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Capital Campaign 


Campagne de souscription 
Concordia University 


de PUniversité Concordia 


Soo 


Batissons ensembie 





RDO” 


Building together 





Concordia University, Montreal 


Vol. 9 No. 23 Mar. 20, 1986 





Plans going well for 


day care centre 


rganizers of a day 

O care centre mainly 

for children of 
Concordia staff and faculty 
are awaiting the final go ahead 
from the provincial govern- 
ment that would allow the cen- 
tre to open in September. They 
will know by mid-April if they 
are going to receive a govern- 
ment grant that would provide 
funds for renovations and on- 
going operation, reports 
Marie-France Sampson, who 
is chairman of the committee 
for the Maison Arc-en-Ciel 
centre at the west-end campus. 


Sampson has been working 
with several other staff 
members for the past three 
years to organize the centre. A 
location was- obtained recently 
with the help of Beth Morey, 
Advisor to the Rector, Status 
of Women. The centre will be 
located in WB Annex at 2499 
and 2501 West Broadway, 
which is an upstairs and 
downstairs duplex. 

A goverment architect has 
already visited the location, 
giving her.approval and re- 
quiring minor renovations 
such as adding linoleum floors 
and a toilet for the handicap- 
ped. 


Space will be available in the 
12 room centre for five babies 
and 24 toddlers between the 
ages of 18 months and five 
years. The children of staff 
and faculty will be given 
priority, although space will 
also be available for the 
children of students, Sampson 
says. If the quota of children is 
not filled, the centre will also 
accept children from the 
public. : 

A day care centre mainly for 
the children of students is 
already operating at the 
downtown campus. 

The centre will be parent- 
run and non-profit. The Board 
of Directors be composed 
mostly of parents, who will 
hire a director and employees. 
Government regulations re- 
quire one employee for every 
five babies and one employee 
for every eight toddlers. 

Among those already in- 
volved in organizing the centre 
with Sampson are staff 
members Kathé Shannon, who 
is working on space, Danuta 
Weston, personnel, Loni Cor- 
nax, finances, and Sharon 
Rankin, legal requirements. 

The cost per child at the cen- 
tre will be approximately $12 
to $15 a day. B.V. 


és 





Concordia psychologist, Prof. Zalman Amit, has been studying the underlying causes of 


alcoholism for the past decade. 





Causes of alcoholism are probed 


By Simon Twiston Davies 
n the US and Canada ap- 
| proximately 5% of the 
adult population can be 
considered alcoholic. Another 
10 to 15% are classifiable 
problem drinkers. Perhaps 


‘20% more can be considered 


heavy drinkers. Alcohol is a 





Mass mock wedding makes a point 


by Simon Twiston Davies 
“‘Forasmuch as these Left- 
hand-side-of-certificate 
spouses and Right-hand-side- 
of-certificate spouses have 
made this solemn covenant of 
mock money marriage before 
the Government and _all of us 
here, I declare them to be 
mock married for the sake of 
loans and bursaries and the in- 
dependence criteria. Praise be 
to the Québec government’’ 
ast Friday at 2:30 
| p.m. those words 
were solemnly pro- 
nounced by the Reverend 


Father O’Bursary at the 
Loyola Campus Centre to 33 
happy couples. They had con- 
sented to a mock wedding 
ceremony to protest provincial 
regulations that give special 
privileges to students who are 
married, rather than single. 

Following the ceremony, the 
33 couples had their marriage 
certificates signed and witness- 
ed. Photographers took pic- 
tures and rice and confetti 
were liberally distributed. 
Some 30 friends of the brides 
and grooms were there to help 
things along. 


‘*We took this action,”’ said 
Peter Wheeland, a CUSA 
Vice-President, ‘‘because of 
the criteria the Québec govern- 
ment uses to determine which 
students are deemed to be 
dependent on their parents 
and which students are deem- 
ed to be independent. This has 
a serious effect on the amount 
of financial aid available to 
students.”’ 

If a student is determined by 
the provincial government to 
be dependent on his parents, 
whether the parents contribute 


(See page 2) 


major factor in approximately 
50%of all assaults, rapes and 
murders; it is the fifth leading 
cause of death in North 
America; it is the leading cause 
of death among young adults 
involved in traffic accidents. 
Alcoholism lies behind 27% of 
all first admissions to mental 
hospitals. 

The litany of startling 
statistics rolls on endlessly. 

For the past decade, Con- 
cordia psychologist Zalman 
Amit has been trying to 
understand the underlying 
causes of alcoholism — both 
psychological and 
physiological. ‘‘I am essential- 
ly looking at the neurological 
changes which take place when 
alcohol is taken,’’ says Amit, 
who is also examining the 
genetics underlying those 
changes. 

Although there are as yet an 
uncounted number of reasons 
for people becoming 
alcoholics, substantial 
evidence shows that a percen- 
tage of the population is 


physically more susceptible to 
alcoholism, says Amit. 
Evidence comes mostly from 
extensive studies of sets of 
European twins who have 
been separated at birth. One 
twin, in these studies, was sent 
to foster parents with a non- 
alcoholic family. The other re- 
mained with parents or grand- 
parents with acute drinking 
problems. 

The incidence of alcoholism 
in the twins was consistent and 
had little or nothing to do with 
their home environment. If 
their natural parents and 
grandparents were alcohol 
abusers, both twins had a high 
incidence of alcoholism, 


x 
x 
ae 
3 
80 
= 
3 
3 
i) 
8 
~ 
S 
= 
O 


whatever their upbringing — 


sober or bibulous. 

However, after all that 
work, we still don’t know 
what is the actual cause of the 
alcoholism, says Amit. What 
precise genetic factors give this 
15% minority of the alcoholic 
population a _ physical 
predisposition towards the 
(See ‘‘Causes’’ on page 5) 


Page 2 THE THURSDAY REPORT Mar. 20, 1986 


rom 
INQ — 1) 
towards his education or not, 
the amount will be con- 
siderably less than if said to be 
independent. Thus the mock 
marriages of last week. If you 
are married, you have finally 
cut the strings with Mom and 
Pop, and so,can’t rely on them 
for financial handouts. 

The official criteria for 
‘independence’ are that (1) a 
student has. been married, 
separated or divorced. (2) has 
dependent children (3) has at 
least 90 credits or an 
undergraduate degree. 

Parents of students who live 
away from home and don’t 
qualify as the above must help 
towards their children’s 
upkeep. 

‘“‘The Liberal party during 
the recent election campaign 
admitted that parents who 
were below the poverty line 
were being asked to contribute 
to their children’s education. 
They said they’d change that. 
They haven’t done it yet,’’ ex- 
plained Wheeland. 

Wheeland is unsure how 


ATTENTION: 


Québec compares with other 
provinces over ‘dependence’ 
but added that he knew that in 
British Columbia if you are 
caught driving your father’s 
car, you can lose your status as 
an independent student.’’ 
Grim stuff. 

Last Friday’s nuptials were 
really just a symbolic attack 
on the financial aid system as a 
whole, said Wheeland. The 
general criteria used by the 
province to distribute student 
aid has little to do with reality. 
‘All students over 18 should 
be eligible for some aid if their 
parents really don’t support 
them,’’ he said. 

Amid the champagne and 
caviar, there was a $450 draw 
for one of the lucky newlywed 
couples to help pay off the 
equivalent of one year’s tui- 
tion fees. The winners were 
Jonathan Strickland and 
Natalie Potvin. However, 
when we tried to interview the 


happy couple about their good ' 


fortune, they had left for the 
bank. That’s romance for you 
in the hard-hearted ‘80s. 


ALL FALL 1986 CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA, 
BACHELOR’S, MASTER’S, AND DOCTORAL 
DEGREE CANDIDATES: 


If you are completing the requirements for your certificate, 
degree, or diploma program this Summer and therefore ex- 
pect to be considered as a graduation candidate this Fall, 


YOU must inform the Graduation Office by submitting a Fall 
1986 Graduation Application no later than July 15th, 1986. 


STUDENTS WHO DO NOT APPLY BY THIS 
DATE WILL NOT GRADUATE THIS FALL. 


Obtain your form from the Registrar’s Services Department 
on your campus and submit it today! (Loyola CC214, $.G.W. 
N107) 


ARE YOU A HUMAN BEING? 


Are you concerned about the state of the world - and what it 
means for our children? 


We are: our approach is enquiring - responsible - but not 
limited by any rules or orthodoxy. 


Come and visit us one Sunday at lla.m. You may not agree 
with opinions expressed - but you should find it stimulating! 


