48 has been an important stepping-stone on the path 
of Branksome' s history. 

Although this element of change will undoubtedly prevail for years 
to come, there are basic foundations which, for the benefit of the school, 
must never change. Branksome's school spirit, for example, must retain 
its present glowing flame. Loyalty to the school, in all our thoug^hts, 
words and deeds, is equally as important, even in later years when we 
are out in the busy world and perhaps have begun to forget s.ome of 
"the best years of our lives". Then, come what may, although Brank- 
some will change in many respects, the essence of its being, its very 
drive and powder will remain unchanged^ and it will still stand ''ever true 
to God and right". 



The Branksome Slogan 



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EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief: 
Advertising Manager : 
Associate Editors: 

Reporters : 

Art Editors: 
Committer : 



Sally McConnell. 

Nancy Blundell. 

Jessie Marriner, Jeanne 
Roscoe. 

Elizabeth Evans, Mary 
Lou Porter, Marion 
Wallace, Heather Mac- 
Pherson, Shirlay Mair. 

Cathleen Cherry, Harriet 
Saylor. 

Ann Blackwell, Beverley 
Galbraith, Virginia 
L e i s h m a n, Mary 
Stephens, Maxwell 
Stewart, Joan Vipond, 
Norma Wood. 



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The Branksome Slogan 



CALENDAR FOR 1947-1948 



Sept. 10 — School opened. 

Sept. 12 — Gathering- of the Clans. 

Sept. 19 — Picnic in gym. 

Sept. 21— Rev. Calvin Chao. 

Sept. 28 — Harvest Festival. 

Oct. 3— Old Girls' Basketball. 

Oct. 5 — Wing Commander 

Spencer 

Oct. 7 — II Trovatore. 

Oct. 10 — Thanksgiving- Week 

end. 

Oct. 16— Elman. 

Oct. 22 — Installation of Prefects. 

O'ct. 23— B. Ball St. Clem. vs. B.H.. 

Oct. 24 — Fourth Form Plays. 

Oct. 26 — Mrs. Norman Stirrett. 

Oct. 27— B. Ball Moulton vs. B.H. 

Oct. 29— B. Ball B.S.S. vs. B.H. 

Oct. 31 — Masquerade. 

Nov. 2 — Canon Paterson. 

Nov. 4— B. Ball H.L.C. vs. B.H. 

Nov. 7 — Week-end. 

Nov. 11 — Memorial Service. 

Nov. 12 — Toronto Symphony. 

Nov. 13— B. Ball St. Clem. vs. B.H. 

Nov. 14 — Ramabai. 

Nov. 16— B. Ball B.S.S. vs. B.H. 

Nov. 19 — Winter Fair. 

Nov. 22 — Anthony and Cleopatra, 

Nov. 28— Ski Pictures. 

Nov. 30 — Mrs. Bronstein. 

Dec. 12 — Dance. 

Dec. 14 — ^Carol Service. 

Dec. 15— Whitby. 

Dec. 19 — School closed. 

Jan. 12— School re-opened. 
Jan. 16 — Skating Party. 
Jan. 18 — Mr. Peter Ackroyd. 



Jan. 19— Macbeth. 

Jan. 21— Twelfth Night. 

Jan. 23— Skating Party. 

Jan. 25— Mr. Rayfield. 

Jan. 30 — The Dance. 

Feb. 1 — Sound Movies. 
Feb. 3— Ice Follies. 
Feb. 6 — Skating Party. 
Feb. 8— Mr. Wilfrid Bauman. 

Feb. 11— Mr. Joe Muchan. 

Feb. 13 — Swimming Meet. 

Feb. 14 — Alumnae Dinner. 

Feb. 15 — Westmijister Church. 

Feb. 18 — First Form Plays. 

Feb. .20— Week End. 

Feb. 25— Hockey Match. 

Feb. 27— Disraeli. 

Mar. 5 — Fashion Show. 
Mar. 7-^Mr. Germaine. 

Mar. 12— Talent Night 

Mar. 14 — Dr. Strangway. 

Mar. 15 — Brailowsky. 

Mar. 17 — Barbara Ann Scott. 

Mar. 19 — Junior Operetta. 

Mar. 21— Mr. Adams. 

Mar. 24— School Closed. 

Apr. 6 — School re-opened. 

Apr. 18 — Mr. Don Warren. 

Apr. 25 — Rosedale United. 

Apr. 27 — Philadelphia Orchestra. 

May 2 — Confirmation. 
May 6 — Toronto Symphony. 
May 7 — Senior Operetta. 

May 11— Mr. Chas. Tipp. 

May 22— Week-end. 

June 4 — Strawberry Festival. 
June 6 — Closing Service. 
June 8 — Prize Giving. 



The Branksome Slogan 7 




We at Branksome are intensely proud of our school and of its tra- 
ditions. We are grateful, not only for the opportunities offered in 
education, but also for the splendid chances given in our sports. For, 
after all, learning to succeed in life is achieved not only in the academic 
field, but also in the field of sport, where we have been taught fair play, 
co-operation and sportsmanship. 

To be able to say that you have been graduated from Branksome 
Hall means a great deal in later years. It means that you represent a 
God-fearing school that has carried the beliefs of fair play and justice 
through forty years of service. It means that you, personally, believe in 
these qualities and are ready to support and defend them at any time. 

JOAN LANGLOIS, 

Head Girl. 



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The Branksome Slogan 



APPOINTMENTS 

Head Girl — Joan Langlois 

HOUSE PREFECTS 

Ann Armour, Doris Badgloy, Winifride Drover, Alcia Eager, Alma Hatch, Xandra Hoskingr, 

Judith ShoebottotA. 



DAY PREFECTS 

Valinda Burruss, Sally Dalton, Evelyn Howden, Joan Heise, Jessie Marriner, Sally McConnell, 

Joan Vipond, Jerry Weir. 



SUB-PREFECTS— (House) 
Marion Cornish, Helen De Nike, Mary Anne 
Hearn, Naomi Inglis, Charmian Philpott, Ailsa 
Reid, Helen Scace, Joan Spackman. 

BETTA KAPPA SOCIETY 
President — Alma Hatch. 
Vice-Presidient— -Ann Armour. 
Secretary — Betty Southgate. 
Treasurer — Joan Heise. 



Committee: Joan Ellis, Grace Flavelle, Marj rie 
Flavelle, Patricia Gillesijie, Virginia 
Hearst, Kathryn Keene, Charmian 
Philpott, Joan Vipond, Louise 
Walwyn, Jeri-y Weir. 

HIGH NEWS REPRESENTATIVE 
Jean Gillandars. 

CLAN CHIEFTAINS 
Scott — Joan ElHs, 
Campbell — Jerry Weir. 
Ross — Evelyn Howden. 
MacAlpine — Alison Zimmerman. 
MacgregoT — Sally Daltan. 
McLeod — Charmian Philpott. 
Douglas^ — Helen De Nike. 
Maclean — Naomi Inglis. 



SUB-PREFECTS— (Day) 
Nancy Blundell, Jean Catto, Helen Costerus, 
Joan Ellis, Maida Harris, Betty Southgatc, 
Muriel Joy Stewart, Louise Walwyn, Alison 
Zimmerman. 



OPHELEO SOCIETY 
President — Doris Badgley. 
Vice-President — Muriel Joy Stewart. 
Secretary — Judith Shciebottom. 
Treasurer — Valinda Burruss. 

Committee: Beverley Britt, Helen Costerus, Lucy 
Deck, Alicia Eageer, Maida Harris, 
Grace Seaman, Joan Spackman, 
Jean Wallace. 

I.S.C.F. 

President — Lucy Deck. 
Vice-President — Muriel Joy Stewart. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Melba Rycroft. 

SUB-CHIEFTAINS 
Patricia Marriner 
Barbara Fleming 
Jeanne Garrow 
Marjorie Flavelle 
Virginia Leishman 
Mary Lou Lyon 
Faye Purdy 
Joanne Moore 



LIBRARY ASSISTANT — Helen De Nike 

LIBRARY REPRESENTATIVES:— Jean Catto, Marjorie Flavelle, Wanda Hutchings, Barbara 
Gorman, Elizabeth Evans, Miriam Moeller, Patricia McClocklin, Patricia Howorth, Joan Somerville, 
Ellen Avigdor, Millioent Hsiung, Peggy Porter, Joan Adamson. 



FORM OFFICERS 



President 

Form VA — Jeanne Garrow 

Form VB — Joan Spackman 

Form VSp. (Com.) — Jane McPherson 

Form VSP. rH.E.)— Chairman Philpott 

Form IVA — Margaret Ohisholm 

Form IVB — Jane Macaulay 

Form IVSp. — Joanne Moore 

Foim III A — Sally Lang-ford 

Form IIIB^ — ^Marion Wallace 

Form IIA^ — Lynn Dibblee 

Form IIB — Pauline Cole 

Form lA — Shirley Mair 

Form IB — Joan Bradshaw 



Vice-President 

Norma Wood 
Marion Cornish 
Julia Echlin 
Frances Fair 
Mary Louise Edmonds 
Jean Trestrail 
Molly McMurray 
Patricia Garnett 
Corinne Mayhew 
Heather McPherson 
Joan Mawhinney 
Joan Archer 
Nancy Patten 



Sec. -Treasurer 

Grace Flavelle 
Patricia Phair 
Peggy Bamford 
Jocelyn Wright 
Helen Hill 
Harriet Say lor 
Jo Ann Patterson 
Wendy Aitken 
Susan Stott 
Anna Lea Elderkin 
Frances Snetsinger 
Beverley Balmer 
Nancy Lyle 



The Branksome Slogan 



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SUB-PREFECTS 

Left to Rig:ht: M. A. Hearn, J. Snackman, M. Harris, M. J. Stewart, H. Costeres, 
Ailsa Keid, N. Blundell, J. Catto, L. Walwyn, H. Scace, B. Smithgate, 
M. Cornish (absent). 



AWARDS 1947 

JUNIOR SCHOOL PRIZE LIST 

Grade III— Pamela Kerr. Grade V — Elizabeth Wilson. 

Grade IV — Hilary Warren. Grade VI — Patricia Fulford. 

Grade VII — Sandra Robertson, Elizabeth Smyth. 
Grade VIII — Mary Barnet, Jennifer Jones. 

SCRIPTURE 

Jennifer Jones, Shirley Mair, Beverley Balmer, Anne Stagg. 



SENIOR SCHOOL PRIZE LIST 

FORM IV 



English— Sally McConnell. 
French — Valinda Burruss, 
Latin — Jessie Marriner. 
Science — Evelyn Howden. 
History of Art — Janet Stewart. 



History — Sally Dalton. 
Mathematics — Jean Catto. 
Spanish — Dorothy Burnham. 
Interior Decoration — Jocelyn Wright. 



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The Branksome Slogan 



FORM V 

General Proficiency — Barbara Wales. 
English — Anne Burton. French — Barbara Wales. 
Mathematics — Beverley Rush. Biology — Aune Merriman. 
Physics and Chemistry — Patricia Marlow. Latin — Judith Godfrey. 
Secretarial — Elaine Hutson, Diane Kinzie. 
Interior Decoration and History of Art — Barbara Metcalf. 
Home Economicsi — Margaret Ross. Library Service — Judith Godfrey. 
Essays — Helen Costerus, Diana King, Esther Turnbull. 
Slogan — Judith Livingston. Poetry — Joan Heise. 
Perseverance — Jane Macaulay. Dramatics — Sheila Craig. 
Co-operation in Residence — Frances Snetsinger. 

PRIZES VOTED FOR 

Best AH Around Girl — Anne James. 
Integrity — House, Jean Reid; Day, Elizabeth German. 
Sportsmanship — House, Sally Spence; Day, Mary Craig. 
Service — House, Josephine Williams; Day, Antoinette Echlin. 
Loyalty — House, Catherine Shields ; Day, Sheila Craig. 
Perseverance — House, Grace Seaman; Day, Jane Hamilton. 
Comradeship — Helen De Nike. School Spirit — Diana Windeyer. 

MARGARET T. SCOTT MEMORIAL PRIZES 

Memorizing of Scripture 

Doris Badgley, Anne Croll, Alicia Eager, Lorene Piercey, Ailsa Reid, 
Jean Reid, Jean Roscoe, Grace Seaman, Esther Turnbull, Marilyn Webb. 

MEDALS 

Ruth Caven Memorial — Evelyn Howden. 
Scholarship, Form V — Anne Burton. 
' Governor- GeneraFs — Patricia Marlov^. 
Jean Hume Memorial — Anne James. 



PREFECTS 



Ann Armour — Vice-president of the B.K. Ann 
plans to enter dramatics at London next year. 
(Sideline — psychology at Western). Ambition 
— to play woman's part in a play. 



Alma Hatch — Persevering President of B.K. 
"Bubs' " quick trips to Oakville, wowing 
Boston society, keep Branksome's athlete 
busy. Talents include tennis, track, badmin- 
ton, basketball, etc. 



Doris Badgely — Energetic president of Opheleo. 
Her pat expression is "Oh, conscience!" Will 
make hats while on duty in the nurses' resi- 
denca at Kingston. 



Joan Heise — Member of B.K. Spends her time 
out of Botany experimenting with fermented 
yeast. Desired future — Occupational Therapy 
at U. of T. 



Valinda Burruss — Says there's no place like 
Trois Pistoles. Opheleo's stalwart treasurer 
claims her "life's a mess". Linda forever 
has open house; is B.H.S.'s hope for a 
scholarship. 



Xandra Hoskingr — "Xanie" is crazy about 
horses. Occasionally has a blackie cocker as 
a guest. A good friend to all and full of fun. 
Future — une autre nurse. 



Sally Dalton— Likes all sports (led 1st B.B. 
team, tennis and badminton champ, star 
swimmer, also manages to do "push-ups). 
"Wee MacGregor" returns to G.B.C. — a law 

prospect ! ! 



Evelyn Howden — Ross chieftain, captain of 
2nd B.B. team. Her long NAVY blue sweaters 
are a familiar sight. "Hev" sets out on her 
quest for nursing in Greenland ! 



Winefride Drover — "Freddie" is a Bluenose 
contribution to Branksome. "Fooshing" off to 
the dentist, and playing bridge (especially at 
midnight) are her main occupations. It's 
Queen's next year! 



Jessie Marriner — Maintenance of 1st B.B. 
team, regularly visited Summit this winter. 
Jess pines for N.S. fish and seaweed. Is our 
sporting sports editor. 



PREFECTS 



Sally McConnell — EnterimHiiiK editor-in-chief, 
on 1st B.B. team, terrific tennis player. Well 
informed on Timaffami. Trinity, Toronto. 
(Scottish — a true Scotswoman — loves kilts!) 



Joan Vipond — Member of B.K. You notice 
the sun-lamp fjrlow, yeorf^eous auburn tresses. 
Interests centred on certain fraternities, 
bridge and the "New ^ Look". Headed for 
Varsity. 



Judy Shoebottom — Secretary of Opheleo. 
"Shudy's" tenth and final year in boardinjz:. 
She can hardly wait to R-et to University. A 
wonderful "Queen Victoria" with definite 
heart interest. 



Jerry Weir Active Campbell chieftain, tennis 
fiend, Lst team B.B. player. Leads a yay 
social life. Shares "Mac's" interest in Trinity 
and kilts! Claims fame at Gay Venture. 



V ACADEMIC 



Nancy Bicatty — Eaton's Jqnior Council Rej). 
You notice that terrific complexion — that 
voice ! Claim to fame — flutter-brain and head- 
ed for the lounge at R.Y. 



Shirley Brown — "Buster" appears to be (luiet. 
but who knows? Enjoys tennis and all kinds 
of music. Ambition — to take a hostlinp: trip 
across Canada. Future — nursing. 



Nancy Blundell— Sub prefect. Small, lot of 
fun, is efficient advertising editor of the 
Slogan. Hobby is J. F. Outside interest — 
J. F. Favourite topic of conversation — J. F. 



Jean Catto — Va's mathematical genius, is in- 
terested in riding, geometry, riding, algebra, 
riding, trig. Next year at Trinity in Honour 
Science and Mathematics. 



Joan Bradely — Member of "Night Hawk Club". 
Has one ambition — to pass a Geometry test. 
Teased a lot about those "teners", has diffi- 
culty in finding stamps. 



Marion Cornish — Sub-prefect. Butterscotch 
plus horses equals our "Cornie" — star boarder 
of the one and only "pink room". Enthusi- 
astic collector of old Peruvian door-knobs. 
Destination— Phys. Ed. at McGill. 



y ACADEMIC 



Helen Ccsterus — Suib-p refect. Member of 
Opheleo, was an eager prop in V's "Queen 
Victoria". Plans an industrious career in the 
school of nursing-. 



Joan Ellis — Sub-prefect. Scott's industrious 
leader has an unfathomable taste for egg- 
noggs and Corn Flakes ; skis, swims and golfs 
— all exceptionally well. Future — ^engineering, 
chemical or marital. 



1 



Mary Beth Coutts — Quiet and demure, "Mame" 
converses I'eadily on any topic concerning 
Mount Forest (especially cadet corps), al- 
though Gait is known home. Indefinite cai'ecr 
at Western. 



Grace Flavelle^ — Our own Sara Bernhart from 
"mighty" Vancouver. Actively interested in 
evei-ything — from plumbing to singing "Begin 
the Beguine" for "Bubs". Headed for U.B.C. 




Helen De Nike — Sub-prefect. Douglas chief- 
tain. Library rep., staunch player of 1st B.B. 
t;am. Can be .seen evei-ywhere. You can't 
miss that infectious grin and friendliness. 
Destination — Psychology at Queen's. 



Marjorie Flavelle — Giggles plus pearls equals 
"Pudgie". Note her gleaming hair. Member 
of B.K. who bathes monthly in full dress. 
Apprenticing at an undertaker's is probably 
destiny. 




Luci Deck — President of I.S.C.F., our poetry 
champion hails from Australia, where she 
Isarned the fine art of P.T. Who is the 
interest at Jarvis? 



Barbara Fleming — Barb, with her friendly 

dimple, is a great six)rt — especially famous in 
the skiing world. Interested in music. 1956 
will probably see her at the Olympics ! 



^^^^ 



Jean Debbie— "Dob", from Victoria, B.C., is 
a fiend at the piano. Intends to be at Victoria 
College (B.C., that is!) next year. Interests — 
symphonies, writing to Andy. 



Margraret Foulds — Loves tennis and badmin- 
ton. Note that natural curl! A frequent 
question from Marg — "How do you do this 
Algebra?" Veteran of 11 years at B.H.S. 



V ACADEMIC 



Jeanne Garrow — President of Va, instigator 
of form play. Helps Evis rule the Rosses, 
feeds Dalton cookies. Likes sailing and ski- 
ing (wonderful skiing at Collingwood, they 
say ! ) . 



Naomi Inglis — Mclean's chieftain, bulwark on 
1st B.B. team. "Ne" dove and swam on 
swimming team. Our ^1948 debutante is 
famous for her curly !? hair and her skiing! 



Ann Godisall — shows an avid interest in tracks 
with white rails. Loves music and animals 
(with dark eyes, dark curly hair . . .). 
Future — a bookie. 



