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Government 
of  Canada 


Gouvernement 
du  Canada 


Receiver  General  for  Canada 

Hon.  Jean-Jacques  Blais,  MP.,  P.C. 


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Volume  I 

Summary  Report  and 
Financial  Statements 


Canada 


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METROPOLITAN 
TORONTO 
CENTRAL 
LIBRARY 


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Business 


Government      Gouvernement 
of  Canada         du  Canada 

Receiver  General  for  Canada 

Hon.  Jean-Jacques  Blais,  M.P.,  P.C. 


uUk  occounls  of  conodo 


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1 
1 

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Volume  I 

Summary  Report  and 
Financial  Statements 


Canada 


GOVERNMENT  DOCUMENTS 


lb 


©  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services  Canada  1982 
Available  in  Canada  through 

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NOV  151982 


To  His  Excellency 

The  Right  Honourable  Edward  Schreyer, 
C.C,  C.M.M.,  CD., 

Governor  General  and 
Commander-  in-  Chief  of  Canada. 

MAY  IT  PLEASE  YOUR  EXCELLENCY: 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  to  Your 
Excellency  the  Public  Accounts  of  Canada  for  the  year 
ended  March  31,  1982. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

Marc  Lalonde, 
Minister  of  Finance. 


OTTAWA.  OCTOBER  14,  1982 


To  The  Honourable  Marc  Lalonde, 
Minister  of  Finance. 

In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section  55(1)  of 
the  Financial  Administration  Act,  Revised  Statutes  of 
Canada,  1970,  c.  F.  10,  I  have  the  honour  to  transmit 
herewith  the  Public  Accounts  of  Canada  for  the  year 
ended  March  31,  1982,  to  be  laid  by  you  before  the 
House  of  Commons. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

Jean-Jacques  Blais, 
Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


To  The  Honourable  Jean-Jacques  Blais, 
Receiver  General  for  Canada. 

Sir: 

I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  Public  Accounts  of 
Canada  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1982. 

Under  Section  55(1)  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act,  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1970,  c.  F.  10,  the 
Public  Accounts  for  each  fiscal  year  shall  be  prepared 
by  the  Receiver  General  and  shall  be  laid  before  the 
House  of  Commons  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  on  or 
before  the  thirty-first  day  of  December  next  following 
the  end  of  that  year,  or  if  Parliament  is  not  then  sitting, 
within  any  of  the  first  fifteen  days  next  thereafter  that 
Parliament  is  sitting. 

This  annual  report  is  presented  in  three  volumes: 

Volume  I — A  survey  of  the  transactions  for  the  year 
including  summary  statements;  the  financial  statements 
of  Canada  on  which  the  Auditor  General  has  expressed 
an  opinion,  namely,  the  statements  of  transactions,  of 
revenue  and  expenditure  on  a  gross  and  net  basis,  of  the 
assets  and  liabilities  of  Canada  and  of  the  use  of  appro- 
priations together  with  related  notes;  the  observations  by 
the  Auditor  General  on  the  financial  statements  of 
Canada;  analyses  of  budgetary  revenue  and  expenditure, 
and  of  asset  and  liability  accounts  together  with  those 
statements  required  by  the  Financial  Administration 
Act  to  be  published  in  the  Public  Accounts  and  various 
other  schedules  and  statements. 

Volume  II — Details  of  the  financial  operations  of  the 
Government,  segregated  by  department. 

Volume  III — The  financial  statements  of  Crown  cor- 
porations and  the  auditors'  reports  thereon. 

The  audited  financial  statements,  contained  in 
Volume  I,  are  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1982.  They 
are,  however,  dated  September  15,  to  allow  for  the 
closing  and  audit  of  accounts. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

David  Kirkwood, 
Deputy  Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


OTTAWA,  OCTOBER  14,  1982 


OTTAWA,  OCTOBER  14,  1982 


INTRODUCTION  TO  THE  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Nature  of  the  Public  Accounts 

The  Public  Accounts  is  the  report  of  the  Government 
of  Canada  prepared  each  fiscal  year  by  the  Receiver 
General  as  required  by  Section  55  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

The  report  covers  the  fiscal  year  of  the  Government, 
which  ends  on  March  31,  and  is  prepared  from  data 
contained  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  and  from  more 
detailed  records  maintained  in  departments  and  agen- 
cies. The  accounts  of  Canada  is  the  centralized  record  of 
the  Government's  financial  transactions  maintained  by 
the  Receiver  General  in  which  the  transactions  of  all 
departments  and  agencies  are  summarized.  Each  depart- 
ment is  responsible  for  agreeing  its  accounts  to  the 
control  accounts  of  the  Receiver  General,  and  maintains 
detailed  records  of  the  transactions  in  those  accounts. 

The  report  covers  the  financial  transactions  of  the 
Government  during  the  year.  In  certain  cases,  parlia- 
mentary authority  to  undertake  transactions  was  pro- 
vided by  legislation  approved  in  earlier  years.  The  report 
also  includes  the  financial  statements  of  those  Crown 
corporations  and  other  bodies  whose  accounts  are  main- 
tained separately  from  the  accounts  of  Canada.  The 
financial  year  of  a  number  of  these  corporations  and 
other  bodies  is  the  calendar  year  rather  than  the  fiscal 
year  of  the  Government. 


Format  of  the  Public  Accounts 

The  Public  Accounts  is  produced  in  three  volumes. 

Volume  I 

Volume  I  presents  a  summary  and  analysis  of  the 
financial  transactions  of  the  Government.  The  content  of 
the  sections  of  Volume  I  can  be  summarized  as  follows: 

SECTION  1:  summary  statements  of  the  financial 
transactions  of  the  Government  of  Canada  on  both  a 
Public  Accounts  and  an  Extended  National  Accounts 
basis; 

SECTION  2:  audited  financial  statements  of  the 
Government  of  Canada,  prepared  in  accordance  with 
Section  55  of  t^ie  Financial  Administration  Act; 

SECTION  i:  observations  by  the  Auditor  General  on 
the  financial  statements; 

SECTION  4:  review  of  outlays  by  envelope; 

SECTION  5:  review  of  budgetary  revenue; 

SECTION  6:  review  of  budgetary  expenditure; 

SECTION  7:  analysis  of  loans,  investments  and 
advances; 

SECTION  8:  analysis  of  specified  purpose  accounts; 


SECTION  9:  analysis  of  other  liabilities; 

SECTION  10:  analysis  of  foreign  exchange  accounts; 

SECTION  1 1 :  analysis  of  unmatured  debt; 

SECTION  1 2:  analysis  of  other  accounts  reported  on 
the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities; 

SECTION  13:  supplementary  information  required 
by  the  Financial  Administration  Act;  and, 

SECTION  14:  other  miscellaneous  information. 


Volume  IT 

Volume  II  presents  the  financial  operations  of  the 
Government,  segregated  by  department.  It  contains 
financial  operations  of  individual  departments  and  their 
associated  agencies,  and  additional  information  and 
analysis. 

(a)  DEPARTMENTAL  FINANCIAL 
OPERATIONS 

In  a  fashion  similar  to  the  Estimates,  Volume  II 
uses  a  uniform  set  of  statements  to  present  each 
department's  financial  operations.  In  most  respects, 
the  level  of  detail  is  the  same  as  in  the  Estimates, 
and  provides  the  following  information: 

(i)  Use  of  Appropriations 

This  is  the  principal  departmental  statement. 
It  is  a  summary  of  the  use  of  the  authority  given 
by  Parliament  in  appropriation  acts  and  other 
statutes.  It  displays,  by  program: 

— the  wording  of  the  relevant  appropriations  or 
statutes; 

— the  amount  authorized  under  each  appro- 
priation or  statute; 

— the  total  use  made  during  the  year  of  the 
authorized  amounts; 

— unexpended  balances  (amounts  lapsed  and 
carried  forward)  or  amounts  overexpended; 
and, 

— total  use  for  the  previous  year. 

(ii)  Total  Cost  of  Programs — Budgetary 

This  table  shows  the  total  calculated  cost  for 
each  program,  by  adding  to  budgetary  expendi- 
ture, the  values  of  services  provided  by  other 
departments,  and  of  accommodation  provided  by 
the  reporting  department  and  by  the  Department 
of  Public  Works,  and  by  deducting  non-tax 
receipts  credited  to  revenue. 


The  total  calculated  program  cost  is  also  re- 
flected in  the  Estimates  and  in  the  Public 
Accounts  in  the  "Programs  by  Activity"  table. 

(Hi)  Programs  by  Activity — Budgetary 

This  is  a  comparison  of  budgetary  appropria- 
tions with  actual  expenditures  and  the  imputed 
costs  and  revenues  referred  to  in  (ii).  The  table 
displays  total  program  expenditures  by  activity 
and  type  of  vote,  and  total  cost  of  programs  by 
type  of  vote.  It  is  related  to  the  "Program  by 
Activities"  table  displayed  in  the  Estimates. 

(iv)  Grants  and  Contributions 

This  table  displays  details  of  amounts  appro- 
priated for  grants  and  contributions,  by  class  of 
recipients  and  by  program,  and  the  payments. 


(v)  Budgetary     Expenditure 
Standard  Object 


by     Program     and 


This  table  presents  expenditure  by  standard 
object  and  relates  to  the  "Objects  of  Expendi- 
ture" table  shown  in  the  Estimates. 

(vi)  Budgetary     Expenditure     of    Major     Capital 
Projects 

This  table  presents,  by  activity  within  each 
program,  the  estimated  total  cost  of  each  major 
capital  project,  together  with  the  related  current 
year  estimates  and  expenditures,  and  the  total 
expenditure  to  date. 

(vii)  Revenue 

Each  department  displays  summary  and 
detailed  statements  of  revenue  collected  as  part 
of  its  operations. 

(viii)  Revolving  Funds 

The  commercial  orientation  of  a  revolving  fund 
is  reflected  in  the  balance  sheet  and  statement  of 
operations,  or  income  and  expenditure,  presented 
each  year.  A  revolving  fund's  minimum  goal  is 
the  recovery  of  cost,  and  most  commercial 
accounting  conventions  are  used  to  measure  cost. 


(ix)  Other  Organizations 

To  further  the  objectives  of  the  Government 
and  of  departments,  various  boards,  agencies, 
commissions  and  accounts  have  been  created  by 
appropriation  acts  and  other  legislation.  Finan- 
cial statements  for  these  organizations  and 
accounts  are  also  shown. 

(b)  ADDITIONAL  INFORMATION  AND 
ANALYSIS 

Further  details  are  provided,  in  Volume  II,  to 
supplement  the  statements  already  presented.  This 
supplementary  information  includes: 

— accounts  receivable  and  deletions  (Section  32); 

— professional  and  special  services  (Section  33); 

— construction  and  acquisition  of  land,  buildings, 
machinery  and  equipment  (Section  34); 

— payments  of  damage  claims,  ex  gratia  pay- 
ments, federal  court  awards  and  nugatory  pay- 
ments (Section  35); 

— selected  miscellaneous  payments  and  federal- 
provincial  shared-cost  programs  by  province 
(Section  36); 

— grants  and  contributions  (Section  37);  and, 

— miscellaneous  statements  by  department  (Sec- 
tion 38). 


Volume  III 

Volume  III  contains  the  financial  statements  of  those 
Crown  corporations  which  are  permitted  by  legislation 
to  keep  their  own  accounts.  These  are  Schedules  C  and 
D  (agency  and  proprietary)  corporations,  as  well  as  the 
Bank  of  Canada  and  The  Canadian  Wheat  Board 
which,  although  not  designated  as  Crown  corporations, 
act  as  agents  of  Her  Majesty.  The  activities  of  Schedule 
B  (departmental)  corporations  are  reported  by  the 
responsible  departments  in  Volume  II,  either  under 
departmental  budgetary  expenditure  or  in  separate 
reports. 


1 


VOLUME 

TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 


SECTION 

1 .  Comparative  Statements  of  Transactions. 

2.  Audited  Financial  Statements  of  the  Government  of 
Canada. 

3.  Observations  by  the  Auditor  General  on  the  Finan- 
,  cial  Statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada. 

4.  Outlays  by  Envelope. 
$.  Budgetary  Revenue. 

6.  Budgetary  Expenditure. 

7.  Loans,  Investments  and  Advances. 

8.  Specified  Purpose  Accounts. 

9.  Other  Liabilities. 

10.  Foreign  Exchange  Accounts. 

1 1 .  Unmatured  Debt. 

1 2.  Other  Accounts  reported  on  the  Statement  of  Assets 
and  Liabilities. 

13.  Supplementary  Information  Required  by  the  Finan- 
cial Administration  Act. 

14.  Other  Miscellaneous  Information. 

15.  Index. 


SECTION 


1 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Comparative  Statements 
of  Transactions 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 1.3 

Summary  statement  of  transactions — Public  Accounts  presen- 
tation      1.4 

Summary  statement  of  transactions — Extended  National 
Accounts  presentation 1.13 

Public  Accounts  and  Extended  National  Accounts  reconcilia- 
tion       1.17 


[COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 


[NTRODUCTION 


I 

r 

^B  In  this  section,  the  financial  transactions  of  the  Government 
^Bof  Canada  are  set  out  in  summary  form,  with  comparative 
^■figures  for  the  previous  four  years.  The  fmanciai  transactions 
are  first  presented  according  to  the  accounting  policies 
explained  in  Note  1  to  the  audited  fmanciai  statements  in 
Section  2  of  this  volume,  and  are  referred  to  as  the  Public 
Accounts  presentation;  the  second  presentation  is  on  the  Na- 
tional Income  and  Expenditure  Accounts  basis,  extended  to 
encompass  other  fmanciai  transactions  affecting  the  Con- 
solidated Revenue  Fund.  This  second  form  of  presentation  is 
referred  to  as  the  Extended  National  Accounts  presentation. 

This  section  is  intended  to  provide  an  overview  of  the 
Government's  fmanciai  operations,  both  on  the  Public 
Accounts  basis  and  on  the  Extended  National  Accounts  basis. 
The  Public  Accounts  presentation  reflects  the  accounting 
procedures  and  conventions  which  have  been  adopted  in  pro- 
viding Parliament  with  an  accounting  of  the  source  and  use  of 
fmanciai  resources.  The  National  Accounts  transactions  block 
of  the  Extended  National  Accounts  presentation  is  designed 
primarily  to  facilitate  economic  analysis  of  the  federal  Govern- 
ment sector  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  used  in  measuring 
income  and  expenditure  flows  in  the  economy.  The  remaining 
blocks  show  the  relation  between  the  traditional  budget  bal- 
ance on  the  National  Accounts  basis  and  the  Government's 
overall  fmanciai  requirements,  debt  transactions  and  cash 
position. 

Public  Accounts  Presentation 

The  "Summary  Statement  of  Transactions"  table  provides 
aggregate  data  on  the  major  categories  of  transactions  under 
four  main  headings:  budgetary,  non-budgetary,  foreign 
exchange  and  unmatured  debt.  The  resulting  cash  position  at 
the  end  of  each  year  is  also  shown. 

The  form  of  presentation  is  fairly  consistent  with  the  tables 
presented  in  the  Budget  Speech,  the  presentation  in  the 
Department  of  Finance's  Economic  Review  and  the  Statement 
of  Financial  Operations  published  each  month  in  the  Canada 
Gazette,  and  is  compatible  with  other  sections  of  the  Public 
Accounts. 

Budgetary  revenue  and  expenditure  in  this  section  treat 
Canada  Post  as  a  Crown  corporation  for  all  years,  for  purposes 
of  comparability.  This  differs  from  Section  2  in  which  Canada 
_  Post  is  treated  as  a  Crown  corporation  only  from  October  16, 
1981,  the  date  of  its  commencement.  The  treatment  of  Canada 
Post  as  a  Crown  corporation  for  all  years  is  consistent  with  the 
Budget  presentation  but  differs  from  the  Statement  of  Finan- 
jCJal  Operations.  An  explanation  of  the  difference  in  the  treat- 
lent  of  Canada  Post  in  this  section  and  in  Section  2  is 
'^provided  in  Note  6  to  the  audited  fmanciai  statements  includ- 
ed in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 

Figures  for  budgetary  and  non-budgetary  items  in  the 
Public  Accounts  presentation  of  this  section,  for  1977-78  to 
1979-80,  have  not  been  adjusted  to  take  account  of  minor 


1*3 

changes  in  departmental  responsibilities  and  classification  of 
accounts  which  may  have  occurred.  Thus,  most  components 
are  comparable  from  one  year  to  the  next.  However,  the 
statements  have  been  adjusted  to  reflect  changes  which  have  a 
significant  impact  on  year  to  year  comparisons.  Contracting- 
out  payments,  which  were  formerly  part  of  fiscal  transfers  in 
the  Department  of  Finance,  have  been  recorded  as  part  of  the 
Canada  Assistance  Plan  throughout  the  year  in  line  with 
current  practice;  similarly,  payments  related  to  guaranteed 
loans  have  been  recorded  as  part  of  education  support,  whereas 
they  had  previously  been  recorded  as  expenditures  of  the 
Department  of  Finance.  The  write-offs  in  1977-78  of  loans  to 
Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited,  developing  countries  and 
the  Canadian  Dairy  Commission  have  been  reallocated  to  the 
individual  years  to  which  the  transactions  relate. 

Non-budgetary  transactions  have  been  redefined  to  include 
subscriptions  and  notes  payable  to  international  organizations 
other  than  the  International  Monetary  Fund.  These  transac- 
tions had  previously  been  recorded  as  foreign  exchange 
transactions. 


Extended  National  Accounts  Presentation 

The  presentation  of  the  Government's  financial  transactions 
on  an  Extended  National  Accounts  basis  in  the  Public 
Accounts  was  first  introduced  for  the  year  ended  March  31, 
1977.  As  in  the  Public  Accounts  presentation,  the  transactions 
are  categorized  under  four  main  headings:  the  traditional 
National  Income  and  Expenditure  Accounts  which  are 
referred  to  herein  as  National  Accounts  transactions,  loans 
and  other  transactions,  foreign  exchange  and  unmatured  debt 
transactions.  The  resulting  cash  position  at  the  end  of  each 
year  is  also  shown.  It  may  be  noted  that  starting  with  the  line 
entitled  "Financial  requirements  (excluding  foreign 
exchange)",  the  Extended  National  Accounts  presentation  is 
identical  to  the  Public  Accounts  presentation. 

The  total  for  loans  and  other  transactions  will  differ  from 
the  non-budgetary  transactions  in  the  Public  Accounts  presen- 
tation due  in  part  to  differences  in  coverage.  Loans  to  certain 
agencies  such  as  Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited,  as  well  as 
advances  to  certain  special  funds,  are  excluded  in  arriving  at 
the  total  of  loans  and  other  transactions  on  the  Extended 
National  Accounts  presentation,  as  transactions  of  these  agen- 
cies and  special  funds  are  included  in  the  National  Accounts 
transactions.  Similarly,  the  receipts  and  disbursements  of  Gov- 
ernment pension  and  social  security  accounts,  such  as  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Account,  are  included  in  the  Na- 
tional Accounts  transactions.  As  a  result,  they  are  not  included 
in  the  loans  and  other  transactions  adjustment.  In  determining 
the  surplus  or  deficit  on  a  National  Accounts  basis,  certain 
revenue  items,  such  as  corporate  income  taxes,  are  reflected  on 
an  accrual,  as  opposed  to  a  cash  basis.  The  loans  and  other 
transactions  section  includes  the  adjusting  entry  required  to 
convert  from  the  accrual  basis  of  revenue  and  expenditure  to  a 
cash  basis. 


1*4 


■-  v.!'.!  Kif^'/i 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


SUMMARY  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS— PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION 


Total  financial  requirements,  excluding  foreign  exchange 
transactions,  amounted  to  $8,331  million  for  the  year  ended 
March  31,  1982.  The  budgetary  deficit  of  $13,606  million  was 
offset  by  a  source  of  $5,275  million  for  non-budgetary  transac- 
tions. Foreign  exchange  transactions  increased  requirements 
$347  million.  Total  financial  requirements  were  $8,678  million 
in  1981-82.  These  transactions,  together  with  the  $9,367  mil- 
lion increase  in  unmatured  debt,  resulted  in  a  cash  balance  of 
$6,620  million  at  March  31,  1982.  Therefore,  the  increase  in 
the  cash  balance,  from  the  $5,931  million  at  the  beginning  of 
the  year,  is  $689  million. 

The  audited  statements,  presented  in  Section  2  of  this 
volume,  reflect  the  change  in  the  level  of  the  provision  for  the 
valuation  of  assets  in  the  particular  years  in  which  the  provi- 
sion was  adjusted.  The  adjustment  of  the  provision  does  not 
affect  financial  requirements  since  it  is  internal  to  the  Govern- 
ment. Table  1.1.1  presents  the  transactions  on  an  historical 


basis  consistent  with  the  Statement  of  Transactions  in  Section 
2. 

In  order  to  provide  an  historical  series  on  a  consistent 
accounting  basis,  the  provision  for  the  valuation  of  assets  has 
been  reallocated  to  the  years  to  which  the  provision  applied. 
Table  1.1.2  presents  the  financial  transactions  on  a  reallocated 
basis  as  described  below.  With  respect  to  the  Government's 
share  of  unemployment  insurance  costs,  the  net  requirements 
of  revolving  funds,  the  undisbursed  balances  of  appropriations 
to  special  accounts  and  the  unamortized  portion  of  bond 
flotation  costs,  the  amounts  have  been  recorded  as  expendi- 
tures of  the  departments  to  which  they  relate  in  the  year  the 
provision  applied.  That  portion  of  the  general  provision  which 
relates  to  loans,  investments  and  advances  has  also  been 
reallocated  to  the  years  to  which  it  applies,  but  has  not  been 
identified  with  any  particular  department.  The  allocation  of 
this  provision  by  fiscal  years  is  shown  in  Table  1.3. 


COMPARA  TIVE  STA TEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS  1  •  5 

TABLE  1.1.1 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION<'> 

SUMMARY  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Year  ended  March  3 1 
1978  1979 

I.    Budgetary  transactions 

A.  Revenue 

B.  Expenditure 

Deficit 

II.    Non-budgetary  transactions 

A.  Loans,  investments  and  advances^^) 

B.  Specified  purpose  accounts^^^ 

C.  Other  transactions 

Net  source 

Financial  requirements  (excluding  foreign  exchange) 

III.  Foreign  exchange  transactions^^)  

Total  financial  requirements^*) 

IV.  Unmatured  debt  transactions^^) 

Change  in  cash  balance^') 

V.    Cash  balance  at  end  of  year 4,506  6,433  3,738  5,931  6,620 

Details  can  be  found  in  other  sections  of  this  volume. 
(')  Consistent  with  the  Statement  of  Transactions  in  Section  2  of  this  volume  except  for  the  Post  Office  Department  which  is  presented  for  all  years  as  a  Crown 

corporation. 
^^)  For  purposes  of  presenting  the  transactions  of  Government, 

^•)  loans,  investments  and  advances,  for  the  years  1978  through  1980,  include  working  capital  advances  to  revolving  funds,  departments  and  agencies;  and, 

<*')  specified  purpose  accounts  include  advances  made  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account. 
(^)  Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  has  been  included  as  part  of  foreign  exchange  transactions. 
^*)  Cash  requirements  ( - ). 
<')  Cash  decrease  ( - ). 


1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

32,093 
-42,129 

34,313 
-  50,498 

38,936 

-51,724 

45,398 
-  58,066 

54,068 
-  67,674 

-  10,036 

-16,185 

-12,788 

-  12,668 

-  13,606 

-  1,217 

2,130 

853 

-386 
3,158 
2,300 

-119 

2,047 

415 

-493 

2,781 

263 

-  1,239 
4,345 
2,169 

1,766 

5,072 

2,343 

2,551 

5,275 

-  8,270 

-11,113 

-  10,445 

-10,117 

-8,331 

1,007 

4,262 

-128 

1,157 

-347 

-  7,263 

-6,851 

-  10,573 

-  8,960 

-  8,678 

8,172 

8,778 

7,878 

11,153 

9,367 

909 

1,927 

-  2,695 

2,193 

689 

TABLE  1.1.2 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

SUMMARY  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


I.    Budgetary  transactions 

A.  Revenue 

B.  Expenditure 

Deficit 

II.    Non-budgetary  transactions 

A.  Loans,  investments  and  advances 

B.  Specified  purpose  accounts 

C.  Other  transactions 

Net  source 

Financial  requirements  (excluding  foreign  exchange) 

III.  Foreign  exchange  transactions^')  

Total  financial  requirements**) 

IV.  Unmatured  debt  transactions*') 

Change  in  cash  balance*^) 

V.    Cash  balance  at  end  of  year 

J')  Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  has  been  included  as  part  of  foreign  exchange  transactions 
*^)  Cash  requirements  ( - ). 
*^)  Cash  decrease  ( - ). 


Year  ended  March  3 1 


1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

32,093 
-  42,382 

34,313 
-  46,539 

38,936 
-50,416 

45,398 
-  58,066 

54,068 
-  67,674 

-  10,289 

-  12,226 

-11,480 

-  12,668 

-  13,606 

- 1,770 

2,771 
839 

-1,102 
2,780 
-565 

-  1,428 

2,047 

416 

-523 

2,781 

293 

-  1,239 
4,345 
2,169 

1,840 

1,113 

1,035 

2,551 

5,275 

-  8,449 

-11,113 

-  10,445 

-10,117 

-8,331 

1,186 

4,262 

-128 

1,157 

-347 

-  7,263 

-6,851 

-  10,573 

-  8,960 

-  8,678 

8,172 

8,778 

7,878 

11,153 

9,367 

909 

1,927 

-  2,695 

2,193 

689 

4,506 

6,433 

3,738 

5,931 

6,620 

1*6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


I.  Budgetary  Transactions 

A.  Revenue 

Total  budgetary  revenue  increased  $8,670  million,  or  19.1%, 
to  a  level  of  $54,068  million  in  1981-82.  Taxes  on  energy 
production  revenue  and  energy  products  account  for  a  large 
portion  of  the  $7,305  million  increase  in  total  tax  revenue.  The 
growth  in  non-tax  revenue  was  largely  from  Bank  of  Canada 
profits,  interest  on  bank  deposits  and  a  special  $300  million 
entry  to  other  non-tax  revenue  for  the  transfer  of  uranium 
stockpiles  to  Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited. 

Personal  income  tax  revenue  increased  21.2%.  This  reflects 
strong  growth  in  the  personal  income  tax  base,  particularly 
from  investment  income  sources.  Revenue  growth  was  further 
supported  by  the  fact  that  taxable  income  growth  per  individu- 
al was  faster  than  the  growth  of  the  indexation  factor  in  1981. 
As  a  result,  there  was  a  tendency  for  taxpayers  to  move  to 
higher  tax  brackets. 

Corporate  income  tax  collections  remained  close  to  their 
1980-81  level.  Revenue  collections  from  this  source  began  to 
weaken  as  the  profit  position  of  corporations  deteriorated 
during  1981-82.  The  first  full  year  effect  of  the  petroleum  and 
gas  revenue  tax  occured  in  1981-82.  Revenue  from  this  source 
increased  from  $27  million  in  1980-81  to  $864  million  in 
1981-82.  This  total  includes  a  small  amount  of  revenue  collect- 
ed from  the  incremental  oil  revenue  tax,  which  became  effec- 
tive January  1982. 

Revenue  from  excise  taxes  and  duties  increased  $2,075 
million,  or  17.7%.  The  major  source  of  increase  was  the 
natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax,  which  had  its  first  full  year 


effect  in  1981-82.  Revenue  from  the  sales  tax  and  excise  duties 
grew  roughly  at  the  rate  of  nominal  output.  Revenue  from 
excise  duties  was  supported  by  the  indexation  of  the  specific 
duties  on  alcohol  and  tobacco.  The  growth  in  customs  import 
duties  was  slowed  somewhat  by  the  impact  of  scheduled  tariff 
reductions  under  the  Multilateral  Trade  Negotiations.  The 
growth  in  total  revenue  from  excise  taxes  and  duties  was 
lowered  by  a  decline  in  revenue  from  oil  export  charges.  The 
decline  from  this  source  results  from  crediting  $445  million  to 
a  specified  purpose  account  for  the  oil  export  charges  portion 
which  accrued  to  the  provinces  from  November  1980  through 
January  1982.  This  credit  more  than  offset  an  increase  in 
revenue  from  the  transportation  fuel  compensation  recovery 
charge. 

Revenue  from  the  special  petroleum  compensation  charge 
totalled  $473  million  in  1981-82.  This  charge  was  levied  on 
domestic  and  imported  oil  at  various  rates  from  March  3,  1981 
to  September  21,  1981  to  offset  the  cost  of  subsidizing  addi- 
tional imports  of  oil  resulting  from  the  production  cutbacks  in 
Alberta. 

Revenue  from  the  petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax,  the 
natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax  and  the  special  petroleum 
compensation  charge  increased  $2,121  million  in  1981-82. 
This  accounts  for  29%  of  the  increase  in  total  tax  revenue. 

Return  on  investments  increased  $965  million,  or  23.4%. 
The  main  sources  of  increase  were  Bank  of  Canada  profits  and 
interest  on  bank  deposits.  The  important  factors  explaining  the 
increases  in  these  components  of  return  on  investments  were 
the  higher  levels  of  interest  rates  and  government  cash 
balances. 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 
TABLE  1.2 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1«7 


1978 


Budgetary  transactions 

A.    REVENUE,  Section  5 
Tax  revenue — 
Income  tax — 

Personal 

Corporation 

Non-resident 

Petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax 

Excise  taxes  and  duties — 

Sales  tax  

Customs  import  duties 

Excise  duties 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax  

Oil  export  charges  

Special  petroleum  compensation  charge 

Special  excise  tax-Gasoline 

Other 

Other  tax  revenue 

Total  tax  revenue 

Non-tax  revenue — 
Return  on  investments — 

Bank  of  Canada 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 

Exchange  Fund  Account 

Interest  on  bank  deposits 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  

Other  return  on  investments 

Other  non-tax  revenue 

Total  non-tax  revenue 

Total  revenue 


Year  ended  March  3  i 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


13,988 

14,656 

16,808 

19,837 

24,046 

5.280 

5,654 

6,951 

8,106 

8,118 

503 

568 

787 

867 

27 

1,018 
864 

19.771 

20.878 

24.546 

28.837 

34.046 

4,427 

4,729 

4,698 

5,429 

6,185 

2,312 

2,747 

3,000 

3,188 

3,439 

882 

878 

895 

1,042 
187 

1,175 
998 

432 

328 

750 

842 

519 

473 

598 

516 

421 

453 

436 

472 

499 

502 

573 

564 

9.123 

9.697 

10.266 

11.714 

13.789 

66 

77 

96 

99 

120 

28,960 

30,652 

34,908 

40,650 

47,955 

786 

925 

1,084 

1,459 

1,853 

700 

753 

782 

839 

873 

138 

325 

404 

620 

763 

196 

407 

244 

318 

701 

161 

184 

210 

243 

285 

611 

564 

620 

651 

620 

2.592 

3.158 

3.344 

4.130 

5.095 

541 

503 

684 

618 

1,018 

3,133 

3,661 

4,028 

4,748 

6,113 

32,093 


34,313 


38,936 


45,398 


54.068 


B.  Expenditure 

Budgetary  expenditure  in  1981-82  increased  16.5%  to 
$67,674  million,  compared  to  increases  of  15.2%  in  1980-81 
and  8.3%  in  1979-80. 

Of  the  total  increase  of  $9,608  million,  public  debt  charges, 
old  age  security  benefits,  National  Defence,  and  fiscal  trans- 
fers accounted  for  over  76%  of  the  increase.  Interest  on  the 
jublic  debt  increased  $4,481   million,  or  41.9%,  to  $15,168 

lillion  in  1981-82  reflecting  higher  interest  rates  and  a  large 
Increase  in   unmatured  debt  outstanding  during  the  year. 

ixcluding  public  debt  charges,  expenditure  increased  10.8%. 

Old  age  security  payments,  including  guaranteed  income 
Supplements  and  spouses'  allowances,  rose  in  1981-82  to 
$8,585  million  or  15.7%  above  the  level  in  1980-81  of  $7,418 
million.  This  accounts  for  12.1%  of  the  increase  in  total 
expenditure.  The  increase  is  due  to  the  quarterly  indexing  of 
payments  and  the  $35  increase  in  the  maximum  monthly 
guaranteed  income  supplement  effective  July  1,  1980. 


National  Defence  expenditures  rose  $951  million,  or  18.7%, 
to  $6,028  million  in  1981-82.  This  reflects  the  government's 
NATO  commitment  to  increase  defence  expenditures  by  three 
per  cent  in  real  terms  per  annum. 

Fiscal  transfers  to  other  levels  of  government  increased 
19.7%  to  $4,535  million  in  1981-82  compared  to  the  increase 
of  7.6%  in  1980-81  over  1979-80.  Equalization  payments 
increased  $888  million  to  $4,478  million  in  1981-82  largely 
due  to  the  inclusion  of  large  adjustment  payments  relating  to 
prior  years.  This  increase  was  offset  somewhat  by  the  public 
utilities  income  tax  transfer  which  decreased  35.3%  to  $88 
million.  Contributions  to  the  provinces  for  hospital  insurance, 
medical  care,  and  extended  health  care  services  rose  by  7.6% 
over  1980-81  to  $4,283  million. 

Other  departments  and  programs  where  notable  increases 
occurred  over  1980-81  were:  Transport,  $429  million  or  23.2%; 
Canada  Assistance  Plan,  including  contracting-out  payments, 
$357  million  or  18.4%;  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  $335 
million  or  51.1%;  and,  Agriculture,  $243  million  or  27.6%. 


1*8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


The  most  notable  decrease  in  budgetary  expenditure 
occurred  in  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources  which  fell  $2,610 
million  in  1981-82  to  $1,398  million.  This  reflects  the  large 
decline  in  the  cost  of  petroleum  compensation  payments  net  of 
revenues.  In  respect  to  Communications,  the  payment  to  the 
Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation,  to  cover  its  operating 


deficit,  capital  expenditures,  and  for  working  capital,  reduced 
expenditure  $118  million,  or  15.1%  in  1981-82  to  $665  million. 
The  reduction  for  this  category  reflects  a  loan  write-off  of 
$198  million  in  1980-81.  The  write-off  did  not  affect  total 
budgetary  expenditure. 


TABLE  1.3 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Year  ended  March  3 1 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


I.    Budgetary  transactions 

B.    EXPENDITURE,  Section  6 

Agriculture 957  768  782  882  1,125 

Communications — 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation 467  562  522  783  665 

Other 271  314  320  388  469 

738  876  842  1.171  1.134 
Employment  and  Immigration — 

Unemployment  insurance 2,019  2,107  1,171  949  1,050 

Other 1,259  1,210  1,200  1,093  1,159 

3,278  3.317  2.371  2.042  2.209 
Energy,  Mines  and  Resources- — 

Oil  price  stabilization 925  628  1,633  3,162  426<') 

Other 356  310  533  846  972 

1.281  938  2.166  4,008  1.398 

Environment 549  604  457  530  627 

External  Affairs — 

Canadian  International  Development  Agency  607  616  683  668  803 

Other 305  346  372  415  482 

912  962  1.055  1.083  1.285 

Finance — 

Public  debt  charges  5,550  7,058  8,524  10,687  15,168 

Fiscal  transfers 3,004  2,995  3,522  3,788  4,535 

Other 273  230  209  129  121 

8.827  10.283  12.255  14.604  19.824 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development 1,170  1,228  1,127  1,417  1,507 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 544  577  579  655  990 

National  Defence 3,785  4.108  4,391  5,077  6,028 

National  Health  and  Welfare — 

Family  and  youth  allowances  2,122  2,093  1,726  1,851  2,020 

Insurance  and  medical  care  services 2,726  3,466  3,859  3,982  4,283 

Canada  Assistance  Plan  including  contracting-out  payments 1,338  1,465  1,653  1,941  2,298 

Old  age  security  benefits 4,861  5,491  6,319  7,418  8,585 

Other 491  542  481  590  632 

11.538  13.057  14.038  15,782  17.818 

National  Revenue 522  573  581  677  816 

Post  Office 464  371  293  486  672 

Public  Works  816  831  1,470  1,852  2,188 

Regional  Economic  Expansion 562  570  628  722  745 

Secretary  of  State — 

Education  support 1,167  1,442  1,608  1,693  1,730 

Bilingualism  development 234  224  190  190  196 

Other 216  228  260  286  338 

1.617  1,894  2,058  2.169  2.264 

Solicitor  General  813  890  907  1,038  1,184 

Transport 1,527  1,671  1,636  1,851  2,280 

Veterans  Affairs 841  889  934  1,016  1,140 

Other  departmental  expenditure 1,542  1,888  1,635  1,734  2,240 

Total  allocated  expenditure 42,283  46,295  50,205  58,796  67,474 

Provision  for  valuation 99  244  211  -730  200 

Total  expenditure 42,382  46,539  50,416  58,066  67,674 

^''  The  substantial  downward  shift  from  1980-81  to  1981-82  reflects  the  excess  of  revenue  over  payments  with  respect  to  the  Petroleum  compensation  revolving  fund; 
these  revenues  and  payments  were  $3,791  million  and  $737  million  respectively.  This  resulted  in  a  surplus  of  $3,054  million  in  1981-82  which  was  offset  against 
other  program  expenditures. 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 


1-9 


II.  Non-budgetary  Transactions 

A.  Loans,  Investments  and  Advances 

Requirements  for  loans,  investments  and  advances  were 
$1,239  million  or  $716  million  above  the  1980-81  level  of  $523 
million.  This  increase  reflected  a  $403  million  additional 
requirement  for  lending  institutions  of  which  $133  million  is 
related  to  the  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation, 
$200  million  to  the  Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 
and  $78  million  to  the  Farm  Credit  Corporation.  There  was 
also  an  additional  requirement  of  $304  million  for  Eldorado 
Nuclear  Limited. 

Investment  in  Petro-Canada  amounted  to  $129  million  in 
1981-82,  compared  to  $440  million  in  1980-81,  for  a  reduction 
of  $311  million.  The  lower  requirements  for  Petro-Canada 
were  largely  offset  by  higher  net  requirements  for  the  Canadi- 
an Dairy  Commission,  loans  to  developing  countries  and  inter- 
national flnancial  institutions  and  the  allowance  for  valuation. 
The  change  in  requirements  for  the  Canadian  Dairy  Commis- 
sion amounted  to  $98  million!  Loans  to  developing  countries 
were  higher  by  $49  million  and  net  subscriptions  to  interna- 
tional financial  institutions  at  $166  million  were  $56  million 
above  the  1980-81  level.  The  allowance  for  valuation  account 
provided  a  net  source  of  $200  million  in  1981-82  compared  to 
the  1980-81  allocation  of  $307  million,  for  a  reduction  of  $107 
million. 

B.  Specified  Purpose  Accounts 

The  specified  purpose  accounts  provided  a  net  source  of 
$4,345  million  or  $1,564  million  above  the  1980-81  level.  The 


increase  reflects  $667  million  from  the  Unemployment  Insur- 
ance Account  and  $707  million  from  the  superannuation 
accounts.  The  provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 
represented  a  net  requirement  of  $56  million  in  1981-82  in 
comparison  to  a  source  of  $728  million  in  1980-81.  An  addi- 
tional source  of  $963  million  over  the  1980-81  level  came  from 
deposit  and  trust  accounts,  of  which  $445  million  related  to 
the  oil  export  charges  sharing  account,  $200  million  to  the 
Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  account,  $192  million 
for  the  Western  grain  stabilization  account,  $85  million  for  the 
Indian  band  funds  and  $75  million  for  the  Canadian  Owner- 
ship Account. 

C.  Other  Transactions 

Other  transactions  provided  a  net  source  of  $2,169  million 
in  1981-82  compared  to  $293  million  in  1980-81.  The  increase 
of  $1,876  million  is  related  principally  to  interest  and  matured 
debt;  this  group  of  accounts  was  $1,747  million  higher  in 
1981-82  than  in  1980-81  and  reflects  the  large  sales  of  Canada 
savings  bonds  in  1981.  While  interest  accrued  on  Canada 
savings  bonds  is  recorded  in  budgetary  expenditure,  much  of 
this  interest  remains  uncashed  for  several  years  on  a  new  bond. 
As  a  result,  the  uncashed  portion  is  recorded  in  the  interest 
and  matured  debt  to  reflect  the  fact  that  the  accrued  Canada 
savings  bonds  interest  has  no  effect  on  financial  requirements. 
Cash  in  transit  provided  a  source  of  $16  million  in  1981-82 
compared  to  a  requirement  of  $693  million  in  1980-81,  for  a 
swing  of  $709  million;  this  was  partly  offset  by  a  $594  million 
reduced  source  of  funds  from  accounts  payable.  The  cash  in 
transit  and  accounts  payable  are  year-end  accounts  which  may 
fluctuate  considerably  from  year  to  year. 


TABLE  1.4 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Year  ended  March  3 1 


Non-budgetary  transactions^" 

A.  LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES,  Section  7 
Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 

Lending  institutions — 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation  

Export  Development  Corporation 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

All  other  Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 

Air  Canada 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited  

Canadian  National  Railways  

Petro-Canada 

Other 

Other  loans,  investments  and  advances — 

Provincial  and  territorial  governments 

National  governments  including  developing  countries 

International  organizations  (subscriptions  less  notes  payable)  

Veterans'   Land  Act   Fund  advances  less  allowance  for  conditional 

benefits 

Government  controlled  corporations  

Private  sector  enterprises 

Miscellaneous 

Loans,  investments  and  advances  before  allowance 

Allowance  for  valuation  of  assets 

Total  loans,  investments  and  advances  after  allowance  for  valuation  of 
assets  

B.  SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS,  Section  8 
Liability  accounts — 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 

Superannuation  accounts 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account  

Government  Annuities  Account 

Canadian  Ownership  Account  

Deposit  and  trust  accounts  

Provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 

Other 

Total  specified  purpose  accounts  

C.  OTHER  TRANSACTIONS,  Sections  9  and  12 

Cash  in  transit  

Interest  and  matured  debt  less  unamortized  discount  on  Treasury  bills... 

Accounts  payable 

Outstanding  cheques  and  warrants 

Miscellaneous 

Total  other  transactions 

Net  non-budgetary  transactions  before  allowance  for  valuation  of  assets 

Allowance  for  valuation  of  assets  

Net  non-budgetary  transactions  after  allowance  for  valuation  of  assets 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


1982 


10 

-200 

-532 

-52 

-366 

-66 

-  199 

-84 

-51 

-44 

19 

3 

-297 

-267 

-307 

-270 

-348 

-241 

-267 

-245 

101 

125 

-  1.144 

-637 

-962 

-216 

-619 

3 

-341 

16 

13 

14 

-201 

-242 

-216 

697 

8 

-99 

385 

-  108 

-8 

-150 

-280 

-80 

-440 

-  129 

124 

-II 

15 

275 

-359 

-323 

-489 

-373 

537 

-466 

-1,467 

-  1,126 

- 1,335 

321 

-  1,085 

-113 

131 

44 

247 

28 

-166 

-215 

-218 

-229 

-256 

-179 

-  173 

-134 

-no 

-  166 

37 

47 

43 

37 

29 

-1 

4 

4 

-2 

9 

-14 

-38 

13 

11 

-14 

-29 

-  19 

-2 

-402 

-220 

-304 

-114 

-354 

-  1,869 

-  1,346 

-1,639 

207 

-  1,439 

99 

244 

211 

-730 

200 

-  1,770 

.  -1,102 

-1,428 

-523 

-  1,239 

93 

124 

113 

173 

170 

1,888 

1,956 

1,966 

2,307 

3,014 

261 

271 

-150 

-682 

-15 

-9 

-10 

-  14 

-  15 

-21 
75 

174 

37 

-14 

241 

1,129 

330 

366 

118 

728 

-56 

34 

36 

28 

29 

49 

2,771 

2,780 

2,047 

2,781 

4,345 

-  188 

3 

-130 

-693 

16 

904 

-509 

-38 

186 

1,933 

-521 

214 

91 

772 

178 

632 

-243 

506 

9 

29 

12 

-30 

-  13 

19 

13 

839 

-565 

416 

293 

2,169 

1,741 

869 

824 

3,281 

5,075 

99 

244 

211 

-730 

200 

1,840 


1,113 


1,035 


2,551 


5,275 


'"Source/requirement  ( - ). 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 


1-11 


III.  Foreign  Exchange  Transactions 

Foreign  exchange  transactions  include  the  operations  of  the 
Exchange  Fund  Account,  the  objective  of  which  is  to  assist  in 
maintaining  orderly  conditions  in  the  exchange  markets  and  to 
effect  payments  by  various  departments  for  the  purchase  of 
goods  and  services.  Also  included  in  foreign  exchange  transac- 
tions are  subscriptions  and  notes  payable  to  the  International 
Monetary  Fund,  together  with  Special  Drawing  Rights.  Total 
foreign  exchange  transactions  produced  a  requirement  for 
Canadian  dollars  of  $347  million  in  1981-82  compared  to  a 
source  of$l,157  million  in  1980-81. 

IV.  Unmatured  Debt  Transactions 

Marketable  bonds  payable  in  Canadian  currency  increased 
in  1981-82  by  $2,634  million  and  Canada  savings  bonds  by 


$9,166  million;  net  redemptions  of  Treasury  bills  amounted  to 
$2,395  million.  In  total,  net  unmatured  debt  payable  in 
Canadian  currency  increased  by  $9,367  million  in  1981-82 
compared  to  an  increase  of  $  11 , 1 53  million  in  1 980-8 1 . 

V.  Cash  Balance  at  End  of  Year 

Financial  requirements,  including  foreign  exchange  transac- 
tions, amounted  to  $8,678  million.  This  was  offset  by  an 
increase  of  $9,367  million  in  unmatured  debt  transactions.  The 
excess  of  the  increase  in  unmatured  debt  over  financial 
requirements  resulted  in  an  increase  in  the  cash  balance  at 
March  31,  1982  to  $6,620  million,  or  $689  million  above  the 
March  31,  1981  level  of  $5,931  million. 


TABLE  1.5 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


III.  Foreign  exchange  transactions^ '\  Section  10 

Exchange  Fund  Account— Advances 

International  Monetary  Fund — Subscriptions 

Less:  International  Monetary  Fund — Notes  payable 

Special  Drawing  Rights 

Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  

Total  foreign  exchange  transactions 

IV.  Unmatured  debt  transactions^'),  Section  1 1 

Marketable  bonds 

Canada  savings  bonds 

Special  non-marketable  bonds 

Treasury  bills 

Notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies 

Less: 
Government's  holdings  of  unmatured  debt — 

Marketable  bonds 

Canada  savings  bonds  held  on  account  of  employees  

Special  non-marketable  bonds  issued  to  Canada  Pension  Plan  Invest- 
ment Fund 

Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  

Total  unmatured  debt  transactions  payable  in  Canadian  currency 

V.    Cash  balance  at  end  of  year.  Section  !  2 

In  Canadian  currency 

In  foreign  currencies 

Total  cash  balance 

'*'  Source/requirement  ( - ). 


Year  ended  March  3 1 

1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

248 

-  2,375 

2,143 

1,263 

-237 

-310 

-482 

-7 

-930 

181 

-62 

-  2.857 

2.136 

333 

-56 

-260 

-690 

-39 

-715 

2 

-133 

-243 

-213 

-175 

70 

-393 

-933 

-252 

-890 

72 

855 

6,186 

-2,516 

-66 

-219 

1,186 

4,262 

-128 

1,157 

-347 

3,439 

8,146 

6,417 

7,834 

3,000 

1,707 

1,236 

-1,166 

-  2,269 

9,166 

12 

12 

17 

23 

18 

3,040 

2,240 

2,790 

5,445 

-  2,395 

850 

3,390 

-  2,528 

-5 

-585 

9.048 

15.024 

5.530 

11.028 

9.204 

2 

33 

145 

-83 

14 

7 

15 

6 

1 

24 

12 

12 

17 

23 

18 

855 

6,186 

-2,516 

-66 

-219 

876 

6.246 

-  2.348 

-125 

-163 

8,172 

ijn 

i,%n 

11,153 

9,367 

4,487 

6,374 

3,661 

5,826 

6,594 

19 

59 

77 

105 

26 

4,506 


6,433 


3,738 


5,931 


6,620 


1-12 
TABLE  1.6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION  (REVISED  ACCOUNTING  BASIS) 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Year  ended  March  3 1 


CANADA  PENSION  PLAN 
Receipts — 

Employer  and  employee  contributions  

Investment  income 

Disbursements — 

Pensions 

Administration  expenses 

Net 

Investments — Provincial  government  securities  in  Investment  Fund . 

Total  (net)  Canada  Pension  Plan 

UNEMPLOYMENT  INSURANCE  ACCOUNT 
Receipts — 

Government  contribution*" 

Employer  and  employee  contributions  

Investment  income 

Disbursements — 

Benefits*" 

Interest  payments  

Administration  expenses 

Total  (net*^')  Unemployment  Insurance  Account 


1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

1,846 
921 

-  1,059 
-46 

2,124 
1,089 

-  1,328 
-51 

2,367 
1,289 

-1,635 
-58 

2,689 
1,519 

-  2,01 1 
-67 

3,282 
1,850 

-  2,456 
-76 

1,662 
-  1,569 

1,834 
-1,710 

1,963 
-  1,850 

2,130 
-  1,957 

2,600 
-  2,430 

93 


124 


113 


173 


170 


2,018 

2,595 

10 

2,104 

2,865 

21 

1,167 
2,860 

24 

946 

3,399 

13 

1,047 

4,887 

38 

-4,121 

-  4,446 

-  3,922 

-4,524 

-5,318 

-6 

-663 

-241 

-273 

-279 

-516 

261 


271 


150 


-682 


-15 


SUPERANNUATION  ACCOUNTS 
Public  Service  Superannuation  Account — 
Receipts — 

Government  contribution 

Employee  contribution 

Public  Service  corporations — Employer  and  employee  contributions 

Interest 

Actuarial  liability  adjustment 

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Change  in  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 

Net 

Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account — 
Receipts — 

Government  contribution 

Employee  contribution 

Interest  

Actuarial  liability  adjustment  

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities  

Other 

Change  in  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 

Net 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation  Account — 
Receipts — 

Government  contribution 

Employee  contribution 

Interest  

Actuarial  liability  adjustment 

Disbursements — 

Annuities  

Other 

Change  in  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 

Net 

Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account — 
Receipts — 

Government  contribution 

Employee  contribution 

Public  Service  corporations — Employer  and  employee  contributions 

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Net 

Total  (net)  superannuation  accounts 

*"  Including  benefits  to  fishermen. 

'^>  Net  of  non-interest  bearing  and  interest  bearing  advances. 


229 

263 

111 

288 

321 

263 

272 

282 

314 

331 

43 

47 

54 

57 

128 

336 

375 

417 

608 

837 

306 

434 

630 

559 

951 

4 

4 

14 

10 

14 

-258 

-302 

-357 

-409 

-466 

-29 

-42 

-66 

-61 

-65 

77 

1 

-  194 

-  104 

-375 

971 

1.052 

1.052 

1.262 

1,676 

119 

124 

133 

142 

159 

67 

71 

74 

80 

91 

290 

311 

340 

480 

618 

264 

1 

257 
1 

284 
1 

252 

1 

454 

1 

-199 

-220 

-242 

-267 

-292 

-9 

-8 

-  11 

-14 

-15 

147 

90 

28 

19 

-151 

680 

626 

607 

693 

865 

30 

36 

39 

44 

52 

17 

18 

20 

22 

27 

24 

45 

51 

59 

68 

46 

1 

13 

38 

51 

-7 

-9 

-10 

-13 

-16 

-1 

-1 

-2 

-3 

-3 

-11 

31 

14 

-12 

-21 

98 

121 

125 

135 

158 

61 

63 

66 

74 

88 

61 

63 

68 

75 

83 

6 

8 

10 

10 

24 

21 

37 

59 

94 

159 

-6 

-7 

-11 

-25 

-26 

-4 

-7 

-  10 

-  11 

-13 

139 

157 

182 

217 

315 

1,956 


1,966 


2,307 


3,014 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 


1-13 


SUMMARY  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS— EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS 
PRESENTATION 


The  National  Income  and  Expenditure  Accounts  were  de- 
veloped as  a  basis  for  economic  analysis  of  income  and  expen- 
diture flows  in  the  economy.  The  concepts  and  definitions 
applied  to  the  Government  sector  are  consistent  with  those 
applied  to  other  sectors  and  follow  international  practices 
developed  under  the  aegis  of  the  United  Nations.  The  econom- 
ic nature  of  a  transaction  is  the  determining  factor  in  its 
classification  within  the  National  Accounts  framework.  The 
Extended  National  Accounts  present,  in  addition  to  the  tradi- 
tional National  Accounts  revenue,  expenditure  and  balance 
shown  here  under  the  heading  "National  Accounts  transac- 
tions", the  items  which  account  for  the  difference  between  the 


National  Accounts  budget  balance  and  total  financial  require- 
ments on  a  Public  Accounts  basis. 

In  1981-82,  National  Accounts  transactions  resulted  in  a 
deficit  of  $10,025  million.  Loans  and  other  transactions  pro- 
vided a  net  source  of  $1,694  million.  Foreign  exchange  trans- 
actions increased  requirements  $347  million  and  unmatured 
debt  transactions  provided  a  source  of  $9,367  million.  As 
previously  noted,  foreign  exchange  and  unmatured  debt  trans- 
actions are  identical  to  those  reported  in  the  Public  Accounts 
presentation. 


TABLE  L7 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION 

SUMMARY  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Year  ended  March  3 1 
1978  1979 

I.    National  Accounts  transactions") 

A.  Revenue'^' 

B.  Expenditure*^' 

Surplus  or  deficit  ( - ) 

11.    Loans  and  other  transactions 

A.  Loans,  investments  and  advances 

B.  Cash  versus  accruals  

C.  Other  transactions 

Net  source  or  requirement  (  - )  

Financial  requirements  (excluding  foreign  exchange) 

lU.    Foreign  exchange  transactions*^^  

Total  financial  requirements**^  

IV.    Unmatured  debt  transactions*^) 

Change  in  cash  balance*') 

V.    Cash  balance  at  end  of  year 4,506  6,433  3,738 

*"  These  "National  Accounts  transactions"  are  consistent  with  those  released  by  Statistics  Canada  on  September  1,  1982. 

*2)  "Total  revenue"  plus  "Capital  consumption  allowances"  as  per  Statistics  Canada's  National  Income  and  Expenditure  Accounts. 

*^)  "Current  expenditures"  plus  "Gross  capital  formation"  as  per  Statistics  Canada's  National  Income  and  Expenditure  Accounts. 

**)  Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  has  been  included  as  part  of  foreign  exchange  transactions. 

*')  Cash  requirements  ( - ). 

'*)  Cash  decrease  ( - ). 


1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

36,159 

-45,558 

39,821 
-  49,467 

45,337 
-  54,645 

53,286 
-62,861 

65,139 

-75,164 

-  9,399 

-  9,646 

-  9,308 

-  9,575 

-  10,025 

-  1,766 

2,212 

504 

-1,005 

-958 

496 

-  1.309 

-123 

295 

-634 

-861 

953 

-1,178 
1,756 
1,116 

950 

-  1,467 

-1,137 

-542 

1,694 

-  8,449 

-11,113 

-  10,445 

-10,117 

-8,331 

1,186 

4,262 

-  128 

1,157 

-347 

-  7,263 

-6,851 

-  10,573 

-  8,960 

-  8,678 

8,172 

8,778 

7,878 

11,153 

9,367 

909 

1,927 

-  2,695 

2,193 

689 

5,931 


6,620 


1«14 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


I.  National  Accounts  Transactions 

A.  Revenue 

On  a  National  Accounts  basis,  total  revenue  increased 
$11,853  million  or  22.2%,  to  a  level  of  $65,139  million.  For 
most  revenue  sources,  the  growth  patterns  in  the  National 
Accounts  are  similar  to  those  in  the  Public  Accounts.  The 
major  differences  in  the  growth  rates  for  1981-82  relate  to  the 
treatment  of  taxes  on  energy  products. 

In  the  Public  Accounts,  revenue  from  the  petroleum  com- 
pensation charge  is  netted  against  the  cost  of  subsidizing  oil 
imports  and  oil  qualifying  for  the  New  Oil  Reference  Price.  In 
the  National  Accounts,  the  petroleum  compensation  charge  is 
included  in  revenue  on  a  gross  basis.  This  accounts  for  $2,396 
million,  excluding  the  special  petroleum  compensation  charge, 
of  the  increase  in  National  Accounts  revenue  from  1980-81  to 
1981-82.  There  is  also  a  difference  in  the  treatment  of  revenue 
from  the  Canadian  Ownership  charge  on  petroleum  and  natu- 
ral gas.  In  the  Public  Accounts,  revenue  is  netted  against  the 
transfers  out  of  the  account  to  acquire  ownership  interests  in 
non-resident-owned  Canadian  oil  and  gas  operations.  In  the 
National  Accounts,  revenue  from  this  source  is  shown  on  a 
gross  basis.  The  $872  million  increase  in  revenue  from  this 
source,  together  with  the  increase  from  the  petroleum  compen- 
sation charge,  accounts  for  27.6%  of  the  total  increase  in 
National  Accounts  revenue.  Another  major  difference  in  the 
accounts  concerns  the  oil  export  charges.  The  $445  million 
credited  to  a  specified  purpose  account  for  the  provincial  share 
of  oil  export  charges  is  not  deducted  from  National  Accounts 
revenue. 

The  increase  in  direct  taxes  on  persons  was  $5,926  million  or 
24.1%.  Personal  income  tax  revenue  grew  21%,  contributions 
to  Government  pension  plans  increased  21.3%,  and  employer- 
employee  contributions  for  unemployment  insurance  rose 
43.5%.  The  sharp  increase  in  unemployment  insurance  contri- 
butions reflects  the  increase  in  employer-employee  contribu- 
tion rates  from  $1.89/$  1.35  in  1980  to  $2.52/$  1.80  in  1981. 

Corporate  tax  liabilities,  excluding  the  petroleum  and  gas 
revenue  tax  for  the  private  incorporated  sector  and  the  incre- 
mental oil  revenue  tax,  fell  21.2%.  This  is  in  contrast  to  the 
.1%  increase  in  corporate  income  tax  collections  in  the  Public 
Accounts.  The  divergence  in  growth  patterns  occurred  because 
tax  liabilities  responded  more  quickly  to  the  downturn  in 
profits  than  did  tax  collections.  Liabilities  for  the  petroleum 
and  gas  revenue  tax  increased  $718  million  and  the  liabilities 
for  the  incremental  oil  revenue  tax  were  $95  million  for  the 
first  quarter  of  1982.  Revenue  from  the  withholding  tax 
increased  24.8%. 

The  growth  rate  for  indirect  taxes  was  44%  in  1981-82. 
With  the  exception  of  certain  taxes  on  energy  products,  the 
growth  profiles  for  the  components  are  similar  to  those  in  the 
Public  Accounts. 

Investment  income  increased  13.4%  in  1981-82,  with  the 
main  source  of  increase  being  interest  on  public-held  funds. 
Capital  consumption  allowances  increased  1 5%. 

B.  Expenditure 

Federal  government  expenditure  on  a  National  Accounts 
basis  was  $75,164  million  in  1981-82,  an  increase  of  $12,303 


million  or  19.6%  over  1980-81.  This  compares  with  growth 
rates  of  15%  in  1980-81  and  10.5%  in  1979-80. 

Interest  on  the  public  debt  rose  $3,868  million  or  36.8%  in 
1981-82  reflecting  higher  interest  rates  and  an  increase  in 
outstanding  debt.  This  increase  in  public  debt  interest  com- 
pares to  increases  of  25.9%  in  1980-81  and  21.6%  in  1979-80. 
Interest  on  the  public  debt  accounted  for  31.4%  of  the  total 
increase  in  expenditure  in  1981-82. 

Transfer  payments  to  persons  increased  $2,759  million  or 
16.1%  and  account  for  22.4%  of  the  total  federal  expenditure 
increase  in  1981-82.  This  compares  with  rates  of  increase  of 
14.7%  and  1.7%  for  1980-81  and  1979-80  respectively.  The 
largest  increase  in  this  category  occurred  in  old  age  security 
benefits  which  grew  $1,157  million  or  15.8%  in  1981-82.  In 
addition,  unemployment  insurance  benefits  grew  $943  million, 
or  21%,  to  $5,436  million  in  1981-82,  reflecting  the  higher 
level  of  unemployment.  Family  and  youth  allowances 
increased  $168  million,  or  9.1%  in  1981-82.  Following 
increases  of  20.9%  in  1979-80  and  18%  in  1980-81,  govern- 
ment pensions  for  1981-82  increased  15.5%  to  $1,315  million. 

Total  current  goods  and  services  grew  17.1%  to  $16,898 
million.  This  component  accounts  for  20.1%  of  the  total 
increase  in  expenditure.  The  increases  were  11.7%  in  1980-81 
and  4.8%  in  1979-80.  Non-defence  goods  and  services  expendi- 
tures increased  $1,687  million,  or  18.2%,  in  1981-82,  while 
defence  goods  and  services  expenditures  increased  $780  mil- 
lion, or  15.1%,  to  a  level  of  $5,960  million.  Non-defence 
wages,  salaries  and  supplementary  labour  income  increased 
$1,476  million,  or  20.8%,  to  $8,568  million  while  military  pay 
and  allowances  increased  $299  million,  or  17.7%,  to  $1,990 
million  in  1981-82.  Other  current  goods  and  services  increased 
$567  million,  or  1 1.8%,  to  $5,384  million  in  1981-82  compared 
to  a  growth  rate  of  10.3%  in  1980-81. 

Transfer  payments  to  other  levels  of  government  increased 
to  $14,521  million,  or  12.8%,  in  1981-82  compared  with 
growth  rates  of  5.9%  in  1980-81  and  12.3%  in  1979-80.  While 
federal  contributions  to  the  provinces  for  hospital  insurance, 
medical  care  and  post-secondary  education  rose  4.5%  in  1981- 
82  to  $5,189  million,  payments  under  the  taxation  agreements 
increased  by  $774  million,  or  20.8%,  to  $4,493  million.  Pay- 
ments under  the  Canada  Assistance  Plan  including  contract- 
ing-out  payments  rose  $341  million,  or  17.8%,  to  $2,258 
million  in  1981-82. 

Gross  capital  formation  increased  $546  million,  or  69.2%,  to 
amount  to  $1,335  million  in  1981-82.  A  major  reason  for  the 
large  increase  is  the  return  to  a  normal  change  in  inventories 
in  1981-82  following  the  $272  million  drawdown  in  1980-81 
associated  with  the  transfer  of  uranium  stockpiles  to  Eldorado 
Nuclear  Limited.  Both  capital  assistance  to  industry  and 
current  transfers  to  non-residents  increased  substantially  in 
1981-82  by  25.9%  to  $826  million  and  20.5%  to  $939  million 
respectively.  The  growth  in  subsidies  of  $689  million,  or 
12.1%,  to  $6,386  million  is  less  than  the  increases  of  46.3%  in 
1980-81  and  70.7%  in  1979-80.  This  is  explained  by  the 
decrease  in  synthetic  oil  subsidies  of  14.6%  to  $769  million  and 
a  small  increase  of  3.9%  in  oil  import  compensation  payments 
to  $3,308  million  in  1981-82. 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

TABLE  1.8 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1-15 


Year  ended  March  31 


National  Accounts  transactions 

A.  REVENUE- 
Direcl  taxes — 

Persons  

Corporations 

Non-residents 

Total  direct  taxes 

Indirect  taxes  

Other  current  transfers  from  persons. 

Investment  income 

Capital  consumption  allowances 

Total  revenue 

B.  EXPENDITURE— 
Current  goods  and  services — 

Defence 

Non-defence 

Total  current  goods  and  services. 

Transfer  payments  to  persons 

Subsidies 

Capital  assistance 

Current  transfers  to  non-residents 

Interest  on  the  public  debt 

Transfers  to  provinces 

Transfers  to  local  governments 

Gross  capital  formation 

Total  expenditure 


1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 

1982 

17,614 

18,432 

20,803 

24,547 

30,473 

5,131 

6,049 

7,531 

8,715 

7,749 

544 

636 

890 

932 

1,163 

23.289 

25.117 

29.224 

34.194 

39.385 

9,162 

9,997 

10,976 

13,339 

19,209 

13 

17 

17 

16 

24 

3,123 

4,025 

4,372 

4,906 

5,565 

572 

665 

748 

831 

956 

36,159 

39,821 

45,337 

53,286 

65,139 

3,790 

4,169 

4,404 

5,180 

5,960 

7,703 

8,168 

8,520 

9,251 

10,938 

11,493 

12.337 

12.924 

14.431 

16.898 

13,529 

14,678 

14,933 

17,132 

19,891 

2,305 

2,280 

3,893 

5,697 

6,386 

519 

616 

694 

656 

826 

933 

729 

795 

779 

939 

5,473 

6,857 

8,340 

10,500 

14,368 

9,754 

10,449 

11,839 

12,574 

14,229 

383 

370 

316 

303 

292 

1,169 

1,151 

911 

789 

1,335 

45,558 


49,467 


54,645 


62,861 


75,164 


II.  Loans  and  Other  Transactions 

A.  Loans,  Investments  and  Advances 

Requirements  for  loans,  investments  and  advances  were 
$1,178  million  in  1981-82  or  $544  million  above  the  level  of 
$634  million  recorded  in  1980-81. 

Loans,  investments  and  advances  to  lending  institutions 
were  $578  million  or  $411  million  above  the  1980-81  level  of 
$167  million.  In  addition,  requirements  for  Eldorado  Nuclear 
Limited  were  $303  million  above  the  1980-81  level.  These 
increases  were  partially  offset  by  a  $3 1 1  million  reduction  in 
requirements  for  Petro-Canada. 

B.  Accrual  Accounts 

This  category  reflects  mainly  the  difference  between 
accrued  taxes,  interest  receivable  and  accounts  payable  com- 


pared to  the  actual  amount  of  taxes  received,  interest  and 
accounts  paid. 

These  accrual  accounts  resulted  in  a  net  source  of  $1,756 
million  in  1981-82  compared  to  a  requirement  of  $861  million 
in  1980-81. 

C.  Other  Transactions 

Other  transactions  provided  a  source  of  $1,116  million  in 
1981-82  compared  to  a  source  of  $953  million  in  1980-81.  The 
$163  million  increase  occurred  despite  a  $784  million  swing  to 
additional  requirements  for  the  provincial  tax  collection  agree- 
ments account;  this  swing  was  more  than  offset  by  other 
deposit  and  trust  accounts  which,  on  an  Extended  National 
Accounts  basis,  provided  an  additional  source  of  $888  million, 
from  $48  million  in  1980-81  to  $936  million  in  1981-82. 


1«16 
TABLE  1.9 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  PRESENTATION 

DETAILED  STATEMENT  OF  TRANSACTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1978 


II.    Loans  and  other  transactions 

A.  LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES— 
Lending  institutions — 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 

Export  Development  Corporation 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  

Veterans'  Land  Act 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board 

Regional  economic  development — 

Stabilization  and  development  loans  to  provinces 

Regional  Economic  Expansion 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce — Miscellaneous  loans 

Electrical  loans 

Transportation  and  communications — 

Air  Canada 

Canadian  National  Railways 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation 

Other 

Loans  to  other  levels  of  government — 

Other  levels  of  government — Domestic 

Other  levels  of  government — International 

International  organizations 

Miscellaneous — 

Pctro-Canada 

Other 

Total  loans,  investments  and  advances  before  allowance  for  valuation. 

Allowance  for  valuation  of  assets 

Total  loans,  investment  and  advances  after  allowance  for  valuation 

B.  ACCRUAL  ACCOUNTS— 

Interest  accounts  

Supplementary  period  accounts 

Corporate  income  tax 

Oil  export  charges  

Gross  capital  formation 

Outstanding  cheques  and  warrants 

Total  cash  versus  accruals 

C.  OTHER  TRANSACTIONS— 

Provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 

Other 

Total  other  transactions 

Net  source  or  requirement  ( - ) 


10 

-532 

-84 

-297 

37 

-241 

10 


1,097 


14 

4 

II 

-59 


30 


3 

-99 

2 

6 


972 
393 
100 
33 
82 
632 


Year  ended  March  3 1 


1979 


-52 

-51 

-267 

47 

-267 

II 


579 


-2 

1 

-18 


-341 
385 
-  10 
-10 


-386 
247 
-431 
-37 
-108 
-243 


1980 


-366 

-44 

-307 

43 

-245 

11 


908 


-I 


16 

-108 

-4 

-5 


145 
-254 
-639 
-76 
195 
506 


1981 


-66 
19 

-270 

37 

101 

12 


167 


7 
-15 

-3 


-3 


13 
-8 
188 


399 
-574 
-449 
-24 
-222 
9 


1982 


200 
199 

3 
348 

29 
125 

12 


578 


9 
14 

-  I 

-  I 


21 


14 


-88 

24 

-  101 

193 

23 

-95 
-166 
-179 

113 
-215 
-173 

1 
-218 
-134 

167 
-229 
-110 

-7 
-256 
-166 

-440 

-275 

-351 

-  172 

-429 

-150 
8 

-280 
-8 

-80 

-15 

-440 
10 

-129 
-286 

-142 

-288 

-95 

-430 

-415 

-  1,797 

-1,129 

-  1,448 

-579 

-1,378 

31 

124 

139 

-55 

200 

-  1,766 

-1,005 

-  1,309 

-634 

-1,178 

1,848 
1,548 
1,223 

97 
107 

29 


2,212 

-958 

-123 

-861 

1,756 

330 
174 

366 
130 

118 
177 

728 
225 

-56 

1,172 

504 

496 

295 

953 

1,116 

950 


-  1,467 


1,137 


542 


1,694 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENTS  OF  TRANSACTIONS 


1'17 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  AND  EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  RECONCILIATION 


While  the  Public  Accounts  and  the  Extended  National 
Accounts  presentations  result  in  the  same  total  financial 
requirement  figures,  differences  exist  in  the  treatment  of  trans- 
actions in  arriving  at  the  budgetary  surplus  or  deficit  on  a 
Public  Accounts  basis  and  the  surplus  or  deficit  on  an  Extend- 
ed National  Accounts  basis.  These  differences  are  offset  in  the 
non-budgetary  components  of  total  financial  requirements. 

The  reconciliation  of  transactions  according  to  the  two 
systems  of  accounts  is  set  out  in  the  tables  that  follow.  The 
major  factors  which  give  rise  to  the  need  for  a  reconciliation 
are  listed  below. 

The  deficits  of  Government  business  enterprises  which  are 
outside  the  Government  accounting  entity  are,  for  Public 
Accounts  presentation  purposes,  met  through  budgetary 
appropriations  and  thus  recorded  as  budgetary  expenditure.  In 
the  National  Accounts  presentation,  these  deficits,  including 
the  deficit  of  the  Canada  Post  Corporation,  are  netted  against 
Government  investment  income. 

Revenue  in  the  Public  Accounts  is  recorded  on  a  cash  basis. 
While  the  major  portion  of  National  Accounts  revenue  is 
accounted  for  on  a  cash  basis,  certain  items,  such  as  corporate 
income  taxes  and  the  oil  export  charges,  are  reported  on  an 
accrual  basis. 


Transactions  of  employee  pension  accounts  and  the  Unem- 
ployment Insurance  Account  are  treated  as  non-budgetary  in 
the  Public  Accounts,  although  the  Government's  statutory 
contributions  to  these  accounts  and  interest  payments  on  the 
Government's  liability  to  these  accounts  form  part  of  budget- 
ary expenditure.  Employer  and  employee  contributions  to 
these  accounts,  plus  any  related  interest  income,  form  part  of 
Government  revenue  in  the  Extended  National  Accounts  pres- 
entation, and  benefit  payments  form  part  of  Government 
expenditure. 

In  the  Public  Accounts  presentation,  the  purchase  of  capital 
assets  such  as  buildings  and  machinery  is  recorded  as  a 
budgetary  expenditure  in  the  year  of  acquisition.  Only  newly 
produced  capital  assets  and  capital  expenditures  are  included 
in  National  Accounts  expenditure.  Both  Government  revenue 
and  expenditure  include  an  allowance  for  the  depreciation  of 
capital  assets  in  the  latter  framework  while  no  such  provision 
is  made  in  the  Public  Accounts  presentation. 

The  Extended  National  Accounts  universe  includes  certain 
Government  agencies  which  are  not  part  of  the  Public 
Accounts  universe.  The  actual  financial  transactions  of  those 
agencies  form  part  of  Extended  National  Accounts  revenue 
and  expenditure.  Transfers  and  loans  to  these  agencies  are 
thus  not  accounted  for  in  the  Extended  National  Accounts 
presentation. 


TABLE  1.10 


P 


GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  AND  EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  RECONCILIATION 

REVENUE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Year  ended  March  3 1 
1978  1979  1980  1981  1982 

Budgetary  revenue— Public  Accounts 32,093  34,313  38,936  45,398  54.068 

Deduct: 
Deficitsof  Government  business  enterprises^') -664  -570  -791  -1,124  -1,485 

Add: 

Corporate  income  tax^^) — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections -100                    431                     639                    449              -1,223 

Government  pension  and  social  security  receipts 5,051                 5,475                 5,613                 6,599                 8,762 

Capital  consumption  allowances 572                    665                    748                    831                    956 

Energy  related  adjustments 

Petroleum  compensation  charge<^> 89                    400                  1,459                 3,855 

Canadian  Ownership  charge'^' 872 

Oil  export  charges — Payments  to  provinces^'' 445 

Oil  export  charges — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections -33                      37                      76                      24                   -97 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections 78 

Miscellaneous  adjustments^ -760                 -619                 -284                 -350              -1,092 

Total  revenue— Extended  National  Accounts 36,159  39,821  45.337  53,286  65,139 

*"  Including  Canada  Post  Corporation. 

(^)  Including  the  petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax  and  the  incremental  oil  revenue  tax. 

^^)  In  the  Public  Accounts,  the  petroleum  compensation  charge  is  netted  against  petroleum  compensation  payments.  Gross  revenues  and  payments  are  recorded  in  the 

National  Accounts.  The  revenues  are  recorded  on  an  accrual  basis  in  the  National  Accounts.  Figures  exclude  the  special  petroleum  compensation  charge. 
**'  In  the  Public  Accounts,  only  net  Canadian  Ownership  Account  revenues  are  recorded  in  budgetary  revenue  while  in  the  National  Accounts,  the  revenues  arc 

reported  on  a  gross  basis. 
(^>  In  the  Public  Accounts,  the  provincial  share  of  receipts  from  the  oil  export  charges  is  excluded  from  budgetary  revenue  as  it  is  included  in  a  deposit  and  trust 

account.  In  the  National  Accounts,  these  collections  arc  included  in  revenue. 
(')  This  category  includes  proceeds  from  the  sale  of  existing  capital  assets,  budgetary  revenue  items  offset  against  budgetary  expenditure,  imputed  items  and  an 

adjustment  for  the  treatment  of  revenue  in  the  supplementary  period. 


I-IS  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

TABLE  1.11 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  AND  EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  RECONCILIATION 

EXPENDITURE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Year  ended  March  3 1 


1978  1979  1980  1981  1982 


Budgetary  expenditure— Public  Accounts 42,382  46,539  50,416  58,066  67,674 

Deduct: 

Budgetary  transfers  to  funds  and  agencies<'> -3,623  -3,458  -2,525  -  1,737<2)  -2,789 

Deficits  of  Government  business  enterprises^^) -664  -570  -791  -1,124  -1,485 

Add: 

Expenditure  of  funds  and  agencies  1,808                  1,565                  1,491                  1,399  1,571 

Government  pension  and  social  security  disbursements  4,915                  5,434                  5,239                  5,852  7,026 

Petroleum  compensation  payments 24                    457                     900  3,804 

Capital  consumption  allowances  572                     665                     748                     831  956 

Miscellaneous  adjustments^ 168 -732 -390 -  1,326<^>  -1,593 

Total  expenditure— Extended  National  Accounts 45,558  49,467  54,645  62,861  75,164 

<'*  Includes  budgetary  transfers  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account  and  the  Western  Grain  Stabilization  Plan. 

<^)  These  amounts  include  adjustments  totalling  $675  million  reflecting  the  unwinding  of  loan  write-offs  which  were  allocated  in  earlier  years  to  a  general  provision 

account  rather  than  to  specific  funds  and  agencies. 
(^'  Including  Canada  Post  Corporation. 
<*)  These  items  include  reserves  and  write-offs,  the  provision  for  valuation  of  assets,  purchase  of  existing  capital  assets,  budgetary  revenue  items  offset  against  budgetary 

expenditure,  expenditure  of  reserve  accounts,  imputed  items  and  an  adjustment  for  the  treatment  of  expenditure  in  the  supplementary  period. 


TABLE  1.12 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS  AND  EXTENDED  NATIONAL  ACCOUNTS  RECONCILIATION 

NON-BUDGETARY 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Year  ended  March  31 


1978  1979  1980  1981  1982 


Non-budgetary  transactions— Public  Accounts 1,840                 1,113                 1,035                 2,551                 5,275 

Deduct: 

Loans  and  advances  to  funds  and  agencies 4                      97                     119                 -111                       61 

Government  pension  and  social  security  accounts -2,279               -1,1A\               -1,741               -1,849               -3,240 

Corporate  income  tax — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections^'^ 100                  -431                  -639                  -449                  1,223 

Energy  related  adjustments^^' 

Canadian  Ownership  charge  -  796 

Oil  export  charges — Payments  to  provinces -  445 

Oil  export  charges — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections 33                   -37                   -76                   -24                      97 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax — Excess  of  accruals  over  collections -  78 

Miscellaneous  adjustments*^' 1,252 32 165 -660 -403 

Loans  and  other  transactions — Extended  National  Accounts  950              -1,467               -1,137                  -542                  1,694 

*''  Including  the  petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax  and  the  incremental  oil  revenue  tax. 

*^'  These  adjustments  reflect  the  adjustments  in  Table  1.10. 