Unitarian Church of Montréal 
Sherbrooke St. West at Simpson 
935-1522 


Schedule of Thursday Reports 
for the remaining academic year 


The Thursday Report will be published on: 
March 27 April 10 = April 17 April 24 


June 5 











Letter 


To the Editor 

Concerning the article 
printed in the Section ‘‘Letters 
to the Editor’’ in the Thursday 
Report dated March 6, 1986, 
regarding Concordia Physical 
Plant. 

The views and opinions 
stated in this article are solely 
those of Mr. Glendon Flynn 
and not necessarily those of 
Physical Plant Employees or 
of its Association. 

Thank you 
Physical Plant Employees 
MWCLCCU Association 


Grad to be soloist 
at concert 


Concordia 
A graduate, Dianne 
Thornhill, will per- 
form as a soloist in the Ken- 
tucky State University Concert 
Choir when it appears at Er- 
skine and American United 
Church next Tuesday at 7:30 

p.m. 

Thornhill graduated with 


her BFA, Specialization in In- . 


tegrative Music Studies, in 
1983 and is the first Canadian 
studying on a music scholar- 
ship at Kentucky State Univer- 
sity. She has been on the 
Dean’s List of Excellence each 
year since beginning her post- 
doctoral studies there in 1983. 

During the summer months 
she gives concerts in Montreal 
with well-known pianist Oliver 
Jones. 

The choir is on a US and 
Canadian tour. Ticket infor- 
mation is available by calling 
935-8237, 848-3588 or 
488-0358. 


World peace 
is topic of talk 


arry Davis, who has 

‘been referred to as 

both a ‘‘world figure’’ 
by the Atlantic Monthly and a 
‘“‘misguided crackpot’’ by 
Time, will speak tomorrow at 
4 p.m. in the Hall Bldg., 
Room 620. 

His topic will be “Educating 
for World Peace’’, and, the 
event is sponsored by the 
Graduate Programme in 
Educational Technology. 

World government, nuclear 
war and world peace are 
among his topics. He is the 
organizer of a World Service 
Authority, which issues 
passports in the name of the 
World Government of World 
Citizens — and over 80 coun- 
tries have partly recognized 
the passports and six fully ac- 
cepted them. 





Savings plan available 


oncordia staff and faculty can use a provision in the 
( University Pension Plan, which allows a member of 
the University to contribute personal Additional 
Voluntary Contributions (AVCs). This can be used instead of 
Registered Retirement Savings Plans for personal savings, 
Benefits Administrator Dawn Johnson says. The AVCs are in 
addition to ‘‘required’’ plan contributions, Johnson adds. 
The AVCs work in this manner: 
1) You have access to the investment returns obtained by 
the Pension Plan Investment Managers with no added ad- 


ministration or carrying charges. 


2) If you wish to make ‘‘Current Service’? AVCS you must 
authorize regular Payroll deductions. The maximum amount 
of ‘‘Current Service’? AVCs in a taxation year is $3,500 less 
the amount of your required contribution. You will receive 
immediate tax exemption of these deductible contributions. 

3) You can purchase units in either the Equity Fund or the 
Fixed Income Fund in any one of the following proportions 
of your choice: 

100% Equity 
75% Equity 
50% Equity 
25% Equity 

0% Equity 


0% Fixed Income 
25% Fixed Income 
50% Fixed Income 
75% Fixed Income 

100% Fixed Income 


4) If you have a year of ‘‘Past Service’’ which is eligible for 


a ‘‘Past Service’ contribution under Section 8(1)(m)(ii) of the 
Income Tax Act, you can make an additional AVC of up to 
$3,500 for such year of ‘‘Past Service’? when you were not a 
contributor to the Concordia pension plan. 

CAUTION: There may be changes to the tax rules pertaining 
to the treatment of ‘‘additional’’ voluntary contributions: 
such changes are. not expected to reduce deductibility en- 
titlements in 1986. We recommend that you verify this provi- 
sion with your personal tax accountant. You may want to 
refer to interpretation bulletin IT167R5 issued March 14, 
1985 for a review of the current rules. 

What are the disadvantages of AVCs? 

1) You cannot withdraw your personal voluntary contribu- 
tions while you are an employee of the University. You can 
stop making contributions at any time but your contributions 
already deposited must remain in the plan until you either ter- 
minate your employment or retire. 

2) Your voluntary personal ‘‘Current Service’’ contribu- 
tions must be deducted regularly from your paycheque. You 
cannot make lump sum contributions for ‘‘current service’’; 
‘‘Current Service’? and ‘‘Past Service’? AVCs must be paid 
into the plan before December 31st each year (Procrastinators 
beware!!!). 

How have AVC participants done in the recent past? 

Let’s take a look at the returns over the past four years. (A 
word of caution to conservative investors - there are no 
guarantees on returns! This is not the ideal investment vehicle 
for the faint-hearted investor.) 


Fixed Income. Equity 
December 31/84 to 
December 31/85 

December 31/83 to 


December 31/84 


16.7% 26.1% 


15.1% 7% (Low 
market) 
December 31/82 to 

December 31/83 
December 31/81 to 
December 31/82 


11.8% 27.8% 


30.8% 18.7% 


How do I participate? 

To start making Additional Voluntary Contributions you 
must sign a special enrollment card indicating how much you 
wish to contribute biweekly; you must ensure that your con- 
tributions will not exceed the exemption and you must choose 
the proportion you wish to deposit to the Fixed Income Fund 
and the Equity Fund. 

Please call the Benefits Office (848-3673) for further 
details. Please be patient the first few days after the article is 
published. Your fellow participants will be seeking informa- 
tion too!!! 





Mar. 20, 1986 THE THURSDAY REPORT Page 3 





A cheque for $5,000 for Concordia’s Capital Campaign was 
presented by the President of the Chinese Alumni Association 
in Toronto, Daniel Chan, left, and the President of the 
Toronto Alumni Chapter, Marion Kunstler,.on Feb. 21 at a 
fund-raising banquet. Receiving the cheque above is Rector 
Patrick Kenniff. About 300 people attended the event to 
mark the Chinese New Year at a downtown Toronto 


restaurant, 





Student Co-op opens 


By Simon Twiston Davies 
n the fourth floor 
O in the EN Annex at 
2040 Mackay Street 
you can get some pretty good 
deals if you’re searching for 
some of those academic 
peripherals so often overpric- 
ed. 

The first student co- 
operative at an anglophone 
university, Co-operative de 
l'Université Concordia, can 
supply you with a computer, 
typewriter, calculator or even 
felt-tip pens and folders — all 
at rock bottom prices. 

Alain Lévesque, the 
Secretary, explains that the co- 
operative was formed last 
September solely to service 
Engineering students. 
However, it soon became ob- 
vious that there was a need for 
such an organization for the 
whole University. 

Membership costs a mere 
$11 and is more or less for life, 
says Lévesque. ‘‘When you 
‘pay your $11, you become a 
shareholder in the Co-op. 
Nine dollars is refundable 
when you graduate from the 
University, but a lot of people 
continue to use a co-op long 
after graduating,’’ he adds. 

Membership entitles you to 


a reduction of about 20% on 


everything in the co-op’s 
catalogue. If you aren’t a 
member, you can still buy at 
the co-op but must pay the full 
price. Membership is open to 
all Concordia students, faculty 
and staff. 

‘“We haven’t had that much 
publicity yet,’’ says Lévesque, 


‘*so that, so far, our member- 
ship isn’t too big.’’ 

At the present time, only 
seven volunteers are running 
(See ‘‘Co-op”’ on page 4) 


Prominent 
composer 
to visit 
r. Anthony Milner, a 
D prominent British 
composer, will visit 
Concordia University on 
Wednesday and Thursday, 
April 2nd and 3rd. 

On April 2nd at 8 p.m., 
Milner will present a lecture on 
‘Church Music Today’’ at 
Lonergan University College, 
7300 Sherbrooke St. W. Then 
on April 3rd at 8p.m., he will 
discuss one of his own com- 
positions, in RF-101 of the 
Music Department, West-end 
Campus. 

Milner is Principal Lecturer 
at the Royal College of Music 
in London and has regularly 
given lectures at Canadian and 
American universities. 

He is considered one of 
England’s foremost contem- 
porary composers. Most of his 
compositions are published by 
leading music publishers; his 
performances have attracted 
abundant critical acclaim. 

The lectures are free and 
open to the public. For infor- 
mation call 848-4706. 


Shakespeare’s Italy is topic 


he Department of 
T English will present a 
. public lecture by Dr. 
Maurice Charney, 
Distinguished Professor of 
English at Rutgers University, 
on Wed., Mar. 26. The topic 
will be ‘‘Shakespeare’s Italy 
and the Venice of Shylock and 
Othello.’’ The lecture will be 
given at 8:30 p.m. in Room 
435 of the Hall Building, 1455 
de Maisonneuve Boulevard 
West. A reception will follow 
in the Faculty Club. 
Charney is the author of a 
number of books and several 
dozen articles on Shakespeare 


and related subjects. He is a 
consultant to the National En- 
dowment of the Humanities in 
Washington, D.C., and to 
several publishers, including 
the University of Toronto 
Press. In 1981, he taught a 
course on ‘‘Shakespeare and 
his Contemporaries’”’ in Con- 
cordia’s Summer Institute. 