Barbara Keeler — Music, especially South 
American style! tennis, .skiing (she's a whiz!), 
tall, dark, handsome . . . (gxiess who?) are 
Barbie's favourites. Future — Phys. Ed. at 
Varsity. 



P'&ggy Hand — Member of the "Group of 
Seven" (visitors to IVb French classes). 
Likes badminton and rushing to Muskoka on 
week-ends. Future — a term at Port Credit 
High, then nursing. 



Kathryne Keene — Member of B.K. Our Oak- 
ville blonde spent a most profitable summer 
in New York. "Keeney" is an accomplished 
diver, etc. Note her short kilt and her long 
legs ! 



Maida Harris — Our quieter sub-prefect was an 
angel in the pageant. Authority on China 
and Latin. Interested in swimming. Prob- 
able future is nursing. 



Joan Langlois — Who's our "H.G."? Who's 
proud of her Western lineage? Who's known 
as Big Sulphur? Who persists in, "Kids, 
guess what?" basketball and tennis? Who? 
It's LUNGS! 



Rosemary Hutchison — Spends all her spare 
time doing Spanish. Is very interested in 
Michigan University. Another tennis player 
and another prospect for nursing. 



Ann Larmour — Otherwise known as "Voyag- 
eur" from Saskatoon. Always planning big 
week-ends. Biggest plans for her future — 
Queen's! Can be heard "beating it out"^' in 
Sherb. 



V ACADEMIC 



June McMu'len — Member of the "Big Four" 
bridge club. You notice her deep voice and 
heavy correspondence with O.A.C. Knows 
everyone headed for P.H. and E. at Queen's. 



Melba Rycroft — May be found now and then 
in Va. One of our Trig brains (?). Plans 
to take Pass Arts at Queen's. 



^1 

L 



Paula Mounce — From Newburgh (suburb of 
Napanee, that is!). Notice her dark hair, 
deep, dark eyes ! Headed for nursing, seen 

in Va furiously finishing her French. ^ 



Grace Seaman — Opheieo member, "Grassy" 
sticks out her tongue while catching up on 
Caesar. Likes tennis, laughter, hates arti- 
chokes. Ambition is nursing-. Destiny — first 
woman explorer of moon. 



\ 



V. 



Eileen Murton — "Murt", chief paiJer "hander- 
out" in zoo, is always tired on Thursday. 
Ambition — to drive a car, play tennis. Loves 
badminton. Fascinating future at Varsity. 



Carol Secord — Returned from Florida with the 
New Look in a dark shade. Intere.sted in 
maths, modern music AND George. 



Marilyn Nation — Just ask Marilyn how to fool 
the authorities in crossing the border. A 
Jamaica import who suffered bad i-epercussions 
from a winter of skiing. 



M 



Helen Sibbett — Champion bridge player and 
skater ; likes knitting and other pastimes as 
well. Is heading for Trinity. Another favour- 
ite is Russ. 



I 



Pat Phair — You notice her French book in 
her hand. Her favourite animal — the horse 
in gym. Hobby is collecting coins from Vb. 
Good luck in dental nursing, Pat ! 




Ann Smith — "Andy", our Lauren Bacall, is 
active member of school life — particularly 
swimming, riding and skiing. Queen's and 
perhaps a law profession ai-e the planned 
future. 



V ACADEMIC 



Shieila Smith — Vb's Latin genius claims she 
lost her knowledge of French between Mont- 
real and Toronto. Favourite occupations' — 
swimming- and skiinj?- Most desired future is 
one of loafing- — possibly St. Anne's. 



Jean Wallace — "Wally" — 5' 1" of vim and 
vigour — usually seen with a gleam in her eye, 
snippers in hand. Hobby isx Dicky birds! 
Destination — nur.sing ! 



Betty Southgate — B.K.'s illustrious secretaiy 
takes a lively interest in badminton and 
tennis. "South" returns to England for the 
summer and re-returns to Trinity. Has a 
recent past at Lake of Bays. 



Harley Walters — Pastime is taking life as it 
comes and U.T.S. Pet aversions — answering 
history questions, skiing at 5 a.m. Probab 
future — taking life as it comes — and U.T.S. 



Joan Spackman — St. Thomas's President of 
Vb. member of the Opheleo. Note : starry- 
eyes and passion for mushrooms. Usually 
found losing "things". Probable destination 
— "The Lady with the Lamp". 



Louise Walwyn — Our symphony rep. Her 

high^class tastes run to classical music and 

James Mason. "Weesy" is noted for her 
lovely blonde hair and sweet voice. 



Muriel Joy Stewart — "Myrt" is kept busy as 
Vice-president of both I.S.C.F. and Opheleo. 
Interested in dramatics and badminton. 
Brilliant future in nursing. 



Helen Wilkinson — Her trade marks : numerous 
hair-do's, "don't be a chicken", bridge game, 
letters to "Spike". Will model New Look on 
little farm. 



Helen Stronach — Note her Florida tan. "Hes" 
loves basketball and swimming. Spends most 
of her time in York Mills. Ambition — to be 
a dietitian. Future — matrimony. 



Norma Wood — Enthusiastic forward on 1st 
B.B. team. Note that gurgling g-iggle, that 
Ottawa stride. Ambition — to "curl the close 
crop" with a needle. Destiny awaits her at 
Western. 



V COMMERCIAL 



Peggie Bamford — Form treasurer, conspicuous 
for her absence (especially during- the Lent 
Collection weeks). Blonde and freckled. 
Possible near future — marriage. 



Pat Gillespie — Member of the B.K. — alway s 
anxious to help. Diplomatic relations with 
Great Britain have been difficult. Note her 
inability to decide Which One ! 



Caroline Benson — Redhead. How easily she 
manages always to have the wrong work 
done ! Favourite occupation — hours on Satur- 
day. 



Evelyn Grant — From Jamaica. Note her 
friendliness and gorgeous shoes ! Likes swim- 
ming in the salty sea sans swim suit. Future 
— air-line hostess for Pan-America. 



Jane Echlin — Inability to be in the right place 
at the right time — weakness for Collingwood 
at week-ends — the other of the two. 



Wanda Hatchings — Came to us from "Kar- 
sons" in Ottawa. Enthusiastic drummer, 
skier, rider, speller. Montreal — mostly what's 
in it. Wanda's whole existence is just 
"Scoooper !" 



Judy Echlin — Secretary of class. Which one of 
the two? Weakness for orange milk shakes. 
Dislikes sweeping floors. Future is un- 
certain. 



Jane McPherson — Intellectual form President, 
seen showing that Ipana smile out loud. Weak- 
ness for the "Lig^ht of My Life" and Babe 
Austin. F\iture — Branksome's own Oima 
Wright. 



Jill Etherington — Blonde bomsbhell from Burl- 
ington. Noted for THOSE eyes! Past- 
madly p'anning week-ends. Future — headed 
F.O. Vogue School in Chicago. 



Jean Morine — The thirteenth to join the class, 
yet far from least. Commercial's brain. You 
notice her weakness for second helpings. 



V COMMERCIAL 



Barbara Robinson - "Bobby" our Boston 
cream pie — is noted for that cute smile and 
tiiat sparkler. Often Keen writing to and 
receiving letters from a certain someone 
wonder who ! 



Dorothy Edwards — "Ah! kids, it's nighty- 
night time!" That's Dodie, who lesides 
(luietly in the Geranium Room. Noted for 
that shiny hair and good hunr^our. Destina- 
tion— Mac Hall. 



Mary Stephens — Britain's contribution — 
"Stevie" is noted for her implied humour, 
weakness for butter tarts, and "navy blue". 
Will make an excellent doctor's wife. 



Frances Fair — Will "Nanno" never stop 
chopping at those locks? If you're in doubt, 
ask Nanno where Ajax is. Future — most 
decidedly undecided. 



Barbara Tobias — Not much of her, but what 
there is wastes no tims. Shines in tyiiing. 
"Toby" is apt to lose her appetite while in 
love. < 



Ann Fitzpatrick — Ann brings a bit of old 
Ireland to us. Loves to putter in pottei-y and 
hopes to grace the Art College. Interested 
in handicrafts and yellow convertibles. 



V HOME ECONOMICS 



Sally Beckett — Sally's active spirit brightens 
up V Special, especially on blue Mondays. Is 
enthusiastic about sports, particularly tennis. 
Ambition — to be able to eat during class. 
Future — catching burglars ! 



Beverley Galbraith — A quieter member of the 
class, from Willowdale, who excels in piano 
playing — especially "The Blue Room", Enjoys 
visiting around with her neighbours. 



Francois Chaubert — Frannie is Switzerland's 
contribution to the development of culture at 
B.H.S. You notice THE accent, her hair and 
tennis. Destination — a chalet on an alp. 



Barbara Gorman — Barb regales her friends in 
the panty Monday morning with the week- 
end's activities. From what we've heard about 
her future, we hope she can cook ! 



V HOME ECONOMICS 



Margaret Graham — A g-igg-le during- c'.ass from 
the far side of the room — that's Marg ! Her 
secret ambition is to sit in closer range of 
Sally's marshmallows ! 



Jeanne Roscoe^ — Note that "northern accent" 
and aesthetic ( ?) taste. Ros says, "just an 
old northern custom". Ambition — to drive a 
Cadillac convertible. Future — implying humour 
at Cantab. 



Janet Kingsburgh — "Yea, Navy!" Noted for 
that giggle, her knack of blushing. A wonder- 
ful cook, possessing a good nature. Destina- 
tion — second mats on a destroyer. 



Sylvia Thompson — "Foosh !" there goes Sylvia! 
Note the led hair and long legs. Can be seen 
hanging from rings in the gTm at any time. 
Destination — unknown. 




Joan Lindsay — Here to-day, gone to-morrow. 
Joan is one of our enthusiastic bridge players 
— but oh ! that bidding ! Plans to enter 
Shaw's. 



Diana Waddington — Quiet in her own way, 
but there no doubt she's around when she 
hears that model "T". Future — that's what 
we'd all like to know. 



i 



Charmian Philpott — "Chum" is class Presi- 
dent, MacLeod chieftain, (2 minutes silence) 
member of B.K. Excels in wit and humour. 
Keeps calm at all times. Destination — an 
"ether" artist. 



Jean Williams — "Willy" planned to raise 
golden Hampshires with Joey ; has turned 
her affections to Barney, her dog. Knows all 
about plastering. Life calling still undecided. 



Jean Robertson — "Jeanikins" lives on the 2nd 
floor with the other "J's". Note that south- 
em drawl, redi hair, and pin collection. Desti- 
nation — Oakville. Ambition is to sleep ! 



Jocelyn Wright — Oh! that coiffure!! We're 
still dazed. Loves dog's (especially Bo), horses 
and golden Hampshires. V Special will long 
remember Joey's questioning mind. 



Form News 

From the scholastic aspect and in outside interests, this school year 
has met with rousing success. We got off to an active start with picnics 
up at Clansdale Heights. Each form went up on a different day, and all 
found beautiful autumn weather and wonderful fun at the farm. Later 
in the year, when snow covered the hills of Clansdale Heights, we went 
back on form ski-picnics. 

In October, the hard-playing Form I captured the basketball cup. 
All forms were kept busy in clan competition — volley-ball, badminton, 
swimming, basketball, and bowling teams. 

For many form members, dramatic interests came first. Play 
practices were an important part of their activities. After hard work 
and planning, each form presented a play. Form IV put on "A Miracle 
in Blaise" and '*A Night at An Inn". '*A Ghost Named Henry" and ''The 
Perfect Gentleman" were presented by Form HI. Form II gave us 'The 
Little Father of the Wilderness" and "Belle", and Form I, "Scrambled 
Eggs" and "Babe Goes Dramatic". In all, worthy efforts were very 
successful. 

Now an active and energetic school years ends and, looking back, 
we are brought clearly to the realization that we have had a ripping 
good time! 




CLASS PRESIDENTS 
Standing: C. Philpott. J. MacPherson. 
Seated: J. Garrow, J. MacCaulay, P. Cole, J. Bradshaw, J. Spackman, M. McMurrayr 
M. A. Chisholm, S. Mair, .T. Diblee, tM>. Wallace (absent). 



22 



The Branksome Slogan 



The Clans 

(Quite in keeping with our kilts and Gaelic yells, we at Branksome are divided 
into eight "clans", as most schools are divided into houses. A new girl coming to 
Branksome may express her preference for one of the following: Campbell, Douglas, 
MacAlpine, MacGregor, Maclean, MacLeod, Ross or Scott. The Slogan has been 
asked to print a short historical account of each of those Scottish clans which have 
been chosen as our patrons. Editors.) 

The Camptoells have played a great part in Highland history. They 
were the rivals and later the supplanters of the old Lords of the Isles. 
Many elan territories, such as the MacDonald, MacGregor, Lamont, 
Macnaib, MacNaughtons and others, were gradually acquired by. the 
Campibells. Through the numerous clan conflicts of the early Scottish 
history the Campbells always managed to be on the right side, either by 
sword or by diplomacy. More than once in history has that war song, 
"The Campbells are Coming," struck terror into the hearts of incon- 
venient rivals of the clan; for when the Campbells came they usually 
came to stay. The tartan we use at Branksome is the Campbell of Bread- 
albane, which is one of the three divisions of the clan, the other two 
being Campbell of Argyll and Campbell of Cawdor (Caldor). The crest 
of Campbell of Breadalbane is a boar's head; the present chieftain of 
this clan is 8th Earl. 

The origin of the Douglas clan, one of the most powerful families 
in Scotland and rivals of Royalty, is unknown. A branch of the Douglas 
clan is called Douglas of Drumlanrig. The "Black Douglas" mentioned 
in history was the Good Sir James of Douglas, a great captain in the 
long War of the Succession. The hero of seventy fights, it is said that 
he won all but thirteen, so leaving the name of Black Douglas — suggest- 
ed by his swarthy complexion. He was slain during one of the Crusades, 
carrying the heart of his royal master. The motto of the Douglas Arms 
is Jamais arnere — (Never behind). On the crest the bloody heart com- 
memorates Bruce' s dying request to the Good Sir James to carry his 
heart to the Holy Land; the three stars which both the Douglases and 
the Murrays bear in common seem to denote the descent of both from 
one ancestor. 

The actual name of Alpine is derived from the Welsh. The ancestor 
of the clan is believed to be Kenneth MacAlpine. The clan itself has at 
all times claimed the distinction of being the noblest and most ancient 
of the Highland clans. The crest of the MacAlpines is a boar's head 
with the motto, ''Remember the death of Alpin". This motto refers to 
the murder of King Alpin by Brudus after the Picts defeated the Scots 
in the year 834. 

"Royal is my race" is the motto of the MacGregors, the senior of 



The Branksome Slogan 



23 




CLAN CHIEFTAINS 
N. Inglis (Maclean), J. Weir (Campbell), A. Zimmerman (MacAlpine), J. Ellis (Scott), 
C. Philpott (MacLeod), S. Dalton (MacGregor), H. De Nike (Douglas), 

E. Howden (Ross). 



the Clan Alpin. The clan claims descent from Griogar, third son of King: 
Alpin, king in the year 787. The neighbours of the Clan Gregor, the 
Campbell's, unlawfully obtained the land belonging to the Gregors. The 
latter then used forceful means to regain it, acquired a reputation for 
turbulence, robbery and disturbance of the peace of the country. By an 
Act of Parliament the clan was then forced to change its name. Many 
were chosen, but the one by which we now know it is the MacGregor 
Clan. 

The motto of the Maclean clan is ''Life or Death". The first of the 
clan of whom there is any authentic account is Gillean of the Battle-axe, 
named from his pioverbial dexterity with that weapon, who lived during 
the reign of Alexander III. Most of the branches of the Clan Maclean 
now bear, as part of their armorial bearings, a battle-axe in memory of 
their famed ancestor. 

The origin of the MacLeods is not very well known by historians, 
but they are beheved to be descended from the Norse. According to the 
traditions of the Norse origin, the forefather of the MacLeod Clan was 
Leoid, son of the Black King of Man. The family seat of the clan is 



24 



The Branksome Slogan 



Dunvegan Castle ; it is a grand old place, combining the romance of the 
ninth century with the comfort of the twentieth ; in it are preserved 
some of the most famous relics of the past. 

The Ross Clan takes its name from the province of Ross. The name 
in Gaelic is Clann Andrias. One account of the origin of this clan reports 
that it came from the Nioisemen. The district of Ross was very fre- 
quently mentioned in Norse sagas along with other districts ruled by 
the Mormaors or Jarls. It was only upon the downfall of that powerful 
race that the Chiefs of Ross first appear in history. The badge of the 
Ross Clan is juniper, which in Gaelic is aiteann. The crest is a hand 
holding a garland of laurel. 

The Scotts, one of the most powerful Border clans, take their name 
from the race who invaded Scotland in the early ages. The Scotts of 
Buccleuch (mentioned in Sir Walter Scott's ''Lay of the Last Minstrel") 
and the Scotts of Balwearie were descended from Uchtredus filius Scoti, 
who witnessed charters between 1107 and 1128. Sir Michael Scott, a 
famous wizard, also mentioned in 'The Lay", who died about 1200, was 
actually one of the most learned men of his time. Sir Walter Scott was 
himself a descendant of the Scotts of Harden. The war cry of this clan 
is "A Ballandean". The seat of the Scotts of Buccleuch was Branksome 
Castle, after which this school is named, in honour of the founder, Miss 
Scott. 



Events of the Year 



GATHERING OF THE CLANS 

The first Friday in September, after the return to school, found 
sports activities off to a fast start. The eight clans gathered on Sher- 
borne lawn for their first annual gathering and clan games. New girls 
began to feel at home leaping down the lawn tied up in a sack and try- 
ing to defeat contestants from the other seven clans. The complete 
MacGregor clan was to be found afterwards clustered about two 
enormous cakes which they won as first prize. 



26 



The Branksome Slogan 



INSTALLATION OF PREFECTS 

The annual installation of the prefects and officers of the school 
was held on Wednesday, October 22. Miss Read ratified the appointments 
of the sub-prefects and clan chieftains and, with a few words to each, 
installed individually the sixteen prefects and Joan Langlois as the head 
girl of the school. An explanation of the school standards to the parents, 
friends and new girls followed. The school flags were then placed in the 
four corners of the gymnasium. The school song effectively completed 
a very impressive ceremony. 

That evening, the newly-appointed officers of the school were 
entertained at dinner by Miss Read. Toasts were proposed to the new 
boarders, the new prefects, the head girl and Miss Read. The dinner was 
a fitting climax to a memorable day. 



THE CAROL SERVICE 

The last Sunday of the Fall teim was kept, appropriately enough, 
for the annual carol service. It was again held in St. Andrew's Church 
and, large as the church is, hardly another person could have found a 




ARCHERY AT "READ ACRES" 



The Branksome Slogan 



27 




BADMINTON TEAM 
S. Dalton, A. Hatch, K. Keene, B. Southgate, N. Wood, F. Snetsinger. 



seat. It encouraged us as we realized that there were few people who 
do net enjoy singing the carols. 