^"These  items  include  adjustments  for  the  treatment  of  revenue  and  expenditure  in  the  supplementary  period,  the  adjustment  required  to  bring  the  financial 

requirements  of  entities  included  in  the  National  Accounts  Government  sector  into  line  with  the  requirements  of  these  entities  which  are  met  through  the 

Consolidated  Revenue  Fund,  and  an  adjustment  for  the  provision  for  valuation  of  assets. 


SECTION 


2 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Audited 

Financial  Statements 
of  the  Government 
of  Canada 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Preface  to  the  audited  flnancial  statements  of  the  Government 

of  Canada 2.2 

Statement  of  transactions 2.5 

Statement  of  revenue  and  expenditure 2.6 

Statement  of  assets  and  liabilities 2.8 

Statement  of  use  of  appropriations 2.10 

Notes  to  the  Hnancial  statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada  2.1 1 
Opinion  of  the  Auditor  General  on  the  fmancial  statements  of 

the  Government  of  Canada  2.15 


PREFACE  TO  THE 
AUDITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

The  accounting  policies  adopted  by  the  Government  and  summarized  in  Note  1  to  the 
financial  statements  are  the  result  of  continuing  developments  over  the  years  and  form  the 
basis  for  the  preparation  of  the  financial  statements,  designed  primarily  to  provide  an 
accounting  of  the  financial  resources  appropriated  by  Parliament.  The  fundamental  require- 
ment to  report  compliance  with  legislative  authority  results  in  the  presentation  of  financial 
information  in  a  manner  significantly  different  from  that  found  in  the  private  sector.  The 
accrual  basis  of  accounting  used  in  the  private  sector  best  reflects  the  costs  incurred  to  earn 
revenues;  the  policies  followed  by  the  Government,  under  which  revenue  is  on  the  cash  basis 
and  expenditure  (use  of  appropriations)  is  generally  on  the  accrual  basis,  best  accommodate 
reporting  to  Parliament. 

The  four  financial  statements  in  this  section,  together  with  the  accompanying  notes,  are 
presented  for  audit  in  compliance  with  Section  55  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act.  These 
statements  form  the  basis  of  the  Government's  accounting  for  the  management  of  the 
financial  authorities  granted  by  Parliament.  Other  sections  in  this  volume,  together  with 
Volumes  II  and  III  of  the  Public  Accounts,  are  designed  to  provide  information  supporting 
the  financial  statements. 

The  first  financial  statement  is  the  Statement  of  Transactions,  which  summarizes  all 
transactions  of  the  Government,  as  defined  in  Note  1  (ii),  and  shows  how  the  financial 
requirements  were  met,  and  the  effect  of  all  transactions  on  the  cash  balance.  The  financial 
transactions  are  classified  into  four  main  categories:  budgetary,  non-budgetary,  foreign 
exchange  and  unmatured  debt. 

The  first  category,  budgetary  transactions,  consists  of  all  the  transactions  which  enter  into 
the  calculation  of  the  annual  deficit  or  surplus  of  the  Government,  that  is  the  receipts  from 
tax  and  non-tax  revenue  together  with  the  expenditures  authorized  by  Parliament.  Revenue  is 
recognized  only  when  received  and  does  not  include  amounts  due  but  not  collected. 
Budgetary  expenditure,  however,  is  recorded  generally  on  the  accrual  basis.  Expenditure 
includes  charges  for  work  performed,  goods  received,  services  rendered,  transfer  payments 
made,  amortization  of  the  actuarial  deficiencies  of  the  three  main  superannuation  accounts,  a 
provision  for  estimated  losses  on  realization  of  recorded  assets  and  accruals  for  interest  on 
unmatured  debt.  Fixed  assets,  which  include  land,  buildings,  works  and  equipment,  are  not 
capitalized  but  are  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure  at  the  time  of  acquisition  or  construc- 
tion. Budgetary  expenditure  does  not  include  amounts  payable  or  accrued  at  the  year  end,  for 
items  to  be  paid  from  statutory  appropriations,  employee  termination  benefits,  unpaid  annual 
vacation  entitlements  and  the  indexing  of  pensions. 

The  second  category,  non-budgetary  transactions,  consists  of  loans,  investments  and 
advances  made  by  the  Government,  the  Government's  liability  to  outside  parties  from  its  role 
of  administrator  of  certain  public  moneys  received  or  collected  for  special  purposes,  and  other 
liabilities  recorded  as  a  result  of  the  budgetary  accruals  mentioned  above.  These  transactions 
account  for  the  change  in  the  financial  claims  due  to  or  financial  obligations  due  by  the 
Government,  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  policies  referred  to  in  Note  1  to  the  financial 
statements. 

The  third  category,  foreign  exchange  transactions,  reflects  transactions  with  the  Exchange 
Fund  Account,  whose  principal  objective  is  to  aid  in  the  control  and  protection  of  the  external 
value  of  the  Canadian  dollar,  together  with  an  accounting  of  the  net  position  of  the 
Government  with  respect  to  the  International  Monetary  Fund.  Foreign  exchange  transactions 
also  include  unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies. 

The  fourth  category,  unmatured  debt  transactions,  represents  the  extent  to  which  financial 
requirements  have  been  met  through  the  increase  in  unmatured  debt,  that  is  the  net  changes 
in  the  amounts  owing  for  such  debt  instruments  as  marketable  bonds,  Canada  savings  bonds 
and  Treasury  bills.  Unmatured  debt  transactions  exclude  unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign 
currencies. 


The  second  statement  is  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure.  This  statement  gives 
a  more  detailed  accounting  of  the  budgetary  transactions  summarized  in  the  Statement  of 
Transactions.  The  annual  deficit  or  surplus  represents  the  difference  between  the  expendi- 
tures and  the  revenues  of  the  year  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  policies  previously 
summarized. 

The  third  statement  is  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities.  Since  this  statement  is 
based  on  the  Government's  accounting  policies,  it  does  not  parallel  the  conventional  balance 
sheet  presented  in  the  private  sector.  More  particularly,  fixed  assets  having  been  accounted 
for  as  expenditures,  are  recorded  at  the  nominal  value  of  $  1 ,  and  revenues  not  yet  received, 
such  as  uncollected  taxes,  are  not  recorded  as  assets.  The  effect  of  inflation  on  the  economic 
value  of  the  Government's  reported  assets  and  liabilities  has  not  been  reflected.  It  is  generally 
recognized  that  inflation  tends  to  reduce  the  value  of  financial  assets  and  liabilities  while  at 
the  same  time  increasing  the  recorded  value  of  fixed  assets.  Thus  it  should  be  noted  that  the 
difference  between  the  net  recorded  assets  and  liabilities  is  simply  the  aggregate  of  annual 
budgetary  deficits  and  surpluses  determined  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  policies  of  the 
Government;  in  no  way  does  this  difference  reflect  the  Government's  net  worth. 

The  fourth  statement  is  the  Statement  of  Use  of  Appropriations,  which  summarizes,  by 
department,  the  use,  during  the  year,  of  parliamentary  appropriations  for  budgetary  expendi- 
ture and  loans,  investments  and  advances. 

These  four  financial  statements,  when  read  in  conjunction  with  the  notes  thereto,  present 
fairly,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Government,  the  revenue,  expenditure,  assets  and  liabilities  of  the 
Government  of  Canada.  Fair  presentation  is  achieved  through  the  consistent  application  of 
the  significant  accounting  policies,  which  are  summarized  in  Note  1  to  the  financial 
statements. 


AUDITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 


2*5 


Statement  of  Transactions 

for  the  Year  Ended  March  31, 1982 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1982 

BUDGETARY  TRANSACTIONS 

Revenue 54,552 

Expenditure -68,158 

Deficit -  13,606 

NON-BUDGETARY  TRANSACTIONS 

»    Loans,  investments  and  advances  -  1,239 

Specified  purpose  accounts 4,345 

Other  transactions 2,169 

Net  source 5,275 

Financial  requirements  (excluding  foreign  exchange) -8,331 

FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  TRANSACTIONS^^^ -  347 

X|        Total  financial  requirements'"  -8,678 

^U^MATURED  DEBT  TRANSACTIONS^^^  9,367 

^^B     Change  in  cash  689 

CASH  BALANCE  AT  END  OF  YEAR 6,620 

The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  this  statement. 

Details  can  be  found  in  other  sections  of  this  volume. 

'"  Cash  requirements  (  -  ). 

'-'  Unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  has  been  included  as  part  of  foreign  exchange  transactions. 

September  15.  1982. 


1981 


46,507 
59,175 


12,668 


-493 

2,781 

263 


2,551 


-10,117 

1,157 
-  8,960 

11,153 
2,193 

5,931 


I.  A.  STEWART, 

Deputy  Minister  of  Finance. 


DAVID  KIRKWOOD, 
Deputy  Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


2-6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure 
for  the  Year  Ended  March  31, 1982 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1982 


1981 


Gross 
revenue 

Revenue 

credited  to 

appropriations 

and  postal 

receipts  used 

to  defray  postal 

expenditures 

Net 
revenue 

Gross 
revenue 

Revenue 

credited  to 

appropriations 

and  postal 

receipts  used 

to  defray  postal 

expenditures 

Net 
revenue 

REVENUE 

TAX  REVENUE 

Income  tax — 

Personal 24,046 

Corporation 8,118 

Non-resident 1,018 

Petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax 864 

34.046 

Excise  taxes  and  duties — 

Sales  tax  6,185 

Customs  import  duties 3,439 

Excise  duties 1,175 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax  998 

Oil  export  charges  519 

Special  petroleum  compensation  charge  473 

Special  excise  tax — Gasoline 436 

Other 564 

13.789 

Other  tax  revenue 4,100 

TOTAL  TAX  REVENUE  51.935 

NON -TAX  REVENUE 

Return  on  investments — 

Bank  of  Canada 1,853 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 873 

Exchange  Fund  Account 763 

Interest  on  bank  deposits 701 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  285 

Other  return  on  investments 673 

5.148 

Postal  revenue 631 

Refunds  of  previous  years'  expenditure 153 

Services  and  service  fees  1,497 

Privileges,  licences  and  permits 246 

Bullion  and  coinage 70 

Proceeds  from  sales  295 

Premium  and  discount  on  exchange..... '" 

Other  non-tax  revenue 1,706 

4.598 

TOTAL  NON -TAX  REVENUE 9,746 

TOTAL  REVENUE  61,681 


24,046 

19.837 

8.118 

8.106 

1,018 

867 

864 

27 

34.046 

28.837 

6,185 

5.429 

3.439 

3.188 

1.175 

1,042 

998 

187 

519 

842 

473 

436 

453 

564 

573 

13.789 

11.714 

3,980 

120 

1,658 

1,559 

3,980 

47,955 

42,209 

1,559 

1.8S3 

1.459 

873 

839 

763 

620 

701 

318 

285 

243 

53 

620 

695 

44 

53 

5.095 

4.174 

44 

147 

484<2) 

1,369 

260 

153 

111 

1,374 

123 

1.433 

1,315 

126 

120 

223 

104 

70 

60 

228 

67 

259 

202 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

1,221 

485 

983 

830 

3.096 

1.502 

4.438 

2.711 

3,149 


6,597 


8,612 


2,755 


7,129   54,552   50,821 


4,314 


WITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 


2-7 


1982 


1981 


EXPENDITURE 

Agriculture 

Communications 

Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs 

Economic  Development 

Employment  and  Immigration 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources 

Environment 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Governor  General 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 

Justice 

Labour 

National  Defence 

National  Health  and  Welfare 

National  Revenue 

Parliament 

Post  Office  

Privy  Council  

Public  Works  

Regional  Economic  Expansion 

Science  and  Technology  

Secretary  of  State 

Social  Development 

Solicitor  General  

Supply  and  Services 

Transport 

Treasury  Board 

Veterans  Affairs 

TOTAL  DEPARTMENTAL  EXPENDITURE  75,087 

PROVISION  FOR  VALUATION 

TOTAL  EXPENDITURE 

NET  REVENUE 

DEFICIT  


Revenue 

Revenue 

credited  to 

credited  to 

appropriations 

appropriations 

and  postal 

and  postal 

Gross 

receipts  used 

Net 

Gross 

receipts  used 

Net 

expen- 

to defray  postal 

expen- 

expen- 

to defray  postal 

expen- 

diture 

expenditures 

diture 

diture 
890 

expenditures 
8 

diture 

1,135 

10 

1,125 

882 

1,229 

95 

1.134 

1,249(') 

79 

1,170") 

95 

95 

77 

77 

13 

13 

11 

11 

2.877 

668 

2.209 

4,152 

566 

3,586 

5,195 

3,797 

1.398 

5.423<« 

1,397 

4,026(« 

649 

22 

627 

555 

18 

537 

1,298 

13 

1,285 

1,096 

12 

1,084 

19,830 

6 

19,824 

14,772 

5 

14.767 

443 

2 

441 

368 

368 

4 

4 

3 

3 

1,507 

1.507 

1,417(3) 

1,417<') 

990 

990 

655 

655 

200 

200 

175 

175 

82 

11 

71 

66 

10 

56 

6,331 

303 

6,028 

5,312 

235 

5.077 

17,848 

30 

17,818 

15,802 

20 

15.782 

868 

52 

816 

721 

44 

677 

151 

151 

130 

130 

1.303 

147 

I,I56<2) 

1,857 

260 

1.597 

64 

64 

81 

81 

2,512 

324 

2,188 

2,118 

266 

1.852 

745 

745 

722 

722 

496 

10 

486 

401 

9 

392 

2,275 

11 

2,264 

2,184 

10 

2,174 

3 

3 

2 

2 

1,503 

319 

1,184 

1,269 

214 

1,055 

1,084 

690 

394 

941 

620 

321 

2,883 

603 

2,280 

3,052 

529 

2.523 

334 

16 

318 

184 

12 

172 

1,140 

1,140 

1,006 

1,006 

.   75,087 

7,129 

67,958 

200 

66,691 

4,314 

62,377 

-  3,202 

68,158 

59,175 

54,552 

46,507 

13,606 


12,668 


The  accompanying  notes  arc  an  integral  part  of  this  statement. 

Details  of  revenue  and  expenditure  can  be  found  in  Sections  5  and  6  of  this  volume  and  in  Volume  II. 

'"Less  than  $500,000. 

•^)  Further  details  can  be  found  in  Note  6. 

*')  Includes  loans  deleted:  Communications,  S198  million;  Energy.  Mines  and  Resources,  $690  million;  and.  Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development,  S148  million. 


September  IS.  1982. 


I.  A.  STEWART, 

Deputy  Minister  of  Finance. 


DAVID  KIRKWOOD, 
Deputy  Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


2  •  8  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1 981-82 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities 
as  at  March  31, 1982 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Net  increase 
1982  1981  or  decrease  (- ) 


ASSETS 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES,  Table  7.1,  Section  7— 
Crown  corporations  and  agencies^ 
Lending  institutions — 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 

Export  Development  Corporation  

Farm  Credit  Corporation 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

All  other  Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 

Air  Canada 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

Canadian  National  Railways 

Petro-Canada 

Other 

Total  Crown  corporations  and  agencies  

Other  loans,  investments  and  advances — 

Provincial  and  territorial  governments  

National  governments  including  developing  countries,  Table  7.7,  Section  7. 

International  organizations  

Less:  notes  payable 

Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund  advances  less  allowance  for  conditional  benefits  . 

Government  controlled  corporations 

Private  sector  enterprises  

Miscellaneous 


Less:  allowance  for  valuation 

TOTAL  LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS,  TMe  10.1,  Section  10— 

Exchange  Fund  Account — Advances,  Table  10.2,  Section  10 

International  Monetary  Fund — Subscriptions 

Less:  International  Monetary  Fund — Notes  payable 

Special  Drawing  Rights 

TOTAL  FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 

CASH  IN  TRANSIT,  Tahh  12.1,  Section  12 

CASH,  Table  12.2,  Section  12 

FIXED  ASSETS  (valued  at  one  dollar).  Section  12 

NET  RECORDED  ASSETS  

ACCUMULATED  DEFICIT,  Table  12.5,  Section  12 


200 

200 

10,388 

10.189 

199 

1.547 

1,550 

-3 

3,727 

3,379 

348 

1,031 

1,156 

-125 

16,893 

16.274 

619 

608 

622 

-14 

873 

881 

-8 

2,753 

2,753 

1,573 

1,444 

129 

1,854 

1,495 

359 

7,661 

7.195 

466 

24,554 

23.469 

1.085 

1,208 

1,236 

-28 

3,198 

2,942 

256 

2,585 

2,255 

330 

980 

816 

164 

1.605 

1.439 

166 

283 

312 

-29 

441 

441 

167 

180 

-13 

267 

265 

2 

7.169 

6.815 

354 

31,723 

30,284 

1,439 

2,500 

2.300 

200 

29,223 

27,984 

1.239 

1,\1(> 

1,939 

237 

2,780 

2,961 

-181 

4.956 

4.900 

56 

2,327 

2.329 

-2 

1,064 

1,134 

-70 

3.391 

3.463 

-72 

1,565 

1,437 

128 

1,830 

1,846 

-16 

6,620 

5,931 

689 

39,238 

37,198 

2,040 

94,869 

81,263 

13,606 

TOTAL  134,107         118,461  15,646 


AUDITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 


2-9 


1982 


1981 


Net  increase 
or  decrease  ( - ) 


LIABILITIES 

SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS,  Table  8.1,  Section  8— 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 

Less:  provincial  government  securities  held  by  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund 

Superannuation  accounts 

Lej.5;  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiencies., 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account 

Less:  interest  bearing  loans 

Government  Annuities  Account 

Canadian  Ownership  Account 

Special  oil  and  gas  charges 

l^ss:  investments 

Deposit  and  trust  accounts 

Provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 

Other 

TOTAL  SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

OTHER  LIABILITIES,  Table  9.1,  Section  9— 

Interest  and  matured  debt  

Less:  unamortized  discount  on  Treasury  bills 

Accounts  payable 

Outstanding  cheques,  warrants  and  postal  money  orders 

Miscellaneous 

TOTAL  OTHER  LIABILITIES 

UNMATURED  DEBT,  Tables  1 1.1  and  1 1.9,  Section  1 1— 

Payable  in  Canadian  currency — 

Marketable  bonds 

Canada  savings  bonds 

Special  non- marketable  bonds 

Treasury  bills 

Less:  Government's  holdings  of  unmatured  debt — 

Marketable  bonds 

Canada  savings  bonds  held  on  account  of  employees 

Special  non-marketable  bonds  issued  to  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund.. 


Payable  in  foreign  currencies — 

Marketable  bonds 

Notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies 

Less:  Government's  holdings  of  unmatured  debt — 

Marketable  bonds 

TOTAL  UNMATURED  DEBT 

TOTAL 134,107 


21,547 

18,947 

2,600 

20,368 

17,938 

2,430 

1.179 

7,009 

170 

27,528 

23,966 

3,562 

2,185 

1,637 

548 

25.343 

22.329 

3.014 

-318 

-228 

-90 

35 

110 

-75 

-353 

-338 

-15 

1,172 

1,193 

-21 

786 

786 

711 

711 

75 

75 

1,981 

852 

1,129 

1,415 

1,471 

-56 

378 

329 

49 

5.021 

3,845 

1.176 

31,190 

26,845 

4,345 

6.721 

4,873 

1,848 

626 

711 

-85 

6.095 

4.162 

1.933 

2,442 

2,264 

178 

2,322 

2,293 

29 

112 

99 

13 

10,971 

8,818 

2,153 

43,429 

40,795 

2,634 

24,978 

15,812 

9,166 

154 

136 

18 

19,375 

21,770 

-  2,395 

87.936 

78.513 

9.423 

110 

96 

14 

131 

107 

24 

154 

136 

18 

395 

339 

56 

87.541 

78.174 

9.367 

3,295 

2,929 

366 

1,122 

1,707 

-585 

4.417 

4.636 

-219 

12 

12 

4.405 

4.624 

-219 

91,946 

82,798 

9,148 

118,461 


15,646 


The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  this  statement. 

Details  of  assets  and  liabilities  can  be  found  in  Sections  7  to  1 2  of  this  volume. 

September  15.  1982. 


I.  A.  STEWART, 

Deputy  Minister  of  Finance. 


DAVID  KIRKWOOD, 
Deputy  Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


2-10 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

Statement  of  Use  of  Appropriations 
for  the  Year  Ended  March  31, 1982 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Used  in 
the  current 
Appropriations  year 


Balances 


Lapsed 


Overexpended 


Carried 
forward 


Agriculture — Budgetary 1,160 

Non-budgetary 746 

Communications — Budgetary 1,158 

Non-budgetary  7 

Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs — Budgetary 98 

Economic  Development — Budgetary 15 

Employment  and  Immigration— Budgetary 2,269 

Non-budgetary 19 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — Budgetary 7,254 

Non-budgetary 819 

Environment — Budgetary 634 

Non-budgetary '" 

External  Affairs — Budgetary 1,342 

Non-budgetary 2,227 

Finance — Budgetary 19,825 

Non-budgetary 2,251 

Fisheries  and  Oceans — Budgetary 447 

Non-budgetary 38 

Governor  General — Budgetary 4 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development— Budgetary 1,515 

Non-budgetary  89 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce — Budgetary 984 

Non-budgetary 9,478 

Justice — Budgetary 208 

Labour — Budgetary 72 

Non-budgetary  1 

National  Defence — Budgetary 5,979 

Non-budgetary 13 

National  Health  and  Welfare— Budgetary 17,832 

National  Revenue— Budgetary 822 

Parliament — Budgetary 158 

Post  Office— Budgetary  1,989 

Non-budgetary 500 

Privy  Council — Budgetary  65 

Public  Works— Budgetary  2,385 

Non-budgetary 4,419 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — Budgetary 824 

Non-budgetary 29 

Science  and  Technology — Budgetary 507 

Secretary  of  State — Budgetary 2,282 

Social  Development — Budgetary 4 

Solicitor  General — Budgetary  1,248 

Non-budgetary  <'' 

Supply  and  Services — Budgetary 664 

Non-budgetary 16 

Transport — Budgetary 2,425 

Non-budgetary  922 

Treasury  Board — Budgetary 453 

Veterans  Affairs — Budgetary 1,160 

TOTAL  BUDGETARY  75,782 

TOTAL  NON-BUDGETARY  21,574 

The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  this  statement. 

Details  of  use  of  appropriations  can  be  found  in  Volume  II. 

<"  Less  than  $500,000. 

Amounts  in  roman  type  are  budgetary. 

Amounts  in  bold  face  type  arc  non-budgetary  loans,  investments  and  advances. 

September  15. 1982. 


1,125 

416 

1,134 

4 

95 

13 

2,209 

2 

1.398 

419 

627 

1,285 

436 

19,824 

369 

441 

7 

4 

1,507 

32 

990 

-220 

200 

71 

1 

6,028 

17.818 

816 

151 

1,156 

64 

2,188 

577 

745 

4 

486 

2,264 

3 

1,184 

(I) 

394 
-2 

2,280 
-7 
318 

1,140 


67,958 
2,038 


14 

7 
(I) 

3 

2 

60 

2,042 

18 

7 

53 

4 
1 


(I) 

14 

6 

7 

833 

1 

158 

11 

79 
(1) 

21 

13 

1 

64 

11 

84 

27 

135 

20 


49 

(1) 


14 


34 


3,668 
77 


113 

(1) 


21 

882 

330 

240 

17 

1,170 

3 

15 

77 

11 

3,586 

17 

15 

3,815 

4,026 

382 

512 

537 

(1) 

4 

1,084 

1,787 

375 

14,767 

1,882 

181 

368 

31 

-2 

3 

(1) 

1,417 

48 

36 

655 

9,690 

-97 

175 

56 

(1) 

5,077 

13 

15,782 

677 

130 

1,597 

500 

81 

53 

1,852 

3,831 

474 

722 

25 

-8 

392 

5 

2,174 

2 

1,055 

(1) 

(1) 

259 

321 

18 

-2 

95 

2,523 

902 

25 

172 

1,006 

4,269 

62,377 

19,459 

1,764 

I.  A.  STEWART, 

Deputy  Minister  of  Finance. 


DAVID  KIRKWOOD, 

Deputy  Receiver  General  for  Canada. 


AUDITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

Notes  to  the  Financial  Statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada 


2*  11 


1.  Significant  Accounting  Policies 

The  accounting  policies  of  the  Government  of  Canada  are 
based  on  concepts  embodied  in  the  British  North  America  Act, 
the  Financial  Administration  Act  and  other  legislation. 

i.  Basic  concepts 

The  two  basic  concepts  on  which  the  Government's 
accounting  system  is  based  are  found  in  the  British 
North  America  Act:  first,  the  concept  of  the  Con- 
solidated Revenue  Fund,  which  emanates  from  the 
requirement  that  all  duties  and  revenues  received,  other 
than  those  reserved  to  the  provinces,  "shall  form  One 
Consolidated  Revenue  Fund";  second,  the  concept  that 
the  balance  of  the  Fund,  after  certain  prior  charges, 
"shall  be  appropriated  by  the  Parliament  of  Canada". 

Parliament  provides  authority  to  make  payments  out 
of  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  in  annual  appropria- 
tion acts  and  other  statutes  (referred  to  as  statutory 
appropriations).  Spending  authority  granted  in  appro- 
priation acts  is  for  stated  purposes  and  maximum 
amounts.  Unless  provided  for  in  vote  wording,  unused 
spending  authority  granted  in  appropriation  acts  lapses 
at  the  end  of  the  year  for  which  granted.  Spending 
authority  provided  by  statutory  appropriations  is  for 
specified  purposes  and  for  such  amounts  and  such  time 
as  the  acts  prescribe.  Spending  authority  provided  by 
statutory  appropriations  generally  does  not  lapse  at  the 
end  of  the  year  in  which  granted. 

ii.  Government  of  Canada  as  an  accounting  entity 

For  purposes  of  maintaining  the  accounts  of  Canada 
and  preparing  the  Public  Accounts  as  required  by  the 
Financial  Administration  Act,  the  Government  of 
Canada  is  defined  as  all  the  departments  named  in 
Schedule  A  of  the  Act;  any  division  or  branch  of  the 
Public  Service,  including  a  commission  appointed  under 
the  Inquiries  Act,  designated  by  the  Governor  in  Coun- 
cil as  a  department  for  purposes  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act;  the  staffs  of  the  Senate,  the  House 
of  Commons,  and  the  Library  of  Parliament;  and,  any 
corporation  named  in  Schedule  B  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

In  accordance  with  the  above  definition,  the  corpora- 
tions named  in  Schedules  C  and  D  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act  are  excluded  from  the  Government 
of  Canada  as  an  accounting  entity;  therefore,  their 
financial  statements  are  not  consolidated  with  those  of 
the  Government.  The  financial  statements  of  these 
Crown  corporations  are  presented  in  Volume  III  of  the 
Public  Accounts. 

In  addition,  certain  accounts  and  funds  have  finan- 
cial statements  which  are  not  combined  with  those  of 
the  Government,  but  appear  separately  in  Volumes  I 
and  II.  These  accounts  and  funds  include  the  Exchange 
Fund  Account,  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account,  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Account  and  other  similar 
accounts. 


iii.  Classification  of  financial  transactions 

The  financial  transactions  of  the  Government  as 
recorded  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  and  reflected  in  the 
Public  Accounts  are  classified  into  budgetary,  non- 
budgetary,  foreign  exchange  and  unmatured  debt 
transactions. 

In  general  terms,  budgetary  transactions  enter  into 
the  calculation  of  the  annual  deficit  or  surplus  and  are 
disclosed  on  the  Government's  Statement  of  Revenue 
and  Expenditure.  All  other  transactions  lead  to  the 
acquisition  or  disposal  of  financial  claims  or  to  the 
creation  or  discharge  of  financial  obligations,  and  are 
disclosed  on  a  net  basis  on  the  Statement  of  Assets  and 
Liabilities. 

For  purposes  of  accounting  and  reporting,  the  Public 
Accounts  uses  the  classification  in  force  at  the  end  of 
the  year  to  which  the  report  refers,  and  presents  figures 
for  the  previous  year  adjusted  where  necessary  to  pro- 
vide consistency,  except  for  the  Post  Office  as  described 
in  Note  6. 

iv.  Budgetary  revenue 

Budgetary  revenue  consists  of  all  tax  and  non-tax 
receipts  which  affect  the  deficit  or  surplus  of  the  Gov- 
ernment and  includes  revenue  internal  to  the  Govern- 
ment. 

The  Government  generally  reports  revenue  in  the 
year  in  which  it  is  received,  with  refunds  of  revenue 
allocated  to  the  year  in  which  they  are  actually  paid. 

Revenue  is  reported  after  deducting  refunds  paid  and 
excludes  amounts  receivable,  taxes  collected  on  behalf 
of  provinces  and  territories,  receipts  from  contributors 
to  the  Canada  Pension  Plan,  the  Unemployment  Insur- 
ance and  the  superannuation  accounts,  and  receipts 
credited  to  other  liability  accounts. 

In  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure,  reve- 
nue is  reported  both  gross  and  net.  The  difference 
between  the  two  is  revenue  credited  to  appropriations, 
and  postal  receipts  used  to  defray  postal  expenditures. 

V.  Budgetary  expenditure 

Budgetary  expenditure  consists  of  all  charges  to 
budgetary  appropriations  which  affect  the  deficit  or 
surplus  of  the  Government.  Such  charges  include  those 
for  work  performed,  goods  received,  services  rendered, 
and  transfer  payments  made,  during  the  year,  and, 
expenditure  internal  to  the  Government. 

Expenditure  excludes  pensions  paid  under  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan,  superannuation  and  other  pen- 
sion accounts.  Unemployment  Insurance  payments 
other  than  benefits  to  fishermen  and  payments  charged 
to  other  liability  accounts. 

In  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure,  ex- 
penditure is  reported  both  gross  and  net.  The  difference 
between  the  two  is  revenue  credited  to  appropriations, 
and  postal  receipts  used  to  defray  postal  expenditures. 


2-12 


vi.  Assets 

Assets  are  defined  as  the  financial  claims  acquired  by 
the  Government  of  Canada  on  outside  organizations 
and  individuals  as  a  result  of  events  and  transactions 
prior  to  the  accounting  date. 

However,  as  a  result  of  the  Government's  accounting 
policies  described  above,  and  in  accordance  with  the 
provisions  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  and 
other  legislation,  certain  financial  claims  are  not  report- 
ed on  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities.  The  most 
important  of  these  are  accounts  receivable  for  tax  and 
non-tax  revenue. 

vii.  Liabilities 

Liabilities  are  defined  as  financial  obligations  to 
outside  organizations  and  individuals  as  a  result  of 
events  and  transactions  prior  to  the  accounting  date. 

However,  as  a  result  of  the  Government's  accounting 
policies  described  above,  and  in  accordance  with  the 
provisions  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  and 
other  legislation,  certain  financial  obligations  are  not 
reported  on  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities. 
These  include  amounts  for:  items  to  be  paid  from 
statutory  appropriations;  unused  annual  vacation  and 
benefits  payable  upon  termination  of  employment;  and, 
actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  to  the  cost 
of  living  of  superannuate  pensions  and  annuities. 

viii.  Fixed  assets 

The  fixed  assets  of  the  Government,  which  include 
land,  buildings,  works  and  equipment,  are  charged  to 
budgetary  expenditure  at  the  time  of  acquisition  or 
construction.  Their  existence,  however,  is  acknowledged 
on  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities  by  reporting 
them  at  the  nominal  value  of  $1. 

ix.  Accumulated  deficit 

The  accumulated  deficit  consists  of  the  annual  defi- 
cits and  surpluses  since  Confederation,  together  with 
the  write-off  of  certain  amounts  charged  directly  to  this 
account. 

X.  Valuation  of  assets  and  liabilities 
ASSETS 

Assets  are  recorded  at  cost  and  are  subject  to  annual 
valuation  to  reflect  reductions  from  the  recorded  value 
to  the  estimated  realizable  value. 

LIABILITIES 

Liabilities  are  recorded  in  the  amounts  ultimately 
payable  except  for  liabilities  for  the  superannuation 
accounts  of  the  Canadian  Forces,  the  Public  Service 
and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police,  and  the 
Government  Annuities  Account,  which  are  valued  on 
the  actuarial  basis. 

The  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  the  Supple- 
mentary Retirement  Benefits  Account  are  not  main- 
tained on  the  actuarial  basis.  The  Canada  Pension  Plan 
Act  limits  payments  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue 
Fund  to  the  balance  in  the  Canada  Pension  Plan 
Account. 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 
xi.  Translation  of  foreign  currency  transactions 

Foreign  currency  transactions  are  translated  and 
recorded  in  Canadian  currency  equivalents  at  the 
exchange  rates  prevailing  at  the  transaction  dates. 

Assets  and  liabilities  resulting  from  foreign  currency 
transactions  are,  in  turn,  reported  at  year-end  closing 
rates  of  exchange;  net  gains  are  credited  to  revenue, 
while  net  losses  are  charged  to  expenditure. 


2.  Contingent  Liabilities  of  the  Government  of  Canada 

A  contingent  liability  is  a  potential  liability  which  may 
become  an  actual  liability  when  one  or  more  future  events 
occur  or  fail  to  occur.  The  contingent  liabilities  of  the  Govern- 
ment consist  of  explicit  guarantees  by  the  Government,  and 
potential  losses  arising  from  pending  and  threatened  litigation 
relating  to  claims  and  assessments  in  respect  of  breach  of 
contract,  damages  to  persons  and  property,  and  like  items. 

The  contingent  liabilities  of  the  Government  as  at  March 
31,  1982  amounted  to  $5,661  million  and  are  summarized  in 
the  following  table: 


(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1982 


1981 


i)  Explicit  guarantees  by  the  Government: 

Obligations  of  entities  that  are  not  agents — 

Borrowings  by  Crown  corporations 179                 189 

Borrowings  by  other  than  Crown  corpora- 
tions    1,426               1,335 

Other  explicit  guarantees 1,920                 919 

ii)  Pending  and  threatened  litigation 2,136 1.728 


5,661 


4,171 


Details  can  be  found  in  Section  1 2  of  this  volume. 


3.  Financial  Information  Regarding  Agent  Crown 
Corporations 

All  assets  and  liabilities  of  agent  Crown  corporations  are 
assets  and  liabilities  of  the  Government,  due  to  the  agency 
relationship.  However,  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  poli- 
cies of  the  Government,  the  accounts  of  agent  Crown  corpora- 
tions are  not  consolidated  with  those  of  the  Government,  and 
only  the  financial  transactions  between  the  Government  and 
agent  Crown  corporations,  are  recorded  in  the  accounts  of 
Canada. 

Although  borrowings  by  agent  Crown  corporations  from 
lenders  other  than  the  Government  are  considered  direct 
liabilities  of  the  Government,  such  borrowings  are  not  included 
in  the  accounts  of  Canada  since  they  are  intended  to  be,  and  in 
practice  are,  repaid  directly  by  the  corporations. 

The  following  table  summarizes  financial  information 
regarding  agent  Crown  corporations  as  at  March  31,  1982. 
For  corporations  with  financial  year-ends  other  than  March 
3 1 ,  unaudited  financial  information  is  included  in  this  table. 


JDITED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 


2-13 


(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1982 


1981 


ASSETS 
Total  assets  excluding  claims  against  the  Gov- 
ernment and  other  agent  Crown  corporations 

LIABILITIES 
Liabilities  to  other  than  Government 

Borrowings 

Other  

NET  ASSETS 

EQUITY  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT 
Obligations  to  the  Government  and  other  agent 

Crown  corporations 

Less:  claims  against  the  Government  and  other 
agent  Crown  corporations 

Share  capital  and  contributed  surplus 

Retained  earnings 

TOTAL  EQUITY 


36,247 


31,758 


7,252 
5,564 

5,630 
4,365 

12,816 

9,995 

23,431 

21,763 

19,730 
1,314 

18,186 
1,052 

18,416 

4,851 
164 

17,134 

4,217 
412 

23,431 

21,763 

Details  can  be  found  in  Section  7  of  this  volume. 

For  comparative  purposes,  the  1981  figures  have  been  restated  to  conform  to 
the  1982  presentation. 


^ 


4.     Insurance  Programs 


Certain  agent  Crown  corporations  operate  insurance  pro- 
grams. In  the  event  that  such  corporations  did  not  have 
sufficient  funds  to  meet  their  obligations,  the  Government 
would  provide  the  required  financing  through  appropriations, 
either  budgetary  or  non-budgetary. 

The  following  table  summarizes  information  regarding  such 
insurance  programs.  For  corporations  with  financial  year-ends 
other  than  March  31,  unaudited  financial  information  is 
included  in  this  table. 


(in  millions  of  dollars) 

5  year  Amount 
average  of 

Insurance         Net  of  net  fund  or 

Programs  in  force        claims*         claims  provision 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Cor- 
poration 

Current  year 108,937  -15  I  230 

Previous  year 96,082  21  4  120 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing 
Corporation 
Mortgage  insurance  fund*" 

Current  year 27,254  24  82  186 

Previous  year 27,465  20  92  293 

Home  improvement  loan  in- 
surance fund 

Current  year 25  <2)  o  g 

Previous  year 25  '^'  5 

Rental  guarantee  fund 

Current  year 24 

Previous  year 12 

Export   Development   Corpora- 
tion 
Accounts    administered     for 
the  Government 

Current  year 242 

Previous  year 326  1 

Export    insurance    contracts 
entered  into  on  its  own 
.      behalf 

Current  year 1,923  4  2  17 

Previous  year 1,693  8  2  7 

*  Refers  to  the  difference  between  claims  and  amounts  received  from  sales  of 
related  assets  and  other  recoveries. 
'"The  Corporation's  valuation  of  this  fund  as  at  June  30,  1981  disclosed  an 

actuarial  deficiency  estimated  at  approximately  $210  million.  This  valuation 

is  based  on  assumed  future  trends. 
<-'  Less  than  $500,000. 


5.  International  Development  Assistance — Loans  and 
Subscriptions 

i.  Loans  to  developing  countries 

Included  in  loans  to  National  governments  of  $3,198 
million  ($2,942  million  in  1981)  are  loans  to  developing 
countries  in  the  amount  of  $2,431  million  ($2,149 
million  in  1981).  These  loans  are  part  of  Canada's 
international  development  assistance  program  and  are 
either  interest-free  or  bear  interest  at  rates  that  were 
more  favourable  than  those  prevailing  in  Canada  at  the 
time  the  assistance  was  provided.  The  balances  out- 
standing at  March  3 1 ,  grouped  by  term,  are: 


wi^ 


Grace  period 

before 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

repayment 

Interest 

Term 

commences 

rate 

1982 

1981 

20  years 

5  years 

5% 

35 

19 

25  years 

5  years 

6% 

1 

2 

30  years 

7  years 

3% 

178 

168 

30  years 

7  years 

• 

8 

2 

35  years 

5  years 

• 

4 

4 

40  years 

10  years 

* 

1 

1 

50  years 

10  years 

• 

2.204 
2,431 

1,953 
2,149 

*  Interest-free. 

2*14 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


During  the  year,  loan  interest  and  commitment/ser- 
vice charges  of  $5  million  ($3.9  million  in  1981)  was 
received  from  developing  countries.  Details  can  be 
found  in  Sections  7  and  14  of  this  volume  and  in 
Section  8  of  Volume  II. 

ii.  Subscriptions  and  loans  to  international  organizations 

Included  in  Loans,  investments  and  advances — Inter- 
national organizations  of  $2,585  million  ($2,255  million 
in  1981)  are  subscriptions  to  the  capital  of  the  Interna- 
tional Development  Association  and  loans  to  other 
international  financial  institutions  of  $2,175  million 
($1,877  million  in  1981).  These  subscriptions  and  loans 
are  also  part  of  Canada's  development  assistance  pro- 
gram. These  institutions  make  loans  to  developing 
countries  on  terms  similar  to  the  loan  assistance  set  out 
in  sub-section  i.  Subscriptions  to  international  organiza- 
tions do  not  provide  a  return  on  investment.  They  are 
repayabfe  on  termination  of  the  organization  or  on 
Canada's  withdrawal  therefrom.  Details  can  be  found 
in  Sections  7  and  1 4  of  this  volume. 

6.  Post  Office 

The  Post  Office  became  a  Crown  corporation  on  October 
16,  1 98 1 .  Prior  to  this  date,  postal  revenue,  and  operating  and 
capital  expenditure  were  reported  primarily  on  a  gross  basis, 
that  is,  as  budgetary  revenue  and  budgetary  expenditure.  Since 
October  16,  1981,  postal  revenue  is  netted  against  postal 
expenditure  with  only  the  Government's  net  contribution  to 
the  Canada  Post  Corporation  deficit  reported  as  budgetary 
expenditure.  Since  the  effects  of  this  change  have  not  been 
applied  retroactively,  revenue  and  expenditure  reported  in  the 
Government's  financial  statements  for  the  current  year  are  not 
comparable  with  amounts  reported  for  the  previous  year.  The 
following  is  a  summary  of  the  treatment  of  postal  operations  in 
the  financial  statements: 


-Postal 

opera- 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

1982 

1981 

Postal  revenue,  as  reported 

484 

1,109 

Postal  expenditure,  as  reported: 

Departmental  expenditure 

Canada  Post  Corporation 

913 

243 

1,597 

1,156 

1,597 

Excess  of  expenditure  over  revenue- 
tions 

672 

488 

Had  the  effects  of  the  change  in  status  of  the  Post  Office 
been  applied  retroactively,  that  is  if  all  postal  revenue  had 
been  netted  against  postal  expenditure,  both  budgetary  reve- 
nue and  expenditure  would  have  been  $484  million  lower 
($1,109  million  lower  in  1981),  with  no  change  in  the  reported 
deficit.  The  following  table  summarizes  the  effect  that  the 
retroactive  treatment  would  have  had  on  the  financial 
statements: 


(in  millions  of  dollars) 

1982 

1981 

54,552 
484 

46,507 
1,109 

54,068 

45,398 

68,158 
484 

59,175 
1,109 

67,674 

58,066 

Total  revenue,  as  reported 

Less:  postal  revenue  

Total  revenue,  as  restated 

Total  expenditure,  as  reported 

Less:  postal  revenue  

Total  expenditure,  as  restated 

Deficit 13,606  12,668 


7.  Events  Subsequent  to  the  End  of  the  Year 

i.  Massey- Ferguson  Limited 

In  July  1982,  the  Department  of  Industry,  Trade  and 
Commerce  disbursed  $126,349,358  to  acquire  62.5%  of 
the  outstanding  series  "D"  preferred  shares  of  Massey- 
Ferguson  Limited. 

This  purchase  results  from  an  agreement  dated  June 
15,  1981,  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and 
Massey- Ferguson  Limited,  whereby  the  Government 
guaranteed  to  redeem,  upon  request,  five  million  pre- 
ferred shares  in  the  event  of  a  failure  by  the  Company 
to  pay  a  dividend.  On  June  30,  1982,  the  Company 
defaulted  on  its  dividend  payment.  The  audited  finan- 
cial statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada  as  at 
March  31,  1982  have  not  been  adjusted  to  reflect  this 
transaction. 

ii.  Petroleum  incentives  program 

On  June  29,  1982,  Royal  Assent  was  given  to  an  Act 
respecting,  in  part,  the  petroleum  incentives  program. 
Under  the  related  provisions  of  this  Act,  individuals 
and  corporations  are  entitled  to  receive  incentive  pay- 
ments from  the  Government,  in  respect  of  eligible  oil 
and  gas  exploration  expenses  incurred  on  or  after  Janu- 
ary 1,  1981. 

The  Government  permitted  individuals  and  corpora- 
tions to  waive  receipt  of  the  incentive  payments  and 
apply  the  amounts  waived  against  the  petroleum  and 
gas  revenue  tax  owing.  As  at  September  9,  1982,  claims 
received  in  respect  of  the  period  January  1,  1981  to 
March  31,  1982,  amounted  to  approximately  $500 
million  of  which  approximately  $150  million  had  been 
waived. 

In  the  year  in  which  petroleum  incentive  claims  are 
settled,  the  full  amount  of  approved  claims  will  be 
recorded  as  expenditure,  and  the  portion  waived  will  be 
recorded  as  petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax. 


A UDITED  FINANCIAL  STA TEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  2*15 


OPINION  OF  THE  AUDITOR  GENERAL 

ON  THE 

FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA 

I  have  examined  the  following  financial  statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada  for  the 
year  ended  March  31,  1982: 

— Statement  of  Transactions; 
— Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure; 
— Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities;  and 
— Statement  of  Use  of  Appropriations. 

My  examination  was  made  in  accordance  with  generally  accepted  auditing  standards  and 
included  such  inquiries,  tests  and  other  procedures  as  I  considered  necessary  to  enable  me  to 
report  as  required  by  Section  6  of  the  Auditor  General  Act. 

Revenue  for  the  year  from  oil  export  charges,  a  federal  tax  levied  by  Parliament,  excludes 
receipts  of  $445  million  which  are  included  in  a  "specified  purpose"  liability  account.  Failure 
to  include  this  amount  in  revenue  is,  in  my  view,  not  in  accordance  with  the  Government's 
accounting  policy  requirement,  stated  in  Note  1  (iv)  to  the  financial  statements,  that  revenue 
shall  consist  of  all  tax  and  non-tax  receipts  which  affect  the  deficit  or  surplus  of  the 
Government.  This  $445  million  amount  has  been  reported  as  a  liability  in  order  to  reflect  the 
effect  of  a  related  undertaking  by  the  federal  government  to  pay  to  certain  oil-producing 
provinces  amounts  equal  to  50  per  cent  of  oil  export  charges  levied  and  collected  by  Canada 
during  a  specified  period.  Although  I  believe  it  appropriate  to  record  and  report  a  liability  in 
respect  of  this  undertaking,  in  my  opinion,  the  liability  relates  to  expenditure  of  "items  to  be 
paid  from  statutory  appropriations"  and  would  not  be  included  in  the  financial  statements  in 
accordance  with  the  accounting  policy  stated  in  Note  l(vii). 

In  my  opinion,  except  for  the  failure  to  fully  report  revenue  from  oil  export  charges  and  the 
inclusion  in  liabilities  of  an  amount  payable  under  a  statutory  appropriation  as  described  in 
the  preceding  paragraph,  these  financial  statements  present  information  in  accordance  with 
the  stated  accounting  policies  of  the  Government  of  Canada  as  set  out  in  Note  1  to  the 
financial  statements  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  of  the  preceding  year.  However,  because 
of  the  reservations  set  out  in  the  following  paragraph,  in  my  opinion,  these  stated  accounting 
policies  are  not  appropriate  for  a  fair  presentation  of  the  assets  and  liabilities  and  revenues 
and  expenditures  of  the  Government  of  Canada. 

I  have  the  following  reservations  concerning  the  appropriateness  of  the  Government's 
stated  accounting  policies: 

— Last  year,  I  commented  in  my  observations  on  the  financial  statements  that,  although 
they  were  entitled  "The  Financial  Statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada",  certain 
activities  of  government  were  excluded,  as  described  in  Note  l(ii).  As  a  result,  the 
financial  statements  did  not  provide  a  comprehensive  and  complete  summary  of  the 
Government's  assets,  liabilities,  revenues  and  expenditures.  This  year,  because  of  my 
growing  concern  about  the  pervasiveness  of  this  matter,  I  include  it  in  this  opinion  as  a 
reservation.  In  my  view,  the  accounting  entity  as  defined  in  Note  l(ii)  is  inadequate  in 
the  following  two  respects. 

(i)  Significant  departmental  activities  are  reported  in  separate  financial  statements  or 
accounts  that  are  not  combined  in  the  Government's  financial  statements.  These 


2  •  16  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

separate  financial  statements  or  accounts  are  presented  in  the  other  sections  of 
Public  Accounts  Volume  I  indicated  below. 

•  Exchange  Fund  Account  (Section  10) 

•  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  (Section  8) 

•  Unemployment  Insurance  Account  (Section  8) 

•  Canadian  Ownership  Account  (Section  8) 

•  other  similar  Accounts  (Section  8) 

The  addition  in  1981-82  of  the  Canadian  Ownership  Account  (COA)  to  these 
excluded  activities  illustrates  my  concern.  The  reporting  of  transactions  in  the  COA 
results  in  a  net  amount  being  reported  as  a  liability.  This  amount  represents  the 
total  of  levies  received  in  respect  of  oil  and  gas  charges,  reduced  by  loans  to 
Petro-Canada.  If  the  loans  were  reported  as  assets  and  the  levies  reported  as 
revenue,  as  in  my  view  they  should  be,  at  March  31,  1982  assets  would  be  increased 
by  $71 1  million,  liabilities  reduced  by  $75  million,  and  accumulated  deficit  and  the 
deficit  for  the  year  then  ended  reduced  by  $786  million. 

The  effect  on  the  financial  statements  of  the  COA  transactions  is  significant  and 
readily  quantifiable  and,  in  my  view,  resolvable  with  little  study  required.  However, 
in  the  case  of  accounting  for  activities  reported  in  the  Exchange  Fund,  Canada 
Pension  Plan  and  Unemployment  Insurance  Accounts,  while  the  effects  are  signifi- 
cant and  quantifiable,  further  study  is  required  to  determine  to  what  extent  and 
how  these  activities  should  be  included  in  the  Government's  financial  statements  to 
best  satisfy  the  information  needs  of  users. 

(ii)  Investments  in  Crown-owned  corporations  and  agencies  at  March  31,  1982  amount- 
ed to  approximately  $25  billion,  or  63  per  cent  of  the  Government's  net  recorded 
assets.  The  assets,  liabilities,  revenues  and  expenditures  of  these  entities  are  not 
consolidated  in  the  accompanying  financial  statements.  Further  study  is  required  to 
determine  to  what  extent  the  activities  of  such  corporations  and  agencies  should  be 
consolidated,  and  for  those  not  consolidated,  what  alternative  presentation  would  be 
appropriate.  Until  this  fundamental  question  is  resolved,  I  am  unable  to  determine 
the  effect  of  this  matter  on  the  Government's  financial  statements. 

— When  the  international  development  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  identified  in 
Note  5  to  the  financial  statements  are  issued,  they  are  recorded  as  assets  at  the  full 
amounts  advanced  in  accordance  with  Notes  1  (vi)  and  (x).  At  the  date  of  issue,  the 
amounts  advanced  by  Canada  considerably  exceed  the  asset  value  received  by  Canada 
because  of  the  concessionary  terms  described  in  Note  5.  In  my  view,  any  excess  of 
amounts  advanced  over  asset  value  received  confers  a  benefit  and  constitutes  expenditure 
in  respect  of  international  development  assistance,  which  should  be  recorded  and 
reported  as  such  on  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure.  I  have  estimated  that  if 
international  development  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  were  reported  in  this 
manner,  reported  assets  would  decrease  and  accumulated  deficit  would  increase  by 
approximately  $3.9  billion  as  at  March  31,  1982  ($3.4  billion  as  at  March  31,  1981). 

— As  stated  in  Note  1  (vii),  financial  obligations  are  not  recorded  in  respect  of  amounts 
payable  under  statutory  appropriations,  earned  and  unpaid  annual  vacation  leave, 
employee  termination  benefits  and  actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provi- 
sions of  employee  pension  plans.  In  my  view,  all  these  financial  obligations  should  be 
appropriately  recorded  and  reported  in  the  financial  statements  to  provide  a  more 
complete  disclosure  of  liabilities.  I  have  estimated  that  if  these  obligations  were 
recorded,  reported  liabilities  and  accumulated  deficit  would  be  increased  by  at  least 
$  1 4.5  billion  as  at  March  3 1 ,  1 982  ($  1 1 .5  billion  as  at  March  31,1981). 

Additional  information  and  comments  on  these  reservations  are  included  in  my  observa- 
tions on  the  financial  statements  in  Section  3  of  this  volume. 


Ottawa,  Canada  KENNETH  M.  DYE,  F.C.A. 

September  15,1 982  Auditor  General  of  Canada 


SECTION 


3 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Observations  by  the  Auditor 

General  on  the 

Financial  Statements 

of  the  Government  of  Canada 


CONTENTS 


Page 


Introduction 3.2 

Failure  to  comply  with  a  stated  accounting  policy 3.2 

The  accounting  entity 3.4 

International  development  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  ....  3.S 

Unrecorded  liabilities 3.7 

Reporting  of  summary  fmancial  information 3.8 


3-2  PUBLIC  ACCOVNTS,  1981-82 

Observations  by  the  Auditor  General 

on  the 

Financial  Statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada 

Introduction 

I  have  examined  the  financial  statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada  for  the  year  ended 
March  31,  1982,  which  together  with  my  opinion,  are  included  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 
These  financial  statements  are  the  Statement  of  Transactions,  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and 
Expenditure,  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities,  and  the  Statement  of  Use  of 
Appropriations. 

My  examination  was  made  in  accordance  with  generally  accepted  auditing  standards  and 
included  such  inquiries,  tests  and  other  procedures  as  1  considered  necessary  to  enable  me  to 
report  as  required  by  Section  6  of  the  Auditor  General  Act.  This  section  provides  that: 

"The  Auditor  General  shall  examine  the  several  financial  statements  required  by 
section  55  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  to  be  included  in  the  Public 
Accounts,  and  any  other  statement  that  the  Minister  of  Finance  may  present  for 
audit  and  shall  express  his  opinion  as  to  whether  they  present  fairly  information  in 
accordance  with  stated  accounting  policies  of  the  federal  government  and  on  a  basis 
consistent  with  that  of  the  preceding  year  together  with  any  reservations  he  may 
have."  (italics  added) 

The  word  fairly  is  used  to  express  the  auditor's  judgement  as  to  the  appropriateness  of  the 
selection  and  application  of  accounting  principles  to  the  particular  circumstances  of  an 
enterprise.  Because  of  the  significant  and  pervasive  effect  on  the  financial  statements  of  the 
matters  reported  in  my  reservations  concerning  the  appropriateness  of  three  of  the  Govern- 
ment's stated  accounting  policies,  I  have  concluded  that: 

". . .  these  stated  accounting  policies  are  not  appropriate  for  a  fair  presentation  of 
the  assets  and  liabilities  and  revenues  and  expenditures  of  the  Government  of 
Canada."  (italics  added) 

My  opinion  includes  four  reservations.  The  first  reservation,  which  is  new  this  year,  is 
particularly  significant  because  it  concerns  a  failure  by  the  Government  to  comply  with  its 
own  stated  accounting  policies.  The  second,  third  and  fourth  reservations  concern  the 
appropriateness  of  the  Government's  stated  accounting  policies.  The  second  reservation  (the 
Accounting  Entity)  is  also  new  this  year,  although  I  referred  to  the  issue  last  year  in  my 
observations  on  the  financial  statements.  The  third  and  fourth  reservations  (International 
Development  Assistance  Loans  and  Subscriptions,  and  Unrecorded  Liabilities)  are  consistent 
with  last  year,  except  there  is  a  more  complete  estimate  of  unrecorded  liabilities  arising  from 
the  indexing  provisions  of  employee  pension  plans. 

The  observations  that  follow  provide  additional  explanatory  information  on  these  four 
reservations  and  on  related  concerns. 

Failure  to  Comply  with  a  Stated  Accounting  Policy 

In  the  second  paragraph  of  my  opinion  on  the  financial  statements,  I  call  attention  to  a 
$445  million  reduction  of  oil  export  charge  revenue,  and  related  increase  in  deposit  and  trust 
account  liabilities,  resulting  from  recording  and  reporting  as  a  liability  a  portion  of  oil  export 
charges  collected  during  the  year. 

I  take  exception  to  this  accounting  and  reporting  of  oil  export  charge  revenue  because  it 
results,  in  my  view,  in: 

•  an  incomplete  reporting  of  revenues  received,  which  is  contrary  to  the  accounting  policy 
requirement  stated  in  Note  1  (iv)  that  revenue  shall  consist  of  all  tax  and  non-tax 
receipts  which  affect  the  deficit  or  surplus  of  the  Government; 


OBSERVATIONS  BY  THE  AUDITOR  GENERAL  ON  THE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  3-3 

•  the  inclusion  in  liabilities  of  an  amount  payable  under  a  statutory  appropriation,  which  is 
contrary  to  the  accounting  policy  requirement  stated  in  Note  l(vii)  that  "items  to  be 
paid  from  statutory  appropriations"  shall  be  excluded  from  reported  liabilities;  and 

•  a  method  of  accounting  whereby  expenditures  pursuant  to  a  statutory  appropriation 
granted  by  Parliament  are  effectively  eliminated  from  reporting  in  the  financial  state- 
ments of  the  Government. 

Oil  export  charges  are  a  tax  levied  by  Parliament.  Since  the  inception  of  this  tax  in  1975, 
receipts  during  a  year  have  been  reported  as  tax  revenues  of  that  year  in  accordance  with  the 
policy  set  out  in  Note  1  (iv)  to  the  financial  statements. 

The  Minister  of  Finance,  in  his  October  1980  budget  speech,  announced  the  intention  of 
the  Government  to  pay  to  certain  oil-producing  provinces  50  per  cent  of  charges  collected  in 
respect  of  oil  exported  from  those  provinces.  Agreements  were  subsequently  concluded  with 
the  provinces  whereby  payments  would  be  made  to  them  which  would  result  in  a  "sharing"  of 
oil  export  charges  subsequent  to  October  31,  1980;  50  per  cent  to  the  federal  government  and 
50  per  cent  to  these  provinces. 

Under  the  Canadian  Constitution,  revenues  of  Canada  may  be  appropriated  only  by  the 
Parliament  of  Canada.  The  Government  tabled  a  bill  to  amend  the  Petroleum  Administration 
Act  to  provide  appropriation  authority  for  payment  to  certain  provinces  of  their  agreed  share 
of  export  charges  collected.  Passage  of  the  bill  was  delayed.  As  an  interim  measure,  the 
Government  included  authority  to  make  the  payments  in  an  act  called  "An  Act  to  amend  the 
Federal-Provincial  Fiscal  Arrangements  and  Established  Programs  Financing  Act,  1977  and 
to  provide  for  payments  to  certain  provinces"  (SC  1980-81-82,  Chapter  94).  This  Act 
received  Royal  Assent  on  April  7,  1982.  Authority  to  pay  certain  producing  provinces  their 
agreed  share  of  export  charges  on  a  continuing  basis  was  included  in  an  act  called  "An  Act  to 
amend  the  Petroleum  Administration  Act  and  to  enact  provisions  related  thereto"  (SC 
1980-81-82,  Chapter  114)  assented  to  on  July  7,  1982. 

The  Government  maintains  that  it  is  collecting  50  per  cent  of  the  oil  export  charges  on 
behalf  of  certain  producing  provinces.  It  has  therefore  treated  the  provincial  share  of 
collections — $445  million  made  during  the  period  November  1,  1980  to  January  31,  1982 — 
as  a  "specified  purpose"  liability  account.  The  legislation  authorizing  the  collection  of  this 
tax  does  not  direct  that  it  be  used  for  any  "specified  purpose"  or  accounted  for  in  any  special 
way.  Similarly  there  is  no  wording  in  the  appropriation  authorities  referred  to  in  the 
preceding  paragraph  that  direct  the  Government  to  pay  50  per  cent  of  oil  export  charge 
collections,  or  any  part  of  such  collections,  to  the  provinces.  Therefore,  it  is  my  view  that  all 
the  oil  export  charges  collected  should  continue  to  be  accounted  for  and  reported  as  general 
purpose  tax  revenues. 

I  do  agree  that  the  Government  has  a  liability  under  the  agreements  negotiated  with 
certain  producing  provinces  to  pay  them  amounts  equal  to  50  per  cent  of  oil  export  charges 
collected.  However,  the  parliamentary  appropriations  authorizing  payment  are  statutory 
appropriations,  and  government  policy  stated  in  Note  l(vii)  is  to  exclude  items  to  be  paid 
from  statutory  appropriations  from  reported  liabilities.  In  my  view,  this  policy  should  be 
changed  so  as  to  require  all  liabilities  to  be  paid  from  statutory  appropriations  to  be  recorded 
in  the  year  the  liabilities  are  incurred,  consistent  with  the  accounting  for  liabilities  to  be  paid 
from  annually-lapsing  appropriations.  This  matter  is  discussed  further  in  my  fourth  reserva- 
tion concerning  unrecorded  liabilities. 

My  final  concern  with  the  accounting  and  reporting  of  this  amount  relates  to  future  years. 
In  the  preface  to  the  financial  statements,  the  Government  explains  that  the  accounting 
policies  it  has  adopted  are  designed  primarily  to  provide  an  accounting  of  the  financial 
resources  appropriated  by  Parliament.  The  authorities  under  which  payments  may  be  made 
to  provinces  in  respect  of  oil  exports  are  appropriations  granted  by  Parliament.  However,  if 
the  accounting  followed  this  year  is  also  followed  in  subsequent  years,  payments  to  the 
provinces  will  be  excluded  from  reported  expenditure  and  from  reported  use  of  appropria- 
tions. As  a  consequence.  Parliament  will  not  receive  the  accounting  for  resources  appropriat- 
ed by  it  that  the  financial  statements  are  designed  to  provide. 


3*4  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

The  Accounting  Entity 

Significant  assets,  liabilities,  revenues  and  expenditures  of  the  Government  of  Canada  are 
reported  in  separate  financial  statements  of  various  accounts,  funds  and  Crown-owned 
corporations  that  are  not  now  combined  with  the  financial  statements  of  the  Government.  As 
a  result,  although  the  financial  statements  contained  in  Section  2  of  this  volume  are  entitled 
"The  Financial  Statements  of  the  Government  of  Canada",  they  do  not  provide  a  comprehen- 
sive and  complete  summary  of  the  Government's  assets,  liabilities,  revenues  and  expenditures. 

With  the  increasing  size  and  complexity  of  government,  the  practice  of  reporting  govern- 
ment activities  in  separate  financial, statements  or  accounts  that  are  not  combined  with  the 
financial  statements  of  the  Government  has  become  more  significant  and  more  proliferate. 
As  a  result,  the  Government's  financial  statements  have  become  less  comprehensive  and 
complete  and,  accordingly,  less  informative.  ^  .„lj 

As  described  in  the  third  paragraph  of  Note  l(ii),  financial  statements  or  accounts  for  the 
following  departmental  activities  are  not  combined  with  the  financial  statements  of  the 
Government: 

•  Exchange  Fund  Account; 

•  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account; 

•  Unemployment  Insurance  Account; 

•  Canadian  Ownership  Account;  and 

•  other  similar  Accounts. 

Transactions  should  be  recorded  and  reported  in  accordance  with  their  economic  substance 
to  achieve  meaningful  summary  level  financial  reporting  for  the  Government  of  Canada.  If, 
for  example,  a  receipt  is,  in  substance,  federal  tax  revenue,  it  should  be  reported  as  such  in 
the  Government's  financial  statements,  regardless  of  how  it  is  reported  elsewhere  for  other 
purposes. 

The  reporting  of  transactions  in  the  new  Canadian  Ownership  Account  illustrates  my 
concern.  It  seems  clear  to  me  that  transactions  now  reported  in  the  Canadian  Ownership 
Account  as  a  net  liability  constitute,  in  substance,  revenues  and  assets  which  should  be 
reported  as  such  in  the  Government's  financial  statements.  Further  study  is  required  to 
determine  how  best  to  include  other  transactions  in  respect  of  the  above  departmental 
activities  in  these  statements. 

Recognizing  that  such  a  study  has  not  yet  been  completed,  and  for  purposes  of  illustration 
only,  I  have  summarized  below  certain  levies  that  are  not  currently  reported  as  revenues  on 
the  Government's  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure. 

(in  millions 
of  dollars) 

1982         1981 


Canada  Pension  Plan  contributions 3,282         2,689 

Unemployment  Insurance  contributions 4,887         3,399 

Canadian  Ownership  oil  &  gas  charges  786 

Portion  of  oil  export  charges 445 

Unconsolidated  levies 9,400         6,088 


The  significance  of  these  amounts  in  relation  to  the  size  of  the  Government,  as  reflected  by 
its  revenues,  and  the  size  of  the  Canadian  economy,  as  reflected  by  Gross  National  Product, 
is  shown  by  the  following  table.  It  compares  total  tax  revenues  now  reported  in  the 
Government's  financial  statements  with  total  tax  revenues  that  would  be  reported  if  the 
above  levies  were  included. 


OBSERVATIONS  BY  THE  AUDITOR  GENERAL  ON  THE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  3-5 

1982  1981 

$  millions  %ofGNP  $  millions  %ofGNP 

Total  tax  revenues  now  reported 

Net 47,955  14.6  40,650  14.0 

Gross 51,935  15.8  42,209  14.6 

Total  tax  revenues  if  above  levies 

included 61,335  18.7  48,297  16.7 

Note:  Gross  National  Product  used  in  these  calculations  is  for  the  calendar  year  ending 
within  the  fiscal  year. 

Because  the  effect  is  readily  quantifiable  and  easily  understood,  I  have  used  a  possible 
effect  on  total  reported  tax  revenues  to  illustrate  my  concern  about  certain  departmental 
activities  not  being  combined  with  the  financial  statements  of  the  Government.  The  issue  is, 
however,  much  broader  and  also  affects  reported  non-tax  revenues,  expenditures,  assets  and 
liabilities.  The  full  effects  cannot  be  quantified  until  there  is  general  agreement  on  how  the 
government  accounting  entity  should  be  defined  and  on  the  reporting  concepts  to  be  followed. 
As  discussed  in  the  following  paragraphs,  this  should  include  a  consideration  of  the  extent  to 
which  the  activities  of  Crown-owned  corporations  and  agencies  should  be  consolidated  in  the 
financial  statements  of  the  Government  and,  for  those  not  consolidated,  what  alternative 
presentation  would  be  appropriate. 

As  described  in  the  second  paragraph  of  Note  l(ii),  financial  statements  of  many 
Crown-owned  corporations  and  agencies  are  also  not  consolidated  with  the  financial  state- 
ments of  the  Government.  At  March  31,  1982,  investments  in  such  corporations  and 
agencies,  before  allowance  for  valuation,  amounted  to  approximately  $25  billion,  or  63  per 
cent  of  the  Government's  net  recorded  assets. 

As  explained  in  Note  6  to  the  financial  statements,  the  activities  of  the  Post  Office 
Department  were  transferred  to  the  new  Crown-owned  Canada  Post  Corporation  (CPC)  on 
October  16,  1981.  In  accordance  with  the  second  paragraph  of  Note  l(ii),  the  financial 
statements  of  CPC  are  not  consolidated  with  those  of  the  Government  because  CPC  is  a 
Crown  corporation  named  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act.  As  a 
consequence,  beginning  October  16,  1981,  Canada's  postal  revenues  and  expenditures  have 
been  reported  only  in  the  financial  statements  of  CPC.  Only  the  net  contribution  from  the 
Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  to  the  deficit  of  CPC  is  reported  as  postal  expenditure  in  the 
Government's  financial  statements  for  the  period  October  16,  1981  to  March  31,  1982. 
Although  nothing  has  changed  in  substance,  significant  revenues  and  expenditures  have  been 
excluded  from  the  Government's  statements  simply  by  varying  the  legal  form  of  the  entity 
carrying  out  Canada's  postal  activities.  Such  changes  in  reporting  make  it  difficult  to 
compare  meaningfully  the  information  reported  in  these  financial  statements  over  a  period  of 
years. 

In  my  view,  the  current  definition  of  the  Government  of  Canada  accounting  entity  based 
on  legal  form  is  not  satisfactory.  The  accounting  entity  should  be  defined  in  such  a  way  that 
the  economic  substance  of  an  activity  determines  how  that  activity  should  be  reported  in  the 
financial  statements.  Only  in  this  way  will  a  comprehensive,  consistent  reporting  of  govern- 
ment activities  from  year  to  year  be  achieved.  Further  study  is  required  to  determine  how  this 
may  best  be  accomplished. 

International  Development  Assistance  Loans  and  Subscriptions 

In  accordance  with  the  stated  accounting  policies  set  out  in  Notes  l(vi)  and  (x)  to  the 
financial  statements,  the  full  amounts  of  special  assistance  loans  to  developing  countries  and 
subscriptions  to  the  special  development  funds  of  international  financial  institutions  are 
recorded  as  assets.  At  the  date  of  issue,  the  amounts  advanced  by  Canada  considerably 
exceed  the  asset  value  received  by  Canada  because  of  the  concessionary  terms  described  in 
Note  5.  In  my  view,  any  excess  of  amounts  advanced  over  asset  value  received  confers  a 


3*6  1  '  PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1 981-82 

financial  benefit  on  developing  countries  and  constitutes  expenditure  in  respect  of  interna- 
tional development  assistance  that  should  be  recorded  and  reported  as  such  on  the  Statement 
of  Revenue  and  Expenditure.  If  this  expenditure  had  been  recorded  in  this  way  when  the 
loans  and  subscriptions  were  originally  issued,  reported  assets  would  be  decreased  and 
accumulated  deficit  increased  by  approximately  $3.9  billion  as  at  March  31,  1982  ($3.4 
billion  as  at  March  31,  1981). 

Canada  provides  assistance  to  developing  countries  by  making  grants  and  contributions 
and  special  assistance  loans  to  them  and  by  subscribing  to  special  development  funds  of 
international  financial  institutions.  The  loans  and  subscriptions,  like  grants  and  contributions, 
confer  financial  benefits  on  developing  countries  and  are  an  important  part  of  Canada's 
official  program  of  assistance  to  developing  countries.  The  grants  and  contributions,  because 
they  are  not  repayable  or  otherwise  recoverable,  are  made  under  budgetary  authority, 
recorded  as  expenditure  and  included  in  the  deficit.  The  loans  and  subscriptions,  because  they 
are  repayable  or  considered  to  be  eventually  realizable,  are  made  under  non-budgetary 
authority  and  recorded  as  assets. 

The  amount  of  special  assistance  loans  included  in  loans  to  national  governments  at  March 
31,  1982  is  $2,431  million.  Of  these  loans,  $2,204  million  are  repayable  over  50  years  without 
interest,  with  no  payments  for  the  first  10  years.  At  March  31,  1982,  subscriptions  to  special 
development  funds  of  international  financial  institutions  amounted  to  $2,175  million.  These 
special  development  funds  make  loans  to  developing  countries  under  terms  similar  to  the 
special  assistance  loans  made  by  Canada.  The  terms  of  these  subscriptions  provide  that,  on 
withdrawal  from  or  termination  of  the  special  development  funds,  Canada  will  receive  a 
pro-rata  share  of  the  funds'  assets.  Because  of  the  nature  of  such  assets,  it  would  take  many 
years  for  Canada  to  realize  its  share  on  termination  or  withdrawal. 

As  described  above,  amounts  advanced  by  the  Government  in  the  current  and  prior  years 
in  respect  of  special  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  to  special  development  funds  will  be 
recovered  or  realized  without  interest  over  a  significant  number  of  years.  Since  interest  is  not 
provided,  the  Government  is  not  compensated  for  the  use  of  its  funds  over  the  period  the 
loans  and  subscriptions  are  outstanding.  As  a  result,  when  loans  and  subscriptions  are  issued, 
the  value  given  is  significantly  greater  than  the  value  received.  As  stated  in  the  Study  of  the 
Accounts  of  Canada:  "Ideally,  the  Government's  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities  should 
come  as  close  as  possible  to  reflecting  the  true  economic  value  of  the  assets  and  liabilities 
recorded  on  it." 

Sometimes  a  "true  economic  value"  for  financial  claims  is  not  available,  and  an  alternative 
approach  is  required.  For  example,  when  a  loan  is  made  to  a  Crown  corporation  by  the 
Government,  it  is  recorded  as  an  asset  at  the  amount  advanced.  To  compensate  for  the  use  of 
its  funds,  the  Government  charges  interest  on  the  loan.  In  the  absence  of  a  market-deter- 
mined interest  rate,  the  Government  calculates  an  arbitrary  rate  by  reference  to  its  cost  of 
borrowing.  Accordingly,  with  the  addition  of  interest  to  compensate  for  use  of  funds,  the 
amount  advanced  is  equal  to  the  asset  value  received. 

When  special  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  to  special  development  funds  are  issued, 
they  should  be  similarly  recorded  as  assets  only  to  the  extent  of  their  economic  value  at  that 
date.  Such  economic  value  can  be  calculated  as  the  value  today  of  amounts  that  will  be 
recovered  or  realized  in  the  future.  Any  excess  of  amounts  advanced  over  asset  value  received 
should  be  recorded  as  expenditure.  As  with  loans  to  Crown  corporations,  the  selection  of  an 
appropriate  interest  rate  for  calculating  asset  value  received  is,  to  some  extent,  arbitrary. 
However,  it  would  seem  reasonable  to  determine  a  rate  by  reference  to  the  Government's  cost 
of  borrowing  in  the  same  manner  as  rates  are  set  for  loans  to  Crown  corporations. 

If  special  assistance  loans  and  subscriptions  had  been  recorded  and  reported  as  assets  at 
their  economic  value  when  issued,  the  amount  outstanding  would  have  been  approximately 
$700  million  as  at  March  31,  1982.  In  my  opinion,  this  is  the  amount  at  which  these  loans 
and  subscriptions  should  be  recorded  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  at  the  year  end.  The 
difference  of  $3,900  million  between  the  amount  at  which  they  are  currently  recorded 
($4,600  million)  and  the  amount  at  which  they  should  be  recorded  ($700  million)  constitutes 
expenditure  in  respect  of  international  development  assistance  that  should  have  been  reported 


OBSERVA  TIONS  BY  THE  A  UDITOR  GENERAL  ON  THE  FINANCIAL  STA  TEMENTS  OF  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  3  •  7 

as  such  on  the  Statement  of  Revenue  and  Expenditure  and  included  in  the  accumulated 
deficit  in  the  year  the  loans  and  subscriptions  were  issued.  This  would  have  properly 
recognized  the  cost  of  benefits  conferred  by  these  loans  and  subscriptions  in  the  year  they 
were  issued. 

Unrecorded  Liabilities 

The  Government  has  defined  liabilities  as  financial  obligations  to  outside  organizations  and 
individuals  as  a  result  of  events  and  transactions  prior  to  the  accounting  date.  However, 
under  its  stated  accounting  policies,  certain  financial  obligations  that  fit  this  definition  have 
not  been  recorded.  These  unrecorded  liabilities  include  financial  obligations  at  the  year  end 
related  to  items  to  be  paid  from  statutory  appropriations,  employee  termination  benefits,  and 
actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provisions  of  employee  pension  plans  (including 
the  Canadian  Forces  and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police).  My  Office  has  estimated 
that  these  unrecorded  liabilities  amount  to  approximately  $14.5  billion  at  March  31,  1982 
($1 1.5  billion  at  March  31,  1981).  In  addition  to  these  estimated  amounts,  there  is  a  further 
financial  obligation  for  earned  and  unpaid  annual  vacation  leave  that  also  fits  the  Govern- 
ment's definition  of  liabilities  but  is  not  recorded. 

Following  is  a  summary  of  those  unrecorded  liabilities  which  have  been  estimated: 

(in  millions  of 
dollars) 

1982         1981 


Items  to  be  paid  from  statutory  appropriations 

Subsidies  under  the  Railway  Act 250  200 

Entitlements  under  the  petroleum  incentives  program  350 

Acquisition  of  Massey- Ferguson  Limited  shares 1 26 

726  200 

Employee  termination  benefits 1,300  1,200 

Actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provisions  of 

employee  pension  plans 12,500  10,100 

14,526       11,500 


The  liability  for  subsidies  under  the  Railway  Act  has  been  estimated  by  the  Canadian 
Transport  Commission.  The  liabilities  for  entitlements  under  the  petroleum  incentives 
program  and  for  acquisition  of  Massey- Ferguson  Limited  shares  have  been  taken  from  Note 
7  to  the  Government's  financial  statements.  The  liability  for  employee  termination  benefits 
and  the  actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provisions  of  employee  pension  plans 
(including  the  Canadian  Forces  and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police)  were  estimated  by 
the  Department  of  Insurance,  based  on  methods  and  assumptions  used  by  the  Department  for 
purposes  of  current  actuarial  reports  on  the  Government's  superannuation  accounts. 

The  estimate  of  unrecorded  liabilities  related  to  employee  pensions  that  I  included  in  my 
reservation  last  year  did  not  include  the  full  unrecorded  actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the 
indexing  provisions  of  employee  pension  plans.  I  reported  only  that  portion  which  represents 
the  present  value  of  the  indexed  portion  of  pensions  for  persons  that  were  then  retired, 
without  provision  for  future  indexation.  This  amount  was  $4,200  million.  The  corresponding 
amount  for  1982  is  $5,500  million  as  reported  on  page  8.7  of  Section  8  of  this  volume.  I  have 
this  year  reported  the  full  unrecorded  actuarial  liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provisions 
of  employee  pension  plans  because,  in  consultation  with  actuaries  and  with  colleagues  from 
the  accounting  profession,  I  concluded  that  this  fuller  measure  of  the  liability  is  the  one  most 
appropriate  to  use  for  government  financial  reporting. 


3  •  8  PUBLIC  A  CCOUNTS,  1 981-82 

Unrecorded  liabilities  for  earned  and  unpaid  annual  vacation  leave  have  not  been  estimated 
by  my  Office  because  the  information  required  was  not  readily  available  during  our  audit. 
However,  based  on  annual  salary  and  wage  costs,  they  are  also  likely  to  be  substantial.  The 
Government  should  estimate  these  unrecorded  liabilities  at  the  end  of  each  fiscal  year  by 
referring  to  personnel  and  other  records  maintained  by  departments  and  agencies. 

Based  on  the  Government's  definition  of  liabilities  as  financial  obligations  to  outside 
organizations  and  individuals  as  a  result  of  events  and  transactions  prior  to  the  accounting 
date,  the  exclusion  from  reported  liabilities  of  the  significant  financial  obligations  described 
above  results  in  an  incomplete  reporting  of  liabilities  as  defined.  This  directly  affects  the 
reported  accumulated  deficit  and  financial  position  at  the  year  end.  In  my  opinion,  financial 
obligations  at  the  year  end  related  to  items  to  be  paid  from  statutory  appropriations, 
employee  termination  benefits,  earned  and  unpaid  annual  vacation  leave,  and  actuarial 
liabilities  arising  from  the  indexing  provisions  of  employee  pension  plans  should  be  appropri- 
ately recorded  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  and  reported  in  the  financial  statements  to  provide 
a  more  complete  accounting  and  disclosure  of  liabilities. 