Charney will be in Montreal 
to conduct a seminar at the an- 
nual meeting of the 
Shakespeare Association of 
America, which will take place 
at the Ritz Carlton Hotel from 
March 27-30. 





/ 





From Giacomo Franco, Habiti d’huomeni et donne Venetia (1626). 





AT AGLANCE 


ssoc. Prof. Harold M. Angell, Political Science, 
A will deliver a paper entitled ‘‘Québec Language 

Minorities and the Law’’ at an international sym- 
posium on ‘‘Minorities and the Law from 1867 to the Pre- 
sent,’’ planned by Dawson College and the Law Faculty of 
E.L.T.E. (Budapest) for May 2-4...Recently Mariela Gutiér- 
rez, a Sessional Lecturer from Modern Languages and 
Linguistics, gave a lecture at the Department of Hispanic 
Studies of McGill Unviersity, dealing with Afro-American 
culture and literature... ; 

CUNASA, the Concordia Unviersity Non-Academic Staff 
Association, is looking for nominations for positions on the 
executive and classification council for the 1986-87 term. The 
deadline is 4p.m. Frid., Apr. 4. Send nominations to P. Ver- 
ret, Chief Returning Officer, SGW C-523... 

Rector Patrick Kenniff and Mrs. Kenniff were the guests of 
honor at the 152nd ball of the St. Patrick’s Society last Friday 
night at the Chateau Champlain. More than 480 guests at- 
tended the event, the proceeds going to the St. Patrick’s 
Society charities, which include St. Mary’s Hospital, Mon- 
treal Convalescent Hospital, Spera Foundation, Birthright of 
Montreal, Dawson Boys’ and Girls’ Club and the Bishop 
Leonard J. Crowley Fund. 

A 24-hour dance-a-thon starts tomorrow night in the 
Hingston Hall cafeteria, west-end campus, at 8 p.m. and con- 
tinues until Saturday night, with the proceeds slated for the 
Quebec Heart Foundation and the Canadian Cancer Society, 
reports organizer Bonnie Ste-Croix. Dancers, sponsors and 
spectators are all welcome as well as food donations to keep 
the dancers going — whether for an hour or 24 hours. Sign-up 
sheets are available in room 156 at Hingston Hall. 

If you’re looking for Registrar’s Service at the west-end 
campus, you’ll find them at AD 211 instead of their former 
location, CC 214... 

Nancy Allison, who teaches voice, singing and speech for 
the Theatre Department will be guest soprano soloist at a con- 
cert by the Shouer de Montréal and the Metropolitain Or-— 
chestra at 8 p.m. on Mar. 23 and 26 in Eglise St. Viateur in 
Outremont. A concert will also be given on Mar. 19 in 
Lachine. For more information, call 381-5502. 

...The Canadian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals (SPCA) will have information booths at Concordia 
on Mar. 24 and 25 at the main entrance of the Hall Building 
and the Campus Centre at the west-end campus. 





Women’s research institute 


announces grants, conference 


he Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement 
of Women (CRIAW) announces: 


1) Research Grants-in-Aid: A small number of grants are 
being offered for projects that promote the advance- 
ment of women ($2,000 each). 

- The project must make a significant contribution to 
feminist research; 

- be non-sexist in methodology and language; 

- take place in Canada or should concern Canada; 

- the research design and content must meet ap- 
propriate standards. 

Deadline is August 31, 1986 

The 10th CRIAW Conference, University of Moncton, 
November 7-9, 1986. Call for Papers. 

Deadline for receipt of abstracts March 28, 1986 
Address: 

Isabelle McKee-Allain 

Département de sociologie 

Centre universitaire de Moncton 

Moncton, Nouveau-Brunswick 

E1A 3E9 





Page 4 THE THURSDAY REPORT Mar. 20, 1986 





An exhibition of sculptures by Brian McNeil, who is also a 





photographer in Concordia’s Audio-Visual Department, con- 
tinues until May 31 at the Concordia Art Gallery on the mez- 
zanine of the Hall Building. McNeil has exhibited regularly in 
Montreal, most recently at Vehicule and Galerie John A. 
Schweitzer. The iron and wood sculpture seen above is 


“‘Quadrant’’. 


Co-op 
(Continued from page 3) 


the co-op. Now Lévesque and 
his fellow workers are looking 
for new directors from all 
faculties. ‘‘We have one guy 
from Commerce here and 
another from Arts and 
Science. The rest of us are 
Engineers. We now want new 
directors from each Faculty. 
We must reprsent all Faculties 
if we are to serve all of Con- 
cordia.”’ 

Prices certainly look very 
competitive from this writer’s 
viewpoint. A Phillips P-3102 
computer with a 512 kilobyte 
memory will cost you $1,995 
+ tax at the Concordia Co- 
op. A Hewlett Packard HP- 
12C financial calculator will 
cost members $167.10. The 
regular price is $215. 

‘““We have all the computer 
peripherals available,’’ con- 
tinues Lévesque, ‘‘be they 
computer paper, cards, disks 


or screens or even the fur- 
niture to place them on.”’ 

You won’t be able to buy 
computer software or tex- 
tbooks yet though. That, with 
luck, will come in the future. 
‘‘Given a larger membership, 
by .this time next year we 
should be selling books,’’ says 
Lévesque, a third year Elec- 
trical Engineer student. Our 
problem is the competition 
this would give the university 
book store. Lévesque and his 
colleagues are negotiating with 
the administration about that 
one. 

This kind of co-operative 
has been in operation at fran- 
cophone universities for 30 
years, says Lévesque. 
‘‘Concordia is the first in the 
English sector. That is why we 
are going to have to work 
very, very hard to get it going. 
At the moment, people really 
don’t know what a -co- 
operative is,’’ he adds. 

The co-op is open 10a.m. to 
4p.m. Monday to Friday. If 
you have enquiries, call 
848-7905. 


‘i a 


ill, 


- By Patricia Willoughby 


alph Carter is a 
R very adaptable per- 
son. He has to be. 
His job is constantly chang- 
ing as the equipment he uses 
is updated. Carter is day co- 
ordinator of the main com- 
puter centre at. 1440 St. 
Catherine Street. ‘‘I enjoy 
what I do,’’ he said. ‘‘The 
changes are like going to a 
new job.”’ 

The computer braincen- 
tre brings to mind the con- 
trol room of a space centre. 
Large cabinets containing 
millions of dollars worth of 
equipment fill the room, 
which is windowless and 
cool. Computers need a set 
environment to prevent 
overheating, which causes 
them to turn off. Most 
operators use earplugs to 
block out the steady humm- 
ing. Carter only wears them 
when he has to stand by a 
noisy piece of equipment. 

He spends about one 
hour of his seven hour shift 
in front of one of the two 
console screens near the en- 
trance. His first daily task is 
to get the computer system 


Charles Bélanger, A.V. 


Ralph Carter 


up and running, making 
sure that all computer ap- 
plications are operational. 
A morning person, he is at 
his best at this time of day. 


Carter maintains con- 
tinuity between the day and 
night shifts and keeps the 
work flowing smoothly. 
‘I’m the anchor,” he said. 
When the system goes down 
he has to find the problem 
and solve it. It might be 
caused by a power failure or 


by chilled water. If it’s a 
hardware problem, caused 
by a breakdown in the 
equipment itself, he calls in 
a customer engineer to deal 
with it. 

‘Running a computer 
means you impact a lot of 
people when things go 
wrong,’’ he commented. 
Users phone frantically 
when the system goes down. 
The average down time is 
only five to 15 minutes but 
that can feel like forever if 
you’re working in Registra- 
tion with an impatient stu- 
dent standing in front of 
you. 

Carter has evolved his 
own methods of dealing 
with the stress of being at 
the receiving end of this 
kind of pressure. Humour 
helps. ‘‘There’s a lot of jok- 
ing around and fun here,”’ 
he said. 


He also works hard at 
fostering a better 
understanding of the people 
behind the computers. He is 
responsible for organizing 
monthly tours of the com- 
puter centre. 





Journal focuses on liberalism 


By Simon Twiston Davies 

ssoc. Prof. Blair 

Williams of the 

Political Science 
Department has a small 
quarterly publication on his 
hands. Those who appear in 
his magazine aren’t quite so 
small. 

So far, in the first three 
issues of De Novo, a popular 
journal of liberal thought, the 
likes of Monique Bégin, Ar- 
thur Schlesinger, John Ken- 
neth Galbraith, Lloyd Axwor- 
thy and Paul Martin have all 
had their say on current small 
‘L’ liberalism. 