The carols were selected from a wide choice; many of them were 
ones that we had known for years and which are sung Christmas after 
Christmas. But Miss La Von had also gone to a great deal of trouble 
cheesing ones that were not so well known, including a Czechoslovakian 
and French one, and I think that I can truthfully say that these new 
ones were included among the old favourites by the end of the term. 

The service began with a cornet solo by Captain Parr from the 
back of the church. He played ''Hark the Herald Angels Sing", a perfect 
beginning to the service. The processional carcl was ''Masters in This 
Hall" and the school, led by the prefects and the clan chieftains, came 
into the church on either side and met at the centre aisle. The singing 
of the carols was evenly distributed between the junior and the senior 
schools, some being in unison, some in parts and some sung by the two 
special choirs consisting of the 1st and 2nd forms in one and the Chapel 
and Choral Choirs in the other. Added to these, Miss Faver sang a solo 
which few of us will ever forget. I feel we owe a great deal of thanks 



28 



The Branksome Slogan 



to Mr. Bales, who played the organ for us on the Sunday and also at 
the rehearsal. 

The service ended as perfectly as it had begun, with the pageant 
produced by Madame Perry. In this 'we saw all the characters that we 
connect with the Christmas season. The scene was very simple, the 
shepherds and the wise men coming up to the Chancel steps while at 
the back stood the angels blowing their golden trumpets: 
''Hark the herald angels sing. 
Glory to the new born King." 



ARCHERY 

Aim low! Shoot! A Cold! 
Something similar to this might 
be heard by anyone passing by 
Sherborne lawn on a warfni 
autumn afternoon of this year. In 
the spring term, however, archery 
moved to the new property. On 
either of these inviting lawns 
Branksome' s kilted cupids assem- 
bled to practise the art of the bow. 
However, we aimed at no heart 
but at the bright yellow spot in 
the centre of the various coloured 
circles known as the ''gold". Arch- 
ery, one of the newer sports on 
our list, is growing in favour. 
Many beginners attended the in- 
struction classes and the old- 
faithfuls turned up regularly for 





the practise periods. The fall sea- 
son was clo'ssd with an inter-clan 
archery tournament. A cup for 
the highest scoring archer was 
added last year to the list of sports 
prizes. It was carried off in 1947 
by Anne Garland. 



BASKETBALL 

The first Friday evening in 
October, this year's first and sec- 
ond basketball teams played a 
friendly game with a last-minute 
team made up of form one to five 
years previous. The competition 
was good and the game was keen- 
ly played, with both the old girls 
and the present girls putting forth 
their best efforts. After the game 



The Branksome Slogan 



29 




we all adjourned to the common 
room for chocolate milk and cake, 
and there old friendships were re- 
viewed and new ones begun. Need 
we mention that the present girls 
won? 

The inter-school basketbal] 
schedule was unfortunately mucPi 
shortened this year. All the teams 
were very disappointed to learn 
that no return matches were to be 
played, although this did not 
dampen their spirit in the games 
that were played. The third team 
heaped glory upon itself by win- 
ning all its games. Congratula- 
tions are due to the captain; also 
the captains of the first and sec- 
ond teams. Some nice team work 
was especially noted among the 
second team guards. 

The first and second teams made 
their annual trip to Whitby on De- 
cember 15, supported on the side- 
lines by the third team. We regret 
to say that O.L.C. lost not only the 
game but also one of their gym 
hghts. The Branksome teams will 
also remember the very delicious 
refreshments. O.L.C. arrived at 



Branksome on January 19 for a 
return match, which was also won 
by the Branksome teams. 

Clan basketball matches were 
played after the inter-school 
matches were finished, supported 
by the enthusiasm of the whole 
school. Basketball, too, is a spec- 
ial talent of the MacGregors and 
they defeated the Macleans only 
after several members of both 
teams were bodily carried off the 
floor. They became dizzy from 
watching the ball. 

Third Team — Forwards: Frances 
Snetsinger (captain). Norma Web- 
ber, Priscilla Strand, Cathleen 
Cherry; Guards: Helen Scace, 
Muriel Ferguson, Pat Marriner, 
Eleanor Greenwood, Jane Capon. 

Fourth Team — Forwards: 
Heather McPherson, Alison Roach, 
Mary Wilkinson, Shirley Mair, 
Jane Bradshaw, Claire McMullen; 
Guards: Alice Ann Russell (cap- 
tain), Joan Mawhinney, Elve 
Cassels, Lyn Dibblee. 



Bong, bong, bong. 
Bong, bong, bong, 
Bong, bong, bong. 
Bong, bong, bonj?, 
Midnight, by golly! 



Little cuts from classes, 
Little cards marked late,. 
Make the senior wonder 
If she'll graduate. 



30 



The Branksome Slogan 



BETA KAPPA 

Hallowe'en — the night of ghost and goblin — was celebrated with 
great enthusiasm and even greater' success. A masquerade party, to 
v/hich everyone came as a nursery rhyme or fairy tale character, was 
highlighted by a truly hilarious skit performed by the staff and led by 
Miss Read herself. The costume competition was followed by square 
dancing and refreshments, which combined to make it a very enjoyable 
evening. 

After many last-minute alarms we finally got Sherborne House 
decorated in the true Christmas fashion for the Fourth and Fifth Form 
dance — the Holly Hop — ^which was a great success. 

Amid frequent balloon **poppings", the scrapings of numerous step- 
ladders, noisy and confusedly shouted directions from everybody and 
nobody, there was slowly but surely emerging the product which was 
seen with great appreciation by all who attended our annual Branksome 
At Home last January the thirtieth. I think we'll all agree that the 
Beta Kappa did an exceptionally splendid job. The decorations this year 




SECOND BASKETBALL TEAM 
L. Deck, N. Gammon, H. Stronach, B. Fleming, E. Howden (Captain), V. Leishman, 
M. Binnie, A. Zimmerman, J. Gillanders. 



The Branksome Slogan 



31 




We remember — Helen De-Nike: her unselfish team spirit and dependability. 
Jerry Weir: her effort and improvement. Alma Hatch: her qui^k thinking; infallible 
lay-up shots; her hard-felt hin. Norma Wood: her Ottawa training in her snectacular 
team work with Alma, Sally Dalton: Captain: her fighting fortitude; bullet-like passes; 
"Get those rebounds". Naomi Inglis: her height, endurance and experience. Sally 
McConnell: her interception and "purple" perseverance. Joan Langlois: her perfected 
pivot and bounce. Jessie Marriner: her endless energy and calm efficiency. 

were in '*ye olde Scottische" tradition, with six larger-than-life-size 
Scottish Highlanders looming tall and strong on several of the walls. 
Crossed swords above the gym door, clan standards, kilts and tam 
o'shanters all lent an impressive atmosphere in honour of dear old 
Scotland. And the balloons! — thousands of them, covering the ceiling, 
gave a particular festivity to the occasion. The dancing began promptly 
at nine o'clock to music under the most competent baton of Stanley 
St. John. Although much-appreciated punch was served for the duration 
of the dancing, we were all glad to receive at the end of the evening 
ice cream, delicious coffee and our Jeannie's ''out of this world" chocolate 
cake. 

During the Winter term we had a very successful Talent Night. 
Practically everyone who was stage-gifted in any way performed, 
entertaining the audience by means of the piano, flute, singing, dancing, 



32 



The Branksome Slogan 



recitations and humorous skits. With so much talent in the school, as 
Miss Read has said, it is a pity that we have not had more Talent Nights. 

The Strawberry Festival and Graduation Dance, which is to be 
held this year at the new house, are both yet to come. We hope that they 
will be successful and will wind up ^he Beta Kappa's activities for this 
year with a bang. 

In closing, I would just like to say on behalf of the Beta Kappa 
that I hope you had as much fun at the dances as we had planning them 
at our ''obstreperous" meetings. 



DISRAELI 

Though there is no official Dramatic Society at Branksome, there is 
a group of girls who are definitely interested in the drama. These girls 
worked for many weeks, on Monday evenings and Thursday afternoons, 
under the able and energetic coaching of Miss MacNeill and Miss Sime, 
and on February 27 they presented Disraeli. 




SWIMMING TEAM 

J. Ellis, W. Rogers, A. Sutherland, J. Archer, N. Iiiglis, M. L. Carnahan, S. Thompson, 
E. Cassels, C. McMuUen, S. Dal ton. 



TENNIS TEAM — 1947 
Standing: B. Southgate, A. Hatch, J. Bradshaw, J. Langlois. 
Seated: H. McPherson, J. Binnie, P. Cole, S. McConnell, F. Snetsinger, S. Mair. 

Excelling in the title role was Helen DeNike, whose performance 
as the clever, kindly statesman will long- be remembered by the audience. 
In their supporting- roles, Ann Armour as Viscount Deeford, Ann Cool- 
ing- as Lady Beaconsfield, Mary Louise Edmonds as Lady Clarissa and 
Grace Flavelle as Mrs. Noel Travers turned in splendid performances. 
The rest of the cast as genteel young lords and ladies provided the 
necessary Victorian atmosphere. It was noticeable that to the seven 
ladies in the cast there were twelve gentlemen ; very courageous in a 
female cast! Chaimian Philpott as Potter, the gardener, deserves 
special credit for most spontaneous humour and a convincing country 

accent. 

LS.C.F. 

During the past year the Fellowship has enjoyed weekly meetings 
at No. 16 Elm Avenue. Our meetings were held at noon to avoid clashes 
with afternoon sports. Each month we had two Bible studies, a mission- 
ary study, and a speaker. Among our speakers were Miss Read, Miss 
C. Nicoll, Miss M. Fish, Mrs. Harris, Miss G. Murray, Miss LaVon 
Doherty and Dr. Northcote Deck. Beside our weekly meetings we had 
a Fall picnic up at Clansdale Heights and a party in January. We are 
looking forward to another picnic this spring. 



34 



The Branksome Slogan 



THE OPHELEO 

This year we of the Opheleo would like to extend our most sincere 
thanks to all the staff and girls for' the wonderful co'-operation which 
we have received from them in our various campaigns. We are also 
very grateful to the four missionaries who so kindly brought us movies 
of the Belgian Congo, Ecuador, China and India during our Lenten 
collection. In addition to our usual contributions to the continents and 
our Ramabai week collection for India, we also sent donations to the 
Canadian Indian Hospital in Manitoba and the Save the Children Fund. 
We hope that in the future the Opheleo will continue to meet with co- 
operation and success in order that it may carry on its work of aiding 
people in all parts of the world. 



TREASURER'S REPORT: 



Cash Received: 

Ramabai Week 

Community Chest — 

Carol Service 

Lenten Collections 



257.70 
203.00 
301.50 
315.41 



Cash Paid Out: 

Ramabai Mission ^ 

Shalini, Indian orphan .... 

Community Chest 

Nathaniel Institute 

Merchant Marine 

Shantymen's Christian 

Association 

Salvation Army 

Overseas Postage 

Expenses 

Africa 

Ludhiana Hospital 

Clarabai, Indian teacher.. 
Canadian Indian Hospital 

Belgium 

South America 

China 

Save the Children Fund 



Balance on hand 



200.00 
50.00 
203.00 
25.00 
25.00 

25.00 
25.00 
100.00 
101.50 
25.00 
50.00 
75.00 
25.00 
10.00 
50.00 
25.00 
50.00 

$1,064.50 
13.11 



$1,077.61 



$1,077.61 



In June we expect to collect as usual $100 for underprivileged 
children. 

VALINDA BURRUSS, 

Treasurer. 



The Branksome Slogan 



35 



SWIMMING 

The first teiTn started Brank- 
some off with a bang when the 
great inter-clan swimming meet 
was held. Fun was had by both 
the spectators and the daredevils. 
They had everything from three- 
legged races and three-armed races 
to potato and spoon races. The 
Scott clan swam to victory for the 
third consecutive year. During 
October and November, senior Red 
Cross swimming classes were held 
twice a week. The girls partici- 
pating were examined by a Red 
Cross examiner and an extremely 
good showing was made by the 
class. Twenty girls received cer- 
tificates and pins. Several girls 
tried their Red Cross instructor's 
test this year at the U.T.S. swim- 
ming pool and all were successful. 
Some girls took classes in the 
Royal Life Saving bronze medalion 
and silver award of merit. 

On February 13th, our hard- 
working team was off to Bishop 
Strachan School to a swimming 
meet in which B.S.S., Havergal, 
St. Clement's and Branksome took 
part. The team was cheered on by 
Branksome 's spectators to take 
third place. The score was added 
to by Wendy Rogers, Eve Cassels 
and Sally Dalton placing first, sec- 
ond and third in the junior, inter- 
mediate and senior diving, respect- 
ively. Ann Sutherland swam her- 
self to third place in the inter- 
mediate back crawl for style, while 
Naomi Inglis swam the senior 
breast stroke for style to' tie for 
first place. 




On April 15 the sides of Brank- 
some's pool were filled to over- 
flowing with eager Branksomites 
when the Ontario Ladies' College 
came down to swim against our 
team. 

During April, Miss Read an- 
nounced that a cup had been do- 
nated to the school for the diving 
championship. The swimming and 
diving championship contests have 
not yet taken place but will be 
keenly contested when they do. 



Curious fly, 
Vinegar jug, 
Slippery edge, 
Pickled bug. 



36 



The Branksome Slogan 



SKIING AND SKATING 

Great enthusiasm was shown 
this year in the Saturday and 
week-end excursions up to Clans- 
dale Heights. We are certainly 
very lucky in having- our farm 



late afternoon a weary but happy 
crowd, having struggled up the 
last hill, would flop into the await- 
ing buses for the ride homeward. 

As many week-ends as possible, 
a group of girls went up to the 





adjoining the Summit property, as 
this enaibles us unlimited use of 
this vast skiing terrain. 

Practically every Saturday 



farm for Saturday night, coming 
home Sunday afternoon. These 
week-end excursions were much 
looked forward to by all and wait- 





morning, buses left the school load- 
ed with skiing enthusiasts to spend 
the day at the farm. After lunch 
everyone was off to the slopes, 
winding down through beautiful 
Silver Birch Trail for four hours 
of wonderful skiing. Then in the 



ing lists were the order of the day. 

As the valley from the main 
lodge over to Snow Flake Valley 
was lit at night, it provided won- 
derful skiing by moonlight (and 
electric light) after supper. 



The Branksome Slogan 



37 



As skating- this year did not 
come out of school time, it was de- 
cided that each form could afford 
the time to have a "winter picnic" 
up at the school farm. This was 
done with great success and gave 
us the complete Summit property 
practically all to ourselves for an 
afternoon. There are rumours of 
a clan skiing meet for next year 
which should prove a great deal of 
fun for both beginners and the 
more experienced. So, first thing 
next season — let's all get out and 
practise ! 

This year, Branksome had the 
outdoor rink at Varsity. There 
was skating throughout the week, 
much to the joy of the skaters. 
Instruction for both seniors and 
juniors was pfiven twice a ^-^eek. 
Having a much larger rink and its 
being outdoors seemed to draw 
more skaters. Skating was a big 
success this year. 



BADMINTON AND BOWLING 

This year at St. Paul's, B -ank- 
some, represented by Helen De- 
Nike and Muriel Ferguson, took 
top honours in bowling, with 
Haver gal pushing second. In the 
badminton, Havergal came first 
with a score of 8 and B.S.S. and 
Branksome were not far behind 
with their respective scores — 7 
and 6. The badminton team is to 
be specially congratulated as it is 
the first year on the team for 
nearly all players. A tournament 
was also played for the school 
cups. Alma Hatch gained the 
singles cup, with Katherine Keene 



as runner-up, while Sally Dalton 
and Frances Snetsinger won the 
school doubles. Clan badminton 
and bowling were keenly contest- 
ed. MacGregor, Campbell and Ross 
placed respectively in the badmin- 
ton, and the Dou:?las clan won a 
decisive victory in the bowling 
alleys, followed by Maclean and 
Ross. 



TENNIS 

Branksome was lucky last 
autumn in having Mrs. Swanick 
and Mrs. Dewhurst — two English 
professionals — come to give lessons 
to would-be tennis players. The 
courts this spring are more than 
ever in demand by the enthusiasts 
eager to show off their new powers 
in the game. Practising is well 
under way for the school cham- 
pionships as well as for the tennis 
team. Last year saw many thrill- 
ing sets before the outcome became 
definite: Willa Birks was singles 
champion and Sally Dalton and 
Alma Hatch were doubles winners. 
Branksome sent a strong team to 
the tennis meet last year and, al- 
though defeated by Havergal Col- 
lege, it showed an indomitable 
spirit. We are looking forward to 
this year's meet. 



VOLLEYBALL AND SOFTBALL 

Volleyball at Branksome Hall is 
not played on a large scale. Be- 
cause we are very lucky in having 
so many sports in which to par- 
ticipate, there has been only one 
attempt to organize an inter- 



38 



The Branksome Slogan 



school volleyball tournament, and day, the Sherborne and Senior 

in the last few years there' has Main House g-irls winning- the 

been no time for a similar under- laurels, 
taking. 



The clan tournament is always 
a great deal of fun, however, and 
the games are enjoyed very much 




by all those who play, and it is 
hoped that we shall be able to take 
a more active interest in volley- 
ball in the years to come. 

The inter-house soft-ball com- 
petition is one of the events of the 
Spring term. This year it was 
played on a cool and showery April 



SPORTS DAY 

When the kilts were flung to the 
ground, the jumping pits dug and 
the shot-put ring marked, it was 
a sure sign the Sports Day was 
here ! Yes, Sports Day — the day 
for which many enthusiastic 
Branksomites had worked and 
practised long hours to try their 
skills at the wide variety of events. 
From the keen competition in the 
1947 meet, Leonette Baldwin and 
Alma Hatch emerged with the 
coveted Intermediate and Senior 
Championships. 

The 1948 Sports Day is now in 
sight and it seems as though there 
will be a great many eager con- 
testants competing for the much- 
desired awards. 



40 t'* :' The Branksome Slogan 




CREATIVE EFFORTS 

A PLAN TOO PERFECT 

Mr. Daley sat at his office desk, staring at a picture of his wife, 
Janet. His fingers drummed the surface of his desk nervously as his 
mind wandered back over the events of the morning. 

This was it — the perfect murder. He was sure of that. He went 
back carefully over his plans. His thoughts shied away from recalling 
the inert body of his wife lying on the kitchen floor where he had left 
her. He had planned his crime for weeks, and finally put it into action. 
Nothing could gO' wrong and he would be rid of Janet forever. Sweet, 
loving Janet^ — ^how carefully he had planned her death ! The wiring of 
the telephone had been completed for days. He had studied the fixtures 
and wired the telephone so^ that the whole first floor of the house would 
explode when the 'phone rang. Everything was completed but the final 
wire, which was to' be connected before he left for the office that day. 
That morning he had killed his wife; crushed her skull with a heavy 
candlestick. He recalled with a shudder stumibling back into a table as 
he saw her face staring up at him. Then he had collected his wits; care- 



The Branksome Slogan 



41 



fully locked each door, connected the last wire of the telephone, and 
quickly leaving the house, had hurried to the office. 