Reporting  of  Summary  Financial  Information 

In  my  observations  last  year,  I  stated  that  the  Office  of  the  Comptroller  General  had 
begun  a  study  of  the  purposes  of  summary  financial  reporting  for  the  Government  and  of  the 
feasibility  of  developing  comprehensive  financial  statements.  This  important  study  is  pro- 
gressing. I  also  reported  that  the  Canadian  Institute  of  Chartered  Accountants  (CICA)  had 
established  a  Public  Sector  Accounting  and  Auditing  Committee  to  recommend  accounting 
and  auditing  principles  and  practices  for  governments.  These  efforts  are  encouraging,  but 
much  remains  to  be  done.  The  Standing  Committee  on  Public  Accounts,  the  Government  and 
my  Office  all  have  an  interest  in  the  development  of  improved  summary  financial  reporting 
for  the  Government  of  Canada  and  in  the  work  of  the  CICA.  I  believe  it  is  crucial  that 
appropriate  consultation  take  place  among  the  interested  and  affected  parties  so  that  the 
common  goal  of  providing  financial  information  that  best  serves  the  needs  of  users  will  be 
achieved  as  soon  as  possible. 


SECTION 


4 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Outlays  by  envelope 


CONTENTS 


Details  of  actual  outlays  by  envelope 

Actual  outlays  of  departments  by  envelope 


Page 

4.2 
4.S 


4-2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


OUTLAYS  BY  ENVELOPE 

The  increasing  complexity  of  Government  responsibilities, 
as  well  as  the  limited  resources  available  to  meet  those  respon- 
sibilities, have  led  to  the  adoption  of  the  new  policy  and 
expenditure  management  system.  Under  this  system,  the  Gov- 
ernment presents  its  resources  by  "envelopes".  Each  envelope 
represents  the  resources  allocated  to  a  particular  policy  sector 
for  all  elements  of  departmental  spending  that  relate  to  that 
sector. 

Under  the  envelope  system,  spending  is  measured  in  terms 
of  outlays  for  budgetary  expenditure  and  for  loans,  invest- 
ments   and    advances.    Outlays    for    budgetary    expenditure 


include  costs  of  servicing  the  public  debt,  operating  and  capital 
expenditure,  grants  and  contributions  to  other  levels  of  govern- 
ment, persons  or  organizations  and  other  forms  of  transfer 
payments.  Outlays  for  loans,  investments  and  advances  repre- 
sent the  net  change  in  the  value  of  loans,  investments  and 
advances. 

Details  of  Actual  Outlays  by  Envelope 

Table  4. 1  presents  actual  outlays  for  budgetary  expenditure 
and  for  loans,  investments  and  advances  by  major  element 
within  each  envelope. 


TABLE  4.1 

DETAILS  OF  ACTUAL  OUTLAYS  BY  ENVELOPE 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1982 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Actual  outlays 


Loans, 
Budgetary     investments 
expenditure  and  advances        Total 


Actual  outlays 


Loans, 
Budgetary      investments 
expenditure   and  advances        Total 


ENERGY 

ENERGY,        MINES        AND 
RESOURCES— 

Department — 
Energy  program  

Atomic  Energy  Control  Board.. 

Atomic     Energy     of    Canada 
Limited 

National  Energy  Board  

Petro-Canada 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited 

ECONOMIC  DEVELOP- 

MENT— 

Northern  Pipeline  Agency 


ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT 

AGRICULTURE— 

Department 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission .... 
Canadian       Livestock       Feed 

Board 

Farm  Credit  Corporation 

COMMUNICATIONS— 
Department — 
Communications  program  .... 
CONSUMER    AND    CORPO- 
RATE AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Restrictive     Trade     Practices 

Commission 

ECONOMIC  DEVELOP- 

MENT— 

Ministry  of  State 

ENERGY,        MINES        AND 
RESOURCES— 
Department — 

Administration  program 

Minerals  and  earth  sciences 

program 

ENVIRONMENT— 
Department — 

Environmental  services  pro- 
gram (forestry)  

FISHERIES  AND  OCEANS 


891 

891 

15 

15 

284 

-7 

277 

17 

17 

108 

108 

293 

293 

1,214 


1,103 
4 


143 


94 
1 


17 
174 


56 
441 


394 


1,608 


68 

1,103 

72 

348 

18 
348 

-3 

140 

94 
I 


17 
174 


56 

447 


INDUSTRY,     TRADE     AND 
COMMERCE— 

Department 

Canadian  Commercial  Corpo- 
ration   

Export  Development  Corpora- 
tion   

Federal  Business  Development 
Bank 

Foreign     Investment     Review 
Agency 

Standards  Council 

LABOUR— 

Department 

Canada      Labour      Relations 

Board 

REGIONAL  ECONOMIC 

EXPANSION— 

Department 

Cape  Breton  Development  Cor- 
poration   

SCIENCE  AND  TECHNOLO- 
GY— 

Ministry  of  State 

National  Research  Council  of 
Canada 

Natural    Sciences    and    Engi- 
neering Research  Council 

Science  Council  of  Canada  

SUPPLY  AND  SERVICES— 

Department — 
Supply  program  (unsolicited 
proposals  for  research  and 

development) 

TRANSPORT— 

Department 

Air  Canada  

Canadian  Transport  Commis- 
sion   


SOCIAL  AFFAIRS 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department — 

Arts  and  culture  program . 
Canada  Council 


907 

19 

36 

18 

5 
5 

63 

4 

612 
133 

10 

272 

201 
3 


15 
1,836 

444 


6,640 


9 

-7 
-4 
125 


14 


259 


916 
12 
32 

107 

5 

5 

64 
4 

598 
133 

10 

272 

201 
3 


15 

1,831 
-  15 

444 


6,899 


32 
53 


32 
53 


OVTLA  YS  BY  ENVELOPE 
TABLE  4.1 


4-3 


DETAILS  OF  ACTUAL  OUTLAYS  BY  ENVELOPE 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  Xni— Continued 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Actual  outlays 


Loans, 
Budgetary      investments 
expenditure  and  advances        Total 


Actual  outlays 


Loans, 
Budgetary      investments 
expenditure  and  advances        Total 


SOCIAL  \V¥ WVIS— Concluded 
COMMUNICATIONS— Co«c/M</e</ 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corpo- 
ration    665 

Canadian  Film  Development 
Corporation 1 

Canadian  Radio-Television  and 
Telecommunications  Com- 
mission    20 

National  Arts  Centre  Corpora- 
tion    14 

National  Film  Board 50 

National  Library 22 

National  Museums  of  Canada ..  58 

Public  Archives 29 

Social  Sciences  and  Humani- 
ties Research  Council 47 

EMPLOYMENT  AND  IMMI- 
GRATION— 

Department 6 

Canada  Employment  and 
Immigration  Commission 2,200 

Immigration  Appeal  Board  3 

ENVIRONMENT— 

Department — 

Administration  program 37 

Environmental  services  pro- 
gram (excluding  forestry) .  272 

Parks  Canada  program 262 

INDIAN  AFFAIRS  AND 
NORTHERN  DEVELOP- 
MENT— 

Department 1,505 

Northern  Canada  Power  Com- 
mission    2 

LABOUR— 

Canadian  Centre  for  Occupa- 
tional Health  and  Safety  4 

NATIONAL  HEALTH  AND 
WELFARE— 

Department  ■ 17,718 

Medical  Research  Council 100 

PUBLIC  WORKS— 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing 

Corporation 968 

SECRETARY  OF  STATE— 

Department 2,170 

Advisory  Council  on  the  Status 
of  Women 2 

Status  of  Women — Office  of 

the  Co-Ordinator I 

SOCIAL  DEVELOPMENT 3 

VETERANS  AFFAIRS 1,140 

27,384 

JUSTICE  AND  LEGAL 

JUSTICE— 

Department 113 

Canadian  Human  Rights  Com- 
mission    6 

Commissioner  for  Federal  Ju- 
dicial Affairs 72 

Law  Reform  Commission  of 
Canada 3 

Supreme  Court  of  Canada 4 

Tax  Review  Board 2 


199 


30 


195 


665 

5 

20 

14 
50 
22 
58 
29 

47 


2,200 
3 


37 

272 
262 


1,521 
6 


17,718 
100 


1,167 

2,170 

2 

I 
3 

1,110 


27,579 


113 

6 

72 

3 

4 
2 


SOLICITOR  GENERAL— 

Department 22 

Correctional  Services 500 

National  Parole  Board II 

Royal      Canadian      Mounted 

Police 651 


1,384 


4,748 


FISCAL  ARRANGEMENTS 

FINANCE— 
Department — 
Fiscal     transfer     payments 

program 4,535 

PUBLIC  WORKS— 
Department — 
Municipal    grants    program 
(grants    in    lieu    of    real 
property  taxes)  213 

EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS 

EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Canadian     International     De- 
velopment Agency 

International         Development 

Research  Centre 

International  Joint  Commission 

FINANCE- 
DC  partment — 
Special  program  

DEFENCE 

NATIONAL  DEFENCE  

PARLIAMENT 

PARLIAMENT— 

The  Senate 19 

House  of  Commons 124 

Library  of  Parliament 8 


151 


SERVICES  TO  GOVERNMENT 

FINANCE— 
Department — 
Financial  and  economic  poli- 
cies program  73 

Anti-Dumping  Tribunal  pro- 
gram    1 

Inspector  General  of  Banks  ..  1 

Auditor  General  32 

Insurance 12 

Tariff  Board 2 

GOVENOR  GENERAL 4 

NATIONAL  REVENUE— 

Customs  and  Excise 322 

Taxation 494 

POST  OFFICE— 

Department 913 

Canada  Post  Corporation 243 


-14 


14 


200 


22 

500 

11 

651 


1,384 


4,521 


213 


4,734 


433 

1 

434 

803 

309 

1,112 

47 

47 

2 

2 

107 

107 

1,285 

417 

1,702 

6,028 

3 

6,031 

19 

124 


151 


-9 


273 

1 
I 
32 
12 
2 
4 

322 
494 

904 
243 


4-4 
TABLE  4.1 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


DETAILS  OF  ACTUAL  OUTLAYS  BY  ENVELOPE 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  \9S2— Concluded 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Actual  outlays 

Loans, 
Budgetary      investments 
expenditure   and  advances 

SERVICES  TO  GOVERNMENT— Co«c/M</e^ 
PRIVY  COUNCIL— 

Privy  Council 37 

Canadian       Intergovernmental 

Conference  Secretariat 2 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 4 

Commissioner  of  Official  Lan- 
guages   6 

Economic  Council 8 

Public  Service  Staff  Relations 

Board  7 

PUBLIC  WORKS— 
Department — 

Administration  program 47 

Professional    and    technical 

services  program 50 

Accommodation  program 633 

Marine  program  67 

Transportation     and     other 

engineering  program 49 

Land  management  and  de- 
velopment program 61 

Municipal  grants  (excluding 
grants  in  lieu  of  real  prop- 
erty taxes)  2 

National  Capital  Commission  ..  98  -  3 


Total 


37 


47 

50 

633 

67 

49 

61 


2 
95 


Actual  outlays 


Loans, 
Budgetary      investments 
expenditure   and  advances        Total 


SECRETARY  OF  STATE— 

Public  Service  Commission  

SUPPLY  AND  SERVICES— 
Department — 
Supply   program   (excluding 
unsolicited    proposals    for 
research  and  development) 

Statistics  Canada  

TREASURY  BOARD— 
Secretariat — 

Government  contingencies 
and  centrally  financed 
programs  (excluding  youth 

and  other  employment) 

Comptroller  General 


PUBLIC  DEBT 

FINANCE— 

Department — 
Public  debt  program 

TOTAL 


91 


157 
222 


309 
9 


-3 


91 


154 
222 


309 
9 


3,956 


185 


4,141 


15,168 


15,168 


67,958 


1,439 


69,397 


OUTLA  YS  BY  ENVELOPE 


4«5 


Actual  Outlays  of  Departments  by  Envelope 

Table  4.2  discloses  departmental  involvement  in  actual  out- 
lays by  envelope. 

TABLE  4.2 

ACTUAL  OUTLAYS  OF  DEPARTMENTS  BY  ENVELOPE 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1982 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Department 


Economic     Social     Justice 
Energy  development   affairs  and  legal 


Fiscal 
arrange- 


External 
affairs 


Defence 


Parlia- 
ment 


Services  to 
government 


Public 
debt 


Total 
outlays 


Agriculture 

Communications  

Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs 

Economic  Development 7 

Employment  and  Immigration 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources 1,601 

Environment 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Governor  General 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Develop- 
ment  

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 

Justice 

Labour 

National  Defence 

National  Health  and  Welfare 

National  Revenue  

Parliament  

Post  Office  

Privy  Council 

Public  Works  

Regional  Economic  Expansion 

Science  and  Technology 

Secretary  of  State  

Social  Development 

Solicitor  General  

Supply  and  Services 

Transport  

Treasury  Board  

Veterans  Affairs 

Total  outlays  (Net) 1,608 


1,541 

140 

95 

6 

191 
56 


447 


731 
486 


IS 
2,260 


995 

2,211 
571 


1,527 
863 

68      4 

17,818 


1,167 


2,173 
3 


1,110 


4,521 


1,595 
107 


200 


6.031 


151 


213 


1,184 


321     15,168 
4 


816 

1,147 

64 

1,004 


91 

376 
318 


1,541 

1,135 

95 

13 

2.211 

1,792 

627 

1,595 

20,117 

447 

4 

1,527 

863 

200 

72 

6,031 

17,818 

816 

151 

1.147 
64 

2,384 
731 
486 

2,264 
3 

1,184 
391 

2,260 
318 

1,110 


6,899   27,579    1,384    4,734 


1,702 


6,031 


151 


4.141     15,168   69,397 


^e*^ 


i-di... 


"JfJ 


Od£,l 


M  IM.t 


arjv^'i /aa  /a/  raiKi  m 


n-     In    Jf'i.  .j..'>    •^::;'iv.       ,,  ,  ■ 


SECTION 


5 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Ji^J  1«av   R  ifil 


Budgetary  Revenue 


jibfii 

vr,b 
no';)! 


CONTENTS 

Budgetary  revenue ...(li^!il:/Al.?H!^.l^.;^::fj?HnLn^«>^  ^<i 

Tax  revenue 5.4 

Non-tax  revenue 5.5 

Receipts  and  revenues  credited  to  appropriations 5.7 

Supplementary  statement — 

Monthly  revenue  by  selected  classification 5.8 


5-2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


BUDGETARY  REVENUE 

Budgetary  revenue  consists  of  all  tax  and  non-tax  receipts 
which  affect  the  deficit  or  surplus  of  the  Government  and 
includes  revenue  internal  to  the  Government. 

The  Government  generally  reports  revenue  in  the  year  in 
which  it  is  received,  with  refunds  of  revenue  allocated  to  the 
year  in  which  they  are  actually  paid. 

Revenue  is  reported  after  deducting  refunds  paid  and 
excludes  amounts  receivable,  taxes  collected  on  behalf  of 
provinces  and  territories,  receipts  from  contributors  to  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan,  the  Unemployment  Insurance  and  the 
superannuation  accounts,  and  receipts  credited  to  other  liabili- 
ty accounts. 

Revenue  for  a  year  therefore  includes  receipts  credited  to 
the  Receiver  General  by  the  Bank  of  Canada  and  the  char- 
tered banks  by  March  31,  and  amounts  received  in  Govern- 
ment offices  by  March  3 1 ,  but  not  deposited  until  April  or  not 
credited  to  the  Receiver  General  until  April.  Revenue  also 
includes  the  amounts  received  in  the  mail  on  the  first  working 
day  of  April  except  where  it  is  clear  that  it  was  the  remitter's 
intention  to  discharge  an  obligation  arising  in  the  new  year. 

The  yield  from  tax  revenue  is  affected  by  changes  in  tax 
rates,  by  changes  in  the  base  on  which  taxes  are  calculated  and 
by  variations  in  economic  conditions.  Income  tax  liability 
relates  to  the  income  of  a  taxation  year,  but  the  system  of 
collecting  personal  and  corporation  income  taxes  by  payroll 
deductions  and  instalments  results  in  a  distribution  of  receipts 
throughout  the  year. 

Tax  revenue  increased  by  $7,305  million  in  1981-82  com- 
pared to  an  increase  of  $5,742  million  in  1980-81. 


The  major  tax  changes  which  had  an  effect  on  this  year's 
tax  revenue  are: 

— the  petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax  and  the  natural  gas 
and  gas  liquids  tax  had  their  first  full-year  effect  in 
1981-82; 

— the  oil  export  charges  were  extended  to  marine  and 
aviation  fuel  used  in  international  travel.  Beginning  in 
February  1 982,  the  charges  on  aviation  fuel  were  convert- 
ed to  a  corporate  income  tax  provision; 

— excise  taxes  and  duties  on  alcohol  and  tobacco  began  to 
be  adjusted  in  line  with  price  increases; 

— temporary  corporate  surtax.  The  5%  surtax  for  1981  was 
extended  for  large  businesses; 

— multilateral  trade  negotiations.  The  third  of  eight  sched- 
uled annual  tariff  reductions  was  implemented  in  January 
1982;  and, 

— the  provincial  share  of  the  oil  export  charges,  accrued 
from  November  1980  through  January  1982,  was  charged 
to  revenue. 

Under  fiscal  arrangements  that  became  operative  in  1962, 
the  federal  Government  entered  into  tax  collection  agreements 
to  collect  the  personal  income  taxes  of  all  provinces  and 
territories  (except  Quebec)  and  the  corporation  income  taxes 
of  all  provinces  and  territories  (except  Ontario,  Quebec  and 
Alberta). 

Personal  and  corporation  income  taxes  collected  by  the 
federal  Government  on  behalf  of  the  provinces  and  territories, 
and  subsequently  remitted  to  them,  are  not  included  in  the 
tables  shown  hereunder. 


BUDGETARY  REVENUE 


5*3 


REVENUE 

Five  year  comparative  summary' 
Millions  of  dollars 


54,552        1 00°. 


32.866        100% 


6.8111       21% 


35.216       100"/, 


6,950         20' 


\  14,656^ 


7,266        18% 


46.507         100°( 


OTHER  REVENUE 


6%  CUSTOMS  IMPORT  DUTIES 


EXCISE  DUTIES.  SALES  AND 
OTHER  EXCISE  TAXES 


i  6.118  M    1 5%  CORPORATION  INCOME  TAX 


PERSONAL  INCOME  TAX 


5-4 
TABLE  5.1 

BUDGETARY  REVENUE  BY  MAIN  CLASSIFICATION  AND  SOURCE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


1981-82 


From  Internal  to 

outside  parties     the  Government     Total 


Tax  revenue — 

Income  tax — 

Personal 24,046 

Corporation 8,118 

Non-resident 1,018 

Petroleum  and  gas  revenue  tax 864 

34.046 

Excise  taxes  and  duties — 

Sales  tax  6,148                      37 

Customs  import  duties 3,435                         4 

Excise  duties 1,175 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax  998                      ^'^ 

Oil  export  charges  519 

Special  petroleum  compensation  charge  ..  473 

Special  excise  tax — Gasoline 436 

Other 564                       «> 

13.748  41 

Other  tax  revenue 120 

Total  tax  revenue 47,914                       41 

Non-tax  revenue — 
Return  on  investments — 

Bank  of  Canada 1,853 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corpora- 
tion   873 

Exchange  Fund  Account 763 

Interest  on  bank  deposits 701 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  285 

Other  return  on  investments 577                      43 

5.052  43 

Postal  revenue 449                       35 

Refunds  of  previous  years' expenditure 132                      21 

Services  and  service  fees  116                         7 

Privileges,  licences  and  permits 117                         3 

Bullion  and  coinage 70 

Proceeds  from  sales  58                         9 

Premium  and  discount  on  exchange •" 

Other  non-tax  revenue 462                      23 

Total  non-tax  revenue  6,456                     141 

Total  revenue  54,370                     182 

<i>  Less  than  $500,000. 

<-'  See  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statements  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


24,046 

8,118 

1,018 

864 

34.046 

6,185 

3,439 

1,175 

998 

519 

473 

436 

564 

13.789 

120 


1980-81 

Increase  or 

decrease  ( - ) 

From 

Internal  to 

outside  parties 

the  Government 

Total 

Amount 

% 

19,837 

19,837 

4,209 

21 

8,106 

8,106 

12 

867 

867 

151 

17 

27 

27 

837 

3,100 

28.837 

28,837 

5.209 

18 

5,355 

74 

5,429 

756 

14 

3,185 

3 

3,188 

251 

8 

1,042 

1,042 

133 

13 

187 

187 

811 

434      , 

842 

842 

-323 
473 

-38 
100     1 

453 

453 

-17 

-4    J 

570 

3 

573 

-9 

2    1 

11.634 

80 

11.714 

2.075 

18  1 

99 

99 

21 

21    1 

47,955 


40,570 


1,853 


1,459 


6,597 


5,709 


80 


148 


54.552 


46,279 


228 


40,650 


1,459 


5,857 


46,507 


7,305 


394 


740 


8,045 


18 


27    , 


873 

839 

839 

34 

4 

763 

620 

620 

143 

23 

701 

318 

318 

383 

120 

285 

243 

243 

42 

17 

620 

606 

45 

651 

-31 

-5 

5.095 

4.085 

45 

4.130 

965 

23 

484(2) 

1,039 

70 

1,109 

-625 

-56 

153 

105 

6 

111 

42 

38 

123 

111 

7 

118 

5 

4 

120 

116 

3 

119 

1 

1 

70 

60 

60 

10 

17 

67 

46 

11 

57 

10 

18 

(1) 

485 

147 

6 

153 

332 

217 

17    ■ 


Tax  Revenue 

Table  5.2  presents  the  tax  revenue  on  a  per  capita  basis  for 
the  last  five  years. 

TABLE  5.2 

TAX  REVENUE  PER  CAPITA 

Tax 
revenue 


1982<" 

1981   

1980  

1979  

1978  

<"  Based  on  population  as  of  October  1,  1981. 


1,962 
1,673 
1,454 
1,297 
1,236 


Personal  Income  Tax 

In  1981-82,  personal  income  tax  was  the  largest  source  ol 
Government  revenue.  It  amounted  to  $24,046  million  or  44% 
of  total  budgetary  revenue. 


Corporation  Income  Tax 

Corporation  income  tax  was  the  second  largest  source  o 
Government  revenue.  It  amounted  to  $8,118  million  or  15% 
total  budgetary  revenue. 


Bl  DGETARY  REVENUE 

Non-Resident  Income  Tax 

Non-resident  income  tax  is  derived  from  tax  withheld  from 
dividends,  interest,  rents,  royalties,  alimony  and  income  from 
estates  and  trusts  paid  to  non-residents.  It  amounted  to  $1,018 
million  or  2%  of  total  budgetary  revenue. 

Petroleum  and  Gas  Revenue  Tax 

This  tax  came  into  effect  on  January  1,  1981  and  is  appli- 
cable to  net  operating  revenues  related  to  the  production  of  oil 
and  gas. 

Excise  Taxes  and  Duties 

Excise  taxes  and  duties  totalled  $13,789  million,  25%  of 
total  budgetary  revenue. 

TABLE  5.3 

EXCISE  TAXES  AND  DUTIES 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Increase  or 
1981-82  1980-81  decrease  (-) 


Sales  tax — 

Domestic  goods  

Imports 

Diesel  

Less:  refunds  and  drawbacks  .... 

Customs  import  duties  

Less:  refunds  and  drawbacks  .... 

Excise  duties — 
Cigarettes,  tobacco  and  cigars  .. 

Spirits 

Beer 

Licences  

Less:  refunds  and  drawbacks  .... 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax  .... 

Oil  export  charges 

Special    petroleum   compensation 

charge  

Special  excise  tax — Gasoline 

Other- 
Cigarettes,  tobacco  and  cigars 
Wines  

-  Jewellery 

Air  conditioners 

Penalties 

Coin  games 

,  Automobiles 

•  Sundry  commodities 

Less:  refunds  and  drawbacks  .... 

Total 13,789 

<"  Less  than  $500,000. 


Sales  tax 

The  sales  tax,  totalling  $6,185  million,  was  the  most  impor- 
tant tax  levied  under  the  Excise  Tax  Act. 


5*5 


Excise  duties 


5,260 

4,369 

891 

1,183 

1,117 

66 

153 

-153 

258 

210 

48 

6.185 

5.429 

756 

3,912 

3,601 

311 

473 

413 

60 

3.439 

3.188 

251 

461 

398 

63 

445 

412 

33 

269 

232 

37 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

1.175 

1.042 

133 

998 

187 

811 

519 

842 

-323 

473 

473 

436 

453 

-17 

404 

426 

-22 

61 

54 

7 

49 

51 

-2 

26 

25 

1 

14 

9 

5 

6 

6 

5 

9 

-4 

2 

2 

564 

573 

-9 

11,714 


2,075 


Excise  duties,  which  totalled  $1,175  million,  are  levied  on 
alcoholic  beverages  (other  than  wines)  and  tobacco  products. 
(Additional  taxes  on  tobacco  products  and  taxes  on  wines  are 
levied  under  the  Excise  Tax  Act). 

Natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax 

The  revenues  from  the  natural  gas  and  gas  liquids  tax 
totalled  $998  million  in  1981-82.  This  tax,  which  came  into 
effect  during  1980-81,  is  imposed  on  all  sales  of  natural  gas 
and  gas  liquids. 

Oil  export  charges 

The  federal  share  of  revenues  from  oil  export  charges 
totalled  $519  million  in  1981-82.  In  accordance  with  Section 
10  of  the  Act  to  amend  the  Federal-Provincial  Fiscal  Arrange- 
ments and  Established  Programs  Financing  Act,  1977  and  to 
provide  for  payments  to  certain  provinces,  oil  export  charges 
are  shared  with  the  oil  producing  provinces.  The  share  is  in 
respect  of  oil  produced  in  and  exported  from  the  provinces 
during  the  period  November  1,  1980  to  January  31,  1982.  The 
share  payable  for  that  period,  amounting  to  $445  million,  was 
charged  to  this  revenue  account. 

Special  petroleum  compensation  charge 

The  revenues  from  the  special  petroleum  compensation 
charge  amounted  to  $473  million  in  1981-82.  This  charge  is 
imposed  on  domestic  petroleum  received  for  processing  or 
consumption  in  Canada  and  on  foreign  petroleum  or  petroleum 
product  imported  into  Canada  for  processing,  consumption, 
sale  or  other  use  in  Canada. 

Special  excise  tax — Gasoline 

Receipts  from  the  special  excise  tax — Gasoline  were  $436 
million.  Under  certain  conditions,  the  amounts  received  may 
be  refunded  to  purchasers.  As  of  March  31,  1982,  $542  million 
was  received  and  $106  million  refunded  and  charged  to 
revenue. 


Non-Tax  Revenue 

Return  on  Investments 

Return  on  investments  consists  of  interest  from  loans  and 
advances,  and  from  the  transfer  of  profits,  surpluses  and 
dividends. 

Return  on  investments  related  to  the  assets  on  the  State- 
ment of  Assets  and  Liabilities,  is  summarized  in  Table  5.4. 
Additional  details  are  given  in  Section  14  of  this  volume  and  in 
the  departmental  sections  of  Volume  II. 


5-6 
TABLE  5.4 

RETURN  ON  INVESTMENTS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Loans,  investments  and 

advances — 

Crown  corporations  and  agen- 

cies— 

Lending  institutions — 

Canada     Mortgage     and 

Housing  Corporation 

873 

839 

Export  Development  Cor- 

poration  

86 

101 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  .. 

285 

243 

Federal  Business  Develop- 

ment Bank   

81 
1,325 

95 

1.278 

Ail  other  Crown  corporations 

and  agencies — 

Air  Canada           

34 

35 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada 

Limited 

43 

68 

Canadian    National    Rail- 

ways   

60 

63 

Other 

69 

50 

Bank  of  Canada 

1,853 

1,459 

2.059 

1.675 

3,384 

2,953 

Other   loans,   investments   and 

advances — 

Provincial  and  territorial  gov- 

ernments   

103 

105 

National     governments     in- 

cluding   developing    coun- 

tries   

24 

23 

International  organizations... 

(1) 

(1) 

Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund — 

Advances 

17 

19 

Private  sector  enterprises  

7 

6 

Miscellaneous 

8 

9 

159 


3,543 


162 


3,115 


Increase 

or 

decrease  (  -  ) 


34 


-15 
42 


-14 

47 


-1 

-25 

-3 
19 
394 
384 
431 


-  1 
-3 


428 


Foreign  exchange  accounts — 
Exchange      Fund      Account — 

Advances 

International  Monetary  Fund — 

Subscriptions 

763 
8 

620 

1 

143 

7 

771 

621 

150 

Cash- 
Interest  on  bank  deposits 

701 

318 

383 

Other  accounts — 

Rent  from  properties 

Government's  holdings  of 

unmatured  debt — Interest 
Canada  student  loans — Interest 
■   Interest  on  investment  re: 
military  purchases  . 

21 

38 
4 

3 

6 

6 

2 

19 

30 

4 

5 
18 

2 
8 

3 

Interest  on  loans  to  the  Unem- 
ployment Insurance  Account 

Supply   revolving  fund — Inter- 
est   

Other 

6 

1 
-16 

80 

76 

4 

Total 

5,095 

4,130 

965 

(')  Less  than  $500,000. 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

Postal  Revenue 

Postal  revenue  was  reported  by  the  Post  Office  Department 
only  to  October  16,  1981,  the  date  on  which  the  Canada  Post 
Corporation  came  into  existence.  Since  that  date,  postal  reve- 
nue has  been  treated  as  revenue  of  the  Canada  Post  Corpora- 
tion (see  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statements  in  Section 
2  of  this  volume). 

Gross  postal  revenue  from  postal  operations,  from  April  1  to 
October  15,  1981,  was  $631  million.  For  that  period,  author- 
ized disbursements  from  revenue  of  $97  million  and  receipts 
credited  to  expenditure  of  $50  million,  reduced  net  postal 
revenue  to  $484  million. 

TABLE  5.5 

POSTAL  REVENUE  (POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT) 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Increase 

or 

1981-82<" 

1980-81 

decrease  ( - ) 

Postage — 

Canada  

581 

1.275 

-694 

Foreign  countries 

30 

51 

-21 

Sale  of  philatelic  values 

6 

13 

-7 

Money  orders 

5 

13 

-8 

Rental  of  post  office  boxes 

7 

12 

-5 

Other 

2 

5 

-3 

Gross  postal  revenue 

631 

1,369 

-738 

Less — 

Expenditure  charged  directly 

to  revenue — 

Salaries  and  allowances — 

Semi-staff  post  offices .... 

50 

84 

-34 

Revenue  post  offices  

22 

33 

-11 

Sub-post  offices 

8 

20 

-12 

Postage,  transit  and  termi- 

nal     charges      to      or 

through    foreign    coun- 

tries   

14 

26 

-12 

Other 

3 

3 

97 

166 

-69 

534 

1,203 

-669 

Less — 

Receipts  credited  to 

expenditure 

50 

94 

-44 

Net  postal  revenue 

484 

1,109 

-625 

»"  From  April  1  to  October  15,  1981. 

Other  Non-Tax  Revenue 

Other  non-tax  revenue  totalled  $485  million  in  1981-82 
compared  to  $153  million  in  1980-81.  The  net  increase  of  $332 
million  resulted  mainly  from  an  amount  of  $300  million  taken 
into  revenue  and  resulting  from  the  transfer  of  uranium  stock- 
piles by  the  Government  of  Canada  to  Eldorado  Nuclear 
Limited  in  exchange  for  shares  of  that  Corporation. 


BUDGETA  R  Y  REVENUE 

RECEIPTS  AND  REVENUES 
CREDITED  TO  APPROPRIATIONS 

Receipts  and  revenues  arising  from  the  activities  of  particu- 
lar programs,  which  are  credited  to  the  appropriations  for 
those  programs,  and  which  are  not  included  in  budgetary 
revenue,  totalled  $7,032  million  in  1981-82  compared  to 
$4,148  million  in  1980-81.  The  net  increase  of  $2,884  million 
resulted  mainly  from  petroleum  compensation  charges  credited 
to  expenditure  to  cover  the  costs  of  oil  import  compensation. 


5*7 


Receipts  and  revenues  credited  to  appropriations  are  sum- 
marized by  department  and  selected  classification  and  by 
source  in  Tables  5.6  and  5.7. 


TABLE  5.6 

RECEIPTS  AND  REVENUES  CREDITED  TO  APPROPRIATIONS  BY  SOURCE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Agriculture 

Communications 

Employment  and  Immigration . 
Energy,  Mines  and  Resources  . 

Environment 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Labour  

National  Defence 

National  Health  and  Welfare  . 

National  Revenue 

Post  Office 

Public  Works 

Science  and  Technology 

Secretary  of  State 

Solicitor  General 

Supply  and  Services  

Transport 

Treasury  Board 

Total 

<■>  Less  than  $500,000. 


From  outside 

Internal  to 

From  outside 

Internal  to 

parties 

the  Government 

Total 

parties 

the  Government 

Total 

10 

10 

8 

8 

7 

88 

95 

7 

72 

79 

668 

668 

566 

566 

3.792 

5 

3.797 

1,393 

4 

1,397 

0) 

22 

22 

(1) 

18 

18 

13 

(1) 

13 

12 

(1) 

12 

6 

6 

5 

5 

2 

2 

11 

11 

10 

10 

296 

7 

303 

227 

8 

235 

30 

30 

20 

20 

52 

1 

52 
50 

44 

44  , 

49 

93 

1 

94 

15 

309 

324 

17 

249 

266 

6 

4 

10 

6 

3 

9 

1 

10 

11 

1 

9 

10 

297 

22 

319 

201 

13 

214 

30 

660 

690 

29 

591 

620 

448 

155 

603 

394 

135 

529 

16 

16 

12 

12 

4,975 


2,057 


7,032 


2,398 


1,750 


4,148 


TABLE  5.7 

RECEIPTS  AND  REVENUES  CREDITED  TO  APPROPRIATIONS  BY  SELECTED  CLASSIFICATION  AND  SOURCE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


From  outside 
parties 


Internal  to 
the  Government 


Total 


From  outside 
parties 


Internal  to 
the  Government 


Total 


Tax  revenue — 
Other  tax  revenue 

Non-tax  revenue — 

Services  and  service  fees 

Proceeds  from  sales 

Privileges,  licences  and  permits 

Return  on  investments  

Postal  revenue  

Premium  and  discount  on  exchange 
Other  non-tax  revenue  

Total 

<■>  Less  than  $500,000. 


3.980 


4.975 


2.057 


3,980 


1,559 


7,032 


2,398 


1,750 


1,559 


491 

883 

1,374 

39S 

920 

1.315 

139 

89 

228 

123 

79 

202 

126 

126 

104 

104 

(!) 

S3 

S3 

.<•) 

44 

44 

49 

1 

SO 

93 

1 

94 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

190 

1,031 

1,221 

124 

706 

830 

995 

2.057 

3.052 

839 

1.750 

2.589 

4,148 


5-8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


SUPPLEMENTARY  STATEMENT 
Monthly  Revenue  by  Selected  Classification 

Revenue  by  selected  classification  is  presented  by  month  in 
Table  5.8. 

TABLE  5.8 

MONTHLY  REVENUE  BY  SELECTED  CLASSIFICATION 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Personal 


Income  tax 


Corpo- 
ration 


Petroleum 
and  gas 
Non-       revenue 
resident        tax 


Sales 
tax 


Natural 
gas 
Customs  and  gas        Oil 

import     Excise     liquids       export 
duties     duties        tax        charges 


Other 
Special  excise  taxes 

petroleum      Special      and  duties 
compensa-       excise  and 

tion  tax —        other  tax     Non-tax 

charge        Gasoline       revenue      revenue      Total 


April.  1981  869  378  54  51  298  299 

May 2,163  613  54  58  554  226 

June 1,717  659  67  57  477  352 

July  1,937  649  86  37  514  258 

August 1,913  612  56  84  571  309 

September 2,198  549  79  60  568  363 

October 2,337  667  106  62  553  272 

November 2,271  520  69  54  609  306 

December 2,082  584  50  73  487  251 

January,  1982 2,713  747  206  58  486  242 

February 1,801  525  91  80  461  214 

March 2,024  1,641  81  170  411  298 

Supplementary...  21  -26  19  20  196  49 

Total  24,046  8,118  Toli  864 


75 
95 
120 
92 
70 
121 
116 
113 
106 
67 
88 
102 
10 


6 
82 
48 

106 
50 
68 
95 

104 
99 
46 
70 

107 

117 


82 
105 
76 
80 
67 
70 
91 
78 
79 
76 
87 
71 
443 


38 
43 
38 
94 
-  1 
202 
59 


16 
46 

6 
62 
43 
38 
92 

I 
38 
35 
32 
25 

2 


42 

II 

8 

177 

145 

-38 

64 

53 

54 

69 

41 

66 


412 
312 
707 
356 
273 

1,046 
512 
278 
930 
268 
66 

1,244 
193 


2,532 
4,388 
4,340 
4,223 
4,319 
5,304 
5,067 
4,526 
4,832 
4.998 
3,584 
6,215 
224 


6,185   3,439   1,175 


998 


519 


473 


436 


684 


6,597    54,552 


Y!l* 


SECTION 


6 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Budgetary  Expenditure 


CONTENTS 


Page 

Budgetary  appropriations 6.2 

Budgetary  expenditure 6.3 

Classified  by  function 6.4 

Classified  by  program 6.6 

Classified  by  type  6.8 

Classified  by  standard  object 6.1 1 

Supplementary  statements — 

Interest  on  the  public  debt 6.12 

Expenditure  under  statutory  authority 6.12 

Monthly  expenditure  by  major  spending  department 6.14 


6'2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


BUDGETARY  APPROPRIATIONS 

Although  a  large  part  of  budgetary  expenditure  is  author- 
ized in  annual  appropriation  acts,  the  larger  part  is  made 
under  authority  of  other  acts  which  authorize  expenditures  for 
specified  purposes  and  for  such  amounts  and  during  such  time 
as  the  acts  may  prescribe.  The  spending  authority  granted  in 
the  annual  appropriation  acts  differs  from  that  granted  in 
"statutory"  authorities  in  that  it  is  usually  for  a  specific 
amount  and  of  definite  duration  and,  unless  there  is  provision 
to  the  contrary  in  the  wording  of  a  vote,  any  unused  balance 
lapses  at  the  end  of  the  year  for  which  it  is  granted. 


Table  6.1  presents  a  summary  of  budgetary  expenditure 
made  under  annual  appropriations  and  various  statutory 
authorities  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1982.  Table  6.2 
provides  details  by  department  for  the  year.  A  statement  of  use 
of  appropriations  by  department,  as  examined  by  the  Auditor 
General,  is  presented  in  Section  2  of  this  volume.  In  addition, 
detailed  information  on  budgetary  appropriations  and  expendi- 
ture is  given  in  the  departmental  sections  of  Volume  II. 


TABLE  6.1 

BUDGETARY  APPROPRIATIONS  AND  EXPENDITURE— ANNUAL  AND  STATUTORY 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Carried 
forward'^) 


Appropriations 

Brought  Balances 
forward 

from  Over- 

1980-81 1981-82 Used<') Lapsed  expended 

Annual 21  31,752  28,356  3,507  112 

Statutory  1.133 42,876 39,602 161 1 

Total 1,154  74,628  67,958  3,668  113 

("  Represents  total  departmental  expenditure  but  does  not  include  the  provision  for  valuation  which  is  not  allocated  to  individual  departments. 
<2>  Available  for  expenditure  in  1982-83. 


22 
4,247 


4,269 


Annual  spending  authority  of  $21  million  was  brought 
forward  from  1980-81  in  accordance  with  provisions  of  the 
original  appropriations.  Spending  authority  provided  by  appro- 
priation acts  totalled  $31,752  million  in  1981-82.  Budgetary 
expenditure  during  the  year,  as  approved  in  appropriation  acts, 
totalled  $28,356  million,  consequently,  $3,417  million  was 
unspent  at  the  close  of  the  year.  Of  this  amount,  $3,507 
million  lapsed,  $112  million  was  overspent  and  $22  million  is 
available  for  expenditure  in  1982-83  in  accordance  with  provi- 
sions of  the  original  appropriations. 

Spending  authority  provided  by  statutory  appropriations 
amounted  to  $42,876  million  in  1981-82.  Amounts  totalling 


$1,133  million  were  brought  forward  from  1980-81  and  relate 
to  revolving  funds  operating  under  non-lapsing  budgetary 
statutory  authorities.  Budgetary  expenditure  under  statutory 
appropriations  totalled  $39,602  million  in  1981-82.  Conse- 
quently, $4,407  million  was  unspent  at  the  close  of  the  year. 
Of  this  amount  $161  million  lapsed  and  $1  million  was 
overspent  as  a  result  of  definite  duration  provisions  included  in 
certain  statutes,  and  $4,247  million  is  available  for  expenditure 
in  future  years,  relating  to  revolving  funds  which  operate 
under  non-lapsing  budgetary  statutory  authorities. 

The  Estimates  and  appropriations  for   1981-82,  covering 
budgetary  expenditure  (other  than  statutory),  were  as  follows: 


ESTIMATES 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Main  Estimates 28,497 

Less:  deletion  of  6  Votes  from  the  Main  Estimates  as  per  House  of  Commons  Speaker's  ruling  of  June  1 2, 

1981  585 

Supplementary  Estimates  (A) 

Supplementary  Estimates  (B) 

Supplementary  Estimates  (C) 

Supplementary  Estimates  (D) 

Supplementary  Estimates  (E) 

Less:  reserved  allotments* 

transfer  from  a  budgetary  to  a  non-budgetary  appropriation,  as  authorized  by  the  Canadian  Film 
Development  Corporation  Act 


27,912 

2.144 

184 

874 

94 

593 

42 


31,801 


49 


31,752 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 


6*3 


APPROPRIATIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Appropriation  Act  No  I,  1981-82 

Appropriation  Act  No  2,  1981-82 i"!!!!!.!'"!!^!^!!'!"!!!!!"!!!"!!!!!.!".! 

Appropriation  Act  No  3,  1981-82 "!!'"!!I^!!'!!!"!!!'!""."1"1"!"""1!. 

Appropriation  Act  No  4,  1981-82 !'"!!^!!!!!."!!""!!!!"!!!!!!.I! 

Less:  reserved  allotments* 

transfer  from  a  budgetary  to  a  non-budgetary  appropriation,  as  authorized  by  the  Canadian  Film 
Development  Corporation  Act 


*  Reserved  allotments  were  established  to  provide  payment  authority  for  the  overexpenditures  of  the  previous  year's  appropriations  which  resulted  from  Payables  at 
Year  End  (PAYE). 


8,150 

22,090 

968 

593 

31,801 
49 

42 

7 

31,752 

TABLE  6.2 

BUDGETARY  APPROPRIATIONS  AND  EXPENDITURE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


Appropriations 


Expenditure*^' 


Statutory         Annual 


Total 


Statutory        Annual  Total 


1980-81 
Expenditure 


Agriculture  274  886  1,160  274  851  1,125 

Communications 40  1,118  1,158  23  1,111  1,134 

Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs 9  89  98  9  86  95 

Economic  Development 114  15  1  12  13 

Employment  and  Immigration  1,125  1,144  2,269  1,125  1,084  2,209 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources 1,194  6,060  7,254  -2,782  4,180  1,398 

Environment 44  590  634  44    ,  583  627 

External  Affairs  20  1,322  1,342  16  1,269  1,285 

Finance  19,754  71  19,825  19,755  69  19,824 

Fisheries  and  Oceans 25  422  447  25  416  441 

Governor  General (')  4  4  (D  4  4 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development 41  1,474  1,515  42  1,465  1,507 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  174  810  984  174  816  990 

Justice  74  134  208  74  126  200 

Labour 25  47  72  25  46  71 

National  Defence 520  5,459  5,979  520  5,508  6,028 

National  Health  and  Welfare 17,225  607  17,832  17,225  593  17,818 

National  Revenue 94  728  822  94  722  816 

Parliament 51  107  158  51  100  151 

Post  Office 112  1,877  1,989  112  1,044  1,156<« 

Privy  Council 7  58  65  7  57  64 

Public  Works 300  2,085  2,385  247  1,941  2,188 

Regional  Economic  Expansion  8  816  824  8  737  745 

Science  and  Technology 15  492  507  15  471  486 

Secretary  of  State 1,752  530  2,282  1,746  518  2,264 

Social  Development  <»  4  4  <•>  3  3 

Solicitor  General 141  1,107  1,248  142  1,042  1,184 

Supply  and  Services 294  370  664  35  359  394 

Transport 579  1,846  2,425  484  1,796  2,280 

Treasury  Board 95  358  453  95  223  318 

Veterans  Affairs 16  1,144  1,160  16  1,124  1,140 

Total  departmental  expenditure 44,009<*)  31,773<*>  75,782  39,602  28,356  67,958 

("Less  than  $500,000. 

*^)  Represents  total  departmental  expenditure  but  does  not  include  the  provision  for  valuation  which  is  not  allocated  to  individual  departments. 

*^*  See  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statements  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 

('*'  Includes  $1,133  million  brought  forward  from  1980-81  and  relating  to  revolving  funds  operating  under  non-lapsing  budgetary  statutory  authorities. 

<5'  Includes  $21  million  brought  forward  from  1980-81. 


882 

1,170 

77 

11 

3,586 

4,026 

537 

1,084 

14,767 

368 

3 

1,417 

655 

175 

56 

5,077 

15,782 

677 

130 

1,597 

81 

1,852 

722 

392 

2,174 

2 

1,055 

321 

2,523 

172 

1,006 


62,377 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 

Budgetary  expenditure  consists  of  all  charges  to  budgetary 
appropriations  which  affect  the  deficit  or  surplus  of  the  Gov- 
ernment. Such  charges  include  those  for  work  performed, 
goods  received,  services  rendered,  and  transfer  payments 
made,  during  the  year,  and,  expenditure  internal  to  the 
Government. 

Expenditure  excludes  pensions  paid  under  the  Canada  Pen- 
sion Plan,  superannuation  and  other  pension  accounts.  Unem- 
ployment Insurance  payments  other  than  benefits  to  fishermen 
and  payments  charged  to  other  liability  accounts. 


In  this  section,  expenditure  is  analysed  in  several  different 
ways: 

(1)  by  function,  i.e.  broad  policies; 

(2)  by  program,  i.e.  purpose; 

(3)  by  type,  i.e.  operating,  capital,  and  grants  and  contribu- 
tions; and, 

(4)  by  standard  object,  i.e.  productive  resources  acquired  or 
transfer  payments  made. 

These  analyses  do  not  take  into  account  the  provision  for 
valuation  reflected  in  Sections  1  and  2  of  this  volume. 


6-4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Expenditure  by  Function 

The   functional    presentation   of  expenditure   reflects   the  The  largest  category  of  expenditure  under  the  functional 

broad  policies  pursued  by  the  Government.  These  functions,       classification    is   health   and   welfare,   which   accounted   for 
which  are  reflected  in  Table  6.3,  are  primarily  services  pro-       $20,964  million,  or  31%  of  total  expenditure, 
vided  to  the  people  of  Canada  or  to  other  governmental 
jurisdictions  within  Canada. 

EXPENDITURE  BY  MAJOR  FUNCTION 

"Five  year  comparative  summary" 
Millions  of  dollars 


67,958  100°< 


42.902      100% 


;4.615:     11% 


14,133      33% 


46.923       100% 


=5,001=     11% 


16.344        35% 


52.364       100% 


=  5.324=     10% 


7 

.' 

4 

t 

17,967        34% 


62,377  1 00°. 


ALL  OTHER  FUNCTIONS 


11%  DEFENCE 


TRANSPORTATION  AND 
COMMUNICATIONS 


ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT 
AND  SUPPORT 


31%  HEALTH  AND  WELFARE 


FISCAL  TRANSFER  PAYMENTS 


22%  PUBLIC  DEBTd  I 


(1 1  Includes  additional  interest  in  respect  of  the  Public  Service,  the  Canadian  Forces 
and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  superannuation  accounts. 


p 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 
TABLE  6.3 


6'5 


EXPENDITURE  BY  FUNCTION 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Increase 


decrease  ( - ) 


Increase 
or 
1981-82         1980-81        decrease  (- ) 


General  Government  services — 
Legislation  and  administration — 

Legislative 187 

Executive 167 

Collection  of  taxes  and  duties  ..  818 

National  capital  region 98 

Other  legislation  and  adminis- 
tration   375 

1.645 
Protection  of  persons  and  proper- 
ty- 
Justice 87 

Correctional  services 533 

Police  protection 651 

Consumer  services 62 

Other  protection  of  persons  and 

property 25 

1.358 


3.003 


Foreign  affairs — 
External  relations — 

Diplomatic  relations 331 

Contributions  to  international 
organizations 

Assistance   to  developing  coun- 
tries  

Defence — 

Defence  services  

Veterans  benefits 


Transportation     and     communica- 
tions— 

Air  transport 

Water  transport 

Road  transport 

Postal  services 

Telecommunications 

Other  transportation  and  com- 
munications   


Economic    development    and    sup- 
port— 
Primary  industry — 

Agriculture  1.263 

Fisheries,    forestry   and   water 

resources 601 

Energy 802 

Other  primary  industry 54 

2.720 

Secondary  industry 454 

Service  industry 39 

Foreign  trade 306 

Labour  force — 

Working  conditions 44 

Training 688 

Immigration 106 

Other  labour  force 370 

1.208 


177 
187 
679 
111 

315 
1.469 


77 
447 
608 

49 

16 

l.t97 


2.666 


282 


1.032 


10 
-20 
139 
-13 

60 
176 


10 
86 
43 
13 

9 

161 


337 


49 


100 

90 

10 

431 

372 

59 

850 

710 

140 

1.281 

1.082 

199 

6,029 

5.078 

951 

1.140 

1,006 

134 

7,169 

6.084 

1,085 

392 

942 

-55b 

511 

381 

130 

49 

46 

3 

I.156<') 

1.597 

-441 

143 

111 

32 

1.448 

1.231 

217 

3.699 

4.308 

-609 

231 


507 

94 

398 

404 

40 

14 

1.977 

743 

351 

103 

31 

8 

90 

216 

35 

9 

631 

57 

135 

-29 

330 

40 

I.I3I 

77 

General  research — 

Social  science  research 

Physical  science  research 

Regional  development 

Other  economic  development  and 
support 


277 

188 

89 

675 

564 

111 

952 

752 

200 

850 

982 

-132 

624 


7.153 


Health  and  welfare — 
Health- 
Public  health  128 

Medical  care 1,014 

Hospital  care 3,376 

Other  health 103 

4.621 
Income  maintenance — 

Payments  to  aged  8,585 

Payments  to  families 2,020 

Payments  to  unemployed 1,052 

11.657 
Social  assistance — 
Canada    Assistance    Plan    and 

related  items  2,325 

Aid  to  handicapped 39 

Other  social  assistance 120 

2.484 

Indians  and  Inuit 1,202 

Housing  and  urban  renewal 968 

Other  health  and  welfare 32 


Education  assistance — 

Post-secondary  education . 
Other  education 


Culture  and  recreation — 

Archives,    galleries,     theatres, 

etc 115 

Parks,  historic  sites  and  other 

recreational  areas 

Film,  radio  and  television 

Other  culture  and  recreation 


Fiscal  transfer  payments — 
Statutory  subsidies  to  provincial 

governments 

Revenue  equalization  payments... 
Other  fiscal  transfer  payments 

Public  debt 

Internal  overhead  expenses — 

Government  support  services 

Contributions  to  employee  pen- 
sion and  medical  plans 

Total  departmental  expenditure  67.958 


3.645 


8,959 


96 


3.021 


1.806 


105 

23 

959 

55 

3,124 

252 

87 

16 

4.275 

346 

7.418 

1,167 

1,851 

169 

2,494 

-1.442 

(1.763 

-106 

1,996 

329 

32 

7 

112 

8 

2.140 

344 

1,015 

187 

878 

90 

26 

6 

20,964 

20,097 

867 

1,634 
292 

1,609 

275 

25 

17 

1,926 

1,884 

42 

19 


262 
734 
259 

221 
844 
207 

41 

-no 

52 

1,370 

1,368 

2 

35 

4,269 

89 

34 

3,473 

136 

1 
796 

-47 

4,393 

3,643 

750 

15,168 

10,827 

4.341 

1,545 
287 

1,312 
147 

233 

140 

1,832 

1,459 

373 

62.377 


5,581 


'')  See  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statenKnts  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


6*6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Expenditure  by  Program 

The  programs  of  each  department  and  agency  identify  the 
major  objectives  of  the  department. 


A  comparative  summary  of  expenditure  by  program  is 
provided  in  Table  6.4. 


TABLE  6.4 


EXPENDITURE  BY  PROGRAM 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Increase 

or 

decrease  (  -  ) 


1981-82 


Increase 
or 
1980-81        decrease  (-) 


AGRICULTURE— 

Department — 

Administration  38 

Agri-food  development 868 

Agri-food       regulation       and 

inspection 166 

Race  track  supervision 

revolving  fund *'' 

Canadian  Grain  Commission...  31 
1.103 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission 4 

Canadian  Livestock  Feed  Board  18 

~1.125 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department — 

Communications 141 

Government    Telecommuni- 
cations  Agency   revolving 

fund  2 

Arts  and  culture  32 

175 

Canada  Council 53 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corpora- 
tion    665 

Canadian      Film      Development 

Corporation 1 

Canadian  Radio-television  and 
Telecommunications  Commis- 
sion    20 

National  Arts  Centre  Corpora- 
tion    14 

National  Film  Board 48 

National  Film  Board 

revolving  fund  2 

National  Library 22 

National  Museums  of  Canada 58 

Public  Archives 29 

Social  Sciences  and  Humanities 

Research  Council  47 

~  1.134 

CONSUMER      AND      CORPO- 
RATE  AFFAIRS— 

Department 94 

Restrictive  Trade  Practices  Com- 
mission   

ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT 

Ministry  of  State 

Northern  Pipeline  Agency 


EMPLOYMENT     AND     IMMI- 
GRATION— 

Department — 
Departmental  administration...  6 

Canada  Employment  and  Immi- 
gration Commission — 

Administration  

Employment  and  insurance 

Immigration 

Annuities 

Immigration  Appeal  Board  ... 


32 

6 

655 

213 

143 

23 

1 
28 

-1 

3 

859 

244 

5 

-I 

18 

882 


110 


I 

22 

133 

45 

783 


42 


170 


76 


243 


1 
10 
42 


118 


II 

3 

44 

4 

(1) 

2 

17 

5 

52 

6 

25 

4 

-36 


1 

1 

95 

77 

18 

6 

7 

5 
6 

1 

1 

13 

11 

2 

25 

26 

-1 

2,075 

3,420 

-  1,345 

97 

129 

-32 

3 

3 

2.200 

3.578 

-  1.378 

3 

2 

1 

2,209 

3,586 

-1,377 

ENERGY,  MINES  AND 

RESOURCES— 

Department — 

Administration               

17 
3,945 

13 

Energy 

3,469 

Petroleum  compensation 

revolving  fund 

-  3,054 

-478 

Minerals  and  earth  sciences 

174 

152 

1.082 

3,156 

Atomic  Energy  Control  Board 

15 

14 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Lim- 

ited   

284 

842 

National  Energy  Board  

17 

14 

ENVIRONMENT— 

Administration  

Environmental  services . 
Parks  Canada  


EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS— 

Department — 

Canadian  interests  abroad 

Passport     Office     revolving 

fund  

World  exhibitions 

Canadian  International  Develop- 
ment Agency 

International  Development 
Research  Centre 

International  Joint  Commission... 


FINANCE— 
Department — 
Financial  and  economic  poli- 
cies   

Public  debt 

Fiscal  transfer  payments 

Anti-Dumping  Tribunal 

Inspector  General  of  Banks 

Special 

Auditor  General  

Insurance  

Tariff  Board 


FISHERIES  AND  OCEANS- 

Department 

Pacific  Fisheries  Policy 

GOVERNOR  GENERAL  


1,398 


37 
328 
262 


627 


431 


4,026 


26 
290 
221 


537 


372 


4 
476 

2,576 

22 

2.074 

I 

-558 
3 


-  2,628 


11 
38 
41 


90 


59 


- 1 

(1) 

-1 

3 

(1) 

3 

433 

372 

61 

803 

668 

135 

47 

42 

5 

2 

2 

1,285 

1,084 

201 

73 
15,168 
4,535 

1 

114 

10,827 

3,788 

1 

-41 

4,341 

747 

1 
(1) 

1 
(1) 

19.778 
32 
12 

2 

14.731 

27 

7 

2 

5.047 

5 
5 

19,824 

14,767 

5,057 

440 

1 

368 

(1) 

72 
1 

441 

368 

73 

4 

3 

1 

BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 
TABLE  6.4 


6'7 


EXPENDITURE  BY  PROGRAM— Continued 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Increase 
or 
1981-82         1980-81         decrease  (-) 


1981-82 


Increase 


1980-81        decrease  (-) 


INDIAN  AFFAIRS  AND 

NORTHERN  DEVELOP- 

MENT— 

Department — 

Administration  

42 
1,004 

29 

857 

13 

Indian  and  Inuit  affairs  

147 

Northern  affairs  

441 

527 

-86 

Native  claims 

18 
1.505 

4 
1.417 

14 

88 

Northern   Canada    Power   Com- 

mission   

2 

(1) 

2 

1,507 

1,417 

90 

INDUSTRY,       TRADE       AND 
COMMERCE- 
DC  partment — 

Trade-industrial 

Tourism  

Grains  and  oilseeds 

Canadian  Commercial  Corpora- 
tion   

Export  Development  Corporation 

Federal  Business  Development 
Bank 

Foreign  Investment  Review 
Agency 

Standards  Council  of  Canada 

JUSTICE— 
Department — 

Administration  of  Justice 85 

Canadian    Unity    Information 

Office 28 

113 
Canadian   Human   Rights  Com- 
mission    6 

Commissioner  for  Federal  Judi- 
cial Affairs — 
Administration      of      Federal 

Court  of  Canada 5 

Administration  of  Federal  Ju- 
dicial Affairs 67 

72 
Law     Reform     Commission     of 

Canada 3 

Supreme  Court  of  Canada 4 

Tax  Review  Board 2 

~    200 

LABOUR— 

Department 63 

Canada  Labour  Relations  Board..  4 
Canadian  Centre  for  Occupation- 
al Health  and  Safety 

NATIONAL  DEFENCE— 
Defence  services  

NATIONAL      HEALTH      AND 
WELFARE— 

Department — 

Departmental  administration...  29 

Health  and  social  services  6,717 

Medical  services  229 

Health  protection  83 

Income  security 10,660 

17.718 

Medical  Research  Council 100 

17,818 


730 

426 

304 

39 

32 

7 

138 

149 

-11 

907 

607 

300 

19 

24 

-5 

36 

36 

18 

16 

2 

5 

4 

1 

5 

4 

I 

990 

655 

335 

73 


25 
98 


61 
65 

2 

4 
1 


175 


50 
4 


12 


3 
15 


25 


13 


4 

2 

2 

71 

56 

15 

6,028 

5,077 

951 

24 

5 

6,089 

628 

202 

27 

69 

14 

9,316 

1,344 

15.700 

2.018 

82 

18 

NATIONAL  REVENUE— 

Customs  and  Excise 322 

Taxation 494 

PARLIAMENT— 

The  Senate 

House  of  Commons 

Library  of  Parliament 

POST  OFFICE— 

Department 

Canada  Post  Corporation 

PRIVY  COUNCIL— 

Privy  Council — 

Privy  Council 37 

Special <■> 

37 
Canadian  Intergovernmental 

Con  ference  Secretariat 2 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 4 

Commissioner   of  Official    Lan- 
guages   6 

Economic  Council  of  Canada 8 

Public    Service    Staff    Relations 
Board 7 

64 

PUBLIC  WORKS— 

Department — 

Administration  47 

Professional  and  technical  ser- 
vices    49 

Construction  services  revolv- 
ing fund  1 

Accommodation  633 

Marine 67 

Transportation  and  other  engi- 
neering    49 

Land    management    and    de- 
velopment   61 

Municipal  grants 215 

1.122 
Canada   Mortgage  and  Housing 

Corporation 968 

National  Capital  Commission 98 

~"2,188 

REGIONAL     ECONOMIC     EX- 
PANSION— 

Department 612 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corpo- 
ration    133 

745 

SCIENCE  AND  TECH- 
NOLOGY— 

Ministry  of  State 10 

National    Research    Council    of 
Canada — 
Scientific        and        industrial 

research  257 

Scientific  and  technical  infor- 
mation   

Natural  Sciences  and  Engineer 

ing  Research  Council  

Science  Council  of  Canada  


266 

411 


81 


878 
111 


1,852 


624 
98 


722 


206 


56 

83 


816 

677 

139 

19 

124 

8 

15 
108 

7 

4 

16 

1 

151 

130 

21 

913 

243 

1,597 

-684 
243 

1.156<2) 

1,597 

-441 

27 

10 

14 

-14 

41 

-4 

1 

20 

-16 

5 

1 

7 

1 

6 

1 

-17 


39 

8 

45 

4 

2 

524 

39 

-1 

109 

28 

35 

14 

23 
156 
863 

38 

59 

259 

90 

-13 


336 


-12 

35 


23 


51 


15,782 


2,036 


15 
272 

12 
218 

3 
54 

201 

3 

162 

3 

39 

486 

392 

94 

6*8 
TABLE  6.4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


EXPENDITURE  BY  PROGRAM— Co/ic/M</e^ 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Increase 
or 
1 98 1  -82         1 980-8 1         decrease  ( - ) 


Increase 
or 
1 98 1  -82         1 980-8 1        decrease  ( - ) 


SECRETARY  OF  STATE— 

Department — 

Administration  24 

Official  languages 196 

Education  support 1,730 

Translation 70 

Citizenship 100 

Fitness  and  amateur  sport  50 

2,170 

Public  Service  Commission  92 

Staff  development  and  training 

revolving  fund -  1 

Advisory  Council  on  the  Status  of 

Women 2 

Status  of  Women — Office  of  the 

Co-ordinator 1 


394 


19 

5 

191 

5 

1,693 

37 

61 

9 

84 

16 

38 

12 

2.086 

84 

83 

9 

2.264 

2,174 

90 

SOCIAL  DEVELOPMENT— 

Ministry  of  State 

3 

2 

1 

SOLICITOR  GENERAL— 

Department 

Correctional  Services 

22 

soo 
11 

651 

17 

421 

9 

608 

5 
79 

National  Parole  Board 

2 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police.. 

43 

1,184 

1,055 

129 

SUPPLY  AND  SERVICES— 

Department — 

Services  

Supply  

Supply  revolving  fund 

155 
20 
-1 

-2 
172 
111 

127 
72 
-8 

-8 
183 
138 

28 

-52 

7 

Defence  production  revolving 
fund  

Statistics  Canada  

6 

-// 
84 

321 


73 


TRANSPORT— 

Department — 
Departmental  administration...  85 

Stores  revolving  fund  4 

Marine  transportation 444 

Air  transportation 383 

Self-supporting  airports  and 
associated  ground  services 

revolving  fund 7 

Surface  transportation 913 

1.836 

Air  Canada  

Canadian  Transport  Commission  444 


2,280 


43 


TREASURY  BOARD— 
Secretariat — 
Central  administration  of  the 

public  service •  •• 

Employer  contributions  to  in- 
surance plans 

Temporary  assignments 

Comptroller  General 


VETERANS  AFFAIRS— 

Veterans  Affairs 584 

War  Veterans  Allowance 

Board 1 

Pensions 551 

Bureau  of  pensions  advocates...  4 

1,140 

Total  departmental  expenditure  67,958 


99 

-14 

2 

2 

343 

101 

957 

-574 

-19 

26 

792 

121 

2,174 

-338 

1 

-1 

347 

97 

2,523 


35 


503 

1 
499 

3 


1,006 


61,377 


243 


265 
I 

130 

(1) 

135 
1 

309 
9 

165 

7 

144 

1 

318 

172 

146 

81 


52 
1 


134 


5,581 


<■)  Less  than  $500,000. 

(^>  See  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statements  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


Expenditure  by  Type 

Expenditure  may  be  classified  under  three  major  types: 
operating,  capital,  and  grants  and  contributions.  Operating 
expenditures  consist  of  expenditures  incurred  in  conducting  the 
administrative  and  operating  activities  of  the  program;  capital 
expenditures  are  for  the  construction  and  acquisition  of  fixed 


assets;  grants  and  contributions  represent  payments  other  than 
for  goods  and  services  made  for  the  purpose  of  furthering 
program  objectives. 

A  comparative  summary  of  expenditure  by  type  is  presented 
in  Table  6.5. 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 

TABLE  6.5 

EXPENDITURE  BY  TYPE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


6*9 


AGRICULTURE- 
DC  pa  rtment  

Canadian  Dairy  Commission 

Canadian  Livestock  Feed  Board 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department 

Canada  Council  

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation  

Canadian  Film  Development  Corporation 

Canadian  Radio-television  and  Telecommunications  Commis- 
sion  

National  Arts  Centre  Corporation 

National  Film  Board  

National  Library  

National  Museums  of  Canada  

Public  Archives 

Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  Research  Council 

CONSUMER  AND  CORPORATE  AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Restrictive  Trade  Practices  Commission 

ECONOMIC  DEVELOPMENT— 

Ministry  of  State  

Northern  Pipeline  Agency 

EMPLOYMENT  AND  IMMIGRATION— 

Department 

Canada  Employment  and  Immigration  Commission 

Immigration  Appeal  Board 

ENERGY,  MINES  AND  RESOURCES— 

Department 

Atomic  Energy  Control  Board  

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

National  Energy  Board 

ENVIRONMENT 

EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Canadian  International  Development  Agency 

International  Development  Research  Centre 

International  Joint  Commission 

FINANCE— 

Department 

Auditor  General 

Insurance 

Tariff  Board  

FISHERIES  AND  OCEANS— 

Department 

Pacific  Fisheries  Policy  

GOVERNOR  GENERAL 

INDIAN  AFFAIRS  AND  NORTHERN  DEVELOPMENT— 

Department 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission 

INDUSTRY,  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE— 

Department 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation 

Export  Development  Corporation 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

Foreign  Investment  Review  Agency 

Standards  Council  of  Canada 


Grants  and 

Operating 

Capital 

contributions 

Total 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

412 

346 

18 

18 

673 

495 

1.103 

859 

4 

5 

(1) 

(1) 

4 

5 

1 

1 

(1) 

(1) 

17 

17 

18 

18 

417 

352 

/« 

18 

690 

512 

I.J25 

882 

109 

86 

19 

16 

47 

31 

175 

133 

53 

45 

53 

45 

665 

1 

783 
1 

665 

1 

783 

1 

20 

17 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

20 

17 

14 

11 

14 

11 

48 

43 

2 

1 

(1) 

(1) 

50 

44 

21 

17 

1 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

22 

17 

48 

42 

1 

1 

9 

9 

58 

52 

28 

24 

1 

I 

(1) 

29 

25 

5 

4 

42 

38 

47 

42 

959 

1.028 

24 

19 

151 

123 

I.I34 

1.170 

89 

1 

74 

1 

3 

(1) 

1 
(1) 

2 

1 

94 
1 

76 
I 

90 

75 

3 

/ 

2 

I 

95 

77 

6 

5 

0) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

6 

5 

7 

6 

(1) 

(1) 

7 

6 

13 

11 

<n 

III 

III 

III 

13 

// 

6 

6 

(1) 

(1) 

6 

6 

604 

589 

5 

4 

1.591 

2,985 

2,200 

3,578 

3 

2 

3 

2 

613 

597 

5 

4 

1.591 

2.985 

2.209 

3.586 

-  3,543 

-1,180 

20 

12 

4.605 

4,324 

1,082 

3,156 

15 

14 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

15 

14 

255 

824 

29 

18 

284 

842 

17 

14 

(1) 

(1) 

17 

14 

-3.256 

-328 

49 

30 

4.605 

4.324 

1.398 

4.026 

485 

419 

123 

97 

19 

21 

627 

537 

292 

251 

41 

31 

100 

90 

433 

372 

49 

41 

(1) 

I 

754 

626 

803 

668 

47 

42 

47 

42 

2 

2 

(1) 

(!) 

2 

2 

343 

294 

41 

32 

901 

758 

1.285 

J. 084 

15.242 

10,943 

(1) 

(1) 

4,536 

3.788 

19,778 

14,731 

31 

27 

1 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

32 

27 

12 

7 

(1) 

(1) 

12 

7 

2 

2 

(1) 

(1) 

2 

2 

15.287 

10.979 

/ 

(II 

4.536 

3.788 

19.824 

14.767 

335 

1 

278 

(1) 

78 

75 

27 

15 

440 

1 

368 

(1) 

336 

278 

78 

75 

27 

15 

441 

368 

4 

3 

(1) 

(r) 

4 

3 

454 

552 

58 

55 

993 

810 

1.505 

1.417 

2 

(1) 

2 

(1) 

456 

552 

58 

55 

993 

810 

1.507 

1.417 

292 

169 

2 

1 

613 

437 

907 

607 

19 

24 

19 

24 

36 

36 

18 

16 

18 

16 

5 

4 

(1) 

(1) 

5 

4 

5 

4 

5 

4 

370 

213 

2 

/ 

618 

441 

990 

655 

6'10 
TABLE  6.5 

EXPENDITURE  BY  TYPE— Continued 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


JUSTICE— 

Department 

Canadian  Human  Rights  Commission 

Commissioner  for  Federal  Judicial  Affairs 

Law  Reform  Commission  of  Canada 

Supreme  Court  of  Canada 

Tax  Review  Board  

LABOUR— 

Department 

Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  

Canadian  Centre  for  Occupational  Health  and  Safety 

NATIONAL  DEFENCE 

NATIONAL  HEALTH  AND  WELFARE— 

Department 

Medical  Research  Council 

NATIONAL  REVENUE— 

Customs  and  Excise 

Taxation  

PARLIAMENT— 

The  Senate  

House  of  Commons  

Library  of  Parliament  

POST  OFFICE— 

Department 

Canada  Post  Corporation  

PRIVY  COUNCIL— 

Privy  Council  

Canadian  Intergovernmental  Conference  Secretariat 

Chief  Electoral  Officer 

Commissioner  of  Official  Languages 

Economic  Council  of  Canada 

Public  Service  Staff  Relations  Board 

PUBLIC  WORKS— 

Department 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation  

National  Capital  Commission 

REGIONAL  ECONOMIC  EXPANSION— 

Department 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corporation 

SCIENCE  AND  TECHNOLOGY— 

Ministry  of  State  

National  Research  Council  of  Canada 

Natural  Sciences  and  Engineering  Research  Council 

Science  Council  of  Canada 

SECRETARY  OF  STATE— 

Department 

Public  Service  Commission 

Advisory  Council  on  the  Status  of  Women  

Status  of  Women — Office  of  the  Co-ordinator 

SOCIAL  DEVELOPMENT  3 

SOLICITOR  GENERAL— 

Department 18 

Correctional  Services 445 

National  Parole  Board 1  \ 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  577 

1.051 


Grants  and 

Operating 

Capital 

contributions 

Total 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

78 

66 

1 

2 

34 

30 

113 

98 

6 

5 

(1) 

(1) 

6 

5 

60 

56 

(1) 

(1) 

12 

9 

72 

65 

3 

2 

(1) 

(1) 

3 

2 

4 

3 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

1 

4 

4 

2 

1 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

(1) 

2 

1 

153 

133 

/ 

2 

46 

40 

200 

175 

53 

43 

I 

(1) 

9 

1 

63 

50 

4 

4 

(1) 

<i) 

4 

4 

4 

2 

4 

2 

57 

47 

/ 

in 

13 

9 

71 

56 

4,513 

3,807 

1,198 

978 

317 

292 

6,028 

5,077 

385 

334 

15 

14 

17,318 

15,352 

17,718 

15,700 

2 

2 

(1) 

(1) 

98 

80 

100 

82 

387 

336 

15 

14 

17.416 

15.432 

17.818 

15.782 

316 

263 

6 

3 

322 

266 

488 

405 

6 

6 

(1) 

(1) 

494 

411 

804 

668 

12 

9 

in 

in 

816 

677 

18 

14 

(1) 

(1) 

1 

1 

19 

15 

122 

106 

1 

2 

1 

(I) 

124 

108 

8 

7 

(1) 

(1) 

8 

7 

148 

127 

/ 

2 

2 

/ 

151 

130 

909 

1,587 

3 

9 

1 

1 

913 

1,597 

243 

243 

1.152 

1.587 

3 

9 

/ 

/ 

1.156<^> 

1.597 

35 

25 

1 

1 

1 

15 

37 

41 

2 

2 

(I) 

(I) 

2 

2 

4 

9 

(I) 

(1) 

(1) 

11 

4 

20 

6 

5 

(I) 

(1) 

6 

5 

8 

7 

(1) 

(1) 

8 

7 

7 

6 

(1) 

(I) 

7 

6 

62 

54 

/ 

1 

/ 

26 

64 

81 

675 

557 

227 

145 

220 

161 

1,122 

863 

968 

878 

968 

878 

48 

74 

50 

37 

(1) 

98 

111 

1.691 

1.509 

277 

182 

220 

161 

2.188 

1.852 

90 

79 

8 

1 

514 

538 

612 

624 

133 

98 

133 

98 

223 

177 

8 

7 

514 

538 

745 

722 

8 

7 

(1) 

(I) 

2 

2 

10 

9 

186 

153 

31 

27 

55 

38 

272 

218 

4 

3 

197 

159 

201 

162 

3 

3 

(1) 

(1) 

3 

3 

201 

166 

31 

27 

254 

199 

486 

392 

136 

111 

1 

1 

2,033 

1,974 

2,170 

2,086 

91 

84 

(1) 

1 

(I) 

91 

85 

2 

1 

2 

1 

(1) 
(1) 

(1) 
(1) 

(I) 

2 
1 

2 
1 

230 

198 

1 

2 

2.033 

1.974 

2.264 

2.174 

13 

1 

(1) 

3 

4 

22 

17 

382 

54 

37 

1 

2 

500 

421 

9 

(1) 

(1) 

11 

9 

549 

62 

48 

12 

11 

651 

608 

953 

117 

85 

16 

17 

1.184 

1.055 

BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 
TABLE  6.5 


6«11 


EXPENDITURE  BY  TYPE— Concluded 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Operating 


Capital 


Grants  and 
contributions 


Total 


1981-82    1980-81        1981-82       1980-81        1981-82       1980-81        1981-82       1980-81 


SUPPLY  AND  SERVICES— 

Department 169 

Statistics  Canada 215 

384 

TRANSPORT— 

Department 1,358 

Air  Canada 

Canadian  Transport  Commission 31 

1.389 

TREASURY  BOARD— 

Secretariat 308 

Comptroller  General  9 

317 

VETERANS  AFFAIRS 233 

Total  departmental  expenditure 29,1 15 

"»  Less  than  $500,000. 

<^'  See  Note  6  to  the  audited  financial  statements  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


182 
135 
317 


1,120 

2 

22 

1.144 


164 

7 

171 

202 


3 

7 

10 


265 

(I) 
265 


859 

(I) 
859 


213 


413 
626 


1 
U) 

/ 

905 


195 


325 
520 


1 

(I) 

/ 
802 


172 
222 
394 


1,836 

444 
2.280 


309 
9 

318 

1,140 


26,071 


2,345 


2,515 


36,498  33,791 


67,958 


183 
138 
321 


2,174 

2 

347 

2,523 


165 

7 
172 

1,006 


62,377 


Expenditure  by  Standard  Object 

The  standard  object  presentation  of  expenditure  is  related  to 
the  goods  and  services  acquired  and  transfer  payments  made 
by  the  Government. 

A  comparative  summary  of  expenditure  by  standard  object 
is  presented  in  Table  6.6.  Additional  details  are  given  in 
Volume  11. 

Grants,  contributions  and  other  transfer  payments  were  the 
largest  category  and  accounted  for  $36,498  million  or  54%  of 
total  budgetary  expenditure.  Payments  included  fiscal  transfer 
payments  to  provinces,  $4,446  million;  payments  under  the 
Public  Utilities  Income  Tax  Act,  $89  million;  payments  for 
hospital  insurance,  medical  care  and  extended  health  care. 


$4,264  million;  family  allowance  payments,  $2,020  million; 
guaranteed  income  payments,  $2,242  million;  spouse's  allow- 
ance payments,  $203  million;  old  age  security  payments, 
$6,140  million;  Canada  Assistance  Plan  payments,  $2,298 
million;  and,  post-secondary  education  payments,  $1,628 
million. 

Salaries  and  wages  accounted  for  $8,915  million  or  13%  of 
total  expenditure.  The  increase  of  $643  million  was  due  mainly 
to  higher  salary  rates. 

Public  debt  charges  totalled  $15,168  million  or  22%  of  the 
total  expenditure.  The  increase  of  $4,481  million  was  due  to  an 
increase  in  unmatured  debt  and  to  higher  interest  rates. 


TABLE  6.6 

EXPENDITURE  BY  STANDARD  OBJECT 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


Salaries  and  wages (1) 

Other  personnel  costs (1) 

Transportation  and  communications  (2) 

Information (3) 

Professional  and  special  services (4) 

Rentals (5) 

Purchased  repair  and  upkeep (6) 

Utilities,  materials  and  supplies  (7) 

Construction  and  acquisition  of  land,  buildings  and  works  (8) 

Construction  and  acquisition  of  machinery  and  equipment (9) 

Grants,  contributions  and  other  transfer  payments (10) 

Public  debt  charges  (II) 

All  other  expenditure (12) 

Total  standard  objects (1-12) 

Less:  receipts  and  revenues  credited  to  the  vote  (13) 

Net  total  departmental  expenditure 


1981-82 


74,990 
7,032 


1980-81 


66,525 
4,148 


Increase 

or 

decrease  ( - ) 


Amount 


8,915 

8,272 

643 

8 

1,903 

1,506 

397 

26 

1.231 

1,154 

77 

7 

225 

190 

35 

18 

2,011 

1,704 

307 

18 

585 

507 

78 

15 

709 

576 

133 

23 

1,942 

1,646 

296 

18 

757 

555 

202 

36 

1,417 

1.198 

219 

18 

36,498 

33.791 

2.707 

8 

15,168 

10,687 

4,481 

42 

3,629 

4,739 

-  1,110 

-23 

8,465 
2,884 


13 
70 


67,958 


62,377 


5,581 


6*12  PUBLIC  A  CCOUNTS,  1 981  -82 

SUPPLEMENTARY  STATEMENTS 
Interest  on  the  Public  Debt 

Interest  on  the  public  debt  consists  of  interest  on  unmatured        increases  of  $426  million  in  respect  of  the  superannuation 
debt  and  specified  purpose  accounts.  accounts. 