De Novo was established by 
Williams and some like- 
minded colleagues about a 
year ago. ‘‘The objective is to 
try and stimulate some kind of 
debate on public policy issues 
by people who define 
themselves as small ‘L’ 
liberals,’’ says Williams, who 
teaches Community Politics 
and Law. 

“‘We started the magazine in 
response to the drift towards 


so-called neo-conservatism 
and attacks on the welfare 
state,’? he explains. ‘‘No, it 
certainly is not in business to 
salvage the federal Liberal 
Party on partisan grounds,’’ 
he adds, perhaps a little defen- 
sively. 

The 44-page, $6 an issue, 
magazine currently has a print 
run of 6,000 and is aimed at 
people interested in politics 
from a varying perspective, 
says Williams. ‘‘We are trying 
to hit a stride somewhere bet- 
ween heavy academic analysis 
(which few people want to 
read) and top flight journalism 
(which so often doesn’t have 
enough substance.)”’ 

Williams is the co-editor of 
De Novo along with Claude- 
André Lachance of the 
University of Ottawa. 
“‘Sometimes we are finding 
some of the articles submitted 
to us to- be rather too heavy 
and we send them back for a 
little lightening up. On other 
occasions we have found them 
to rather lack substance, too 


close to a Dalton Camp-type 
of analysis. We’re trying to hit 
the mid-point,’’ adds 
Williams. 

““Of course I would like to 
see some of the ideas put for- 
ward in De Novo becoming a 
part of Liberal policy in 
time,’’ continues Williams, a 
former chairperson of the 
federal Liberal Party during 
the middle years of the 
Trudeau administration. ‘‘I 
would also like to think that 
some of the-ideas generated in 
the magazine would have an 
impact right across the 
political spectrum.’’ A 
number of progressive Tories 
and members of the NDP are 
also readers, he points out. 


Some articles already 
published are ‘‘What 
liberalism in Canada means to 
me’’ by life-long Grit and 
former federal backbencher, 
J.W. Pickersgill, and a series 
by Donald Macdonald on the 
Commission he recently head- 
ed. 


Halifax artists 
work is on display 


he Concordia Art 
Gallery is presenting 


an exhibition of 13 
paintings and 11 works on 
paper by the Halifax artist 
Ron Shuebrook until April 26. 
These recent works, produced 
from 1980 to 1985 
demonstrate an articulate 
understanding of the issues of 
contemporary abstraction and 
Shuebrook’s belief in the 
emotive subjective meaning of 
abstract images. 

Since moving to Nova 
Scotia in 1973, Shuebrook has 
reworked the tenets of 
geometric abstraction by in- 
troducing idiosyncratic 
shapes, an assymetrical align- 
ment of structural elements 
and resonant colour. His crea- 
tion of tension between the 
organizing principles of the 
pictures and the improvisation 
of the character of the in- 
dividual elements gives his 
work an expressive spatial am- 


biguity. By drawing on the 
sensations evoked by the land- 
scape, the cityscape and his 
personal and private ex- 
perience, the works possess a 
universal symbolic meaning 
that is the basic function of 
contemporary art. 


Ron Shuebrook’s work has 
been seen in many solo and 
group exhibitions across 
Canada in the United States. 
This exhibition will mark the 
first major showing of his 
work in Montréal. The exhibi- 
tion will be accompanied by an 
illustrated bilingual catalogue 
with an introductory essay by 
the gallery curator, Sandra 
Paikowsky, and a major essay 
by Ron Shuebrook. The ex- 
hibition has been organized by 
the Concordia Art Gallery 
with the financial assistance of 
the Canada Council. For fur- 
ther information, please call 
848-4750. 


This acrylic on canvas, which is entitled, is one of the works 
on display until April 26 by Halifax artist Ron Shuebrook. 
The exhibition consists of works produced from 1980 to 1985. 





Prof. Zalman Amit has found evidence that.a percentage of the population is physically more 


susceptible to alcoholism. 


Causes 


(Continued from page 1) 


serious abuse of alcohol? he 
wonders. 

After extensive animal 
studies, mostly using rats and 
mice, Amit and his colleagues 
believe that at the level of the 
neural transmitters, it is the 
norepinephrine system,  in- 
teracting with an enzyme call- 
ed catalase, which is the key to 
the problem. 

When alcohol is ingested, an 
enzyme called 
aldehydrogenace helps to form 
acidaldehyde in the liver. Amit 
and his Concordia colleague 
Carlos Aragon, an adjunct 
Assistant. Professor in the 
Centre for Studies in 
Behavioural Neuro-biology, 
believe that a small amount of 
acidaldehyde is formed in the 


brain at the same time. 
However, the acidaldehyde is 
not formed by 


aldehydrogenace as was 
previously believed, but is 
biochemically metabolized by 
the catalase enzyme. 

Amit’s theory runs that it is 
the amount of catalase in the 
human body which gives some 
people a _ predisposition 
towards alcoholism. 

“Theoretically, we believe 
this is what happens,’’ says 
Amit. ‘‘Our breakthrough has 
been to show, through our 
animal studies, that the higher 
the activity of catalase in the 
brain, the more likely the sub- 
ject is to abuse alcohol.”’ 

Soon after Amit and his col- 
leagues came to the conclusion 
that catalase could well be the 


Mar. 20,1986 THE THURSDAY REPORT Page 5 


answer to their genetic puzzle, 
they had a stroke of luck. 
Another research team in the 
US showed that the activity of 
catalase in the bloodstream 
and the brain is almost the 
same. 

So far, Amit has only work- 
ed with animals in his studies. 
The next step will be to test 
people. ‘‘The picture with 
humans may be different,’’ he 
says. ‘‘But if it is the same as 
with our animal studies, 
basically we will have found 
an early warning system for 
some people who might 
become alcoholics. That 
would be quite a contribu- 
tion.”’ 

In the next few months, he 
will study a group of 50 or so 
social drinkers. ‘‘We want to 
look at people who only drink 
a small amount and at people 
who drink rather more. We 
will be trying to gather a com- 
plete picture of individual 
drinking habits,’’ explains 
Amit. 


Having taken the survey in- 
formation, the subjects will 
then be asked for blood 
samples, he continues. Ques- 
tions will be asked about the 
history of alcoholism in the 
subject’s family. This will give 
Amit and his team of resear- 
chers a chance to look for the 
relationship between the sub- 
ject’s personal and family 
drinking history and his or her 
catalase activity. 

‘I believe that we will find 
the same results as we have in 
our animal studies. If we do, 
that will open the gate to an 


enormous program of ex- 
perimentation,’’ Amit 
declares. 


If catalase is proved to be a 
genetic marker for the 
possibility of alcoholism, then 
those with such an indicator 
will have a vital advance warn- 
ing of their possible predilec- 
tion toward alcoholism. To be 
forewarned is to be forearm- 
ed, adds Amit. 


NEWS FOR FACULTY FOOTNOTES 


News is welcome for upcoming Faculty Footnotes reports. 


The deadlines are as follows: 


Philosophy, Physics, 


Political 


Science, Psychology, 


Recreation and Leisure Studies, Religion, Russian Studies, 
Science/Mathematics for Teachers, Science and Human Af- 
fairs, Sociology and Anthropology, Teaching English as a Se- 
cond Language, Theological Studies, Urban Studies, Centre 
for Mature Students, Institute for Co-operative Education, 
Liberal Arts College, Lonergan University College, Simone 
de Beauvoir Institute and Women’s Studies — April 14. 
Please send information to the Editor, Room 219, Bishop 


Court. 





Charles Bélanger, A.V. 





Page 6 THE THURSDAY REPORT Mar. 20, 1986 








SPORTSLINE 


By Simon Twiston Davies 
ark Kosturik, the brightest star the Concordia 
M hockey Stingers have had in several years, has 
been voted to the All-Canadian team for the se- 
cond time. He has also been selected by the provincial hockey 
association as one of the four nominees for the Canadian Col- 
lege Hockey Player of the Year. ‘‘We’ve had one of our 
players get this once before,’’ reports Stinger coach Paul 
Arsenault. ‘‘That was in 1976 when goalie Jim Corsy won the 
award.’’ It would be a nice fillip for the Hockey Stingers if 
one of their number was to come up with something special 
after all their hard work as a team... Kosturik has also been 
offered a try-out for the Vancouver Canucks in the West. 
There has also been interest shown by teams in Europe, in- 
cluding Switzerland... If Kosturik should end up in the Swiss 
Alps he shouldn’t be too lonely. Concordia already has half a 
dozen cheery alumni showing the flag in a number of coun- 
tries. 