He summed it all up in his mind; if someone knocked at the door, 
no one would answer, and no one could enter the house to find the body. 
But the first time the telephone rang, a section of the house would 
explode, destroying all evidence of his crime. Defective wiring would 
be blamed for the explosion, and no one would ever suspect him. 

He rubbed his hands in satisfaction and then pressed a button at 
his elbow. Why not do the job himself? 

His efficient secretary, Miss Roberts, entered and inquired, "Did 
you ring, sir?" 

**Yes, get Mrs. Daley on the phone, will you please," he answered 
gruffly. 

*'At once, sir." She left the oflfice and he waited tensely. 
Miss Roberts re-entered. 'Tm sorry, Mr. Daley, the line is busy. 
Shall I call again?" 

Busy! The man was stunned. The line could not be busy. Could it 
be possible that the body had been discovered? Even now they might 
be calling his office ! He suddenly remembered knocking the table over. 
Of course ! The telephone had been on that table. He had knocked the 
receiver off, then. He tried to regain his composure. 

''Shall I try again, sir?" The voice of his secretary came to him 
again. 

**0h yes. Yes. Try again in about twenty minutes." That would 
give him time to get home and back to the office again. 

After Miss Roberts left, Mr. Daley caught up his hat and coat and 
left the office by the back way, thus making sure no one saw him leave. 
He reached his home in a few minutes, walking swiftly and keeping his 
eyes lowered. He felt certain everyone he passed pointed an accusing 
finger at him; he had never thought his conscience would bother him. 

He fumbled with his key and unlocked the door. Going straight tO' 
the kitchen, he did not glance at the body of his wife, but went directly 
to the telephone and replaced the receiver. Stepping carefully around 
the body of his victim, he picked up a candlestick from the floor and 
went to the sink with it. He washed the blood from it and placed it on 
the table beside the phone. 

Just then the doorbell rang. He froze in his tracks. He could not 
answer the door; no one was to know he had left the oflflce. Again the 
bell rang. There was nothing he could do but wait. The bell rang im- 
patiently a third time, and then he heard retreating footsteps. With a 



42 



The Branksome Slogan 



deep sigh of relief, he started across the room. He found his gaze drawn 
to the face of his dead' wife. He paused. 

At this precise moment the efficient Miss Roberts again dialed the 
I home of Mr. Daley, her employer. 

This time the line was not busy. 

MARIAN WALLACE, HIB. 



CREATION 

What is this world? 

Flaming mass of substance 

Twisting forever 'mid a myriad of spheres, 

Whirling down the vast uncharted mists of time. 

What is this earth? 
Object of God's love 

Flung in space for all the silence of eternity. 

Revolving, unceasing, through known paths of the universe. 

What is God? 

Infinity, Perfection, Life, 

Eternal Ruler of Time and the Universe, 

Set a million worlds beyond all grasp of circumstance. 

God is Creation. 

He is Supreme, Sublime, Eternal, 
His is our tiny world, our little earth, 

We are but a fragment of His creation and a figment of His love. 

CHARMIAN PHILPOTT, 
Form V Special. 




OCTOBER IN ONTARIO 

*Tn autumn, when the leaves are bro^wn, 
Take pen and ink and write it down." 
I am going to take Humpty Dumpty's advice to Alice in Through 
the Looking Glass. 

The sun was gradually rising, etching the hills black against the 



The Branksome Slogan 



43 



pale pink eastern sky, visible only through the turbulent mist as I stood 
on the edge of the crystal clear lake. My shoulders shuddered from the 
damp, nipping air as I heard the rustling of the fallen leaves and the 
waking songs of the chattering birds. 

Looking over my shoulder, I could see that the first rays of the 
autumn sun touched the crest of the hills reflecting the gaudy reds and 
oranges of autumn colours. As I watched, the rays climbed down the 
hills, making them look like a football stadium on a cold day. 

The leaves began to crackle as the sun hit the lake, causing the 
mist to break, soar up, gather and blow away like clouds in an angry 
sky. 

Just below me I could see a family of deer coming down to water 
before the rest of the forest life could arrive. The fawns romped and 
played on the sandy beach not far from the protection of their mother. 

As the mist" rose slowly, cutting oflP my vista that with its beauty 
had almost hypnotized me, I turned back to my campfire thinking that 
another new day had been born — full of beauty and life. 

NAOMI INGLIS, VB. 




Wee MacGregor Was Here ! ! I 



44 



The Branksome Slogan 



SUNLIGHT AND SOMBREROS 

The day was sunny and bright; 
one of those late August days in 
Wyoming when the sky is a 
heavenly blue and the majestic 
Bighorn Mountains rise above the 
prairie enshrouded at their snow- 
capped peaks by a silver haze. The 
prairies and foot-hills were parch- 
ed to a delicate reddish-brown 
which contrasted delightfully with 
the last of the purple lupins and 
sweet-smelling sage bush. Here 
and there a band of wild horses 
grazed, sometimes kicking and 
nipping at each other ; their bodies, 
well rounded by July's succulent 
hay and alfalfa, flashed crimson 
and golden in the sun. 

The town of Sheridan was abuzz 
on this morning of mornings. The 
annual rodeo was commencing to 
take shape in the form of a parade, 
bazaar and wild-west show, all in 
one. It was the day when owners 
of the top breeding and racing 
stables brought their choicest ani- 
mals to compete for the state's 
biggest stake races, cow-cutting, 
bull-dogging" and bronco riding 
classes. The wagons and vans 
representing their different ranch- 
es were lining up, their gaudy 
colours making a fringe around 
the fair grounds. 

The town seethed with Indians 
--Cheyennes, Blackfeet and Crows 
from the neighbouring reserva- 
tions. Their swarthy faces con- 
trasted with their gay shawls, 
blankets and beaded accessories. 
Many a Blackfoot chief had turned 




out in his traditional feathered 
headdress, his expressionless coun- 
tenance glistening with war paint. 
His squaw walked behind him, her 
beady black eyes never ceasing to 
dart hither and yon in rhythm 
with her short, light footsteps. 
The squaws often carried a tiny 
papoose on the back or hips, his 
beady eyes peering inquiringly out 
of his little doe-skin case. 

On the steps of Bison Bar, or 
in congenial groups straddling the 
corral gates, the makers and 
shapers of the Great West draped 
themselves — the cowboys. Most of 
them were long and lanky, broad- 
shouldered and sun-tanned. Wide 
sombreros and "ten-galloners" 
were creased and pulled well for- 
ward to shield their eyes from the 
sun. Tanned necks and arms pro- 
truded from their best festive 
shirts of gay colours. Their age- 
old boots and jingling silver spurs, 
caked with mud and manure, 
showed beneath each pair of blue- 
jeaned legs. One of the boys pro- 
duced a banjo and sat strumming 



The Branksome Slogan 



45 



it and singing in a rich untrained 
voice while his admiring cronies 
listened. His straw sombrero was 
tilted back and he looked up at the 
sun as though singing a hymn to 
it for the mere joy of living. His 
tanned face broke into a broad 
smile, lighting his deep blue eyes 
that rivalled the sky's azure hues, 
as his comrades bellowed the 
choruses to his songs with all the 
vigor and heartiness of the young 
and free. 

A laughing, jovial fellow made 
himself the centre of attention on 
the porch of the inn, where he 
stood waiting for a parade. He 
was a familiar, amusing, yet rather 
pathetic figure to all around him — 
the dude tenderfoot. His over- 
festive cowboy suit, embroidered 
lavishly with red and yellow 
flowers, and his ten-gallon hat 
were hardly suited to his pudgy 
form. He was bubbling over with 
wild and wonderful tales of 
'Injuns" and *'broncs", his pink 
face a study of confused merri- 
ment, like a small child who knows 
he has the grown-ups' attention. 

Thus the Western town prepared 
for the big day. 

DIANA KING, II-A. 



McDUFF 

McDuff, he was teddy bear, 
Of slightly portly girth; 
Who got a very dreadful scare 
When crossing o'er the firth. 



His craft was but a rowboat, 
And the waves like mountains 
seemed ; 

How could he coax the ship to float 
When winds against him teamed? 

* 'Where can the shore have dis- 
appeared?" 

Our perplexed bear was heard to 
moan. 

As through the mist he vainly 
peered 

In search of land to call his own. 

At last our brave bear heaved a 
sigh. 

For there beneath his tubby form 
The good strong earth did firmly 
lie, 

Safe refuge from a wayward 
storm. 

McDuff, he was a teddy bear, 
Of slightly portly girth. 
Who got a very dreadful scare 
When crossing o'er the firth. 

JENNIFER JONES, I-A. 




46 



The Branksome Slogan 



THE FIRST ADVENTURE 

At seven fifteen on the morning of Tuesday, June the twenty-first, 
Bobby Dickens quietly but firmly closed the front door, wriggled into 
his shoes and started down the path to the green gate. His most prized, 
though perhaps not his most useful, possessions were tucked securely 
under his right arm in a scuffed black box. In his left hand he carried 
a white package marked ''breakable". He should have delivered the 
package the day before, but he had forgotten, and now his conscience 
told him to respect his mother's wish even if he were running a-way 
from her. 

From his house it was only two miles to his aunt's small farm 
(that is if you cut through Lawyer Corner's property, jumped the 
creek and managed to get over the big stone wall at the south end of 
the meadow). Boibby was certain that he could manage all that. 
Obstacles however large seemed as insignificant to him as they become 
to old people, and his heart thumped excitedly at thoughts of what he 
might encounter on his first real adventure. 

He would see that the package was given to his aunt; this would 
be done secretly and safely by a scout, this scout being, of course, Nina, 
the young cockney housekeeper. 

Then, freedom! The whole world to explore. He could go east, 
west, north, anywhere at all, be anything and everything he wanted. 

So Bobby Dickens began his first adventure. As he started along 
the old road that twisted through the meadows he whistled. His blood 
pounded wildly through his veins^ — it was not that he was unhappy at 
home, but a boy had to become a man some time, and — well, see things 
for himself and find out what they mean. 

Bobby knew the road well ; many times in the last two' of his seven 
years his feet had scampered or plodded or skipped or dragged over it, 
depending on his mood. Now he walked steadily, looking ahead most 
of the time, not stopping to watch a cricket jump on to the toe of his 
shoe, or to' shake the nimble young cedars to see how gently their 
feathery tops rocked. He did not hear the scratching sounds the 
squirrels made as they scurried down the black trees. He did not see 
a lone lark soar effortlessly into the sky, far above his head. 

His mind belonged to' circuses, to open-topped buseis, to ships as 
large as cities and to shops where anything could be bought for a penny. 

He came to the funny little fence that wound not too defiantly 
about Lawyer Corner's garden. Bobby knew its weak spots and he knew 
where its holes were. Usually he crawled through one of these, but 
to-day he had on his good suit and he decided that if the world was to 
see him at his best, he had better climb over. 



The Branksome Slogan 



47 



There was a fountain in the centre of the g'rounds which had 
always fascinated Bobby. Below the marble g-oddess, whose hair was 
a continuous stream of water, tiny brightly coloured fish swam grace- 
fully among their more awkward companions, the frogs. Bobby stopped. 
He stepped on to the base of the fountain and, by straining his slender 
body from the tip of his toes to his neck, he was able to reach over and 
touch with his outstretched hand the feet of the marble goddess. She 
was smiling at him, but then he thought, ''She always smiles". He 
wondered if perhaps at night, when the blackness fell about her, the 
corners of her mouth turned down and her hair stopped flowing. He 
wished he knew for sure. He poked at the fish and the frogs for a while 
and started on his way once more. 

He walked slowly past the brilliant beds of flowers, and he thought 
that when he was a big man, really strong, he would come back to take 
the fountain away; Lawyer Corner was a very kind and rich man; 




48 



The Branksome Slogan 



Bobby did not think he would miss it. Besides he was terribly old and 
would probably die soon, and then Who would look after the g-oddess ? 

Ominous clouds suddenly (fathered, thickened and hovered over 
Bo'bby's black head, but it was not until the first drop of water bounced 
on his ear that he noticed them. At first he was alarmed at the idea of 
a thunder storm overtaking him, but his fear was swept away by the 
thrilling anticipation of battling the elements by himself — one man 
against all nature's wrath ! 

The rain came down, lightly, making a murmuring sound while the 
sky thrust darkness upon the earth. Not until Bo^bby reached the tiny 
creek did he realize how cold he was. A wind had sprung up and it 
seemed to jump out at him from every direction. 

He tried to hurry more. He decided he could rest and get dry in 
his aunt's barn ; she need never know he Was there. 

He looked for the little row of stepping stones that trailed across 
the stream; they were hidden by the jostling, tempetuous water. Boibby 
stopped and watched, fascinated and shivering. He had never seen this 
frothing mass before; the creek he had known was serene and deep 
with a sunny brown bottom. 

Somehow he had to get across that raging torrent and there seemed 
to be no other way except to wade. Already his clothes were clinging 
to him, sucking at his skin. He floundered and fell and the rushing 
water splashed over him, but the river was narrow and soon he was 
clambering up the steep bank on the other side, feet sliding and sinking 
in oozing mud, hands grasping at pieces of brush. 

At the top he stopped for breath, and a long uncontrollable shudder 
shook him. 

With the wind slashing his back like a whip, he tried to run across 
the open field. Ahead was the big stone wall and, beyond it, his aunt's 
farm. 

He tried whistling, but the rain and the wind and the thunder 
killed the sounds before they left his lips. The soft grass, trying to flee 
from the storm, thrust itself forward at Boibby' s feet. A million sting- 
ing drops swept hot tears down his cheeks. 

His head was bowed, and he was almost at the wall before he saw 
it. The old box he had been grasping so tightly was squashed and a 
lump came suddenly to his throat as he thoug'ht of the little brown 
monkey who was wet and miserable inside. 

With a great effort, he climibed into the crotch of the gnarled 
apple tree which grew against the wall; once there, he could just reach 
the top. He put his aunt's breakable package carefully, if shakily, on 



The Branksome Slogan 



49 



the ledge and slid down the trunk to pick up his own treasures. His 
hands were cut from the rough bark, but he did not know it. When at 
last he reached the top of the wall himself, he lay there, still and pant- 
ing, unable to think or to feel for some minutes. 

Then, summoning all his remaining strength, Bobby began to lower 
himself. He struggled to find the hole into which his foot would fit and 
support him while he got whatever he had left on top. This time he 
could not find the hole. His arms ached and a peculiar feeling came over 
him. He tried to fight against it, but he became very weak and very 
warm, and then he fell to the ground. 

When Bobby Dickens awoke, he saw his aunt's kind face and heard 
Butch's tail thumping beisde him. 

*'He left the horses so he could look after you to-night," she said. 

*T bet they wonder where he is," whispered Bobby, his gray eyes 
turned questioningly towards the barn. 

His aunt put a cool hand on his brow and smoothed the black curls 
back. 

'To-morrow your mommy's coming over, Bofoby, to take you home." 

He smiled and closed his eyes. 

"I haven't seen her for such a long time." 

ANNA GODSALL, VB. 




50 



The Branksome Slogan 



THE ROCK 

A wind-swept rock; 

Just a piece of land stretching 

Beyond the hmit of the usual 

boundary. 
An ancient monument, 
Carved by the keen blade of winter 

gales, 



That the waters may pound, 

And the winds roar, 

And the rains fall, 

And the sun shine; 

But all these things together 

Cannot harm the flowers, 

Or the rock. 

GRACE FLAVELLE, V-A. 




And the year-round pounding of 
the sea. 

Northward stand the mountains, 

Snow-capped, cold and brilliant 

Even in the summer sun — 

Things of majesty and grace. 

But see the rock. 

In the sheltered crevices 

The shallow earth 

(A mean and frugal saving of the 

years) , 
Has borne her children — 
Erupted slowly and painfully 
A few tender stems 
With red and yellow heads. 
And has nourished them with 

care 



FACTS ABOUT FLOWERS 

Oh, plants, they may be pretty 
things. 

But, oh! the names they've got! 
They have a language all their own 
That we take up in Bot. 

We hear of xylem, and of phloem. 
Of flowers smooth and lacy; 
Of carpels, bracts, and pedicels, 
And scrophulariaceae ; 
We study stamens, roots and seeds. 
And fruits that are quite tasty; 
The love-life of a pollen grain, 
And all the Liliaceae. 



The Branksome Slogan 



51 



And now, whenever I see a rose, 
1 can't just sniff its essence; 
Instead, I must pull off its leaves, 
And learn its inflorescence. 

J. HEISE, V-A. 



THE CHEMISTRY LAB. 

Up in the Chem. Lab., 
On the third floor. 
The air seems to hit you 
As you come in the door. 




'TIS THE FAR COOLINS" 

I wear the kilt. 
I dance the fling. 
I thrill to hear 
The bagpipes sing. 
I smell the heather. 
Of haggis I dream, 
I eat my porridge 
Without the cream. 
I study Scott. 
I read B. Burns. 
My heart to 

Highland country yearns. 
I hoard my money. 
McLean's my clan. 
But still I be— 
An Irishman ! ! ! 



A mixture of acetic 

And bromthymol blue. 

Such substances Pastuer, 

I'm sure, never knew. 

The test-tubes we've broken I 

The sulphuric we've spdlt! 

My tie is in flames, 

There are holes in my kilt. 

That extra window 

On the south wall 

Just isn't meant 

To be there at all. 

But one star student. 

In a moment of glee. 

Dumped explo'sives together— 

Oh, woe. Chemistry! 



SALLY MoCONNELL, V-B. 



A. J. BUCHAN, IV-A. 



52 



The Branksome Slogan 



FORGET IT 

When someone hasn't played the 
game, 

And you have had to take the 
blame, 

Don't turn around and do the same, 
Forget it; 

When trouble comes to you one 
day. 

You cannot cure or drive away, 
Don't let it fill you with dismay, 
Forget it; 

That frown you have for things 
awry, 

That rainy day or cloudy sky. 
Don't stand around and whine arid 
sigh. 

Forget it; 

You'll be surprised to find it's true, 
Misfortune soon fades out of view 
And disappears, if only you 
Forget it. 

A. J. BUCHAN, IV-A. 



ROYAL WEDDING 

The wedding bells are pealing 

In London far away. 
Yet over miles of ocean 

They're pealing here to-day. 

Chimes from the ancient Abbey, 
The masses' gusty cheer. 

They're heard by humble farmer, 
They're heard by palace peer. 




'Midst all the strikes and sorrow. 
And strifes that will not cease. 

These bells peal joy and gladness 
A prayer for perfect peace. 

The wedding bells are pealing 

In London far away; 
And wedding bells are pealing 

In all our hearts to-day. 

J. HEISE, V-A. 



Softly and quietly falls the snow. 
Spreading a blanket of white below. 
Like feathers from heaven, it 

floats to the ground. 
Lazily falling without any sound. 

Dark pines erect 'neath the blue 

dome of night. 
How ghostly they look in their 

coating of white! 
Like violin strings, branches reach 

to the sky. 
And the wdnd plucks muted a 
lullaby. 

JUDY WADDINGTON, 

Form I. 



The Branksome Slogan 



53 



THE RED CANOE 

The trees are a living flame each 
side, 

The river a haunting blue, 

And silver clouds and silver mist. 