The  increase  of  $3,869  million  in  interest  on  unmatured  debt  A  comparative  summary  of  interest  on  the  public  debt  is 

reflects  an   increase  in  unmatured  debt  which   rose  from       presented  in  Table  6.7. 

$83,149  million  at  March  31,   1981   to  $92,353  million  at  r.  *    i     r-  *       .       ♦u       ur   ^  u*        u   c      ^  ■    c    .• 

*°  '  7 -. ,   Vrtoi.      J       •  •    •.       ♦ -„«L  xuo  ;«^r^oc^  Detais  of  mterest  on  the  public  debt  can  be  found  m  Section 

March  31,  1982  and  an  mcrease  in  interest  rates.  The  increase        ^^  ^^  ^^.^  volume 

in  interest  on  specified  purpose  accounts  was  due  mainly  to 

TABLE  6.7 

INTEREST  ON  THE  PUBLIC  DEBT 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

Increase 
or 
_  1981-82  1980-81        decrease  (- ) 

Unmatured  debt — 
Marketable  bonds — 

Payable  in  Canadian  currency 

Payable  in  foreign  currencies — 

United  States  dollars 

Deutsche  marks 

Swiss  francs 

Japanese  yen 

Canada  savings  bonds 

Special  non-marketable  bonds — 

Canada  Pension  Plan  investment  Fund 

Treasury  bills 

Notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies — 

United  States  dollars 

Deutsche  marks 

Swiss  francs 

Japanese  yen 

12,269  8,400  3,869 
Specified  purpose  accounts — 

Superannuation  accounts 2,328  1,902  426 

Government  Annuities  Account gO  81  - 1 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 143  91  52 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account 37  13  24 

Deposit  and  trust  accounts 255  157  98 

Other !."I!"Z                17  13  4 

2.860  2.257  603 


4,500 

3,630 

870 

192 

165 

27 

28 

36 

-8 

7 

7 

10 

11 

-  1 

4.737 

3.849 

888 

3,882 

2,048 

1,834 

14 

12 

2 

3,474 

2.374 

1,100 

97 

54 

43 

II 

13 

-2 

27 

22 

5 

27 

28 

-  1 

162 

117 

45 

Total 15J29  10,657  4,472 


Expenditure  under  Statutory  Authority 

The  spending  authority  provided  by  statutory  appropriations  In  1981-82,  expenditure  under  statutory  authority  amounted 

is  for  specified  purposes  and  for  such  amounts  and  such  time  to  $39,602  million,  accounting  for  58%  of  the  total  budgetary 

as  the  acts  prescribe.  This  spending  authority  does  not  general-  expenditure  of  $67,958  million. 

ly  lapse  at  the  end  of  the  year  in  which  it  was  granted.  -»-  . ,    ^  o 

Expenditure  under  such  authority  accounts  for  more  than  half  ^^^^^  ^j.  Presents  a  comparative  summary  of  these  statu- 

of  the  total  budgetary  expenditure  each  year.  ^°'"y  expenditures. 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE 
TABLE  6.8 


6-13 


BUDGETARY  EXPENDITURE  UNDER  STATUTORY  AUTHORITY 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


Interest  and  other  public  debt  charges 

Old  age  security  payments 

Federal-provincial  fiscal  arrangements  and  public  utilities  

Contributions  to  the  provinces  for  hospital  insurance,  medical  care  and  extended  health  care 
under  Federal-Provincial  Fiscal  Arrangements  and  Established  Programs  Financing  Act, 
1977  

Revolving  funds 

Payments  to  the  provinces  under  the  Canada  Assistance  Plan 

Guaranteed  income  supplement  payments 

Family  allowance  payments 

Post-secondary  education  payments  to  provinces 

Government's  contribution  to  the  Unemployment  insurance  Account 

Deletion  of  accounts  in  accordance  with  the  Adjustment  of  Accounts  Act 

Payments  to  railway  and  transportation  companies  pursuant  to  the  Railway  Act 

Spouse's  allowance  payments 

Grants  to  municipalities  and  other  taxing  authorities 

Oil  substitution  and  conservation  

Contributions  under  the  Crop  Insurance  Act 

Payments  to  producers  for  named  agricultural  commodities 

Interest  payments  under  the  Canada  Student  Loans  Act 

Canadian  home  insulation 

Payments  in  connection  with  the  Western  Grain  Stabilization  Act 

Contribution  in  respect  of  fishermen's  benefits 

Judges'  salaries,  allowances  and  annuities 

Payments  to  railway  and  trucking  companies  of  amounts  determined  pursuant  to  the 
provisions  of  the  Atlantic  Region  Freight  Assistance  Act 

Insurance  payments  under  the  enterprise  development  program 

Ministers,  Members  of  Parliament  and  Senators — Salaries  and  motor  car  allowances 

Superannuation,  supplementary  retirement  benefits,  death  benefits  and  other  pensions — 
Public  Service — 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Public  Service  Superannuation  Account  321 

Statutory  payments  under  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Act  264 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Canada  and  Quebec  Pension  Plans 71 

Government's  contribution  as  employer  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account  100 

Government's    matching    contribution    to    the    Supplementary    Retirement    Benefits 

Account 66 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Death  Benefit  account 6 

Amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency 576 

Less:  interest  applied  against  amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency  and  charged  as 

interest  on  the  public  debt 355 

recoveries  from  revolving  funds 28 


Canadian  Forces — 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account  ..  159 

Statutory  payments  under  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Act  141 

Government's  contribution  as  employer  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account  27 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Canada  and  Quebec  Pension  Plans 20 

Government's    matching    contribution    to    the    Supplementary    Retirement    Benefits 

Account 17 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Death  Benefit  account I 

Amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency 302 

Less:  interest  applied  against  amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency  and  charged  as 
interest  on  the  public  debt  


Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police — 

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superan- 
nuation Account  

Government's  contribution  as  employer  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account  

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Canada  and  Quebec  Pension  Plans 

Statutory  payments  under  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Act  

Government's  matching  contribution  to  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits 
Account 

Amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency 

Less:  interest  applied  against  amortization  of  actuarial  deficiency  and  charged  as 
interest  on  the  public  debt 

Payments  under  the  Defence  Services  and  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Pension 
Continuation  Act 

All  other  statutory  expenditure 

Total 


1,404 


383 


667 


262 


52 
7 
5 

12 

5 
30 


111 
29 


15,168 
6,140 
4.535 


4,264 
3,043 
2,298 
2,242 
2,020 
1,628 
957 

334 
203 
210 
141 
116 
107 
96 
95 
94 
90 
65 

57 
44 
39 


1,021 


405 


82 


17 
177 


39.602 


1980-81 


Increase 

or 

decrease  ( - ) 


288 

202 

68 

72 

55 

4 

456 


371 

25 


1,145 


396 


142 

109 

19 

17 

15 

1 

271 


574 


271 


44 
5 
5 

10 

4 
26 


94 


19 


10,827 
5,322 
3,788 


3,980 
-505 
1,941 
1,918 
1,851 
1,605 
2,416 
1,318 
252 
178 


100 

84 

119 
74 
60 

51 

27 


749 


303 


75 


18 

36 


4.341 
818 

747 


284 

2,538 

357 

324 

169 

23 

1,459 

1,318 

82 

25 

210 

141 

16 

107 

12 

95 

-25 

16 

5 

6 

44 
12 


272 


102 


-I 

141 


36,587 


3,015 


6'14 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Monthly  Expenditure  by  Major  Spending 
Department 

Table  6.9  presents  a  summary  of  expenditure  by  month  for 
1981-82. 

TABLE  6.9 

MONTHLY  EXPENDITURE  BY  MAJOR  SPENDING  DEPARTMENT 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


National 

Health  Secretary 

and  National  of 

Finance      Welfare  Defence     Transport         State 


Employ- 
ment 
and 

Immigra- 
tion 


Public 
Works 


Indian 
Affairs 

and 
North- 
ern 
Develop- 
ment 


Energy, 
Mines 

and  External 

Resources      Affairs     Other     Total 


April,  1981  

May 

June 

July  

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January,  1982 

February  

March 

Supplementary 

Total  departmental  expendi- 
ture          19,824        17,818       6,028 


1,289 

1,409 

214 

157 

169 

67 

90 

140 

558 

91 

576 

4.760 

1,332 

1,419 

355 

87 

174 

177 

183 

87 

166 

54 

658 

4,692 

1,336 

1,443 

435 

138 

181 

180 

162 

93 

181 

93 

892 

5,134 

1,491 

1,469 

463 

185 

198 

216 

163 

124 

165 

116 

926 

5,516 

1,419 

1,225 

457 

145 

166 

138 

141 

134 

271 

66 

829 

4,991 

1,507 

1,663 

488 

150 

163 

149 

171 

131 

85 

90 

836 

5,433 

1,734 

1,477 

568 

267 

167 

143 

145 

125 

-8 

109 

1,078 

5,805 

1,826 

1,490 

483 

179 

157 

166 

147 

119 

-21 

79 

814 

5.439 

1,694 

1,502 

512 

243 

166 

196 

174 

110 

80 

102 

1,031 

5,810 

1,548 

1,510 

435 

115 

176 

204 

316 

108 

-16 

104 

1,093 

5,593 

1,683 

1,524 

457 

140 

148 

172 

138 

104 

17 

107 

570 

5,060 

2,672 

1,517 

510 

246 

221 

236 

227 

96 

73 

204 

907 

6,909 

293 

170 

651 

228 

178 

165 

131 

136 

-153 

70 

947 

2,816 

2,280 


2,264 


2,209 


2,188 


1,507 


1,398 


1,285     11,157     67,958 


SECTION 


7 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Loans,  Investments 
and  Advances 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Crown  corporations  and  agencies  7.4 

Lending  institutions 7.4 

All  other 7.8 

Summary  of  the  financial  position  of  agent  Crown  corpora- 
tions    7.18 

Government  of  Canada  financial  interest  in  agent  and  other 

Crown  corporations 7.20 

Provincial  and  territorial  governments 7.22 

National  governments  including  developing  countries 7.28 

International  organizations  7.31 

Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund  advances 7.34 

Government  controlled  corporations 7.35 

Private  sector  enterprises 7.36 

Miscellaneous 7.41 

Allowance  for  valuation 7.46 

Supplementary  statement — 

Recorded  uncollected  interest  7.47 


7*2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND 
ADVANCES 

Loans,  investments  and  advances  is  a  category  of  assets 
representing  financial  claims  and  equity  held  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada.  They  are  made  under  parliamentary  appro- 
priations. Some  of  these  appropriations  permit  repayments  to 
be  used  for  further  loans  and  advances.  Many  appropriations 
are  non-lapsing,  that  is,  the  unexpended  balances  may  be 
carried  forward  from  year  to  year.  Details  of  the  use  of  these 
non-budgetary  appropriations,  for  loans,  investments  and 
advances,  can  be  found  in  the  departmental  sections  of  Volume 
II. 

Loans,  investments  and  advances  are  recorded  at  cost  and 
are  subject  to  valuation  to  reflect  estimated  losses  on  realiza- 
tion. Foreign  currency  transactions  are  translated  and  record- 
ed in  Canadian  currency  equivalents  at  the  exchange  rates 
prevailing  at  the  transaction  dates.  Loans,  investments  and 
advances  resulting  from  foreign  currency  transactions  are,  in 
turn,  reported  at  year-end  closing  rates  of  exchange;  net  gains 
are  credited  to  revenue  as  premium  and  discount  on  exchange, 
while  net  losses  are  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure  as  a 
statutory  item  in  the  Department  of  Finance. 

An  allowance  has  been  established  to  reflect  estimated 
losses  on  realization  of  financial  claims  held  by  the  Govern- 
ment. This  allowance  has  been  authorized  by  the  Minister  of 
Finance  under  Section  54(2)(b)  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

Revenue  received  during  the  year,  on  loans,  investments  and 
advances,  is  credited,  when  received,  to  return  on  investments. 
Details  of  return  on  investments,  for  loans,  investments  and 
advances,  are  disclosed   in  Section    14  of  this  volume.   In 


accordance  with  stated  accounting  policies,  accrued  interest 
and  interest  due  but  not  received  are  not  recorded  as  revenue. 
Table  7.13  gives  details  of  recorded  uncollected  interest. 

Gross  transactions  and  year-end  balances  of  loans,  invest- 
ments and  advances  are  presented  as  follows: 

— Crown  corporations  and  agencies; 

— provincial  and  territorial  governments; 

— national  governments  including  developing  countries; 

— international  organizations; 

— Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund  advances; 

— Government  controlled  corporations; 

— private  sector  enterprises;  and, 

— miscellaneous. 

Transactions  and  balances  are  further  summarized  in  Sec- 
tions 1  and  2  of  this  volume. 

Some  tables  in  this  section  present  the  continuity  for  each 
account  by  showing  the  opening  and  closing  balances,  as  well 
as  receipts  and  other  credits  and  payments  and  other  charges, 
i.e.  inflow  and  outflow  of  transactions.  In  addition,  the  term 
"accounts  without  current  transactions"  has  been  included  in 
some  tables  in  order  to  provide  a  link  with  figures  published  in 
the  previous  year's  edition  of  the  Public  Accounts  to  show  net 
transactions  in  accounts  which  were  closed  out  in  the  previous 
year. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

TABLE  7.1 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


^yo' 


7*3 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


1982 


1981 


Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 
Lending  institutions.  Table  7.2 — 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corpora- 
tion    10,189,124,246 

Export  Development  Corporation  1,550,248,256 

Farm  Credit  Corporation 3,378,934,607 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 1,156,000,000 

16,274.307.109 

All  other  Crown  corporations  and  agencies. 
Table  7.3— 

Air  Canada 622,162,009 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 880,627,470 

Canadian  National  Railways 2,753,102,278 

Petro-Canada 1,443,799,853 

Other 1,495,231,428 

7.194.923.038 

Total  Crown  corporations  and  agencies 23,469,230,147 

Other  loans,  investments  and  advances — 
Provincial  and  territorial  governments.  Table 

7.6 1,236.193,044 

National   governments   including  developing 

countries.  Table  7.7 2,942,015,950 

International  organizations.  Table  7.8 2,254,843,354 

Less:  notes  payable.  Table  7.8  816,329,249 

1.438.514. 105 

Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund  advances  less  allow- 
ance for  conditional  benefits.  Table  7.9 312,466,485 

Government   controlled   corporations.   Table 

7.10 440,492,772 

Private  sector  enterprises.  Table  7. 1 1  180,489,433 

Miscellaneous,  Table  7.12 264,672,620 

Total  other  loans,  investments  and  advances  6,814,844,409 

30,284,074,556 

Less:  allowance  for  valuation 2,300,000,000 

Total 27,984,074,556 


378,166,429 
116,600,260 
154,483,175 
171,000,000 
820.249.864 


14,661,076 
10,350,078 
6,720,543 

332.474,742 
364.206.439 


200,000,000 

577,200,000 

112.992,128 

502,654,000 

46,000,000 

1,438.846.128 


3,200,000 

6,897,000 

128.972,000 

691,580,582 

830.649.582 


200,000,000 

10,388,157,817 
1,546,640,124 
3,727,105,432 
1,031,000,000 

16.892,903.373 


607,500,933 
873,477,392 
2,753,278,735 
1,572,771,853 
1,854,337.268 
7.661. 366.1 8 1 


200.000.000 

199.033.571 
-3,608,132 
348,170,825 
-125,000,000 
618.596.264 


-14,661,076 
-7,150,078 
176,457 
128,972,000 
359,105,840 
466.443.143 


66,338,061 

-  19,348,858 

270,315,672 

101,000,000 

216.304.875 


-13,382,875 
697,420,506 
7,908,476 
440,000.000 
274,918.342 
537.813.247 


1,184,456,303 


2,269,495,710 


24,554,269,554    1,085,039,407 


321,508,372 


49,141,060 

39,284,274 

360,692 

298,680,579 

299.041.271 

48.678,572 

147.123 

36,572,977 

428,349,979 


20,807.753 

1.207,859,737 

-  28,333,307 

-246,132,630 

295.714.902 
330,430,385 
135,392,294 
465.822.679 

3,198,446,578 

2,584,913,047 

979,617,534 

i.605.295.513 

256,430,628 
330,069,693 
163,288,285 
166.781,408 

228,925,499 
288,981,734 
179,097,611 
109,884,123 

19,023,052 

282,810,965 

-  29,655,520 

-36,785,153 

110,312 

22,896,433 

430,969,743 

440,455,961 
166,812,889 
267,292,384 

-36,811 

-13,676,544 

2,619,764 

1,588,120 
38,280,268 
18,602,337 

901,215,256 


1,255,344,874 


7,168,974,027 


354,129,618 


114,362,564 


2,085,671,559 
200,000,000 


3,524,840,584 


31,723,243,581 
2,500,000,000 


1,439,169,025 
200,000,000 


207,145,808 
700.000,000 


2.285.671.559 


3.524,840.584 


29,223,243,581 


1,239,169,025 


492,854,192 


7-4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


CROWN  CORPORATIONS  AND 
AGENCIES 

Loans  to,  and  investments  in,  Crown  corporations  represent 
the  balance  of  financial  claims  held  by  the  Government 
against  Crown  corporations  for  working  capital,  capital  expen- 
diture and  other  purposes,  investment  in  the  capital  stock  of 
corporations  and  advances  to  corporations  for  re-lending. 

A  Crown  corporation  is  ultimately  accountable  to  Parlia- 
ment, through  a  Minister  of  the  Crown,  for  the  conduct  of  its 
affairs.  Crown  corporations  are  listed  in  Schedules  B,  C  and  D 
of  the  Financial  Administration  Act.  Most  of  the  Crown 
corporations  listed  in  the  Schedules  to  the  Financial  Adminis- 
tration Act  are  agents  of  Her  Majesty,  in  the  right  of  Canada. 
This  power  is  granted  in  any  one  of  the  following  ways: 
(i)  designation  as  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty  by  Parliament 
through  the  special  act  of  incorporation; 


(ii)  statutory  authorization  as  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty;  and, 
(iii)  proclamation  as  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty  by  the  Govern- 
ment Companies  Operation  Act. 
Financial  statements  of  Crown  corporations  and  agencies 
listed  in  Schedules  C  and  D  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act  can  be  found  in  Volume  III.  Information  on  Schedule  B 
corporations  can  be  found  in  the  departmental  sections  of 
Volume  II. 

Lending  Institutions 

Table  7.2  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans,  investments  and  advances 
which  were  made  to  Crown  corporations  and  agencies  provid- 
ing fmancial  assistance. 


TABLE  7.2 

CROWN  CORPORATIONS  AND  AGENCIES— LENDING  INSTITUTIONS 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation- 
Capital  stock  

Housing 

Real  estate 

Joint  projects 

Urban  renewal  scheme 

University  housing  projects 

Sewage  treatment  projects 

Mortgage  and  loan  purchase  fund 

Mortgage  insurance  fund 

Ownership  assistance 

Export  Development  Corporation — 

Capital  stock  

Capital  surplus 

Loans 

Farm  Credit  Corporation — 

Capital  stock  

Notes 

Farm  syndicates  loan  fund 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Total 


Receipts  and 

Payments  and 

April  1/1981 

other  credits 

other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

$ 

S 

$ 

$ 

$ 

S 

200,000,000 

200,000,000 

200,000,000 

25,000,000 

25,000,000 

6,670,087,480 

184,209,282 

213,000,000 

6,698,878,198 

28,790,718 

68,529,926 

80,537,106 

19,084,490 

5,000,000 

66,452,616 

-  14,084,490 

-  13,780,479 

986,367,365 

54,760,044 

140,500,000 

1,072,107,321 

85,739,956 

108,650,430 

30,593,029 

3,524,879 

5,000,000 

32,068,150 

1,475,121 

-  2,688,630 

398,642,383 

1,954,873 

396,687,510 

-1,954,873 

-  15,119,317 

1,076.778,783 

27,756,778 

81,500,000 

1,130,522,005 

53,743,222 

37,168,576 

1,052,605 

376,513 

676,092 

-376,513 

-355,331 

197,600,000 

131,700,000 

329,300,000 

131,700,000 

-  15,100,000 

722,465,495 

86,499,570 

500,000 

636,465,925 

-  85,999,570 

-  100,967,114 

10.189.124,246 

378.166.429 

577.200,000 

10,388,157,817 

199,033,571 

66.338.061 

305,000,000 

47,000,000 

352,000,000 

47,000,000 

20,000,000 

25,000,000 

25,000,000 

1,220,248,256 

116,600,260 

65,992,128 

1,169,640,124 

-50,608,132 

-  39,348,858 

1.550.248.256 

116,600.260 

112,992,128 

1,546,640,124 

-3.608.132 

-  19.348.858 

129,700,000 

13,148,000 

142,848,000 

13,148,000 

10,400,000 

3,235,249,845 

151,073,699 

483,506,000 

3,567,682,146 

332,432,301 

257,965,910 

13,984,762 

3,409,476 

6,000,000 

16,575,286 

2,590,524 

1,949,762 

3.378.934,607 

154.483.175 

502.654.000 

3,727,105,432 

348.170.825 

270.315,672 

222,000,000 

46,000,000 

268,000,000 

46,000,000 

38,000,000 

934,000,000 

171,000,000 

763,000,000 

-  171,000,000 

-  139,000,000 

1,156.000,000 

171.000.000 

46.000.000 

1,031,000,000 

-  125.000.000 

-  101.000,000 

16,274,307,109 

820,249,864 

1,438,846,128 

16,892,903,373 

618,596,264 

216,304,875 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7'5 


Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Deposit 
Insurance  Corporation  Act  to  provide  insurance  (of  up  to 
$20,000  per  depositor  per  institution)  on  deposits  with  federal 
institutions  and  approved  provincial  institutions. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Finance,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprietary 
corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act. 

Section  37  of  the  Act  provides  that  the  Minister  of  Finance 
with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council  may  advance  to 
the  Corporation  amounts  by  way  of  loan  on  such  terms  and 
conditions  as  the  Governor  in  Council  may  determine.  The 
aggregate  of  such  loans  outstanding  at  any  time  shall  not 
exceed  $500,000,000. 

During  the  year,  a  loan  was  made,  to  provide  contingency 
financing,  and  remained  on  deposit  in  the  Consolidated  Reve- 
nue Fund  (see  Table  8.12  in  Section  8  of  this  volume).  The 
loan  has  been  repaid  in  1982-83. 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Mort- 
gage and  Housing  Corporation  Act  to  promote  the  construc- 
tion of  new  houses,  the  repair  and  modernization  of  existing 
houses,  the  improvement  of  housing  and  living  conditions  in 
Canada  and  to  promote  the  development  of  communities 
through  the  provision  of  infrastructure  facilities. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Public  Works,  and  is  listed  as  a 
proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$969  million,  it  paid  interest  of  $850  million  and  transferred 
$22  million  of  profit  to  the  Government. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  authorized  by  Section  17  of  the  Canada  Mortgage  and 
Housing  Corporation  Act. 

Housing 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  the  following  sections  of  the  National  Housing 
Act:  Section  15,  to  a  limited-dividend  company  for  construc- 
tion of  a  low-rental  housing  project;  Section  16,  to  an  incorpo- 
rated company  engaged  in  the  mining,  lumbering,  logging  or 
fishing  industries  for  construction  of  low  or  moderate-cost 
housing  projects  in  areas  or  localities  that  are  adjacent  to  or 
connected  with  the  operations  of  the  borrower;  Section  58,  to  a 
person  unable  to  obtain  a  loan  from  an  approved  lender  for 
construction  of  a  house  or  housing  project;  and,  Section  59,  to 
an  Indian  for  the  construction  of  housing  projects  on  Indian 
reserves. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.813%  to 
13.014%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
1 8  to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  September 
30,  1997  and  December  31,  2031. 


Real  estate 

Section  55  of  the  National  Housing  Act  authorizes  advances 
for  the  acquisition  and  construction  of  real  estate  by  the 
Corporation. 

During  the  year,  additional  advances  were  authorized  by 
Vote  L65,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  9.525%  to 
10.867%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  period  of  50  years 
and  mature  December  3 1 ,  203 1 . 

Joint  projects 

Section  40  of  the  National  Housing  Act  authorizes  advances 
for  the  purpose  of  undertaking  projects  jointly  with  the  govern- 
ment of  any  province.  Provision  is  made  for  repayment  of  all 
or  any  part  of  the  outstanding  principal  advances  under  this 
section  without  notice  or  bonus,  if  the  Corporation  so  desires. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.467%  to 
17.96%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
25  to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  March  3 1 , 
2005  and  December  31,  2031. 

Urban  renewal  scheme 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  Section  26  of  the  National  Housing  Act  to  a 
province  or  municipality  to  assist  in  the  implementation  of  an 
urban  renewal  scheme. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.31%  to 
8.75%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  20 
to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  December  31, 
1982  and  December  31,  1996. 

University  housing  projects 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  Section  48  of  the  National  Housing  Act  to  a 
university  for  construction  of  a  university  housing  project,  or 
for  the  acquisition  of  existing  buildings,  and  their  conversion 
into  a  university  housing  project. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to 
10.054%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
20  to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  September 
30,  2012  and  December  31,  2031. 

Sewage  treatment  projects 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  Section  53  of  the  National  Housing  Act  to  any 
province,  municipality  or  municipal  sewerage  corporation  for 
the  purpose  of  assisting  in  the  construction  or  expansion  of  a 
sewage  treatment  project. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to 
10.376%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
1 8  to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  September 
30,  1993  and  December  31,  2030. 


7-6 

Mortgage  and  loan  purchase  fund 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  Section  10(l)(b)  of  the  National  Housing  Act  to 
holders  of  National  Housing  Act  insured  mortgages. 

The  payment  of  an  advance  shall  not  be  greater  than  the 
amount  by  which  $100,000,000  exceeds  the  total  amount  of 
advances  charged  to  the  mortgage  and  loan  purchase  fund,  less 
the  total  amount  of  moneys  paid  by  the  Corporation  pursuant 
to  Section  10(2)  of  the  National  Housing  Act. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  5.875%  per  annum, 
are  repayable  over  a  period  of  20  years  and  mature  on  March 
31,  1985. 

Mortgage  insurance  fund 

Advances  have  been  made  pursuant  to  Section  9(6)  of  the 
National  Housing  Act  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  discharge 
its  obligations  under  Section  8  of  the  Act. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  1 1.875%  to 
18.375%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
1  to  5  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  December 
21,  1984  and  January  20,  1986. 

Ownership  assistance 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to  lend 
money  under  Section  34.15  of  the  National  Housing  Act  to  an 
individual  for  assistance  in  the  construction  or  acquisition  of  a 
house  or  the  acquisition  of  a  condominium  unit. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.625%  to 
9.625%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
20  to  50  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  December 
31,  1993  and  June  30,  1997. 

Export  Development  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Export  Develop- 
ment Act  to  facilitate  and  develop  export  trade  by  the  provi- 
sion of  insurance,  guarantees,  loans  and  other  financial 
facilities. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  and  is 
listed  as  a  proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the 
Financial  Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$36  million. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  authorized  by  Section  1 1  of  the  Export  Development 
Act. 

Capital  surplus 

Section  1 1(3)  of  the  Export  Development  Act  provides  for  a 
maximum  amount  of  $25,000,000  as  contributed  capital. 

Loans 

Loans  to  the  Corporation  are  authorized  by  Sections  29  and 
3 1  of  the  Export  Development  Act. 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

Loan  transactions  during  the  year  were  as  follows: 


Receipts 

Payments 

and  other 

and  other 

April  1/1981 

credits 

charges     March  31/1982 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Section  29— 

Canadian     cur- 

rency   

580.535,006 

98,843,750 

481.691,256 

US        currency 

(Cdn    equiva- 

lent)  

26,960,540 

7,027.040 

19.933.500 

607.495.546 

105.870,790 

501.624.756 

Section  31 — 

Canadian     cur- 

rency   

431,680,037 

4.721.172 

13.121.971 

440,080,836 

US        currency 

(Cdn    equiva- 

lent)  

172,524,180 

6.008.298 

45.923,798 

212,439,680 

604.204.217 

10.729.470 

59.045.769 

652.520.516 

Revaluation 

8,548.493 

6,946,359 

15,494,852 

Total 

1,220.248,256 

116,600,260 

65,992,128 

1,169.640.124 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  4  to  9  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.438%  to  11% 
per  annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  between 
April  15,  1982  and  December  15,  1992,  $365,420,852; 

(b)  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  10  to  15  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.5%  to  9.5%  per 
annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  between  July  15, 
1983  and  April  15,  1995,  $398,139,964;  and, 

(c)  repayable  over  a  22  year  period,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  3.25%  to  8.25%  per  annum  and 
maturing  on  November  20,  1995  and  March  25,  2008, 
$390,584,457. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $87  mil- 
lion to  the  Government. 


Farm  Credit  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Farm  Credit  Act 
to  assist  Canadian  farmers  to  establish  and  develop  sound 
farm  enterprises  through  the  use  of  long-term  credit. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Agriculture,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 
tary corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  authorized  by  Section  12  of  the  Farm  Credit  Act. 

Notes 

Promissory  notes  are  issued  to  the  Minister  of  Finance  in 
respect  of  loans  made  pursuant  to  Section  13  of  the  Act  to 
provide  the  Corporation  with  funds  for  making  loans  to  farm- 
ers. The  total  amount  of  such  loans  outstanding  at  any  time 
may  not  exceed  twenty-five  times  the  capital  of  the 
Corporation. 


i 


UNS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  periods  of  20  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  11.75%  to  15%  per  annum  and 
maturing  July  1,  2001  and  July  1,  2002,  $874,230,608; 

(b)  repayable  over  periods  of  20  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  7.75%  to  9.75%  per  annum  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  July  1,  1990  and 
July  1,2000,  $1,747,237,127; 

(c)  repayable  over  periods  of  20  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  5.25%  to  7.5%  per  annum  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  December  1,  1985 
and  July  1,  1996,  $798,363,170; 

(d)  repayable  over  periods  of  19  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  5.25%  to  6%  per  annum  and  matur- 
ing at  various  dates  between  December  1,  1985  and 
July  1,  1986,  $116,582,178; 

(e)  repayable  over  periods  of  14  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  5.312%  to  6.875%  per  annum  and 
maturing  July  1,  1982,  $10,154,081;  and, 

(/)  repayable  over  periods  of  25  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  3.5%  to  5.75%  per  annum  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  December  31,  1982 
and  June  30,  1986,  $21,1 14,982. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $283 
million  to  the  Government. 

Farm  syndicates  loan  fund 

Advances  have  been  made  by  the  Minister  of  Finance 
pursuant  to  Section  8  of  the  Farm  Syndicates  Credit  Act,  to 
enable  the  Corporation  to  make  loans.  Section  3(1)  of  the  Act 
allows  the  Corporation  to  make  loans  to  a  farm  syndicate  (a) 
to  purchase  farm  machinery,  (b)  to  purchase,  erect  or  improve 
buildings,  or  (c)  to  purchase  or  improve  land  on  which  build- 
ings are  or  are  to  be  erected — for  use  primarily  by  the 
syndicate  or  its  members  in  their  farming  operations.  Section  8 
of  the  Act  limits  total  advances  which  may  be  outstanding  to 
$25,000,000. 

The  advances  are  repayable  over  periods  of  5  years,  bear 
interest  at  rales  varying  from  7%  to  10%  per  annum  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  July  1,  1982  and  July  1, 
1987. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $2  million 
to  the  Government. 


7'7 


Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

The  Corporation  was  incorporated  under  the  Federal  Busi- 
ness Development  Bank  Act  to  promote  and  assist  in  the 
establishment  and  development  of  business  enterprises  in 
Canada  by  providing  financial  assistance,  management  coun- 
selling, management  training  information  and  advice  and  such 
other  services  as  are  ancillary  or  incidental  to  any  of  the 
foregoing. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  and  is 
listed  as  a  proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the 
Financial  Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$18  million. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  authorized  by  Sections  28  and  52  of  the  Federal 
Business  Development  Bank  Act. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  pursuant  to 
Section  30  of  the  Federal  Business  Development  Bank  Act. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8%  to  10.125% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  1  to  8 
years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and 
August  1,  1988. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $8 1  mil- 
lion to  the  Government. 


7*8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


All  Other  Crown  Corporations  and  Agencies 

Table  7.3  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans,  investments  and  advances 
which  were  made  to  Crown  corporations  and  agencies  engaged 
in  activities  other  than  providing  financial  assistance. 


TABLE  7.3 

ALL  OTHER  CROWN  CORPORATIONS  AND  AGENCIES 


Net  increase  or  decrease  { — ) 


Air  Canada — 

Capital  stock  

Consolidated  loan  

Winnipeg  maintenance  hangar 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited — 

Capital  stock  

Contributed  capital 

Housing 

Bruce  heavy  water  plant 

Commercial  products  division  

Gentilly  II  nuclear  power  station 

Heavy  water  inventory  

Isotope  production  building  

Isotope  production  equipment  

Lepreau  nuclear  station 

Sheridan  Park  engineering  design  office 

Uranium  concentrate 

Working  capital 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Canadian  National  Railways — 

Capital  stock  

Consolidated  loan  

Yarmouth  Bar  Harbour  ferry  services — 

New  dock  and  facilities 

Canadian  Government  Railways — 

Working  capital 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Petro-Canada — 

Capital  stock — Common 

— Preferred 

Loans 

Less:  amount  recorded  as  investments  of  the 
Canadian  Ownership  Account  (see  Section 
8  of  this  volume)  


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

S 

S 

329,009,000 

279,353,009 

13,800,000 

622.162.009 

14,369,716 

291,360 

14.661,076 

329,009,000 

264,983,293 

13,508,640 

607.500.933 

-  14,369,716 

-291,360 

-  14.661.076 

-13,382,875 
-  13.382.875 

15,000,000 

149,159,473 

7,509,168 

142,057,782 

4,499,929 

151,000,000 

75,500,000 

3,600,000 

460,353 

7,861,936 

371,034 

1,500,000 

3,200,000 

1 5,000,000 

149,159,473 

7,048,815 

134,195,846 

4,128,895 

151,000,000 

74,000,000 

6,800,000 

-  460,353 

-7,861.936 

-371,034 

-  1,500,000 
3,200,000 

-437,795 

-7,300,159 

-  346.399 

-  65.500,000 
3,600,000 

299,400,000 

1,001,118 

1 1 ,900,000 

20,000,000 

880.627.470 

156,755 
10.350.078 

3.200.000 

299,400,000 

844,363 

11,900,000 

20,000,000 

873.477,392 

-  156,755 
-  7.150.078 

-  148,090 

-  627.288.063 

-  697.420.506 

2,496,480,732 
241,918,610 

6,223,175 

6,897,000 

2,503,377,732 
235,695,435 

6,897,000 
-6,223,175 

16.517.000 
-5.712,406 

122,540 

24,508 

98,032 

-  24,508 

-  24,508 

14,580,396 
2.753.102.278 

472,860 
6.720,543 

6.897.000 

14,107,536 
2,753,278.735 

-  472,860 
176.457 

-389,109 

-2,482,501 

7.908.476 

580,000,000 
863,799,853 

20,000,000 
108,972,000 
710,933,716 

600,000,000 

972,771,853 
710,933,716 

20,000,000 
108,972,000 
710,933,716 

440,000,000 

1.443.799.853 

710,933,716 
128.972.000 

710,933,716 
1,572.771.853 

710,933,716 
128.972.000 

440,000,000 

5,699,691,610 

31,731,697 

139,069,000 

5,807,028,913 

107,337,303 

-  262,894,905 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

TABLE  7.3 

ALL  OTHER  CROWN  CORPORATIONS  AND  KGE^Cm'^— Concluded 


7.9 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( — ) 


Other- 
Bank  of  Canada 

Canadian  Arsenals  Limited  

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation — 

Paid  in  capital  

Loans 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission 

Canadian  Film  Development  Corporation  

Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steamships 
Limited — 

Capital  stock  

Advances 

Canadian  Patents  and  Development  Limited  .. 

Canadian  Saltfish  Corporation 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Freshwater  Fish  Marketing  Corporation 

The  Jacques  Cartier  and  Champlain  Bridges 

Incorporated 

Loto  Canada  Inc 

National  Capital  Commission  

National  Harbours  Board 

Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission — 
Northern  Canada  Power  Commission  Act, 

Section  15 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission  Act, 

Section  14 

Working  capital 

Northern  Transportation  Company 

Limited — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Royal  Canadian  Mint 

The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority 

Teleglobe  Canada  

Uranium  Canada,  Limited 

VIA  Rail  Canada  Inc 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

S 

S 

S 

$ 

S 

5,920,000 

3,500,000 

33,000,000 

5,920,000 

3,500,000 

33,000,000 

10,000,000 

10,000,000 

7,000,000 

17.000.000 

12,312,000 

5,756,462 

7,000,000 

7.000.000 

238,940,800 

1,197,989 

306,627,638 
5,140,937 

10.000.000 

10.000.000 

79,998,838 

9,699,410 

-  7,000,000 

-  7.000.000 
67,686,838 

3,942,948 

-30,274,218 
4,998,768 

976 

324,024 

325.000 

296,199 

2,031,000 

21,300,000 

21,000,000 

976 

324,024 

325.000 

296,199 

1,731,000 

-300,000 

-2,915,000 

8,246,877 
22,200,000 
30.446.877 
11,552.895 

7,500,000 

7.500.000 

41,708,416 

300,000,000 

300.000.000 
48.483,108 

308,246.877 
14.700,000 

322.946.877 
18,327,587 

300,000,000 

-  7,500,000 

292.500.000 

6,774,692 

-  11,468,618 

-II.46S.618 

1.029,473 

59,752,867 

59,752,867 

43,619,097 
343,423,368 

14,650,186 
358.073.554 

2,945,128 

545,844 

77,395 

623.239 

200,000 
528,899 

528.899 

40,873,969 
343,406,423 

14,572,791 
357.979.214 

-2.745.128 

-  16.945 

-  77.395 

-  94.340 

-  2.854.065 

20,935,000 

-72,381 

20.862.619 

171,858,924 

5,357.357 

9,600,000 

176,101,567 

4.242,643 

167,116 

50,000 

7,500,000 

179.408.924 

5.357.357 

9.600,000 

50,000 

7,500,000 

183.651.567 

4.242.643 

167,116 

24,900,000 

37,225,105 

62.125.105 

20,467,730 

624,950,000 

15,393,708 

9 

9,300,000 

762,623 

762.623 

2,131,785 

3,007,405 

24.900,000 

36,462,482 

61.362.482 

18,335,945 

624,950,000 

12.386,303 

9 

9,300,000 

-  762.623 

-  762.623 
-2,131,785 

-  3,007,405 

- 161  Ml 

-  767,422 

-2,131,785 

-2.853.196 

-258.712.014 

1,495,231,428 

332,474,742 

691,580,582 

1,854,337,268 

359,105,840 

-274.918,342 

7,194,923,038 

364,206,439 

830,649,582 

7,661,366,181 

466,443,143 

-537,813,247 

7'10 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Air  Canada 

The  Corporation  was  incorporated  under  the  Air  Canada 
Act  to  provide  scheduled  domestic  and  international  air  ser- 
vices to  North  America,  the  British  Isles,  continental  Europe 
and  the  Caribbean. 

The  Corporation  is  not  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 
tary corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $21  mil- 
lion and  dividends  of  $13  million  to  the  Government. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

The  Air  Canada  Act,  1977,  authorized  the  reorganization  of 
Air  Canada  including  its  capital  structure.  This  reorganization 
resulted  in  the  Government  owning  all  of  Air  Canada's 
329,009  issued  shares  valued  at  $329,009,000. 

Consolidated  loan 

PC  1978-1172  dated  April  13,  1978  authorized  the  consoli- 
dation of  previous  loans. 

The  consolidated  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate  of  7.243% 
per  annum,  is  repayable  over  a  15  year  period  in  semi-annual 
instalments  due  April  13  and  October  13  of  each  year  and 
matures  on  April  13,  1993. 

Winnipeg  maintenance  hangar 

Specific  loans  have  been  made  for  the  purpose  of  construct- 
ing a  line  maintenance  hangar  at  Winnipeg,  Manitoba. 

All  loans  outstanding  as  of  January  1,  1981  were 
consolidated. 

The  consolidated  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate  of  8.31%  per 
annum,  is  repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in  annual  equal 
instalments  due  January  1  of  each  year  and  matures  on 
December  31,  2001. 


Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  by  the  Atomic  Energy 
Control  Act  to  develop  atomic  energy  for  peaceful  purposes.  It 
also  promotes,  assists  and  performs  research  and  development 
in  support  of  the  use  of  atomic  energy  that  will  meet  near  and 
long-term  Canadian  needs  for  low  cost  energy  and  will  be 
commercially  attractive  to  other  countries  and  which  will 
widen  and  improve  the  practical  application  of  atomic  energy 
in  fields  such  as  industry,  agriculture  and  medicine. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources,  and  is 
listed  as  an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 


$284    million.    It    paid    interest    of    $43    million    to    the 
Government. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

Contributed  capital 

Vote  L51a,  Appropriation  Act  No  3,  1977-78  and  PC 
1977-3586  dated  December  16,  1977  approved  the  conversion 
of  $149,159,473  of  indebtedness  into  contributed  capital  of  the 
Corporation. 

Housing 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  construction  of  hous- 
ing near  the  Whiteshell  Nuclear  Research  Establishment. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  3.5%  to  8.5% 
per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  4.354%,  are  repayable  over 
a  30  year  period  in  monthly  equal  instalments  and  mature  at 
various  dates  between  December  31,  1984  and  June  30,  2003. 

Bruce  heavy  water  plant 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  construction  of  the 
Bruce  heavy  water  plant  at  Douglas  Point,  Ontario. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.687%  to 
8.5%  per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  7.566%,  are  repayable 
over  a  1 7  year  period  in  monthly  equal  instalments  and  mature 
December  31,  1992. 

Commercial  products  division 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  construction  of  manu- 
facturing facilities  and  a  laboratory  at  South  March,  Ontario. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.687%  to 
7.5%  per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  6.933%,  are  repayable 
over  a  20  year  period  in  monthly  equal  instalments  and  mature 
at  various  dates  between  May  31,  1988  and  September  30, 
1992. 

Gentilly  II  nuclear  power  station 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  a  share  in  the  construction 
of  the  CANDU-PHW  600  generating  station  at  Gentilly 
under  agreement  with  the  Province  of  Quebec  and 
Hydro-Quebec. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8.375%  to  10% 
per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  9.18%  and  are  repayable  on 
demand  with  semi-annual  payments  of  interest  due  June  30 
and  December  31. 

Heavy  water  inventory 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  production  and  pur- 
chase of  heavy  water  for  lease  or  resale  to  Canadian  and 
foreign  users. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  9.125%  to 
10.125%  per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  10.015%,  are 
repayable  at  the  end  of  a  10  year  period  and  mature  January 
1,  1988.  Semi-annual  instalments  of  interest  are  payable  on 
May  1  and  November  1 . 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7M1 


Isotope  production  building 

Loans  have  been  made  to  assist  in  the  construction  of  an 
isotope  production  building. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L80,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  13.75%  to 
16.125%  i3er  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  14.558%.  A 
renewal/consolidation  note  will  be  issued  on  the  in-service  date 
or  April  1,  1984,  whichever  is  earlier. 


Isotope  production  equipment 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  for  the  purchase  of  new 
equipment  were  authorized  by  Vote  L85,  Appropriation  Acts 
No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 


Lepreau  nuclear  station 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  a  share  in  the  construction 
of  the  nuclear  generating  station  at  Lepreau. 

In  accordance  with  the  terms  and  conditions  of  the  original 
loans,  all  outstanding  loans  were  consolidated  on  April  1, 
1980.  The  consolidated  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate  of 
9.706%  per  annum,  is  repayable  over  a  25  year  period  in  equal 
instalments  starting  April  1,  1984  and  ending  April  1,  2008.  In 
accordance  with  PC  1981-1428  dated  May  28,  1981,  no 
interest  was  payable  on  this  loan  during  1981-82. 

Sheridan  Park  engineering  design  office 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  construction  of  office 
facilities. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.625%  to  6% 
per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  5.698%,  are  repayable  over 
a  20  year  period  in  equal  monthly  instalments  and  mature  on 
October  31,  1986. 


Uranium  concentrate 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  purchase  of  uranium 
concentrate  for  lease  to  Argentina. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rates  of  8.125%  and  8.375% 
per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  8.196%,  are  repayable  in 
annual  instalments  due  March  31,  and  mature  on  March  31, 
1984. 


Working  capital 

Advances  have  been  made  for  working  capital. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$20,000,000. 

The  advances  bear  interest  at  the  rate  dictated  by  the  Crown 
corporations'  1  year  borrowing  rate  in  effect  on  April  1  of  each 
year.  These  advances  are  payable  on  demand  with  annual 
payments  of  interest  due  on  March  3 1 . 


Canadian  National  Railways 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canadian  Na- 
tional Railways  Act  to  provide,  operate  and  manage  a  national 
system  of  railways. 

The  Corporation  is  not  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 
tary corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$158  million. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

PC  1978-1172  dated  April  13,  1978  authorized  the  conver- 
sion of  previous  loans,  investments  and  advances.  This  conver- 
sion increased  the  value  of  the  no-par  value  shares  of  the 
Canadian  National  Railways. 

During  the  year,  13,794  additional  common  shares  amount- 
ing to  $6,897,000  were  purchased  under  the  authority  of  Vote 
LI 00,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  dividends  of  $39 
million  to  the  Government. 

Consolidated  loan 

PC  1978-3052  dated  October  4,  1978  authorized  the  con- 
solidation of  previous  loans. 

The  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate  of  8.75%  per  annum,  is 
repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in  semi-annual  instalments 
due  June  30  and  December  30  of  each  year  and  matures  on 
June  30,  1998. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $21  mil- 
lion to  the  Government. 

Yarmouth  Bar  Harbour  ferry  services 

Recoverable  advances  have  been  made  for  the  completion  of 
the  ferry  terminal  at  Bar  Harbour,  Maine,  USA. 

The  new  dock  and  facilities  non-interest  bearing  advances 
are  repayable  at  $24,508  per  year  over  an  1 1  year  period,  and 
mature  on  December  28,  1986. 

Canadian  Government  Railways — Working  capital 

Under  authority  of  Section  8  of  the  Canadian  National 
Railways  Capital  Revision  Act,  the  balances  then  outstanding 
in  the  accounts  of  Canada  in  respect  of:  Canadian  Government 
Railways — Open  accounts,  Canadian  Government  Railways — 
Stores  accounts,  and  the  Saint  John  and  Quebec  Railway — 
Open  and  stores  accounts  were  adjusted  as  prescribed  in  the 
Act  and  the  residue  was  consolidated  under  the  title  of 
"Canadian  Government  Railways — Working  capital". 

The  balance  in  this  account  is  carried  against  the  Canadian 
National  Railways  without  interest  as  representing  a  fair 


7M2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


approximation  of  the  amount  of  Canadian  National  Railways 
working  capital  used  for  Canadian  Government  Railways  pur- 
poses. There  are  no  repayment  dates  for  this  account. 


Petro-Canada 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Petro-Canada 
Act  to: 

(a)  engage  in  exploration  for  and  development  of  hydrocar- 
bons and  other  types  of  fuel  or  energy; 

{b)  engage  in  research  and  development  projects  relating  to 
fuel  and  energy  resources; 

(c)  import,  produce,  transport,  distribute,  refine  and 
market  hydrocarbons  of  all  descriptions; 

(d)  produce,  distribute,  transport  and  market  other  fuels 
and  energy;  and, 

(e)  engage  or  invest  in  ventures  or  enterprises  related  to  the 
exploration,  production,  importation,  distribution, 
refining  and  marketing  of  fuel,  energy  and  related 
resources. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources,  and  is 
listed  as  a  proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the 
Financial  Administration  Act. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  authorized  by  Sections  5,  22  and  25  of  the  Petro- 
Canada  Act  and  Vote  5c,  Appropriation  Act  No  4,  1980-81. 

Loans 

This  account  reports  advances  to  Petro-Canada  to  finance 
the  acquisition  of  Petrofina  Canada  Inc,  in  accordance  with 
Vote  5c,  Appropriation  Act  No  4,  1980-81.  Petro-Canada 
issued  interest-free  notes  convertible  into  its  shares,  in  return. 
Petro-Canada's  investments  in  Petrofina  Canada  Inc  are 
reported  as  a  deduction  from  the  Canadian  Ownership 
Account  (see  Section  8  of  this  volume). 

Bank  of  Canada 

The  Bank  of  Canada  was  established  under  the  Bank  of 
Canada  Act  to  regulate  credit  and  currency  in  the  best  inter- 
ests of  the  economic  life  of  the  nation,  to  control  and  protect 
the  external  value  of  the  national  monetary  unit,  and  to 
mitigate,  by  its  influence,  fluctuations  in  the  general  levels  of 
production,  trade,  prices  and  employment  so  far  as  may  be 
possible  within  the  scope  of  monetary  action,  and  generally  to 
promote  the  economic  and  financial  welfare  of  Canada. 

The  Bank  is  not  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty  and  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Finance. 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Bank  is 
authorized  by  Section  17  of  the  Act.  An  amount  of  $5,000,000 
represents  the  par  value  of  100,000  shares  of  capital  stock  and 
the  remaining  balance  of  $920,000  represents  premiums  paid 
in  respect  of  the  acquisition  in  1938,  of  shares  held  by  the 
public. 

All  profits  of  the  Bank  are  remitted  to  the  Government.  In 
1981-82,  the  profit  of  the  Bank  was  $1,853  million. 


Canadian  Arsenals  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Companies  Act 
to  maintain  an  efficient  Canadian  manufacturing  capability 
for  certain  military  materiel  for  Canadian  defence  needs  and 
related  ammunition  products. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services,  and  is  listed  as 
an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$34,500. 

Advances  have  been  made  to  enable  the  Corporation  to 
pursue  its  mandate. 

The  advances  are  non-interest  bearing  and  have  no  fixed 
repayment  dates. 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Broadcasting 
Act  to  provide  a  national  broadcasting  service  in  both  official 
languages  and  an  international  broadcasting  service  predomi- 
nantly Canadian  in  content  and  character. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Communications,  and  is  listed  as  a 
proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$665  million. 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  purposes  of 
working  capital.  The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is 
not  to  exceed  $33,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  no  interest  and  are  repayable  using  the 
amounts  on  hand  (cash  and  marketable  securities)  which,  at 
any  time,  are  in  excess  of  what  is  required  by  the  Corporation 
for  working  capital  purposes. 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canadian  Com- 
mercial Corporation  Act  to  assist  in  the  development  of  inter- 
national trade;  to  assist  persons  in  obtaining  goods  from 
outside  Canada;  and,  to  dispose  of  goods  available  for  export. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  and  is 
listed  as  an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$19  million.  It  paid  interest  of  $207,325  to  the  Government. 

Paid  in  capital 

Section  8(1)  of  the  Act  states  that  advances  not  exceeding  in 
the  aggregate  $10,000,000  may  be  made  available  to  the 
Corporation  as  paid  in  capital. 

Loans 

Section  8(2)  of  the  Act  states  that  loans  may  be  made  to  the 
Corporation,  not  exceeding  the  aggregate  of  $10,000,000. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


I'U 


Canadian  Dairy  Commission 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canadian  Dairy 
Commission  Act  to  provide,  to  efficient  producers  of  milk  and 
cream,  the  opportunity  of  obtaining  a  fair  return  for  their 
labour  and  investment,  and  to  provide,  to  consumers  of  dairy 
products,  a  continuous  and  adequate  supply  of  high  quality 
dairy  products. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Agriculture,  and  is  listed  as  an  agency 
corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to  $4 
million. 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  the  purpose  of 
financing  its  dealings  in  dairy  products.  The  total  amount 
outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed  $300,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  14%  to 
17.125%  per  annum  and  are  repayable  over  a  period  of  1  year 
or  less. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $12  mil- 
lion to  the  Government. 

Canadian  Film  Development  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canadian  Film 
Development  Corporation  Act  to  foster  and  promote  the  de- 
velopment of  a  feature  film  industry  in  Canada. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Communications,  and  is  listed  as  an 
agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  amount  originally  appropriated  under 
Section  18(1)  of  the  Act  was  increased  to  $48,072,000  under 
authority  of  Votes  50  and  50c,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1 ,  No  2 
and  No  3,  1981-82. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to  $1 
million. 

The  advances  are  non-interest  bearing  and  have  no  fixed 
terms  of  repayment. 

Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steamships  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  to  provide  steamship  ser- 
vices between  Canada  and  the  West  Indies. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  an  agency 
corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

Advances 

The  advances  are  repayable  from  monies  to  be  received 
upon  collection  of  the  final  instalment  on  the  sale  of  the  eight 


vessels  to  Cuban  interests  which  was  due  to  be  paid  August  19, 
1963  by  an  irrevocable  letter  of  credit  issued  through  the  Bank 
of  America.  However,  on  July  3,  1963,  the  United  States 
Cuban  Assets  Control  Regulations  became  effective  which 
prohibited  the  Bank  of  America  from  honouring  payment  of 
the  draft.  Since  that  time,  legal  negotiations  to  obtain  a 
preferred  status,  in  order  to  collect  the  receivable,  have  not 
been  successful.  It  is  the  opinion  of  management,  based  on 
legal  counsel,  that  these  monies  plus  applicable  interest  will  be 
collected  when  the  regulations  are  repealed. 

A  waiver  of  the  application  of  the  statute  of  limitations  has 
been  obtained  until  January  1,  1984,  and  further  extensions 
will  be  obtained  as  required. 


Canadian  Patents  and  Development  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  Section  17  of  the 
National  Research  Council  Act  to  make  available  to  the  public 
through  licensing  arrangements  with  industry,  the  industrial 
and  intellectual  property  which  results  from  publicly-funded 
research  and  development. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  and  is 
listed  as  an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$350,000. 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 


Canadian  Saltfish  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Saltfish  Act  to 
regulate  interprovincial  and  export  trade  in  saltfish  in  order  to 
improve  the  earnings  of  primary  producers  of  cured  cod  fish. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Fisheries  and  Oceans,  and  is  listed  as 
an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

For  the  purpose  of  enabling  the  Corporation  to  carry  on  its 
operations  under  the  Act,  Section  1 7  provides  that  the  Gover- 
nor in  Council  may  authorize  the  Minister  of  Finance,  on  such 
terms  and  conditions  as  may  be  agreed  upon,  to  {a)  guarantee 
repayment  of  loans,  and  interest  thereon,  made  by  any  bank  to 
the  Corporation;  and,  {b)  make  loans  to  the  Corporation. 

The  aggregate  amount  of  loans  outstanding  at  any  time 
which  may  be  borrowed  from  all  lenders  is  $30,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.375%  to 
12.375%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  10  year  period  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  March  25,  1984  and  Septem- 
ber 30,  1990. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $1  million 
to  the  Government. 


7'14 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Corpo- 
rations Act  for  the  mining  and  refining  of  uranium  and  the 
production  of  nuclear  fuel  in  Canada. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources,  and  is 
listed  as  a  proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the 
Financial  Administration  Act. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

Votes  LI 07a  and  LI 07c,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No 
4,  1980-81,  authorized: 

(a)  the  Corporation  to  borrow  or  raise  money  for  debt 
repayment,  working  capital  and  capital  expenditures  by 
the  issue  and  sale  of  securities,  up  to  an  aggregate 
amount  not  to  exceed  $280,000,000;  and, 

{b)  the  transfer  by  the  Government  to  the  Corporation  of 
the  title  in  the  uranium  stockpiles  in  exchange  for 
shares  valued  at  $300  million.  Although  the  transfer  of 
the  uranium  stockpiles  was  authorized  in  1980-81,  the 
transfer  legally  took  effect  only  in  1981-82  following 
the  approval  of  the  terms  and  conditions  by  PC  1981-4/ 
1422  dated  May  28,  1981.  The  Government  received 
800,000  no  par  value  common  shares  and  1,600,000 
preferred  shares  for  a  total  value  of  $300,000,000  in 
consideration  of  such  transfer. 

During  the  year.  Vote  L107e,  Appropriation  Act  No  4, 
1981-82  increased  the  aggregate  borrowing  authority  to 
$600,000,000  and  provided  for  the  termination  of  the  author- 
ity at  December  3 1 ,  1988. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  for  the  purpose  of  meeting  capital 
and  operating  expenses. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.875%  to 
6.375%  per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  6.324%,  are  repay- 
able at  the  end  of  periods  varying  from  7  to  10  years  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  October  15,  1982  and  Decem- 
ber 31,  1984.  Semi-annual  payments  of  interest  are  payable  on 
June  30  and  December  3 1 . 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $2  million 
to  the  Government. 

Freshwater  Fish  Marketing  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Freshwater  Fish 
Marketing  Act  to  regulate  interprovincial  and  export  trade  in 
freshwater  fish  and  to  market  and  trade  in  fish. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Fisheries  and  Oceans,  and  is  listed  as 
a  proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

For  the  purpose  of  enabling  the  Corporation  to  carry  on  its 
operations  under  the  Act,  Section  1 7  provides  that  the  Gover- 
nor in  Council  may  authorize  the  Minister  of  Finance,  on  such 
terms  and  conditions  as  may  be  agreed  upon,  to  (a)  guarantee 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

repayment  of  loans,  and  interest  thereon,  made  by  any  bank  to 
the  Corporation;  and,  (b)  make  loans  to  the  Corporation. 

The  aggregate  amount  of  loans  outstanding  at  any  time 
which  may  be  borrowed  from  all  lenders  is  $20,000,000. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  a  10  year  period,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  4.875%  to  15.675%  per  annum  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  September  15,  1982 
and  March  31,  1992,  $5,172,587;  and, 

(b)  repayable  over  a  1  year  period,  bearing  interest  at  rates 
varying  from  14%  to  15.5%  per  annum  and  maturing  at 
various  dates  between  December  31,  1982  and  March 
18,  1983,  $13,155,000. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $1  million 
to  the  Government. 

The  Jacques  Cartier  and  Champlain  Bridges  Incorpo- 
rated 

The  Corporation  was  incorporated  under  the  Canada  Busi- 
ness Corporations  Act  to  operate  and  maintain  the  Jacques 
Cartier  Bridge  and  the  Champlain  Bridge  and  part  of  the 
Bonaventure  Autoroute  in  Montreal  (Quebec).  The  Corpora- 
tion is  a  wholly  owned  subsidiary  of  The  St  Lawrence  Seaway 
Authority. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty  and  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport. 

This  account  records  loans  which  were  transferred  to  the 
Corporation.  The  loans  used  to  bear  interest  at  rates  varying 
from  2.75%  to  6.875%  per  annum.  There  was  no  formal 
repayment  schedule.  Repayments  were  to  be  based  on  the 
availability  of  surplus  cash  after  meeting  the  operating 
expenses  of  each  bridge.  Tolls  having  been  eliminated  on  the 
Jacques  Cartier  Bridge  in  1962,  revenues  are  derived  mainly 
from  the  collection  of  tolls  on  the  Champlain  Bridge. 

On  December  17,  1981,  as  per  PC  1981-3635,  the  Certifi- 
cates of  Indebtedness  were  cancelled  and  replaced  by  Certifi- 
cates bearing  an  issue  date  of  April  1,  1981,  an  indefinite  due 
date,  with  no  repayment  of  principal  and  an  interest  rate  equal 
to  zero  percent  per  annum.  Furthermore,  accrued  and  unpaid 
interest  amounting  to  $44,513,580  as  of  March  31,  1981  on 
the  original  Certificates  are  to  be  treated  as  not  due  and 
payable  beginning  on  April  1,  1981. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to  $2 
million. 

Loto  Canada  Inc 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Business 
Corporations  Act  to  conduct  and  manage  a  national  lottery  in 
accordance  with  the  National  Lottery  Regulations.  The  net 
revenues  of  the  Corporation  are  to  be  paid  over  to  the  Receiver 
General  for  Canada  to  be  credited  to  a  National  Lottery 
Account  and  distributed  as  follows: 

82.5% — to  assist  in  the  financing  of  the  deficit  of  the  1976 
Olympic  Games  and  to  assist  in  the  financing  of  the 
1978  Commonwealth  Games; 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7-15 


I 


12.5% — to  the  provinces,  in  proportion  to  the  number  of 
lottery  tickets  sold  in  each  province;  and, 

5% — for  the  purpose  of  physical  fitness,  amateur  sport 
and  recreation  programs. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Secretary  of  State,  and  is  listed  as  an  agency 
corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administration 

Act. 

The  balance  in  the  account  represents  the  purchase,  fpr  $1, 
of  the  common  shares  of  Loto  Canada  Inc. 


National  Capital  Commission 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  National  Capital 
Act  to  prepare  plans  for  and  assist  in  the  development,  conser- 
vation and  improvement  of  the  National  Capital  Region  in 
order  that  the  nature  and  character  of  the  seat  of  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  may  be  in  accordance  with  its  national 
significance. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Public  Works,  and  is  listed  as  an 
agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$98  million. 

Loans  have  been  made  for  the  purpose  of  acquiring  property 
in  the  National  Capital  Region.  During  the  year,  additional 
loans  were  authorized  by  Vote  L90,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1 
and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  4.75%  to 
10.125%  per  annum.  No  dates  for  repayment  of  principal  are 
specified  except  that  loans  and  interest  are  required  to  be 
repaid  by  the  full  proceeds  of  property  sales. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $3  million 
to  the  Government. 


National  Harbours  Board 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  National  Har- 
bours Board  Act  to  administer,  manage  and  control  Canadian 
harbours  as  provided  for  in  the  National  Harbours  Board  Act 
and  any  other  harbour,  work  or  property  of  Canada  trans- 
ferred by  the  Governor  in  Council. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  an  agency 
corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$39  million.  It  paid  interest  of  $3  million  to  the  Government. 

Subject  to  the  authority  of  the  National  Harbours  Board 
Act,  loans  are  made  to  finance  capital  expenditures  of  various 
harbours  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  National  Harbours 


Board.  A  summary  of  the  outstanding  balances  of  loans  made 
to  various  harbours  follows: 


Receipts 

Payments 

and  other 

and  other 

April  1/1981 

credits 

charges 

March  31/1982 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

2,340,875 

30,343 

2,310,532 

25,555,762 

25,555,762 

142,465,832 

250,624 

142.215,208 

81,698,379 

120,170 

81.578,209 

27,084,979 

27,084,979 

2,977,437 

2,977,437 

13,693,573 

13,693,573 

45,048,986 

96,130 

528,899 

45,481,755 

1,766,915 

33,279 

1,733,636 

790,630 

15,298 

775,332 

343,423,368 

545,844 

528,899 

343,406,423 

Belledune 

Halifax 

Montreal 

Vancouver 

Prince  Rupert ... 

Sept-iles 

Churchill 

Saint  John,  NB . 
St  John's,  Nnd  . 
Chicoutimi 


During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Votes 
L45,  L45c  and  L45e,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1,  No  2,  No  3 
and  No  4,  1981-82. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  non-interest  bearing  loans  having  an  indefinite  maturity 
date  and  requiring  no  principal  repayments, 
$317,739,455; 

(b)  interest  bearing  loans  at  rates  varying  from  6.25%  to 
12.43%  per  annum,  repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in 
annual  equal  instalments  due  December  3 1  of  each  year 
and  maturing  on  December  31,  2000,  $25,138,069;  and, 

(c)  interest  bearing  loans  at  a  rate  of  15.625  %  per  annum, 
repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in  annual  equal  instal- 
ments due  January  29  of  each  year  and  maturing  on 
January  29,  2002,  $528,899. 

Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge 
Authority  in  respect  of  a  vehicular  bridge  across  the  harbour 
of  Saint  John.  An  agreement  was  entered  into  between 
Canada,  the  Province  of  New  Brunswick,  the  City  of  Saint 
John  and  the  Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority,  dated 
July  7,  1966,  which  requires  that  debentures  issued  by  the 
Authority  and  acquired  by  the  National  Harbours  Board  shall 
be  related  exclusively  to  the  financing  of  the  total  capital  costs 
of  the  bridge  (see  also  Table  7.1 1,  Private  Sector  Enterprises). 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.687%  to 
8.5%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  50 
to  51  years  in  semi-annual  equal  instalments  due  January  1 
and  July  1  of  each  year  and  mature  at  various  dates  between 
January  1,  2020  and  January  1,  2021. 


Northern  Canada  Power  Commission 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Northern 
Canada  Power  Commission  Act  to  construct,  purchase,  rent  or 
otherwise  acquire,  operate  and  maintain  (electrical  power) 
plants  within  the  Northwest  Territories  and  the  Yukon  Terri- 
tory and,  with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council  but 
subject  to  the  laws  of  the  province,  elsewhere  in  Canada. 


7-16 


'.s  )V 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Develop- 
ment, and  is  listed  as  an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of 
the  Financial  Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$2  million.  It  paid  interest  of  $17  million  to  the  Government. 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission  Act — Section  15 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  capital  expen- 
ditures. During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  made  under 
authority  of  Vote  L70,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2, 
1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  4%  to  15.625% 
per  annum  and  are  repayable  over  a  period  extending  up  to 
March  31,  2024. 

The  balance  of  loans  outstanding  as  at  March  31,  1982 
includes  $2.2  million  which  represents  unpaid  principal  for 

1976-77. 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission  Act — Section  14 

Section  14  of  the  Northern  Canada  Power  Commission  Act 
authorized  the  payment  to  the  Commission  of  $50,000  for  the 
purpose  of  meeting  expenditures  incurred  in  carrying  out 
investigations  in  accordance  with  Section  13  of  the  Act. 

The  advances  are  non-interest  bearing  and  have  no  fixed 
repayment  dates. 

Working  capital 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  the  purpose  of 
maintaining  inventories  and  meeting  current  liabilities. 

The  loans  are  interest  free  and  are  repayable  in  10  equal 
annual  instalments  of  $750,000  commencing  on  March  31, 
1990.  Should  any  instalment  become  due  and  unpaid,  interest 
at  then  current  rates  is  applicable  until  the  date  of  payment. 

Northern  Transportation  Company  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Business 
Corporations  Act  to  provide  a  general  transportation  service 
throughout  Northern  Canada  and  the  Arctic,  together  with 
related  intermodal  services. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 
tary corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$1  million. 


The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  categorized  into  three  groups: 

(a)  15  year  loans  bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from 
8.375%  to  8.5%  per  annum  and  maturing  October  15, 
1989  and  October  15,  1990,  $4,662,482; 

(b)  10  year  loan  bearing  interest  at  the  rate  of  8.41%  per 
annum  and  maturing  December  31,  1986,  $620,000; 
and, 

(c)  15  year  loan  bearing  interest  at  the  rate  of  7.45%  per 
annum  and  maturing  December  31,  1991,  $31,180,000. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $3  million 
to  the  Government. 

Royal  Canadian  Mint 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Royal  Canadian 
Mint  Act  to: 

(a)  produce  and  arrange  for  the  production  and  supply  of 
coins  of  the  currency  of  Canada; 

(b)  produce  coins  of  the  currency  of  countries  other  than 
Canada; 

(c)  melt,  assay,  refine,  buy  and  sell  gold,  silver  and  other 
metals  for  the  account  of  Canada;  and, 

(d)  make  medals,  plaques  and  other  things  as  are  incidental 
to  the  powers  of  the  Mint. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services,  and  is  listed  as 
an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

Section  18(l)(a)  of  the  Act  states  that  loans  not  exceeding 
in  the  aggregate  $5,000,000  may  be  made  available  to  the 
Mint  to  meet  establishment  and  operating  expenses. 

Section  18(l)(b)  of  the  Act  states  that  loans  may  be  made 
available  for  the  purpose  of  financing  the  costs  of  capital 
projects  that  are  approved  by  the  Governor  in  Council. 

Section  18(2)  of  the  Act  states  that  the  total  amount 
outstanding  at  any  time  of  loans  made  under  Subsection  (1) 
shall  not  exceed  $35,000,000. 

Section  19(2)  of  the  Act  states  that  the  aggregate  of  all 
amounts  loaned  to  the  Mint  for  temporary  purposes  and 
outstanding  at  any  time  shall  not  exceed  $1,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.625%  to 
10.125%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
4  to  17  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1, 
1984  and  April  1,  1998. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $2  million 
and  transferred  surplus  of  $17  million  to  the  Government. 


Capital  stock 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  to  finance  the 
acquisition  of  transportation  facilities  for  the  movement  of 
goods  to  the  Canadian  North. 


The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  The  St  Lawrence 
Seaway  Authority  Act  to  construct,  operate  and  maintain 
either  wholly  in  Canada  or  in  conjunction  with  works  under- 
taken by  an  appropriate  authority  in  the  United  States,  a  deep 
waterway  between  the  Port  of  Montreal  and  Lake  Erie. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 


p 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

tary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 


Teleglobe  Canada 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Teleglobe 
Canada  Act  to  establish,  maintain  and  operate  in  Canada  and 
elsewhere  external  telecommunication  services  by  cable, 
radiotelegraph,  radio-telephone  and  any  other  means  of  tele- 
communication for  the  conduct  of  public  communications,  and 
to  coordinate  Canada's  external  telecommunication  services 
with  those  of  other  parts  of  the  British  Commonwealth  of 
Nations. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Communications,  and  is  listed  as  a 
proprietary  corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

Section  1 2  of  the  Act  provides  that  the  Minister  of  Finance 
with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council  may  pay  to  the 
Corporation  for  capital  purposes  amounts  not  exceeding 
$4,500,000  out  of  unappropriated  moneys  and  in  addition  any 
other  moneys  appropriated  by  Parliament. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  3.5%  to  6.75% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  15  to  40 
years  in  semi-annual  instalments  and  mature  at  various  dates 
between  March  31,  1983  and  March  31,  1998. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  paid  interest  of  $1  million 
and  transferred  surplus  of  $7  million  to  the  Government. 


7'17 


Uranium  Canada,  Limited 


The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Corpo- 
rations Act  to  provide  for  the  acquisition  and  sale  of  uranium 
concentrates.  The  final  sale  and  shipment  from  the  joint 
venture  stockpile  was  made  on  July  1,  1977,  thereby  exhaust- 
ing the  joint  venture  stockpile. 

The  Corporation  is  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources,  and  is 
listed  as  an  agency  corporation  in  Schedule  C  of  the  Financial 
Administration  Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$55,205. 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 

VIA  Rail  Canada  Inc 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  Business 
Corporations  Act  to  revitalize  passenger  rail  services  in 
Canada  and  to  manage  and  market  them  on  an  efficient 
commercial  basis,  reducing  the  financial  burden  on  the  Gov- 
ernment of  Canada. 

The  Corporation  is  not  an  agent  of  Her  Majesty,  reports 
through  the  Minister  of  Transport,  and  is  listed  as  a  proprie- 
tary corporation  in  Schedule  D  of  the  Financial  Administra- 
tion Act. 

During  the  year,  the  Corporation  received  financial  assist- 
ance authorized  by  budgetary  appropriations  amounting  to 
$541  million. 

The  Government's  investment  in  the  capital  of  the  Corpora- 
tion is  recorded  in  this  account. 


7'1! 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Summary  of  the  Financial  Position  of  Agent 
Crown  Corporations 

All  assets  and  liabilities  of  agent  Crown  corporations  are 
assets  and  liabilities  of  the  Government,  due  to  the  agency 
relationship.  However,  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  poli- 
cies of  the  Government,  the  accounts  of  agent  Crown  corpora- 
tions are  not  consolidated  with  those  of  the  Government,  and 
only  the  financial  transactions  between  the  Government  and 
agent  Crown  corporations,  are  recorded  in  the  accounts  of 
Canada. 

Although  borrowings  by  agent  Crown  corporations  from 
lenders  other  than  the  Government  are  considered  direct 
liabilities  of  the  Government,  such  borrowings  are  not  included 
in  the  accounts  of  Canada  since  they  are  intended  to  be,  and  in 
practice  are,  repaid  directly  by  the  corporations. 


Table  7.4  presents  the  assets,  liabilities  (including  identifica- 
tion of  borrowings  from  other  than  the  Government),  equity 
and  contingent  liabilities  of  Crown  corporations  which  are 
agents  of  the  Government  and  which  are  outside  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  as  an  accounting  entity.  In  accordance  with 
Section  40  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act,  details  of 
borrowings  by  these  entities  from  other  than  Government  are 
detailed  in  Note  2  to  this  table. 

For  corporations  with  financial  year-ends  other  than  March 
31,  1982,  unaudited  financial  information  is  included  in  this 
table.  The  table  is  summarized  in  Note  3  to  the  audited 
financial  statements  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


TABLE  7.4 

SUMMARY  OF  THE  FINANCIAL  POSITION  OF  AGENT  CROWN  CORPORATIONS 
AS  AT  MARCH  31,  1982 
(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Agent") 


Liabilities 


Borrowings 
from  other 

than 
Govern-       All  other 
Assets  ment^^)     liabilities^^' 


Net 
assets 


Equity  of  Canada 


Claims 

against 

the  Gov- 

Obligations  to   ernment 

the  Govern-    and  other 

ment  agent 

and  other  Crown 
agent  Crown  corpora- 
corporations       tions 


Share 
capital 

and 
contri- 
buted 
surplus 


Retained 
earnings 
(deficits) 
Balance 
March  31, 
1982 


Change 
from 

previous 
year 


Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 1,486,799             61,472 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  ....  79,432 

Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corpora- 
tion    10,290,858 

Canadian  Arsenals  Limited 47,457 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation 565,438 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation 275,910 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission 132,986 

Canadian  Film  Development  Corporation  2,003 

Canadian  Livestock  Feed  Board  1,052 

Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steam- 
ships Limited 472 

Canadian  Patents  and  Development  Lim- 
ited    1.300 

Canadian  Saltflsh  Corporation  11,567 

The  Canadian  Wheat  Board  3,192,948 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corporation  ....  284,318 

Crown  Assets  Disposal  Corporation  6,824 

Defence  Construction  (1951)  Limited 872 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited 643,006 

Export  Development  Corporation 4,355,752 

Farm  Credit  Corporation 3,853,882 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 1,951,450 

Freshwater  Fish  Marketing  Corporation  ..  26,1 14 

The    Jacques    Cartier    and    Champlain 

Bridges  Incorporated 29,929 

Loto  Canada  Inc 12,485 

National  BattlePields  Commission 2,781 

National  Capital  Commission 391,551 

National  Harbours  Board 503,822 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission 212,331 

Northern  Transportation  Company  Lim- 
ited    71,899 

Petro-Canada 6,751,482 

Royal  Canadian  Mint 62,558 

The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority 624,279 

The  Seaway  International  Bridge  Corpo- 
ration, Ltd  301 

Teleglobe  Canada 373,228 

Uranium  Canada,  Limited 

Total 36,247,086        7,252,347      5,564,193 


2,175,326 


263,482 
3,155,153 


939,727 


21,594 


1,211 
634,374 


306,844 
638 

146,234 

11,595 

189,273 

249,121 

77,175 

93 

2.129 

14 

494 

4,725 

1,020,310 

30,357 

778 

3,402 

99,268 

100,362 

5,685 

69,834 

9,315 

1.817 

81 

159 

36,245 

57,356 

10,165 

5,969 

2,984,216 

8,516 

18,452 

258 
113,313 


1,118,483 
78,794 

10,144,624 

35,862 

376,165 

26,789 

55,811 

1,910 

-  1,077 

458 

806 
6.842 

-  2,688 
253,961 

6,046 

-  2,530 
280,256 

1.100.237 

3.848.197 

941.889 

16.799 

28.112 

12.404 

2.622 

355.306 

424.872 

202,166 

64,719 

3,132,892 

54,042 

605,827 

35 
259,915 


991,253 
203,381 

10,483,563 
47,503 
43,581 

3,466 
79,999 

4,000 


324 

92 

2,438 

430 

6,061 

447 

29,058 

565.070 

3.694.492 

784.945 

16,799 

111,057 
13,094 

42,316 
517,975 
206,349 

37,755 

1,527,051 

60,284 

210,075 


46,812 


22,136 
354,350 

368,939 

25,014 

614 

1,840 

51,228 

2,613 

1,740 

95 

375 

988 

3,118 

17,999 

203 

37 

23 

26,853 

15 

6,513 


1 

690 

30 

365 

211,057 


1,024 

141,082 

6,242 

42.277 


116,185 
167.330 

30,000 

3,924 

333,198 

20,000 


1 
296 

271,960 

(4) 
306,586 
377,000 
142,848 
268.000 


-  72.034 
(4) 


313.355 
349,361 


25,052 
1,572.772 


624.950 


33,181 
62,433 


9,449 

5,163 

27,040 

523 

663 

228 

793 
5,392 


188 

-2.940 

-  55,365 

185,020 

10,872 

104,543 


-  10,910 

2,652 


•231,407 
-4,183 


2,936 
174.151 


186.921 


27 
239,299 


1,118,483 
78,794 

10,144,624 

35,862 

376,165 

26,789 

55.811 

1,910 

-  1.077 

458 

806 
6,842 

-  2,688 
253,961 

6.046 

-  2,530 
280,256 

1,100,237 

3,848,197 

941,889 

16,799 

28,112 

12,404 

2,622 

355,306 

424,872 

202,166 

64,719 

3,132,892 

54,042 

605.827 

35 
259,915 


109,123 
46,598 

110.935 
16,546 
56,303 
9,270 
54,01 1 
-861 
1,235 


258 

849 

351 

92,745 

-2,112 

107 

-180,754 

111,412 

370,564 

-312,314 

4,978 

-  1,375 

1.294 

94 

19.181 

38,350 

4,683 

4,268 

1,090,408 

-  12,071 

-89 

25 

33,692 

(4) 


23,430,546 


19,729,670      1,313,657       4,850,792 


163,741     23,430,546         1,667,704 


'Canada  Post  Corporation:  The  Post  Office  Department  was  converted  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  by  an  act  of  Parliament  on  October  16,  1981.  There  are 
certain  valuations  to  be  determined  for  major  assets  turned  over  to  the  Corporation.  In  addition,  the  transfer  of  titles  to  the  land  and  buildings  turned  over  to  the 
Corporation  by  the  Government  has  not  been  completed;  therefore,  no  figures  are  being  reported  in  this  table. 