This Saturday afternoon there will be a hockey match bet- 
ween some 40 alumni of the Stingers at the Loyola rink. 
Players from all over Central Canada, members of The 
Friends of Concordia Hockey, who haven’t run to fat will be 
taking part in this get-together organized by recent graduate 
Gilles Hebert. 

There is a double badminton tourney taking place tomor- 
row at Loyola. It’s open to all staff, faculty and students. The 
men’s doubles, women’s doubles and mixed doubles matches 
begin at six o’clock. If three pairs should band together they 
can enter as a team. A trophy donated by the South East 
Asian Students Association will be handed to the winning 
team. It is a little unclear whether they will be allowed to keep 
it though. 

With all the varsity sports completed, we now move into 
the playoffs of the intra-murals. The soccer league wound up 
last week with the Caribbean students winning the senior divi- 
sion, as fearlessly forecast in this column a while ago. The 
‘MSC’ and the Great Antonios were the runners-up. The 
elegantly self-styled Paris, St. Germain topped the second 
division. The playoffs are in progress as you read this — well, 
probably... The semi-finals of the hockey intra-murals should 
be just about completed now... The Rooster Rubbies, Rink 
Rats, Puckers and Hawks have all been forecast to be in con- 
tention at this point of the proceedings. 

With the varsity hockey team taking a well-earned rest, the 
ice rink at Loyola is freed for more gentle pursuits. There is 
now time for free-skating on Mondays and Wednesdays at 
noon and Fridays at 10 a.m. The thought of skaters gliding 
through figure eights to the sound of Tchaikowsky seems 
suitably restful at the end of a hectic athletic year. 








Chinese script being computerized | 


By James Risdon 
(The following is part of an 
on-going series about outstan- 
ding graduate students at Con- 
cordia.) 
uan Yan Tang, a 
Y 42-year-old Concor- 
dia graduate student, 
is computerizing Chinese 
writing. And with all its squig- 
gly lines and odd_ shapes, 
that’s not something that’s 
particularly easy to do. But 
he’s managed so far to input 
over 2,000 characters in three 
different styles of Chinese 
writing into the central Con- 
cordia computer. 

His program can recognize a 
Chinese character 98.7 percent 
of the time. But, more impor- 
tantly for the advance of com- 
puter technology, is that 
Tang’s program can do the 
work fast — four times faster 
than another program on the 
market today. 

And that makes his work 
desirable to people all over the 
world. 

“‘The commercial aspect of 
this work is due to the 
sophistication of our pro- 
gram,”’ says Dr. Ching Y. 
Suen, the professor of com- 
puter science whose work in 
pattern recognition first at- 
tracted Tang to Concordia. 

“‘The patterns could be 
anything that can be seen, 
heard or felt: cancer cells, 
chromosones, x-rays, Landsat 
photos, or voice patterns,”’ 
said Suen. 2 

Typical uses of this work 
could be the early diagnosis of 
cancers or broken bones; a 
fingerprint or eye scan iden- 
tification for instant bank 


Corinna Sobol 


Grad student Yuan Yan Tang, seated, is working on a project 
to computerize Chinese writing. Looking on is his professor, 
Ching Y. Suen, whose work in pattern recognition attracted 


Tang to study at Concordia. 


tellers; or an _ identification 
system of voice patterns that 
could allow business people to 
complete transactions entirely 
over the phone. 

It might seem like a far cry 
from a program that 
recognizes Chinese characters 
at a glance, but it’s all in the 
way the computer has been 
‘taught’? to do the work. 

‘“We have a smart decision 
tree,’’ says Suen. ‘‘We have a 
clever way of making use of 
the knowledge.’’ 

To adapt the Chinese 
language to the computer, 
Tang had to first skeletonize 
the characters by removing 
any -thickness the letters may 
have in one style or the other. 
And then he had to stretch, 
shrink, widen or narrow the 


Holding an event? 





grid that measures the par- 
ticular style of character he’s 
trying to have recognized. 

It’s a little bit like trying to 
get a computer to recognize an 
English letter, say ‘‘S’’, in 
bold type as well as in the 
italics and modern styles. 

Except that English is easy. 
English has only 26 letters to 
enter compared to the 
minimum 3,000 Chinese 
characters usually regarded as 
necessary to hold intelligent, 
ordinary Chinese conversa- 
tions. 


Tang, who is the recipient of 
a Concordia Fellowship, earn- 
ed his Master’s in Electrical 
Engineering in 1982, and. has, 
written books about’ com- 
puters. Bias 


Have an announcement to make? 


Want a classified ad? 


The President of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), Franklin Walter, was at Concordia 
on Monday, visiting the Engineering and Computer Science Faculty, Mechanical Engineering 
Department, and Executives of the SAE Student Branches. From left to right above are: Dean 
M.N.S. Swamy, Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering Department Tom Sankar, Franklin - 
' Walter, and Prof. T. Krepec, SAE Faculty Advisor. 


Contact Maryse Perraud at 4880 and your item 
will be published in the Thursday Report. 





NOTICES 





DO YOU WANT TO TRAVEL 
AND RECEIVE CREDIT IN A 
COURSE? Then register for 
Political Science K498/1. The 
course will be given in connection 
with field trips to the Soviet Union 
and Czechoslovakia between 
MAY 9 and MAY 22, 1986. For 
details contact: Dr. L. LASZLO 
(848-2121) or Mrs. Bates 
(848-3603). REGISTRATION 
MUST TAKE PLACE BEFORE 
MARCH 15, 1986 at 1822 De 
Maisonneuve Blvd. West. 
RECORD LENDING LIBRARY; 
A Record Lending Library of 
classical, light classical and Jazz 
music is available to anyone witha 
Concordia I.D. card. 3 records 
can be taken out for 14 days. 
(Tapes are also available). See 
Teddy at RF-03, Loyola Campus, 
or call 848-3510. This is a free ser- 
vice sponsored by the Dean of 
Students. 

ALL DISABLED STUDENTS: 
For assistance with any problems 
you might have please call Paul or 
Nelly at the Centre for Disabled 
Students at 848-3524 or drop by in 
room H-580-2, Hall Bldg. SGW 
campus. 

GUIDANCE INFORMATION 
CENTRE: Thinking about 
graduate school? Important deci- 
sions regarding graduate educa- 
tion require careful planning. 
Why not visit the Guidance Infor- 
mation. Centre and explore the 
resources available to assist you? 
The Centre has a wide range of 
subject directories to graduate 
programmes as well as a com- 
prehensive university calendar col- 
lection for Canada and the U.S. 
Information on graduate and pro- 
fessional school admission tests 
and private sources of financial 
aid can be obtained also. Don’t 
lose the opportunity to attend the 
school of your choice simply 
because you missed application 
deadlines for programmes, admis- 
sion tests and financial aid. Make 
time to visit us soon. Guidance In- 
formation Centre, SGW campus, 
H-440 and Loyola campus, 2490 
W. Broadway. 

UNIVERSITY WRITING TEST: 
March 21, 4-5:30 p.m., on the 
SGW campus. Appointment cards 
are necessary and they may be 
picked up March 10-14 at 
Registrar’s Services: CC-214, 
Loyola campus; N-107, SGW 
campus. 

NATIONAL CATHOLIC 
STUDENTS’ CONFERENCE, 
AUGUST 24-29 - St. John’s, 
Nfld. Call 848-3586 for info 
HOLY LAND TOUR (APRIL 26 


_- MAY 13, 1986), $2395 (CAN) - 
Includes air fare, lodging, food, 
travel in Israel, entrance fees and 
taxes. For more information, call 
Campus Ministry at 848-3588. 

BORDEAUX PRISON VISITS: 
Campus Ministry is sponsoring 
prison visits again this semester. 
Volunteers are needed for both 
groups: Monday morning, 10 - 
noon & Wednesday afternoon, 2 - 4 
p.m. Pre-registration is essential. 


LONERGAN UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE: Bernard Lonergan 
Memorial Lecture - Dr. Jean 
Bethke Elshtain, Professor of 
Political Science, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst on 
FREUD, POLITICAL ACTION 
AND ‘THE FEMININE” on 
Thursday, April 10, at 8:30 p.m. 
in H-937, Hall Bldg. SGW cam- 
pus.. For more information: 
848-2280. 


CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: ENGAGED EN- 
COUNTER WEEKEND, 
MARCH 21-23: A weekend of 
reflection, communication and 
discovery for couples planning 
marriage. Inquire at 848-3585. 


LOWEST RATES IN TOWN: 
HOLIDAY/THRIFTY RENT-A- 
CAR is pleased to offer Concordia 
University personnel the lowest ren- 
tal rates in Montreal. Sub=compact 
to full size vehicles are available for 
only $28 per day including 
kilometrage, upon presentation of 
Concordia University I.D. 
(incidentals extra). To reserve a 
vehicle or for more information, 
please call Holiday/Thrift Rent-A- 
Car at 879-1932 (Windsor Train 
Station) or 845-5954 (1600 Berri 
Street). 