And shining silver dew 

Go floating past, are fading fast 

Behind my red canoe. 

LUCY DECK, VA. 



GLAMOROUS BRANKSOME 

Thursday morn. 
Straggly hair, 
Kilt is torn. 
Don't care! 

Friday morn, 

Curly hair. 

Kilt still torn, 

But we're getting there ! 

Friday night, 
Gorgeous gown, 
Brilliant sight. 
Talk of the town ! 

Monday morn. 
Straggly hair. 
Kilt is torn. 
Don't care! 

BETTY SOUTHGATE,, V-B. 



LA MAUVAISE HUMEUR 

J'ai la peur, 

La grande terreur 

Quand je regarde ma face. 

Mes joues sont enormes, 

De tres grande forme; 

Elles sont gonfles-helas ! 

Mai au cou 

Et doulereux 

Je cris et puis je pleure. 

Je ne peux pas, 

Je ne veux pas 

Avoir mauvaise humeur.* 

* mumps ! ! I 

Author's note — When this in- 
spiration was written there were 
four friends stricken with 
''mauvaise humeur", two had re- 
covered and twenty were constant- 
ly feeling the vicinity of the 
glands. 

SALLY McCONNELL, V-B. 



The prospect of ''hours" is fiend- 
ishly grim. 

And the prospect of missing them 
terribly slim. 

For if you should miss one appoint- 
ed to you 

The next week you'll find it has 
grown into two! 

A. ZIMMERMAN, IVA. 



Instead of calling the house girls "boarders", it has been sug^gested 
that they be known as *"borderers". We know that the days girls will 
approve. ^Borderers — the dwellers (usually robbers and freebooters) on 
the borders of Scotland and England. 



54 



The Branksome Slogan 



OF COURTESY 

The dictionary defines courtesy as polite behaviour, kind conduct, 
an aiCt of consideration, ^nd as kindness ; but these meanings are only 
the upper surface of the word's deeper sense. Polite behaviour is more 
than otoeying the ordinary rules of good society, or exercising perfect 
manners; it is the delicate, thoughtful act which is very much appreci- 
ated and yet so often overlooked. Kind conduct is being as helpful and 
as co-operative with those with whom we are brought in contact, as we 
can, rather than adopting a diffident or difficult attitude when things 
do not go our way. Acts of consideration are the little seemingly un- 
important things which mean very much when accomplished. Someone 
once said, "Anyone can do the kindest thing for another person, but it 
takes a wise man to do the kindest thing in the kindest way." 

The whole principle of courtesy is to put others first, and to con- 
sider the rights of other people. Courtesy is the rule by which many 
things are governed, including the accepted manners at the table and 
our daily morning toilette. These ordinary and natural procedures are 
the result of the courteous wish not to offend others by unpleasant 
sights. Thus almost unconsciously our whole existence is filled with 
small, seemingly insignificant acts, which are for the benefit of those 
around us. Courtesy cannot and will not be overlooked, and plays a 
large role in the life of everyone, even of most who try to ignore its 
existence. 

Courtesy is really only thoughtfulness and consideration for other 
people. The whole meaning of courtesy might be summed up in this one 
quotation from the Bible. It is found in the Gospel according to St. 
Matthew, chapter 7, verse 12: /Therefore all things whatsoever ye 
would that men should do to you, do ye even so tO' them, for this is the 
law and prophets". 

JENNIFER JONES, lA. 



DAY DREAMER 

(With apologies to Stephen Foster) 

Beautiful dreamer, wake unto me, 
School books and teachers are waiting for theei; 
Sounds of the school world heard in your dreams 
Are here in reality, strange as it seems. 
Force open those eyelids ! Up with that head ! 
**An hour orn Saturday!" Is that what she said? 



HEATHEIR McPHERSON, 
IIA. 



The Branksome Slogan 



55 



TRINIDAD 

The bluish-green sea which surrounds the island; the breakers 
rolling- up the sandy beaches; the bright, hot, sunny days in the country: 
that is what I see when I look back to Trinidad, the land of tropical 
splendour and beauty. That is what I think of when people say, ''Where 
do you come from?" and I answer, 'Trinidad". 

Now that you know my state of mind, I think that I should begin 
by telling you what I mean by tropical splendour and beauty. When 
you see a row of royal palms or coconut trees silhouetted against an 
orange and blue sky; when all around in the sky even the clouds are 
glowing a bright orange against the pale blue evening sky ; when again 
you see the palms on a sandy beach with the big, round tropical moon 
shining down on them ; you realize that it really is one of the most 
beautiful places on earth. 

Also, I said that I thought of the bluish-green sea which surrounds 
the island. My mind always goes back to a spot on the north coast 
where the sea seems to be made of diamonds, and big rollers come in 
like white horses from the deep. Then at night there is the peaceful 
sound of the waves gently lapping at the dock, which drifts up into 
your room and sends you into a deep sleep. As I have already mentioned 
the breakers up at the north, I shall go out to the east coast where miles 
and miles of sandy beaches stretch practically from one end of the island 
to the other. There in the daytime you may see breakers large enough 
to swallow you in one mouthful. Those are the ones that you may have 
the most fun on, learning how to surf-ride and enjoying yourself im- 
mensely as you do so. These do not calm down even at night, for that 
part of the island is exposed to the winds and storms from the fierce 
Atlantic. I also think of those hot, sunny days when one walks along 
the street and feels the heat rising around the legs, and looking back 
sees footprints in the warm pitch sidewalks. I look across fields of 
sugar cane, and can actually see the heat rising above the cane arrows. 
I also see the colourful birds darting from tree to tree as the white 
clouds drift by overhead. These are a few of the many scenes which 
pass through my mind when I think of Trinidad. 

AILSA REID, IVB. 



Scene — Alumnae dinner. 



Speaker — Miss Read: "The large group in the corner over there all 
dressed in black are not young widows. They are this year's Fifth Form." 



56 



The Branksome Slogan 



PRELUDE TO ETERNITY 

Fear clung to the dark corners of his cell and whispered harshly 
throiugh the black branches of the trees outside the barred window. It 
mocked him in the austere beauty of moonlight which fell in a cold 
silver pool at his feet. On the wall behind him black shadows danced 
in weird and grotesque shapes, flinging out their long arms as if to 
graisp him in their evil dance. 

He sat on the edge of the hard cot. Every fibre in his tired body 
filled with that same hideous fear which enveloped his cell and enclosed 
him in the suffocating black cloak of nig^ht. There was no escape. It 
reached into the very soul of his being with icy fingers and filled his 
confused mind with the sickening thoughts of reality: the fearful 
realization that he was to die ; that this life which belonged to him was 
to be taken away for a crime which he had not committed. Why would 
they noit believe him? Why would they not grant him an appeal to 
prove his innocence? 

Oh God ! It was not just that man should have the right to condemn 
his fellow-man with his imperfect laws and empty words. Why should 
man have the right to take away a life which God had given ? His mind 
and body ached with every beat of his heart which brought him nearer 
and nearer to that great unknown abyss called — "Death". Each labour- 
ing breath he drew from his parched and swollen throat drew him closer 
and closer to that vast uncharted eternity beyond. 

Why should he be tortured in this way? Why could they not kill 
him now? His pulse throbbed, drowning out the fear which hammered 
incessantly into his weary brain. Panic gripped him. Every nerve in 
his body was tense crying out for pity. Tiny silver rivers of perspiration 
trickled along the furrowed lines of his forehead. His hands became 
cold and clammy as he clenched and unclenched his fists. He could not 
stand it any longer. In blind hysteria he screamed for mercy. 

It was all over. He trembled in a cold sweat, shaking as great sobs 
wracked his haggard form. He did not care any more. Guards stood 
over him, swearing and shouting at him to be quiet. Blinding lights 
flashed in his aching eyes. A feeling of nausea swept over him as an 
overwhelming desire to scream in anger and fear surged through his 
mind. How comld they possibly understand? Had they ever prayed for 
Death to come and banish that agonizing fear of dying? How could 
these fools, who held his life in their hands, ever realize the horrible 
suffering which distorted his mind and twisted every thought? 



The Branksome Slogan 



57 



Again his screams filled the prison. Every nerve in his body cried 
out for that intangible thing called ''Death". ''Death" who knows no 
mercy or discrimination but who is man's best weapon. He was going 
to lose his life: that life which had been given to him to love beauty 
and goodness and which now made him hate with a savage fury. Once 
more the same horrible fear took hold of him and screamed in grim 
hatred through his mind and soul. 

They dragged him through echoing corridors — ^past bright hot lights 
and glaring white walls. He wanted to run ! To escape from these fools 
who were so sure of his guilt. At last! They were almost there. He 
wanted to get into that room of terror which condemned men enter but 
never leave. He wanted to die — to escape forever this world of men 
who killed innocent people with one word of their puny judgement. 

They would never know of his innocence. They would kill him as 
another murderer. Only God and his soul would ever know that he had 
not committed that crime. Through the cloud which veiled his glazed 
eyes he saw the priest open the Bible and heard him read the last rites. 
But his lips were too parched to repeat the words. What did these mere 
men know of God, the greatest and only Judge? 




58 



The Branksome Slogan 



The guard walked deliberately over to the switch. He braced him- 
self for that last second of life. He could not breathe. It was as if some 
evil force were strangling him. The hand of the guard gi'asped the 
switch. His nails dug into the smooth leather sides of the death chair 
in one last effort to overcome that ultimate fear and pain. 

The inevitable instant was past. His weary body hung limp and 
relaxed. He was at peace for the first time. Fear had left him forever. 
Death had conquered Life. 

CHARMIAN PHILPOTT, V Si^ecia]. 



FALSE ALARM 

'Twas just before morning, when all through the house 
Not a creature was stirring, except for a mouse. 

The bell was rung by Jeannie with strength, in hopes that we girls 

would be walking at length. 
The boarders were nestled all snug in their beds while visions of boy 

friends danced round in their heads. 
Ailsa in her nightgown, and I in my wrap, had both settled down for a 

long Winter's nap. 

When out in the hall there arose such a clatter I leaped from my bed 

to see what was the matter. 
There to my wondering eyes did appear a bevy of Branksomites 

hovering near. 

They thought that the walk bell had already gone, and there they were 

standing, without very much on. 
I questioned them all, saying what was the hurry, the bell hadn't go^ne. 

Then — swhoosh — what a scurry! 
Back to their rooms, and back to their beds, and soon all the covers were 

over their heads. 

DORIS HILL, 
Form IVA. 



Miss Edmison: Where do the insects go in the winter? 
Nancy Beatty: Search me. 

Miss Edmison: I don't want them — I just vv^ant to know where 
they go! 



The Branksome Slogan 



59 



MONUMENTS IN CEDAR 

"Monument, mystical, awesome and ghoulish; 
Seemingly purposeless, paganish, foolish; 
What is the message your symbols conceal?" 

When one leaves Puget Sound and heads noTthwestward toward 
Alaska, one almost immediately enters a region known for the past two 
hundred years as the ''Northwest Coast". It comprises all coastal British 
Columbia and the Alaskan 'Tanhandle" or, in other words. Southeastern 
Alaska. This incredibly beautiful land of virgin forest, rock encased 
fiords, turbulent cataracts and majestic glaciers might well be called 
the 'T'otempolar Region", for here is the home and birthplace of those 
most interesting graven cedar monuments erected by a primitive people 
in a bygone age. 

The first impression one gains of totempoles is that they must be 
of great antiquity. This is due largely to the presence of a great many 
rotting, lichen-co'vered, leaning poles in a num'ber of deserted Indian 
villages throughout the totempolar region. The Iron Age, after 1775, 
marks the beginning of an extensive trade between the natives and 
explorers. The principal item wished by the Indians in trade for their 
furs was iron, either implement or bar. Their great dexterity in works 
of wood may be attributed to the assistance they received from iron 
tools. The Golden Age of the Totempole was the period of some forty or 
fifty years, ending aboiut 1880. Strangely, this is the most poorly docu- 
mented period in the history of the totempole, yet in those few years 
the entire coast suddenly blossomed in elaborate totemic columns and 
gaily decorated community houses — ^and then, just as suddenly, faded 
out forever. 

What is generally referred to as a totempole may be any one of a 
half-dozen types found on the Northwest Coast. The one thing they 
have in common is that they are nearly all carved of red cedar. The 
difference lies in their use and the purpose for whicih they were erected. 
The house pillar was used to support central rafters of the massive 
community houses ; the carvings illustrated stories from Haida myth- 
ology and sometimes one story was continued o^n all four poles. The 
mortuary pole consisted of a plain (sometimes painted) pole on top of 
which a box containing ashes of the dead was placed. The mortuary 
pole went out as the missionaries came in. The family pole was origin- 
ally short and broad, but as years went on it developed into a tall, stately 
pole; beautifully carved and painted; its legend was the history of the 



60 



The Branksome Slogan 



family residing within. The potlack pole was the result of the accumu- 
lation of wealth in the hands of the miiddle-class Indians resulting from 
the fur trade and wages sent home by Indian seamen. The ridicule pole 
was erected for the purpose of ridiculing some person of high standing 
for failing to meet or recognize an obligation. 

Most of the stories carved on the totempoles are taken from the 
general mythology of the tribe, principal among them being the exploits 



of Raven, a culture hero. Totempoles are read from the top downward ; 
also one must acquire a fair knowledge of the art, style and symbolism 
employed by the carvers. 

The unusual characteristics of the art are what distinguish it from 
the art of any other people in the world. Since realism was seldom 
employed, a system of sjrmbols was developed by which the various 
figures could be recogmzed. Totem poles were painted with a type of 
fishegg tempera and the colours originially were red, black and apple 
green. Tlhey were carved of Western red cedar and Alaska, yellow cedar. 
Smaller carvings were made of alder, maple, crabapple and spruce. 





There are still remaining many totempoles which, if beyond restora- 
tion, should at least be duplicated, for the time is not far distant when 



The Branksome Slogan 



61 



these monuments will be considered a source as important to South- 
eastern Alaska and Coiastal British Columbia as the pyramids are to 
Egypt or the ruins of Ancient Rome to modern Italy. The significant 
fact is simply that no other place in the whole world has totempoles; 
people will come from far and wide to see them — as long as they remain. 

JANE MACAULAY, IVB. 



ON HER STUDIES 

(With apologies to Milton) 

When I consider how my days are spent 

Ere half my life, in this dark school and wide, 

And those few subjects which are meant to guide 

Have to my mind a bitter hatred lent, 

I serve therefore my sentence, and present 

My homework, lest my case at court be tried ; 

"Doth school demand day-labour, pay denied?" 

I sadly ask, but Patience to prevent 

That murmur soon replies, ''School does not need 

Either man's studies, nor his books. Who best 

Leave it alone, they serve it best. Their fate 

Is teachers : thousands at whose bidding speed. 

And study night and day for each hard test ; 

They also fail who can get forty-eight. 

BARBARA HElISE, 
Form IVA. 



THE FOOTBALL MATCH 

From a distance it lies, a large "0". It was empty a moment ago, 
but now small variously coloured insects can be seen moving across the 
field and entering the stands. Small groups of them sit in secluded 
corners with large dark spaces in between. Some few minutes pass and 
as the teams trot onto the field the '*0" is outlined again, this time in 
solid colour. 

Even at closer range there is no distinction of persons. There is 
simply row on row of heads of a uniform size and shape placed on a 
multi-co'loured background of clothes. They sit as on an artist's canvas 



62 



The Branksome Slogan 



— as one 'team scores he raises his canvas and suibsequently lowers it 
back into place. It is a puppet show without individuality, as though 
all these cardboard dolls were attached to the same strings, to rise and 
fall in unison. Behind this puppet stage a gramaphone record emits 
loud screeches as the mass on one side stands and cheers, while the 
other side sits in gloomy silence. 

Perhaps on closer inspection — yes, people are discernible. Gum- 
chewing concent ration is reflected on one face ; grim tension on another, 
as one man's arms invo'luntarily reach to catch the ball; relief here; 
despondency there, where that man is fingering in his pocket the money 
which he seems about to lose ; all have one characteristic in common — 
wholehearted interest. All have their eyes glued to the play in the field 
below them. 

As the game ends, the mass crumbles into small groups, laughing 
and talking, standing in the field, or moving towards the gates. A few 
minutes — there it is again, simply a large "0". 

JESSIE MARRINER, VA. 



Miss Sime : Molly ! Are you chewing gum in your uniform ? 
Molly: No, Miss Sime, I'm chewing it in my mouth. 



JASPER PARK 

Shall I ever forget Jasper National Park! All the grandeur and 
glory of Canada's greatest tourist attraction, the Rocky Mountains, 
surround the location. Set deep in the heart of a most of awe-inspiring 
peaks, Lac Beauvert, with its everchanging colours of deep blue and 
green, is like a jewel. Small rivers born from great white glaciers wend 
their way through wide-spreading valleys. Waterfalls leap in a sheen 
of silver, to' fall hundreds of feet and burst in diamond spray, glittering 
and shimmering in the sun. To this place of natural beauty man has 
brought his ingenuity. Jasper Park Lodge is built to fit in with the 
background. It is set back from Lac Beauvert so that there is a com- 
manding view of the lake. Rimming the shore of the lake is a row of 
quaint cottages. These buildings, as well as the lodge, are all construct- 
ed of the trees taken from the surrounding district. Set amid colourful 
flowers and encircled by friendly peaks, Jasper is a masterpiece, created 
and coloured by nature for the delight of man. 



A. ZIMMERMAN, IVA. 



The Branksome Slogan 



63 



SUNRISE OVER BARRANJOEY, N.S.W. 

It was about five o'clock in the morning and I felt an urge tO' rise 
and say "good morning" to the sea. 

I swished through wet, cool salt-grasses, and broke the surface of 
the salt-rimed sand as I flung behind me the shadows and felt the swift 
gold of the sun on my arms. 

Later on, and higher up on the headland, overlooking the morning 
sea, were the great, grey sandstone rocks still numb from the touch of 
the night, but tingling into^ living gold where the sun crowned them. 
My eyes were blinded with the gold. The thin, hazy streamers of morn- 
ing mist cloaked the inlet with dancing motes, and the sky Was all pure 
saffron. The sea rolled in beneath me interminably, breaking in a 
smother of gold foam and falling back, then rolling in and breaking 
again. 

The sand was gold; miles and miles of it, a smooth clear colour in 
curving crescents, and between them, rocky headlands, then more 
beaches stretching into infinity. 

Moving flecks of yellow wheeled and screamed down the cliff face, 
outlined against the violent, violet water, blue as only an Australian sea 
can be — gulls, straining their narrow wings, rising and falling in a cloud 
of moving flocks — gold dust. 

Down again on the grass-tufted dunes, I wondered if King Midas 
had touched me, too. 

LUCI DECK, VB. 



Miss Stirling : If you were walking along with a cow and two ducks, 
what would you have? 

Helen DeNike: Quackers and milk! 



A WINTER EVENING 

The snow falls slowly from an empty sky, 
And spreads a deep, soft blanket on the hillsi ; 
While, in the village, flickering lights appear 
As lamps glow gently from their curtained sills. 