Canada  Lands  Company  (Mirabel)  Limited,  Canada  Lands  Company  (Le  Vieux-Port  de  Montreal)  Limited  and  Canada  Lands  Company  (Vieux-Port  de  Quebec) 
Inc  became  Schedule  "C"  Crown  corporations  on  March  26.  1982.  Their  financial  statements  as  well  as  those  of  the  parent  company,  Canada  Lands  Company 
Limited,  were  not  available  at  date  of  printing  and  are  not  included  in  this  table. 


f 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES  ?•  19 

(2)  The  borrowing  transactions  from  other  than  Government  of  Canada  during  the  year  are  summarized  below  (in  thousands  of  dollars): 

Name 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited  

The  Canadian  Wheat  Board 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited  

Export  Development  Corporation 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank 

National  Harbours  Board 

Northern  Transportation  Company  Limited 

Petro-Canada 

The  Seaway  International  Bridge  Corporation,  Ltd 

Total  

^^*  Contingent  liabilities 

The  contingent  liabilities  reported  in  this  note  are  those  as  at  March  31.  They  therefore  may  be  different  from  those  contingent  liabilities  reported  in  Volume  III  of 
the  Public  Accounts  for  those  corporations  with  fiscal  year-ends  other  than  March  3 1 . 

March  31/1982 


Balance 

Balance 

March  31/1981 

Borrowings 

Repayments 

March  31/1982 

66,061 

4,589 

61,472 

1,616,999 

3,103,755 

2,545,428 

2,175.326 

144,902 

118,580 

263,482 

2,786,737 

12,447,013 

12,078,597 

3,155,153 

700,081 

1,540,661 

1.301,015 

939,727 

22,651 

1,057 

21,594 

557 

5,034 

4.380 

1,211 

292,129 
8 

1,259,371 

917,126 

634,374 
8 

5,630,125 

18,474,414 

16,852,192 

7,252,347 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation — contract  damages 7,300,000 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission — contract  dispute 1,800,000 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corporation — loan  guarantees  73,395.000 

Export  Development  Corporation — loan  guarantees 225.049.000 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank — bank  loan  guarantees 19.448.750 

Loto  Canada  Inc — litigation,  ticket  wholesalers 4,175,000 

National  Battlefields  Commission — potential  liability  re:  retirement  of 

employees  35,000 

National  Capital  Commission — miscellaneous  litigation 21,187,000 

National  Harbours  Board*— miscellaneous  litigation 17,000,000 

Petro-Canada — claim  re:  purchase  agreement  of  subsidiary 12,039,000 

Teleglobe  Canada — potential  liability  re:  retirement  agreement  1,965,500 


Total  383.394.250 

(*>  Less  than  $500. 


7'20 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Government  of  Canada  Financial  Interest  in 
Agent  and  other  Crown  Corporations 

Table  7.5  summarizes  the  major  balance  sheet  items  for 
both  agent  and  other  Crown  corporations  as  at  March  31, 
1982. 

The  assets  and  liabilities  of  agent  Crown  corporations  are 
the  assets  and  liabilities  of  the  Government,  due  to  the  agency 
relationship.  However,  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  poli- 
cies of  the  Government,  the  accounts  of  agent  Crown  corpora- 
tions are  not  consolidated  with  those  of  the  Government,  and 
only  certain  financial  transactions  between  the  Government 
and  its  Crown  corporations,  are  recorded  in  the  accounts  of 
Canada. 

The  table  displays  "Assets"  less  "Borrowings  and  other 
liabilities"  to  arrive  at  "Net  assets". 

Balances  which  represent  transactions  with  the  Government, 
and  which  are  recorded  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  include: 
long  term  obligations  to  the  Government,  share  capital  and 
contributed  surplus  as  well  as  claims  against  the  Government 
of  Canada.  Such  balances  are  described  in  this  table  as 
"Financial  interest  recorded  by  the  Government". 

"Unrecorded  financial  interest"  represents  retained  earnings 
of  agent  and  other  Crown  corporations  adjusted  for  items 
which  had  previously  been  included  in  their  asset  and  liability 
accounts.  These  adjustments  arise  from  timing  differences  in 
the  recording  of  transactions  between  the  Crown  corporations 


and  the  Government.  Crown  corporations  record  amounts 
payable  to  or  receivable  from  Government  on  an  accrual  basis 
for  such  items  as  income  taxes.  The  accounts  of  Canada  do  not 
include  such  amounts  until  payment  is  either  received  or  made. 
Amounts  which  represent  transactions  with  the  Government 
and  which  are  not  recorded  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  are 
adjusted  and  are  reported  under  "Unrecorded  financial  inter- 
est". They  include:  grants  receivable,  current  or  deferred 
income  taxes  receivable  or  payable,  capitalized  or  accrued 
interest  payable,  sundry  accounts  payable,  long  term  capital- 
ized leases  payable  and  prepaid  expenses  related  to  Canada. 
"Unrecorded  financial  interest"  adjustments  represent 
amounts  which  will  be  eventually  received  or  disbursed  by 
Canada. 

Other  information  presented  in  this  table  includes  "Change 
in  financial  interest  from  previous  year"  which  identifies  the 
increase  or  decrease  since  April  1,  1981.  "Financial  assistance 
under  budgetary  appropriations"  summarizes  the  assistance 
received  by  these  entities  during  1981-82.  Details  of  such 
assistance  can  be  found  in  Section  14  of  this  volume. 

Amounts  listed  in  this  table  reflect  information  regarding 
Crown  corporations  as  at  March  31,  1982.  For  corporations 
with  financial  year-ends  other  than  March  31,  unaudited 
financial  information  is  included. 


TABLE  7.5 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  FINANCIAL  INTEREST  IN  AGENT  AND  OTHER  CROWN  CORPORATIONS 
AS  AT  MARCH  31,  1982 
(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Borrowings  and  other 
liabilities 


Borrowings 
from  other 

than  All  other 

Assets  Government      liabilities 


Financial  interest 


Net 
assets 


Recorded  by  the  Government 

Share  capital  Claims 

Obligations           and  against 

to  the         contributed  the 

Government       surplus  Government 


Unrecorded         Total 
flnancial         financial 
interest  interest 


Change  in 
flnancial 
interest 

from 

previous 

year 


Financial 
assistance 

under 
budgetary 
appropria- 
tions 


Agent  Crown  corporations^'^ 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited  ..  1 ,486,799 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corpora- 
tion    79,432 

Canada    Mortgage    and    Housing 

Corporation 10,835,925 

Canadian  Arsenals  Limited 47,457 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation  565,438 

Canadian  Commercial  Corporation  275,910 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission 132,986 

Canadian  Film  Development  Corpo- 
ration    2,003 

Canadian  Livestock  Feed  Board  1,052 

Canadian  National  (West  Indies) 

Steamships  Limited 472 

Canadian  Patents  and  Development 

Limited 1,300 

Canadian  Saltflsh  Corporation  II  ,567 

The  Canadian  Wheat  Board  3,1 92,948 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corpora- 
tion    284,318 

Crown  Assets  Disposal  Corporation  6,824 

Defence  Construction  (1951)  Lim- 
ited    872 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited 643,006 

Export  Development  Corporation  ....  5,061,385 

Farm  Credit  Corporation 3,853,882 

Federal  Business  Development  Bank  1,951,450 

Freshwater  Fish  Marketing  Corpo- 
ration    26,114 

The  Jacques  Cartier  and  Champlain 

Bridges  Incorporated 29,929 


61,472 


2,175,326 


263,482 
3,155,153 


939,727 


638 

146,234 

11,595 

189,273 

249,121 

77,175 

93 
2,129 


494 

4,725 

1,020,310 

30,357 
778 

3,402 
99,268 
101,414 

5,685 
69,834 

9,315 

1,817 


1,118,483 

78,794 

10,689,691 

35,862 

376,165 

26,789 

55,811 

1,910 

-  1,077 

458 

806 
6,842 

-  2,688 

253,961 
6,046 

-  2,530 
280,256 

1,804,818 

3,848,197 

941,889 

16,799 

28,112 


709,318 

200,000 

10,363,158 

3,500 

33,000 

79,999 

9,699 

324 

1,731 


164,159 

25,000 
10,000 


I 
296 


14,700  308,247 

1,169,640  377,000 

3,584,257  142,848 

763,000  268,000 

18,328 

59,753 


22,136 
354,350 

31,509 

7,196 

550 

1,840 

51,228 

1.740 

95 

356 

988 

3,118 

17,999 
203 

37 

23 

26,853 

15 

6,513 


267,142 
233,144 

333,042 
39,558 

343,715 
18,629 
27,040 

-  7,789 
663 


866 

6,099 

430 

271,960 
6,249 

-  2,493 

-  42,668 
285,031 
121,107 

-  82,598 

-  1,529 
-31,640 


78,794<2) 

10,689,691(3) 

35,862 

376,165 

26,789 

55,811 

1,910 

-  1,077 

458«) 

806 

6,842 

-  2,688 

253,961 
6,046 

-  2,530 
280,256<5) 

1,804,8 18W 
3,848,197 
941,889 

16,799 


109,123 

46,598 

89,447 
16,546 
56,303 
9,270 
54,01 1 

-861 
1,235 


258 
849 
351 

92,745 
-2,112 

107 

•  180,754 

184,739 

370,564 

-312,314 

4,978 

-  1,375 


283,934 


968,654 

34 

664,619 

18,717 

4,254 

1,138 
17.504 


350 

133,015 

10,372 
36,000 
17,628 

2,371 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

TABLE  7.5 

GOVERNMENT  OF  CANADA  FINANCIAL  INTEREST  IN  AGENT  AND  OTHER  CROWN  CORPORATIONS 
AS  AT  MARCH  31,  \m— Concluded 
(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


7'21 


Borrowings  and  other 
liabilities 

Net 
asseu 

Financial  interest 

Borrowings 
from  other 

than 
Government 

All  other 
liabilities 

Recorded  by  the  Government 

Unrecorded 
Tmancial 
interest 

Total 
financial 
interest 

Change  in 
financial 
interest 

from 

previous 

year 

Financial 

Assets 

Obligations 

to  the 
Government 

Share  capital 

and 

contributed 

surplus 

Claims 

against 

the 

Government 

assistance 

under 
budgetary 
appropria- 
tions 

12,485 

2,781 

391,551 

81 

159 

36  245 

12,404 

2,622 

355,306 

424,872 

40,874 
357,979 

(10) 

690 

30 

365 

211,057 

13.094 

2,652 

314,797 

277,950 

12.404 

2,622 

355,306 

424,872 

1,294 
94 

19,181 
38,350 

1,413 

97,774 
39,239 

503,822 

21,594 

57.356 

212,331 

10.165 

202,166 

183,652 

18,514 

202,166 

4,683 

1,900 

71,899 

6,751,482 

62,558 

624,279 

1,211 
634,374 

5.969 

2.984.216 

8.516 

18,452 

64,719 

3,132,892 

54,042 

605,827 

36,463 
18,336 

24,900 

1,572,772 

624,950 

1,024 

848 

6,242 

42.193 

4,380 

1,560,968 

41,948 

23,070 

64,719 
3,132,892 
54,042 
605,827<7) 

4.268 

1.090.408 

-12.071 

-89 

642 

301 

373,228 

(10) 

8 

258 
113,313 

35 

259,915 

(10) 

12,386 

(10) 

26,196 

35 
273,725 

35 

259,915 

(10) 

25 
33.692 

55 

37.497.786 

7.252.347 

5.565.245 

24.680.194 

17.660.097 

3.5 1 8.1 7  3 

815.395 

4.317.319 

24.680.194 

1.719.543 

2.299.613 

1,815,743 

1,507 

1.823,861 

6.131.146 

294,380 
1,693,418 

634,300 
1,106 
17,409,948  - 
1,219,213 

887,063 

401 

-15,586,087 

3,218,515 

278,492 
249,901 

329,009 

5,920 
2,503,378 

96 

13 

15,662,455 

40,482 

279,658 
414 
70,448  - 
505,718 

887,063 
401 
I5,586.087<«) 
3.21 8,5  I5W 

-3.130 

-245 

-  587,901 

24,507 

157,979 

1.116 

3,078 

2,771 

374,900 

10.154.122 

1.987.798 

2,856 

2,413 

1,483 

70,200 

19.341.519  - 

-1,740 

665 

1,288 

304,700 

-1 1.175.195 

528.393 

9,300 
2.847.607 

50,600 
15.753.646 

-1,740 
66S 

1,288 
346,000 
1.202.451  - 

-1.740 
665 

1,288 

304,700 

11.175.195 

-234 
475 

-22 

83,850 

-  482.700 

639 

540,617 
699.235 

Loto  Canada  Inc 

National  Battlefields  Commission... 

National  Capital  Commission 

National  Harbours  Board 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commis- 
sion   

Northern  Transportation  Company 
Limited 

Petro- Canada 

Royal  Canadian  Mint 

The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority 

The  Seaway  International  Bridge 
Corporation,  Ltd 

Teleglobe  Canada 

Uranium  Canada,  Limited 


Other  Crown  corporations 

Air  Canada 

Atlantic  Pilotage  Authority 

Bank  of  Canada 

Canadian  National  Railway  System 
Great    Lakes    Pilotage    Authority, 

Ltd  

Laurentian  Pilotage  Authority 

Pacific  Pilotage  Authority 

VIA  Rail  Canada  Inc 

Total 47,651,908 


9,240,145      24,906.764      13.504,999      18,188,490       6,365,780      16,569,041        5,519,770      13,504,999        1,236,843        2,998,848 


'"The  Post  Office  Department  was  converted  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  by  an  act  of  Parliament  on  October  16,  1981.  There  are  certain  valuations  to  be 

determined  for  major  assets  turned  over  to  the  Corporation.  In  addition,  the  transfer  of  titles  to  the  land  and  buildings  turned  over  to  the  Corporation  by  the 

Government  has  not  been  completed;  therefore,  no  figures  are  being  reported  in  this  table. 

Canada  Lands  Company  (Mirabel)  Limited,  Canada  Lands  Company  (Le  Vieux-Port  de  Montreal)  Limited  and  Canada  Lands  Company  (Vieux-Port  de  Quebec) 

Inc  became  Schedule  "C"  Crown  corporations  on  March  26,  1982.  Their  financial  statements  as  well  as  those  of  the  parent  company,  Canada  Lands  Company 

Limited,  were  not  available  at  date  of  printing  and  are  not  included  in  this  table. 
^^^  Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation — Unrecorded  financial  interest  consists  of  premiums  credited  to  the  Deposit  Insurance  Fund  plus  adjusted  accumulated  net 

earnings.  The  deposits  with  member  institutions  insured  by  the  Corporation  totalled  $109  billion  as  at  April  30,  1981. 
<'>  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation — Unrecorded  financial  interest  includes  $216,102,000  for  balances  in  insurance  and  guarantee  funds.  The  estimated 

amount  of  insurance  in  force  as  at  March  31,  1982  was  $27.2  billion. 
<*)  Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steamships  Limited — The  assets  of  the  Corporation  include  a  receivable  of  $470,400  due  since  1963  from  Cuban  interests. 
<')  Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited — Recorded  share  capital  includes  a  premium  of  $1,660,797  representing  the  capital  deficit  (after  adjustments)  shown  in  the  balance 

sheet  of  Eldorado  Mining  and  Refining  Limited  as  at  December  31,  1944  but  not  refiected  in  subsequent  balance  sheets  of  Eldorado  Mining  and  Refining  (1944) 

Limited.  Consequently,  unrecorded  financial  interest  has  been  reduced  by  $1,660,797. 
^''  Export  Development  Corporation — Obligations  recorded  by  the  Government  include  loans  administered  by  the  Export  Development  Corporation  but  receivable 

through  the  Corporation  from  foreign  governments  and  foreign  companies. 
<^'  The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority — Total  fitiancial  interest  takes  into  account  the  capital  stock  of,  and  investment  in.  Great  Lakes  Pilotage  Authority,  Ltd,  The 

Jacques  Cartier  and  Champlain  Bridges  Incorporated  and  The  Seaway  International  Bridge,  Ltd  at  a  cost  of  $1,500,  $100  and  $8,000  respectively.  Great   Lakes 

Pilotage  Authority,  Ltd,  The  Jacques  Cartier  and  Champlain  Bridges  Incorporated  and  The  Seaway  International  Bridge,  Ltd  are  wholly-owned  subsidiaries. 
'*'  Bank  of  Canada — Recorded  share  capital  includes  $920,000  representing  a  premium  paid  in  respect  of  the  acquisition  in  1938  of  shares  held  by  the  public. 

Consequently,  unrecorded  financial  interest  Has  been  reduced  by  $920,000. 
">  Canadian  National  Railway  System — Recorded  share  capital  includes  a  premium  of  $19,452,732  representing  the  excess  of  previous  year's  depreciation  not 

charged  to  CNR's  retained  earnings  over  the  Government's  investments  in  Canadian  Government  Railways  and  Canadian  National  Railways  Company.  These 

investments  were  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure  by  the  Government  of  Canada  and  credited  to  shareholder's  equity  by  CNR.  Consequently,  after  the  capital 

revision  of  Canadian  National  Railways,  the  recorded  capital  stock  of  the  Corporation  is  $19,452,732  less  than  the  recorded  investment  of  the  Government. 

Accordingly,  unrecorded  financial  interest  is  being  reduced  by  this  deficiency. 
<'0>  Less  than  $500. 


7*22 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


PROVINCIAL  AND  TERRITORIAL 
GOVERNMENTS 

This  group  records  loans  to  provinces  made  under  relief  acts 
and  other  legislation. 


Table  7.6  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans  and  advances  that  have 
been  made  to  provincial  and  territorial  governments. 


TABLE  7.6 

PROVINCIAL  AND  TERRITORIAL  GOVERNMENTS 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( — ) 


1982 


1981 


NEWFOUNDLAND— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Atlantic    Development    Board    carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic  Provinces  Power  Development  Act 
Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 

Loans 

Total  Newfoundland 

NOVA  SCOTIA— 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 
Regional  electrical  interconnections  

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Atlantic    Development    Board    carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic  Provinces  Power  Development  Act 

Mainland  Investments  Limited  

Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 

Advances 

Loans 

Transport — 
Loading  ramp,  Yarmouth,  NS 

Total  Nova  Scotia 

PRINCE  EDWARD  ISLAND— 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 
Regional  electrical  interconnections  

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 

Atlantic  Development  Board  carry-over 
projects  

Comprehensive  development  plan  agree- 
ment   

Total  Prince  Edward  Island 


3,661,214 
6,064,967 
6,700,000 

7,260,277 
23.686.458 


1,146,027 
85,320,504 


2,634,064 


5,213,551 
4,912,003 
4,300,000 
5,429,734 
19.855,288 


4,583,184 

48,922,490 

3,500,000 


31,433,240 
88,438.914 

143,340 


111,071,606 


8,869,362 


29,299 


151,366 

37,182 
188,548 


24,729 
1,386,639 


16,910 


409,263 

579,835 

185,222 
1,174,320 


124,322 

1,311,058 

500,000 


1,465,048 
3.400,428 

28,666 


4,620,324 


74,565 


262,637 

11,863 

1,116,006 

63,358 

299,386 

1,315,746 

44,736 

2.993.775 

119,957 

1,545 


3,661,214 
5,913,601 
6,700,000 
7,223,095 
23,497,910 


1,121,298 
83,933,865 


-151,366 

-37,182 
- 188,548 


-  24,729 
1,386,639 


2,617,154 


-16,910 


8,794,797 


■  74,565 


27,754 


-1,545 


-  143,804 

-  38,998 

-  182.802 


-  22,965 
1,297,171 


42,997,010 
129.463.541 

1,436,934 
2,848,302 

41,560,076 
126.615.239 

-  1,436,934 

-  2.848.302 

-  1,326,549 

-  2,646.685 

153,149,999 

3,036,850 

150,113,149 

-  3,036,850 

-  2,829,487 

180,658 


4,804,288 
4,332,168 
4,300,000 
5,244,512 
18,680,968 

-409,263 

-579,835 

-185,222 
-1,174.320 

-  382,660 

-  553,067 

-  169,960 
- 1,105.687 

4,458,862 

47,611,432 

3,000,000 

-  124,322 
-1,311,058 

-  500,000 

-  108,580 
-  2,394,934 

-  500,000 

29,968,192 
85.038.486 

-  1,465,048 

-  3,400,428 

-  632,430 

-713,259 

-  4,349.203 

114,674 

-  28,666 

-  28,666 

106,451,282 

-  4,620,324 

-  5,302,898 

-68,221 


250,774 

-11,863 

-11,114 

1,052,648 

-63,358 

-59,771 

299,386 

-  18,276 

1,271,010 

-  44,736 

-  47,928 

2.873.818 

-  119,957 

- 137,089 

12,090,289 
12,119,588 

119,016 
120.561 

11,971,273 
11.999.027 

-119,016 
- 120.561 

-110,236 
-110,236 

23,982,725 

315,083 

23,667,642 

-315,083 

-315,546 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

TABLE  7.6 

PROVINCIAL  AND  TERRITORIAL  GOVERNMENTS— Co/ir//iuf</ 


7*23 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (-  ) 


1982 


1981 


NEW  BRUNSWICK— 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 
Regional  electrical  interconnections  

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Town  of  Oromocto 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Atlantic    Development    Board    carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic  Provinces  Power  Development  Act 
Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 

Advances 

Loans 

Total  New  Brunswick 

QUEBEC— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 
Loans 

Total  Quebec 

ONTARIO— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Total  Ontario 

MANITOBA— 
Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 
Regional  electrical  interconnections  

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Agricultural  service  centres — 

Advances 

Loans 

Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 

Loans 

Total  Manitoba 


10,000.000 

5.034,341 

7.006,548 
7,119,894 
5,375,000 
271,494 
9,933,937 
29,706.873 

129.593 
296.881 

55.962 

72.769 

555.205 

980,233 
48,676,587 

24.909 
1.303.580 

48.773.169 
98,429.989 


138.136.862 


61,300.779 
61.241.580 
70.300,000 
91.314,928 
284,157,287 


108,229,325 


392,386,612 


103,903,365 


1,517.889 
2.846.378 


8,435,924 


2.560.783 
2.560.783 
1.482,086 


4,042,869 


13.316.367 

697.509 

44.626.151 

4.926.796 

2.782.575 

308.400 

43,178,272 

2.137.072 

8,069.777 


4.965.659 


-  5.034.341 


6.876.955 
6.823.013 
5.375.000 
215.532 
9.861.168 
29.151.668 

-129.593 
-296.881 

-  55.962 

-  72.769 
-555.205 

-121,535 

-  255,442 

-64,931 
-  67.680 

-  509.588 

955.324 
47.373.007 

-  24.909 
-1.303,580 

-23.170 
-1.232.121 

47.255.280 
95.583.611 

-1,517,889 
-  2.846.378 

-3.415.387 

2.009.405 

-  2,661.273 

129.700.938 


8,435,924 


61,300.779 
58.680.797 
70.300.000 
91.314.928 
281.596.504 


106.747.239 


2.560,783 
2.560.783 
1,482,086 


388,343,743 


4,042,869 


95,833,588 


-  8,069,777 


-3,170,861 


2.437,877 
2.437.877 
1,369.668 


3.807.545 


12,618,858 

-  697,509 

-652,361 

39.699,355 

-  4,926,796 

-  4.729,488 

2.474,175 

-  308,400 

-290,461 

41,041,200 

-2,137,072 

-  1,966,827 

7,639.137 


115.887.647 

1,017.090 

2,578,818 

117.449,375 

1.561,728 

380,636 

5.676.423 
7.063.299 
5.702.962 
2.882.728 
21.325.412 

321.425 

601.273 

328.117 

83.414 

1.334.229 

5,354.998 
6,462.026 
5,374.845 
2,799.314 
19.991.183 

-321,425 

-601.273 

-328.117 

-83.414 

- 1.334.229 

-286.816 

-615,656 

-  308,061 

-  77,066 

- 1.287.599 

1.156.744 
6,678,823 

1.145.497 
225.898 

1.037.083 
1.132.324 

1.048.330 
7.585.249 

-  108.414 
906.426 

237,220 
674,400 

3,636,798 
11.472.365 

137.494 
1.508.889 

2.169.407 

3.499.304 
12.132.883 

-  137.494 
660.518 

-135.234 
776.386 

148,685.424 

3.860.208 

4.748.225 

149.573.441 

888.017 

-130,577 

7*24 
TABLE  7.6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


PROVINCIAL  AND  TERRITORIAL  GOVERNMENTS— Co/ic/M</e</ 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


1982 


1981 


SASKATCHEWAN— 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Federal-provincial  fiscal  arrangements 

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 
Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Agricultural  service  centres — 

Advances 

Loans 

South  Saskatchewan  River  project — 

Treasury  bills 

Total  Saskatchewan 

ALBERTA— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Regional  Economic  Expansion — 
Agricultural  service  centres — 

Advances 

Loans 

Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — 
Loans 

Total  Alberta 

BRITISH  COLUMBIA— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Total  British  Columbia 

NORTHWEST  TERRITORIES— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial  employment  loans  pro- 
gram   

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  .... 
Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 
Government  of  the  Northwest  Territories.... 

Total  Northwest  Territories 

YUKON  TERRITORY— 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 

Government  of  the  Yukon  Territory 

Yukon  Territory  small  business  loans 

Total  Yukon  Territory  

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total 


1,088.383 

4,225,874 

19,529 

5.333.786 


1,119,602 
6,038,863 

11,710,900 
18.869.365 


67,718,386 


18,242,371 


68,432 

611,527 

6,043 

686.002 


1,082,916 
690,510 

1,264,500 
3.037.926 


13,132,788 

666,068 

12,463,083 

1,241,009 

24,540,054 

1,844,223 

17,582,461 

667,928 

4,419,228 


24.983 

1,242 

15,081 

15,081 

307,975 

10,654 

348.039 

26.977 

1,322,628 


6,356,128 
6.356.128 


1,269,038 
1,067,586 


2.336.624 


1,019,951 

6,356,128 

3,614,347 

13,486 

U. 003.91 2 


1,305,724 
6,415,939 

10,446,400 
18.168.063 


-68,432 

6,356,128 

-611,527 

-6,043 

5,670.126 


186,122 
377,076 

1,264,500 
-  701.302 


12,466,720 

11,222,074 
22.695.831 
16.914,533 


-  666,068 
-1,241,009 
-  1.844,223 

-  667,928 


63,299,158 


4,419,228 


-  64,030 

694,437 
-  5,620 
764.087 


-  59,343 
806,752 

-  563,387 
184.022 


24,203,151 

3,723,928 

8,692,752 

29,171,975 

4,968,824 

-  580,065 

4,622.361 

300,424 

4,321,937 

-  300,424 

-  239.209 

9.313,903 

967,811 

8,346,092 

-967,811 

-  932.045 

4,000,000 

4.000.000 

5,271,270 

233,840 

5.037,430 

-  233,840 

-  209,383 

23.207.534 

1.502.075 

21.705.459 

- 1.502.075 

-  1.380.637 

14.516 

14,516 

-14,516 

-  3,966 

295.716 

14,516 

310,232 

14,516 

15,329 

3.358.765 

138,238 

3,220,527 

-  138,238 

-  247,043 

3.668.997 

152.754 

14.516 

3.530.759 

-  138.238 

-  235.680 

26,876.531 

1,654,829 

14,516 

25.236.218 

-1,640,313 

-1,616,317 

-  624,590 
-1,173,367 
-1.770.114 

-616.145 


-4.184,216 


23,741 

-1,242 

-  1,161 

-15,081 

-  14,328 

297,321 

-  10,654 

-9,917 

321.062 

-  26.977 

-  25.406 

2,352,221 


19,271,964 


1,029,593 


105,339,404 


18,590.410 

1,349,605 

2,352,221 

19,593,026 

1,002,616 

-  105,364,810 

26.765.676 
722.297 

5,450.498 
161.937 

5,000,000 
39 

26,315,178 
560.399 

-  450,498 
-161,898 

-33,152,990 
-  98,760 

27.487.973 

5.612.435 

5,000,039 

26,875,577 

-612,396 

-33,251,750 

-77.939,421 

1,236,193,044 


49,141.060 


20.807.753 


1,207.859.737 


28,333,307 


246,132.630 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7*25 


Federal-provincial  employment  loans  program 

Loans  have  been  made  to  provinces,  provincial  agencies  and 
municipalities  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  in  the  creation  of 
employment.  The  loan  authority  provides  for  the  forgiveness  of 
that  portion  of  the  principal  amount  equal  to  75%  of  normal 
direct  on-site  payroll  costs  incurred  and  paid  before  June  30, 
1972. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.34%  to 
7.41%  per  annum  and  mature  at  various  dates  between 
December  4,  1982  and  November  30,  1994.  Individual  loans 
have  repayment  periods  ranging  from  10  to  20  years  and  are 
repayable  as  follows: 

(a)  in  annual  instalments;  or, 

(b)  at  maturity. 

Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board 

Under  the  Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Act,  loans 
have  been  made  to  provinces  and  municipalities  to  augment  or 
accelerate  municipal  capital  works  programs. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.25%  to 
5.625%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
15  to  50  years  in  annual  or  semi-annual  instalments  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and  March  31, 
2016. 

Special  development  loans  program 

Loans  have  been  made  to  provinces,  provincial  agencies  and 
municipalities  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  in  the  creation  of 
employment. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.57%  to 
7.54%  per  annum  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April 
1,  1982  and  March  30,  1993.  Individual  loans  have  repayment 
periods  ranging  from  10  to  20  years  and  are  repayable  as 
follows: 

(a)  in  annual  or  semi-annual  instalments;  or, 

(b)  at  maturity. 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Loans  have  been  made  to  provinces,  provincial  agencies  and 
municipalities  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  in  the  creation  of 
employment.  There  is  provision  for  the  forgiveness  of  that 
portion  of  the  principal  amount  equal  to  50%  of  normal  direct 
on-site  payroll  costs  for  the  duration  of  the  loan  program  plus 
50%  for  the  periods  December-May  1973,  1974  and  1975. 
Vote  L 1 3a,  Appropriation  Act  No  1 ,  1 974,  authorized  in  fiscal 
years  subsequent  to  March  31,1 976,  the  consolidation  of  any 
loan  made  pursuant  to  that  authority  which  may  include  the 
amount  of  interest  accrued  thereon  to  the  date  of 
consolidation. 

There  was  no  loan  forgiveness  during  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.11%  to 
9.84%  per  annum  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  Sep- 
tember 30,  1984  and  February  25,  1999.  Individual  loans  have 
repayment  periods  ranging  from  5  to  20  years  and  are  repay- 
able as  follows: 

{a)  in  annual  instalments;  or, 

(b)  at  maturity. 


Atlantic  Development  Board  carry-over  projects 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  certain  water  projects  that 
were  carried  over  from  the  Atlantic  Development  Board. 
Loans  were  made  pursuant  to  terms  and  conditions  of  agree- 
ments entered  into  between  Canada  and  the  provinces  in  the 
Atlantic  region,  with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 
The  department's  policy  on  water  projects  and  such  agree- 
ments included  a  forgiveness  provision  which  is  found  in  some 
agreements  to  reflect  recognition  of  a  shortfall  in  the  use  of 
available  capacity  in  the  early  years  of  such  projects. 

During  the  year,  repayments  included  forgiveness  of  princi- 
pal to  Nova  Scotia,  $4,079. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  categorized  into  two  main  groups: 

(fl)  28  year  loans,  bearing  interest  at  the  rate  of  7.5%  per 
annum,  due  on  various  anniversary  amortization  dates, 
and  maturing  July  31,  1999,  $51,323;  and, 

{b)  30  year  loans,  bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from 
7.161%  to  8.5%  per  annum,  due  on  various  anniversary 
amortization  dates,  and  maturing  at  various  dates  be- 
tween November  21,  1998  and  April  1,  2006, 
$6,511,915. 

Atlantic  Provinces  Power  Development  Act 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Atlantic  provinces  to  assist  in 
the  generation  of  electrical  energy  by  steam  driven  generators 
in  the  provinces,  and  the  control  and  transmission  of  electric 
energy. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  4.5%  to  8.5% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  29  to  40 
years  in  annual  equal  instalments  due  March  3 1  of  each  year 
and  mature  at  various  dates  between  March  31,  1992  and 
March  31,  2014. 

Special  areas  and  highways  agreement 

Loans  and  advances  have  been  made  to  finance  development 
of  community  and  industrial  infrastructure  projects  for  special 
areas  and  for  highway  development  pursuant  to  terms  and 
conditions  of  agreements  entered  into  between  Canada  and  the 
provinces,  with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 

Advances 

The  amounts  shown  as  advances  represent  outlays  made  on 
incomplete  projects.  When  a  project  is  completed,  the  ad- 
vances are  transferred  to  the  loan  account. 

Upon  completion  of  projects,  accrued  interest  is  calculated 
and  added  to  the  amount  of  advances  being  transferred  to 
loans  for  repayment.  This  is  in  accordance  with  the  terms  and 
conditions  of  the  agreements  entered  into  between  Canada  and 
the  provinces,  with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 

Loans 

This  account  records  amounts  transferred  from  the  advances 
account  whenever  projects  are  completed. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5.768%  to 
10.164%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
5  to  30  years  in  annual  equal  instalments  due  March  31  of 
each  year  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  March  31, 
1984  and  March  31,  2009. 


7*26 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Regional  electrical  interconnections 

Loans  have  been  made  to  assist  in  financing  regional  electri- 
cal interconnections  under  agreements  with  the  Provinces  of 
Manitoba,  New  Brunswick,  Nova  Scotia  and  Prince  Edward 
Island  and  the  Government  of  Canada. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L50,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  9%  to  15.625% 
per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  9.406%,  are  repayable  over 
periods  ranging  from  29  to  3 1  years  in  annual  instalments  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  December  31,  2008  and 
October  31,  2009. 


Mainland  Investments  Limited 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia  for 
the  purchase  of  shares  of  the  capital  stock  of  Mainland 
Investments  Limited  (formerly  Metropolitan  Area  Growth 
Investments  Limited)  in  accordance  with  an  agreement 
entered  into  between  Canada  and  Nova  Scotia  pursuant  to 
Section  8  of  the  Department  of  Regional  Economic  Expansion 
Act. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  7%  per  annum  and  are 
repayable  over  a  15  year  period.  During  the  first  5  years, 
interest  only  is  payable  and  during  the  subsequent  10  years, 
annual  equal  instalments  are  required  of  principal  and  accrued 
interest  due  on  March  30  of  each  year,  maturing  February  28, 
1988. 


Loading  ramp,  Yarmouth,  NS 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia  for 
the  construction  of  an  end-loading  ramp  at  Yarmouth,  Nova 
Scotia. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  8%  per  annum,  are 
repayable  over  a  15  year  period  in  semi-annual  instalments 
due  September  1 4  and  March  1 4  of  each  year  and  mature  on 
September  14,  1985. 


Comprehensive  development  plan  agreement 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Prince  Edward  Island  to  assist  in 
financing  the  realization  of  a  comprehensive  and  co-ordinated 
development  plan  of  the  province  pursuant  to  an  agreement 
entered  into  with  the  province  whose  territory  has  been  desig- 
nated a  "special  rural  development  area". 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  a  30  year  period,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  6.688%  to  9.375%  per  annum,  due  in 
equal  instalments  at  various  anniversary  dates,  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  25,  2000  and 
March  27,  2005,  $4,891,000;  and, 

{b)  repayable  over  a  30  year  period,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  6.688%  to  9.375%  per  annum,  due  in 
annual  equal  instalments  on  March  3 1  of  each  year  and 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  31,  2001  and 
March  31,  2005,  $7,080,273. 


Town  of  Oromocto 

Capital  assistance  loans  have  been  made  to  the  Town  of 
Oromocto,  New  Brunswick. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  of  5.25%,  5.375%  and 
5.625%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in 
semi-annual  equal  instalments  and  mature  at  various  dates 
between  January  1,  1985  and  April  1,  1986. 

Agricultural  service  centres 

Loans  and  advances  have  been  made  to  assist  provincial  and 
municipal  authorities  to  construct  or  expand  water  supply  and 
waste  disposal  facilities  in  key  agriculture  service  centres, 
which  are  essential  to  rural  adjustment  and  urban  development 
in  the  agricultural  portion  of  the  Prairie  region. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  and  advances  were  author- 
ized by  Vote  LI 5,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2, 
1981-82. 

Advances 

The  amount  shown  as  advances  represent  outlays  made  on 
incomplete  projects.  When  a  project  is  completed,  the 
advances  are  transferred  to  the  loan  account. 

Upon  completion  of  projects,  accrued  interest  is  calculated 
and  added  to  the  amount  of  advances  being  transferred  to 
loans  for  repayment.  This  is  in  accordance  with  the  terms  and 
conditions  of  the  agreements  entered  into  between  Canada  and 
the  provinces  with  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 

Loans 

This  account  records  amounts  transferred  from  the  advances 
account  whenever  projects  are  completed. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  a  period  of  20  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  6.747%  to  13.476%  per  annum,  due 
in  annual  equal  instalments  on  March  30  of  each  year 
and  maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  30,  1992 
and  March  30,  2002,  $14,001,189;  and, 

(b)  repayable  over  a  period  of  20  years,  bearing  interest  at 
rates  varying  from  9.593%  to  13.466%  per  annum,  due 
in  annual  equal  instalments  on  March  3 1  of  each  year 
and  maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  31,  1999 
and  March  31,  2001,  $310,233. 


Federal-provincial  fiscal  arrangements 

These  amounts  represent  overpayments  in  respect  of  provin- 
cial equalization  entitlements  under  the  Federal  Provincial 
Fiscal  Arrangements  Act  and  the  Federal  Provincial  Fiscal 
Arrangements  and  Established  Programs  Financing  Act. 
These  overpayments  are  non-interest  bearing  and  are  recov- 
ered in  the  subsequent  year. 

South  Saskatchewan  River  project — ^Treasury  bills 

Treasury  bills  are  received  as  payment  of  the  Province  of 
Saskatchewan's  share  of  certain  expenditures  on  the  South 
Saskatchewan  River  project. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


I'll 


The  Treasury  bills  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to 
5.875%  per  annum,  are  repayable  in  semi-annual  instalments 
due  June  30  and  December  31,  and  mature  annually  on 
December  31  up  to  1986. 

Government  of  the  Northwest  Territories 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Government  of  the  Northwest 
Territories  for  the  following  purposes: 


April  1/1981 

Receipts 

and  other 

credits 

Payments 
and  other 
charges     March  31/1982 

Second  mortgage  

Low  cost  housing  

Development  of  new 

$ 

184.090 
446,573 

$ 

7,719 
43,809 

11,229 

10,142 
1,249,729 

$ 

2,352,221 

S 

176,371 
402,764 

sub-divisions  at  Hay 
River  

Establishment    of    the 
Capital    at    Yellow- 
knife 

Outside  party  

93,004 

129,322 
17,389,382 

81,775 

119,180 
18,491,874 

18,242,371 

1,322,628 

2,352,221 

19,271,964 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L50,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  an  annual  rate  equal  to  the  rate 
established  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  in  respect  of  Crown 
corporations'  borrowings  during  the  period  in  which  the  loans 
were  made.  Interest  rates  presently  vary  from  5.125%  to 
17.125%  per  annum.  The  loans  are  repayable  over  periods 
ranging  from  3  to  25  years  in  equal  annual  instalments  start- 
ing one  year  from  the  date  they  were  made  and  mature  at 
various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and  March  31,  2003. 


Government  of  the  Yukon  Territory 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Government  of  the  Yukon 
Territory  for  the  following  purposes: 


Receipts 
and  other 
April  1/1981       credits 

$  $ 

Second  mortgage  153,459  8,766 

Low  cost  housing  575.586  38,803 

Capital  expenditures 1,238,596  78,741 

Outside  party — Capital 

projects  24,498,372  5,278,841 

City   of   Whitehorse— 

Capital  projects 299.663  45.347 

26,765,676       5.450,498 


Payments 
and  other 
charges     March  31/1982 


5,000,000 


144.693 

536,783 

1,159,855 

24,219,531 

254,316 


5,000,000       26,315.178 


During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L45,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  an  annual  rate  equal  to  the  rate 
established  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  in  respect  of  Crown 
corporations'  borrowings  during  the  period  in  which  the  loans 
were  made.  Interest  rates  presently  vary  from  3.875%  to 
17.75%  per  annum.  The  loans  are  repayable  over  periods 
ranging  from  2  to  35  years  in  equal  annual  instalments  start- 
ing one  year  from  the  date  they  were  made  and  mature  at 
various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and  March  31,  2007. 

Yukon  Territory  small  business  loans 

Loans  have  been  made  for  the  establishment  or  expansion  of 
small  businesses  in  the  Yukon  Territory. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$5,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  established  by  the  Minister 
of  Finance  and  vary  from  9%  to  1 2%  per  annum,  are  repayable 
in  annual  instalments  over  a  10  year  period  and  mature  at 
various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and  March  31,  1988. 
Such  repayment  period  may  be  extended  with  the  approval  of 
the  Minister. 


7-28 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  GOVERNMENTS 
INCLUDING  DEVELOPING  COUNTRIES 

Loans  to  national  governments  consist  mainly  of  the  loan  to 
the  Government  of  the  United  Kingdom  under  the  authority  of 
the  United  Kingdom  Financial  Agreement  Act,  and  special 
loan  assistance  to  developing  countries. 


Table  7.7  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans  and  advances  that  were 
made  to  national  governments  including  developing  countries. 


TABLE  7.7 

NATIONAL  GOVERNMENTS  INCLUDING  DEVELOPING  COUNTRIES 


China — Finance 

Greece — -Finance 

Jamaica — 
Finance — 
Special  program — Economic  assistance  

United  Kingdom — 
Finance — 
The  United  Kingdom  Financial  Agreement 

Act,  1946  

Deferred  principal 

Developing  countries — 

External     Affairs — Canadian     International 
Development  Agenc> — 
Special  loan  assistance  2,149,431,850 

National  Defence — 
North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization — 
Damage  claims  recoverable  11,253 

Total 2,942,015,950 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

$ 

$ 

$ 

S 

$ 

S 

49,426,118 

49,426,118 

6,525,000 

310,874 

6,214,126 

-310,874 

25,000,000 

25,000,000 

616,630,866 

94,990,863 

711,621.729 

25,377,638 
25.377,638 

591,253,228 

94,990,863 

686,244.091 

-  25,377,638 

-  25.377,638 

-  24,880,037 

-  24.880,037 

13,577,235 
18,527 


295,701,276  2,431,555,891  282,124,041  253,811,519 


13,626 


6,352 


4,901 


39,284,274 


-  5,983 


295,714,902  3,198,446,578  256,430,628  228,925,499 


China 

An  interest-free  loan  to  China  was  authorized  under  the 
Export  Credits  Insurance  Act. 

Greece 

An  interest-free  loan  to  Greece  was  authorized  by  PC 
1932-2630.  Partial  settlement  was  received  in  1981-82.  Parlia- 
mentary authority  to  write-off  the  balance  during  1982-83  is 
being  sought. 

Jamaica — Economic  assistance 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Government  of  Jamaica  to 
provide  for  economic  assistance.  The  maturity  date  under  the 
agreement  has  been  further  extended  to  August  9,  1989. 
Interest  at  11%  per  annum  is  payable  annually  from  August  9, 
1982  to  August  9,  1984.  For  the  period  from  August  9,  1984 
to  August  9,  1989,  the  interest  rate  will  be  equal  to  the  Crown 
corporations'  borrowing  rate  for  a  5  year  term  effective 
August  9,  1984. 

United  Kingdom 

The  United  Kingdom  Financial  Agreement  Act,  1946 

Under  authority  of  the  United  Kingdom  Financial  Agree- 
ment Act,  a  credit  of  $1,250,000,000  was  extended  to  the 


Government  of  the  United  Kingdom  which  might  be  drawn  on 
at  any  time  prior  to  December  31,  1951.  The  purpose  of  the 
credit  was  to  facilitate  purchases  by  the  United  Kingdom  of 
goods  and  services  in  Canada  and  to  assist  in  making  it 
possible  for  the  United  Kingdom  to  meet  transitional  post-war 
deficits  in  its  current  balance  of  payments,  to  maintain  ade- 
quate reserves  of  gold  and  dollars  and  to  assume  the  obliga- 
tions of  multilateral  trade.  No  interest  was  to  be  payable  in 
respect  of  any  period  prior  to  January  1,  1951.  The  amount  of 
the  credit  drawn  by  December  31,  1951  was  to  be  repaid  in  50 
annual  instalments  beginning  on  that  date  with  interest  at  the 
rate  of  2%  per  annum.  The  loan  matures  December  3 1 ,  2000. 

Deferred  principal 

The  agreement,  as  amended  in  1957,  provides  for  the  defer- 
ment of  interest  in  respect  to  the  year  1956  and  of  seven 
instalments  of  principal  and  interest  after  December  31,  1956, 
under  certain  conditions.  Interest  for  1956  and  interest  and 
principal  for  1957,  1964,  1965,  1968  and  1976  were  deferred. 
The  maturity  of  the  deferrals  shall  commence  December  3 1 , 
2001  and  continue  annually  to  December  31,  2006. 


Developing  countries — Special  loan  assistance 

Special  loan  assistance  is  given  to  developing  countries. 
During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Votes 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


1'19 


L40,  L40c  and  L40e,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1,  No  2,  No  3 
and  No  4,  1981-82. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  loans  to  developing  countries, 
with  their  year-end  balances,  are  categorized  into  seven  main 
groups: 

{a)  20  year  maturity,  5  year  grace  period  at  5%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  September  2000  and  March  2001, 
$35,283,217; 

{b)  25  year  maturity,  5  year  grace  period  at  6%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  March  2001,  $1,498,789; 

{c)  30  year  maturity,  7  year  grace  period  at  3%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  1997 
and  September  201 1,  $178,417,879; 


(</)  30  year  maturity,  7  year  grace  period  interest-free, 
maturing  March  2010,  $8,215,120; 

(e)  35  year  maturity,  5  year  grace  period  interest-free, 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  April  2001  and 
November  2005,  $3,648,514; 

(/)  40  year  maturity,  10  year  grace  period  interest-free, 
maturing  March  2008,  $828,320;  and, 

{g)  50  year  maturity,  10  year  grace  period  interest-free, 
maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  2013  and 
March  2032,  $2,203,664,052. 

Maturity  means  the  interval  to  final  repayment  while  grace 
period  refers  to  interval  to  first  repayment  of  principal. 

Loans  were  made  to  various  governments  as  follows: 


April  1/1981 


Receipts 

and  other 

credits 


Payments 
and  other 
charges 


March  31/1982 


(a)  20  year  maturity,  S  year  grace  period  at  S%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  September  2000  and  March  2001: 

Jamaica 

Turkey 

ib)  25  year  maturity,  5  year  grace  period  at  6%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  March  2001: 
Nigeria 

(c)  30  year  maturity,  7  year  grace  period  at  3%  interest  per 
annum,  maturing  at  various  dates  between  March  1997  and 
September  201 1: 

Barbados 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Cuba  

Dominican  Republic 

Egypt 

Jamaica 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Nigeria 

Peru 

Trinidad 

Turkey 

(</)  30  year  maturity,  7  year  grace  period  interest-free,  maturing 
March  2010: 
El  Salvador 

{e)  35  year  maturity,  5  year  grace  period  interest-free,  maturing 
at  various  dates  between  April  2001  and  November  2005: 
El  Salvador ', 

(/)  40  year  maturity,  10  year  grace  period  interest-free,  maturing 
March  2008: 
Thailand  

ig)  50  year  maturity,  10  year  grace  period  interest-free,  maturing 
at  various  dates  between  March  2013  and  March  2032: 

Algeria 

Antigua 

Argentina  

Barbados  

Belize 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Burma  

Cameroun 

Chile 

Colombia 

Congo-Brazzaville  

Dominica 


18,958.697 
18.958.697 


1,673,789 


1,960,057 


3,820.444 


861.654 


175,000 


171,930 


33.334 


4,500,000 
11,824,520 
16.324.520 


6,255.063 


4,500,000 
30,783,217 
35.283.217 


1,498,789 


16,987,706 

273,912 

1,015,676 

17,729,470 

12,141,301 

452,381 

1,146,242 

12,835,162 

3,108,782 

182,873 

2,925,909 

14,196,477 

1.422.750 

15,619,227 

9,992,664 

9,992,664 

2,173,513 

2,173,513 

49.351,353 

648,647 

50,000,000 

29,910,139 

1,105,987 

5,162.748 

33,966,900 

695,125 

43,446 

651,679 

13,814,682 

507,899 

874,762 

14,181,545 

1,260,775 

53,258 

1,207,517 

536,622 

536,622 

6,567,661 

548.758 

728,768 

6,747.671 

9,850,000 

9,850,000 

168.413.287 

3.168.514 

13.173.106 

178.417.879 

8,215,120 


3,648,514 


828.320 


22,030,000 

8,806 

1,073,179 

23,094,373 

5,382,365 

536,508 

5,918.873 

681,331 

18,661 

662,670 

2,341,392 

3.125 

10.636 

2,348,903 

12,095,573 

90.299 

12.185.872 

1,717.000 

21,197 

1.695,803 

805.172 

20,907 

784,265 

8.007,939 

156,830 

8,164,769 

72,468,348 

17,097,770 

89.566,118 

3,658,541 

49,024 

3,609,517 

22,106,551 

439,638 

21,666,913 

17,615,531 

1,346,500 

18,962,031 

1,760,401 

109,600 

1,870,001 

7*30 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Dominican  Republic 

East  African  Community''^ 
Ecuador 

Egypt 

El  Salvador 

Ghana  

Grenada 

Guatemala 

Guyana  

Honduras 

India 

Indonesia 

Ivory  Coast 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

Madagascar 

Malaysia 

Malta 

Mauritania  

Mexico 

Montserrat  

Morocco 

Nicaragua 

Nigeria 

Pakistan 

Paraguay  

Peru 

Philippines 

St  Lucia 

St  Vincent  

Senegal  

Sri  Lanka 

Swaziland  

Thailand  

Togo 

Trinidad 

Tunisia 

Various  Francophone*^' 

Zaire  

Zambia  

Zimbabwe 


Receipts 

Payments 

and  other 

and  other 

April  1/I9HI 

credits 

charges 

March  31/1982 

S 

S 

S 

S 

8,163,951 

376,382 

8,540,333 

47,402,298 

47,402,298 

12,208,720 

86,141 

12,122,579 

23,428,300 

23,428,300 

1,200,000 

1.200.000 

71,455,676 

282,337 

5,685,990 

76.859.329 

850,000 

850.000 

1,037,305 

546,814 

1.584.119 

28.972,358 

119,699 

2,234,317 

31.086.976 

13,697,325 

566,923 

14.264.248 

526,542,832 

6,585,684 

34,663,063 

554.620.211 

123,213,549 

50,000 

23,019,247 

146.182.796 

43,271,378 

215,614 

2,954,516 

46,010,280 

12,108,160 

195,248 

8,856,967 

20,769,879 

28,593,194 

10,246 

33,896,249 

62,479,197 

16,367,861 

4,053,389 

20,421.250 

371,509 

9,907 

361.602 

1,000,000 

1.000.000 

3,914,866 

72,777 

3,987.643 

101,159 

2.776 

98.383 

678,584 

5,231 

683.815 

9,188,677 

132,948 

3,359,850 

12.415.579 

1,887,610 

1.887.610 

46,181,535 

95,706 

46.085.829 

448,147,218 

6 

41,473,747 

489,620,959 

719,870 

19,997 

699.873 

5,119,700 

3,730 

5.115.970 

3,886,371 

3.886.371 

556,062 

556.062 

1,145,000 

1,145,000 

13,077,780 

1,182,913 

14,260,693 

102,532,018 

423,415 

24,567,221 

126,675,824 

1,376,227 

17,267 

1,393,494 

19,569,737 

4,814,544 

24,384,281 

17,081,157 

316,216 

16,764,941 

3,889,953 

57,117 

3,832,836 

103,261,835 

760,312 

9,397,048 

111,898,571 

1,684,192 

1,684,192 

17,464,925 

3,238,287 

20.703.212 

45,153,186 

100,000 

4.770,384 

49.823.570 

6,345,839 

6.345.839 

1.953.743.922 

10.028.457 

259.948,587 

2.203.664.052 

2,149,431,850 

13,577,235 

295,701,276 

2.431.555.891 

*')  Joint  project  involving  Kenya.  Tanzania  and  Uganda. 
*^'  Joint  project  involving  Mali  and  Senegal. 


Similar  assistance  has  been  provided  to  developing  countries 
by  way  of  subscriptions  to  the  capital  of  the  International 
Development  Association  in  the  amount  of  $1,437  million,  and 
loans  to  other  international  financial  institutions  in  the  amount 
of  $738  million.  These  amounts  are  reported  later  in  this 
section  under  the  heading  "International  Organizations". 


North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization — Damage  claims 
recoverable 

Article  VIII  of  the  NATO  Status  of  Forces  Agreement 
signed  April  4,  1949,  as  amended,  deals  with  claims  for 
damages  to  third  parties  arising  from  accidents  in  which  a 
member  of  a  visiting  force  is  involved.  This  account  is  debited 
with  the  amount  chargeable  to  other  states,  of  such  claims  for 
damages  which  took  place  in  Canada,  and  is  credited  with 
recoveries. 

The  advances  bear  no  interest  and  have  no  specific  repay- 
ment terms. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7'31 


INTERNATIONAL  ORGANIZATIONS 

This  group  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital  of 
the  Asian  Development  Bank,  the  Caribbean  Development 
Bank,  the  Inter-American  Development  Bank,  the  Internation- 
al Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development  (i.e.  World 
Bank),  the  International  Development  Association  and  the 
International  Finance  Corporation.  It  also  includes  loans  and 
advances  to  other  international  organizations. 

The  capital  subscriptions  are  made  in  part  by  the  issuance  of 
non-negotiable,  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on  demand. 
The  amounts  advanced  or  loaned  vary  according  to  the  needs 
of  the  organizations  concerned  and  the  terms  of  the 
agreements. 


The  net  position  of  the  Government  vis-a-vis  the  internation- 
al organizations  has  been  obtained  by  deducting  from  the 
subscriptions,  loans  and  advances,  the  non-interest  bearing 
notes  issued  by  Canada  to  these  organizations.  These  notes, 
payable  on  demand,  represent  that  portion  of  the  investment 
by  Canada  in  these  organizations  which  has  not  yet  been 
encashed  by  them.  These  notes  are  encashed  subject  to  the 
financial  requirements  of  these  organizations. 

Table  7.8  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  subscriptions,  loans  and  advances  to  international 
organizations. 


TABLE  7.8 

INTERNATIONAL  ORGANIZATIONS 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  - ) 
Receipts  and  Payments  and 

April  1  / 1 98 1  other  credits           other  charges          March  31/1982 1982 1981 

$  S                             $                            $                                $                        $ 

Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital  of — 

Asian  Development  Bank 119,968,520  9,410,742               129,379,262               9,410,742              8,159,252 

£«ii;  notes  payable  16,435,013  5,448,934                                                    21,883,947                5,448,934               5,557,321 

103.533,507  5,448.934                  9,410,742              107,495,315               3,961.808              2.601.931 

Caribbean  Development  Bank 8,815,688  1,183,805                  9,999,493                1,183,805                 756,346 

Leii."  notes  payable  831,154  422,758                                                    1,253,912                  422,758                 419,864 

7.984,534  422,758                  1.183.805                  8.745.581                  761.047                336.482 

Inter-American  Development  Bank 94,312,481  10,535,218               104,847,699              10,535,218              6,015,772 

Leirnotes  payable  30,767,067  7,008,887                    5,210,225                  32,565,729                 1,798,662           -2,461,214 

63.545.414  7,008.887                15.745.443                72.281.970               8,736,556             8,476,986 
International   Bank  for  Reconstruction  and 

Development 125,233,772  489,923               125,723,695                  489,923              -372,488 

International  Development  Association 1,272,487,061  164,600,000            l,437,087,06l('^        164,600,000          177,109,000 

L«jj;  notes  payable  592,806,190  164,600,000               126,606,000               630,800,190             37,994,000            82,977,000 

679.680.871  164.600,000              291.206,000              806.286.871            126.606.000           94.132.000 

International  Finance  Corporation  20,703,312  5,006,887                 25,710,199               5,006,887              3,944,550 

1,000.681.410  177.480.579               323.042.800            1,146.243.631            145.562.221           109.119.461 

International  financial  institutions 604,126,434  25,501               134,178,964               738,279,897<')        134,153,463            93,583,928 

L^ii;  notes  payable  172,677,325  121,200,000                      763,569                293,113,756            120,436,431             92,604,640 

431.449.109  121.225.501               134,942.533              445.166.141              13.717.032                979.288 

Common  Fund  for  Commodities 

International  Tin  Council 4,500,000  4,500,000 

£^55/ notes  payable  2,812,500  2,812,500                                             -2,812,500 

1,687.500  2.812.500                  4.500.000               2.812.500 

International  Natural  Rubber  Agreement  4,775,194                  4,775,194               4,775,194 

International  organizations  and  associations — 
Berne  Union  of  the  World  Intellectual  Prop- 
erty Organization 12,523  5,982                        18,505                      5,982                   12,523 

Customs  Co-operation  Council 6,309  6,309 

Food  and  Agriculture  Organization 275,648  275,648 

General  Agreement  on  Tariffs  and  Trade 14,508  14,508 

Intergovernmental     Maritime     Consultative 

Organization  1,617  1,617 

International  Atomic  Energy  Agency 72,455  72,455                                                   1,666 

International  Civil  Aviation  Organization  49,473  49,473                                                  -180 

International  Labour  Organization 68,666  68,666 

Paris  Union  of  the  World  Intellectual  Prop- 
erty Organization 15,110  7,218                       22,328                      7,218                   15,110 

United  Nations  bonds 2,121,119  335,191                        67,091                   1,853,019               -268,100              -357,025 

United  Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and 

Cultural  Organization 511,158  169,361                      680,519                   169,361 

United  Nations  organizations 1,384,865  1,384,865                                               113,280 

World  Health  Organization 162,635  162,635 

4.696.086 335.191 249.652 4.610.547 -  85.539 -  214,626 

Total 1,438,514,105  299,041,271                465,822,679             1,605,295,513             166,781,408           109,884,123 

*'^  The  subscriptions  to  the  Association  and  the  loans  to  the  international  financial  institutions  are  used  to  lend  funds  to  developing  countries  at  rates  favourable  to  the 

borrowers.  In  addition,  as  described  earlier  in  this  section,  under  the  heading  "National  Governments  including  Developing  Countries",  special  loan  assistance 
amounting  to  $2,431  million  has  also  been  provided  to  developing  countries. 


7-32 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Asian  Development  Bank 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital 
of  the  Asian  Development  Bank  as  authorized  by  various 
appropriation  acts. 

As  at  year-end,  total  authorities  granted  were  for  the  pur- 
chase of  8,740  paid-in  shares  and  36,403  callable  shares. 
Instalment  payments  for  the  paid-in  shares  may  be  made  in 
cash  or  in  non-interest  bearing,  non-negotiable  demand  notes. 
These  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on  demand  are 
deducted  from  the  subscriptions  to  show  the  net  position  of  the 
Government  vis-a-vis  the  Bank. 

As  at  March  31,  1981,  the  foreign  currency  balance  of 
$101,290,543  US  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the 
year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$1.1844  Cdn). 

During  the  year,  transactions  included  additional  subscrip- 
tions in  cash  and  in  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on 
demand  and  an  adjustment  due  to  revaluation. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  Canada's  instalment  payments 
amounted  to  $105,434,978  US  for  8,740  paid-in  shares.  This 
foreign  currency  balance  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars 
at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271 
Cdn).  The  36,403  callable  shares  are  subject  to  call  by  the 
Bank  under  certain  circumstances.  Canada's  commitment  for 
the  callable  shares  has  a  current  value  of  $439,147,591  US 
valued  at  $538,878,008  Cdn  at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of 
exchange. 


Caribbean  Development  Bank 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital 
of  the  Caribbean  Development  Bank  as  authorized  by  various 
appropriation  acts.  During  the  year,  additional  subscriptions  of 
351  paid-in  shares  and  878  callable  shares  were  authorized  by 
Vote  L50,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

As  at  year-end,  total  authorities  granted  were  for  the  pur- 
chase of  1,585  paid-in  shares  and  5,355  callable  shares. 
Canada  may  issue,  as  payment  for  the  shares  so  purchased, 
pending  cash  requirements  by  the  Bank,  non-interest  bearing, 
non-negotiable  demand  notes.  These  non-interest  bearing  notes 
payable  on  demand  are  deducted  from  the  subscriptions  to 
show  the  net  position  of  the  Government  vis-a-vis  the  Bank. 

As  at  March  31,  1981,  the  foreign  currency  balance  of 
$7,443,168  US  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the 
year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$1.1844  Cdn). 

During  the  year,  transactions  included  additional  subscrip- 
tions in  cash  and  in  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on 
demand  and  an  adjustment  due  to  revaluation. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  Canada's  instalment  payments 
amounted  to  $8,148,882  US  for  1,351  paid-in  shares.  This 
foreign  currency  balance  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars 
at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271 
Cdn).  The  5,355  callable  shares  are  subject  to  call  by  the  Bank 
under  certain  circumstances.  Canada's  commitment  for  the 
callable  shares  has  a  current  value  of  $32,300,021  US  valued 
at  $39,635,356  Cdn  at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange. 


Inter-American  Development  Bank 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital 
of  the  Inter-American  Development  Bank  as  authorized  by 
various  appropriation  acts. 

As  at  year-end,  total  authorities  granted  were  for  the  pur- 
chase of  7,554  paid-in  shares  and  63,692  callable  shares. 
Instalment  payments  for  the  paid-in  shares  may  be  made  in 
cash  or  in  non-interest  bearing,  non-negotiable  demand  notes. 
These  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on  demand  are 
deducted  from  the  subscriptions  to  show  the  net  position  of  the 
Government  vis-a-vis  the  Bank. 

As  at  March  31,  1981,  the  foreign  currency  balance  of 
$79,628,910  US  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the 
year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$1.1844  Cdn). 

During  the  year,  transactions  included  additional  subscrip- 
tions in  the  form  of  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on 
demand  and  an  adjustment  due  to  revaluation. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  Canada's  instalment  payments 
amounted  to  $85,443,484  US  for  7,072  paid-in  shares.  This 
foreign  currency  balance  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars 
at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271 
Cdn).  The  63,692  callable  shares  are  subject  to  call  by  the 
Bank  under  certain  circumstances.  Canada's  commitment  for 
the  callable  shares  has  a  current  value  of  $768,348,442  US 
valued  at  $942,840,373  Cdn  at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of 
exchange. 

International  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development 
(World  Bank) 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital 
of  the  International  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development 
as  authorized  by  various  appropriation  acts.  Canada  has  sub- 
scribed for  1 1,122  shares  of  the  Bank  of  which  10%  has  been 
paid  by  cash  and  notes.  The  remaining  90%  is  represented  by  a 
guarantee  subject  to  call  by  the  Bank  only  when  required  to 
meet  obligations  of  the  Bank  for  funds  borrowed  or  loans 
guaranteed  by  it  and  not  for  use  by  the  Bank  in  its  lending 
activities  or  for  administrative  expenses. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  the  foreign  currency  balance  was 
translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of 
exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271  Cdn). 

International  Development  Association 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  Interna- 
tional Development  Association  as  authorized  by  various 
appropriation  acts  and  Section  4  of  the  International  Develop- 
ment Association  Act.  The  subscriptions  to  the  Association, 
which  is  part  of  the  World  Bank  Groups,  are  used  to  lend 
funds  to  developing  countries  for  development  purposes  at 
rates  highly  favourable  to  the  borrower  (no  interest  with  a  50 
year  maturity  and  10  years  grace). 

Subscriptions  have  been  made  in  the  form  of  non-interest 
bearing,  non-negotiable  demand  notes.  The  non-interest  bear- 
ing notes  payable  on  demand  are  deducted  from  the  subscrip- 
tions to  show  the  net  position  of  the  Government  vis-a-vis  the 
Association. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7*33 


International  Finance  Corporation 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  capital 
of  the  International  Finance  Corporation,  which  is  part  of  the 
World  Bank  Groups,  as  authorized  by  various  appropriation 
acts. 

At  the  year-end,  total  authorities  granted  were  for  the 
purchase  of  20,952  paid-in  shares. 

As  at  March  31,  1981,  Canada's  total  instalment  payments 
amounted  to  $17,480,000  US  for  17,480  paid-in  shares.  This 
foreign  currency  balance  was  translated  into  Canadian  dollars 
at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$1.1844 
Cdn).  During  the  year,  transactions  included  an  instalment  in 
the  amount  of  $3,472,000  US  for  a  total  of  3,472  paid-in 
shares. 


As  at  March  31,  1982,  Canada  had  purchased  a  total  of 
20,952  paid-in  shares.  Canada  is  no  longer  liable  to  purchase 
paid-in  shares. 

The  paid-in  subscriptions  of  $20,952,000  US  have  been 
translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the  year-end  closing  rate  of 
exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271  Cdn). 

International  financial  institutions 

This  account  records  loans  for  assistance  to  international 
financial  institutions  as  authorized  by  the  International  De- 
velopment (Financial  Institutions)  Assistance  Act  and  by  vari- 
ous appropriation  acts. 

The  balances  of  loans  to  various  international  financial 
institutions  are  as  follows: 


African  Development  Bank 

African  Development  Fund 

Less:  notes  payable 

Andean  Development  Corporation 

Asian  Development  Bank — Special 

Asian  Development  Fund  

Less:  notes  payable 

Caribbean  Development  Bank — 

Agricultural  Development  Fund 

Caribbean  Development  Bank — 

Commonwealth  Caribbean  Regional 

Caribbean  Development  Bank — Special 

Less:  notes  payable 

Central  American  Bank  for  Economic  Integration 

Inter-American  Development  Bank — Fund  for  Special  Operations . 
Less:  noits  payable 

International  Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  Development 

International  Fund  for  Agricultural  Development 

Less:  notes  payable 

International  Monetary  Fund 


April  1/1981 

Receipts 

and  other 

credits 

Payments 
and  other 
charges 

March  31/1982 

S 

$ 

$ 

$ 

4,718,896 
143,829,933 
55,000,000 
88.829.933 

30,000,000 
30.000.000 

33,202,497 
33.202.497 

4,718,896 
177,032,430 
85,000,000 
92,032.430 

5,000,000 

27,027,000 

168,665,720 

80,000,000 

88.665.720 

56,721,670 
56.721.670 

56,721,670 
56.721.670 

5,000,000 

27,027,000 

225,387,390 

136,721,670 

88,665.720 

8,600,000 

8,600,000 

4,737,600 
31,904,845 

3,500,000 
28,404.845 

2,969,895 
2.969.895 

170,800 
3,505,780 

3.505,780 

4.908,400 
35,410,625 

6,469,895 
28.940,730 

2,460,780 

25,501 

2,435,279 

170,501,464 

34,177,325 

136.324.139 

17,508,435 
17,508,435 

25,255,823 

763,569 

26,019,392 

195,757,287 

50,922,191 

144,835,096 

23,688,000 
12,992,196 

14,000,000 
14,000.000 

854,000 
14,000,000 

14,000.000 
468,394 

24,542,000 
14,000,000 
14,000,000 

13,460,590 

431,449,109 

121,225,501 

134,942,533 

445,166,141 

Common  Fund  for  Commodities 

This  account  was  established  to  make  payments  and  issue 
guarantees  and  promissory  notes  in  the  current  and  subsequent 
fiscal  years  to  purchase  shares  in  the  first  account  of  the 
Common  Fund  for  Commodities  in  accordance  with  the  terms 
and  conditions  of  the  agreement  establishing  the  Common 
Fund  for  Commodities. 

Payments,  guarantees  and  promissory  notes  shall  not  exceed 
$10,380,000  US. 

International  Tin  Council 

This  account  records  Canada's  subscriptions  to  the  Interna- 
tional Tin  Council  as  authorized  by  a  previous  appropriation 
act.  The  subscriptions,  made  in  the  form  of  non-interest  bear- 
ing, non-negotiable  demand  notes,  are  for  the  investment  in 
the  buffer  stock  established  under  the  Fifth  International  Tin 
Agreement. 


Subscriptions  have  been  made  in  the  form  of  non-interest 
bearing  demand  notes,  which  are  deducted  from  the  subscrip- 
tions to  show  the  net  position  of  the  Government  vis-a-vis  the 
Council. 

During  the  year.  Vote  L42e,  Appropriation  Act  No  4, 
1981-82  provided  for  Canada's  participation  in  the  Interna- 
tional Tin  Council  for  1982-83. 


International  Natural  Rubber  Agreement 

This  account  was  established  to  make  payments  and  issue 
guarantees,  in  the  1980-81,  1981-82,  1982-83,  1983-84,  1984- 
85  and  1985-86  fiscal  years,  for  participation  in  the  natural 
rubber  buffer  stock  in  accordance  with  terms  and  conditions  of 
the  International  Natural  Rubber  Agreement,  1 979. 

Payments  and  guarantees  shall  not  exceed  $12,500,000. 


7*34 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


International  organizations  and  associations 

These  items  represent  the  historical  value  of  payments  made 
by  the  Canadian  Government  to  working  capital  funds  main- 
tained by  international  organizations  of  which  Canada  is  a 
member.  Participation  in  the  financing  of  these  working  capi- 
tal funds,  on  the  basis  of  the  scale  of  assessments,  is  prescribed 
by  financial  regulations  for  membership  in  the  organizations. 
Payments  into  the  funds  are  not  subject  to  interest  or  repay- 
ments schedules,  but  are  recorded  by  the  organizations  as 
credits  from  member  states.  Payments  by  Canada  were 
authorized  by  various  appropriation  acts. 

During  the  year,  additional  advances  to  the  working  capital 
funds  of  the  Berne  Union  of  the  World  Intellectual  Property 
Organization,  the  Paris  Union  of  the  World  Intellectual  Prop- 
erty Organization  and  the  United  Nations  Educational,  Scien- 
tific and  Cultural  Organization  were  authorized  by  Votes  LI 5, 
L20  and  LI 6c,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1,  No  2  and  No  3, 
1981-82. 

During  the  year,  Canada  made  a  payment  of  9,363  Swiss 
Francs  valued  at  $5,982  Cdn  to  the  Berne  Union  of  the  World 
Intellectual  Property  Organization,  a  payment  of  1 1,297  Swiss 
Francs  valued  at  $7,218  Cdn  to  the  Paris  Union  of  the  World 
Intellectual  Property  Organization,  and  a  payment  of 
$142,320  US  valued  at  $169,361  Cdn  to  the  United  Nations 
Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization. 

This  account  also  records  payments  and  the  balance  out- 
standing on  United  Nations  bonds  purchased  by  the  Canadian 
Government  in  September  1962.  The  bonds  yield  interest  at 
the  rate  of  2%  per  annum  and  are  repayable  over  a  25  year 
period  by  annual  instalments  in  amounts  ranging  from  3.1%  to 
5.1%  of  the  amount  subscribed.  During  the  year,  Canada's 
investment  of  $1,790,880  US  as  at  April  1,  1981,  was  reduced 
by  a  payment  of  $280,800  US  valued  at  $335,191  Cdn. 
Payments  and  other  charges  amounting  to  $67,092  represent  a 
valuation  adjustment  of  Canada's  foreign  investment  of 
$1,510,080  US  translated  into  Canadian  dollars  at  the  year- 
end  closing  rate  of  exchange  ($1  US/$  1.2271  Cdn). 


VETERANS'  LAND  ACT  FUND 
ADVANCES 

Advances  have  been  made,  under  Parts  I  and  III  of  the 
Veterans'  Land  Act,  for  the  acquisition  of  land,  permanent 
improvements,  removal  of  encumbrances,  purchase  of  stock 
and  equipment  and  protection  of  security  and,  under  Part  II  of 
the  Act,  for  the  purchase,  subdivision  and  development  of  land 
and  for  progress  payments  to  veterans  during  construction  and 
completion  of  unfinished  houses  after  termination  of  the  con- 
struction contract,  etc.  On  completion  of  the  construction 
contract  for  each  house,  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Cor- 
poration will  place  or  arrange  to  have  placed  a  mortgage  on 
the  property  and  reimburse  the  Fund  the  full  cost  of  that 
property.  The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to 
exceed  $605,000,000. 

A  provision  equal  to  Vio  of  the  benefits  to  veterans  is 
established  each  year.  This  annual  provision  is  charged  to 
budgetary  expenditure  and  credited  to  the  allowance  for  condi- 
tional benefits  account.  The  allowance  for  conditional  benefits 
account  represents  the  accumulated  net  provisions  for  benefits 
to  veterans  in  the  form  of  forgiveness  of  loans  authorized  by 
the  Veterans'  Land  Act.  These  benefits  come  into  effect  only 
after  certain  conditions  are  fulfilled  by  the  veterans.  At  the 
end  of  10  years,  the  conditions  having  been  met,  the 
accumulated  provision  is  charged  to  the  allowance  for  condi- 
tional benefits  account  and  credited  to  the  veteran's  loan 
account. 

Table  7.9  summarizes  the  balances  and  transactions  for 
advances  to  the  Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund. 


TABLE  7.9 

VETERANS'  LAND  ACT  FUND 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

Net  increase  or 
1982 

decrease  ( - ) 
1981 

Veterans'  Land  Act  Fund — 

Advances 

Less:  allowance  for  conditional  beneflts  

$ 

324,729,618 
12,263,133 

$ 
48,678,572 

$ 

16,619,398 
2,403,654 

$ 

292,670,444 
9,859,479 

$ 

-32,059,174 
-  2,403,654 

$ 

-  40,050,303 
-3,265,150 

Total 

312,466,485 

48,678,572 

19,023,052 

282,810,965 

-  29,655,520 

-36,785,153 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7*35 


GOVERNMENT  CONTROLLED 
CORPORATIONS 

This  group  records  loans,  investments  and  advances  to  Gov- 
ernment controlled  corporations.  The  terms  and  conditions  of 
the  loans  are  governed  by  the  Governor  in  Council  or  an 
appropriation  act.  For  the  purposes  of  this  group,  a  Govern- 

TABLE  7.10 

GOVERNMENT  CONTROLLED  CORPORATIONS 


ment  controlled  corporation  is  a  business  corporation,  other 
than  a  Crown  corporation,  in  which  the  Government  of 
Canada  has  a  controlling  interest. 

Table  7.10  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans,  investments  and  advances 
that  were  made  to  Government  controlled  corporations. 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  - ) 


Canadair  Limited — Industry,  Trade  and  Com- 
merce— 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Canada  Development  Corporation — Finance 

Consolidated    Computer    Incorporated — Indus- 
try, Trade  and  Commerce 

The  de  Haviliand  Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited — 
Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Total 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

$ 

S 

S 

S 

$ 

46,618,550 
14,928,447 
61.546.997 

147,122 
147,122 

46,618,550 
14,781,325 
61.399.875 

-147,122 
- 147.122 

-71,953 
-  71.953 

322,000,000 

322,000,000 

12,395,999 

I 

12,395,998 

-I 

40,792,888 

3,756,888 

44.549.776 

110,312 
110.312 

40,792,888 

3,867,200 

44.660.088 

110.312 
110.312 

293,985 
1,366,088 
1.660.073 

440,492,772 

147,123 

110,312 

440,455,961 

-36,811 

1,588,120 

Canadair  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  by  letters  patent,  granted 
under  the  Canada  Corporations  Act,  to  manufacture  and  sell 
aircraft. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government  has  purchased  shares  of  the  capital  stock 
and  notes  of  the  Corporation. 

The  Government  purchased  251,700,  4'/4%  non  cumulative, 
$100  par  value  preferred  shares  for  $25,170,000  and  3,102,206 
common,  no  par  value  shares  for  $21,448,550.  This  represents 
100%  of  the  shares. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  the  financing 
of  water  bomber  aircraft,  such  loans  to  be  recovered  on  the 
sale  of  such  aircraft. 

The  loans  are  interest-free  and  are  repayable  only  if  and 
when  the  aircraft  concerned  are  sold.  Because  of  this  condi- 
tion, no  periods  for  repayment  have  been  set  up. 

Canada  Development  Corporation 

The  Corporation  was  established  under  the  Canada  De- 
velopment Corporation  Act  to  assist  in  the  creation  or  develop- 
ment of  businesses,  resources,  properties  and  industries  in 
Canada.  The  Minister  of  Finance  may  subscribe  to  purchase 
and  hold  shares  of  the  Corporation  for  the  Government  of 
Canada. 

The  Government  has  purchased,  pursuant  to  Section  35  of 
the  Act,  30,71 1,990  no  par  value  common  shares. 

The  Government's  holding  of  shares  represents  87.5%  of  the 
common  shares  outstanding  and  48.5%  of  the  voting  rights. 


Consolidated  Computer  Incorporated 

During  the  year,  the  Government  disposed  of  all  of  its 
interest  in  Consolidated  Computer  Incorporated.  The  sum  of 
$100,000  was  received  from  Nabu  Manufacturing  Corporation 
in  consideration  of  the  transfer  to  them  of  debentures  obtained 
by  the  Government  as  a  result  of  paying  off  certain  loans 
incurred  by  Consolidated  Computer  Incorporated.  Now  that 
the  above  transaction  is  completed,  authority  will  be  requested 
to  delete  the  Government's  investment  in  the  Company  from 
the  accounts  of  Canada. 

The  de  Haviliand  Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited 

The  Corporation  was  established  by  letters  patent,  granted 
under  the  Ontario  Corporations  Act,  to  manufacture  and  sell 
aircraft. 