OFFICE OF THE OM- 
BUDSMAN: The ombudsmen are 
available to all members of the 
university for information, 
assistance and advice with 
university-related problems. Call 
848-4964 or drop into 2100 
Mackay on the SGW campus; 
Room 326 Central Building on the 
Loyola campus. The om- 
budsman’s services are confiden- 
tial. 


ATTENTION: ALL FALL 1986 
CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA, 
BACHELORS, MASTER’S, 
AND DOCTORAL DEGREE 
CANDIDATES. If you are com- 
pleting the requirements of your 
certificate, degree, 
program this Summer and 
therefore expect to be considered 
as\a graduation candidate this 
Fall, YOU must inform the 
Graduation Application no later 
than July 15th, 1986. STUDENTS 
WHO DO NOT APPLY BY 
THIS DATE WILL NOT 
GRADUATE THIS FALL. Ob- 
tain your form from the 
Registrar’s Services Department 
on your campus and submit it to- 
day. (Loyola, CC-214; SGW, 
N-107). 


BENEDICTINE CHRISTIAN 
MEDITATION GROUP: This 
form of prayer, utilizing a mantra, 
originated with the desert fathers 
of the Church, dating back to the 
4th century. This group used tapes 
by DOM John Main OSB, as 
teaching, followed by meditation, 


or diploma ~ 


Mar. 20, 1986 THE THURSDAY REPORT Page 7 


EVENTS 


Thursday 20 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS: 
Open meeting at about 1:15 p.m. 
in H-769, Hall Bldg. SGW cam- 
pus. 

LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE: 
Dr. Harry M. Orlinsky, Prof. of 
Bible Studies at the New York 
School of Hebrew Union College - 
Jewish Institute of Religion, on 
GENDER AND GENESIS: PRO- 
BLEMS IN BIBLICAL 
TRANSLATION at 8:30 p.m. in 
H-110, Hall Bldg. SGW campus. 
FREE. 

LONERGAN UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE: Dr. Jeffrey M. 
Masson, Past Projects Director, 
Sigmund Freud Archives, Library 
of Congress, on FREUD AND 
THE CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE 
CONTROVERSY at 8:30 p.m. in 
H-937, Hall Bldg. SGW campus. 
For more information: 848-2280. 
ADVANCES IN INSTRUC- 
TIONAL THEORY FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION: Lucin- 
da Bray, Management Develop- 
ment, Touche Ross, Toronto on 
APPLICATIONS OF EDUCA- 


and an opportunity for questions 
and discussion. The group meets 
Monday evenings at 8 p.m., at the 
Ignation Center, 5467 West 
Broadway. Call Magda Jass at 
489-8941 or Sandra DeRome at 
481-1064. 


2 


NEED HELP WITH THE 
UNIVERSITY WRITING TEST? 
If you are not registered in a Com- 
position course and it is either too 
late or inconvenient for you, and 
you have failed the UWT or think 
you are likely to, individual help is 
available at the UWT Clinic. 
Simply telephone 848-3896 any 
time and arrange an appointment 
with the tutor, and you will 
receive help in groups never larger 
than three. 


LEGAL PROBLEMS? WE 
CAN HELP: The Legal Informa- 
tion Service can help with infor- 
mation, counselling,- and 
representation, if needed. We are 
located in room CC-326, and our 
telephone number is 848-4960. Of- 
fice hours are Monday through 
Friday, 9 a.m. — 5 p.m. This ser- 
vice is FREE and CONFIDEN- 
TIAL. 


WHERE ARE THE JOBS? 
Did you know that 80 per cent of 
the jobs that are available are not 
advertised through the classified 
ads or though job hunting agen- 
cies? How, then, do you find out 
about where these jobs are? Learn 
all about researching the employer 
and where to find those jobs in the 
Guidance Information Center. 
SGW campus, H-440, 848-3556. 
Loyola Campus, WC-203, 
848-3555. 


TIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN 
HUMAN RESOURCES AND 
ORGANIZATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT at 4 p.m. in 
room ET-200, 1401 Mackay. For 
more information call the Dept. 
of Education at 848-2004. SGW 
campus. 

SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR INST. 
& WOMEN’S STUDIES: Prof. 
Pieter De Vries and Prof. 
Georgina MacNab-De Vries on 
WOMEN AND WORK: A 
CRAPE BRETON PERSPEC- 
TIVE at 8 p.m. in room 101, 2170 
Bishop Street. 

M.A. PROGRAMME IN 
MEDIA STUDIES: Guest lec- 
turer Prof. Michael McGee, Dept. 
of Communication Studies, 
University of lowa, on THE ART 
OF RHETORIC AS 
AESTHETIC POLITICAL 
PRACTICE, 6:05-8:10 p.m., in 
BR-209, Loyola campus. 

JAZZ CONCERT: Jazz Sax 
Ensemble (Dave Turner, director) 
and Jazz Combo (Peter Magadini, 
director), at 8:30 p.m. in the F.C. 
Smith Auditorium, Loyola cam- 
pus. FREE. 

COMMERCE AND _ AD- 
MINISTRATION STUDENTS 
ASSOCIATION: BUSINESS 
SEMINAR WEEK 1986: Debate - 
Free Trade. Judges: Steven Flott, 
Lillick, McHose & Charleas Law 


Firm, Washington, D.C.; Herran- 
Lima, External Affairs, Ottawa. 
Debaters: members of the Con- 
cordia Debating Society. From 3-5 
p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. FREE. 
SGW campus. 

CONCORDIA ART GALLERY: 
RON SHUEBROOK: RECENT 
WORKS, until April 26; BRIAN 
MCNEIL: IRONWORKS, until 
May 31. Mezzanine, Hall Bldg. 
SGW campus. 

CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: PLACES OF THE 
PASSION: WHAT IT LOOKS 
LIKE TODAY - A slide on 
Jerusalem by Robert Gaudet, S.J. 
(Food for Thought Series), 11:45 
a.m.-1 p.m., in Belmore House. 
Loyola campus. 


Friday 21 
DANCE-A-THON — From 8 
p.m. tonight to 8 p.m. Sat. night 
in Hingston Hall cafeteria to raise 
funds for the Quebec Heart Foun- 
dation and Canadian Cancer 
Society. Sign-up 156, Hingston 
CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
MER DU NORD, MER DE LA 
MORT (Nordsee ist Mord- 
see)(Hark Bohm, 1976)(French 
subt.) with Uwe Enkelmann, 
Dschingis Bokalow, Marquard 
Bowakow at 8:30 p.m. in H-110, 
(Continued on the Back Page) 


CLASSIFIED 





PRIVATE FRENCH COURSE - 
Daniel Gagnon - well-known 
writer - N.D.G. 489-8953. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: 
SARGENT’S BAY YACHT 
CLUB ON LAKE MEM- 
PHREMAGOG: Two instructors 
are needed to lead the sailing- 
swimming programmes in the 
junior sailing camp for the mon- 
ths of July and August 1986. Sail- 
ing instructors qualifications: 1) 


over 16 years. 2) Must obtain ass. . 


instructor’s level of C.Y.A. Have 
bronze medallion of R.L.S. of 
Canada. Swimming instructors 
qualifications: Must be 18 years or 
over. Have Nat. Lifesaving Cer- 
tificate. For more information 
call: Pamela Frankel: 933-7963 or 
Valerie Aitken: 933-2981. 
WORDPROCESSING - Profes- 
sional service specializing in 
theses, reports, term papers, etc. 
Student & rush rates available. 
Letter-quality printer. Near Con- 
cordia. 934-1455. 

““THE MASTER WORD IS THE 
OPEN SESAME TO EVERY 
PORTAL...’? COMPLETE THIS 
QUOTE TO RECEIVE 10 PER 
CENT DISCOUNT FROM 
WORDMASTERS, THE PRO- 
FESSIONAL EDITORS/WORD 
PROCESSORS. STARTING AT 
$2.50/PAGE. CALL WORD- 
MASTERS, 288-0095, 1411 Cres- 
cent, No. 207, just above Ste- 
Catherine. 


GRAPHIC AID: Need help il- 
lustrating your thesis? Experienc- 
ed designer can do your montage, 


~ drafting, technical or freehand il- 


lustrations. Low tech, Low cost. 
David, 871-9717/844-4650. 


FOR RENT: Céte d’Azur, Le 
Lavandou, 3 bedroom furnished 
house, close to sea, commuting 
distance Nice, Marseilles, Aix-en- 
Provence. Available July 15. 
Phone 848-3955. 