And then the moon begins to keep its watch — 
A pale-faced vigil on the glistening snow. 
Where on the morrow skiers will be seen, 
Where now dark shadows ever darker grow. 



BARBARA FLEMING, 
Form VB. 



The Branksome Slogan 
WAVE 

I sweep over beaches with shells in my fingers ; 
I cover the shore with silver-g-old sand. 
I glaze the bright earth with a crystal that lingers, 
And scatter foam-lace with a delicate hand. 

Like a gull in a wind-storm I fly from mid-ocean ; 
The tempest behind me, I hammer the ground, 
But I soothe like a mother, with monotonous motion, 
The little, live creatures that in me abound'. 

I'm a song, I'm a zephyr, the little blue daughter 
Of my great, blue mother, the overhead sky ; 
And though I can reign with the proudest of hauteur 
I collapse on the beach with a whisper^ — and die. 

L. DECK, 
Form VB. 

Awarded prize for poetry, 1948. 



The Branksome Slogan 



65 




Junior Activities 

During the school year the Juniors participated in many sports. 
In the Fall there was swimming and basketball. During the Winter we 
had skating at Varsity Arena. At the first signs of spring we played 
Softball and we arranged a softball team to play against other schools. 
Swimming and croquet were also enjoyed by all. 

The swimming in the junior school has increased this year and we 
have m.any eager swimmers and divers. Miss Shirton teaches classes in 
diving and swimming after school in the Fall and Spring. We have had 
two big swimming meets this year. The first was with Bishop Strachan, 
in v/hich Branksome came third. The second was with Ontario Ladies' 
College. Branksome was more successful and came first. 

On Friday, the nineteenth of March, the Junior School presented 



66 



The Branksome Slogan 



the Gilbert aiid Sullivan operetta, H.M.S. Pinafore. The play (in two 
acts) gave excellent opportunities for some young- aspirants. 



The cast was as follows: 



Captain Corcoron 



June Binnie 



Sir Joseph 
Buttercup 



Charmian MacRoberts 



Babs Smyth 
Wendy Rogers 



Dick Deadeye 
Josephine 
Ralf Rackstraw 
Phoebe 
Boatswain 



Noreen Philpott 
Janet Howard 



Patsy Fulford 



Ann Stag 



The Rhythm Band played the overture, with Miss LaVon at the 
piano. The songs, both solos and choruses, were exceptionally well done. 
Nearly all the characters enjoyed acting their parts, while it was found 
that the audience enjoyed their acting just as much, if not more. There 
was great applause all the way through and everyone agreed that the 
operetta was a great success. 



I am the St. Lawrence River, one of the great rivers of the world. 
On the maps I start from Lake Ontario' and flow east to the Atlantic 
Ocean, but my waters come from all the great lakes and the hundreds 
of rivers that floiw into them; some such great rivers as the Ottawa, 
the Saguenay and the St. Maurice. 

For many centuries my waters flowed between banks covered with 
great forests. The only men living on my shores were Indians in hunting 
camps and sciattered villages such as Stadacona and Hochelaga. These 
Indians were known as Algonquins and they travelled on my waters in 
bii'ch bark canoes. 

In 1535 a stranger from France named Jacques Cartier discovered 
me, and I wias named by him the St. Lawrence River. He explored my 
waters as far as Montreal and spent the winter near what is now 
Quebec City and in the spring he returned to France. It was not until 
Champlain came from France in 1608 and founded what is now Quebec 
City that the white man made a real attempt to start settlements on 
my shores. Later another settlement was started at Mount Royal. I 
was then used as a highway between the settlements along my shores. 

As these villages became settled, the French started to explore the 
country to the west and to the' north. So my waters became the highway 



THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER 



The Branksome Slogan 



67 



for La Salle, Joliet and Frontenac, who discovered the Great Lakes, the 
Mississippi River and the Great Prairies of the West. The explorers 
were followed by fur traders and missionaries. 

Though I love peace and helping man, many times my shores were 
disturbed by war. There were war parties from the Iroquois attacking 
the Indian and white settlements along my shores. There were also ths 
wars between England and France, which were not settled until Quebec 
and Canada were captured by Wolfe in 1759. Again, in 1812, war broke 
out and there was fighting between the Americans and the Canadians. 
Since then I have lived in jJeace. 





First Row: W. Rogers, J. West, B. Smythe. 
Second Row: P. Giilford, T. Patterson, N. Phil pott. 



68 



The Branksome Slogan 



After Wolfe captured Quebec, many British traders and settlers 
came to live in Canada. They traded not only with the Indians but with 
the Americans to the south. So the number of ships bringing goods 
from Europe and taking back the riches of a new country grew greater 
each year. As trade increased, the cities on my shores grew larger. 
Soon sihips using me as a highway to the ocean were trading with all 
parts of the world. Later new cities like Toronto, Hamilton, Sault St. 
Marie and Fort Wilham started to grow up along the lakes and rivers 
which flowed intO' me. 

My life has been very closely connected with the building of Canada. 
I feel that I still may see many developments, maybe greater than I 
have yet seen, as Canada grows. 

Truly I feel that I am one of the great rivers of the world and 
that the years to come will add to my greatness. 

SANDRA WOODS, Grade VII. 



A TRIP TO HOLLAND 

We were all very surprised when 
we got a letter inviting us to go to 
Holland, from our friends the Van 
Gelders. We were all very pleased 
when it was decided we could go. 
They had a girl, Juiliana, just my 
age, and I was glad I was going to 
meet her. 

We now had to write to Ottawa 
for passports so we would be 
allowed to enter Holland when we 
got there. 

It took a long time packing to 
get ready for this long trip. We 
left Toronto on the night train for 
New York. The next morning we 
took a taxi to our ship. On board 
was a Punch and Judy show, a 
swimming pool and a big deck to 
play on. Everybody had a good 
time for the seven days we were 
on board. At last we saw land; it 
was England. The ship stopped at 
Southampton, but we did not get 



off. Then it took us to Rotterdam. 

And there were our friends wav- 
ing to greet us. They took us home. 
We had a Dutch dinner which was 
very good. Then Juliana showed 
me around the house and also her 
Dutch costume that she wore on 
festival days, a costume of a tight 
bodice over a white blouse and a 
very full skirt. She showed me 
her wooden shoes, too. 

The next morning Juliana and I 
went to the cheese market in 
Alkmaar. We saw them making 
Gouda and Edam cheese. On our 
way home we went to the ship- 
building yards. Ships are built 
here that sail all over the world. 

Another trip we took was to the 
Art Gallery. We saw the follow- 
ing pictures: "The Cats' Dancing 
Lesson" by Jan Steen and the 
''Laughing Cavalier" by Franz 
Hals, some flower pictures by Van 
Gogh, and pictures by Rembrandt 
and Vermeer. 



The Branksome Slogan 



69 



Juliana and I took our bicycles 
out one sunny day and we saw the 
dykes beside which were many 
windmills. The tulips were just 
out and it made a beautiful scene 
in the waving- breezes. 

After several weeks of sig'ht- 
seeing we went on to other coun- 
tries. When we left Holland we 
thanked the Van Gelders for our 
lovely visit. 

ADRIENNE ALLEN, 
Grade V. 



BRANKSOME HALL 

Harrogate and our Miss MacG. 
Made a sturdy out of me. 
Old grade 8 and dear Miss J. 
Pulled my grammar up a way. 
When to Branksome first I strode, 
I was told, ''Keep well the road." 
If I fail, or prove too lame, 
Branksome, you are not to blame. 
For the term, I sadly fear. 
Only half of me was here. 
Dear old roomates, fights and fun 
Are caused by spots upon the sun. 
Branksome, Staff, Miss R. astute. 
May a Yankee give salute? 

SHEILA TODD, 
Grade VIII. 



WINTER 

Winter is the time for fun 
WTicn everyone is on the run; 
Back and forth go sleig-hs and skis, 
And children doing as they please. 
Tinkling sleighbells, merry songs 
Echo through the bustling- throngs 
That swarm about the snowy hill 
To know this wondrous winter 
thrill! 




The swirling- snow comes dancing 
down 

To clothe in white each little town, 
And everywhere gay laughter 
rings, 

For this is the song that winter 
sings. 

SALLY HUME, Grade VIII. 

THE ROBIN 

The robin came flying 
One day in spring. 
He flew to a tree 
And started to sing. 

A squirrel came up 
The tree so fast. 
The robin flew 
Away at last. 

As he flew away 

He sang a tune. 

That I thought would go up 

To the sun and the moon. 

HENRIETTA EGLY, 
Grade 11. 



70 



The Branksome Slogan 



THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A FOUNTAIN PEN 

* In the sumni(u- ol' 1925, Caiptain Pierre Le Blanc was taking- a stroll 
oin the battlefield where, but nine years before, he and his buddies had 
fought so bra ve^ly:*" 

It brought''- Ba^k many memories, both sad and merry, of how his 
pals, who joked and laughed with him, had also given their lives for 
peace. "Peace," thought Pierre, ''how long should it last? Shall I see 
my sons brutally killed as I saw so many die?" 

Then, in the distance, he saw the old ruins of Rheims Cathedral. 
Slowly he made his way up to that historic landmark. There it stood, 
still and majestic. As he looked at the one lone spire, he felt that he 
must go in and look at the inside. 

As he entered the broken archway, he stumbled on a rock. It moved, 
revealing a long, black object. He bent down and picked it up. ''Why, 
it's a fountain pen!" he exclaimed and put it in his pocket. 

That night, as he was going to bed, he said to the pen, "If you 
could but talk, what stories you could tell." 

Suddenly he was awakened to find the pen sitting on his pillow, 
calling to him to wake up. 

"Pierre, you said that if I could talk I could tell great stories. Well, 
I can talk, and if you want I shall tell you my life story. 

"It was in October, 1915, when my adventures began. On my last 
day on Canadian soil I was in the pocket of my owner. Captain David 
Matheson. He was loading his baggage on the ship which was to take 
him on a voyage from which he might never return. 

"Then came a blast from the funnel of the ship. We w^ere off — 
off into the unknown ! 

"A few weeks later we were standing on French soil. The sound 
of battle could be heard and ambulances came by carrying- wounded. 

"Suddenly I felt a jolt and my owner dropped to the ground. He 
was wounded very seriously, but before he dropped into unconsciousness 
he pulled me out of his pocket and tried to write a note to' his mother. 
His clutch on me loosened and I fell to the g-round. Trampling^ feet 
kicked me into the flaming" ruins of Rheims Cathedral. There I lay, 
mourning- the loss of my friend the Captain and feeling sorrowful over 
the letter to his mother which I had failed to write. 

"And that is my story," concluded the pen. 

The next morning, Pierre picked up the pen, walked out the door 
and doiwn the road to the "Armed Forces" cemetery. He waited for a 
moment, searching for a certain grave. Then he saw it and dug a hole 
beside the grave. Here he buried the pen. "You don't belong to me," 
he said. "Rest here with your Captain." 

The name on the grave was: Captain David Matheson. 

NOREEN PHILPOTT, VII. 



The Branksome Slogan 



71 




In the death of Miss Violet Robinson on December 10, 1947, 
Branksome Hall has this year suffered an irreparable loss, which is 
apparent to all those who knew her intimately, for during the many 
years (1906-1947) she was associated with the School, she identified 
herself with its interests in a unique manner. 

Miss Robinson taught first in the Junior School; later she intro- 
duced classes in History of Art and Interior Decoration into the Senior 
School. For this work she had marked ability and inspired great interest 
among her pupils. She was sometimes consulted by outsiders and con- 
tributed articles on these subjects to various periodicals. In this, and 
in other ways, her talents enriched the cultural side of our school life. 
In later years she served as School Librarian. 

To the members of the staff closely associated with her was 
given the great privilege of working with one always dignified, gracious, 
and genuinely kind. She was never known to speak disparagingly of 
pupil, colleague or school, and her loyalty was so outstanding that she 
has set a standard for us all — staff, alumnae and students. 

Miss Robinson had a remarkable gift for friendship and had a 
wide circle of devoted friends, among them many of her former pupils 
and colleagues, while to the end she cherished friendships formed in 
childhood. 

Her life, lived on a high plane, exemplified the dignity of the 
human spirit and her strong Christian faith was the vital factor in that 
serenity of mind which was such a noticeable characteristic. Of her it 
can truly be said that she O'beyed the command: 'Whatsoever things 
are lovely . . . whatsoever things are of good report, think on these 
things." 



72 



The Branksome Slogan 



ALUMNAE 



At a meeting held in the autumn the following were elected as 
officers of the Branksome Hall Alumnae Association: 

Honourary President - Miss Read 

President ------ Carmen Fair Capon 

First Vice-President - . . Shirley Lind Chelew 

Second Vice-President - - - Jacqueline Sinclair Blackwell 

Secretary ------ Erie Sheppard Catto 

Treasurer ------ Mary Jean Hall 

Scholarship Treasurer - - - Edythe Hewitt 

Social Convenor ----- Margaret Withers 

Slogan Representative - _ - Ainslie McMichael 

Committee — Grace Norris Craig, Anne James, Jane Anne Rees, 
Pat McConnelll Ross, Laura Stone Bradfield, Joan Peat, 
Alixe Wood McCart, Joanne Edmonds, Isobel Coulthard, 
Patricia Stewart and Diana Griffith. 

Miss Read gave her annual dinner for the Alumnae February 14th. 
The new officers of the Association were there in force and were pre- 
sented to the members by the President. Reports were read by the 
secretary and treasurers, but the chief speaker was the Principal, who 
gave a brief resume of the history of the school and told of the new^ 
property recently acquired and of the uses to which the grounds and 
building are to be put. The Extension Fund was launched amid much 
enthusiasm, and altogether it was a delightful affair. 

Sheila MacQueen was offered scholarships at five American uni- 
versities and accepted the Charles Walgren at the University of 
Chicago'. She is working in the field of industrial affairs. Zelda Fried- 
man is also at this university. At the University of Toronto, Patricia 
Marlow was awarded the Dickson Scholarship in History, English, Latin 
and French and the Margaret Ann Brock in English and History. Anne 
Burton won the Edward Blake in Botany, Zoology, English and History 
and the Jacob Cohen Memorial Scholarship in English, French and 
History. 



The Branksome Slogan 



73 



Joyce Frankel was chosen from five hundred students to be Presi- 
dent of the Student Body at Smith College. The first time this honour 
has been won by a Canadian. Ellen Fleming", who graduates from 
Cornell this year, is secretary of the Women's Student Government of 
this college. 

Dorothy Gaebelein graduates from Barnard College this year. She 
has been awarded the highest scholarship in her class and was elected 
to Phi Beta Kappa. Kay Everitt graduated in Law from the University 
of Manitoba, the only girl in her class. 

Grace Cockburn, who obtained her B.A. at McMaster, May, 1947, 
is at Edinburgh University studying Social Service. Mary Twigg Wood- 
ward is attending the University of London, England. 

Joan Marlow graduates this year from the University of British 
Columbia with the degree of B.Sc.A. At this college are Janice McColI 
and Anne Hargraft in their freshman year. Pat Reynolds is taking a 
Science and Commercial Course at Acadia. Priscilla Hinchcliffe is at 
Wells College. Among those graduating from U. of T. are Joan Peat, 
Margaret McKelvey, Patricia Stewart, June Whitehead and Nancy 
Tyrrell. Those in their first year at this institution of learning include 
Ann Cawthra, Barbara Hragraft, Jane Hamilton, Ann Spence, Mary and 
Sheila Craig, Joyce Hassard, Judith Livingston and Barbara Scott. 
Catherine Lukes is taking the course in dental nursing. Joan Vanstone 
is a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Social Work. 

Mary Hanson, Noreen Emory, Althea McCoy, Meribeth Stobie, 
Mary Powell and Hazel Parry graduated from McGill, May, 1947. Hazel 
has returned to England. Judith Godfrey is at this university and took 
part in the annual Red and White Review. Donna Mackenzie has chosen 
to get her B.A. from Western University. 

Gina Baker and Mary Joyce Phelan are attending universities at 
Geneva and Neuchatel, Switzerland. Kate Haas is at **Les Fougeres", 
Lausanne. 

Anne James and Rosemary Hanna are at Macdonald College, Guelph, 
and Judith Palmer and Peggy Perriton at Macdonald College, St. Anne 
de Bellevue. Constance Colthurst is a student at the Appalachian State 
Teachers' College, Boone, N.C. 



74 



The Branksome Slogan 



Joyce Cobban plays forward on the St. Hilda's basketball team, she 
is also a member of the swimming team which competes with other 
colleges. According to the Trinity College Review, Joy Clegg, who took 
part in the play ^'The Oid Lady Shows Her Medals", was outstanding 
for her sincerity in conveying emotion. 

Louise Park is in training at the Chatham General, from whicli 
hospital Helen Russell graduated last May. Betty Oliver is at the 
Hamilton General and Gerda Murray is a student nurse at the Royal 
Victoria, Montreal. Caroline Jean started training last January in the 
Orthpaedic Hospital, Hampshire, England. Jane Copeman and Sally 
Evans are at the Wellesley and Anne Blake is a lab technician in a 
Montreal hospital. Lois Mudie is one of the secretaries of the Gananoque 
branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses. 

In New York are Kathleen McGee taking a course in drawing and 
designing, Ann Nicholls attending the Fashion Academy, Fifth Avenue, 
and Gloria Lyons studying dancing- at the Helen Norflett School. Boston 
finds Diana Griffith at the Sargent School of Physical Education and 
Joan Bradfield, who graduates this year from the Modern School of 
Fashion and Design, where she has been studying merchandising and 
styling. 

Mary Reid is librarian at Victoria University. Diana Hawkins is in 
the Physical Education Department, Queen's University, and Joyce 
Bertram is physical instructor at Branksome. Barbara Browne is teach- 
ing at a school near Oxford, England, and Margaret Emmerson is teach- 
ing at Niagara. Nancy Rendell is in London, England, doing physio- 
therapy. 

Theresa Goldie Faulkner was referred to in ''Time" magazine, 
January 12th, 1948, as the Aldermen's Hansard. She felt that if more 
voters knew what was at stake they would go to the polls in greater 
numbers. So whenever the city council meets, Theresa is there and 
takes notes. These reports are mimeographed and are preferred reading 
for many civic organizations as well as the Women's Electors' Associa- 
tion. 

Phyllis Hollinrake is President of the Board of Management, Home 
for Insurable Children. Wilhelmina Maclean Howard is one of the Vice- 
presidents of the Royal Conserva^tory of Music Alumni. Mary Campbell 
Lewis is executive secretary of the Child Study Association of America 



The Branksome Slogan 



75 



at their office in New York City. Virginia Copping: Wilson, president of 
the Toronto Junior League, represented that chapter at the conference 
of the Association of Junior League held in French Lick, Indiana, in 
May. Joyce Tedman Howell has launched a new publication, a four-page 
tabloid-style monthly about women's activities in Toronto. 