Capital  stock 

The  Government  has  purchased  3 1 ,999  non-assessable,  class 
"A",  no  par  value  shares  and  10,000  class  "B",  no  par  value 
common  shares  for  $40,792,888.  This  represents  100%  of  the 
shares,  less  one  share  held  by  the  union. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  in  respect  of  the 
costs  of  rate  tooling  for  the  DHC-7  aircraft,  such  loans  to  be 
recovered  on  the  sale  of  such  aircraft.  During  the  year,  addi- 
tional loans  were  authorized  by  Vote  L41c,  Appropriation  Act 
No  3,  1981-82. 

The  loans  are  interest-free  and  are  repayable  only  if  and 
when  the  aircraft  concerned  are  sold.  Because  of  this  condi- 
tion, no  periods  for  repayment  have  been  set  up. 


7'36 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


PRIVATE  SECTOR  ENTERPRISES 

This  group  records  loans,  investments  and  advances  to  pri- 
vate sector  enterprises.  Private  sector  enterprises  are  industrial 
or  commercial  organizations  controlled  by  private  ownership. 


Table  7.1 1  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  loans,  investments  and  advances 
to  private  sector  enterprises. 


TABLE  7.11 

PRIVATE  SECTOR  ENTERPRISES 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


British  Yukon  Railway  Company — Indian 
Affairs  and  Northern  Development 

Burgeo  Leasing  Limited — Public  Works  

Canadian  Arctic  Producers  Limited — Indian 
Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Canadian  defence  industry — Industry,  Trade 
and  Commerce 

Canadian  manufacturers  of  automotive  prod- 
ucts— Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  

Canadian  producers  of  frozen  groundfish — 
Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Coast  Ferries  Limited — Transport 

Coleman  Collieries  Limited — Energy,  Mines 
and  Resources  

Company  stock  option — Industry,  Trade  and 
Commerce  

Enterprise  development  program — Industry, 
Trade  and  Commerce 

Eurocan  Pulp  and  Paper  Co  Ltd — Public  Works 

Footwear  and  tanning  industries  adjustment 
program — Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 

Groundfish  processors — Fisheries  and  Oceans... 

Haddock  fishermen — Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Kennedy  Round  agreement — Industry,  Trade 
and  Commerce 

La  Societe  du  Pare  Industriel  et  Commercial 
Aeroportuaire  de  Mirabel — Regional  Eco- 
nomic Expansion 

Lower  Churchill  Development  Corporation — 
Energy,  Mines  and  Resources  

Mainland  Investments  Limited — Regional  Eco- 
nomic Expansion 

Newfoundland  and  Labrador  Development  Cor- 
poration Limited — Regional  Economic 
Expansion — 

Capital  stock  

Loans 

Oil  refinery  terminal  wharf  at  Come-by- 
Chance,  Newfoundland— Public  Works 

Panarctic  Oils  Limited — Indian  Affairs  and 
Northern  Development 

Pharmaceutical  industry  development  assistance 
program — Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 

Radio  Engineering  Products  Limited — Industry, 
Trade  and  Commerce 

Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority — Finance 

Societe  Inter-Port  de  Quebec — Regional  Eco- 
nomic Expansion 

Sydney  Steel  Corporation — Public  Works 

Telesat  Canada — Communications 

Town  of  Oromocto  Development  Corporation — 
Finance 

Total 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

$ 

$ 

S 

$ 

$ 

$ 

194,823 

6,423 

5,000,000 

5,000,000 
188,400 

5,000,000 
-  6,423 

241,000 
191,905 
432.905 

5,000 
15,107 
20,107 

236,000 
176,798 
412,798 

-  5,000 
-15,107 
-20.107 

-  10,000 
-12,952 

-  22.952 

42,648,629 

8,671,970 

11,212,159 

45,188,818 

2,540,189 

15,467,453 

1,897,540 

437,055 

1,460,485 

-  437,055 

-  1,014,480 

1,121,809 
100,000 

193,616 

928,193 
100,000 

-193,616 

-43,191 

227,000 


8,349,167 
2,250,000 

829,000 

554,101 

1,450,672 

1,190,000 


227,000 


399,000 
225,000 

60,628 

\23,671 

6,209 

80,190 


7,950,167 
2,025,000 

768,372 

430,424 

1,444,463 

1,109,810 


227,000 


-  399,000 

-  225,000 

-  60,628 

-123,677 

-  6,209 

-80,190 


250,000 


-  734,333 

-  225,000 

-  583,953 
-317,882 

-43,215 

-  25,000 


400 

400 

9,850,000 

4,900,000 

14,750,000 

4,900,000 

1,990,000 

5,001,000 

5,001,000 

-5,001,000 

200 
23,000,000 
23,000,200 

1,500,000 
1.500.000 

200 
24,500,000 
24,500.200 

1,500,000 
1,500.000 

3,000,000 
3,000,000 

14,207,689 

14,207,689 

20,971,510 

20,971,510 

-20,971,510 

20.971,510 

153,750 

63,000 

90,750 

-  63,000 

-  82,250 

1,000,000 
9,260,006 

32,977 

284,274 

1,000,000 
9,511,303 

251,297 

244,441 

400 

5,218,162 

30,000,000 

400 

5,218,162 

30,000,000 

580,670 

53,615 

527,055 

-53,615 

-  50,880 

180,489,433 

36,572,977 

22,896,433 

166,812,889 

-13,676,544 

38,280,268 

LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


1'31 


British  Yukon  Railway  Company 

During  the  year,  a  loan  was  authorized  by  Vote  L51c, 
Appropriation  Act  No  3,  1981-82  to  the  British  Yukon  Rail- 
way Company  for  the  Whitepass  and  Yukon  Railway  for 
maintaining  and  improving  the  rail  service  of  the  Yukon 
Territory. 

The  loan  is  interest-free  and  repayable  over  a  20  year  period 
in  annual  equal  instalments  due  December  31  of  each  year, 
starting  December  31,  1984,  and  ending  December  31,  2003. 
Any  payment  by  the  British  Yukon  Railway  Company  not 
made  on  the  day  it  is  payable,  will  bear  interest  at  the  rate 
established  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  for  loans  to  Crown 
corporations  in  effect  on  the  day  the  instalment  or  amount  is 
payable. 

Burgeo  Leasing  Limited 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Burgeo  Leasing  Limited  for  the 
construction  of  an  extension  to  the  wharf  at  Burgeo,  New- 
foundland. The  total  amount  that  may  be  charged  to  the 
account  is  $240,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6.938%  to 
8.063%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  25  year  period  in 
equal  annual  instalments  due  September  1  of  each  year  and 
mature  on  September  1,  1996. 

Canadian  Arctic  Producers  Limited 

Capital  stock 

The  Government  has  purchased  common  shares  of  Canadi- 
an Arctic  Producers  Limited  for  an  amount  not  exceeding 
$1,000,  and  400,000,  7%  non-cumulative  redeemable  preferred 
shares  of  Canadian  Arctic  Producers  Limited  for  $400,000. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  165,000  of  the  preferred  shares  had 
been  redeemed  at  $1  per  share.  Of  the  400,000  preferred 
shares  originally  purchased,  the  balance  as  of  March  31,  1982 
is  $235,000  plus  $1,000  of  common  shares  representing 
20.24%  of  the  total  shareholders'  equity. 

Loans 

In  1971-72,  a  loan  of  $250,000  was  issued  to  Canadian 
Arctic  Producers  Limited.  The  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate 
of  7%  per  annum  and  is  repayable  in  monthly  instalments  up 
to  June  30,  1990. 

Canadian  defence  industry 

Advances  have  been  made  to  assist  Canadian  defence  indus- 
try with  plant  modernization  in  amounts  not  to  exceed  one- 
half  of  the  cost  of  the  acquisition  of  new  equipment  to  defence 
industry. 

During  the  year,  additional  advances  were  authorized  by 
Vote  L30,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  advances  bear  no  interest,  are  repayable  over  periods 
ranging  from  1  to  10  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  from 
April  1,  1982  and  June  1,  1986. 

Canadian  manufacturers  of  automotive  products 

Loans  have  been  made  to  assist  manufacturers  of  automo- 
tive products  in  Canada,  including  material  suppliers  and 


tooling  manufacturers,  affected  by  Canada-United  States 
Agreement  on  Automotive  Products,  to  adjust  and  expand 
their  production,  such  loans  to  be  made  for  the  purpose  of 
acquisition,  construction,  installation,  modernization,  develop- 
ment, conversion  and  expansion  of  land,  buildings,  equipment, 
facilities  or  machinery  and  for  working  capital. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.25%  to 
13.875%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
10  to  14  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  August  16, 
1982  and  October  15,  1984. 

Canadian  producers  of  frozen  groundfish 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Canadian  producers  of  frozen 
groundfish,  canned  and  frozen  crabmeat  and  canned  and 
frozen  lobster  meat  for  assistance  in  the  financing  of  invento- 
ries. The  total  amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $5,500,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  13%  per  annum  and 
are  repayable  over  a  7  year  period  in  annual  equal  instalments 
maturing  December  1982. 

Coast  Ferries  Limited 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  for  purposes  of 
working  capital. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  an  annual  rate  equal  to  the  rate 
established  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  in  respect  of  Crown 
corporations'  borrowings.  The  loans  were  due  April  1,  1978. 

Coleman  Collieries  Limited 

A  loan  has  been  made  under  the  terms  of  the  Coal  Produc- 
tion Assistance  Act  to  mechanize  the  coal  mine. 

This  loan  was  repaid  in  full  in  1981-82. 

Company  stock  option 

This  account  records  the  purchase  by  the  General  Adjust- 
ment Assistance  Board  and  the  Enterprise  Development 
Board,  on  behalf  of  Her  Majesty  in  right  of  Canada,  of  the 
capital  stock  of  a  company  in  order  to  exercise  a  stock  option 
in  such  company  that  has  been  taken  by  the  Board  in  connec- 
tion with  the  provision  of  a  loan,  or  of  insurance  of  a  loan  or  a 
letter  of  credit  made  or  issued  to  the  company  in  accordance 
with  the  General  Adjustment  Assistance  Regulations,  the 
Automotive  Manufacturing  Assistance  Regulations,  or  under 
the  Enterprise  Development  Program,  where,  in  the  opinion  of 
a  Board  established  pursuant  to  Section  7  of  the  Department 
of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  Act: 

(i)  the  value  of  the  capital  stock  of  the  company  has 
increased  as  a  result  of  the  assistance  provided  and  the 
stock  option  should  be  exercised,  in  order  to  permit  Her 
Majesty  in  right  of  Canada  to  benefit  from  the 
increased  value  of  the  capital  stock  of  the  company;  or, 

(ii)  the  stock  option  should  be  exercised,  to  protect  the 
Crown's  interest  in  respect  of  the  loan  made  or  insur- 
ance provided;  and, 

to  authorize  the  sale  or  other  disposition  of  any  capital  stock  so 
acquired. 

During  the  year,  additional  purchases  were  authorized  by 
Vote  L40,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 


7'38 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Enterprise  development  program 

This  account  records  loans  to: 

(a)  a  person  engaged  in  a  manufacturing  or  processing 
activity  in  Canada  where  in  the  opinion  of  the  Enter- 
prise Development  Board  such  loan  is  required  for  the 
purpose  of: 

(i)  restructuring  operations  in  order  to  adapt  efficient- 
ly to  competition  from  goods  imported  at  such 
prices,  in  such  quantities  or  under  such  conditions 
as  to  cause  or  threaten  serious  injury;  or, 

(ii)  adjusting  to  changes  in  conditions  affecting  access 
to  foreign  markets  which  are  attributable  to  the 
imposition  by  a  country  other  than  Canada  of  an 
import  surtax  or  to  the  taking  by  such  country  of 
other  actions  having  the  same  effect; 

(b)  a  person  in  respect  of  whom  the  Board  has  authorized 
the  provision  of  insurance  of  a  loan  not  exceeding 
$200,000  where,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Board,  such  loan 
is  required  for  the  purpose  of  preventing  a  serious  delay 
in  implementing  a  restructuring  program; 

(c)  a  person  who  has  previously  obtained  assistance  in 
accordance  with  the  Automotive  Manufacturing  Assist- 
ance Regulations,  the  Pharmaceutical  Industry  Incen- 
tives Development  Assistance  Regulations  or  the  Foot- 
wear and  Tanning  Industries  Assistance  Regulations  or 
under  the  Enterprise  Development  Program  or  to  any 
trustee  or  receiver  authorized  by  law  to  carry  on  the 
business  of  such  person  or  manufacturer  where,  in  the 
opinion  of  the  Board,  such  loan  is  required  for  the 
purpose  of  protecting  the  Crown's  interest  in  the  assets 
securing  a  loan  previously  made  or  a  loan  or  letter  of 
credit  previously  insured,  where  such  a  person  is  unable 
to  obtain  sufficient  financing  on  reasonable  terms  from 
other  sources  for  such  purposes; 

(d)  a  person  in  Canada  engaged  or  about  to  engage  in 
tanning  or  in  the  manufacture  of  footwear  who,  in  the 
opinion  of  the  Board,  requires  assistance  to  establish  or 
restructure  his  operations  in  order  to  meet  international 
competition; 

(e)  a  person  engaged  or  about  to  engage  in  a  manufactur- 
ing, processing  or  other  commercial  activity  for  the 
purpose  of  promoting  the  establishment,  growth,  effi- 
ciency or  international  competitiveness  of  Canadian 
industry  and  to  foster  the  expansion  of  Canadian  trade; 
and, 

(/)  a  person  who  has  previously  obtained  assistance  under  a 
program  of  assistance  to  industry  or  any  trustee  or 
receiver  authorized  by  law  to  carry  on  the  business  of 
such  person  for  the  purpose  of  protecting  the  Crown's 
interest  resulting  therefrom. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L35,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  7  to  20 
years,  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  ftom  8.375%  to  12.875% 
per  annum  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  November  1 5, 
1985  and  December  1,  1998. 

No  further  loans  under  the  Footwear  and  Tanning  compo- 
nent will  be  made. 


Eurocan  Pulp  and  Paper  Co  Ltd 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Eurocan  Pulp  and  Paper  Co  Ltd 
for  the  construction  of  a  marine  terminal  at  Kitimat,  British 
Columbia.  The  total  amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $4,500,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.062%  to 
7.812%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in 
annual  equal  instalments  due  March  31  of  each  year  and 
mature  on  March  31,  1991. 

Footwear  and  tanning  industries  adjustment  program 

Loans  have  been  made  under  the  footwear  and  tanning 
industries  adjustment  program,  to  assist  persons  in  Canada 
engaged  or  about  to  engage  in  tanning  or  in  the  manufacture 
of  footwear,  who  have  been  determined  by  the  General  Adjust- 
ment Assistance  Board  to  be  eligible  for  assistance  to  establish 
or  restructure  their  operations  in  order  to  meet  international 
competition. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8.7%  to  10% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  5  to  9 
years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1983  and 
December  1,  1989. 

This  loan  program  has  been  superceded  by  the  enterprise 
development  program  and  no  further  loans  will  be  made. 

Groundfish  processors 

Loans  have  been  made  to  assist  processors  of  groundfish  in 
Canada,  which,  as  determined  by  the  Fisheries  Prices  Support 
Board,  are  unable  to  obtain  sufficient  financing  on  reasonable 
terms  from  other  sources,  to  maintain  raw  fish  prices,  i.e., 
prices  to  primary  producers  at  the  1966-68  level.  The  total 
amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $6,000,000.  The  loans  bear 
interest  at  the  rate  of  8.75%  per  annum  and  are  repayable  over 
a  7  year  period  in  annual  equal  instalments  maturing  Decem- 
ber 1984. 

Loans  have  also  been  made  to  ice  affected  fish  plants  in 
Newfoundland,  Labrador  and  North  Shore,  Quebec  to  provide 
advances  for  working  capital  assistance  to  Canadian  producers 
of  groundfish  products  in  Newfoundland  and  Quebec  who 
were  affected  by  severe  ice  conditions  in  May  and  June  1974, 
in  the  amount  of  $3,000,000.  The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates 
varying  from  8%  to  10%  per  annum  and  are  repayable  over  a  7 
year  period  in  annual  equal  instalments  maturing  December 
1985. 

Haddock  fishermen 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Nova  Scotia  haddock  fishermen 
whose  fishery  was  closed  from  February  1  to  May  31,  1975 
pursuant  to  an  agreement  under  the  International  Agreement 
for  the  Northwest  Atlantic  Fisheries.  The  total  amount  of 
loans  authorized  is  $1,650,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  8%  per  annum  and  are 
repayable  over  a  4  year  period  in  annual  equal  instalments. 
The  loans  matured  in  1979,  but  are  not  yet  repaid. 

Kennedy  Round  agreement 

Loans  have  been  made  under  the  Adjustment  Assistance 
Program  related  to  the  Kennedy  Round  agreement  to  assist 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7*39 


manufacturers  in  Canada  who  have  been  determined  by  a 
board  established  pursuant  to  Section  1 5  of  the  Department  of 
Industry  Act:  {a)  to  be  seriously  injured  or  threatened  with 
serious  injury  by  reason  of  increased  imports  attributable  to 
Kennedy  Round  tariff  reductions  made  by  Canada  resulting  in 
exceptional  problems  of  adjustment;  {b)  to  be  unable  to  obtain 
sufficient  financing  on  reasonable  terms  from  other  sources  for 
purposes  of  making  the  necessary  adjustment;  (c)  to  require 
such  loans  in  order  to  adapt  efficiently  to  competition  from 
goods  imported  at  such  prices,  in  such  quantities  or  under  such 
conditions  as  to  cause  or  threaten  serious  injury;  and,  (</)  to  be 
unable  to  obtain  sufficient  financing  on  reasonable  terms  from 
other  sources  for  such  purposes.  Also  to  include  in  the  category 
of  persons  eligible  for  loans  thereunder,  a  manufacturer  or 
other  person  in  Canada: 

(a)  in  respect  of  whom  the  General  Adjustment  Assistance 
Board  has  authorized  the  provision  of  insurance  pursu- 
ant to  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  Vote  30c, 
Appropriation  Act  No  1,  1968,  of  a  loan  therein 
described  for  an  amount  not  exceeding  $200,000;  and, 

{b)  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Board,  requires  such  loan  to 
prevent  serious  delay  in  implementing  the  restructuring 
program  approved  by  the  Board. 

The  outstanding  loans  bear  interest  only  if  the  Company 
generates  a  profit,  are  repayable  over  a  17  year  period  and 
mature  on  March  1,  1990. 

This  loan  program  has  been  superceded  by  the  Enterprise 
Development  Program  and  consequently  no  further  loans  will 
be  made. 

La  Societe  du  Pare  Industriel  et  Commercial  Aeropor- 
tuaire  de  Mirabel 

The  Government  has  purchased  400  fully  paid  capital  shares 
of  La  Societe  du  Pare  Industriel  et  Commercial  Aeroportuaire 
de  Mirabel  at  $1  par  value  per  share  under  the  authority  of  the 
Minister  of  the  Department  of  Regional  Economic  Expansion. 
This  represents  40%  of  authorized  shares.  The  balance  of 
outstanding  shares  is  owned  by  the  Government  of  Quebec. 

Lower  Churchill  Development  Corporation 

This  account  records  the  Government's  investment  in  the 
capital  of  the  Corporation.  In  respect  of  Canada's  participa- 
tion with  the  Government  of  Newfoundland  in  the  develop- 
ment of  the  hydro-electric  power  potential  of  the  Lower 
Churchill  River  in  Labrador,  the  Government  is  authorized  to 
purchase  approximately  49%  of  the  shares  of  the  Lower 
Churchill  Development  Corporation. 

During  the  year,  additional  shares  of  the  Corporation  were 
authorized  to  be  purchased  by  Vote  L51c,  Appropriation  Act 
No  3,  1981-82. 

The  Government  purchased  1,475  class  "A"  shares,  repre- 
senting 49%  of  the  shares  outstanding.  The  balance  of  the 
outstanding  shares  is  owned  by  Newfoundland  and  Labrador 
Hydro. 

Mainland  Investments  Limited 

The  Government  has  purchased  5,000  shares  of  the  capital 
stock  of  Mainland  Investments  Limited  (formerly  Metropoli- 
tan Area  Growth  Investments  Limited)  at  $1,000  par  value 


per  share  in  accordance  with  an  agreement  entered  into  be- 
tween Canada  and  Nova  Scotia  pursuant  to  Section  8  of  the 
Department  of  Regional  Economic  Expansion  Act.  This  repre- 
sents 25%  of  authorized  shares. 

The  Government  has  also  purchased  one  fully  paid  and 
non-assessable  common  share  of  Mainland  Investments  Lim- 
ited at  $1,000  par  value  per  share  in  accordance  with  an 
agreement  entered  into  between  Canada  and  Nova  Scotia 
pursuant  to  Section  8  of  the  Department  of  Regional  Econom- 
ic Expansion  Act.  This  represents  .005%  of  authorized  shares. 
The  balance  of  outstanding  shares  is  owned  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  Nova  Scotia. 

During  the  year.  Mainland  Investments  Limited  was  liqui- 
dated pursuant  to  the  Companies'  Winding  Up  Act,  Chapter 
47  of  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Nova  Scotia,  1967.  The  assets 
were  disposed  of  and  $5,945,994  was  distributed  to  and 
received  by  the  Government.  The  account  was  credited  with 
$5,001,000;  the  residual  of  $944,994  was  credited  to  non-tax 
revenue — Return  on  investments. 

Newfoundland  and  Labrador  Development  Corporation 
Limited 

Capital  stock 

The  Government  has  purchased  200  ordinary  shares  of 
Newfoundland  and  Labrador  Development  Corporation  Lim- 
ited at  $1  par  value  per  share  in  accordance  with  an  agreement 
entered  into  between  Canada  and  Newfoundland  pursuant  to 
Sections  5  and  8(3)(c)  of  the  Department  of  Regional  Eco- 
nomic Expansion  Act.  This  represents  40%  of  authorized 
shares.  The  balance  of  the  outstanding  shares  is  owned  by  the 
Government  of  Newfoundland. 

Loans 

Loans  have  been  made  to  provide  financing  and  other 
services  to  small  and  medium-sized  businesses  in  Newfound- 
land. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L20,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8.375%  to 
18.375%  per  annum  with  interest  only  payable  annually  on 
March  31  of  each  year,  to  the  expiry  date  of  the  10  year 
promissory  notes  and  maturing  at  various  dates  between  April 
13,  1987  and  March  31,  1992. 

Oil  refinery  terminal  wharf  at  Come-by-Chance, 
Newfoundland 

Loans  have  been  made  for  the  construction  of  an  oil  refinery 
terminal  wharf  at  Come-by-Chance,  Newfoundland.  The  total 
amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $28,200,520. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  1.803%  per  quarter, 
are  repayable  over  a  15  year  period  in  equal  quarterly  instal- 
ments due  the  first  day  of  each  calendar  year  quarter  and 
mature  on  March  1,  1990. 

Panarctic  Oils  Limited 

Pursuant  to  Vote  25b,  Appropriation  Act  No  1,  1976,  the 
Minister  guaranteed  loans  from  commercial  sources  to  Panarc- 


7'40 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


tic  Oils  Limited,  for  its  exploration  program,  up  to  an  aggre- 
gate principal  amount  of  $12  million  plus  interest  thereon. 

In  1980-81,  Her  Majesty  paid  the  defaulted  loans  of  the 
Corporation  and  received  common  shares  of  the  Corporation 
for  the  amount  of  the  Corporation's  indebtedness  as  of 
November  30,  1980.  Therefore,  4,338,963  common  shares, 
valued  at  $4.8333  per  share,  totalling  $20,971,510,  were 
acquired.  This  represents  8.22%  of  the  total  shareholders' 
equity. 

During  the  year,  PC  1981-1352  dated  May  26,  1981, 
authorized  the  transfer  of  the  relevant  shares  to  Petro-Canada 
in  exchange  for  common  and  preferred  shares  of  that 
Corporation. 

Pharmaceutical  industry  development  assistance  pro- 
gram 

Loans  have  been  made  in  respect  of  the  pharmaceutical 
industry  development  assistance  program  to  companies  in 
Canada  for  the  purpose  of  improving  their  ability  to  manufac- 
ture and  market  lower-priced  prescription  drugs  at  competitive 
prices  through  reorganization  of  any  of  their  operations  of 
manufacturing,  marketing,  distribution  and  research,  and  who 
are  unable  to  obtain  sufficient  financing  on  reasonable  terms 
from  other  sources  for  such  purposes. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8%  to  8.75% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  10  year  period  and  mature  at 
various  dates  between  October  15,  1982  and  April  15,  1984. 

No  further  loans  under  this  program  will  be  made. 

Radio  Engineering  Products  Limited 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Radio  Engineering  Products  Lim- 
ited to  provide  for  working  capital  in  order  that  the  Company 
could  remain  viable  and  complete  certain  production. 

Radio  Engineering  Products  Limited  was  indebted  to  Reve- 
nue Canada  for  tax  arrears  of  some  $3,500,000  and  to  the 
Department  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  for  approxi- 
mately $400,000  under  the  Defence  Industry  Productivity 
Program.  At  the  time  of  the  loans,  the  Government  had 
acquired  control  of  the  Company.  In  November  of  1975,  the 
Company  declared  bankruptcy  and  the  assets  were  subse- 
quently disposed  of,  however,  the  proceeds  were  insufficient  to 
return  any  funds  to  the  Government.  Procedures  for  the  formal 
write-off  of  these  loans  have  been  delayed  pending  the  out- 
come of  a  lawsuit. 

Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority 

Advances  have  been  made  to  the  Saint  John  Harbour 
Bridge  Authority  in  connection  with  the  financing,  construc- 


tion and  operation  of  a  toll  bridge  across  the  harbour  of  Saint 
John,  NB.  The  total  amount  of  advances  in  each  year  is  to  be 
based  on  the  difference  for  the  year  between  the  operating  and 
financing  costs  of  the  toll  bridge  and  the  actual  revenue  of  the 
Bridge  Authority,  repayable  when  the  actual  revenue  of  the 
Bridge  Authority  for  the  year  exceeds  the  amount  of  the 
operating  and  financing  costs  for  such  year.  The  advances  bear 
interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to  1 2%  per  annum. 

Advances  made  to  enable  the  Authority  to  meet  payments 
on  Municipal  Development  and  Loan  Board  loans  and/or 
National  Harbours  Board  loans  result  in  a  charge  to  this 
account.  The  total  amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $10,000,000. 


Societe  Inter-Port  de  Quebec 

The  Government  has  purchased  400  fully  paid  capital  shares 
of  Societe  Inter- Port  de  Quebec  at  $1  par  value  per  share 
under  the  authority  of  the  Minister  of  the  Department  of 
Regional  Economic  Expansion.  This  represents  40%  of  author- 
ized shares.  The  balance  of  outstanding  shares  is  owned  by  the 
Government  of  Quebec. 


Sydney  Steel  Corporation 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Sydney  Steel  Corporation  for  the 
construction  of  wharf  facilities  at  Sydney,  Nova  Scotia.  The 
total  amount  of  loans  authorized  is  $6,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  9.078%  per  annum,  are 
repayable  over  a  20  year  period  in  equal  annual  instalments 
due  June  12  of  each  year  and  mature  on  June  12,  1998. 


Telesat  Canada 

The  Government  has  purchased  3,000,000  common  shares 
(without  nominal  or  par  value)  of  capital  stock  of  Telesat 
Canada  at  a  consideration  of  $10  per  share,  for  $30,000,000. 
This  investment  represents  49.99%  of  the  shares  outstanding. 


Town  of  Oromocto  Development  Corporation 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Town  of  Oromocto  Develop- 
ment Corporation  for  housing  projects  in  the  Town  of  Oro- 
mocto, New  Brunswick.  The  total  amount  of  loans  authorized 
is  $1,250,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  of  5%  and  5.75%  per  annum, 
are  repayable  over  a  30  year  period  in  semi-annual  equal 
instalments  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  November 
15,  1988  and  February  15,  1992. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

MISCELLANEOUS 

This  group  records  advances  to  employees,  and  other  types 
of  loans  not  classified  elsewhere. 

TABLE  7.12 

MISCELLANEOUS  LOANS  AND  ADVANCES 


7*41 


Table  7.12  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  various  types  of  miscellaneous  loans  and 
advances. 


Receipts  and 
April  1  / 1 98 1        other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


1982 


1981 


Loans  and  accountable  advances — 
Employment  and  Immigration — 
Personnel  posted  abroad 

External  Affairs — 

Personnel  posted  abroad 

Posts  abroad 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce — 
Personnel  posted  in  Canada  and  abroad 

National  Defence — 
Imprest  accounts,  standing  advances  and 
authorized  loans 

Post  Office  account 

Supply  and  Services — 

Miscellaneous    departmental    accountable 
advances 

Treasury  Board — 

Miscellaneous    departmental    accountable 

imprest  and  standing  advances 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total  loans  and  accountable  advances 

Other  miscellaneous — 
Agriculture — 
Construction   of  multi-purpose   exhibition 
buildings 

Communications — 
Cultural  property 

Employment  and  Immigration — 
Assisted  passage  scheme 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 
Hydro-Quebec  Research  Institute 

Finance — 
Ottawa  Civil  Service  Recreational  Associa- 
tion   

Town  of  Oromocto 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 

Eskimo  loan  fund 

Inuvialuit  Development  Corporation 

Native  claimants 

Chippewa  Band  of  Kettlepoint 

Indian  economic  development  

Indian  housing  assistance 

Indian  Associations  of  Canada 

Indians  and  Inuit  of  Quebec 

Council  for  Yukon  Indians 

Labour — 
Provincial       Workmen's       Compensation 

Boards 

Canada  Labour  Code — Safety  services 

National  Defence — 
Canadian  Forces  housing  projects 

Solicitor  General — 

Parolees 

Supply  and  Services — 

Defence  production  loan  account 


332,091 


586,748 


24,775,790 


332,091 


-332,091 


412,534 


508,044 


682,258 


95.510 


53,353,503    408,071,009 


404,269,863 


49,552,357 


3,801,146 


469,912 


24,305,878 


-469,912 


32,718 


3,045,568 

3,405,202 

3,883,086 

3,523,452 

477,884 

-263,591 

5,158,910 

264,753,626 

265,174,568 

5,579,852 

420,942 

218,317 

8.204.478 

268.158.828 

269.057.654 

9.103.304 

898.826 

-  45.274 

-136,532 


21,191,259 

115,448,455 

119,344,482 

25,087,286 

3,896,027 

2,581,788 

7,416,455 

7,416,455 

-7,416.455 

425,804 

4,655,408 

4,838,750 

4,681,662 

4,498,320 

-157,088 

1,512,799 

10,967,064 

11,463,896 

10,678,021 

10,181,189 

-  785,875 

1,950,761 

-  365,838 


5,956,226 


-  455,287 


40,554,137 

7,002,236 

9,471,495 

43,023,396 

2,469,259 

14.835,282 

15,203,773 

431,511 

14,772,262 

-431,511 

-401,905 

753,052 

20,712 

732,340 

-20,712 

-27,100 

39,764 

6,321 

33,443 

-6,321 

-  23,241 

792.816 

27.033 

765.783 

-  27.033 

-  50.341 

4,138,740 

(>(Xi,(,ll 

602,059 

4,140,127 

1,387 

209,729 

8,850,000 

825,000 

9,675,000 

825,000 

1,650,000 

29,537,276 

232,405 

8,399,584 

37,704,455 

8,167.179 

8,399,971 

65,000 

65,000 

41,539,012 

3,641,993 

5,500,658 

43,397,677 

1.858,665 

-10,768,015 

7,118,148 

1,576,851 

267,877 

5,809,174 

-1,308.974 

-945,101 

74,731 

50,987 

23,744 

-  50.987 

-41,269 

3,500,000 

3,500,000 

-  176,000 

480,000 

620,000 

1,100,000 

620,000 

480,000 

95.302.907 

6.102.908 

16.215.178 

105.415.177 

10.112.270 

-  1.190.685 

3,137,000 

1,000,000 

4,137,000 

1,000.000 

30,000 

15,000 

15,000 

3.152.000 

1. 000.000 

4.152.000 

1.000.000 

30.000 

17,643,135 

454,147 

17,188,988 

-454.147 

-  423,536 

7,688 

11,669 

13,207 

9,226 

1,538 

-4 

2.474.007 

750,000 

1,724,007 

-  750.000 

750,000 

7'42 
TABLE  7.12 

MISCELLANEOUS  LOANS  AND  ADVANCES— Co/ic/i/^e^ 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

Net  increase  or 
1982 

decrease  (  -  ) 
1981 

Transport — 
Corporation  of  the  City  of  Montreal — 
Atwater  Tunnel     

$ 

952,315 

204,653 

413,516 

3,351,481 

585,593 

1,390,714 

4,435,143 

11.333.415 

79,449 

$ 

73,955 

66,130 

127,824 

169,142 

51,571 

92,094 

4,435,143 

5.015.859 

13,695 

$ 

S 

878,360 
138,523 
285,692 

3,182,339 
534,022 

1,298,620 

6.317.556 
65,754 

$ 

-73,955 

-66,130 

-127,824 

-169,142 

-51,571 

-  92,094 

-4,435,143 

-  5.015.859 

-13,695 

% 
-71,714 

-64,126 

Fraser  River  Harbour  Commission 

-  118,750 

Hamilton  Harbour  Commissioners 

603,660 

Lakehead  Harbour  Commission  

-  47,939 

Port  Alberni  Harbour  Commission 

Maritime  Employers'  Association 

Veterans  Affairs — 

Commonwealth  War  Graves  Commission  .. 
Accounts  without  current  transactions 

-  85,639 
-648,215 
-432.723 

-  16,937 

Total  other  miscellaneous 

211,319,117 

20,278,970 

26,699,880 

217,740,027 

6,420,910 

12,646,111 

Total 

264,672,620 

428,349,979 

430,969,743 

267,292,384 

2,619,764 

18,602,337 

Personnel  posted  abroad — Employment  and  Immigra- 
tion 

Advances  have  been  made  to  provide  for  working  capital 
advances  to  posts  and  advances  to  employees  on  posting 
abroad  including  the  charging  to  the  account  of  advances  to 
employees  during  service  abroad. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  was  not  to  exceed 
$750,000. 

Interest  on  advances  to  employees  was  charged  at  an  aver- 
age rate  of  10.125%  per  annum.  Repayment  was  by  adminis- 
trative deduction  from  salary  over  the  term  of  the  posting. 
Postings  were  for  two,  three  or  four  years. 

During  the  year,  the  account  was  closed  and  all  outstanding 
loan  balances  were  transferred  to  the  "personnel  posted 
abroad"  account  of  External  Affairs. 


Personnel  posted  abroad — External  Affairs 

A  working  capital  advance  account  was  established  to 
finance  loans  and  advances  to  employees  posted  abroad  includ- 
ing employees  of  other  government  departments.  The  purposes 
of  the  account  were  extended  to  include  loans  and  advances  to 
locally-engaged  staff  abroad  and  their  dependants  for  medical 
expenses. 

During  the  year,  the  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time 
was  increased  to  $6,500,000  by  Vote  L17e,  Appropriation  Act 
No  4,  1981-82. 

The  closing  balance  consists  of  loans  to  employees, 
$2,252,985;  advances  for  medical  expenses,  $424,950;  and, 
security  and  other  deposits  under  Foreign  Service  Directives, 
$845,977. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8.875%  to 
15.125%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  a  4  year  period  and 
mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  to  June  30, 
1986. 


Posts  abroad — External  Affairs 

Non-interest  bearing  advances  have  been  made  for  interim 
financing  of  expenditures  at  posts  abroad  pending  distribution 
to  appropriations  of  this  and  other  departments. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$19,500,000. 

Personnel   posted   in   Canada   and   abroad — Industry, 
Trade  and  Commerce 

This  account  records  advances  made  to  regional  offices  and 
loans  made  to  employees  posted  abroad. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$1,950,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  8.875%  to 
15.125%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from 
1  to  4  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  July  1,  1982 
and  March  31,  1986. 

The  closing  balance  consists  of  advances  of  $582,258  to 
employees  and  $100,000  to  field  offices  in  Canada. 

Imprest  accounts,  standing  advances  and  authorized 
loans — National  Defence 

This  account  was  established  for  the  purpose  of  financing: 
(a)  public  funds  imprest  and  public  funds  advance  accounts; 
{b)  standing  advances;  (c)  authorized  loans  and  advances  to 
employees  posted  abroad;  and,  {d)  authorized  recoverable 
advances  to  establish  military  messes  and  canteens. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$26,000,000. 

Post  Office  account — Post  Office 

This  account  represents  the  difference  between  the  value  of 
certain  accounts  receivable,  accounts  payable  and  sundry  sus- 
pense accounts  of  the  Post  Office  Department. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7-43 


This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  Section  8  of  this  volume). 

Miscellaneous    departmental    accountable    advances — 
Supply  and  Services 

The  closing  balance  reflects  amounts  outstanding  in  the 
hands  of  departments,  Government  agencies  and  individuals  at 
the  year  end  to  be  expended  in  the  following  year. 

Miscellaneous  departmental  accountable  imprest  and 
standing  advances — Treasury  Board 

This  account  is  operated  for  the  purpose  of  providing  stand- 
ing travel  advances,  petty  cash  and  imprest  bank  account 
advances  to  federal  Government  departments  and  agencies. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$17,000,000. 

Construction  of  multi-purpose  exhibition  buildings — 
Agriculture 

Loans  have  been  made  to  finance  the  construction  of  multi- 
purpose exhibition  buildings. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  27  to  30  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.432%  to 
9.684%  per  annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  be- 
tween May  31,  2002  and  May  1,  2008,  $16,971,931; 

{b)  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  18  to  26  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.266%  to 
9.543%  per  annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  be- 
tween December  31,  1992  and  February  15,  2006, 
$5,990,781;  and, 

(c)  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  10  to  15  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.613%  to 
9.066%  per  annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  be- 
tween November  1,  1982  and  August  1,  1994, 
$1,343,166. 

Cultural  property — Communications 

Loans  can  be  made  to  institutions  and  public  authorities  in 
Canada  for  the  purchase  of  objects  in  respect  of  which  export 
permits  have  been  refused  under  the  Cultural  Property  Export 
and  Import  Act  or  for  the  purchase  of  cultural  property 
situated  outside  Canada  that  is  related  to  the  national 
heritage. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L25,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

Assisted  passage  scheme — Employment  and  Immigra- 
tion 

Section  121  of  the  Immigration  Act  authorizes  the  operation 
of  this  account  to  make  loans  to  immigrants  and  such  other 
classes  of  persons. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$60,000,000. 


The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  as  follows: 

(a)  repayable  by  monthly  instalments  over  periods  ranging 
from  1  to  3  years,  with  a  possible  deferment  of  2  years, 
bearing  interest  at  rates  varying  from  6%  to  15%  per 
annum  and  maturing  at  various  dates  between  April  1, 
1982  and  April  1,  1985,  $3,426,605;  and, 

{b)  repayable  by  monthly  instalments  over  periods  ranging 
from  1  to  3  years,  with  a  possible  deferment  of  2  years, 
non-interest  bearing  and  maturing  at  various  dates 
between  April  1,  1982  and  April  1,  1985,  $39,596,791. 

Hydro-Quebec  Research  Institute — Energy,  Mines  and 
Resources 

Loans  have  been  made  to  Hydro-Quebec  Research  Institute, 
guaranteed  by  the  Province  of  Quebec,  to  provide  financial 
assistance  for  construction  and  operation  of  the  Hydro-Quebec 
Research  Institute. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.187%  to 
7.937%  per  annum  for  an  average  yield  of  7.357%,  are  repay- 
able over  a  25  year  period  in  equal  annual  instalments  due 
March  25  and  mature  March  25,  1999. 

Ottawa     Civil     Service     Recreational     Association — 
Finance 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Ottawa  Civil  Service  Recrea- 
tional Association  to  assist  them  in  building  and  developing  the 
W  Clifford  Clark  Memorial  Centre. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  of  3.375%,  4.25%  and 
5.375%  per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  of  25  and  45 
years  in  semi-annual  equal  instalments  and  mature  on  March 
31,  2006,  September  30,  2005  and  September  30,  1990, 
respectively. 

Town  of  Oromocto — Finance 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Town  of  Oromocto,  New 
Brunswick,  to  provide  capital  assistance. 

The  remaining  loan  bears  interest  at  the  rate  of  5.875%  per 
annum,  is  repayable  over  a  period  of  20  years  in  semi-annual 
equal  instalments  and  matures  June  1,  1986. 

Eskimo    loan    fund — Indian    Affairs    and    Northern 
Development 

Loans  have  been  made  to  individual  Eskimos  or  groups  of 
Eskimos  to  promote  commercial  activities  and  gainful  occupa- 
tions. Loans  may  also  be  made  to  a  co-operative  association,  a 
credit  union,  a  caisse  populaire  or  other  credit  society  incorpo- 
rated under  the  laws  of  a  province  where  the  majority  of  the 
members  are  Eskimos  or  to  a  corporation  incorporated  under 
the  laws  of  Canada  or  a  province  where  the  controlling  interest 
is  held  by  Eskimos. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$7,072,000. 

Included  in  the  balance  of  loans  outstanding  at  March  31, 
1982  is  $170,465  which  is  an  investment  in  Canadian  Arctic 
Producers  Ltd. 

Guarantees  are  established  up  to  an  aggregate  of  $9,900,000 
to  cover  loans  to  or  in  respect  of  loans  to  persons  eligible  for 
loans  from  commercial  sources. 


7'44 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Existing  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to  21% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  1  to  15 
years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1982  and 
March  31,  1990.  New  loans  will  bear  interest  at  rates  being 
1%  greater  than  the  simple  average  prime  commercial  lending 
rate. 

Inuvialuit    Development   Corporation — Indian   Affairs 
and  Northern  Development 

Interest-free  loans  have  been  made  in  support  of  the  Agree- 
ment-in-Principle  for  comprehensive  land  claims  settlement. 
The  loans  are  repayable  in  full  when  claims  are  settled  and 
awarded. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L65,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

Native  claimants — Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  De- 
velopment 

Loans  have  been  made  to  native  claimants  for  the  purpose  of 
defraying  costs  relating  to  the  research,  development  and 
negotiation  of  claims. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L60,  Appropriation  Acts  No  1  and  No  2,  1981-82. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans  are  as  follows: 

(a)  loans  made  before  an  Agreement-in-Principle  for  the 
settlement  of  a  claim  is  reached  are  interest-free; 

{b)  loans  made  after  the  date  on  which  an  Agreement-in- 
Principle  for  settlement  of  the  claim  has  been  reached 
bear  interest  at  a  rate  equal  to  the  rate  established  by 
the  Minister  of  Finance  in  respect  of  borrowings  for 
equivalent  terms  by  Crown  corporations  during  the 
period  in  which  the  payment  is  made;  and, 

(c)  loans  are  due  and  payable,  as  to  principal  and  interest, 
on  the  date  on  which  the  claim  is  settled  or  on  a  date 
fixed  in  the  agreement  which  shall  be  not  later  than 
March  31,  1992,  whichever  date  is  earlier. 

Chippewa   Band   of  Kettlepoint — Indian   Affairs   and 
Northern  Development 

An  interest-free  loan  has  been  made  to  the  Chippewa  Band 
of  Kettlepoint  to  purchase  Lots  60  and  6 1  in  Lake  Road  West 
Concession  in  the  Township  of  Bosanquet,  County  of  Lamb- 
ton,  Ontario.  Repayment  of  this  loan  will  be  negotiated  with 
the  Band. 

Indian    economic    development — Indian    Affairs    and 
Northern  Development 

Loans  have  been  made  for  the  purposes  of  economic  de- 
velopment of  Indians,  to  Indians  or  Indian  bands,  or  to 
individuals,  partnerships  or  corporations,  the  activities  of 
which  contribute  or  may  contribute  to  such  development. 
Loans  to  such  borrowers  by  commercial  lenders  for  the  same 
purposes  are  also  guaranteed;  the  taking  of  security  by  Her 
Majesty  or  other  lenders  in  respect  of  such  loans  or  guaranteed 
loans,  including;  notwithstanding  Section  89  of  the  Indian  Act, 
security  on  property  situated  on  a  reserve  and  power  to  realize 
on  such  security;  and  to  which  shall  be  charged  loans  author- 
ized and  which  shall  be  credited  with: 


(a)  repayments  of  loans  made  pursuant  to  Section  70  of  the 
Indian  Act;  and, 

(b)  repayments  of  loans  made  pursuant  to  this  authority. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$70,000,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  5%  to  22.25% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  1  month 
to  15  years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  April  1,  1982 
and  March  31,  1996. 

Indian  housing  assistance — Indian  Affairs  and  North- 
ern Development 

Second  mortgage  loans  have  been  made  to  provide  financial 
assistance  to  Indians  and  Inuit  for  the  construction  and  acqui- 
sition of  houses  and  land  in  areas  other  than  Indian  reserves. 
The  purposes  of  the  account  were  extended  to  authorize  loans 
and  advances  to  Indians  and  Inuit  for  repairs  or  improvements 
to  houses  at  the  time  of  purchase  in  areas  other  than  Indian 
reserves. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$20,000,000. 

The  loans  are  interest-free  and  are  repayable  in  full  by  equal 
annual  instalments  or  forgiveness  or  when  the  borrower  sells 
the  property.  Whenever  certain  conditions  of  occupancy  and 
maintenance  are  satisfied,  instalments  are  forgiven  at  a  rate  of 
10%  per  annum  for  a  duration  of  up  to  10  years. 

During  the  year,  repaymients  included  forgiveness  of 
$1,422,353  pursuant  to  Vote  L51a,  Appropriation  Act  No  9, 
1966. 

Indian  Associations  of  Canada — Indian  Affairs  and 
Northern  Development 

An  interest-free  loan  was  made  to  the  Indian  Association  of 
Alberta  to  meet  the  Association's  1971-72  operating  deficit. 

Indians    and    Inuit    of   Quebec — Indian    Affairs    and 
Northern  Development 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Indians  and  Inuit  of  Quebec  to 
meet  legal  and  other  related  costs  in  their  court  action  con- 
cerning the  James  Bay  Hydro  Project.  Loans  issued  to  date  are 
as  follows: 

(a)  Grand  Council  of  the  Crees,  $2,000,000;  and, 
{b)  Northern  Quebec  Inuit  Association,  $1,500,000. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  7.125%  to 
8.875%  per  annum  and  will  be  repaid  at  time  of  settlement. 

Council  for  Yukon  Indians — Indian  Affairs  and  North- 
ern Development 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Council  for  Yukon  Indians  for 
the  purpose  of  providing  interim  benefits  to  elderly  Yukon 
Indians  pending  settlement  of  the  Yukon  Indians  land  claims. 

During  the  year,  additional  loans  were  authorized  by  Vote 
L66c,  Appropriation  Act  No  3,  1981-82. 

The  loans  are  repayable  in  full  upon  settlement  of  the  land 
claims  and  are  interest-free  before  an  Agreement-in-Principle 
for  the  settlement  of  a  claim  is  reached. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 


7'45 


Provincial  Workmen's  Compensation  Boards — Labour  Defence  production  loan  account — Supply  and  Services 


This  account  is  operated  under  the  authority  of  Section  3(4) 
of  the  Government  Employees  Compensation  Act  to  provide 
operating  funds  to  enable  provincial  compensation  boards  to 
administer  the  Act  on  behalf  of  the  Crown  and  pay  claims  to 
Canadian  Government  employees  injured  in  the  course  of  their 
employment. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$4,307,738  comprised  of  $1,100,000  for  the  Province  of 
Quebec  and  $3,207,738  for  other  provinces. 

The  interest-free  advances  are  calculated  on  three  months' 
cash  requirements  by  the  boards.  The  advances  are  to  be 
repaid  on  termination  of  the  agreements  with  the  provincial 
boards. 


Canada  Labour  Code — Safety  services — Labour 

This  account  is  operated  under  the  authority  of  Section  1 1 
of  the  Canada  Labour  (Safety)  Code.  PC  1968-12/1599  dated 
August  21,  1968  authorizes  the  Minister  of  Labour  to  enter 
into  agreements  with  provinces  for  the  services  of  safety 
officers  and  related  safety  service  in  order  to  implement  the 
Canada  Labour  (Safety)  Code. 

The  agreement  authorizes  provision  of  an  accountable 
advance  to  the  province  sufficient  to  meet  the  estimated  cost  of 
services  for  a  three  month  period. 

The  current  outstanding  advance  is  with  the  Province  of 
British  Columbia. 

The  advance  may  be  renewed,  extended  or  withdrawn  by  the 
Minister.  Interest  is  not  charged  under  the  terms  of  the 
agreement. 


Canadian  Forces  housing  projects — National  Defence 

Advances  have  been  made  to  the  Canada  Mortgage  and 
Housing  Corporation  in  respect  of  loans  arranged  by  the 
Corporation  for  housing  projects  for  occupancy  by  members  of 
the  Canadian  Forces. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  rates  varying  from  4%  to  5.75% 
per  annum,  are  repayable  over  periods  ranging  from  35  to  48 
years  and  mature  at  various  dates  between  August  1 ,  1 996  and 
November  1,2010. 

Parolees — Solicitor  General 

Loans  have  been  made  to  parolees  to  assist  in  their 
rehabilitation. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$10,000. 

The  loans  are  non-interest  bearing  and  are  repayable  before 
the  expiration  of  the  parole  period  or  within  one  year  from  the 
date  the  loans  were  made,  whichever  period  is  the  shorter.  The 
repayment  of  a  loan  or  any  part  thereof  may  be  forgiven  by 
the  Solicitor  General  if  certain  conditions  are  met. 

During  the  year,  loans  totalling  $5,800  were  forgiven  pursu- 
ant to  Vote  LI 03b,  Appropriation  Act  No  1,  1969.  These  loans 
were  initially  recorded  in  1 979-80  and  1 980-8 1 . 


This  account  was  established  under  Section  15.1  of  the 
Defence  Production  Act  to  record  loans  or  advances  for  any 
purpose  other  than  to  assist  in  the  construction,  acquisition, 
extension  or  improvement  of  capital  equipment  or  works  by 
any  person. 

Section  15.2  of  the  Defence  Production  Act  stated  that  the 
aggregate  of  expenditures  charged  to  the  Defence  production 
revolving  fund  (budgetary  account)  and  to  this  account  shall 
not  at  any  time  exceed  by  more  than  $100,000,000  the  aggre- 
gate of  amounts: 

(a)  received  from  the  sale  or  disposition  of  materials,  sub- 
stances or  defence  supplies; 

(b)  charged  to  another  appropriation  in  respect  of  costs  of 
acquisition,  storage,  maintenance  or  transportation  of 
stocks  of  materials  or  substances  purchased  or  of  stocks 
of  defence  supplies  acquired,  where  such  materials, 
substances  or  defence  supplies  may  be  acquired  under 
that  appropriation; 

(c)  charged  to  an  appropriation  or  paid  by  an  agent  of  Her 
Majesty  or  by  an  associated  government  to  pay  costs 
incurred  in  respect  of  defence  supplies  payment  for 
which  was  made  out  and  charged  to  the  Defence  pro- 
duction revolving  fund;  and, 

(d)  received  in  repayment  of  a  loan  or  advance  previously 
charged  to  this  account. 

A  repayment  of  $1.7  million  owed  to  this  account  by  CAE 
Aircraft  is  tied  up  in  court  over  a  dispute  concerning  the  due 
date  from  which  interest  should  be  charged.  Legal  counsel  is  of 
the  opinion  that  no  loss  to  the  account  will  be  incurred. 

Corporation  of  the  City  of  Montreal — Transport 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Corporation  of  the  City  of 
Montreal  for  the  construction  of  vehicular  tunnels  under  the 
Lachine  Canal  at  Atwater  Avenue  and  at  St  Remi  Street.  The 
lands  upon  which  the  tunnels  and  approaches  are  constructed, 
other  than  Lachine  Canal  reserve  lands,  are  to  be  conveyed  to 
the  City  upon  completion  of  the  tunnels. 

Under  the  agreement,  the  Corporation  was  required  to 
reimburse  Vi  of  the  cost  of  construction  of  the  tunnels,  with 
interest  at  the  rate  of  3.125%  per  annum  calculated  from  the 
date  of  conveyance  of  the  lands,  provided  that  the  amount  did 
not  exceed  the  sums  of  $2,000,000  for  the  Atwater  Tunnel  and 
$1,500,000  for  the  St  Remi  Tunnel  plus  interest,  and  such 
amounts  were  to  be  repaid  in  30  consecutive  annual  instal- 
ments, the  first  of  which  was  to  be  due  and  payable  twelve 
months  after  the  date  of  conveyance  of  the  lands,  namely  June 
20,  1961,  for  the  Atwater  Tunnel  and  June  12,  1953,  for  the  St 
Remi  Tunnel. 

The  cost  of  the  construction  of  the  Atwater  Tunnel  for 
purposes  of  the  agreement  exceeded  $6,000,000  and  the  share 
to  be  reimbursed  by  the  City  is  $2,000,000  with  interest  at 
3.125%  per  annum,  maturing  on  June  20,  1991. 

The  cost  of  the  construction  of  the  St  Remi  Tunnel  for  the 
purposes  of  the  agreement  has  been  established  at  $4,132,353 
and  the  share  to  be  reimbursed  by  the  City  was  $1,377,451 
plus  $21,738  for  supplementary  ducts  installed  at  the  request 
of  the  Montreal  Hydro  Commission,  with  interest  at  the  rate 
of  3.125%  per  annum,  maturing  on  June  12,  1983. 


7'46 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Debentures  of  the  City  of  Montreal  furnished  as  security  are 
held  in  the  custody  of  the  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services. 

Fraser  River  Harbour  Commission — Transport 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Fraser  River  Harbour  Com- 
mission to  assist  in  the  development  of  the  harbour.  Loans  are 
also  made  to  assist  in  wharf  reconstruction  and  extension. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  7.5%  per  annum,  are 
repayable  over  a  15  year  period  in  semi-annual  instalments 
due  June  30  and  December  31  of  each  year  and  mature  on 
December  31,  1983. 

Hamilton  Harbour  Commissioners — Transport 

Loans  secured  by  debentures  or  promissory  notes  have  been 
made  to  the  Hamilton  Harbour  Commissioners  to  assist  in  the 
development  of  the  harbour. 

The  total  amount  outstanding  at  any  time  is  not  to  exceed 
$4,000,000. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  categorized  into  four  groups: 

(a)  20  year  loans  at  6.062%  interest  per  annum,  repayable 
in  semi-annual  instalments  due  June  30  and  December 
31  of  each  year  and  maturing  on  June  30,  1987, 
$401,584; 

(b)  20  year  loans  at  5.562%  interest  per  annum,  repayable 
in  semi-annual  instalments  due  June  30  and  December 
31  of  each  year  and  maturing  on  June  30,  1987, 
$390,970; 

(c)  39  year  loan  at  4.125%  interest  per  annum,  repayable 
in  semi-annual  instalments  due  June  30  and  December 
31  of  each  year  and  maturing  on  January  31,  2001, 
$925,000;  and, 

(d)  one  loan  to  bear  interest  from  the  date  construction  is 
substantially  completed  or  April  1,  1983,  whichever  is 
earlier,  at  a  rate  equal  to  the  then  existing  rate  estab- 
lished by  the  Minister  of  Finance  in  respect  of  Crown 
corporations'  borrowings,  repayable  in  40  equal  semi- 
annual instalments,  $1,464,785. 

Lakehead  Harbour  Commission — Transport 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Lakehead  Harbour  Commis- 
sion for  expansion  of  the  Keefer  terminal. 

The  loans  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  7.437%  per  annum,  are 
repayable  over  a  15  year  period  in  semi-annual  instalments 
due  June  30  and  December  31  of  each  year  and  mature  on 
June  30,  1989. 


Port  Alberni  Harbour  Commission — Transport 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Port  Alberni  Harbour  Com- 
mission to  finance  the  construction  of  a  new  lumber  assembly 
wharf. 

The  terms  and  conditions  of  the  loans,  with  their  year-end 
balances,  are  categorized  into  two  groups: 

(fl)  20  year  loan  at  8.062%  interest  per  annum,  repayable 
in  semi-annual  instalments  due  June  30  and  December 
31  of  each  year  and  maturing  on  June  30,  1991, 
$332,429;  and, 

{b)  20  year  loan  at  7.187%  interest  per  annum,  repayable 
in  semi-annual  instalments  due  June  30  and  December 
31  of  each  year  and  maturing  on  June  30,  1991, 
$966,191. 

Maritime  Employers'  Association — Transport 

Loans  have  been  made  to  the  Maritime  Employers'  Associa- 
tion to  finance  the  early  retirement  of  employees. 

During  the  year,  the  loans  were  repaid  in  full. 

Commonwealth    War    Graves    Commission — Veterans 
Affairs 

Advances  have  been  made  to  the  working  capital  fund  of  the 
Commonwealth  War  Graves  Commission  (formerly  the 
Imperial  War  Graves  Commission)  to  maintain  graves  and 
cemeteries. 

As  at  March  31,  1982,  the  balance  of  the  advances  was 
£30,000  UK.  This  foreign  currency  balance  was  converted  to 
$65,754  Cdn,  using  the  year-end  rate  of  exchange 
(£lUK=$2.1918Cdn). 

The  advances  are  interest-free  and  have  no  fixed  terms  of 
repayment. 


ALLOWANCE  FOR  VALUATION 

In  accordance  with  the  comprehensive  policy  on  valuation, 
which  became  effective  in  1979-80,  assets  are  subject  to  an 
annual  valuation  to  reflect  reductions  from  the  recorded  value 
to  the  estimated  realizable  value. 

The  allowance  for  valuation,  for  loans,  investments  and 
advances,  amounting  to  $2,300  million  at  the  beginning  of  the 
year,  was  increased  by  $200  million  to  provide  a  total  of 
$2,500  million,  that  is  the  estimated  losses  on  the  realization  of 
the  loans,  investments  and  advances  included  in  the  accounts 
of  Canada  at  the  year  end. 


LOANS,  INVESTMENTS  AND  ADVANCES 

SUPPLEMENTARY  STATEMENT 
Recorded  Uncollected  Interest 

In  accordance  with  the  Government's  stated  accounting 
policies,  interest  due  but  not  received  is  not  recorded  as 
revenue.  In  certain  cases,  this  uncollected  interest  is  recorded 
by  being  added  to  the  applicable  loan  and  advance  account 
and  credited  to  a  recorded  uncollected  interest  account.  Since 
the   Government's   policy   is   to   record   revenue  only   when 


7'47 


received,  the  balance  of  the  recorded  uncollected  interest 
account  is  deducted  from  the  loan  and  advance  account  to 
present  it  on  a  net  basis. 

Table  7.13  reports  transactions  for  the  year  in  respect  of  the 
recorded  uncollected  interest. 


TABLE  7.13 

RECORDED  UNCOLLECTED  INTEREST 


April  1/1981 


Additions 


Collections 
and  deletions 


March  31/1982 


Loans,  investments  and  advances — 
Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 
All  other  Crown  corporations  and  agencies — 
Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited — 

Housing 

Bruce  heavy  water  plant  

Commercial  products  division 

Lepreau  nuclear  station 

Sheridan  Park  engineering  design  office 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited — Loans 

Northern  Canada  Power  Commission — Northern  Canada  Power 

Commission  Act,  Section  15 

The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority — Interest  bearing  loans 

Provincial  and  territorial  governments — 

Federal-provincial  employment  loans  program 

Special  development  loans  program 

Winter  capital  projects  fund 

Atlantic  Development  Board  carry-over  projects 

Special  areas  and  highways  agreement — Loans 

Regional  electrical  interconnections 

Agricultural  service  centres — Loans  

Atlantic  Provinces  Power  Development  Act 

Yukon  Territory  small  business  loans  

National   governments   including   developing   countries — The    United 

Kingdom  Financial  Agreement  Act,  1946 

International  organizations — 

International  financial  institutions — 

Inter-American  Development  Bank 

Private  sector  enterprises — Saint  John  Harbour  Bridge  Authority  

Miscellaneous — Hydro-Quebec  Research  Institute 


7,563 

432 

7,131 

51,970,509 

2,875,898 

49,094,611 

223,896 

15,533 

208,363 

50,600,000 

50,600,000 

28,101 

4,408 

23,693 

102.830.069 

2.896.271 

99.933.798 

10,799,020 

261.755 

10,537,265 

15,694,782 

369,007 

15,325,775 

210,000,000 

210,000,000 

106,036 

4,849 

101,187 

4,453 

256 

4,197 

3,033,383 

98,208 

2,935,175 

153,858 

2,239 

151,619 

37,330,985 

948,143 

36.382,842 

13,411,330 

1,463,100 

127,932 

14.746,498 

447,752 

104,930 

28,232 

524,450 

13,776,828 

278,862 

13,497,966 

112,545 

12,502 

125,047 

115,802.213 

115,802,213 

4,069,246 

481,486 

4,550,732 

301,576 

32,977 

334,553 

2,704,056 

77,480 

2.626.576 

530,578,132 

2,094,995 

5,093,234 

527,579.893 

SECTION 


8 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Specifled  Purpose  Accounts 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 8.2 

Superannuation  accounts 8.4 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account 8.8 

Government  Annuities  Account 8.8 

Canadian  Ownership  Account 8.8 

Deposit  and  trust  accounts 8.8 

Provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 8.23 

Other  specified  purpose  accounts 8.23 

Supplementary  statements — 
Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  Canada  Pension  Plan 

Investment  Fund 8.26 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account 8.29 

Government  Annuities  Account 8.32 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  (Dependants)  Pension  Fund  8.34 


8*2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

Specified  purpose  accounts  represent  the  recorded  value  of 
the  financial  obligations  of  the  Government  of  Canada  in  its 
role  of  administrator  of  certain  public  moneys  received  or 
collected  for  specified  purposes,  under  or  pursuant  to  legisla- 
tion, a  trust,  treaty,  undertaking  or  contract.  These  public 
moneys  may  be  paid  out  only  for  such  purposes  specified  in  or 
pursuant  to  such  legislation,  trust,  treaty,  undertaking  or 
contract. 

Because  of  the  dedicated  purposes  of  these  moneys,  specific 
accounts  are  required  to  be  maintained  to  provide  an  account- 
ing mechanism  to  ensure  that  the  moneys  are  used  only  for  the 
purposes  for  which  they  were  received  or  collected.  Legislation 
relating  to  some  accounts  permits  investments  to  be  made  and 
in  certain  cases  the  balances  of  the  accounts  earn  interest. 

This  section  gives  details  of  specified  purpose  accounts  on 
which  summary  information  was  given  in  Sections  1  and  2  of 
this  volume. 


Some  tables  in  this  section  present  the  continuity  for  each 
account  by  showing  the  opening  and  closing  balances,  as  well 
as  receipts  and  other  credits  and  payments  and  other  charges, 
i.e.  inflow  and  outflow  of  transactions.  In  addition,  the  term 
"accounts  without  current  transactions"  has  been  included  in 
one  table  in  order  to  provide  a  link  with  figures  published  in 
the  previous  year's  edition  of  the  Public  Accounts  to  show  net 
transactions  in  accounts  which  were  closed  out  in  the  previous 
year. 

The  financial  statements  of  the  Canada  Pension  Plan 
Account  and  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund,  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Account,  the  Government  Annuities 
Account  and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  (Depend- 
ants) Pension  Fund,  together  with  the  Auditor  General's 
reports  thereon,  are  presented  at  the  end  of  this  section. 


TABLE  8.1 

SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account,  Table  8.2 18,946,921,810 

Less:  provincial  government  securities  held  by  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund,  Table  8.2...      17,938,195,000 

1,008,726.810 

Superannuation  accounts,  Table  8.4  23,966,606,702 

Less:  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiencies. 

Table  8.4 1,637,225,906 

22,329,380.796 

Unemployment  Insurance  Account,  Table  8.1 1 -  228,287,963 

Less:  interest  bearing  loans 1 10,000,000 

allowance    for   Government's   cost   of   paying 

unemployment  insurance  benefits 

-338,287.963 

Government  Annuities  Account 1,193,241,877 

Canadian  Ownership  Account 

Deposit  and  trust  accounts,  Table  8.12 852,256,654 

Provincial  tax  collection  agreements  account 1,470,821,836 

Other  speciHed  purpose  accounts.  Table  8.13 328,846,730 

Total  26,844,986,740 


5,132,207,574 


5.132,207,574 
4,457,754,313 

908,629,745 
5.366,384,058 
5,956,874,724 

150,000,000 


6,106,874,724 

81,094,254 

786,451,316 

5,269,487,708 

11,474,549,136 

103,281,663 


2,531,923,097     21,547,206,287       2,600,284,477       2,130,407,055 


2,430,132,000 

4,962,055,097 

895,726,157 

1,456,281,849 

2,352,008,006 

6,046,862,362 

75,000,000 


20,368,327,000 

1,178,879,287 

27,528,634,858 

2,184,878,010 

25.343,756,848 

-318,275,601 

35,000,000 


6,121,862,362       -353,275,601 


102,360,997 

710,933,716 

4,141,171,527 

11,530,031,750 

54,498,998 


1,171,975,134 

75,517,600 

1,980,572,835 

1,415,339,222 

377,629,395 


2,430,132,000 

170,152,477 

3,562,028,156 

547,652,104 
3.014.376.052 

-  89,987,638 

-  75,000,000 


-  14.987.638 
-21,266,743 

75,517,600 
1,128,316,181 
-55,482,614 

48,782,665 


1,957,429,000 

172,978,055 

2,405,213,298 

97,205,498 
2.308,007.800 

-  40,560,089 
110,000,000 

532,495,809 
-  683,055,898 

-  14,596,888 

240,928,787 

727,258,610 

28,557,970 


34,320,330,433    29,974,922,453  31,190,394,720   4,345,407,980   2,780,078,436 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 

The  Canada  Pension  Plan  is  a  compulsory  and  contributory 
social  insurance  plan  which  enables  members  of  the  labour 
force  to  acquire  and  retain  protection  for  themselves  and  their 
families  against  loss  of  income  due  to  retirement,  disability  or 
death.  Established  in  1965,  the  Plan  applies  in  all  parts  of 
Canada,  except  for  the  Province  of  Quebec  which  has  a 
parallel  plan. 

Under  existing  arrangements,  all  benefits  and  all  costs 
incurred  in  the  administration  of  the  program  are  financed 
from  the  contributions  made  by  employees,  employers  and 


self-employed  persons  and  the  interest  earned  from  the  invest- 
ment of  funds. 

The  Government's  financial  obligation,  as  the  administrator 
of  the  Canada  Pension  Plan,  is  limited  to  the  balance  of  the 
account. 

Table  8.2  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions in  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  in  the  Canada 
Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  8.2 

CANADA  PENSION  PLAN  ACCOUNT 


8*3 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 

other  charges      March  31/1 982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  - ) 


1982 


1981 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 18,946.921,810       5,132,207,574 

Less:  provincial  government  securities  held  by  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund — 

Newfoundland 367,217,000 

Nova  Scotia  711,956,000 

Prince  Edward  Island  75,165,000 

New  Brunswick  532,028,000 

Quebec  87,505,000 

Ontario 9,795,194,000 

Manitoba  1,046,437,000 

Saskatchewan 806,768,000 

Alberta  1,835,939,000 

British  Columbia 2,679,986,000 

17,938.195.000 

Total  1,008,726,810       5,132,207,574 


S  $ 

2,531,923,097     21,547,206,287 


52,973,000 

96,251,000 

11,504,000 

75,637,000 

6,316,000 

1,268,736,000 

135,001,000 

109,647.000 

295,844,000 

378,223,000 

2.430.132.000 


420,190,000 

808,207,000 

86,669,000 

607,665,000 

93,821,000 

11,063,930,000 

1,181.438,000 

916,415,000 

2,131,783,000 

3,058,209.000 

20,368.327.000 


$  S 

2.600,284.477       2, 1 30.407,055 


52,973,000 

96,251,000 

1 1 ,504,000 

75,637,000 

6,316,000 

1,268,736.000 

135,001,000 

109,647,000 

295,844,000 

378,223,000 

2.430.132,000 


42,645,000 

78.277,000 

9.136,000 

53.014.000 

6.453.000 

1,037,872,000 

111,459,000 

87.129,000 

229,318,000 

302.126.000 

1,957,429,000 


4.962.055,097        1.178,879.287 


170,152.477 


172,978,055 


Receipts  and  other  credits  include: 

{a)  contributions  of:  (i)  1.8%  of  earnings  by  employees 
earning  over  $1,400  for  the  1981  calendar  year  and 
$1,600  for  the  1982  calendar  year,  with  matching 
contributions  by  employers,  subject  to  a  maximum 
payment  of  $239.40  for  the  1981  calendar  year  and 
$268.20  for  the  1982  calendar  year  and  (ii)  3.6%  of  the 
earnings  of  self-employed  persons  over  $1,400  for  the 
1981  calendar  year  and  $1,600  for  the  1982  calendar 
year,  subject  to  a  maximum  payment  of  $478.80  for  the 
1981  calendar  year  and  $536.40  for  the  1982  calendar 
year;  and, 

{b)  interest  received  from  securities  of  the  Canada  Pension 
Plan  Investment  Fund  and  from  the  average  daily 
operating  balance. 


ment  in  the  province  bears  to  total  contributions.  Contribu- 
tions received  in  respect  of  employment  in  the  Yukon  Territo- 
ry, the  Northwest  Territories  and  from  certain  other 
employees  outside  Canada  are  invested  in  bonds  of  the  Gov- 
ernment of  Canada. 

Certain  federal  employees,  such  as  members  of  the  Canadi- 
an Armed  Forces,  who  are  resident  in  the  Province  of  Quebec 
contribute  to  the  Canada  Pension  Plan.  The  securities  of 
Quebec  which  are  purchased  by  the  Plan  relate  to  the  contri- 
butions of  these  employees. 

On  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities  of  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada,  the  investment  in  securities  issued  by  prov- 
inces, as  charged  to  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment 
Fund,  is  deducted  from  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account. 


Payments  and  other  charges  include: 

(a)  benefits  paid  under  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  as  retire- 
ment pensions,  survivors'  benefits  paid  to  widows,  wid- 
owers and  orphans,  or  as  lump  sum  death  benefits,  and 
disability  pensions  and  benefits  to  children  of  disabled 
contributors; 

{b)  all  benefits  paid  and  recovered  from  the  Canada  Pen- 
sion Plan  in  accordance  with  an  agreement  with  a 
province  providing  a  comprehensive  pension  plan; 

(c)  payments  that  are  required  to  be  charged  to  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  in  accordance  with 
reciprocal  agreements  with  other  countries;  and, 

(</)  the  costs  of  administration  of  the  Plan. 

When  the  operating  balance  exceeds  the  estimated  amount 
required  to  meet  all  payments  in  the  following  three-month 
period,  the  excess  is  available  for  purchase  of  securities  of  the 
provinces  and  Canada. 

Provinces  are  advised  monthly  of  the  amount  of  excess 
moneys  in  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  that  is  available 
for  the  purchase  of  provincial  securities.  The  amount  available 
to  each  province  is  the  proportion  that  contributions  made  to 
the  Plan  during  the  preceding  ten  years  in  respect  of  employ- 


TABLE  8.3 

CANADA  PENSION  PLAN  ACCOUNT 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions — 
Employees,  employers  and  self-employed 

Interest  on  investments  

Interest  on  monthly  operating  balance 

PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Benefits 

Expenses 

Excess  of  receipts  and  other  credits  over  pay- 
ments and  other  charges 

Funds  applied — 
Purchases  of  bonds — 

Provincial  

Federal  

Increase  in  deposits  with  Receiver  General .. 

Net  increase 

Balance  at  beginning  of  year 

Balance  at  end  of  year 


1981-82 


1980-81 


3,282 

1,707 

143 

2.689 

1.427 

92 

5,132 

4,208 

2,456 
76 

2,010 
67 

2,532 

2,077 

2,600 

2,131 

2,430 
18 

152 

1,957 

23 

151 

2,600 
18,947 

2,131 
16,816 

21,547 


18,947 


8-4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Superannuation  Accounts 

The  Government  provides  pensions  to  retired  employees  or 
their  dependants  through  pension  schemes  authorized  by  the 
Public  Service  Superannuation  Act,  the  Canadian  Forces 
Superannuation  Act  and  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 
Superannuation  Act.  These  pensions  are  indexed  to  the  cost  of 
living  under  authority  of  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Ben- 
efits Act.  The  Government's  liabilities  in  its  role  as  administra- 
tor of  these  pension  plans  in  respect  of  its  employees  and 
certain  other  contributors  are  recorded  in  the  relevant  super- 
annuation accounts. 

Legislation  for  basic  pensions  provides  for  employee  contri- 
butions (6'/2%  of  salary),  employer  contributions  (prior  year's 
employee  contributions  for  members  of  the  Public  Service,  and 
approximately  1.8  and  2.0  times  current  year's  employee 
contributions  for  members  of  the  Canadian  Forces  and  Royal 
Canadian  Mounted  Police  respectively),  allocation  of  interest 
(average  market  yield  of  20  year  Canada  bonds  weighted  by 
the  quarterly  excess  of  receipts  over  disbursements  in  the  three 
accounts  each  quarter  over  20  years),  and  actuarial  valuation 
deficiencies  (full  valuation  every  5  years  with  annual  adjust- 
ments for  authorized  salary  increases).  Legislation  for  index- 
ing basic  pensions  does  not  require  actuarial  valuations  but 
does  provide  for  additional  employee  contributions  (1%  of 
salary),  matching  employer  contributions  and  allocation  of 
interest  (current  rate  of  5  year  Canada  bonds). 

Receipts  and  other  credits  for  the  superannuation  accounts 
consist  of  contributions  from  personnel,  matching  contribu- 
tions from  the  Government  and  participating  Public  Service 
corporations,  transfers  from  other  pension  funds  and  other 
Government  contributions  related  to  interest  and  actuarial 
liability  adjustments  (the  latter  are  not  applicable  to  the 
Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account).  Payments  and 
other  charges  for  the  superannuation  accounts  consist  of  pay- 
ments of  pensions,  death  benefits,  refunds  of  contributions  and 
transfers  to  other  plans. 

Actuarial  valuations  are  made  quinquennially,  the  next  of 
which  will  be  made  as  at  December  31,  1982  for  the  Public 
Service  Superannuation  Account,  December  31,  1980  for  the 
Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account  and  December  31, 


1 979  for  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation 
Account.  In  accordance  with  the  legislation  governing  the 
three  superannuation  plans,  the  Minister  of  Finance  has  the 
authority  to  direct  that  any  actuarial  deficiency  found  will  be 
credited  to  the  appropriate  account,  charged  to  unamortized 
portion  of  actuarial  deficiencies,  and  amortized  to  expenditure 
in  five  equal  annual  instalments  commencing  in  the  year  in 
which  the  actuarial  report  is  laid  before  Parliament.  In  addi- 
tion, the  cost  of  added  liabilities,  created  by  the  authorization 
of  salary  increases  each  year,  is  credited  to  the  superannuation 
accounts,  charged  to  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  defici- 
encies and  amortized  to  expenditure  over  a  period  of  five  years 
commencing  in  the  year  in  which  the  increases  are  authorized. 

Since  the  quarter  ending  September  30,  1969,  the  regula- 
tions made  pursuant  to  each  of  the  superannuation  acts  have 
provided  for  the  calculation  of  interest  at  a  rate  related  to  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan  interest  rate.  The  acts  further  provide 
that  the  amount  by  which  the  calculated  interest  rate  (current- 
ly about  8.8%  per  annum)  exceeds  the  amount  of  interest 
calculated  at  the  rate  used  in  the  latest  actuarial  report  . 
(currently  6.5%  per  annum  for  the  Public  Service,  Canadian 
Forces  and  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation 
Accounts),  may  be  used  to  reduce  the  amortization  of  actuari- 
al deficiencies  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure. 

Table  8.4  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  superannuation  accounts  including  the  unamor- 
tized portion  of  actuarial  deficiencies.  Table  8.5  presents  an 
analysis  of  the  actuarial  deficiencies. 

Table  8.6  presents  a  summary  of  transactions  in  superannu- 
ation accounts  that  resulted  in  charges  to  budgetary  expendi- 
ture. In  1981-82,  $3,628  million  was  charged  to  budgetary 
expenditure  on  account  of  superannuation  plans.  This  is  com- 
posed of  Government  contributions,  $621  million;  amortization 
of  actuarial  deficiencies  resulting  from  quinquennial  actuarial 
valuations  and  salary  increases,  $908  million;  increased  super- 
annuation benefits  paid  during  the  year  due  to  indexation  in 
excess  of  the  superannuates'  share  of  contributions  to  the 
Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account,  $417  million; 
and,  interest  credited  to  the  accounts,  $1,682  million. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  8.4 

SUPERANNUATION  ACCOUNTS 


8'5 


April  1/1981 
$ 

Public  Service  Superannuation  Account 12,705,719,124 

Less:  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 1,060,857,258 

n. 644. 861. 866 

Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account 9,327,417,912 

L«J5;  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 528,088,808 

8.799.329.104 

Royal    Canadian    Mounted    Police   Superannuation 

Account 1,032,985,638 

Less:  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiency 48,279,840 

984.705.798 

Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account 900,484,028 

Total  superannuation  accounts 23,966,606,702 

Less:  unamortized  portion  of  actuarial  deficiencies 1,637,225,906 

22,329,380,796 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


2,582,725,920 

576,374,515 

3.159.100.435 

1,323,045,378 

302,297,970 

1.625.343.348 

198,200,069 

29,957,260 

228.157,329 

353,782,946 

4,457,754,313 
908,629,745 


531,289,142 

951,351,000 

1.482.640.142 

306,909,882 
453,628,849 
760.538.731 


14,757,155,902 

1,435,833,743 

13.321.322.159 

10,343,553,408 

679,419,687 

9.664.133.721 


19,029,722  1,212,155,985 

51,302,000  69,624,580 

70.331.722  1,142.531.405 

38,497,411  1,215,769,563 


895,726,157 
1,456,281,849 


27,528,634,858 
2,184,878,010 


2,051,436,778    1,366,616,357 

374,976,485     103,667,258 

1.676.460.293       1.262.949.099 


1,016,135,496 
151,330,879 
864,804.617 

179,170,347 

21,344,740 

157.825.607 

315,285,535 

3,562,028,156 
547,652,104 


674,632,476 
-18,421,200 
693.053.676 

146,902,410 

11,959,440 

134.942.970 

217,062,055 

2,405,213,298 
97,205,498 


5,366,384,058 


2,352,008,006     25,343,756,848       3,014,376,052       2,308,007,800 


TABLE  8.5 

ANALYSIS  OF  THE  ACTUARIAL  DEFICIENCIES  FOR  1981-82 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1,930 

1,058 

84 

3,072 

15 

15 

3,087 

869 

530 

39 

1,438 

12 

12 

1,450 

Arising  from  salary  increments  Arising  from  actuarial  valuations 

Canadian  Royal  Canadian  Canadian  Royal  Canadian 
Public  Service      Forces           Mounted                              Public  Service       Forces  Mounted 
Super-            Super-              Police                                      Super-             Super-  Police 
annuation       annuation  Superannuation  Sub-               annuation  annuation  Superannuation      Sub- 
Account         Account          Account  total               Account<^)  Account            Account  total  Total 

Actuarial  deficiencies  recognized^') 
Less:  amount  amortized  to  March 
31,  1981  

Unamortized  balance  at  March  31, 

1981  1,061                 528                45                 1,634                                                                  3                      3                  1,637 

Add:     current     year     actuarial 

deficiencies 951                 454                51                  1,456                                                                                                            1.456 

Less:  current  year  amortization ....    576 302 27 905 3 3 908 

Unamortized  balance  at  March  31, 

1982 1,436  680  69  2,185  2,185 

<■)  Represents  actuarial  deficiencies  recognized  prior  to  1981-82  for  which  the  amounts  have  not  yet  been  fully  amortized. 