FRENCH TUTORING BY EX- 
PERIENCED TEACHER. All 
level. Emphasis on_ individual 
most needed areas (conversation, 
pronunciation, reading, grammar, 
spelling, etc.). Before 8 p.m.: 
849-9708. 

TRANSLATOR AND EDITOR: 
French, English, Spanish. Before 
8 p.m.: 849-9708. 


-TYPING near University/Sher- 


brooke. Professional, punctual. 
Specialized in fast and meticulous- 
ly laid out presentation according 
to college requirements. Memoirs, 
theses, term-papers, CVs, letters. 
English, French, Spanish. IBM- 
Selectric III. Before 8 p.m.: 
849-9708, try weekends too. 
WORDPROCESSING: Term 
papers, essays, resumés, etc. Fast 
and accurate. Reasonable rates. 
Near Loyola. Rod or Leone: 
484-2014. 


The Thursday Report is the community newspaper of Concor- 
dia University, serving faculty, staff and ‘students at the 
downtown and west end campuses. It is published weekly dur- 
ing the academic year by the Public Relations Office, Concor- 
dia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W., Montreal, 
Qué. H3G 1MB8. (514) 848-4882. Material published in The 


(BC-219) in writing no later than Monday noon, prior to the 
Thursday publication date. 

Printing: David-Martin Developments Inc. 

Circulation: 9,000 copies 

Editor: Barbara Verity - 4882 

Regular Contributors: Simon Twiston Davies, Susan Gray, 
Zonia Keywan, R. Bella Rabinovitch, Paul Serralheiro, John 
Credit would be appreciated. University events and notices are Sobol, Patricia Willoughby, David Winch. 

published free of charge. Classified ads cost $2.50 for the first Notices, Back Page, Classified Ads: Maryse Perraud - 4880 
20 words, and 20 cents a word over 20 words. Events, notices, Typesetting and Assembly: Communication Centre Ville - 
§23-2179 


Thursday Report may be reproduced without permission. 


(Continued from page 7) 


Hall Bldg. $2. SGW campus. 
SENATE: Meeting at 2 p.m. in 
room AD-131, Loyola campus. 
COMMERCE AND _ AD- 
MINISTRATION FACULTY 
COUNCIL: Meeting at 9:30 a.m. 
in GM-503-48, 1550 de Maison- 
neuve Blvd. W. SGW campus. 
ADVANCES IN INSTRUC- 
TIONAL THEORY FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION: Garry 
Davis on EDUCATING FOR 
WORLD PEACE at 4 p.m. in 
H-620, Hall Bldg. For more infor- 
mation call the Dept. of Educa- 
tion at 848-2004. SGW campus. 
FRIDAY AFTERNOON CON- 
CERT SERIES: Marie Bastien, a 
la latine group, and Peter An- 
dronas, vocal, at 2 p.m. in 
RF-110, Loyola campus. 

ART GALLERY: Halifax artist 
Ron Shuebrook will speak on his 
work at 11 a.m. in room 315, 
Visual Arts Bldg. 
(Dorchester/Crescent). SGW 
campus. For more information 
call 848-4750. 

PH.D. WORKSHOP - VISITING 
SPEAKER SERIES: Dr. Suresh 
Goyal, Concordia University, on 
Quantitative Methods, 2-4 p.m. in 
GM-503-48, 1550 de Maisonneuve 
Boulevard W. ; 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT: Garnet 
Menger will present a seminar on 
Renaissance organ music from 
Italy and England. Today: Free 
forms and imitative recercari in 
late 16th century Italian keyboard 
music and the use of cantus firmus 
and intavalaturae composition in 
England circa 1600 at 2 p.m. at 
Saint Philip’s Church (four blocks 
west of Loyola campus - Autobus 
105, 62, 162). Repertoire lists are 
available from the Department of 
Music, Loyola campus, RF-310. 
For further information, call 
848-4705. 

DEBATING MEETING: At 2 
p.m. in H-635-2, Hall Bldg. All 
welcome. For more information, 
call 332-9720. 

PHILOSOPHY DEPART- 
MENT: Inter-University round 
table discussion and slide presen- 
tation on POPULAR 
RELIGIOUS IMAGES OF 
MARY, AND WOMEN SAINTS 
‘IN FRANCE AND QUEBEC, 2-5 
p-m., in the Georges Vanier 
Library Auditorium, Loyola cam- 
pus. (Speakers: John Hellman, 
McGill Univ.; Jane Devine, ar- 
chivist; Benoit Lacroix, O.P., 
Univ. de Montréal; Patricia Simp- 
son, Marianopolis College; Con- 
rad Graham, McGill Univ.; 
Beatrice Gothscheck, Univ. de 
Montréal; Sr. Prudence Allen, 
RSM, Concordia Univ.). 


Saturday 22 


CONSERVATORY _ OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART - 
Winners of the 1985 Canadian 
Student Film Festival - 
COCYTUS (Rob Groeneboer, 
Terry Kerr and Gordon Verheul, 
1985, Simon Fraser Univ.); FRIC- 
TIONS (Normand Quinn, 1984, 
Concordia Univ.); THE LOFT 


and classified ads must reach the Public Relations Office 


(Bronwen Hughes, 1985, York 
Univ.); MY REUVEN (Derek 
Rogers, 1985, Ryerson 
Polytechnical Inst.); and ROOM- 
MATE (Carlo Nemiroff, 1985, 
Concordia Univ.) at 7 p.m.; 
Winners of the 1985 Canadian 
Student Film Festival - RUB- 
BLEWOMEN (Ian Doncaster and 
Bryan Sulton, 1985, Simon Fraser 
Univ.); RAISED ON JUNK (Jean 
Murphey and Linda Andrews, 
1985, Simon Fraser Univ.); TER- 
REUR D’UN DIMANCHE 
APRES-MIDI (André Lavigne, 
1985, Concordia Univ..); EFFU- 
SION (Martin Girard, 1985, Con- 
cordia Univ.); and CLOUDS 
(Scott Haynes and Fumiko 
Kiyooka, 1985, Simon Fraser 
Univ.) at 9 p.m. in H-110, Hall 
Bldg. $2 each. SGW campus. 


Sunday 23 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
PAULE PAULANDER 
(Reinhard Hauff, 1975)(French 
subt.) with Manfred Reiss, Man- 
fred Gnoth, Katharina Tuschen 
and Angelika Kulessa at 7 p.m.; 
LES FEUX DU MUSIC-HALL 
(Luci di Varieta)(Federico Fellini 
and Alberto Lattuada, 
1951)(French subt.) with Giulietta 
Masina, Peppino de Filippo, 
Carla del Poggio and Folco Lulli 
at 9 p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. $2 
each. SGW campus. 
CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: PASSION SUN- 
DAY - The Cornerstone Theatre 
will offer a dramatic presentation 
of the Passion of Our Lord, incor- 
porating mime and dance, during 
the Sunday Eucharist in the 
Loyola Chapel at 11 a.m. The 
dramatic presentation will not be 
offered at the 8 p.m. Mass. 
Presider: Robert Gaudet, S.J. 


Monday 24 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
LE BONHEUR (Agnés Varda, 
1964)(French) with Jean-Claude 
Drouot, Claire Drouot, Marie- 
France Boyer, Sandrine Drouot, 
Olivier Drouot and Paul Vecchiali 
at 8:30 p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. 
$2 SGW campus. 

HISTORY DEPT. & ART 
HISTORY: Prof. Serge Guilbaut, 
University of British Columbia, 
on PEACE OFFENSIVE, CAM- 
PAIGN OF TRUTH, AND THE 
PURITY OF ART: NEW YORK- 
PARIS, DIFFICULT ENTENTE 
IN THE 1950’s, at 8:30 p.m., 
Bourget Gallery, 1230 Mountain 
St. SGW campus. FREE. 
DEPARTMENT OF ART 
EDUCATION/ART THERAPY: 


_ Beth Robinson, Vice-President of 


the Ontario Art Therapy Associa- 
tion, on ARTISTS I HAVE 
KNOWN, 6-8 p.m., in room 245, 
Visual Arts Bldg., 1395 Dor- 
chester Blvd. W. (corner Dor- 
chester/Crescent). SGW campus. 
FREE. 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT: 
Michael Lynch, University of 
Toronto on WALT WHITMAN 
IN. THE 1840’S: A LIFE. IN 


SOCIAL HISTORY at 7 p.m., 
Vanier auditorium, Loyola cam- 
pus. For more information call 
848-2320/1. 

TESL CENTRE: Prof. William 
Littlewood, author of Foreign and 
Second Language Learning and 
Communicative Language 
Teaching, of the University Col- 
lege of Swansea, Wales on IN- 
TEGRATING THE NEW WITH 
THE OLD IN LANGUAGE 
TEACHING METHODOLOGY, 
2:30-4 p.m., in H-937, Hall Bldg. 
SGW campus. 