It is always nice hearing from Old Girls. Muriel Moore Bragg wrote 
recently and enclosed a snap of herself, husband, son and two daughters. 
The eldest girl is at college and the boy is a paratrooper with the famous 
82nd Airborne Division. Ruth Langlois Smith's daughter, Priscilla, was 
married in June, 1947, to Mr. Earl D. Osborne, Jr. Grace McGaw and 
a friend are running a guest ranch in British Columbia. The address is 
Dutch Lake Guest Ranch, Clearwater Station, B.C. It is eighty miles 
due north of Kamloops and, from photographs we have seen, seems a 
delightful spot. Barbara Thomas Francis writes that she has returned 
to New York City and tells us of some of the Old Girls she has seen 
recently. 

Mary Stewart Steenstra-Toussaint is singing in Grand Opera in 
Great Britain. She has twin daughters who were born in Portugal, to 
which country she and her husband went after being interned in Japan. 

Latest additions to Life Membership in the B.H. Alumnae are Alice 
Eastmure, Marjorie Flanagan and Flavia Elhott. Flavia graduates in 
June from U. of T., majoring in Geography. 

Charlotte Abbott is with the department of National Defence, 
Ottawa. Aileen Stinson is secretary to the president of the Link Belt 
Co., and Elaine Hutson is with the Industrial Acceptance Corporation. 
Kathlenn McFarren has a position in a life insurance company. 

Jean Ross sailed in February to visit friends in Shanghai. Susan 
Ross visited Nassau this Spring. In April, Madeleine Rogers Peers went 
to China, with her husband, for a six-weeks trip; the Chinese govern- 
ment placed a plane at their disposal. Jeanne Montgomery was in Eng- 
land and Switzerland this winter and Marjorie Postlethwaite Kerry 
went to Trinidad in May. Frances Kilvert Munro was in Toronto, from 
Winnipeg, in April. 

Alumnae who knew Mademoiselle Chaubert will be interested to 
hear that her niece, Francoise Chaubert, is at Branksome this year. 



76 



The Branksome Slogan 



Kathryn Gooderham Donaldson is sojoiurning in England, and 
Frances McLeod Rowland and baby daughter are spending a year in 
that country, where her husband is doing post graduate work in 
medicine. 

Kathleen Hinch Conrad and Ruth Fleming Stumpf are living in 
California and Barbara Martin Ben sen in Honolulu. Catherine Vander- 
burgh Ramsey has taken up residence in Pittsburg, Penn. 

Agnes Campbell Heslip has moved to Madoc and Gretchen Gray 
Bedford-Jones to Cobourg. Mary Northcott may be addressed Nanaimo, 
B.C. Janet James McCague is making her home in Alliston, Ont; Joan 
Sieveright Abra is in Niagara Falls and Euphemia Walker Gilday in 
Sudbury, Hamilton will find Mary Glendinning Macleod, Claire Kilgour 
Vogel and Jane Wilson Lloyd Jones, while Eleanor Reed Gartshore is in 
nearby Ancaster. Ray Cayley Osier and Phyllis McTurk Cornwall are 
domiciled in NewTnarket and Alice Redman Gooch in St. Catherines. 
Lois Sutton Lefebrve, Eleanor Coatsworth Kerfoot, Jean Draper Graham, 
Barbara Ellis Thompson, Patricia Hobbs Dyke, Anne Ripley and Mary 
Walker Beggs have joined the Montreal Alumnae. In Kitchener is 
Margaret Grafton Ross; Betty Darling Halwig is in Waterloo and 
Kathleen Kennedy Rennie in Guelph. Sonia Skinner Apple, Norah 
Morton Fullerton and Ann Beare have come to Toronto to reside. 



Daughters of the following are in residence at Branksome this 
year: Helen Jarvis Anderson, Grace Cochrane Patten, Mary Stone 
Avery, Phyllis Cassels Logie, Bessie Webster Brown, Rosalind Morley 
MacEwen, Jean Ferguson Morine and Dorothy Kennedy Smith. Lillian 
Buckley McMurray's child is in her second year with us. 

In the day school are the children of Evelyn Mackay Gerow, Joyce 
Sweatman Dalton, Adelaide McCulloch Green, Dorothy Grant Hender- 
son, Beatrice Johnston Howard and Sheila Lee McGillivray. Marjorie 
Neale Cope sends us two daughters and the son of Ella Lumbers Gibson 
is in the Kindergarten. 



Among Old Girls visiting the school were Ray Jacobs Frank, 
Frances Chase, Elizabeth Tusting, Madeleine Cantelon, Bessie Webster 
Smith, Katharine McVean Piggott, Ann Blake, Althea McCoy Douglas, 
Barbara Peat, Betty Muntz and Diana Spencer Dyer. 



The Branksome Slogan 



77 



Marriases 1947 

Joan Sieverig-ht to Douglas D. Abra, May 3rd. 

Avis Bowen to Harold D. Black, May 10th. 

Jean McLachlin to Jacques H. Filteau, May 16th. 

Euphemia Walker to Thos. Pope Gilday, May 17th. 

Jean Jordan to Wm. J. Leadbeater, May 17th. 

Katherine Waterman to John E. Featherstone, May 22nd. 

Rose Mar j an Hartog to J. Schokking, May 29th. 

Ruth Barber to Wm. Lloyd Grimshaw, May 31st. 

Claire Kilgour to Alfred J. Vogel, May 31st. 

Pauline Dorst to Robt. Wm. Dunn, June 7th. 

Mary Fairclough to Henry K. Hamilton, June 10th. 

Rosemary Thompson to John P. Jarvis, June 12th. 

Muriel Sinclair to Wm. F. Osburn, June 14th. 

Sonia Skinner to Barnabas W. N. Apple, June 14th. 

Eleanor Reed to John B. Gartshore, June 14th. 

Marion Cardy to Lorne M. Neilson, June 14th. 

Winnifred Clarke to Wm. Donald Brandham, June 21st. 

Margaret Wilkinson to Norman L. Death, June 21st. 

Bernice Purser to Bruce Saunders, June 21st. 

Eleanor Coatsworth to Jas. Henry Kerfoot, June 28th. 

Margaret McCulloch to James McQueen, July 19th. 

Phyllis McTurk to Wm. N. Cornwall, July 26th. 

Betty Marshall to Wilfrid B. Donaldson, August 9th. 

Doris Campbell to Theodore R. SafFord, August 9th. 

Dorothy Stock to Wm. George Ross, August 23rd. 

Lois Sutton to Pierre A. Lefebvre, September 4th. 

Kathleen Hinch to Wm. Ross Conrad, September 9th. 

June Hamilton to Elmer G. Peters, September 10th. 

Pamela Pearse to R. Crawford Biggs, September 17th. 

Mary MacMillan to John Wm. Duncanson, September 23rd. 

Barbara Ellis to E. Winnett Thompson, September 27th. 

Phyllis Robinson to Wm. G. Tilt, October 1st. 

Patricia Gundy to Jas. M. Patterson, October 11th. 

Ray Cayley to Wm. Ramsey Osier, October 25th. 

Mary Lawson Hall to John L. Cbulson, October 25th. 

Anne Marie Higginbottom to John M. Roibinson, October 29th. 

Daphne Dodds to Herbert L. Grant, November 1st. 

Jean Hetherington to Allan John Deans, November 1st. 

Eliabsth Thomson Schofield to Allen Richard Armitage, November 15th. 

Marion Greer to Arthur J. Tanner, November 22nd. 

Dorothy Henry to Leif Bangsboll, December 10th. 

Sheila Kirk wood to Richard C. Stock, December 23rd. 

Phyllis Holden to Matthew G. S. ElUott, December 27th. 



78 



The Branksome Slogan 



1948 

Elizabeth McNabb to Al-ex. C. Batten, January 26th. 

Ellenore Lackie Clark to Samuel F. Donnelly, January 31st. 

Joan Keene to Edward R. Quattlander, February 2nd. 

Joan CrO'Sbie to Eugene P. Shinkle, February 5th. 

Frances Wiser Thomson to Edward H. Ambrose, February 6th. 

Norah Morton to Chas. A. Fullerton, February 14th. 

Joyce Phillips to Gerald J. Keeley, February 21st. 

Joan Burgess to A. Woodburn Langmuir, February 21st. 

Peggy Everitt to Patrick Grewar, February 21st. 

Jane Draper to Chas. Ross Graham, Februar;^' 

Alther McCoy to John C. Douglas, February 28th. 

Shirley A. Brown to Gavin Christie Clark, March 11th. 

Audrey Joy Lyons to Jack H. McQuaig, March 20th. 

Dorothy Hoyle to Harry T. Patterson, March 27th. 

Mary Glennie to C. R. Merrick, April 3rd. 

Barbara Cory to Robert C. Porter, April 7th. 



Births 194 7 

Barbara Conway Mills, a daughter. May 2nd. 
Shirley Morrish Crawford, a daughter. May 2nd. 
Betty Becker Kilgour, a daughter. May 8th. 
Isabel Lundy Fulton, a daughter. May 13th. 
Dorothy Caley Klein, a daughter, May 14th. 
Patricia Hobbs Dyke, a daughter, May 15th. 
Jean McEachren Chubb, a son. May 18th. 
Marion Brown McCurdy, a son, May 23rd. 
Joy Barnes Latimer, a daughter. May 27th. 
Barbara Drew Brook Harris, a daughter. May 30th. 
Diana Spencer Dyer, a son. May 
Jane Kelley Dare, a son. May 
Vivien Campbell Stewart, a son, June 3rd. 
Jean Morton Rayside, twin sons, June 5th. 
Mary Shields Shields, a son, June 5th. 
Betty Lowndes Nordheimer, a daughter, June 11th. 
Frances McDiarmid Box, a son, June 14th. 
Janet Davidson Omand, a son, June 15th. 
Peggy Purvis Percival, a daughter, June 18th. 
Kathryn Gooderham Donaldson, a son, June 21st. 
Nancy Wilson Lord, a son, June 23rd. 
Janet James MoCague, a son, June 26th. 



The Branksome Slogan 

Marjory Dodds Gardner, a son, June 27th. 
Miriam Fox Squires, a son, July 13th. 
Errol Grosch Mackenzie, a son, July 16th. 
Molly Morton Flavelle, a daughter, July 28th. 
Mildred Mahood Thomson, a daughter, August 10th. 
Shirley Peterkin Caswell, a son, August 14th. 
Meryl Bigelow Gregory, a daughter, August 14th. 
Eleanor Lyle Somerville, a son, August 19th. 
Christine Auld West, a son, August 20th. 
Katharine Lea McLean, a daug'hter, August 29th. 
Eleanor Mitchell Macivor, a daughter, Aug-ust 30th. 
Barbara Elliott Robertson, a daughter, Aug-ust 30th. 
Helen Glennie Mowat, a daughter, August 31st. 
Helen Ackerman Morton, a son, August 31st. 
Haldane Goodeve Hutchins, a son, August. 
Rosemary Hewetson Amell, a son, September 4th. 
Catharine Bryans Fallis, a son, September 16th. 
Margaret Earl Wedd, a daug-hter, September 18th. 
Joan Franks Macdonald, a son, September 20th. 
Mary McDonald Bell Irving, a son, September 24th. 
Eleanor Birkett Miller, a son, October 1st. 
Mary Rohinette McEvenue, a daughter, October 12th. 
Margaret Mickle Allan, a daughter, October 21st. 
Charlotte Deacon Alley, a son, October 27th. 
Mary Stuart Playfair Lorriman, a son, November 17th. 
Joan Mitchell Flintoft, a daughter, Novemiber 19th. 
Cecily Taylor Osier, a daughter, November 26th. 
June Forsyth Button, a daughter, December 10th. 
Phyllis Hanley Scandrett, a son, December 14th. 
Viola Beauchamp Farrow, a son, December 14th. 

1948 

Edith Merrill Sheppard, a son, January 9th. 
Betty McBean Leggett, a daughter, January 16th. 
Bernie Harris Howson, a son, January 17th. 
Barbara Wheelwright Gibson, a son, January 25th. 
Gwynneth Sinclair Powell, a daughter, January 28th. 
Jane Morg-an Brooker, a daughter, February 2nd. 
Diana Marriott Irwin, a son, February 2nd. 
Ruth Knowlton McEvoy, a son, February 9th. 
Marion Armstrong Corless, a son, February 13th. 
Dorothy Lyall Purkis, a son, February 15th. 
Lillian Mitchell Blair, a son, February 21st. 



80 



The Branksome Slogan 



Patricia Gilday Brown, a son, February 26th. 
Mary McFarland Smith, a son, February 26th. 
Ellen West Ayre, a son, February 28th. 
Alison Carpenter Brown, a daug-ther, March 2nd. 
Kathryn Shirriff Reid, a son, March 3rd. 
Margaret Davison Lathrop, a son, March 8th. 
Mary Wilder Macdonald, a son, March 11th. 
Brenda Cruikshank Reid, a son, March 15th. 
Katharine Flaunt Thomson, a son, March 16th. 
Hazel Wilkinson Barrett, a son, March 20th. 
Katharine Robarts Jockel, a son, March 24th. 
Joyce Sweatman Dalton, a son, March 29th. 
Elizabeth Le Roy Harrison, a son, April 3rd. 
Jean Lander Dick, a son, April 4th. 
Catherine Matthews Cooper, a daughter, April 7th. 
Eunice Plant McCullou^h, a daughter, April 8th. 
Joan Sieveright Abra, a son, April 13th. 
Ruth Hewetson Matthews, a daughter, April 14th. 
Audrey Levy Jones, a son, April 16th. 

Deaths 

Thomas, son of Ruth Ryan Russell, May 14th, 1947. 
Mr. Morden Neilson, husband of Margaret McTavish Neilson, August 
26th, 1947. 

Colonel David Larr, husband of Peggy Hearne Larr, August 17th, 1947. 
Dr. Gordon S. Foulds, husband of Florence Gall Foulds, and father of 

Margaret and Isabel, November 25th, 1947. 
Colonel Wm. S. Goodeve, husband of Wynifred Gray Goodeve, and 

father of Haldane Goodeve Hutchins and Elaine Goodeve, January 

15th, 1948. 

Michael, son of Margaret Barrett Eldridge, January 18th, 1948. 

Barbara, daughter of Isobel Pirie Lewis, March 15th, 1948. 

Colonel Roy G. Sneath, husband of Claire Prime Sneath, April 8th, 1948. 

STAFF 

Births 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Richardson (Miss Marion Findlay), a son, 
February 4th, 1948. 

Marriages 

Miss Hazel Mackenzie to Mr. Ronald F. D. Roach, September 3rd, 1947. 
Miss B. Maretta Wetmorfe to' Mr. Barry F. McHugh, December 6th, 1947. 
Miss Noreen Allport to Mr. Forrest E. G. Davidson, December 27th, 1947. 



The Branksome Slogan 



81 



3n iWemoriam 

Sheila Sprag-ue Ro'berts, June 10th, 1947. 
Ethel Trees, July 17th, 1947. 
Edna Hinder Hamilton, September 9th, 1947. 
Marjorie Brodie Henry, September 28th, 1947. 
Norma Gagnon Taylor, January 22nd, 1948. 
Marie Junkin Fraser, March 20th, 1948. 



The Branksome Slogan 



83 



SIMPSON'S 

Collegiate Club 

1 9 4 8 - 4 9 

Jane is your new Simpson's Col- 
legiate Club mennber. Better keep 
in touch with her 'cause she'll tip 
you off to all the big things that the 
club is planning for next year! 
What's nnore, she tells us about your 
wants and wishes . . . that's why wc 
are so conscious of you and your 
needs . . . Simpson's is Canada's 
Youth Centre! 





86 



The Bkanksome Slogan 




Now . . . Before 
You Leave School 

Before you leave school is the time to estahlish 
a banking connection. Whatever business or profes- 
sional career you may have in mind, you will find 
that an early association with The Bank of Nova Scotia 
will be most helpful in the years to come. Start with 
a savings account ... no amount is too small . . . and 
it is never too early to open an account. 



THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 



The Branksome Slogan 




Shine With the S'^^^ 

IN SPARKLING NEW SUMMER FASHIONS 

from 

NORTHWAY'/ 

240 YONGE STREET, TORONTO 



The Branksome Slogan 



89 





The graceful swing of 
back fulness . . . the ultra- 
feminine look of lavish- 
ness. 

Order now to insure early 
delivery. 




Ml. 8488 

707 YONGE ST. (1 Block below Bloor, corner of Hayden) 



90 



The Branksome Slogan 



"TJisit us you^ll enjoy ip~--^^ 

VICTOR 
BLUEBIRD 

COLUMBIA 

and 

DECCA RECORDS 

Electrical Housekeeping Ltd 

711 Yonse St. (at Bloor) Ra. 5127 

(Opposite Uptown Theatre) 



The Branksome Slogan 



91 



When 
You Want 

GOOD MILK 
HAVE 

BORDEN'S 

SERVE you 



THE BORDEN CO. LTD. 

TORONTO DIVISION 

Kl. 6151 



The Branksome Slogan 



93 



IF ITS PRINTING 
you DESIRE . . . . 



WE CAN DO IT! 



Our craftsmen are skilled 
and our service unexcelled. 



PUBLICATIONS 
CATALOGUES 
FOLDERS 
PROGRAMMES 
CIRCULARS, Etc 

★ 

ITLdcoomb 

PUBLISHinq COMPAUl] LTD. 

TORonro 

364-370 Richmond St. IDesl - EL. 1216-7 



94. 



The Branksome Slogan 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



*7/te DoMiMONe/' Canada 



yiONe/'tiAN 
INSURANCE COMPANY 



The KEY to the FUTURE 

Is in YOUR HANDS . . . 

Remember ... 

THE D 0 M I N I 0 N B A N K 

offers you the most convenient means of saving, forming 
the habit of thrift. Open a savings Account in The 
Dominion Bank, and put a little of your pocket money 
into it regularly. Your future independence will depend 
on the savings habit. The sooner you start to form this 
habit that leads to success the better. 

The Dominion Bank 

N. J. O'FLYNN, ROSEDALE BRANCH, 

Manager. Toronto. 



The Branksome Slogan 



95 




Quality is the H.R. Tradition 
. . . and H.R. Quality costs no more! 

HOLT RENFREW 

YONGE AT ADELAIDE 



WHAT OF THE FUTURE? 

Whether you marry or remain single, saving money is 
important to your future. And life insurance is a practical 
method of saving, one that keeps you at it, without fail. 
If you marry, your husband will find it easier to provide for 
your joint future if you own life insurance, and if you remain 
single, a life insurance policy will enable you to look forward 
to years of security and independence. 

Make an appointment today with a Mutual Life representative 
to talk over the kind of life insurance that will help make your 
future a happy one. 

THE 

IIOTOALIliE 

HIhOF CANADA I^HB 

HEAD OFFICE • WATERLOO. ONTARIO 

Loiv Cost Life Insurance Since 1869 



96 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of 

J. H. DOYLE 

The Imperial Life Assurance Company of Canada 
Toronto Uptown Branch 57 Bloor Street W. 