<^>  Acturial  deficiency  of  $6 1 .5  million  as  at  December  31,  1 977  reported  by  the  actuary  in  his  valuation  report  has  not  been  provided  for  as  it  was  estimated  that  there 
was  no  deficiency  in  the  Account  as  at  March  31,  1 98 1 . 

TABLE  8.6 


SUMMARY   OF  SUPERANNUATION   TRANSACTIONS   THAT   RESULTED   IN   CHARGES   TO   BUDGETARY 

EXPENDITURE 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 

Statutory 
payments 
under 
Amortization  Supplementary 

of  Retirement 

Government  actuarial  Benefits 

contributions  deficiencies  Account  Interest"'        Total         1980-81 

Public  Service  Superannuation  Account  321  576  264  837  1,998  1,554 

Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account 159  302  141  618  1,220  1,002 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation  Account 52  30  12  68  162  139 

Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account 89  159  248  168 

Total 62^  90i  4\7  1,682  3,628  2,863 

*'*  Does  not  include  interest  applied  against  amortization  of  actuarial  deficiencies:  S355  million  for  the  Public  Service  Superannuation  Account;  S262  million  for  the 
Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account;  and,  S29  million  for  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation  Account. 


8'6 

Public  Service  Superannuation  Account 

This  account  is  operated  under  the  Public  Service  Superan- 
nuation Act. 

The  unamortized  portion  of  the  actuarial  deficiency  in  the 
Public  Service  Superannuation  Account  is  $1,436  million  com- 
pared with  $1,061  million  at  March  31,  1981.  During  the  year, 
$95 1  million  was  charged  to  the  account  with  respect  to  salary 
increases  and  $576  million  was  amortized  as  a  charge  to 
budgetary  expenditure  of  which  $355  million  was  charged  to 
interest  on  the  public  debt. 

TABLE  8.7 

PUBLIC  SERVICE  SUPERANNUATION  ACCOUNT 


1981-82  1980-81 

$  $ 

Opening  balance 12,705,719,124  1 1,339,102,767 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions — 

Government  employees  330,591,651  314,245,218 

Retired  employees  8,453,026  6,957,969 

Public  Service  corporation  employees  64,335,496  29,480,570 

Matching  contributions — 

Government  321,203,160  287,665,560 

Public  Service  corporations 63,847,912  27,442,987 

Transfers  from  other  pension  funds 5,631,283  3,968,000 

Interest'"  837,312,392  608,083,864 

Actuarial  liability  adjustments*^) 951,351,000  559,371,572 

2,582.725.920  1.837.215.740 

15,288,445,044  13,176,318,507 
PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Annuities 459,576,849  403,670,989 

Cash  termination  allowances 198,001  104,103 

Minimum  benefits*^*  6,188,648  5,379,984 

Returns  of  contributions — 

Government  employees 43,129,313  40,003,481 

Public  Service  corporation  employees  8,328,238  5,864,462 

Transfers  to  other  pension  funds 13,868,093  15,576,364 

531.289.142  470.599.383 

Closing  balance 14,757,155,902  12,705,719,124 

'"The  rate  of  interest  credited  to  the  Account  was  increased  from  4%  to  6.5%  as 
at  October  1,  1980  in  accordance  with  the  most  recent  actuarial  valuation 
report  which  was  tabled  in  October  1980. 

'-'  The  actuarial  liability  adjustment  has  decreased  due  to  new  assumptions  used 
in  the  latest  actuarial  report  which  was  tabled  in  October  1980. 

'^'  Amounts  paid  to  contributors'  estates  or  in  certain  cases  to  payees  authorized 
by  Treasury  Board  where  there  is  no  one  to  whom,  an  allowance  provided  by 
the  Act  may  be  paid  and  where  the  amounts  already  paid  are  less  than  the 
amounts  contributed. 


Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account 

This  account  is  operated  under  the  Canadian  Forces  Super- 
annuation Act. 

The  unamortized  portion  of  the  actuarial  deficiency  in  the 
Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Account  is  $680  million 
compared  with  $528  million  at  March  31,  198L  During  the 
year,  $454  million  was  charged  to  the  account  with  respect  to 
salary  increases  and  $302  million  was  amortized  as  a  charge  to 
budgetary  expenditure  of  which  $262  million  was  charged  to 
interest  on  the  public  debt. 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 
TABLE  8.8 
CANADIAN  FORCES  SUPERANNUATION  ACCOUNT 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Opening  balance 9,327,417,912  8,652,785,436 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions  by  personnel 91,295,399  80,056,222 

Contributions  by  the  Government  158,894,275  142,270,253 

Actuarial  liability  adjustments 453,628,849  252,361,000 

Interest  617,982,032  479,806,539 

Other 1,244,823  1,025,1 1 1 

1.323.045.378  955.519.125 


10,650,463,290    9,608,304,561 


PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Pensions  and  retiring  allowances  payments..  291,453,962  266,834,502 
Cash  termination  allowances  and  returns  of 

contributions 14,635,437  13,287.308 

Transfers  to  Public  Service  Superannuation 

Account  (Treasury  Board)  797,312  721,288 

Other 23,171  43,551 

306.909.882  280.886.649 

Closing  balance 10,343,553,408  9,327,417,912 


Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation 
Account 

This  account  is  operated  under  the  Royal  Canadian  Mount- 
ed Police  Superannuation  Act. 

The  unamortized  portion  of  the  actuarial  deficiency  in  the 
Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannuation  Account  is 
$69  million  compared  with  $48  million  at  March  31,  1981. 
During  the  year,  $51  million  was  charged  to  the  account  with 
respect  to  salary  increases  and  $30  million  was  amortized  as  a 
charge  to  budgetary  expenditure  of  which  $29  million  was 
charged  to  interest  on  the  public  debt. 

TABLE  8.9 

ROYAL  CANADIAN  MOUNTED  POLICE  SUPERAN- 
NUATION ACCOUNT 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Opening  balance 1,032,985,638       886,083,228 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions  from  personnel  (current  and 

arrears) 26,759,489        22,478,719 

Contributions    by    the    Province   of   New- 
foundland (provincial  force  absorbed) 10,324 

Contributions  by  the  Government  (statu- 
tory)   52,148,238        43,643,097 

Actuarial  liability  adjustments 51,302,000        38,256,300 

Interest  67,990,342         58,765,937 

198.200.069      163.154.377 

1,231,185,707    1,049,237,605 

PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Annuities  and  allowances  payments 15,884,049         13,331,047 

Cash  termination  allowances  and  returns  of 

contributions 2,736,607          2,608,808 

Transfers  to  other  pension  funds 144,578               68,539 

Interest  on  returns  of  contributions  264,488             243,573 

19.029.722        16.251.967 

Closing  balance 1,212,155,985    1,032,985,638 


p 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 
Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account 

This  account  was  established  by  the  Supplementary  Retire- 
ment Benefits  Act  to  provide  for  the  payment  of  increased 
pension  benefits  resulting  from  indexation.  Actuarial  valuation 
of  the  Account  is  not  required  to  be  made. 

The  Chief  Actuary  of  the  Department  of  Insurance  has 
estimated  that  the  actuarial  present  value  of  supplementary 
retirement  benefits  granted  up  to  March  31,  1982,  in  respect 
of  retired  contributors  or  their  dependants  entitled  to  benefits 
pursuant  to  the  Public  Service,  Canadian  Forces  and  Royal 
Canadian  Mounted  Police  superannuation  accounts  as  at 
March  31,  1982,  was  $5.5  billion.  This  amount  is  based  on  an 
assumed  interest  rate  of  6.5%  and  other  assumptions  as 
described  in  the  last  actuarial  reports  on  those  three  superan- 
nuation accounts. 


8*7 


Increased  superannuation  benefits  paid  during  the  year  due 
to  indexation  amounted  to  $443  million  ($346  million  in 
1980-81)  of  which  $417  million  ($321  million  in  1980-81) 
represents  benefits  to  superannuates  in  excess  of  their  share  of 
contributions  to  the  account  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure. 
The  payments  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure  on  behalf  of 
contributors  amounted  to  $264  million  ($202  million  in  1980- 
81)  for  the  Public  Service  Superannuation  Account,  $141 
million  ($109  million  in  1980-81)  for  the  Canadian  Forces 
Superannuation  Account  and  $12  million  ($10  million  in 
1 980-8 1 )  for  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Superannu- 
ation Account.  Only  $26  million  ($25  million  in  1980-81)  was 
charged  to  the  Supplementary  Retirement  Benefits  Account. 


TABLE  8.10 

SUPPLEMENTARY  RETIREMENT  BENEFITS  ACCOUNT 

(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Opening  balance 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER   CRED 

ITS— 
Employee  contributions — 

Public  Service  corporations  

Government 

Matching  contributions — 

Public  Service  corporations  

Government 

Interest  

Transfers  from  other  pension  funds . 

PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER 
CHARGES— 

Annuities  

Cash  termination  allowances 

Minimum  benefits 

Returns  of  contributions — 

Public  Service  corporations  

Government 

Transfers  toother  pension  funds 

Closing  balance 899,564       664,371 


Public 

Service 

Canadian  Forces 

Royal  Canadian 
Mounted  Police 

Parliament 

Others 

Total 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

1981-82 

1980-81 

664,372 

505,367 

189,675 

144,209 

43,868 

32.018 

1,414 

1,055 

1,155 

773 

900,484 

683.422 

11,458 
60,392 

4,776 
56,278 

16,972 

14,738 

4,766 

4,012 

214 

127 

300 

145 

11,458 
82,644 

4,776 
75,300 

12,299 
66,449 

117,665 
83 

268,346 

4,965 

55,108 

69,588 

80 

190.795 

16,965 

32,818 

10 

66.765 

14,727 

20,254 

4 

49.723 

4.763 

7,669 

14 

17.212 

4,011 

4,330 

14 

12.367 

213 
241 

668 

127 
138 

392 

284 
207 

791 

145 
92 

382 

12,299 
88,674 

158,600 
107 

353.782 

4,965 

74,118 

94,402 

98 

253.659 

932,718 

696,162 

256,440 

193,932 

61,080 

44,385 

2,082 

1,447 

1,946 

1,155 

1,254,266 

937,081 

23,237 

4 

160 

23,251 

3 

115 

2,199 

2,139 

199 

no 

69 

28 

7 

25,711 

4 

160 

25.528 

3 

115 

1.422 

7,163 

1,168 

33.154 

872 

6,419 

1,131 

31.791 

2,357 

47 

4.603 

2,083 

34 

4,256 

444 

17 

660 

400 

7 
517 

1 
70 

5 
33 

3 
10 

1,422 
9,968 

1,232 
38.497 

872 

8.907 

1,172 

36.597 

251,837       189,676 


60.420        43,868 


2,012 


1,414 


1,155        1,215.769       900,484 


8'8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Unemployment  Insurance  Account 

The  Unemployment  Insurance  Act  provides  for  a  compulso- 
ry contributory  unemployment  insurance  program  applying  to 
everyone  employed,  subject  to  minor  exceptions. 

The  Act  authorizes  an  account  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  to 
be  known  as  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Account. 

The  Act  provides  that  the  following  amounts  be  credited  to 
the  Account:  (a)  premiums,  fines,  penalties  and  interest;  (b) 
refunds  of  overpayments  of  benefits;  (c)  all  amounts  for  ser- 
vices rendered  to  other  Government  departments  or  agencies, 
or  to  the  public;  (d)  amounts  provided  for  any  other  purpose 
related  to  unemployment  insurance  and  which  are  authorized 
by  an  appropriation  administered  by  the  Canada  Employment 
and  Immigration  Commission;  and,  (e)  interest  on  the  balance 
of  the  Account  at  such  rate  that  the  Minister  of  Finance  may 
authorize.  The  Act  also  provides  that  the  following  amounts  be 
charged  to  the  Account:  (a)  benefits  paid  under  the  Act;  and, 
(b)  the  costs  of  administering  the  Act. 

Maximum  weekly  employee  premiums  were  $5.67  from 
April  1,  1981  to  December  31,  1981  and  $5.78  from  January 
1,  1982  to  March  31,  1982.  For  the  same  periods,  maximum 
weekly  benefits  were  $189  from  April  1,  1981  to  December  31, 
1981  and  $210  from  January  1,  1982  to  March  31,  1982. 

Interest  bearing  loans  are  made  to  the  Unemployment  In- 
surance Account  under  Section  137(1)  of  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Act  as  a  result  of  deficiencies  in  contributions  from 
employers  and  employees.  The  balance  outstanding  as  at 
March  31,  1982  bears  interest  at  a  rate  of  15%  per  annum  and 
is  repayable  on  or  before  August  31,  1982.  The  balance 
outstanding  at  year  end  is  deducted  from  the  balance  of  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Account  to  show  the  net  position  of 
the  Account. 

TABLE  8.11 

TRANSACTIONS  IN  THE  UNEMPLOYMENT 
INSURANCE  ACCOUNT 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981-82 


1980-81 


RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions — 

Employee  and  employer 

Government  

Investment  income 

Interest  bearing  loans  from  the  Government 

PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Benefits 

Expenses 

Interest  expense 

Repayments  of  interest  bearing  loans  to  the 

Government  

Repayments  of  non-interest  bearing 

advances  to  the  Government 

Net  decrease  ( - ) 

Add — Balance  at  beginning  of  year 

Balance  at  end  of  year 


4,887 

3,399 

957 

2,416 

38 

13 

75 

110 

5,957 

5,938 

5,228 

4,450 

663 

515 

6 

150 

1,013 

6,047 

5,978 

-90 

-40 

-228 

-188 

Government  Annuities  Account 

This  account  was  established  by  the  Government  Annuities 
Act  and  modified  by  the  Government  Annuities  Improvement 
Act  which  discontinued  future  sales  of  annuities.  The  account 
is  valued  on  an  actuarial  basis  each  year  with  the  deficit  or 
surplus  charged  or  credited  to  the  Consolidated  Revenue 
Fund. 

The  purpose  of  the  Government  Annuities  Act  was  to  assist 
Canadians  to  provide  for  their  later  years  by  the  purchase  of 
Government  annuities.  The  Government  Annuities  Improve- 
ment Act  increased  the  rate  of  return  and  flexibility  of  Gov- 
ernment annuity  contracts  and  discontinued  future  sales  of 
annuities. 

Receipts  and  other  credits  consist  of  premiums  received, 
funds  reclaimed  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  for 
previously  unlocated  annuitants,  earned  interest  and  items 
transferred  from  previous  years'  revenue  to  cover  the  actuarial 
deficit.  Payments  and  other  charges  represent  matured  annui- 
ties, the  commuted  value  of  death  benefits,  premium  refunds 
and  withdrawals,  and  actuarial  surpluses  and  unclaimed  items 
transferred  to  non-tax  revenue.  The  amounts  of  unclaimed 
annuities  related  to  annuitants  which  cannot  be  located  are 
transferred  to  non-tax  revenue. 

Canadian  Ownership  Account 

This  account  was  established  under  the  authority  of  Vote  5c, 
Appropriation  Act  No  4,  1980-81.  The  account  is  credited 
with  amounts  received  from  the  Canadian  Ownership  special 
charge  levied  to  increase  public  ownership  of  the  oil  and  gas 
industry  in  Canada. 

During  the  year,  advances  were  made  to  Petro-Canada  to 
finance  the  acquisition  of  Petrofina  Canada  Inc,  as  authorized 
by  Vote  5c.  Petro-Canada  issued  interest-free  notes  convertible 
into  its  shares,  in  return.  Petro-Canada's  investments  in 
Petrofina  Canada  Inc  are  reported  as  a  deduction  from  this 
account. 

Deposit  and  Trust  Accounts 

Deposit  and  trust  accounts  is  a  group  of  liabilities  represent- 
ing the  Government's  financial  obligations  in  its  role  as 
administrator  of  certain  moneys  that  it  has  received  or  collect- 
ed for  specified  purposes  and  that  it  will  pay  out  accordingly. 
To  the  extent  that  the  funds  received  are  represented  by 
securities,  these  are  deducted  from  the  corresponding  accounts 
to  show  the  Government's  net  liability. 

Table  8.12  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions in  deposit  and  trust  accounts. 


318 


228 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  8.12 

DEPOSIT  AND  TRUST  ACCOUNTS 


8*9 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


1982 


1981 


Departmental  deposit  and  trust  accounts — 

Agriculture — 
Commonwealth  institute  of  biological  con- 
trol  

Prairie  farm  emergency  fund 

Western  grain  stabilization  account  

Communications — 
Public  Archives — 

Deposit  account 

Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  Research 
Council — Cultural  exchange — 
Government  of  Manitoba 

Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs — 

Deposit  account 

Estate  fund — Bankruptcy  Act 

Security  deposits — Bankruptcy  Act 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Shares  in  trust — Bankruptcy  Act 

Z^J5;  securities  held  in  trust 

Share  proceeds  in  trust — Bankruptcy  Act  .. 
Unclaimed  dividends  and  undistributed 
assets — 

Bankruptcy  Act 

Canada  Business  Corporations  Act 

Winding-up  Act 

Employment  and  Immigration — 

Immigration  guarantee  fund 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources — 

Oil  export  charges  sharing  account 

Guarantee  deposits — Oil  and  gas 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Market  development  incentive  payments — 
Alberta 

Miscellaneous  projects'  deposits 

Atomic  Energy  Control  Board — 
Nuclear  liability  reinsurance  account 

Environment — 

Miscellaneous  projects'  deposits 

Parks  Canada — 

Guarantee  deposits  

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 


External  Affairs — 

Canada  Foundation  account 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

deposits  in  a  special  bank  account 


Canadian  International  Development 
Agency- 
Guarantee  deposits  

International  agencies — Travel  account 

Finance — 
Common  school  funds — Ontario  and 

Quebec 

Foreign  claims  fund 

Halifax  1917  explosion  pension  account  .... 
Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Investors'  indemnity  fund 

Public  officers  guarantee  account 

War  claims  fund— World  War  II  


3,905 

9,066,972 

259,750,167 

268,821.044 


28 


10,348 
10,376 


137,999 

74,279 

7.000 

7,000 

31,266 
31,266 

44,706 


78 

216,187,259 
216,187.337 


322,921 


2,532 


3,054,01 1 

726,938 
4,037.933 

604.489 

8,239 

10,972 

949.153 

1,943,626 

70,000 

1.873.626 

4.510,197 

15,000 

4.525.197 

31,888.882 

31,884,083 

4.799 

444,710,71  \ 
44,350,528 
17,686,752 
62.037,280 

434,460 

5,734.316 
1,536,348 

522,228 
961.487 

514.078.715 

81,580 

157,326 

42,269 

34,060 

8.209 

89.789 

157.326 

384,746 

284.984 

99.762 

111,278 

484,726 

595,361 

1.191.365 

42,291 
22,021 

310,589 
61,011 

64.312 

1,562,965 

3.518,336 

1.322,468 

490,000 

832.468 

24,764 

168,472 

6.525.534 

13,747.345 

948,097 
153,736 

153,736 

39,000 

11.471 

1,021,185 

2.173.489 

78 

23,738,793 
23.738.871 


2,029.366 

442 
2,343,757 

2.215.180 
2,215,180 


18.436,752 
43.600.528 
62.037.280 


1,456,585 


63.493.865 


152,960 

8,209 

8.209 
161.169 


33,456 

561,905 

596,004 

1,191,365 


152,506 

64,336 

1,408,207 


2,432,632 
165.044 

165.044 
35,869 

215 
2,633,760 


3,905 

9,066,972 

452,198.633 

461.269.510 


28 


192,448,466 
192.448,466 


47.238 


1,629,134 

8.239 

737.468 

2.643.329 

4,238,643 

55,000 

4.183.643 

444,110,11  \ 

57,802,658 

57,797,859 

4,799 

5,734,316 
514,223 

522,228 
451,546,337 

85,946 

34,060 
34,060 

85,946 

462.568 
362.163 
100.405 


200,374 

18,696 

219.070 


2,677,771 

2,033,801 

1,311,160 

490,000 

821.160 

27.895 

179.943 

7.546.504 

13.287.074 


2,532 


-1.424,877 

8,239 

10,530 

-  1.394.604 

2,295,017 

-15,000 

2.310.017 

444,110,11  \ 
25,913,776 
25,913,776 


5,734.316 
79,763 


450.584.850 

4,366 

-8,209 

-8,209 
-  3.843 

77,822 

77,179 

643 


158,083 
-  3,325 
154.758 


1,484.535 
-11.308 

- 11.308 

3.131 

11.471 

1.020.970 

-460.271 


-75 


194,617,149 
194,617,074 


2,280 


10,348 
10,348 

28 

-  10,348 

-  10.348 

-8,126 
-  10.406 

313,920 
29 

147,000 

74.250 

7.000 

7.000 

31.266 
31.266 

9,001 
-29 

84.458 
29 

3,875 


540,179 

2.514 
631.055 


301.306 
301.306 


12,504,197 

12,528,501 

-  24,304 


240.866 

4.081 
220.643 


62.091 

40,219 

34,060 

6.159 

68.250 

117,059 

24.364 

141.423 


-1.208 
3,798 
2.590 


110.291 

-  32.052 
-9.000 

-  23.052 

-  10,376 
832,549 
909.412 


8*10 

TABLE  8.12 

DEPOSIT  AND  TRUST  ACCOVNTS— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


April  1/1981 


Departmental    deposit    and    trust    accounts — 
Continued 

Fisheries  and  Oceans — 
Great  Lakes  Fishery  Commission — 

Lamprey  research  and  control 

Guarantee  deposits  

Miscellaneous  projects'  deposits 

NATO — Symposium — Measurement       of 

trace  metals 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 

Guarantee  deposits  

L^5j;  securities  held  in  trust 

Fines — Indian  Act 

Guarantee  deposits — Reserve  resources 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Guarantee  deposits — Rotating  herds 

Indian   agencies   revenue   trust   bank   ac- 
counts   

Less:  deposits  in  special  bank  accounts  .... 

Indian  band  funds 

Indian  band  funds — Shares  and  certificates 
Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Indian  compensation  funds 

Indian  estate  accounts 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Land  assurance  fund 

Indian  contributions  to  the  subsidy  housing 

program  

Indian  rental  suspense  account 

Indian  savings  accounts 

Indian  special  accounts 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce — 

Fairs  and  shows 

Special  account — 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

Nigeria 

Trinidad  and  Tobago 

Justice — 
Federal  court  special  account 

Labour — 

Fair  wages  suspense  account 

Labour  Standards  suspense  account 

National  Defence — 

Estates — Armed  services 

Foreign  governments — 
United  Kingdom — 

British  Army — Suffield,  Alberta 

— Other  activities 

United  States  of  America 

Federal  Republic  of  Germany — 

German  Army — Shilo,  Manitoba  

— Other  activities 

Netherlands 

Provinces  of  Canada 

North      Atlantic     Treaty      Organization 
(NATO)— 

Infrastructure  projects  

Other  projects  

Non-government  agencies 

Herbert  Lott  naval  trust  fund 

Strathcona  trust  fund  


582,367 


6,989,512 


180,080 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1,811,224 


1,651.949 


741,642 


159,275 


6,008,594 


2,832,245 


10,165,861 


3,176,349 


1,671,654 


1,649,027 


202,707 


22,627 


1981 


75.435 

150,000 

122,045 

103,390 

27,955 

-69,516 

12.159 

7,056 

5,828 

13,387 

1,228 

-82,841 

34,152 

111,753 

56,739 

89.166 

55,014 

22,197 

53,568 

2,835 

56,403 

-  53,568 

53,568 

175.314 

271.644 

241.015 

205,943 

30,629 

-  76.592 

21.303,324 

37,205,759 

32,952,811 

25.556.272 

4,252.948 

3,640,578 

20.822,266 

32,633,792 

36,982,561 

25,171,035 

4.348.769 

3,631,414 

481.058 

69,839.551 

69.935.372 

385.237 

-95,821 

9.164 

695,746 

183,602 

4.840 

874,508 

178.762 

\(,1,191 

557,654 

206,695 

175,574 

588,775 

31.121 

-  98,499 

8,000 

8,000 

549.654 

206.695 

175.574 

580.775 

31,121 

-  98.499 

24.305 

4,188 

28.493 

4,188 

2,590 

253.328 

4,465,123 

4.505.126 

213.325 

-  40,003 

-  77.306 

253.328 

4,505,126 
8.970,249 

4.465.123 
8.970.249 

213.325 

-  40,003 

-  77,306 

298.897.703 

285,076,863 

200.011.909 

383.962.657 

85,064.954 

31,714,136 

24,080 

690 

23.390 

-690 

-  1,320 

24.080 

690 
690 

690 

23.390 

-690 

-  1,320 

54.710 

20,093 

701 

74,102 

19.392 

-  42.404 

2.702.819 

3,053,521 

2.283,700 

3,472,640 

769.821 

292.102 

5,050 

5,050 

5.050 

-  4.250 

2.702.819 

3.053,521 

2.288.750 

3.467.590 

764,771 

296.352 

535.416 

34,289 

569,705 

34,289 

59,347 

19.554 

19,554 

4.486,810 

9,804,894 

1,469,536 

12,822,168 

8,335,358 

1,490,768 

9.543.958 

16,600,524 

1,358,355 

24,786,127 

15,242,169 

6,400,663 

137,244 

53,339 

39,088 

151,495 

14,251 

-  7,362 

318.128,977 

393,848,498 

284,255,064 

427.722,411 

109,593.434 

39,992,552 

110,888 


-119,815 

391.980 

258,281 

13.884 

133.699 

-119,815 

3.389.449 

5.773.696 

5,514,981 

3.648.164 

258.715 

-782,091 

1.637.777 

580,506 

973,307 

1.244.976 

-  392.801 

1,184,976 

5.489.778 

8,557,406 

8,398.518 

5.648.666 

158.888 

393,958 

3,567,962 


9,183 

95,953 

84,062 

21.074 

11,891 

6,237 

407,558 

281,935 

126,898 

562,595 

155,037 

159,714 

416,741 

377,888 

210,960 

583,669 

166,928 

165,951 

16,715 


98.648 

14,057,088 

965,341 

3,420,081 

14,755,450 

837,556 

2,372,347 

-599,714 

127,785 

1,047,734 

-  698,362 

127,785 

1,047,734 

-  1,038.096 

78.292 

9.917.225 
921.663 

3.818.275 
314,703 

7,541,737 
159,986 

1,782,345 
398,844 

2,453,780 
761,677 

2,035,930 
-84,141 

2,375.488 
761.677 

2,035.930 
-84,141 

-  858.642 

4,368,884 

913 

500.000 

5.226,817 

2,809,075 

100.824 

70.595 

300 

38.066,824 

3,670.280 

70,595 

402 

500,000 

33,738,569 

3,507,679 
100,824 

811 

9,555,072 

-861,205 
100,824 

-102 
-  500,000 
4.328.255 

3.314.816 

181 
1.434.974 

SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  8.12 

DEPOSIT  AND  TRUST  ACCOVNTS— Continued 


8*11 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


Departmental    deposit    and    trust    accounts — 
Continued 

National  Health  and  Welfare — 
Health  insurance  supplementary  account .... 

Fort  Simpson  Lions'  Club 

Sioux  Lookout  Zone  Hospital 

World  Health  Organization 

Medical  Research  Council — 
Donations  and  bequests 

National  Revenue — 
Customs  and  Excise — 

Guarantee  deposits  

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Temporary  deposits  received  from 

importers 

Less:  deposits  in  special  bank  accounts 


Post  Office- 
Guarantee  fund — Bonds 

Lesr  securities  held  in  trust 

Guarantee  fund — Cash 

Post  Office  savings  bank 

Privy  Council — 
Chief  Electoral  Officer — Candidates'  elec- 
tion deposits 

Secretary  of  State — 

Promotion  of  official  languages 

Solicitor  General — 
Correctional  Services — 

Inmates'  earnings 

Inmates'  trust  fund 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police — 

Benefit  fund 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 


Supply  and  Services — 

Interest  on  bonds — Insurance  companies  .... 

Military  purchases  excess  funds  deposit 

Z^«.- securities  held  in  trust 

iHV  "  'I. 

Statistics  Canada — 

Advance  payments 

Contractors'     security    deposits     (sundry 
departments) — 

Bonds  

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Cash 

Certified  cheques 

L^ji.- securities  held  in  trust 


Transport — 

Loran  C — United  States  Coast  Guard — 

Deposit  account 

Maritime  pollution  claims  fund 

Province  of  Newfoundland — Social  security 

assessment  collections 

Unclaimed     moneys    due     to    Canadian 

seamen  

Treasury  Board — 
National  Lottery  account 


47,831 
38.280 

8,400 

2,002 

13,250 

30,264 

2.002 
11.200 
6.156 

56,231 

2.050 
62.388 

8,400 

2,050 
24.108 

29.933 
2.320 

82,409 
168.520 

13,407 
67.323 

5,800 
25.158 

90.016 
210,685 

7.607 
42.165 

1,044 
33.297 

5,441,110 

2,722,395 

2,269,100 

5.894.405 

453,295 

-21,090 

5,252,400 
188.710 

2,194,500 
4.916.895 

2,659,500 
4.928.600 

5.717.400 
177,005 

465.000 
-11.705 

-  22.500 
1,410 

1,655.686 
1,655,686 

188.710 

615.328 

615.328 
5.532.223 

615.328 

615.328 

5.543.928 

2.271,014 
2,271,014 

177.005 

615.328 
615.328 

-11.705 

-  282,885 

-  282,885 

1,410 

47,000 
47,000 

37,827 
2,790,577 
2.828.404 

47.000 
47,000 

47.000 

47.000 

47.000 

37.827 

2.790.577 

2.875.404 

-47.000 
-47.000 

-  37.827 

-  2.790,577 

-  2,828.404 

16,943 

-  33,448 

-  16,505 

175,800 

5.600 

177,400 

4,000 

-171,800 

-  277,600 

19.678 

16.759 

2.919 

2,919 

1.244.141 
1.191,300 
2.435.441 

13,982,960 
13.982.960 

1.244.141 
11.153.870 
12,398,011 

4.020.390 
4,020,390 

-1,244,141 
2,829,090 
1,584,949 

81,749 
106,812 
188,561 

396.071 

338.100 

57.971 

2.493.412 

3,063,185 

338,000 

3.401.185 

17.384.145 

2.6S5.005 

2.655.005 
15.053.016 

804,251 

100 

804,151 

4,824,541 

408,180 
-  338,000 

746,180 
2,331,129 

14,024 

14,024 
202.585 

-  232.243 

33,684,605 
104.354,393 

104.354.393 

33.665.328 

104.354,393 
104.354.393 

-212,966 
104,354,393 
104,354,393 

19,277 
104,354,393 
104,354,393 

-  232.243 

522.212 

9,875,360 

10,050,967 

346,605 

-  175.607 

27.701 

4.343,295 
4,343,295 

9,612,366 

1,114,579 

915,589 

198.990 

10.101.325 

1,283,591 
2,133,219 
3.416.810 
12.883,198 
4,188,589 
1,563,256 
5.751.845 
169.966.211 

2,057,476 
1,359,334 
3.416.810 
13,390,569 
4,308.752 
1.245,301 
5.554,053 
170,432,120 

3.569.410 
3.569.410 

9,104.995 
994.416 
597,634 
396,782 

9,635,416 

-  773,885 

-  773,885 

-507,371 
-120,163 
-317,955 
197,792 
-465.909 

424.889 
424.889 

908.576 
477.658 
482,641 
-  4,983 
699.051 

-  35,407 
64,093,642 

541,342 
10.345.279 

684,762 
86,457 

-178,827 
74,352,464 

-  143,420 
10.258,822 

-38,107 
7,309,973 

463 

5.470 

S,4S2 

481 

18 

376 

3,373 
64.062.071 

10.892.091 

776,671 

3,373 
74.177.491 

10.115.420 

-  4,724 
7,267,518 

28,251 

89.000 

117,251 

89.000 

18,494 

8«12 
TABLE  8.12 

DEPOSIT  AND  TRUST  ACCOUNTS— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Departmental    deposit    and    trust    accounts — 
Concluded 

Veterans  Affairs — 

Administered  trust  accounts 

Army  benevolent  fund 

Z-ew;  securities  held  in  trust 

Canadian  army  welfare  fund  

Canadian  Forces  personnel  assistance  fund 

Estates  fund 

^£55/ securities  held  in  trust 

Veterans  administration  and  welfare  trust 

fund 

LfM.- securities  held  in  trust 

Veterans  care  trust  accounts 

Z^ij;  securities  held  in  trust 

Provincial  sales  taxes — 
Communications — 

National  Library 

Public  Archives  

Solicitor  General — Correctional  Services    . 

Instalments  (payroll  deductions)  made  by 
employees  in  the  purchase  of  Canada 
savings  bonds — 

National  Defence 

Post  Office 

Solicitor  General — Royal  Canadian 
Mounted  Police 

Supply  and  Services 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total  departmental  deposit  and  trust  accounts... 

Schedules  C  and  D  Crown  corporations'  depos- 
its— 

Agriculture — 
Canadian  Dairy  Commission  account 

Finance — 
Crown  corporations'  deposits — 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

Canada  Deposit  Insurance  Corporation  .. 

Crown  Assets  Disposal  Corporation  

St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority 

Post  Office- 
Canada  Post  Corporation  account 

Supply  and  Services — 
Royal  Canadian  Mint  account 

Transport — 

Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steam- 
ships Limited 

National  Harbours  Board — 

Special  account  No  1 

Special  account  No  2 

Accounts  without  current  transactions  

Total  Schedules  C  and  D  Crown  corporations' 
deposits 

Payments  received  in  advance — 

Agriculture — Fees  paid  in  advance — Impor- 
tation of  foreign  cattle 

Justice — Office  of  the  Commissioner  for  Fed- 
eral Judicial  Affairs — Federal  court  fees  .... 


April  1/1981 


95,000 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


95,000 


1981 


34,107,083 

14,343,902 

11,591,442 

36,859,543 

2,752,460 

3,700,109 

1,499,417 

463,014 

501,948 

1,460,483 

-  38.934 

-12,916 

256,150 

256,150 

1.243.267 

463.014 

501.948 

1.204,333 

-  38,934 

-  12.916 

32,487 

64,801 

83,938 

13,350 

-19,137 

13,904 

711,824 

109,593 

447,846 

373,571 

-  338,253 

-11,420 

377,202 

1,259,641 

985,913 

650,930 

273,728 

332,831 

12,100 

4,000 

8,100 

-4,000 

3,500 

365.102 

1.263.641 

985.913 

642.830 

277.728 

329,331 

688,321 

1,122,891 

1,177,856 

633,356 

-  54,965 

-  1,943,996 

256,239 

46,076 

65,569 

275,732 

19,493 

233,456 

432.082 

1.168.967 

1,243,425 

357,624 

-  74.458 

-2.177.452 

8,961,450 

7,893,212 

7,484,604 

9,370,058 

408,608 

154,238 

33,857 

3,672 

44,252 

74,437 

40,580 

-  57,276 

8,927.593 

7.896.884 

7,528,856 

9,295.621 

368.028 

211.514 

45,819.438 

25.310.802 

39 

4,417 

22.383,368 

39 
4,416 

48,746,872 
1 

2.927.434 
1 

2.053.070 

4.456 

4,455 

/ 

/ 

-1,864 

23,828 

52,192 

-  30,228 

-  28,364 

-4,817 

- 1,864 

28.284 

56,647 

-  30.227 

-  28.363 

-4,817 

9,010,801 

2,289,457 

207,295 

11,092,963 

2,082,162 

-  484,847 

887,742 

887,742 

-  887,742 

73,403 

4,986,456 

11,553,613 

11,023,106 

5,516,963 

530,507 

800,464 

39,889,022 

190,702,145 

182,881,683 

47,709,484 

7,820,462 

7,057,423 

54.774.021 

204.545.215 

194,999.826 

64.319.410 

9,545.389 

7,446,443 

-  775,534 

806,671,139 

1,620,652,608 

838,021,825 

1,589,301,922 

782,630,783 

258,866,141 

1,567 

1,047,003,692 

1,045,944,829 

1,060,430 

1,058,863 

-  2,068,794 

20,000,000 
20.000,000 

200,000,000 

1,000,000 
201.000.000 

20,000,000 
200,000,000 

1 ,000,000 
221.000.000 

200,000,000 

1,000,000 
201.000.000 

-  100,000 
-100,000 

110,308,042 

110,308,042 

110,308,042 

14,730,879 

717,156,266 

701,232,684 

30,654,461 

15,923,582 

-  3,732,533 

1,717,357 

498,351 

2.310.708 

1,556,842,652 

448,106 

1.557,290,758 

1,537,957,611 

624,050 

1.538.581.661 

20,602,398 

322,407 

21.019,805 

18,885,041 
-  175,944 
18,709,097 

-712,161 

275,866 

-  436.295 

-11,970,295 

37,043,154 

3,632,758,758 

3,285,759,174 

384,042,738 

346,999,584 

-  18,307,917 

176,692 
3.000 

108,278 

167,737 

117,233 
3,000 

-  59,459 

78,730 

SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 
TABLE  8.12 

DEPOSIT  AND  TRUST  ACCOXMS^TS— Concluded 


8-13 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


Payments  received  in  advance — Concluded 

Post  Office — Philatelic  advance  account 

Public  Works — Shared-cost  projects 

Science  and  Technology — National  Research 
Council — Trust  fund 

Total  payments  received  in  advance  

Balances    to   the   credit   of  departments   and 
Schedule  B  Crown  corporations — 

Communications — 

National  Museums  of  Canada — 

Trust  account 

Less:  iec\in\.\t&  held  in  trust 

National       Library — Special       operating 

account 

Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  Research 
Council — 

Queen's  Fellowship  fund 

Less:  securities  held  in  trust 

Science  and  Technology — 

National  Research  Council — Special  fund .. 

Natural       Sciences       and       Engineering 

Research  Council — Trust  fund 

Veterans  Affairs — 
Soldier    Settlement    and    Veterans'    Land 
Act- 
Veterans'  Land  Act  trust  account  general 

Communications — 
Public   Archives — Mackenzie    King    trust 
account 

Finance — 
Custodian  administration  account 

Solicitor  General — 
Correctional  Services — 

Federal  sales  tax  collections 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total  balances  to  the  credit  of  departments  and 
Schedule  B  Crown  corporations 

Total 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

S 

S 

$ 

S 

$ 

1,256,485 
1,040,598 

1.318,964 

1.256,485 
1.319,718 

1,039,844 

-  1,256,485 
-754 

169,662 
487,079 

200,155 

371,094 

475,965 

95,284 

-  104,871 

-  34,473 

2,676,930 

1,798,336 

3,219,905 

1,255,361 

-1,421,569 

700,998 

304,607 

2,000 

302.607 

227.707 

202.631 
202.631 

329,683 

2,000 

327.683 

25.076 
25.076 

171.035 
171.035 

26.025 

n%,in 

295,925 

58.878 

32.853 

-  20.022 

323,473 

250,000 

73.473 

402.105 

36,773 

36.773 
593.258 

33,956 

33.956 
532.512 

326,290 

250,000 

76.290 

462.851 

2.817 

2.817 
60.746 

12,319 

12.319 
163.332 

2,500,026 

9,292,865 

8,792,891 

3,000,000 

499,974 

1,076 

234,408 
2.734.434 

508,052 
9.800.917 

615,567 
9.408.458 

126,893 
3.126.893 

-107,515 
392.459 

-  97,789 

-  96.713 

1,130,234 


3,827.359 


280,617         12,948 
1,303,111  4 


4,121,890 


10.283 


835,703 

283,282 
1,303,115 


-294.531 

2.665 

4 


-211.065 

1,534 

4 


14,930 

43,520 

97,480 

-  39,030 

-  53,960 

10,207 

-  197,734 

5,865,431 

14.278.006 

14,170,623 

5,972,814 

107,383 

-  330,435 

852,256,654    5,269,487,708 


4,141,171,527 


1,980,572,835 


1,128,316,181 


240,928,787 


8«14 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Commonwealth  institute  of  biological  control 

This  account  reflects  the  financial  transactions  of  the  Com- 
monwealth institute  of  biological  control,  a  scientific  institu- 
tion working  on  the  biological  control  of  harmful  insects, 
which  is  supported  by  contributions  from  member  countries  of 
the  British  Commonwealth  and  is  directed  by  the  Executive 
Council  of  the  Commonwealth  Agricultural  Bureau. 

Prairie  farm  emergency  fund 

The  Prairie  Farm  Assistance  Act  provides  for  a  levy  of  1% 
to  be  deducted  by  all  licensed  purchasers  of  grain,  the  amount 
so  deducted  to  be  transferred  to  the  Canadian  Grain  Commis- 
sion for  deposit  to  the  credit  of  a  special  account  known  as  the 
Prairie  farm  emergency  fund.  The  levy  is  not  collected  in 
respect  of  grain  grown  by  farmers  who  participate  in  approved 
crop  insurance  programs.  Collection  of  levies  was  discon- 
tinued, effective  August  1972. 

Western  grain  stabilization  account 

The  purpose  of  the  Western  Grain  Stabilization  Act  is  to 
protect  prairie  grain  producers  from  unexpected  and  large 
income  declines,  through  the  stabilization  of  returns  on  the 
production  and  sale  of  wheat,  oats,  barley,  rye,  mustard  seed, 
rapeseed  and  flax  seed  as  well  as  any  other  seed  as  may  be 
prescribed  which  is:  (a)  produced  in  the  designated  area  and, 
(b)  named  in  Schedule  1  to  the  Canada  Grain  Act  and 
designated  therein  as  "Canada  Western". 

This  account  contains  funds  for  this  purpose  which  are 
received  from: 

(a)  levies  paid  by  participating  producers — Normally  2%  of 
grain  sales  proceeds  to  an  annual  maximum  of  $45,000 
eligible  proceeds  per  participant; 

{b)  Government  contributions  equal  to  levies  paid  by  pro- 
ducers plus  an  additional  2%  of  the  participating  eli- 
gible grain  sales  proceeds  of  all  participants;  and, 

(c)  interest  on  the  amount  standing  to  the  credit  of  the 
stabilization  account,  at  rates  and  in  accordance  with 
terms  and  conditions  determined  by  the  Minister  of 
Finance. 

Deposit  account — Public  Archives 

This  account  is  provided  for  the  recording  of  advance  pay- 
ments received  in  connection  with  the  sale  of  microfilm  and 
reproductions. 

Cultural  exchange — Government  of  Manitoba 

This  account  was  established  to  administer  funds  for  the 
Government  of  Manitoba,  a  scholarship  program  to  encourage 
French  nationals  to  undertake  graduate  studies  in  a  university 
in  Manitoba. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year. 
Deposit  account — Consumer  and  Corporate  Affairs 

This  account  represents  sums  of  moneys  held  in  trust  to 
defray  the  cost  of  services  provided  on  a  regular  basis  by  the 
department.  No  interest  is  credited  to  the  account. 


Estate  fund — Bankruptcy  Act 

Under  the  provisions  of  Section  5(9)  of  the  Bankruptcy  Act, 
the  Superintendent,  for  the  protection  of  an  estate,  may 
require  that  funds  of  an  estate  be  remitted  to  the  Receiver 
General  pending  the  appointment  of  a  trustee.  This  account  is 
credited  with  funds  so  remitted  and  charged  with  disburse- 
ments to  appointed  trustees. 

Security  deposits — Bankruptcy  Act 

This  account  represents  liabilities  to  authorized  trustees 
under  the  Bankruptcy  Act,  for  securities  held  in  trust.  This 
account  is  credited  when  securities  are  deposited  by  trustees 
and  charged  when  securities  are  returned  to  trustees. 

Shares  in  trust — Bankruptcy  Act 

This  account  represents  the  value  of  share  certificates  origi- 
nally held  by  a  bankrupt  stockbroker  on  behalf  of  various 
clients  who  have  not  been  located. 

Share  proceeds  in  trust — Bankruptcy  Act 

This  account  represents  dividends  paid  on  stocks  originally 
held  by  a  bankrupt  stockbroker  but  subsequently  sold  to 
various  clients.  As  the  stocks  were  not  registered  in  the  clients' 
names,  the  dividends  must  be  paid  to  the  last  registered  owner, 
in  this  case,  the  stockbroker.  The  dividends  are  now  forwarded 
to  the  Superintendent  of  Bankruptcy  for  safekeeping. 

Unclaimed  dividends  and  undistributed  assets — Bankruptcy 
Act 

This  account  represents  the  totals  credited  to  the  Receiver 
General  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section  125  of 
the  Bankruptcy  Act,  pending  distribution  to  creditors. 

Unclaimed  dividends  and  undistributed  assets — Canada  Busi- 
ness Corporations  Act 

This  account  represents  liabilities  to  creditors  and  share- 
holders who  have  not  been  located.  The  account  is  debited 
when  funds  are  paid  to  creditors  and  shareholders. 

Unclaimed  dividends  and  undistributed  assets — Winding-up 
Act 

Amounts  in  this  account  were  credited  to  the  Receiver 
General,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  relevant  Act, 
pending  distribution. 

Immigration  guarantee  fund 

This  account  records  amounts  collected  and  held  pending 
final  disposition  either  by  refund  to  the  original  depositor  or 
forfeiture  to  the  Crown. 

During  the  year,  withdrawals  totalled  $2,215,180  and  con- 
sisted of  refunds  to  depositors,  $1,826,084;  departmental 
expenses  recovered  from  deposits,  $51,902;  and,  forfeitures  to 
the  Crown,  $337,194. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8-15 


Oil  export  charges  sharing  account 

This  account  records  the  share  of  the  oil  export  charges  that 
is  payable  to  the  oil  producing  provinces  in  accordance  with 
Section  10  of  the  Act  to  amend  the  Federal-Provincial  Fiscal 
Arrangements  and  Established  Programs  Financing  Act,  1977 
and  to  provide  for  payments  to  certain  provinces.  The  share  of 
the  oil  export  charges  is  in  respect  of  oil  produced  in  and 
exported  from  the  provinces  of  Alberta,  Manitoba  and  Sas- 
katchewan, during  the  period  November  1,  1980  to  January 
31,  1982. 

The  share  payable  was  recorded  by  a  charge  of  $444.8 
million  to  the  revenue  account — Oil  export  charges  and  by  a 
corresponding  credit  to  this  account.  The  amount  of  $444.8 
million  includes  $100.2  million  taken  into  revenue  in  1980-81. 
The  total  amount  of  the  share  will  be  paid  to  the  oil  producing 
provinces  in  1982-83. 

Guarantee  deposits — Oil  and  gas 

This  account  records  cash  deposited  with  the  department  as 
guarantees  for  oil,  gas  and  mining  rights.  Interest  is  not 
authorized  to  be  paid  on  cash  deposits. 

Also  recorded  in  this  account  are  securities  deposited  with 
the  department  as  guarantees  for  oil,  gas  and  mineral  rights. 
Securities  furnished  as  guarantees  are  held  in  the  custody  of 
the  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services.  Securities  deposited  with 
the  Department  of  Supply  and  Services  during  the  year 
totalled  $43,600,528  and  securities  released  totalled 
$17,686,752. 

Market  development  incentive  payments — Alberta 

This  account  records  moneys  received  from  the  Government 
of  Alberta  to  encourage  the  expansion  of  natural  gas  markets 
in  provinces  east  of  Alberta,  for  the  period  November  1,  1981 
to  January  31,  1987.  These  moneys  are  received  in  accordance 
with  an  agreement  entered  into  between  the  Government  of 
Canada  and  the  Government  of  Alberta  on  September  1,  1981. 

Miscellaneous   projects'   deposits — Energy,   Mines  and   Re- 
sources 

These  funds,  which  are  for  the  furtherance  of  research  work, 
are  comprised  of  contributions  from  organizations  and 
individuals. 

Nuclear  liability  reinsurance  account 

This  account  was  established  to  record  premiums  under  the 
Nuclear  Liability  Act  and  to  provide  for  payments  against  any 
claim  arising  from  an  accident  at  an  insured  facility. 

Miscellaneous  projects'  deposits — Environment 

These  funds,  which  are  for  the  furtherance  of  research  work, 
are  comprised  of  contributions  from  organizations  and 
individuals. 

Guarantee  deposits — Parks  Canada 

This  account  was  created  to  record  amounts  deposited  with 
the  department  to  ensure  compliance  with  the  terms  and 
conditions  of  contracts. 


Canada  Foundation  account 

This  account  records  moneys  received  in  connection  with  the 
Civilian  Relief  Agreement  of  1950  and  the  Cultural  Agree- 
ment of  1954  between  Canada  and  Italy,  and  disbursements 
for  the  purposes  of  the  said  agreements. 

The  account  is  maintained  in  Italian  lira  in  the  Banco  di 
Roma,  Italy,  and  all  relevant  transactions  recorded  in  foreign 
currencies  during  the  year  are  converted  at  the  rate  of 
exchange  prevailing  at  the  close  of  the  year  (1981-82,  1 
Lira/$0.0009265  Cdn;  1980-81,  1  Lira/$0.001 122  Cdn). 

During  the  year,  income  derived  from  the  operation  of  the 
account  amounted  to  Lira  45,967,272— $42,589  Cdn  and  dis- 
bursements for  cultural  activities  and  administrative  expenses 
were  Lira  35,157,999— $32,574  Cdn.  Adjustment  of  the  book 
value  carried  forward  from  the  previous  year  resulted  in 
valuation  decreases  of  $49,656  to  securities  held  in  trust  and 
$17,383  to  cash  on  deposit.  The  closing  balance  consists  of 
securities  at  cost  and  cash  on  deposit. 

Guarantee    deposits — Canadian    International    Development 
Agency 

This  account  records  insurance  claims  cheques  for  damage 
"in  transit"  of  goods  being  shipped  to  the  country  specified  in 
the  loan  agreement,  pending  the  decision  of  the  country  on  the 
use  of  these  moneys  to  reduce  the  loan  balance  or  to  purchase 
replacement  goods. 

International  agencies — Travel  account 

This  account  records  the  funds  made  available  by  interna- 
tional agencies  to  provide  for  payment  of  transportation  of 
fellows  and  scholars  who  travel  in  Canada  under  the  sponsor- 
ship of  such  agencies. 

Common  school  funds — Ontario  and  Quebec 

The  funds  represent  the  proceeds  from  the  sale  of  lands  set 
apart  for  the  support  and  maintenance  of  common  schools  in 
Upper  and  Lower  Canada,  now  Ontario  and  Quebec.  Interest 
of  $133,889  apportioned  on  the  basis  of  population  is  paid 
semi-annually  to  these  provinces  at  the  rate  of  5%  per  annum, 
and  is  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Foreign  claims  fund 

This  account  records:  {a)  such  part  of  the  money  received 
from  the  Custodian  of  Enemy  Property,  proceeds  of  the  sale  of 
property  and  the  earnings  of  property,  and,  {b)  all  amounts 
received  from  governments  of  other  countries  pursuant  to 
agreements  entered  into  after  April  1,  1966  relating  to  the 
settlement  of  Canadian  claims,  and  also  records  payment  of 
claims  submitted  including  payment  of  the  expenses  incurred 
in  investigating  and  reporting  on  such  claims. 

Interest  calculated  at  a  rate  equal  to  90%  of  the  simple 
arithmetic  mean  of  accepted  weekly  three-month  Treasury  bill 
tender  rates  for  the  month  immediately  preceding  the  month 
in  respect  of  which  interest  may  be  allowed,  is  credited  to  this 
account  and  is  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Halifax  1917  explosion  pension  account 

This  account  was  established  to  provide  for  the  continuation 
of  pensions,  grants  and  allowances  following  the  dissolution  of 
the  Halifax  Relief  Commission. 


8«16 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Investors'  indemnity  fund 

Section  48  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  provides  for 
this  account  and  for  the  crediting  thereto  of  the  sum  of 
$25,000,  such  further  amounts  as  are  appropriated  by  Parlia- 
ment for  the  purposes  of  this  Section,  and  any  recovery  of 
losses  referred  to  in  Section  49  of  the  Act. 

Section  49  states  that  the  Minister  may,  in  accordance  with 
and  subject  to  the  regulations,  pay  out  of  the  account  any 
losses  sustained  by  subscribers  for  Government  securities  who 
have  paid  all  or  part  of  the  purchase  price  but  have  not 
received  the  security  or  repayment  of  the  amount  so  paid  and 
losses  sustained  by  any  person  in  the  redemption  of  securities. 

Public  officers  guarantee  account 

Section  98  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  provides  for 
this  account  and  the  crediting  thereto  of:  (a)  the  balance  of  the 
Government  officers'  guarantee  fund;  (b)  amounts  paid  by 
departments  and  Crown  corporations  by  way  of  premiums;  (c) 
amounts  recovered  by  Her  Majesty  in  respect  of  payments  out 
of  the  account  or  the  Government  officers'  guarantee  fund; 
and,  {d)  moneys  appropriated  by  Parliament  for  the  purposes 
of  the  account.  Payments  may  be  made  out  of  the  account  in 
accordance  with  the  regulations  by  way  of  indemnity  for  losses 
suffered  by  Her  Majesty  or  others  by  reason  of  defalcations  or 
other  fraudulent  acts  or  omissions  of  public  officers. 

War  claims  fund — World  War  II 

This  account  records  all  money  received  from  the  Custodian 
of  Enemy  Property  or  other  sources  and  payments:  (a)  to 
eligible  claimants  for  compensation  in  respect  of  World  War 
II;  (b)  of  a  supplementary  award  amounting  to  50%  of  the 
original  award  (PC  1958-1467,  October  23,  1958);  and,  (c)  of 
expenses  incurred  in  investigating  and  reporting  on  claims. 

A  War  Claims  Commission  was  established  to  enquire  into 
and  report  upon  claims  made  by  Canadians  arising  out  of 
World  War  II  for  which  compensation  may  be  paid  from  this 
or  any  other  fund  established  for  the  purpose.  The  expenses  of 
this  Commission  are  chargeable  hereto.  Interest  credited  to  the 
account  amounted  to  $1,021,170  and  was  charged  to  interest 
on  public  debt. 

Great  Lakes  Fishery  Commission — Lamprey  research  and 
control 

This  account  was  created  to  record  funds  received  from  the 
Great  Lakes  Fishery  Commission  covering  control  and 
research  work  in  respect  to  lampreys  in  the  Great  Lakes, 
carried  out  by  the  department  on  behalf  of  the  Commission,  on 
a  contract  basis. 

Guarantee  deposits — Fisheries  and  Oceans 

This  account  was  created  to  record  amounts  deposited  with 
the  department  to  ensure  compliance  with  the  terms  and 
conditions  of  the  Coastal  Fisheries  Protection  Act. 

Miscellaneous  projects'  deposits — Fisheries  and  Oceans 

These  funds,  which  are  for  the  furtherance  of  research  work, 
are  comprised  of  contributions  from  organizations  and 
individuals. 


NATO — Symposium — Measurement  of  trace  metals 

These  funds  were  received  from  NATO  to  support  the 
Symposium  on  accurate  measurement  of  trace  metals  in  sea 
water,  being  held  in  the  spring  of  1981. 

Guarantee  deposits — Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Develop- 
ment 

In  this  account  are  recorded  cash  deposits  and  securities 
deposited  with  the  department  as  guarantees  under  the  Arctic 
Water  Pollution  Prevention  Act  and  guarantees  for  oil,  miner- 
al and  timber  rights  and  licences.  Interest  is  not  allowed  on 
cash  deposits.  Securities  furnished  as  guarantees  are  held  in 
the  custody  of  the  Minister  of  Supply  and  Services. 

Cash  deposits  totalled  $223,198  and  cash  disbursements 
were  $319,019.  Securities  deposited  with  the  Department  of 
Supply  and  Services  totalled  $36,982,561  and  securities 
released  totalled  $32,633,792. 

Fines — Indian  Act 

Fines  collected  under  the  Indian  Act  in  connection  with 
liquor  prosecutions  are  credited  to  this  account.  Expenditures 
are  made  covering  certain  costs  incurred  in  the  suppression  of 
liquor  traffic  among  the  Indians  of  Canada. 

Guarantee  deposits — Reserve  resources 

This  account  records  cash  and  bond  security  deposits  with 
respect  to  Indian  reserve  licences  and  contracts  for  the  de- 
velopment of  resources  pursuant  to  the  provisions  of  the  Indian 
Act.  During  the  year,  interest  at  various  rates  in  the  amount  of 
$152,343  was  credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest 
on  public  debt. 

Guarantee  deposits — Rotating  herds 

This  account  records  guarantee  deposits  given  by  Indians 
who  sign  herd  agreements  under  the  rotating  herd  program 
operated  by  the  department.  Interest  in  the  amount  of  $4,188 
was  credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public 
debt. 

Indian  agencies  revenue  trust  bank  accounts 

This  account  records  moneys  held  in  trust  for  Indians  in 
authorized  banks  across  Canada.  These  moneys  include  such 
items  as  savings,  pensions,  deposits  on  leases,  community 
enterprise  funds  and  funds  for  community  projects  of  various 
kinds. 

Indian  band  funds 

The  Indian  band  funds  represent  moneys  belonging  to  the 
Indian  bands  throughout  Canada.  Interest  at  the  rates  of 
13.42%  to  17.66%  per  annum  in  the  amount  of  $30,194,205 
was  credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public 
debt. 

Details  for  this  account  are  provided  in  the  applicable 
departmental  section  of  Volume  II. 

Indian  band  funds — Shares  and  certificates 

This  account  records  the  historical  value  of  Calgary  Power 
Limited  shares  of  stock  as  compensation  for  a  power  line 
right-of-way  on  the  Blood  Indian  reserve. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8-17 


Indian  compensation  funds 

Moneys  received  from  the  sale  of  Indian  lands  and  easement 
compensation  where  the  title  has  not  been  cleared  nor  the  land 
survey  completed  are  recorded  in  this  account  pending  comple- 
tion of  proper  documentation. 

During  the  year,  interest  in  the  amount  of  $9,590  was 
credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Indian  estate  accounts 

This  account  was  established  to  record  the  estates  of 
deceased  or  mentally  incompetent  Indians.  During  the  year, 
interest  in  the  amount  of  $134,688  was  credited  to  the  account 
and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Land  assurance  fund 

This  fund  was  created  to  indemnify  title  holders  who  may 
suffer  loss  through  misdescriptions  in  titles,  and  from  other 
causes  specified  in  the  Land  Titles  Act.  Fees  are  collected 
from  the  parties  who  register  deeds  with  the  Registrar  of  Land 
Titles  in  the  Northwest  Territories  and  the  Yukon  Territory. 
Interest  is  added  to  the  fund  annually,  the  present  rate  being 
3%  per  annum.  Receipts  and  other  credits  consisted  of  fees, 
$18,227;  and,  interest,  $16,062.  There  has  been  no  claim  for 
compensation  in  recent  years. 

Indian  contributions  to  the  subsidy  housing  program 

This  account  records  amounts  deposited  by  Indians  with  the 
department  to  ensure  compliance  with  the  terms  and  condi- 
tions of  the  subsidy  housing  program  carried  out  by  the  social 
programs  division  of  the  department. 

Indian  rental  suspense  account 

In  this  account  are  recorded  moneys  received  for  rentals  and 
leases  of  Indian  lands  such  as  agricultural  leases,  easements, 
oil  and  gas  leases  and  permits,  etc,  pending  proper  documenta- 
tion by  the  department. 

During  the  year,  interest  totalling  $1,102,543  was  credited 
to  the  relevant  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Indian  savings  accounts 

Savings  accounts  are  maintained  for  individual  Indians. 
During  the  year,  interest  in  the  amount  of  $3,776,702  was 
credited  to  the  accounts  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Indian  special  accounts 

Indian  special  accounts  represent  a  number  of  non-interest 
bearing  accounts  which  are  maintained  for  specific  purposes 
and  include  the  following: 

{a)  Absent  or  missing  heirs — Assets  in  an  estate  to  which  a 
missing  heir  might  be  entitled  are  held  in  this  account 
for  a  period  of  seven  years,  after  which  time,  if  the  heirs 
are  not  located,  the  assets  are  distributed  to  other 
persons  according  to  entitlement. 

(6)  Abitibi  fur  preserve — This  account  records  moneys 
received  from  the  sale  of  pelts  trapped  on  the  various 
reserves  in  the  Abitibi  District  in  Quebec  to  defer 
charges  for  tallymen's  wages,  freight  costs,  etc. 


(c)  Abitibi  fishery — This  account  records  charges  for  the 
operation  of  the  Abitibi  sturgeon  fish  catching  project. 

{d)  Indian  off-reserve  housing — This  account  records  per- 
sonal contributions  held  in  trust  until  paid  to  the 
vendor,  the  builder  or  legal  representative. 

Fairs  and  shows 

In  this  account  are  recorded  moneys  deposited  by  companies 
to  cover  various  expenses  incurred  at  fairs  and  missions.  The 
department  will  disburse  the  moneys  on  behalf  of  the 
depositors. 

Special  account — Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 

This  account  records  funds  received  from  Atomic  Energy  of 
Canada  Limited  for  the  training  of  personnel  from  foreign 
nuclear  regulatory  agencies  and  for  the  provision  of  informa- 
tion regarding  the  interpretation  and  application  of  Canadian 
safety  requirements  in  the  nuclear  field  by  the  Atomic  Energy 
Control  Board. 

Special  account — Nigeria 

This  account  records  funds  received  from  the  Nigerian 
Government  for  the  placement  of  Nigerian  students  in  Canadi- 
an secondary  educational  institutes. 

Special  account — Trinidad  and  Tobago 

This  account  records  funds  received  from  the  Government  of 
Trinidad  and  Tobago  for  Canada's  technical  assistance  in  the 
redevelopment  of  the  Piarco  International  Airport  in  Trinidad 
and  the  Crown  Point  Airport  in  Tobago,  as  well  as  the 
development  and  construction  of  the  Golden  Grove  Prison 
Complex. 

Federal  court  special  account 

This  account  records  moneys  paid  into  the  Federal  Court  of 
Canada  pursuant  to  an  order  of  the  Court,  Rules  of  the  Court 
or  Statutes,  to  be  held  in  trust  pending  payment  of  such 
moneys  in  accordance  with  a  Judgment  of  the  Court. 

During  the  year,  interest  amounting  to  $1,083,961  was 
credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Fair  wages  suspense  account 

This  account  is  operated  under  authority  of  the  Fair  Wages 
and  Hours  of  Labour  Act  and  related  regulations.  Where  an 
investigation  by  officials  of  the  department  in  respect  of  a 
contract  on  Government  works  results  in  an  award  of  wages, 
the  amount  received  from  the  contractor  is  credited  to  this 
account  and  subsequently  distributed  to  the  employees. 

The  account  also  reflects  amounts  received  from  various 
departments,  representing  wages  in  respect  of  contracts,  with- 
held from  final  payment  to  contractors. 


8-18 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Labour  Standards  suspense  account 

This  account  is  operated  under  authority  of  the  Canada 
Labour  Code,  Part  III,  Section  65  and  the  Canada  Labour 
Standards,  Regulation  23. 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record: 

(a)  funds  received  from  employers  as  a  result  of  assess- 
ments made  by  inspectors  regarding  underpayments  of 
minimum  wages,  overtime,  vacation  pay,  holiday  pay, 
termination,  severance  or  bereavement  pay.  The  assess- 
ments are  payable  either  directly  to  the  employee,  or  to 
the  Minister  of  Labour  who  is  required  to  transmit  the 
payment  to  the  employee; 

(b)  payments  received  from  employers  who  have  fallen  in 
arrears  in  paying  their  employees.  Such  amounts  are 
repaid  to  employees;  and, 

(c)  wages  received  from  employers  who  cannot  locate 
employees.  Such  wages  are  required  to  be  paid  to  the 
Minister  of  Labour.  Efforts  are  then  made  by  the 
department  to  locate  the  employees. 

Estates — Armed  services 

To  this  account  are  credited  the  service  estates  of  deceased 
members  of  the  Canadian  Forces.  Net  assets  of  estates  are 
distributed  to  the  legal  heirs  under  the  administration  of  the 
Judge  Advocate  General  in  his  capacity  as  Director  of  Estates 
of  this  department. 

United  Kingdom 

These  accounts  are  maintained  to  record  funds  received 
from  the  Government  of  the  United  Kingdom  to  cover  expen- 
ditures to  be  made  on  its  behalf  in  accordance  with  the 
provisions  of  agreements  between  that  government  and  the 
Government  of  Canada. 

The  account  for  Suffield,  Alberta  shows  a  debit  balance 
since  funds  required  were  only  received  from  the  United 
Kingdom  government  after  the  close  of  the  year,  to  cover  costs 
incurred  in  1981-82. 

United  States  of  America 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  from 
the  Government  of  the  United  States  of  America  to  cover 
expenditures  to  be  made  on  its  behalf  in  accordance  with  the 
provisions  of  an  agreement  between  that  government  and  the 
Government  of  Canada. 

Federal  Republic  of  Germany 

These  accounts  are  maintained  to  record  funds  received 
from  the  Government  of  the  Federal  Republic  of  Germany  to 
cover  expenditures  to  be  made  on  its  behalf  in  accordance  with 
the  provisions  of  agreements  between  that  government  and  the 
Government  of  Canada. 


Netherlands 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  from 
the  Netherlands  Government  to  cover  expenditures  to  be  made 
on  its  behalf  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  an  agreement 
between  that  government  and  the  Government  of  Canada. 


Provinces  of  Canada 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  from 
provincial  governments  for  expenditures  to  be  made  on  their 
behalf. 

This  account  shows  a  debit  balance  since  funds  were  only 
received  in  May  1982  to  cover  costs  incurred  in  1981-82. 

North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization  (NATO) 

These  accounts  are  maintained  to  record  funds  received 
from  NATO  to  cover  (a)  NATO  infrastructure  projects  imple- 
mented by  Canada,  and,  (b)  other  expenditures  to  be  made  on 
NATO's  behalf,  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  an  agreement 
with  the  Government  of  Canada. 

Non-government  agencies 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  for 
expenditures  made  on  behalf  of  non-government  agencies  for 
which  specific  accounts  have  not  been  established. 

Herbert  Lott  naval  trust  fund 

Credits  to  this  account  represent  the  Canadian  naval  portion 
of  the  Herbert  Lott  naval  trust  fund  which  is  administered  by 
the  British  Admiralty.  These  funds  are  allocated  to  active  or 
reserve  force  units  which  show  marked  efficiency  in  fighting 
practices  or  contribute  in  signal  degree  to  the  improvement  of 
the  fighting  appliances  of  naval  or  maritime  forces. 

Strathcona  trust  fund 

The  interest  on  this  account  is  to  be  expended  in  encourag- 
ing physical  and  military  training  in  the  public  schools  of 
Canada.  Payments  of  interest  are  made  to  the  trustees  semi- 
annually and  are  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Effective  September  1,  1981,  the  total  amount  outstanding 
was  withdrawn  by  the  trustees  and  the  account  was  closed. 

During  the  year,  interest  to  September  1 ,  1 98 1  amounted  to 
$27,373  and  was  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Health  insurance  supplementary  account 

This  account  was  established  for  payments  in  respect  of 
persons  who  were  unable  to  obtain  or  who  lost  coverage  under 
the  Hospital  Insurance  and  Diagnostic  Services  Act  and/or 
the  Medical  Care  Act  through  no  fault  of  their  own.  Contribu- 
tions are  made  by  all  provinces  to  the  account  in  proportion  to 
their  population  and  are  matched  by  the  federal  Government. 

Fort  Simpson  Lions'  Club 

This  account  was  established  to  record  transactions  relating 
to  a  donation  made  by  the  Fort  Simpson  Lions'  Club  to  be 
used  specifically  to  finance  the  purchase  of  an  hydraulic 
stretcher. 

Sioux  Lookout  Zone  Hospital 

This  account  was  established  to  record  transactions  relating 
to  a  donation  made  by  the  Hospital  for  Sick  Children  Founda- 
tion to  be  used  specifically  to  finance  a  paediatric  play  pro- 
gram and  volunteer  service  at  Sioux  Lookout  Zone  Hospital 
for  a  period  of  one  year. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8-19 


World  Health  Organization 

This  account  records  the  funds  received  from  the  World 
Health  Organization  to  be  used  for  scientific  projects. 

Donations  and  bequests 

This  account  records  a  bequest  of  $75,000  made  by  an 
anonymous  donor  to  establish  a  Fund  for  Research  in  the 
Fields  of  Dyskinesia  and  Torticollis. 

Payments  of  interest  are  made  to  the  fund  semi-annually 
and  are  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt.  Interest  amounted 
to  $13,407  in  1981-82. 

Guarantee  deposits — Customs  and  Excise 

Cash  and  securities  are  furnished  to  the  department  as  a 
guarantee  of  payment  of  customs  duties  and  excise  taxes  on 
imported  goods,  and  of  sales  and  excise  taxes  payable  by 
licensees. 

During  the  year,  receipts  and  other  credits  consisted  of 
bonds,  $2,659,500;  and,  cash,  $62,895.  Payments  and  other 
charges  consisted  of  bonds,  $2,194,500;  and,  cash,  $74,600. 

Temporary  deposits  received  from  importers 

In  this  account  are  recorded  temporary  deposits  in  chartered 
bank  accounts  as  security  for  the  temporary  entry  of  goods,  or 
to  otherwise  ensure  compliance  with  various  departmental 
regulations. 

Guarantee  fund — Bonds 

This  account  records  bonds  held  in  safekeeping  on  behalf  of 
the  Post  Office  guarantee  fund  which  was  derived  from  money 
received  from  postal  employees  and  out  of  which  is  paid  losses 
sustained  by  reason  of  default  or  neglect  of  any  postal 
employee  or  mail  contractor  in  carrying  out  his  duties  in  any 
matter  relating  to  the  Canada  Post  Office. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  this  section). 

Guarantee  fund — Cash 

This  account  represents  the  liability  of  the  Post  Office 
guarantee  fund  for  the  cash  portion  of  the  fund  on  deposit. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  this  section). 

Post  Office  savings  bank 

This  account  records  depositors'  unclaimed  balances  in  the 
Post  Office  savings  bank. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  this  section). 

Candidates'  election  deposits 

This  account  reflects  candidates'  election  deposits,  received 
in  respect  of  a  general  election  or  by-elections,  less  amounts 
refunded  to  the  candidates  or  transferred  to  non-tax  revenue, 


pursuant   to  the   provisions  of  the   Canada   Elections  Act. 
During  the  year,  $171,800  was  transferred  to  non-tax  revenue. 

Promotion  of  official  languages 

This  account  has  been  established  to  provide  members  of  the 
private  sector  with  language  instruction  using  federal  govern- 
ment facilities  and  Public  Service  Commission  instructors. 

The  advance  payments  from  the  private  sector  are  credited 
to  the  account  and  charges  by  the  Public  Service  Commission 
for  its  services  are  debited  thereto. 

Inmates'  earnings 

To  this  account  are  credited  gross  earnings  of  inmates,  the 
corresponding  charge  being  to  a  parliamentary  appropriation 
(Department  of  Solicitor  General,  Correctional  services  pro- 
gram Vote  5,  Correctional  services — Penitentiary  service  and 
National  parole  service — Operating  expenditures).  Canteen 
purchases,  payments  on  release,  damage  payments,  contribu- 
tions to  the  Inmate  Welfare  Fund  and  transfers  of  moneys 
into  the  Inmates'  trust  fund  account  are  debited  to  this 
account. 

Inmates'  trust  fund 

This  account  is  credited  with  all  moneys  that  accompany  an 
inmate  to  the  institution,  moneys  received  on  his  behalf  while 
in  custody,  transfers  from  the  Inmates'  earnings  account  and 
interest.  Payments  to  assist  in  the  reformation  and  rehabilita- 
tion of  the  inmate  are  debited  to  this  account. 

Benefit  fund 

All  moneys  received  by  personnel  of  the  Royal  Canadian 
Mounted  Police  in  connection  with  the  performance  of  duties, 
over  and  above  their  pay  and  allowances,  are  deposited  to  the 
fund  and  benefits  are  payable  therefrom.  Interest  for  the  year 
amounting  to  $6,610  was  credited  to  the  account  and  charged 
to  interest  on  public  debt.  In  addition  to  the  credit  balance  in 
the  fund  of  $804,151,  there  was  an  amount  of  $94,058  out- 
standing in  loans  issued  from  the  fund  for  the  benefit  of 
members. 

Interest  on  bonds — Insurance  companies 

This  account  is  credited  with  the  proceeds  from  interest 
coupons  on  bonds  deposited  by  insurance  companies  under  the 
Canadian  and  British  Insurance  Companies  Act.  Debits  repre- 
sent the  payment  of  the  same  interest  to  the  insurance 
companies. 

Military  purchases  excess  funds  deposit 

This  account  records  temporarily  unutilized  funds  paid  to 
the  United  States  Government  under  contracts  for  purchases 
of  military  equipment.  The  funds  are  invested  by  the  Federal 
Reserve  Bank  of  New  York  to  earn  interest  for  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada. 

Statistics  Canada — Advance  payments 

This  account  records  advance  payments  received  from  Gov- 
ernment departments,  agencies  and  others  for  the  purpose  of 
financing  the  cost  of  special  statistical  services. 


8*20 

Contractors'  security  deposits 

This  account  records  the  contractors'  securities  that  are 
required  for  the  satisfactory  performance  of  the  work.  Cash 
deposits  credited  hereto  bear  interest  at  the  rate  of  2!/2%  per 
annum  compounded  annually.  Securities  in  respect  of  this 
account  are  carried  under  the  Department  of  Supply  and 
Services. 

Loran  C — United  States  Coast  Guard — Deposit  account 

Agreements  were  executed  between  the  United  States  and 
Canadian  Governments,  whereby  the  Department  of  Transport 
undertook  to  act  as  agent  for  the  United  States  Coast  Guard 
in  the  construction,  maintenance  and  operation  of  the  Loran  C 
transmitter  station  and  its  associated  monitor  control  station  in 
the  vicinity  of  Cape  Race,  Newfoundland.  The  debit  balance, 
in  the  account,  is  due  to  the  excess  of  expenditures  incurred  in 
March  1982  over  the  amount  on  deposit  in  the  account.  The 
recovery  payment  from  US  Coast  Guard  to  offset  the  debit 
was  not  deposited  before  May  1982. 

Maritime  pollution  claims  fund 

This  account  was  established  to  record  levy  tonnage  pay- 
ments for  oil  carried  by  ships  in  Canadian  waters.  The  pay- 
ment of  the  levy  was  revoked  effective  September  1 ,  1 976. 

Maritime  pollution  claims,  the  fee  of  the  Fund  Administra- 
tor, and  related  oil  pollution  control  expenses  are  to  be 
financed  out  of  the  fund. 

Province    of    Newfoundland — Social    security    assessment 
collections 

To  this  account  are  credited  the  collections  made  by  the 
federal  Government  at  Gander  Airport  on  behalf  of  the  pro- 
vincial government  under  the  Newfoundland  Social  Assess- 
ment Act.  This  account  is  charged  with  payments  to 
Newfoundland. 

Unclaimed  moneys  due  to  Canadian  seamen 

Unpaid  wages  of  deceased  members  of  ships'  crews  as  well 
as  any  amount  of  cash  on  their  person  at  time  of  death  are 
credited  to  this  account  pending  direction  as  to  payees. 

National  Lottery  account 

This  account  is  credited  with  the  net  revenues  of  Loto 
Canada  Inc.  An  amount,  not  exceeding  5%  of  the  net  revenues 
credited,  will  be  charged  to  the  account  for  the  purposes  of 
physical  fitness,  amateur  sport  and  recreation  programs.  Also 
to  be  charged  to  the  account  is:  (/)  an  amount,  not  exceeding 
12.5%  of  the  net  revenues  credited  to  the  account,  to  be  paid  to 
the  government  of  each  province,  and  (2)  an  amount,  not 
exceeding  82.5%  of  the  net  revenues  credited  to  the  account,  to 
be  paid  to  the  Regie  des  installations  olympiques  and  to  the  XI 
Commonwealth  Games  Canada  (1978)  Foundation. 

Administered  trust  accounts 

This  account  is  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Canada  Pension 
Commission  and  Veterans  Services.  Moneys  held  in  this 
account  include:  (a)  pensions  placed  under  the  administration 
of  the  Canadian  Pension  Commission;  (b)  war  service  gratui- 
ties paid  under  the  War  Service  Grants  Act  and  held  by  the 
department  for  veterans  for  administration  or  whose  where- 


PUBUC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

abouts  are  unknown;  and,  (c)  war  veterans  and  civilian  war 
allowances  and  assistance  fund  payments  placed  under  the 
administration  of  the  department. 