BOARD OF GRADUATE 
STUDIES: Meeting at 2 p.m. in 
H-769, Hall Bldg. SGW campus. 
LESBIAN AND GAY FRIENDS: 
Prof. Michael Lynch, University 
of Toronto, Dept. of English, on 
SODOMY IN THE 19TH CEN- 
TURY IN NEW YORK, 4-6p.m., 
Liberal Arts College, room 
RR-02, 2040 Mackay. SGW cam- 
pus. All welcome. 
CONCORDIA ELECTRO- 
ACOUSTIC COMPOSERS’ 
GROUP (CECG): Tape works 
and live performance at 8:15 p.m. 
in AD-131, Admin. Bldg., Loyola 
campus. For more information 
call 848-4509/4506. FREE. 
CONCORDIA PEACE 
STUDIES GROUP: Prof. Don 
Bates, McGill University, on IM- 
PLICATIONS OF STRATEGIC 
DEFENSE INITIATIVE ‘“‘STAR 
WARS?’’, at 3 p.m. in H-413, Hall 
Bldg. SGW campus. 


Tuesday 25 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
BREATHLESS (Jim McBride, 
1982)(English) with Richard Gere, 
Valérie Kaprisky, William Tepper, 
John P. Ryan and Roger Dunn at 
8:30 p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. $2. 
SGW campus. 

ADVANCES IN INSTRUC- 
TIONAL THEORY FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION: Dr. 
Diana Car, co-ordinator, Distance 
University Education by Televi- 
sion, Mount Saint Vincent 
University, Halifax on DUET: 
TELEVISION TEACHING AT 
A DISTANCE at 2 p.m. in room 
ET-200, 1401 Mackay. For more 
information call the Dept. of 
Education at 848-2004. SGW 
campus. 

SCIENCE COLLEGE: Dr. 
Richard Lewontin, Museum of 
Comparative Zoology, Harvard 
University, on THE NATURE OF 
MOLECULAR POLYMOR- 
PHISMS at 2:45 p.m. in H-620, 
Hall Bldg. SGW campus. 
SOCIAL ASPECTS’ OF 
ENGINEERING: Toby Gilsig, 
V-P Research & Development, 
IREQ on MONTREAL/HIGH 
TECHNOLOGY CENTER: 
HOW TO MAKE IT HAPPEN, 
11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., in H-511/2, 
Hall Bldg. SGW campus. 
SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR IN- 
STITUTE: Dr. Marianne 
Goszfonyi Ainley, History Dept., 
McGill -University, on THE 
OVERLOOKED DIMENSION: 
CANADIAN WOMEN IN 
SCIENCE at 12 noon, room 101, 


2170 Bishop Street. 

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING 
& COMPUTER SCIENCE: Open 
House - Main entrance - Lobby, 
Hall Bldg. For more information 


call 878-3055. SGW campus. 


Wednesday 26 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
THE GREY FOX (Phillip Borsos, 
1982)(English) with Richard Farn- 
sworth, Jackie Burroughs, Wayne 
Robson and Timothy Webber at 
8:30. p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. $2. 
SGW campus. 

SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR IN- 
STITUTE: 8th Anniversary - Dr. 
P. Zelkowitz, Human Develop- 
ment Research Center, Concordia 
University on SOCIAL SUP- 
PORT FOR CHILDREN OF 
WORKING MOTHERS, 12 
noon-1:30 p.m., room 101, 
Simone de Beauvoir Institute, 
2170 Bishop. SGW campus. 
SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR IN- 
STITUTE: Jacqui Smyth will read 
from her novel No Fixed Admis- 
sion and will animate a discussion 
on PRAIRIE WOMEN 
WRITERS at noon, room 203, 
Simone de Beauvoir Institute, 
2170 Bishop. SGW campus. 
LOYOLA FILM SERIES: THE 
WHITE REINDEER (Eric Blom- 
borg, 1952) at 7 p.m.; PASSION 
OF ANNA (Ingmar Bergman, 
1969) with Liv Ullmann, Max Von 
Sydow and Bibi Andersson at 8:40 
p.m. in the F.C. Smith 
Auditorium, Loyola campus. 
MUSIC DEPARTMENT: Lec- 
ture on Musical Anthropology by 
Mr. Rossinger. Today’s topic: 
MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE IN 
NORTH AMERICA, 3:30-5 
p.m., in room RF-101 of the 
Music Department, Loyola cam- 
pus. 

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING 
& COMPUTER SCIENCE: Open 
House - Main entrance - Lobby, 
Hall Bldg. For more information 


call 878-3055. SGW campus. 


Thursday 27 


PART-TIME FACULTY 
ASSOCIATION (CUPFA): 
Meeting 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. in 
room H-773, Hall Bldg. This will 
be a working session: If you can 
come and give us a hand, please 
do. SGW campus. 

SOCIAL ASPECTS OF 
ENGINEERING: André Pot- 


worowski, Federal Ministry of 
Science and Technology, on 
MANAGEMENT OF 


RESEARCH AND DEVELOP- 
MENT: FEDERAL PERSPEC- 
TIVE, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., in 
H-511/2, Hall Bldg. SGW cam- 
pus. 

CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: HOLY THURS- 
DAY - The Mass of the Lord’s 
Supper at 7:30 p.m., Loyola 
Chapel. Presider: Winston Rye, 
S.J. Superior, Loyola Jesuit Com- 
munity. Loyola campus. 
LESBIAN AND GAY FRIENDS 
OF CONCORDIA: Lecture. and 
audiovisual presentation by Prof. 
Thomas Waugh, Concordia Film 





Studies Dept., on EMERGING 
FROM THE UNDERGROUND: 
GAY MALE EROTICISM IN 
THE 1950’S, 4-6 p.m. in room 
VA-114, Visual Arts Bldg., 1395 
Dorchester West. There will be a 
discussion following the presenta- 
tion. For more information call 
LGFC at 848-7414. 

JAZZ CONCERT: Jazz Guitar 
Ensemble (Andrew Homzy, direc- 
tor) and Jazz Combo (Simon 
Stone, director) at 8:30 p.m. in the 
F.C. Smith Auditorium, Loyola 
campus. FREE. 


Friday 28 


GOOD FRIDAY: THE UNIVER- 


SITY WILL BE CLOSED. 
CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
ALBERT - POURQUOI? (Albert 
- Warum?)(Josef Rodl, 
1978)(French subt.) with Fritz 
Binner, Michael Eichenseer, 
Georg Schiess and Elfriede Bleis- 
teiner at 7 p.m.; THE WHITE 
SHEIK (Lo Sciecco Bian- 
co)(Federico Fellini, 
1952)(English subt.) with Brunella 
Bovo, Leopoldoi Trieste, Alberto 
Sordi and Giulietta Masina at 9 
p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. $2 each. 
SGW campus. 

CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: GOOD FRIDAY - 
The Passion-of Jesus at 3 p.m, in 
the Loyola Chapel. Presider: 
Marc Gervais, S.J., Communica- 
tion Studies. Loyola campus. 


Saturday 29 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
LE FEU A MINUIT (Feuer um 
Mitternacht)(Gustav Ehmck, 
1978)(French subt.) with Andreas 
Nutzhorn, Ina Trautman, Nann 
Soderberg, Anke Joldrichsen and 
Joachim Rechert at 7 p.m.; I 
VITELLONI (The Young and the 
Passionate)(Federico Fellini, 
1953)(English subt.) with Alberto 
Sordi, Franco Interlenghi, Franco 
Fabrizi, Leopoldo Trieste and 
Riccardo Fellini at 9 p.m. in 
H-110, Hall Bldg. $2 each. SGW 
campus. 

CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: HOLY SATURDAY 
- The Vigil of Easter at 9 p.m. in 
the Loyola Chapel. Presider: 
Robert Gaudet, S.J. Loyola cam- 
pus. 


Sunday 30 


CONSERVATORY OF 
CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART: 
ERIKA’S LEIDENSCHAFTEN 
(Ula Stockl, 1976)(German ver- 
sion) with Karin Baal and Vera 
Tschechowa at 7 p.m.; LA 
STRADA (Federico Fellini, 
1954)(English subt.) with Giulietta 
Masina, Anthony Quinn, Richard 
Basehart and Aldo Silvani at 8:30 
p.m. in H-110, Hall Bldg. $2 each. 
SGW campus. 

CONCORDIA CAMPUS 
MINISTRY: EASTER SUNDAY 
- The Resurrection of the Lord at 
11 a.m., Loyola Chapel. Presider: 
Robert Nagy. There will only be 
one Mass in the morning on 
Easter Sunday. Loyola campus.