STAlVDREWlS Cp.I£p 




AUROItA, Ol 



lO 



Iff I 




A RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL IN THE COUNTRY 

(860 Feef Above Sea Level) 

FOR BOYS 8-18 

# Highest standards of teaching and scholarship, providing 
a sound education and complete preparation for Lini>ersity 
entrance. Carefully planned recreation; spacious playing 
fields. Modern buildings, beautiful chapel, gymnasium, 
swimming pool, 219 acres of unrivalled grounds. Early 
application advisable. Entrance scholarships. Write to the 
Headmaster; K. G. B. Ketchum, B.A. M 3 



The Branksome Slogan 



97 



Queeiisdale Tea Room 

FOR QUALITY 

We serve the best the market has to offer 
SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT 

The meeting place for Branksome girls 

401 BLOOR ST. EAST, TORONTO 
Phone Midway 0233 




Rich as Butter — Sweet as a Nut 



98' The Branksome Slogan 



ARMSTRONG, DeWITT & CROSSIN, 

LIMITED 

General Insurance Agents and Brokers 



36 TORONTO STREET 
Toronto 1 — ELgin 1473 



LEARN TO DRIVE SAFELY 
AT 

HO WARD'S 

SCHOOL OF SAFE DRIVING 

(Teaching Safe Driving Since 1931) 



Phone: HUdson 9815 

For Appointment at 

YOUR NEAREST BRANCH 



i 



The Branksome Slogan 



99 



Ask your retailer for 

WHYTE'S 

Bacon and Hams 

Cooked Ham, Weiners and Bologna 
Nulaid Eggs and Butter 
Picake Shortening 
Pure Lard of Finest Quality 

Meats put up under Dominion Government Inspection 

WHYTE*S PACKING COMPANY 

LIMITED 

78-80 Front Street East 
TORONTO ELgin 0121 



WONDER 

BREAD and CAKE 

Baked by 

WONDER BAKERIES LIMITED 

183 DOVERCOURT RD., TORONTO 3 
Lombard 1192 



100 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of the 

jWac^repr Clan 



What Does a Bank Mean To You ? 

A Friendly Neighbour 

A bank"' is as essential to welfare and progress as the 
local school, drug and grocery stores, church, police and fire 
stations. And how friendly and useful a neighbour this Bank 
can be! You can use it to cash a cheque, nnake a deposit, pay 
a bill and perform other banking services . . . here and at 
hundreds of other places in Canada. 

THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 



The Branksome Slogan 



101 



W. G. Tubbij & Compantj 

LIMITED 
INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

DOMINION BANK BUILDING 
68 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 1 



TELEPHONE: Midway 5252 

Whitewood's Riding School 

R. E. WHITEWOOD, Prop.— Late Sergt.-Major, 4th C.M.R. 

Rear 921 Yonge Street 
Toronto, Ontario 

- o - 

PRIVATE ROAD FROM STABLE TO RAVINE 
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

— O — 

Riding and Driving Taught by Competent Instructors 
Saddle Horse Training a Specialty 



1>02 



The Branksome Slogan 



lll)alter Stewart 

INSURANCE 

36 'Toronto St., '■Toronto, Elgin 1473 



This is our invitation to you to visit 



Britneirs Art Galleries 

To view our large collection of Oil Paintings, Mezzotints, Water-Colours, 
Engravings, Etchings, Antique Furniture, China, Bric-a-Brac and suitable 
gifts for every occasion. A full line of frames and nnouldings. We are 
experts in cleaning and restoring Oil Paintings. Pictures for Office and 
Public Buildings are carried in our Galleries. 

SPECIALISTS AS VALUATORS AND AUCTIONEERS 

Established 1873 

876 YONGE STREET Kl. 1446 



The Branksome Slogan 



103 




SCHOLASTIC 

OUTLINES and TRANSLATIONS 

STREAMLINED DIGESTS FOR ALL SUBJECTS 
BASED ON DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
REQUIREMENTS / 

AND ALL YOUR 

TEXT BOOKS 

NEW & USED 

STATIONERY SUPPLIES 



COLE'S 



AT ^ I f" • 370 BLOOR ST. W. 

1 BLOCK WEST OF SPADINA 

726 YONGE ST. 

1 BLOCK SOUTH OF BLOOR 



104 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of 

North Western Quebec 



With the Compliments of 



Taylor Engineerins & Construction 

Company Limited 
POWER PLANT ENGINEERS 



80 RICHMOND STREET WEST 
TORONTO 1, ONT. 



The Branksome Slogan 



105 



SHOP AT 




• Neckwear 

• Handbags 

• Gloves 

• Hosiery 

• Lingerie 

• Blouses 

• Sweaters 

• Skirts 

• Sportswear 



FOR SMART ACCESSORIES 
AND SPORTSWEAR AT 
MODERATE PRICES 



EVANGELINE SHOPS 

6 STORES IN TORONTO 



LONDON :: OTTAWA :: HAMILTON :: ST. CATHARINES :: GUELPH 

BROCKVILLE 



Carnahan's '-^'^^o 

Toronto 

Prescription Specialists 

FINE PERFUMES AND COSMETICS 
Expert Photo Finishing 



Main Store: 

741 YONGE ST., TORONTO (at Bloor) KIngsdale 1197 

Branch Store: 

2066 YONGE ST., TORONTO (Cor. Lola Rd.) HYland 1145 



106' 



The Branksome Slogan 



Robertson, Stark and Holland Ltd. 

WHOLESALE LUMBER DEALERS 
1801 Royal Bank Bids., Toronto AD. 3131 



Compliments of 

Stephens-Adamson Mfg. Co. 

of Canada Limited 

CONVEYORS • ELEVATORS • REDLER CONVEYOR- 
ELEVATORS • TRANSMISSION EQUIPMENT 

Aurora. Ills.— BELLEVILLE, ONT.— Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH SALES AND ENGINEERING OFFICES 
in principal cities of Canada and United States 



The Branksome Slogan 



107 



Compliments of 

G. H. GodsdII Equipment Ltd 



Thompson - Jones & Co 

GOLF AND LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS AND 
CONTRACTORS 



57 QUEEN STREET WEST 
TORONTO 

STANLEY THOMPSON RICHARD J. WILKINSON 



108' 



The Branksome Slogan 



WITH 
COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE VARSITY 
ARENA 



Compliments of 

BETTY lANE SHOES 

Best bet 
with the college set. 



BLOOR EAST HAIRDRESSING 

Specializing in 
Permanents, Style Cutting, 
Bleaching 
and all Beauty Culture 

406 Bloor Street East 
RAndolph 4590 

PAULINE BASS 



lilted Laltltesilii^ d-al'^^uxe <=rtxtUti- 




^^^^^^ 



JlifLnl 1 169 -1 160 ' 1497'lf^nfc Sized, notlL ^/ Si. CU 




The Branksome Slogan 



109 



Compliments 
of 

A Friend 



Compliments of 



CARDINAL UNIFORMS LTD. 



Toronto 



Onta 



no 



Compliments of 
MRS. CHAMBERS 



FRESH FISH DAILY 



SEA AND LAKE FISH 
FIRST-CLASS FISH AND 
OYSTER DEPOTS 



One Delivery Daily 



307 DANFORTH AVE. 

(Cor. Bowden Ave.). < 

Phone: GE. 1131 

BRANCHES: 
1841 DANFORTH AVE. 
Phone: GR. 6671 

1518 YONGE ST. 
Phones: HYland 1113-1114 

651 ST. CLAIR AVE. WEST 
LA. 3143 



WAKUNDA HOUSE CENTRE 



110 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of 

DOM & TONY 



VARSITY SKATING RINK 

Why not take your skating 
party to Varsity where the 
ice is hard and the band is 
good? 



CLUB COFFEE 
COMPANY 

COFFEE ROASTERS 
TEA BLENDERS 



240 Church St. 
Toronto 



Telephone : 
ELgin 1161 



Compliments of 

GALBRAITH HARDWARE 

5061 Yongc Street 
Willowdale 



The Branksome Slogan 



111 



School Furniture 

Blackboards and Accessories 

Maps, Globes and Charts 

Kindergarten and Junior 
Grade Materials 

Fine Art and Handicraft 
Materials 



— THE — 

GEO. M. HENDRY CO. 

Limited 

TORONTO, CANADA 



THE GLAMOROUS 
HAIR NET 
IS 

TIDY LOCKS 



EMERSON SUMMERS 
COMPANY LIMITED 



Compliments of 



ROSEDALE CLEANERS 

Ladies' work a specialty 

417 Bloor Street East 
RAndolph 4604 



Brug ^tore 

BLOOR and SHERBOURNE STS. 
TORONTO 

Phone RAndolph 4165 



112 



The Branksome Slogan 



A. M. SHOOK 
&CO. 



INSURANCE IN ALL 
BRANCHES 



Fire 



Liability 



Accident 



802 NORTHERN ONTARIO 
BUILDING 

Toronto, Ont. 
Phone AD. 3469 



COX, EVANS & NOBLE 

Barristers and Solicitors 
Toronto 



Compliments of 

A Friend 



PITMAN 
SHORTHAND 



SIMPLEST 

SWIFTEST 

SUREST 



The Branksome Slogan 



113 



Harry T. Munro 

FLOWER SHOP 

822>^ YONGE STREET 

AT CUMBERLAND 

Toronto 

— O — 

MEMBER OF 
FLORIST TELEGRAPH 
DELIVERY ASSOC. 

— O — 



Phone: KIngsdale 1144-5 



Residence: OR. 2163 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

G. TAMBLYN 
LIMITED 



AS Retail Drug stores 
in Toronto 



Stores also in: 

HAMILTON— GUELPH— KITCHENER 
STRATFORD— BRANTFORD— LONDON 
ST. CATHARINES— WINDSOR 
CHATHAM— OSHAWA— NIAGARA 
FALLS— KINGSTON— OTTAWA 
PETERBOROUGH— SARNIA—BARRIE 
CORNWALL— OWEN SOUND AND 
NORTH BAY 



Ct)e 3nterc£iting 
Jfetuelrp ^fjop 

(NEAR RED CROSS HDQTS.) 

32 Bloor Street East 



Do you want the unusual and in- 
expensive in Jewelry (especially 
earrini;s, pendants and bracelets) ? 
Keep coming to the shop that has 
bloomed into fascination I 

Dependable Watch Repairs. 



Compliments of 

Wm. G. McMullen 

& Company, Limited 

94 Yonge Street, Toronto 
AD. 1541-2 



114 



The Branksome Slogan 



U\[adine^ 
c^ngstrorru 

HANDWOVEN 
BABY BLANKETS 
SCARVES 
LINEN, ETC. 

KNITTING YARNS 

GIFTS 

OAKVILLE, ONT. Tel. 260 



ROHER'S 
BOOK SHOP 

15 BLOOR ST. W. KI. 3425 

All the latest 
BOOKS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

FOUNTAIN PENS AND 
PENCILS 

COSTUME JEWELLERY 

GREETING CARDS 
For all occasions. 



LYON & BUTLER 



INSURANCE 



15 WELLINGTON ST. E. 
TORONTO 



Distinguished 
Appearance . . . 
• 

The distinguished ap- 
pearance of custom- 
tailored clothes is not 
accidental. It is the 
natural result of master- 
designing, precise indi- 
vidual fitting and superb 
workmanship. 



SKITCH CLOTHES 

17 ADELAIDE ST. E. 

ELgin 4763 



The Branksome Slogan 



115 



^0tabItsI{e& 1797 

COOLINO 
GALLERIES 

FINE 
PAINTINGS 



Birks-Ellis-Ryrie Building 

TORONTO 

92 New Bond Street 
LONDON 



QUALITY 

SATISFACTION 

SERVICE 



Staines 

FLOWERS 



15 East St. Clair Ave., Toronto 
Phone: MI. 8484 Night: MO. 5446 



Compliments of 




The 

SHORTHAND PEN 
PITMAN . 
Recommends * 

• ' ■ FOR H 
STUDENTS 




Only after careful tests 
of the qualities of the 
Esterbrook Fountain 
Pen has Pitman given 
its endorsation. Ac- 
curacy and legibil- 
ity are improved 
and the specially 
designed point 
gives a sure out- 
line. The Pit- 
man-approved 
Pen is ideal 
for every 
shorthand 
wri ting 
purpose. 




A feature of The 
Pitman - approved 
Esterbrook Pen is 
the renewable point 
— quickly and easily 
replaced. 



SIR ISAAC PITMAN ft SONS (CANADA) LTD. 
383 CHURCH ST., TORONTO, ONTARIO 



116 



The Branksome Slogan 



Compliments of 

MATHEWS, STIVER, LYONS & VALE 

Barristers and Solicitors 
171 Yonge St., Toronto 

N. L MATHEWS. K.C. K. M. R. STIVER 

MISS B. P. LYONS JOSEPH VALE 

W. J. MULOCK 



CANADIAN MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION SECURITIES 



F. H. DEACON & CO. 

Business Established 1S97 

Members Toronto Stock Exchange 
197 BAY ST. — TORONTO — ELGIN 3401 



BERT MILLS MOTORS 

CHRYSLER • PLYMOUTH • FARGO 



365 DUPONT STREET 
TORONTO 



Compliments of 

B. A. ROBINSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING, LTD. 



The Branksome Slogan 117 



R. DOUGLAS HILL 


R. C. BERTRAM 


HILL and 


BERTRAM 


CHARTERED 


ACCOUNTANTS 




44-8-9 Confederation Life BiMding 


TELEPHONE ELGIN 3640 


TORONTI 1 



PHONE KINGSDALE 4700 659 YONGE STREET 

FAIR'S HARDWARE LIMITED 

HOUSEHOLD AND GENERAL HARDWARE 

(JUST BELOW CHARLES ST. POST OFFICE) 

PLUMBING. GLAZING. ELECTRICAL WORK AND SUPPLIES 



IVs Results 


That Count 




When You Want to BUY 




When You Want to SELL 




When You Want INCOME 


S. 


E. LYONS Limited 




Business and Industrial Realtors 




Building Management 


347 Bay Street 


TORONTO AD. 3282 



S. F. STINSON & SON 

LUMBER :-: DOORS :-: INSULATION 
573 DELAWARE AVE. LA. 1119 



118, 



The Branksome Slogan 



Winona flowers 

413 BLOOR ST. EAST 
Phone RA. 2303 

Member of the F.T.D.A. 



UPTOWN NUT HOUSE 

Nuts from All Parts of the World 
FPvESHLY ROASTED and BUTTEPvED 
Peanut Butte?- made while you wait 
806 '/2 YONGE STREET, TORONTO 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

HARMONY GRILL 

''Good food is good health^^ 
259 Yonge Street Next to Imperial Theatre 



RIDDELL, STEAD, GRAHAM & HUTCHISON 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 
C. G. McCONNELL TORONTO 



The Branksome Slogan 



119 



Bertherene's 
Beauty Salon 



Stylists in Permanent Waving, Finger Waving, 
Facials and All Beauty Culture 

368 BLOOR EAST <Near sherboume) Latest Equipment 

RA. 7273 New Appointments 



The Gift and Toy Shop 

96 BLOOR ST. WEST 

TOYS GAMES BOOKS GIFTS 
GREETING CARDS AND FANCY WRAPPINGS 

MARION C. GAIRNS M. DONALD SMELLIE 



Compliments of 

^ud Bolton blowers 

46 BLOOR ST. EAST Phone: RA. 6363 



Our Century of accumulated experience is at the service of 
every Bride in or cut of Toronto. 

George COLES Limited 

ORIGINAL 1846 

Catering — Weddings — Banquets 
719 YONGE STREET RA. 1163 



120 



The Branksome Slogan 
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Page 

A 

Nadine Angstrom IM 

Armstrong, DeWitt & Crossin, Limited 98 

B 

Bank of Nova Scotia 86 

Baker-Ashdown, Ltd 88 

Borden's 91 

Britnell's Art Galleries 102 

Bloor East Hairdressins? 108 

Betty Jane Shoes 108 

Bertherene's Beauty Salon 119 

Bud Bolton Flowers 119 

C 

Canada Bread 97 

Carnahan's 105 

Mrs. Chambers 109 

Club Cbffee Co 110 

George Cbles Ltd 119 

Cooling Galleries 115 

Camp Gay Venture 110 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 100 

Compliments of a Friend 103 

Cole's Stationery Supplies 103 

Compliments of a Friend 109 

Cardinal Uniforms Ltd 109 

Compliments of a Friend 112 

Cox. Evans & Noble 112 

D 

F. H. Deacon & Co 116 

Dominion Bank 94 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co... 94 

J. H. Doyle 96 

Dom & Tony 110 

E 

T. Eaton Co (Inside Back Cover) 

Evangeline Shops 105 

Electrical Housekeeping Ltd 90 

Emerson Summers Co. Limited Ill 

F 

Fair's Hardware Limited 117 

G 

Gift and Toy Shop 119 

G. H. Godsall Equipment Ltd 107 

Galbraith Hardware 110 

H 

Holt Renfrew & Co., Ltd 95 

George M. Hendry Co., Ltd Ill 

Hooper's Drug Store Ill 

Harmony Grill 118 

Howard's School of Safe Driving 98 

Hill and Bertram 117 

Interesting Jewelry Shop 113 

L 

S. E. Lyons Limited 117 

Lyon & Butler 114 



Page 



M 

Macoomb Publishing Co , 93 

Hariy T. Munro 113 

Mutual Life of Canada 95 

W. W. Magee Limited 92 

MacGregor Clan loo 

Wm. G. McMullen & Co. Limited 113 

Mathews, Stiver, Lyons & Vale 116 

Bert Mills Motors 116 

N 

William NeiLson, Ltd 85 

John Northway & Sons, Ltd 87 

North- We.stern Quebec 104 

O 

Oscar and Josef 108 

P 

Pitman Shorthand 112 

Sir Lsaac Pitman & Sons 115 

Q 

Queensdaie Tea Room 97 

R 

Riddell, Stead, Graham & Hutchison 118 

B. A. Robinson 116 

Roher's Book Shop 114 

Robertson, Stark and Holland Ltd 106 

Rosedale Cleaners Ill 

Simon Ramm 115 

S 

St. Andrew's College 96 

Robert Simpson Co., Ltd 83 

A. M. Shook & Co 112 

Skitch Clothes 114 

Staines Flowers 115 

Walter Stewart 102 

Stan Walker's Tailoring 89 

Stephens- Adam son Mfg. Co 106 

S. F. Stinson & Son 117 

T 

G. Tamblyn Ltd 113 

W. G. Tubby & Company 101 

Taylor Engineering & Construction 104 

Thompson-Jones & Co 107 

U 

Uptown Nut House 118 

V 

Varsity Arena 108 

Varsity Skating Rink 110 

Whitewood's Riding School....- 101 

Whyte's Packing Co., Ltd 99 

Winona Flowers 118 

Wonder Bakeries 99 

Wakunda House Centre 109 



When you shop at these stores, tell them that 
you saw their advertisements in "The Branksome 
Slogan." 



EATON'S has a 

"HI" I.Q.! 



e 

R 
A 



0 
M 
f 




Thanks to 

Nancy Beatty, Yoor EATON Junior Rep. 

Nancy and our 82 other Junior Councillors and 
Executives know that for learnin' and 
leisure needs. Hi Gals and Guys can depend 
on finding them at EATON'S, the Teen-minded 
Store that is interested in YOU, and 
ready to serve you. 



EATON'S The Store For Young Canada