Army  benevolent  fund 

This  account  is  credited  with  certain  canteen  profits  and 
other  funds  and  semi-annually  with  interest  at  the  rate  of 
10.6%  per  annum  from  June  29,  1980  to  June  28,  1985  on  the 
minimum  monthly  balances  to  the  credit  of  the  fund. 

Payments  are  made  out  of  the  fund  to  or  for  the  benefit  of 
veterans  or  their  dependants  or  the  widows,  children  or  other 
dependants  of  deceased  veterans. 

The  Army  benevolent  fund  balance  within  the  meaning  of 
the  Army  Benevolent  Fund  Act  at  March  31,  1982  amounted 
to  $1,451,169;  other  funds  held  in  trust  at  March  31,  1982 
amounted  to  $9,314. 

During  the  year,  interest  amounting  to  $125,158  was  cred- 
ited to  the  account  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 

Canadian  army  welfare  fund 

The  fund  was  established  to  provide  assistance  to  persons 
who  served  as  members  of  the  Canadian  Army  (Regular) 
between  October  1,  1946  and  January  31,  1968  (including 
Korean  veterans  and  their  dependants),  who  are  in  financial 
distress.  Payments  of  interest  are  made  to  the  fund  semi-annu- 
ally and  are  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt.  Interest 
amounted  to  $4,243  in  1981-82. 

Canadian  Forces  personnel  assistance  fund 

This  fund  was  established  to  provide  financial  assistance  to 
serving  or  former  members  of  the  Canadian  Forces  who 
enlisted  on  or  after  February  1,  1968  and  their  dependants 
when  warranted  by  distress  or  other  qualifying  circumstances. 
Interest  is  credited  to  the  fund  semi-annually  and  charged  to 
interest  on  public  debt.  Interest  amounted  to  $82,810  in 
1981-82. 

Estates  fund 

The  proceeds  of  the  service  estates  of  deceased  former 
members  of  the  Armed  Forces,  who  died  while  receiving 
hospital  treatment  or  institutional  care  under  the  control  or 
direction  of  the  department,  are  credited  to  this  fund,  in  which 
individual  accounts  are  maintained  and  from  which  payments 
are  made  to  beneficiaries  on  departmental  authorization. 

Veterans  administration  and  welfare  trust  fund 

Moneys  held  in  this  account  include:  (a)  donations,  legacies, 
gifts,  bequests,  etc,  received  by  the  department  to  be  disbursed 
for  the  benefit  of  veterans  or  their  dependants  under  certain 
conditions  and  for  the  benefit  of  patients  in  departmental 
institutions;  (b)  profits  of  canteens  operated  in  various  depart- 
mental institutions,  which  are  used  for  the  benefit  of  patients; 
and,  (c)  donations,  legacies,  gifts,  bequests,  etc,  received  by  the 
Canadian  Pension  Commission  to  be  disbursed  for  the  use  of 
pensioners  or  dependants  in  distressed  circumstances. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8-21 


Veterans  care  trust  accounts 

PC  1962-1401  of  October  4,  1962,  as  amended,  includes  the 
regulations  respecting  veterans  care  cases  and  provides  that 
domiciliary  care  and  treatment  required  while  receiving  domi- 
ciliary care  be  given  to  a  veteran  who  agrees  to  pay  the 
charges  determined  by  the  Minister  not  in  excess  of  $120  a 
month  and  undertakes  that  if  the  Minister  so  directs,  he  will 
assign  or  pay  to  the  department  any  or  all  of  his  income  and 
resources  to  be  administered  in  the  manner  prescribed. 
Moneys  also  held  in  this  account  include:  (a)  war  service 
gratuities  (World  War  I)  held  by  the  department  for  mental, 
tubercular  and  other  long-term  treatment  cases;  and,  (b)  war 
service  gratuities  paid  under  the  War  Service  Grants  Act  and 
held  by  the  department  for  veterans  while  under  treatment. 

Provincial  sales  taxes — National  Library 

This  account  is  provided  for  the  recording  of  provincial  sales 
taxes  collected  on  behalf  of  provincial  governments  in  connec- 
tion with  the  sale  of  microfilm  and  reproductions. 

Provincial  sales  taxes — Public  Archives 

This  account  is  provided  for  the  recording  of  provincial  sales 
taxes  collected  on  behalf  of  provincial  governments  in  connec- 
tion with  the  sale  of  microfilm  and  reproductions. 

Provincial  sales  taxes — Correctional  Services 

This  account  is  credited  with  provincial  sales  taxes  on  sales 
by  the  Canadian  Penitentiary  Service,  less  the  commission 
allowed  to  vendors,  and  debited  with  payments  to  the 
provinces. 

The  debit  balance,  in  the  account,  is  due  to  the  fact  that 
taxes  are  remitted  at  time  of  sale  and  in  advance  of  being 
reported  as  collected. 

Instalments  (payroll  deductions)  made  by  employees  in  the 
purchase  of  Canada  savings  bonds 

These  accounts  were  established  to  record  instalment  pur- 
chases of  Canada  savings  bonds  by  employees  of  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada,  certain  Government  agencies,  defence  servi- 
ces personnel  and  RCMP  personnel,  by  deductions  from  pay 
and  allowances  where  applicable. 

Canadian  Dairy  Commission  account 

This  account  is  credited  with:  (a)  all  moneys  received  by  the 
Commission  from  its  operations;  {b)  all  licence  fees,  levies  and 
charges  paid  to  the  Commission;  (c)  all  loans  made  to  the 
Commission  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  pursuant  to  Section  16 
of  the  Canadian  Dairy  Commission  Act;  and,  {d)  all  amounts 
paid  to  the  Commission  by  the  Agricultural  Stabilization 
Board  under  the  Agricultural  Stabilization  Act  for  the  purpose 
of  stabilizing  the  price  of  any  dairy  product.  Payments  and 
other  charges  represent:  (a)  all  expenditures  under  the  Act 
except  those  to  be  paid  pursuant  to  Section  14;  and,  (6)  all 
amounts  paid  to  the  Minister  of  Finance  pursuant  to  Section 
16  of  the  Canadian  Dairy  Commission  Act  or  as  interest  on 
any  such  loans. 

All  loans  made  to  the  Commission  pursuant  to  Section  16  of 
the  Canadian  Dairy  Commission  Act  are  recorded  as  contra 
items  under  loans,  investments  and  advances — Crown  corpora- 
tions and  agencies. 


Crown  corporations'  deposits 

Crown  corporations  are  authorized  to  deposit  in  the  Consoli- 
dated Revenue  Fund,  with  the  approval  of  the  appropriate 
Minister  and  the  Minister  of  Finance,  that  portion  of  their 
cash  which  was  temporarily  in  excess  of  their  current  require- 
ments, such  deposits  to  earn  interest  at  rates  fixed  by  Order  in 
Council  PC  1967-914  dated  May  11,  1967. 

Canada  Post  Corporation  account 

This  account  was  established  to  record  the  Government's 
liability  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation. 

The  Post  Office  Department  became  a  Crown  corporation 
on  October  16,  1981.  However,  the  Corporation  continued  to 
use  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  for  banking  purposes. 
Accordingly,  the  outstanding  money  orders  of  the  Corporation 
as  at  March  31,  1982,  in  the  amount  of  $57.8  million,  are 
included  as  part  of  this  account,  whereas  the  outstanding 
money  orders  of  the  Post  Office  Department  as  at  March  3 1 , 
1981,  in  the  amount  of  $61.4  million,  are  reported  as  "Other 
Liabilities"  (see  Section  9  of  this  volume). 

Royal  Canadian  Mint  account 

This  account  was  established  to  record  the  Government's 
liability  to  the  Royal  Canadian  Mint. 

Canadian  National  (West  Indies)  Steamships  Limited 

This  account  records  a  deposit  by  the  Canadian  National 
(West  Indies)  Steamships  Limited  covering  a  transfer  of  funds 
to  be  held  pending  the  wind-up  of  the  Corporation. 

National  Harbours  Board 

These  accounts  are  maintained  in  accordance  with  Section 
24  of  the  National  Harbours  Board  Act. 

Current  revenues  are  credited  to  special  account  No  1,  and 
expenditures  for  capital,  operations  and  maintenance  are 
charged  thereto. 

Cash  and  securities  received  from  contractors  as  guarantees 
for  the  satisfactory  completion  of  construction  projects  are 
credited  to  special  account  No  2  and  released  in  accordance 
with  Treasury  Board  regulations  covering  the  holding  and 
disposition  of  securities. 

Fees  paid  in  advance — Importation  of  foreign  cattle 

Deposits  made  in  connection  with  the  importation  of  foreign 
cattle,  pregnancy  tests  on  cattle  and  applications  for  the 
registration  of  feeds,  fertilizers  and  pesticides  are  credited  to 
this  account  pending  assessment  of  actual  costs  on  completion 
of  the  particular  services  required. 

The  deposits  are  either  credited  to  the  parliamentary  vote 
concerned  or  are  returned  to  the  depositor  on  final  account- 
ability and  at  such  time  as  the  services  are  completed. 


8-22 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Federal  court  fees 

Under  the  provisions  of  Section  57  of  the  Federal  Court  Act, 
all  fees  collected  under  the  Act  are  credited  to  the  Receiver 
General  for  Canada.  In  some  instances,  amounts  are  deposited 
with  the  Administrator  of  the  Court  to  be  used  for  payment  of 
fees  as  services  are  rendered. 

Philatelic  advance  account 

This  account  represents  the  department's  liability  to  phila- 
telists and  stamp  dealers  who  deposit  funds  for  postage  stamps 
to  be  supplied  at  later  dates. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  this  section). 

Shared-cost  projects 

This  account  records  the  receipt  in  advance  of  moneys  from 
federal  Government  departments  and  others  for  their  share  of 
certain  shared-cost  projects. 

Trust  fund — National  Research  Council 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  from 
other  governments  and  organizations  to  cover  expenditures 
made  on  their  behalf. 

Trust  account — National  Museums  of  Canada 

This  account  is  credited  with  moneys  received  by  the  Corpo- 
ration by  way  of  gift,  bequest  or  otherwise,  interest  on  any 
securities,  rent  or  sales  of  any  real  property  acquired  by  the 
Corporation  by  way  of  gift,  bequest  or  otherwise,  and  an 
amount  representing  interest  on  the  balance  from  time  to  time 
to  the  credit  of  the  account  and  to  which  shall  be  charged  such 
amounts  as  are  authorized  by  the  Board  of  Trustees  of  the 
Corporation  to  be  expended  for  the  purpose  for  which  such 
moneys  or  property  were  given,  bequeathed  or  otherwise  made 
available  to  the  Corporation.  Securities  in  connection  with  this 
account  amount  to  $2,000  consisting  of  two  Canada  savings 
bonds  bequeathed  by  the  late  J  Dazell  McKee  and  the  late 
Hugh  de  T  Glazebrook.  Interest  on  these  securities  in  the 
amount  of  $75  was  credited  to  the  account  and  charged  to 
interest  on  public  debt. 

Special  operating  account — National  Library 

This  account  records  all  moneys  received  for  the  purpose  of 
the  National  Library  by  way  of  donation,  bequest  or  other- 
wise. Any  amounts  required  for  the  purposes  of  the  Act  may 
be  paid  out  of  this  account  or  out  of  any  money  appropriated 
by  Parliament  for  such  purposes. 

Queen's  Fellowship  fund — Social  Sciences  and  Humanities 
Research  Council 

This  account  acknowledges  the  transfer,  from  the  Canada 
Council,  of  the  administration  and  control  of  the  Queen's 
Fellowship  fund.  The  capital  has  been  invested  in  bonds  of 
Abitibi  Paper  Ltd,  at  10'/2%  interest,  payable  semi-annually, 
due  March  1,  1995.  The  income  derived  from  the  investment  is 
used  for  the  payment  of  scholarships  to  graduate  students  in 
certain  fields  of  Canadian  studies. 


Special  fund — National  Research  Council 

This  account  was  credited  with  revenue  of  the  National 
Research  Council  of  Canada  derived  from  laboratory  fees, 
$6,804,417;  capital,  $500,000;  information  services,  $1,848; 
sale  of  publications,  $1,821,943;  and,  miscellaneous  receipts, 
$164,657  under  authority  of  the  National  Research  Council 
Act.  An  amount  of  $8,792,891  was  charged  hereto,  of  which 
an  amount  of  $5,642,919  was  credited  to  National  Research 
Council  Vote  5,  $500,000  to  National  Research  Council  Vote 
10,  and,  $2,649,972  to  National  Research  Council  Vote  15,  to 
offset  expenditures. 

Trust   fund — Natural   Sciences   and    Engineering    Research 
Council 

This  account  is  maintained  to  record  funds  received  from 
other  governments  and  organizations  to  cover  expenditures 
made  on  their  behalf  and  to  record  this  agency's  liability  to 
those  other  organizations. 

Veterans'  Land  Act  trust  account  general 

Receipts  and  other  credits  to  this  account  consist  mainly  of 
initial  and  excess  payments  by  veterans  and  civilian  purchasers 
as  provided  under  the  Act,  which  are  held  pending  approval  of 
sales.  Other  items  included  are  veterans'  sales  proceeds  held 
pending  redisbursement  on  their  present  or  second  establish- 
ment, insurance  fire  loss  proceeds  to  pay  for  restoration  of  fire 
damage  and  moneys  sent  in  by  veterans  and  civilian  pur- 
chasers to  be  held  for  payment  of  taxes  and  insurance  and 
other  related  items. 

Mackenzie  King  trust  account 

The  late  The  Right  Hon  W  L  Mackenzie  King  bequeathed 
Laurier  House,  Ottawa,  and  the  sum  of  $225,000  to  the 
Government  of  Canada.  The  amount  of  $225,000  was  credited 
to  this  account.  Interest  computed  in  accordance  with  the 
terms  of  the  Laurier  House  Act  is  to  be  credited  to  the  account 
at  the  end  of  each  year  and  charged  to  interest  on  public  debt. 
The  interest  is  to  be  used  to  assist  in  the  maintenance  of 
Laurier  House  which  is  to  be  preserved  as  a  place  of  historic 
interest  and  also  provide  accommodation  for  study  and 
research.  Expenditures  are  to  be  made  by  the  Dominion 
Archivist  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 

During  the  year,  interest  amounting  to  $43,358  was  credited 
hereto.  In  accordance  with  the  Act,  the  Dominion  Archivist  is 
authorized  to  expend  an  annual  sum  not  to  exceed  70%  of  the 
interest  earned  on  the  Mackenzie  King  trust  account  in  the 
previous  year  for  the  maintenance  and  upkeep  of  the  buildings 
on  the  Laurier  House  property  as  well  as  an  annual  sum  not  to 
exceed  30%  of  the  interest  earned  on  the  above  account  for  the 
maintenance  of  Laurier  House  as  a  museum  and  study  centre 
and  for  the  provision  of  sundry  purchases  therefrom,  and  that 
the  unspent  balance  of  the  interest  earned  be  returned  at  the 
end  of  the  year  to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund. 

Custodian  administration  account 

This  account  was  established  to  record  assets  transferred 
from  the  Custodian  of  Enemy  Property.  This  special  purpose 
money  is  to  be  used  to  satisfy  claims  against  or  expenses  of  the 
Custodian. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

Federal  sales  tax  collections — Correctional  Services 

This  account  is  credited  with  federal  sales  tax  collected  on 
sales  made  by  the  Canadian  Penitentiary  Service  and  debited 
with  remittances  to  National  Revenue. 

The  debit  balance,  in  the  account,  is  due  to  the  fact  that 
taxes  are  remitted  at  time  of  sale  and  in  advance  of  being 
reported  as  collected. 


Provincial  Tax  Collection  Agreements 
Account 

This  account  records  income  taxes  collected  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  on  behalf  of  the  provinces  and  territories 
participating  in  the  joint-collection  provision  of  the  Federal- 
Provincial  Fiscal  Arrangements  Act,  and  the  related  payments 
made  to  them. 

Under  the  Federal-Provincial  Fiscal  Arrangements  Act,  the 
Government  of  Canada  is  empowered  to  enter  into  agreements 
with  the  provincial  and  territorial  governments  to  collect 
income  taxes  on  their  behalf  and  to  make  payments  to  them 
with  respect  to  such  taxes. 


8-23 

The  Government  of  Canada  entered  into  agreements  with 
the  provinces  and  territories  (Quebec  excepted)  to  collect  the 
individual  income  tax  and  with  the  provinces  and  territories 
(Alberta,  Ontario  and  Quebec  excepted)  to  collect  the  corpo- 
ration income  tax,  and  to  pay  in  equal  monthly  instalments  to 
such  provinces  and  territories,  the  estimated  revenue  to  be 
produced  by  the  respective  provincial  and  territorial  taxes. 

At  the  beginning  of  each  year,  the  Minister  of  Finance 
estimates  the  amount  of  the  payments,  for  the  taxation  year 
ending  in  that  year,  to  the  provinces  and  territories  that  have 
entered  into  agreements.  These  estimates  are  adjusted  to 
actual  amounts  at  a  later  date.  Any  adjustment  will  be  made 
not  later  than  March  31  of  the  year  following  that  in  which 
the  taxation  year  ends. 

Other  Specified  Purpose  Accounts 

There  are  a  number  of  other  specified  purpose  accounts 
operated  by  the  Government.  Transactions  on  behalf  of  the 
Public  Service  death  benefit  account,  the  crop  reinsurance 
fund,  the  regular  forces  death  benefit  account  and  the  veter- 
ans' insurance  fund,  account  for  the  greater  part  of  the 
transactions  of  these  accounts. 

Table  8.13  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  all  other  specified  purpose  accounts. 


TABLE  8.13 

OTHER  SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


Agriculture — 

Crop  reinsurance  fund  

Employment  and  Immigration — 

Annuities  agents'  pension  account 

Finance — 

Insurance — Civil  service  insurance  fund 

Fisheries  and  Oceans — 

Fishing  vessel  insurance  plan 

National  Defence — 

Regular  forces  death  benefit  account 

Parliament — 

Members    of    Parliament     retiring     allowances 

account 11,339,160 

Solicitor  General- — 

Royal   Canadian    Mounted    Police — Dependants' 

pension  fund 

Treasury  Board — 

Locally-engaged  contributory  pension  account 

Public  Service  death  benefit  account  

Retirement  fund  

Veterans  Affairs — 

Returned  soldiers'  insurance  fund 

Veterans'  insurance  fund  

Total 


April  1/1981 

Receipts  and 
other  credits 

Payments  and 
other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

% 

$ 

$ 

$ 

S 

$ 

94,209,367 

29,105,158 

9,075,189 

114,239,336 

20,029,969 

6,795,308 

75,764 

11,904 

18,240 

69,428 

-  6,336 

-5,017 

17,808,208 

402,270 

939,041 

17,271,437 

-536,771 

-600,481 

9,794,367 

4,175,584 

6,461,832 

7,508,119 

-  2,286,248 

-830,916 

38,491,291 

10,187,104 

6,016,035 

42,662,360 

4,171,069 

2,872,836 

4,382,272 


1,859,611 


13,861,821 


2,522,661 


580,854 


10,715,255 

1,024,490 

475,216 

11,264,529 

549,274 

519,424 

448,474 

115,225,347 

6,839 

115.680.660 

239,845 

52,421,899 

733 

52.662.477 

114,216 

26,388,114 

2,269 

26.504.599 

574,103 

141,259,132 

5,303 

141.838.538 

125,629 
26,033,785 

-  1,536 
26.157.878 

157,471 
20,008,338 

-  1,679 
20.164.130 

2,639,810 
28,092,848 
30.732.658 

67,249 
1,263,155 
1.330.404 

422,903 
2,726,332 
3,149.235 

2,284,156 
26,629,671 
28.913.827 

-355,654 

-  1,463,177 

-  1.818.831 

-  327,895 
-610,273 
-938.168 

328,846,730 

103,281,663 

54,498,998 

377,629,395 

48,782,665 

28,557,970 

8*24 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Crop  reinsurance  fund 

Under  the  Crop  Insurance  Act,  the  Government  of  Canada 
is  empowered  to  enter  into  an  agreement  with  the  government 
of  any  province  to  provide  contributions  and  loans  in  respect  of 
crop  insurance. 

Section  5(1)  of  the  Act  provides  authority  to  establish  an 
account  to  be  known  as  the  crop  reinsurance  fund,  to  credit 
this  account  with  all  moneys  paid  by  the  provinces  for  the 
purpose  of  reinsurance  and  to  charge  this  account  with  all 
moneys  paid  to  the  provinces  under  the  terms  of  reinsurance 
agreements. 

Annuities  agents'  pension  account 

This  pension  plan  was  established  for  annuities  agents. 
During  the  year,  interest  amounting  to  $2,749,  calculated  at 
the  rate  of  4%  per  annum,  was  credited  to  the  account  and 
charged  to  interest  on  public  debt.  Contributions  from  the 
Annuities  Branch  as  former  employer  amounted  to  $9,153. 

Civil  service  insurance  fund 

In  this  account  are  recorded  transactions  in  connection  with 
insurance  contracts  made  under  authority  of  the  Civil  Service 
Insurance  Act.  Entering  into  contracts  was  discontinued  in 
1954-55  pursuant  to  Subsection  51(2)  of  the  Public  Service 
Superannuation  Act. 

During  the  year,  receipts  and  other  credits  consisted  of 
premiums,  $37,874;  and,  an  amount  of  $364,396  (charged  to 
budgetary  expenditure)  which  represents  an  adjustment  to 
bring  the  balance  in  the  fund  into  agreement  with  the  actuarial 
valuation  as  at  March  31,  1981.  Payments  and  other  charges 
consisted  of  death  benefits,  $610,935;  cash  surrender  value, 
$277,824;  annuities,  $49,817;  and,  premium  refunds,  $465. 

Fishing  vessel  insurance  plan 

The  fishing  vessel  insurance  plan  is  administered  in  accord- 
ance with  regulations  of  the  Governor  in  Council,  for  the 
purpose  of  assisting  fishermen  to  meet  abnormal  capital  losses. 
The  account  is  credited  with  all  amounts  received  by  way  of 
premiums  and  recoveries  and  with  advances  in  accordance 
with  the  regulations,  such  advances  not  at  any  time  to  exceed 
$150,000.  The  account  is  charged  with  refunds  of  premiums 
and  payments  in  settlement  of  third  party  vessel  collision 
damage  claims  against  fishermen  where  the  collision  involves  a 
vessel  insured  under  the  fishing  vessel  insurance  plan. 
Administration  costs  are  paid  from  Department  of  Fisheries 
and  Oceans  Vote  1 . 

Regular  forces  death  benefit  account 

This  account  is  maintained  under  the  Canadian  Forces 
Superannuation  Act.  Receipts  and  other  credits  consist  of:  (a) 
contributions  by  participants;  (b)  Government's  contribution 
(1/6  of  benefits  paid  in  respect  of  participants  who,  at  the  time 
of  death,  were  members  of  the  regular  forces  or  who  were 
elective  regular  forces  participants  to  whom  pensions  were 
payable  under  the  Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Act  or  the 
Defence  Services  Pension  Continuation  Act);  (c)  single  pre- 
miums payable  by  the  Government  in  respect  of  regular  forces 
participants  who  become  entitled  to  a  basic  benefit  of  $500 
without  contribution;  and,  {d)  interest. 


Payments  and  other  charges  consist  of:  (o)  benefits  paid  in 
respect  of  participants  who,  at  the  time  of  death,  were  mem- 
bers of  the  regular  forces  or  who  were  elective  regular  forces 
participants  to  whom  pensions  were  payable  under  the  Cana- 
dian Forces  Superannuation  Act  or  the  Defence  Services 
Pension  Continuation  Act  upon  their  retirement  from  the 
regular  forces;  (b)  benefits  paid  in  respect  of  elective  regular 
forces  participants  to  whom  pensions  were  not  payable  under 
the  Canadian  Forces  Superannuation  Act  or  the  Defence 
Services  Pension  Continuation  Act  upon  their  retirement  from 
the  regular  forces;  and,  (c)  portion  of  benefit  payable  for 
which  a  single  premium  has  been  paid  by  the  Government. 

TABLE  8.14 

REGULAR  FORCES  DEATH  BENEFIT  ACCOUNT 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Opening  balance 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Contributions  by  participants 

Government's  contribution 

Single  premiums  payable  by  the  Govern- 
ment in  respect  of  regular  forces  partici- 
pants who  become  entitled  to  a  basic 
benefit  of  $500  without  contribution 

Interest  


PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

BeneHts  paid  in  respect  of  participants  who, 
at  the  time  of  death,  were  members  of  the 
regular  forces  or  who  were  elective  regu- 
lar forces  participants  to  whom  pensions 
were  payable  under  the  Canadian  Forces 
Superannuation  Act  or  the  Defence  Ser- 
vices Pension  Continuation  Act  


$ 

S 

38,491,291 

35,618,455 

5,253,187 
1,001,089 

4,645,992 
1,024,866 

305,350 

3,627,478 

10.187.104 

277,450 
3,079,425 
9.027.733 

48,678,395 

44,646,188 

6,016,035 


6,154,897 


Closing  balance.. 


42,662,360        38,491,291 


Members  of  Parliament  retiring  allowances  account 

The  Members  of  Parliament  Retiring  Allowances  Act 
provides  retiring  allowances  on  a  contributor  basis  to  persons 
who  have  served  as  Members  of  Parliament.  "Member"  means 
a  member  of  the  Senate  or  House  of  Commons.  Allowances 
are  also  available  to  the  widows  and  to  dependent  children  of 
deceased  members. 

Receipts  and  other  credits  consist  of:  (a)  contributions 
reserved  from  current  indemnities  based  on  the  full  amount 
paid;  {b)  contributions  reserved  from  additional  salaries  based 
upon  the  percentage  of  contribution  elected  up  to  10%  of  the 
full  amount  of  salary;  (c)  contributions  for  previous  sessions 
where  members  elect  to  pay  arrears,  and  interest  on  the 
arrears;  (d)  interest  and  mortality  insurance  on  any  unpaid 
balance,  based  on  Canada  Life  Tables;  (e)  contributions  by  the 
Government  of  an  amount  equal  to  contributions  paid  or 
which  have  become  payable  in  the  year;  (/)  interest  credited 
quarterly;  and,  (g)  repayment  of  pensions  after  elections  to 
transfer  Members  of  Parliament  retiring  allowances  to  the 
Public  Service  Superannuation  Account. 

Payments  and  other  charges  consist  of:  (a)  payments  of 
annual  allowances;  (b)  withdrawal  allowances;  (c)  refunds  of 
contributions  which  are  in  excess  of  the  maximum  required; 
and,  (d)  transfers  of  funds  to  the  Public  Service  Superannua- 
tion Account. 


i 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  8.15 

MEMBERS    OF    PARLIAMENT    RETIRING    ALLOW- 
ANCES ACCOUNT 


1981-82 


1980-81 


$  $ 

Opening  balance 1 1,339,160  10,758,306 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 

Members'  contributions — 

Current 1.640.001  842,194 

Arrears  of  principal,  interest  and  mortal- 
ity insurance 137.310  59,958 

Government  contributions — 

Current 1,640,001  842,194 

Interest  on  fund  964,960  806,597 

4.382.272  2.550.943 

15,721,432  13,309,249 
PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Annual  allowances 1,849,475  1,837,957 

Withdrawal  allowances 6,380  132,132 

Interest  on  withdrawals 3,756 

1.859.611  1.970.089 

Closing  balance 13,861,821  1 1,339,160 


Dependants'  pension  fund 

This  fund  pertains  to  Part  IV  of  the  Royal  Canadian 
Mounted  Police  Pension  Continuation  Act,  whereby  a  widows' 
and  dependants'  pension  fund  is  maintained  by  5%  contribu- 
tions thereto  from  the  pay  of  members  of  the  Force  other  than 
commissioned  officers. 

Locally-engaged  contributory  pension  account 

This  account  pertains  to  Part  II  of  the  Locally-Engaged 
Pension  Regulations.  The  account  is  credited  with  contribu- 
tions from  locally-engaged  employees  and  is  charged  with  the 
subsequent  payment  of  benefits. 

Public  Service  death  benefit  account 

This  account  was  established  under  the  Public  Service 
Superannuation  Act. 

The  account  is  credited  with:  (a)  contributions  by 
employees;  (b)  contributions  by  the  Government  and  Public 
Service  corporations;  and,  (c)  interest.  Payments  and  other 
charges  represent:  (a)  benefits  paid  in  respect  of  participants 
who,  at  the  time  of  death,  were  employed  in  the  Public  Service 
or  were  in  receipt  of  an  annuity  under  Part  I  of  the  Public 
Service  Superannuation  Act;  and,  (b)  benefits  of  $500  paid  in 
respect  of  participants  who,  at  the  time  of  death,  were 
employed  in  the  Public  Service  or  were  in  receipt  of  an  annuity 
under  Part  I  of  the  Public  Service  Superannuation  Act  and  on 
whose  behalf  a  single  premium  for  $500  death  benefit  cover- 
age for  life  has  been  made. 


8*25 


TABLE  8.16 

PUBLIC  SERVICE  DEATH  BENEFIT  ACCOUNT 


1981-82 


1980-81 


Opening  balance 1 15,225,347 

RECEIPTS  AND  OTHER  CREDITS— 
Contributions — 
Employees — 
Government  and  Public  Service  corpo- 
rations   34.451.938 

Government — 
One-sixth  of  benefit  payments — Gen- 
eral   4,219,009 

Single  premium  for  $500 1,601,620 

Public  Service  corporations 959,831 

Interest  1 1,189,501 

52.421.899 


95,217,009 


27,503,504 


3,092.257 

1,494,358 

437,909 

8,440,980 

40.969.008 


167,647,246     136,186,017 


PAYMENTS  AND  OTHER  CHARGES— 

Benefit  payments — 

General 25,314,058  19,785,948 

Life  coverage  of  $500 1,041,031  1,132,477 

Other  death  benefit  payments 33,025  42,245 

26.388.114  20,960.670 

Closing  balance 141,259,132  1 15,225,347 


Retirement  fund 

Contributions  are  made  to  the  fund  in  the  form  of  monthly 
deductions  from  the  salaries  of  certain  prevailing  rate  or 
seasonal  and  certain  other  employees.  Other  credits  are  the 
accrual  of  interest  at  the  rate  of  4%  per  annum  on  the  balance 
to  the  credit  of  each  contributor,  the  off-setting  charge  being 
to  interest  on  the  public  debt.  Payments  and  other  charges 
represent  payment  of  the  amounts  to  the  employees'  credit 
upon  resignation  or  death,  or,  if  they  become  contributors  to 
the  Public  Service  Superannuation  Account,  transfers  to  that 
account. 

Returned  soldiers'  insurance  fund 

This  account  was  established  by  the  Returned  Soldiers' 
Insurance  Act,  to  provide  life  insurance  to  veterans  of  World 
War  I.  The  account  was  credited  with  the  amount  received  as 
premiums  and  an  amount  of  $62,802  (charged  to  budgetary 
expenditure)  representing  an  actuarial  liability  adjustment  as 
at  March  31,  1981  and  debited  with  disbursements  for  death 
benefits  and  cash  surrender  values.  The  final  date  on  which 
application  for  this  insurance  could  have  been  received  was 
August  31,  1933. 

Veterans'  insurance  fund 

This  account  was  established  by  the  Veterans'  Insurance 
Act  to  provide  life  insurance  for  veterans  of  World  War  II. 
The  account  was  credited  with  the  amount  received  as  premi- 
ums and  an  amount  of  $745,298  (charged  to  budgetary  expen- 
diture) representing  an  actuarial  liability  adjustment  as  at 
March  31,  1981  and  debited  with  disbursements  for  death 
benefits  and  cash  surrender  values.  The  final  date  on  which 
application  for  this  insurance  could  have  been  received  was 
October  31,  1968. 


8-26 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  J981-82 


SUPPLEMENTARY  STATEMENTS 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  Canada 
Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund 

(Established  by  the  Canada  Pension  Plan) 
AUDITOR'S  REPORT 

THE  HONOURABLE  MONIQUE  BEGIN,  P.C,  M.P. 
MINISTER  OF  NATIONAL  HEALTH  AND  WELFARE 

I  have  examined  the  statements  of  the  Canada  Pension  Plan 
Account  and  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund  for 
the  year  ended  March  31,  1982.  My  examination  was  made  in 
accordance  with  generally  accepted  auditing  standards,  and 
accordingly  included  such  tests  and  other  procedures  as  I 
considered  necessary  in  the  circumstances. 

In  my  opinion,  these  statements  present  fairly  the  Account 
and  the  Fund  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1982  in  accord- 
ance with  the  accounting  policies  set  out  in  Note  2  to  the 
statements,  applied  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  of  the 
preceding  year. 

As  explained  in  Notes  1  and  6,  these  statements  are  not 
intended  to  show  the  adequacy  of  the  balance  in  the  Account 
to  meet,  on  an  actuarial  basis,  the  future  obligations  of  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan.  Projections  by  the  Chief  Actuary  indi- 
cate that,  if  no  change  is  made  in  the  combined  employer- 
employee  contribution  rate  of  3.6%,  the  annual  cost  of  benefits 
and  expenses  would  exceed  the  amount  of  annual  contributions 
by  1985.  If  the  increase  in  contribution  rate  were  delayed 
beyond  1992,  the  balance  of  the  Account  would  begin  to 
decline  and  by  the  year  2003,  would  be  exhausted.  Since  a 
major  financial  change  takes  place  at  each  of  these  dates  and 
as  a  change  in  the  general  level  of  benefits  or  in  the  rate  of 
contributions  requires  agreement  by  the  Provinces  and,  unless 
waived,  a  delay  to  at  least  January  1  of  the  third  year 
following  the  year  in  which  notice  of  change  was  laid  before 
Parliament,  a  decision  on  long-term  financing  arrangements 
needs  to  be  made  in  the  near  future. 

KENNETH  M.  DYE 
Auditor  General  of  Canada 

Ottawa,  Ontario 
August  17,  1982 


STATEMENT    OF    THE    CANADA    PENSION    PLAN 

ACCOUNT 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1982 

(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Receipts 
Contributions — employees,  employers 

and  self-employed  

Interest  income  (Note  4) 

Disbursements 
Benefits 

Retirement  pensions 

Survivors'  pensions 

Disability  pensions 

Orphans'  benefits 

Death  benefits  

Disabled  contributors'  child  ben- 
efits   

Expenses  (Note  5) 

Collection  of  contributions 

Administration 

Accounting  and  computer  services.. 

Accommodation 

Assignment  of  social  insurance 
numbers  and  maintenance  of 
central  index 

Actuarial  services 

Increase  in  balance 

Balance  at  beginning  of  year. 

Balance  at  end  of  year 

Represented  by: 
Canada    Pension    Plan     Investment 

Fund  

Operating  balance  on  deposit  with  the 

Receiver  General 


1982 


3,281,872 
1,850,335 


5,132,207 


1,597,155 

402,747 

280,515 

85,119 

55,273 

34,762 


2,455,571 


33,023 

30,448 

8,629 

2,091 


20,522,330 
1,024,876 


21,547,206 


Approved: 

D.  M.  LYNGSETH 
Assistant  Deputy  Minister 
Income  Security  Programs 

J.  L.  FRY 

Deputy  Minister 

Department  of  National  Health  and  Welfare 


1981 


2,689,294 
1,518,770 


4,208,064 


1,286,234 

328,030 

237,355 

78,080 

50,833 

30,392 


2,010,924 


31,694 

22,880 

8,475 

1,864 


1,789 
372 

1,556 
264 

76,352 

66,733 

2,531,923 

2,077,657 

2,600,284 
18,946,922 

2,130,407 
16,816,515 

21,547,206 

18,946,922 

18,074,576 
872,346 


18,946,922 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8*27 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  Canada 
Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund — Continued 

STATEMENT    OF    THE    CANADA    PENSION    PLAN 

INVESTMENT  FUND 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1982 

(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Balance  at 

beginning 

of  year 


Amounts 
charged- 
purchases 


Balance  at 
end  of  year 


Investment  in  securities 
(Note  3) 

Provinces 

Newfoundland 367,217 

Prince  Edward 

Island  

Nova  Scotia 

New  Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba  

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 

Canada  


52,973 


420,190 


75,165 

11,504 

86,669 

711,956 

96,251 

808,207 

532,028 

75,637 

607,665 

87,505 

6.316 

93,821 

9.795.194 

1.268.736 

11,063,930 

1.046.437 

135.001 

1,181,438 

806,768 

109,647 

916,415 

1.835,939 

295,844 

2,131,783 

2,679,986 

378,223 

3,058,209 

17,938,195 

2,430,132 

20,368,327 

136,381 

17,622 

154,003 

18,074,576 

2,447.754 

20,522,330 

Approved: 

D.  M.  LYNGSETH 

Assistant  Deputy  Minister 
Income  Security  Programs 

J.  L.  FRY 

Deputy  Minister 

Department  of  National  Health  and  Welfare 


NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
MARCH  31,  1982 


1 .  Authority  and  objectives 

The  Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  (the  Account)  was 
established  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  by  Section  110.(1) 
of  the  Canada  Pension  Plan,  a  1965  Act  of  Parliament. 
The  objective  of  the  Account  is  to  record  the  contribu- 
tions, interest  income,  benefits  and  expenses  under  the 
Plan.  Its  balance  is  not  intended  to  represent  the  future 
obligations  of  the  Plan. 

The  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund  (the  Fund) 
was  established  in  the  accounts  of  Canada  by  Section 
111.(1)  of  the  Plan.  Its  objective  is  to  record  the  invest- 
ment in  securities  of  the  Provinces  and  Canada. 

2.  Accounting  policies 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Account 

The  amounts  credited  and  charged  to  the  Account  are 
in  accordance  with  Sections  110.(2)  and  110.(3)  respec- 
tively. Contributions,  interest  income  and  benefits  are 
recorded  on  a  cash  basis.  Contributions  are  received  from 
the  Department  of  National  Revenue — Taxation  based  on 
estimates  of  collections  for  the  current  year  and  adjust- 
ments to  the  estimates  of  prior  years.  Expenses  include 
amounts  relating  to  work  performed  or  services  rendered 


prior  to  April  1.  The  balance  in  the  Account  represents 
the  accumulated  excess  of  contributions  and  interest 
income  over  benefits  and  expenses  to  date. 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund 

The  amounts  charged  and  credited  to  the  Fund  are  in 
accordance  with  Section  111.(2).  All  securities  held  are 
carried  at  cost,  are  non-negotiable  and  have  a  term  of  20 
years  or  such  lesser  period  as  may  be  determined  by  the 
Minister  of  Finance  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Chief 
Actuary  of  the  Department  of  Insurance.  The  securities 
bear  interest  based  on  the  average  market  yield  of  Canada 
bonds  having  20  years  or  more  to  maturity  as  of  the 
beginning  of  the  month  preceding  the  month  in  which  the 
securities  are  issued. 

3.  Investment  in  securities 

When  the  operating  balance  on  deposit  with  the 
Receiver  General  exceeds  the  estimated  amount  required 
to  meet  all  payments  in  the  following  three-month  period, 
the  excess  is  available  for  purchase  of  securities  of  the 
Provinces  and  Canada. 

Provinces  are  notified  monthly  of  such  excess  that  is 
available  for  the  purchase  of  their  securities.  The  amount 
available  to  each  province  is  the  proportion  that  contribu- 
tions credited  to  the  Account  during  the  preceding  ten 
years  in  respect  of  employment  in  that  province  is  of  the 
total  contributions  in  those  years.  Contributions  received 
in  respect  of  employment  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  the 
Northwest  Territories  and  from  certain  other  employees 
outside  Canada  are  invested  in  securities  of  Canada. 

The  securities  of  Quebec  relate  to  the  contributions  of 
certain  federal  employees,  such  as  members  of  the 
Canadian  Armed  Forces,  who  are  residents  in  the  Prov- 
ince of  Quebec. 


4.  Interest  income 


1982 


1981 


Interest  received  on  investment  in 
securities  held  by  the  Fund 

Provinces 

Newfoundland 

Prince  Edward  Island 

(in  thousar 

35.203 

7.277 

68,687 

50,306 

8,043 

921,261 

98,518 

76,209 

179,656 

248,978 

ds  of  dollars) 

29.212 
5,986 

Nova  Scotia 

New  Brunswick 

56,082 
42,266 

Quebec  

Ontario 

Manitoba  

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 

7,208 

776.363 

83.020 

63.922 

141.208 

211,593 

Canada  

1,694,138 
1 3,046 

1,416,860 
10,465 

Interest  on  operating  balance 

1,707.184 
143.151 

1,427,325 
91.445 

1.850.335 

1.518,770 

The  weighted  average  rate  of  interest  on  securities 
purchased  during  the  year  was  15.43%  (1981—12.70%). 

Interest  on  the  operating  balance,  credited  at  the  end  of 
each  month,  is  based  on  the  average  daily  balance  for  the 
preceding  month  at  rates  equal  to  the  average  yields  at 


8-28 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Canada  Pension  Plan  Account  and  Canada 
Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund — Concluded 

NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
MARCH  31,  mi— Concluded 

tender  on  three-month  Treasury  bills  during  the  month  in 
respect  of  which  interest  is  paid,  less  1/8  of  1  per  cent. 
During  the  year,  interest  was  credited  at  a  weighted 
average  rate  of  17.21%  (1981—13.19%). 

5.  Expenses 

Expenses  of  the  Account  represent  the  costs  of  adminis- 
tration charged  for  services  provided  by  six  federal  gov- 
ernment departments:  National  Revenue — Taxation  (col- 
lection of  contributions);  National  Health  and  Welfare 
(administration);  Supply  and  Services  (accounting  and 
computer  services);  Public  Works  (accommodation); 
Employment  and  Immigration  (assignment  of  social  in- 
surance numbers  and  maintenance  of  central  index)  and 
Insurance  (actuarial  services). 

6.  The  Canada  Pension  Plan 

The  Canada  Pension  Plan  is  a  compulsory  and  con- 
tributory social  insurance  plan  which  enables  members  of 
the  labour  force  to  acquire  and  retain  protection  for 
themselves  and  their  families  against  loss  of  income  due  to 
retirement,  disability  or  death.  The  Plan  applies  in  all 
parts  of  Canada,  except  for  the  Province  of  Quebec  which 
has  a  parallel  plan. 

Under  existing  arrangements,  all  benefits  and  all  costs 
incurred  in  the  administration  of  the  Plan  are  financed  by 
the  contributions  made  by  employees,  employers  and  self- 
employed  persons  and  the  interest  earned  from  the  invest- 
ment of  funds. 

The  Plan  is  not  designed  to  be  fully  funded  on  a  private 
sector  pension  plan  basis.  However,  if  the  Plan  had  been 
designed  to  be  fully  funded,  the  Chief  Actuary  has 
estimated,  based  generally  on  the  same  assumptions  made 
in  his  December  31,  1977  report,  that  an  amount  of 
$134.4  billion  would  be  required  at  December  31,  1981  to 
pay  future  benefits  of  all  contributors  and  pensioners  in 
the  Plan  at  that  time. 

When  the  Plan  was  introduced,  the  combined  employ- 
er-employee contribution  rate  was  set  at  3.6%  of  the 
contributory  earnings  with  the  understanding  that  this 
would  be  sufficient  to  meet  the  cost  of  benefits  and 
administration  for  a  certain  period  of  time  but  not  indefi- 
nitely. In  the  initial  years,  a  fund  would  be  built  up  from 
which  resources  would  be  used  to  purchase  securities  of 
the  provinces  and,  to  a  much  lesser  extent,  securities  of 
Canada  as  described  in  Note  3.  However,  since  inception 
of  the  Plan,  it  has  been  recognized  that  the  3.6%  contribu- 
tion rate  would  need  to  be  raised  at  some  point  in  the 
future. 

Under  the  Plan,  the  Chief  Actuary  of  the  Department 
of  Insurance  is  required  to  prepare  an  actuarial  report  on 
its  operation  and  the  state  of  the  Account  at  least  once 
every  five  years  and  to  update  the  latest  report  whenever 
legislation  affecting  the  Plan  is  introduced  in  the  House  of 
Commons.  The  most  recent  report,  tabled  in  the  House  of 
Commons  on  December  18,  1978,  indicated  that  if  no 
changes  were  made  to  the  combined  employer-employee 
contribution  rate  of  3.6%,  the  annual  cost  of  benefits  and 


expenses  would  exceed  the  amount  of  annual  contribu- 
tions by  the  year  1985. 

After  1985,  a  gradually  increasing  proportion  of  the 
interest  income  would  be  needed  to  finance  benefits  and 
expenses,  and  no  further  funds,  apart  from  the  reinvest- 
ment of  a  portion  of  interest  owed  to  the  Account,  would 
be  available  to  the  provinces  as  loans.  The  Account  would 
continue  to  grow  until  1992  when  all  of  the  interest  would 
be  needed  to  meet  payments.  If  the  increase  in  the 
contribution  rate  were  delayed  beyond  1992,  the  balance 
of  the  Account  would  start  to  decline  and  by  the  year 
2003,  it  would  be  exhausted.  The  contribution  rate  would 
then  be  required  to  be  adjusted  upwards,  eventually 
reaching  8  to  9%  by  the  year  2025. 

While  the  Plan  is  administered  by  the  Government  of 
Canada,  the  Government  does  not  have  exclusive  author- 
ity to  effect  changes  to  the  Plan.  Under  existing  legisla- 
tion, any  proposed  enactment  to  alter  the  general  level  of 
benefits  or  the  rate  of  contributions  requires  agreement  by 
at  least  two-thirds  of  the  ten  provinces  having  an  aggre- 
gate of  not  less  than  two-thirds  of  the  population,  and  a 
delay,  before  coming  into  force,  to  at  least  January  1  of 
the  third  year  following  the  year  in  which  notice  of 
intention  to  make  the  change  was  laid  before  Parliament. 
However,  this  latter  requirement  has  been  waived  on  two 
occasions  when  changes  to  the  Plan  have  been  enacted. 

A  long-term  financing  philosophy  for  the  Plan  which 
will  include  the  timing  and  rate  of  increase  of  the  contri- 
bution rate  is  being  considered  by  the  Provinces  and  the 
Federal  Government. 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8*29 


Unemployment  Insurance  Account 

(Established  under  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  1971) 
AUDITOR'S  REPORT 

THE  HONOURABLE  LLOYD  AXWORTHY,  P.C.,  M.P. 
MINISTER  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  IMMIGRATION 

I  have  examined  the  balance  sheet  of  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Account  as  at  December  31,  1981  and  the  statement 
of  revenues  and  expenses  for  the  year  then  ended.  My  exami- 
nation was  made  in  accordance  with  generally  accepted  audit- 
ing standards,  and  accordingly  included  such  tests  and  other 
procedures  as  I  considered  necessary  in  the  circumstances. 

In  my  opinion,  these  financial  statements  present  fairly  the 
financial  position  of  the  Account  as  at  December  31,  1981  and 
the  results  of  its  operations  for  the  year  then  ended  in  accord- 
ance with  the  accounting  policies  set  out  in  Note  2  to  the 
financial  statements,  applied  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  of 
the  preceding  year. 

As  explained  in  Note  5  to  the  financial  statements,  my 
Office  conducted  a  study,  comparable  to  that  carried  out  in 
1978,  of  benefit  payments.  The  results  of  the  current  study 
established  that  overpayments  and  underpayments  of  benefits 
not  previously  identified  by  the  Commission  still  exist  but  to  a 
lesser  extent  than  in  1978. 

KENNETH  M.  DYE 
Auditor  General  of  Canada 

Ottawa,  Ontario 
September  22,  1982 


f,-..«. 


BALANCE  SHEET  AS  AT  DECEMBER  31,  1981 
(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


ASSETS 


1981 


1980 


Deposit  with   the   Receiver  General   for 

Canada 449,061                   191,478 

Due  from  claimants  (Note  3) 57,311                    51,420 

Due  from  Canada  (Note  4) 50,304 


556,676 


242,898 


LIABILITIES 


Unredeemed  warrants 

Source  deductions  payable 

Due  to  Canada  (Note  4) 

SURPLUS  (DEFICIT) 

Balance  at  beginning  of  the  year 

Excess     of     revenues     over     expenses 
(expenses  over  revenues)  for  the  year  .... 

Balance  at  end  of  the  year 

556,676 


1981 

1980 

191,898 
33,506 

199,195 
26,922 
22.632 

225,404 

248.749 

(5.851) 
337,123 

649,689 

(655,540) 

331,272 

(5,851) 

242,898 


Approved  by  the  Commission: 


PAULGAUVIN 
Executive  Director 
Finance  and  Administration 


GAETAN  LUSSIER 

Chairman 


8'30 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Unemployment  Insurance  Account— Continued 

STATEMENT  OF  REVENUES  AND  EXPENSES 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  DECEMBER  3 1 ,  1 98 1 
(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


1981 


1980 


26,447 
4,092 

12,009 
3,706 

4,746.956 

3,140,573 

4,757,390 

639,449 

4,483 

4,331,996 

489,506 

4,960 

5,401,322 

4,826,462 

654,366 
991,489 

1,685,889 
1 ,030,349 

Revenues 
Premiums      from      employers      and 

employees 4,716,417  3,124,858 

Interest    on    the    deposit    with    the 

Receiver  General  for  Canada 

Penalties 

Expenses 

Benefits  (Note  5  and  Schedule) 

Administration 

Bad  debts  (Note  3)  

Excess  of  expenses  over  revenues  before 

Government's  share  of  benefits 

Government's  share  of  benefits  (Note  6 

and  Schedule) 

Excess     of    revenues     over     expenses 
(expenses  over  revenues)  for  the  year  337, 1 23  (655,540) 


NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
DECEMBERS!  1981 

1 .  Authority  and  objective 

The  Canada  Employment  and  Immigration  Commis- 
sion, a  departmental  Crown  corporation  under  the  Finan- 
cial Administration  Act,  administers  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Act,  1971  as  amended.  The  objective  of  the  Act 
is  to  provide  short-term  financial  relief  and  other  assist- 
ance to  eligible  workers.  The  financial  operations  relating 
to  this  objective  are  reported  through  the  Account. 

In  the  accounts  of  Canada,  an  account  (Unemployment 
Insurance  Account)  was  established  by  Section  1 3 1  of  the 
Act.  All  amounts  received  under  the  Act  are  deposited  in 
the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  and  credited  to  this 
account.  Benefits  and  administration  expenses  are  paid 
out  of  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  and  charged  to 
this  account. 

2.  Accounting  policies 

(a)  Premiums  from  employers  and  employees 

Under  Part  IV  of  the  Act,  the  Minister  of  National 
Revenue  is  responsible  for  collecting  premiums  from 
employers  and  employees.  These  premiums  are 
recorded  based  on  the  estimate  for  the  current  year 
and  include  adjustments  between  actual  and  estimat- 
ed premiums  of  prior  years. 

(b)  Interest 

Interest  earned  on  the  deposit  with  the  Receiver 
General  for  Canada  is  reduced  by  the  interest 
charged  on  any  advances  made  by  the  Government  of 
Canada  to  the  Account,  and  is  recorded  on  an  accru- 
al basis. 

(c)  Penalties 

Penalties,  levied  pursuant  to  Section  47  of  the  Act, 
are  recorded  on  an  accrual  basis. 


(d)  Benefits 

Benefits  represent  warrants  issued  during  the  year 
less  benefit  overpayments  identified  by  the  Commis- 
sion during  the  year  and  benefit  repayments  under 
Section  142  of  the  Act. 

(e)  Administration  expenses 

The  costs  of  administration  of  the  Act  are  deter- 
mined by  Regulation  and  are  charged  to  the  Account 
by  the  Commission. 

(0  Government's  share  of  benefits 

The  Government's  share  of  benefits  is  recorded  on  an 
accrual  basis. 


3.  Due  from  claimants 


Benefit  overpayments  and  penal- 
ties receivable 

Less:  allowance  for  doubtful 
accounts 

Benefit  repayments  under  Section 

142  of  the  Act  


1981 


1980 


(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


54,329 
31,968 


51,789 
30,769 


22,361 
34,950 


21,020 
30,400 


57,311 


51,420 


Bad  debts  expense  includes  $3.3  million  (1980  -  $2.7 
million)  of  uncollectable  overpayments  and  penalties  writ- 
ten off  under  authority  of  Section  60(2)  of  the  Unemploy- 
ment Insurance  Regulations. 


4.  Due  from  (to)  Canada 


Government's  share  of  benefits  .... 
Premiums    from    employers    and 

employees 

Interest  on  the  deposit  with  the 

Receiver  General  for  Canada .... 

Administration  expenses 

Other 


1981 


1980 


(in  thousands  of  dollars) 
58,909  (27,165) 

14,417  7,857 


6,064 

2,811 

(28,575) 

(6,919) 

(511) 

784 

50,304 


(22,632) 


Overpayments  and  underpayments  of  benefits 

The  Commission  is  responsible  for  exercising  the  con- 
trol necessary  to  ensure  the  initial  and  continuing  eligibili- 
ty of  approximately  2.4  million  individual  claimants  to 
whom  benefits  were  paid  in  1981,  while  providing  prompt 
and  efficient  service  to  those  who  are  entitled  to  receive 
benefits  under  the  Act. 

Because  of  the  large  number  of  claimants  to  be  moni- 
tored and  the  requirement  for  prompt  service,  internal 
control  procedures  are  selective  rather  than  universal  in 
application  and  the  Commission  relies  mainly  on  the 
verification  of  claims  after  claimants  have  begun  to 
receive  benefits.  Therefore,  it  is  possible  that  overpay- 
ments and  underpayments  of  benefits  could  be  made. 

Since  1979,  the  Commission  has  implemented  and 
expanded  the  application  of  new  systems  and  other  proce- 
dures to  improve  its  internal  control  and  decision-making 
process  in  respect  of  benefit  payments.  In  1981,  to  evalu- 
ate these  changes,  the  Office  of  the  Auditor  General 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 


8-31 


Unemployment  Insurance  Account — Concluded 

NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER  31,  19SI— Concluded 

conducted  a  study  using  statistical  sampling,  comparable 
to  that  carried  out  in  1978,  of  benefits  paid  during  the 
year. 

The  results  of  the  current  study  established  that  over- 
payments and  underpayments  of  benefits  not  previously 
identified  by  the  Commission  still  exist  but  to  a  lesser 
extent  than  in  1978.  Also  the  study  indicated  that  over- 
payments are  estimated  at  $178  million  ($290  million  in 
1978)  and  underpayments  are  estimated  at  $57  million 
($67  million  in  1978).  Furthermore,  the  Commission  did 
not  adhere,  in  a  significant  number  of  instances,  to  all  its 
administrative  procedures  in  processing  continuing  benefit 
payments  and  part  of  the  amounts  so  paid  could  represent 
further  overpayments  and  underpayments. 

6.  Government's  share  of  benefits 

In  1981,  following  changes  made  in  1980,  the  Govern- 
ment's share  of  benefits  for  initial,  extended  duration  of 
employment  and  extended  national  unemployment  rate 
represents  final  adjustments  relating  to  1980  only. 

The  benefits  for  the  extended  regional  unemployment 
rate  and  the  fishing  benefits  are  the  sole  responsibility  of 
the  Government. 

The  Government's  share  of  fishing  benefits  represents 
the  benefits  paid  minus  the  fishing  premiums  which  are 
collected  for  the  Government  of  Canada. 


SCHEDULE  OF  BENEFITS 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  DECEMBER  31,  1981 

(in  thousands  of  dollars) 


Initial 

Extended  duration  of  employment  and  national  unemployment  rate . 

Extended  regional  unemployment  rate 

Maternity  

Sickness 

Special  severance 

Fishing 


1981 


1980 


Government's 

Government's 

Total 

Share  of 

Total 

Share  of 

Benefits 

Benefits 

Benefits 

Benefits 

2.996,209 

1,079 

2.777,847 

152,447 

313,888 

44 

283,097 

13,535 

907,871 

907,871 

791,829 

791,769 

268,578 

232,602 

162,409 

153.313 

16,127 

13.846 

4,665,082 

908,994 

4,252,534 

957,751 

92,308 

82,495 

79.462 

72,598 

4,757,390 


991,489 


4,331,996 


1,030,349 


8*32 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Government  Annuities  Account 

(Established  by  the  Government  Annuities  Act) 
AUDITOR'S  REPORT 


THE  HONOURABLE  LLOYD  AXWORTHY,  P.C,  M.P. 
MINISTER  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  IMMIGRATION 

I  have  examined  the  balance  sheet  of  the  Government 
Annuities  Account  as  at  March  31,  1981  and  the  statements  of 
revenue  and  expenditure,  and  unpaid  annuities  for  the  year 
then  ended.  My  examination  was  made  in  accordance  with 
generally  accepted  auditing  standards,  and  accordingly  in- 
cluded such  tests  and  other  procedures  as  I  considered  neces- 
sary in  the  circumstances. 

In  my  opinion,  these  financial  statements  present  fairly  the 
financial  position  of  the  Government  Annuities  Account  as  at 
March  31,  1981  and  the  results  of  its  operations  for  the  year 
then  ended  in  accordance  with  the  accounting  policy  set  out  in 
Note  2  to  the  financial  statements  and  generally  accepted 
accounting  principles  applied  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  of 
the  preceding  year. 


Ottawa,  Ontario 
August  20,  1981 


KENNETH  M.  DYE 
Auditor  General  of  Canada 


BALANCE  SHEET  AS  AT  MARCH  31,  1981 


ASSETS  1981 1980 

$  $ 

Deposit  with  the  Receiver  General  for 

Canada 1,1 12,208,226  1,125,604,424 

Accrued  interest  due  from  Canada 80,968,654  82,117,868 

Accounts  receivable 33,336  453,916 

1,193,210,216         1,208,176,208 
The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  the  financial  statements. 


LIABILITIES 


1981 


1980 


Accounts  payable 51,942  373,372 

Actuarial  surplus  due  to  Canada 2,781,091  1,583.229 

Unpaid  annuities 1,190,377,183         1,206,219,607 


1,193,210,216         1,208,176,208 


Approved: 

PAUL  GAUVIN 

Acting  Executive  Director 

Finance  and  Administration 

Canada  Employment  and  Immigration  Commission 


Approved: 


J.  D.  LOVE 

Chairman 

Canada  Employment  and  Immigration  Commission 


SPECIFIED  PURPOSE  ACCOUNTS 

Government  Annuities  Account — Concluded 

STATEMENT  OF  REVENUE  AND  EXPENDITURE 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1981 

1981 1980 

$  $ 

Revenue 

Interest 81,031,163  82,117,868 

Premiums 1,823,650  2,373,537 

Other 19,902 64,375 

82.874,715  84,555,780 

Expenditure 

Annuities  paid  93,600,090  92,036,478 

Refunds  of  premiums 3,781,865  4,836,863 

Unclaimed  annuities  (Note  3)  137,322  336,088 

97,519,277  97,209,429 

Excess  of  expenditure  over  revenue 
before  actuarial  surplus 14,644,562  12,653,649 

Actuarial  surplus — Excess  of  the  re- 
corded unpaid  annuities  over  the  cal- 
culated unpaid  annuities  at  year-end  .  1,197,862  1,583,229 

Excess  of  expenditure  over  revenue  for 

the  year 15,842,424  14,236,878 

The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  the  financial  statements. 

STATEMENT  OF  UNPAID  ANNUITIES 
FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1981 


1981 


1980 


Balance  at  beginning  of  the  year  1,206,219,607  1,220,456,485 

Excess  of  expenditure  over  revenue  for 

the  year 15,842,424  14,236,878 

Balance  at  end  of  the  year 1,190,377,183  1,206,219,607 


Balance  at  end  of  the  year  comprises: 
Annuitants'   premiums   and   accrued 

interest  for  unmatured  annuities    . 
Present  value  of  matured  annuities  .... 


523,259,225 
667,117,958 


547,102,668 
659,116,939 


1,190,377,183  1,206,219,607 


The  accompanying  notes  are  an  integral  part  of  the  financial  statements. 


8'33 


NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
MARCH  31,  1981 

1 .  Authorization  and  purpose 

The  Government  Annuities  Account  was  established  in 
1908  by  the  Government  Annuities  Act  c.  G6,  R.S.  and 
modified  by  the  Government  Annuities  Improvement  Act 
1974-75-76,  c.  83. 

The  purpose  of  the  Account  was  to  assist  individuals 
and  groups  of  Canadians  to  provide  for  their  later  years 
by  the  purchase  of  Government  annuities.  The  purpose  of 
the  Improvement  Act,  assented  to  on  December  20,  1975, 
was  to  increase  the  rate  of  return  on  Government  Annuity 
contracts,  to  increase  their  flexibility  and  to  discontinue 
future  sales  thereof. 

The  Account  is  administered  by  the  Canada  Employ- 
ment and  Immigration  Commission  and  operates  through 
the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund. 

2.  Significant  accounting  policies 

(a)  Calculation  of  unpaid  annuities 

In  accordance  with  section  15  of  the  Government 
Annuities  Improvement  Act  and  Regulations,  unpaid 
annuities  represent  accumulated  premiums  and 
accrued  interest  for  unmatured  annuities  and  the 
present  value  of  matured  annuities  actuarially  deter- 
mined on  the  basis  of  such  rate  or  rates  of  interest 
and  mortality  tables  as  are  prescribed. 

(b)  Actuarial  surplus 

If  at  the  end  of  any  fiscal  year  the  calculation  of 
unpaid  annuities  exceeds  or  is  less  than  the  recorded 
unpaid  annuities,  the  difference  results  in  an  actuari- 
al deficit  or  surplus  which  is  credited  or  charged  to 
the  Government  Annuities  Account  within  the  Con- 
solidated Revenue  Fund. 

(c)  Basis  of  accounting 

The  accounts  of  the  Government  Annuities  Account 
are  maintained  on  an  accrual  basis. 

(d)  Revenue — Interest 

Interest  is  calculated  annually  on  unpaid  annuities,  at 
a  rate  of  seven  per  cent,  as  required  by  the  Govern- 
ment Annuities  Improvement  Act. 

3.  Unclaimed  annuities 

The  unclaimed  annuities  represent  amounts  transferred 
to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  for  annuities  which 
cannot  be  paid  because  annuitants  cannot  be  located. 

4.  Services  provided  without  charge 

Administrative  expenditures  of  the  Government  Annui- 
ties Account  are  provided  by  the  Canada  Employment 
and  Immigration  Commission. 

For  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1981,  these  expen- 
ditures totalled  $3,499,000  ($3,223,000  for  1980).  In- 
cluded therein  are  amounts  for  services  provided  without 
charge  by  other  government  departments  to  the 
Commission. 


8'34 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  (Dependants) 
Pension  Fund 

(Established  by  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Pension 
Continuation  Act) 

AUDITOR'S  REPORT 

THE  HONOURABLE  ROBERT  KAPLAN,  P.C.,  M.P. 
SOLICITOR  GENERAL 

I  have  examined  the  statement  of  receipts  and  disburse- 
ments and  fund  balance  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted 
Police  (Dependants)  Pension  Fund  for  the  year  ended  March 
31,  1982.  My  examination  was  made  in  accordance  with 
generally  accepted  auditing  standards,  and  accordingly  in- 
cluded such  tests  and  other  procedures  as  I  considered  neces- 
sary in  the  circumstances. 

In  my  opinion,  this  financial  statement  presents  fairly  the 
receipts  and  disbursements  of  the  Fund  and  its  balance  for  the 
year  ended  March  31,  1982  in  accordance  with  the  accounting 
policy  set  out  in  Note  2  to  the  financial  statement,  applied  on  a 
basis  consistent  with  that  of  the  preceding  year. 

KENNETH  M.  DYE 
Auditor  General  of  Canada 

Ottawa,  Ontario 
July  14,  1982 


STATEMENT  OF  RECEIPTS  AND  DISBURSEMENTS 

AND  FUND  BALANCE 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1982 


1982 

1981 

$ 

S 

Receipts 

Contributions  by  members 

Interest  

34,854 
989,636 

35,489 
869,952 

1,024,490 

905,441 

Disbursements 
Withdrawal  of  contributions 

25,296 
449,920 

29,452 

Pensions  to  dependants    

356,565 

475,216 

386,017 

Excess  of  receipts  over  disbursements  .... 
Fund  balance  at  beginning  of  the  year... 

549,274 
10,715,255 

519,424 
10,195,831 

Fund  balance  at  end  of  the  year: 
On  deposit  with  the  Receiver  General 
for  Canada                            .... 

11,264,529 

10,715,255 

NOTES  TO  FINANCIAL  STATEMENT 
MARCH  31,  1982 

1 .  Authority  and  operations 

The  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  (Dependants) 
Pension  Fund  was  established  in  1934  in  the  Consolidated 
Revenue  Fund  and  is  administered  under  section  55  of 
Part  IV  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  Pension 
Continuation  Act.  The  Act  provides  for  members  of  the 
Force,  other  than  commissioned  officers,  appointed  before 
March  1,  1949,  to  purchase  certain  survivorship  benefits 
for  their  dependants  by  payment  of  specified  contribu- 
tions. The  Fund  is  to  be  credited  with  these  contributions 
together  with  interest  computed  quarterly  on  the  balance 
to  the  credit  of  the  Fund  at  the  end  of  the  preceding 
quarter,  and  charged  with  contributions  withdrawn  and 
pension  benefits  paid. 

Section  56  of  the  Act  directs  the  Minister  of  Finance  to 
have  an  actuarial  examination  of  the  Fund  made  at  least 
once  every  5  years.  If  the  actuarial  valuation  discloses  a 
surplus,  the  Governor  in  Council  may,  by  order,  increase 
the  benefit  payments.  If  there  is  an  actuarial  deficiency, 
the  Governor  in  Council  may  direct  that  there  be  credited 
to  the  Fund  out  of  any  unappropriated  moneys  in  the 
Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  such  amount  as  may  be 
required  to  re-establish  solvency  of  the  Fund. 

2.  Accounting  policy 

All  transactions  of  the  Fund  are  accounted  for  on  a 
cash  basis. 

3.  Supplementary  information 

The  most  recent  actuarial  examination  was  made  as  at 
March  31,  1980.  The  valuation  disclosed  an  actuarial 
surplus  of  $1,730,000  of  which  $1,048,000  was  allocated 
to  the  payment  of  increased  pension  benefits,  retroactive 
to  January  1,  1980. 


Approved: 

R.  D'AOUST 

Departmental  Services  Officer 


R.  H.  SIMMONDS 
Commissioner 


SECTION 


9 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Other  Liabilities 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Interest  and  matured  debt  9.2 

Accounts  payable 9.3 

Outstanding  cheques,  warrants  and  postal  money  orders 9.3 

Miscellaneous 9,4 


9-2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


OTHER  LIABILITIES 

This  section  presents  gross  transactions  and  year-end  bal- 
ances for  those  accounts  reported  on  the  Statement  of  Assets 
and  Liabilities  under  "Other  Liabilities".  The  establishment 
and  operation  of  these  accounts  is  authorized  by  Parliament  in 
annual  appropriation  acts  and  other  legislation. 

Some  tables  in  this  section  present  the  continuity  for  each 
account  by  showing  the  opening  and  closing  balances,  as  well 


as  receipts  and  other  credits  and  payments  and  other  charges, 
i.e.  inflow  and  outflow  of  transactions.  In  addition,  the  term 
"accounts  without  current  transactions"  has  been  included  in 
some  tables  in  order  to  provide  a  link  with  figures  published  in 
the  previous  year's  edition  of  the  Public  Accounts  to  show  net 
transactions  in  accounts  which  were  closed  out  in  the  previous 
year. 

Table  9.1  presents  the  year-end  balances  for  other  liabilities. 


TABLE  9.1 

OTHER  LIABILITIES 


April  1/1981 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


Interest  and  matured  debt.  Table  9.2 

Less:  unamortized  discount  on  Treasury  bills  

Accounts  payable 

Outstanding  cheques,  warrants  and  postal  money  orders,  Table  9.3 . 

Miscellaneous,  Table  9.4 

Account  without  current  transactions 

Total 


4,872,992,669 
710,873,625 
4.162.119.044 
2,264,048,425 
2,292,980,162 
98,869,176 


8,818,016,807 


6,721,287,092 
626,272,803 
6.095.014.289 
2,441,913,803 
2,322,091,912 
111,722,684 


1,848,294,423 

-  84,600,822 

1.932.895,245 

177,865,378 

29,111,750 

12,853,508 


10,970,742,688 


2,152,725,881 


399,843,400 
213,376,391 
186.467.009 
772,458,408 
8,495,849 
18,010,177 
-  18,061,607 


967,369,836 


Interest  and  Matured  Debt 

Interest  and  matured  debt  includes  interest  due,  interest 
accrued,  provision  for  compound  and  bonus  interest  on  Canada 
savings  bonds  and  matured  debt  payable  in  Canadian  dollars. 


Table  9.2  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions in  this  account. 


TABLE  9.2 

INTEREST  AND  MATURED  DEBT 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( -  ) 


1982 


1981 


Interest  due 2,220,619,880 

Interest  accrued 2,164,017,337 

Provision  for  compound  and  bonus  interest  on 
Canada  savings  bonds — 

Compound  interest — 

Series  23 37,723,000 

Series  25 100,013,000 

Series  27 15,480,000 

Series  28 6,513,000 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

159.729.000 

Bonus  interest — 

Series  23 15,651,000 

Series  25 36,91 1,000 

Series  27 24,788,000 

Series  28 12,567,000 

Series  29 41,315,000 

Series  30 19,135,000 

Series  31 9,324,000 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

159.691.000 
319.420.000 

Matured  debt  payable  in  Canadian  dollars 168,935,452 

Total 4,872,992,669 


12,849,036,404 
7,084,882,992 


14,325,000 
18,937,000 
17,893,000 
8,723,000 

59.878.000 

28,641,000 
35,389,000 
56,601,000 
30,818,000 
176,055,000 
93,957,000 
46.957,000 

468.418.000 
528.296.000 


12,817,151,294 
5,579,269,162 


118,950,000 


118.950.000 


72,300,000 


72.300.000 
191.250.000 


124,026,120,523   124,052,371,040 


2,252,504,990 
3,669,631,167 


52,048,000 

33,373,000 
15,236,000 

100.657.000 


44,292,000 

81,389,000 

43,385,000 

217,370,000 

113,092,000 

56,281,000 

555.809.000 
656.466,000 

142,684,935 


31,885,110 
1,505,613,830 


14;325,000 

-100,013,000 

17,893,000 

8,723,000 

-  59.072.000 

28,641,000 
-36,911,000 
56,601,000 
30,818,000 
176,055,000 
93,957,000 
46,957,000 

396.118,000 
337,046.000 

-26,250,517 


-31,287,217 
303,085,881 


8,422,000 

23,573,000 

11,660,000 

4,833,000 

-72,014,000 

-  23.526.000 

11,651,000 
26,411,000 
18,978,000 

9,437,000 
26,165,000 
11,845,000 

5,964,000 

-  14,770,000 
95.681,000 
72,155,000 

55,889,736 


144,488,335,919   142,640,041,496 


6,721,287,092 


1,848,294,423 


399,843,400 


OTHER  LIABILITIES 


9-3 


Interest  due 

Interest  due  is  the  amount  of  interest  on  the  bonded  debt, 
which  is  payable  by  coupon  but  for  which  the  coupons  have  not 
been  presented  for  payment. 

Interest  accrued 

Interest  accrued  is  the  amount  of  interest  accumulated  as  at 
March  31  on  the  bonded  debt  and  certain  liabilities,  that  is  not 
due  and  payable  until  some  future  date. 

Provision  for  compound  and  bonus  interest  on  Canada  savings 
bonds 

This  account  records  the  amount  estimated  and  set  aside 
each  year  to  meet  future  obligations  for  additional  interest 
payments  in  accordance  with  the  term  of  the  issues,  to  holders 
of  certain  Canada  savings  bonds  with  special  interest  features. 

Matured  debt  payable  in  Canadian  dollars 

This  account  records  the  financial  obligations  represented 
by  certificates  of  indebtedness  issued  by  the  Government  of 
Canada  that  have  become  due  but  that  have  not  as  yet  been 
presented  for  redemption.  Unclaimed  matured  bonds  are 
transferred  to  non-tax  revenue  only  when  they  remain 
unredeemed  15  years  after  the  date  of  call  or  maturity, 
whichever  is  earlier;  the  minimum  time  before  such  a  transfer 
is  made  is  5  years  from  the  date  of  maturity. 


Unamortized  Discount  on  Treasury  Bills 

This  account  records  the  portion  of  the  discount  on  out- 
standing Treasury  bills  which  has  not  yet  been  charged  to 
expenditure.  The  discount  is  amortized  as  an  expenditure  over 
the  term  of  issue. 


Accounts  Payable 

This  account  represents  amounts  owing  at  the  year  end 
pursuant  to  a  contractual  arrangement,  or  for  work  performed, 
goods  received,  or  services  rendered,  relating  to  appropriations 
on  which  Parliament  has  imposed  an  annual  ceiling. 


Outstanding  Cheques,  Warrants  and  Postal 
Money  Orders 

This  account  records  the  cheques,  warrants  and  postal 
money  orders  issued  but  not  yet  presented  for  payment. 


Table  9.3  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions in  this  account. 


TABLE  9.3 

OUTSTANDING  CHEQUES,  WARRANTS  AND  POSTAL  MONEY  ORDERS 


Outstanding  cheques 

Warrants  for  hog  and  lamb  premiums 

Post  Office- 
Money  orders 

Outstanding  salary  warrants 

Imprest  account  cheques  

Unemployment  Insurance  warrants  .... 

Total 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


April  1/1981 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

$ 

S 

$ 

2,084,301,927 
3,172 

2,131,749,127 
3,148 

47,447,200 
-24 

-  7,945.747 
24 

61,356,024 

1,185,273 

62.541.297 

427,891 

145,705,875 

437,251 
189,902,386 

-61,356,024 
-  1,185,273 

-  62,541.297 

9,360 

44,196,511 

1,369,453 

104,338 

1,473,791 

32,927 

14,934,854 

2,292,980,162 

2,322,091,912 

29,111,750 

8,495,849 

Outstanding  cheques 

Cheques  issued  in  Canadian  dollars  and  unpaid  as  at  March 
3 1 ,  are  recorded  in  this  account.  Cheques  remaining  outstand- 
ing for  10  years  are  transferred  to  non-tax  revenue. 

Cheques  in  foreign  currencies  are  credited  at  the  time  of 
issue  to  appropriate  "cash  in  Receiver  General  current  deposits 
accounts". 


Warrants  for  hog  and  lamb  premiums 

The    balance    in    this    account    represents    outstanding 
unredeemed  warrants. 

During  the  year,  the  account  was  charged  with  warrants 
redeemed. 


Post  Office  money  orders 

This  account  represents  the  liability  for  money  orders  out- 
standing at  year  end. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  Since  the  Canada  Post  Corpo- 
ration uses  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  for  banking  pur- 
poses, the  outstanding  money  orders  of  the  Corporation  as  at 
March  31,  1982,  in  the  amount  of  $57.8  million,  are  included 
as  part  of  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit  and 
trust  account  in  Section  8  of  this  volume). 


9*4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Post  Office  outstanding  salary  warrants 

This  account  represents  the  liability  for  salary  warrants 
issued  to  employees  at  revenue  and  semi-staff  post  offices,  who 
are  paid  out  of  postal  revenue. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  Section  8  of  this  volume). 

Imprest  account  cheques 

Imprest  account  cheques  issued  prior  to  the  current  year  and 
unpaid  as  at  March  3 1 ,  in  the  current  year,  with  the  exception 
of  those  outstanding  for  10  years  or  more  (which^have  been 


transferred  to  non-tax  revenue),  are  recorded  in  this  account. 
In  the  year,  an  amount  of  $46,320  was  transferred  to  revenue. 


Unemployment  Insurance  warrants 

This  account  records  outstanding  Unemployment  Insurance 
warrants. 


Other  Liabilities — Miscellaneous 

Table  9.4  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  miscellaneous  other  liabilities. 


TABLE  9.4 

OTHER  LIABILITIES— MISCELLANEOUS 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


Post  Office  unfilled  philatelic  cash  sales 

Eldorado    Mining    and    Refining    Limited — 

Unpresented  capital  stock 

Miscellaneous  departmental  paylist  deductions  .. 

Olympic  account  

Contractors'  and  other  holdbacks — 

Agriculture 

Communications  

Public  Archives 

Employment  and  Immigration 

Energy,  Mines  and  Resources  

Atomic  Energy  Control  Board 

National  Energy  Board 

Environment 

Parks  Canada 

External  Affairs 

Canadian       International       Development 

Agency 

Fisheries  and  Oceans 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development 

Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce 

Justice 

National  Defence 

National  Health  and  Welfare 

Post  Office 

Public  Works 

Regional  Economic  Expansion 

Science  and  Technology — 

National  Research  Council 

Solicitor  General — 

Administration  Program 

Correctional  Services 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

Supply  and  Services 

Transport 

Canadian  Transport  Commission 

Veterans  Affairs 

Suspense  accounts 

Total 


Receipts  and 

Payments  and 

April  1/1981 

other  credits 

other  charges 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

146,566 

146,566 

-  146,566 

26,644 

23,763 

23,763 

-135 

33,966,403 

31,197,389 

33,966,403 

31,197,389 

-2,769,014 

23,061,295 

1,992,677 

1,012,855 

18,405 

2,987,127 

994,450 

-2,921,206 

669,829 

674,348 

800,837 

543,340 

-  126,489 

-  66,460 

652,383 

815,841 

715,808 

752,416 

100,033 

-  308,622 

1,920 

1,920 

-  1,920 

-12,460 

48,357 

26,768 

14,672 

60,453 

12,096 

22,773 

1,326,650 

1,708,188 

1,844,320 

1,190,518 

-136,132 

32,665 

58,064 

60,679 

64,479 

54,264 

-  3,800 

-41,371 

6,100 

6,100 

6,100 

1,378,020 

395,418 

321,747 

1,451,691 

73,671 

25,724 

833,234 

537,837 

102,579 

1,268,492 

435,258 

169,524 

577,983 

119,957 

516,384 

181,556 

-  396,427 

342,662 

5,080,159 

10,452,616 

9,754,947 

5,777,828 

697,669 

-4,315,220 

761,136 

1,648,539 

1,293,526 

1,116,149 

355,013 

29,327 

1,916,418 

1,439,056 

881,614 

2,473,860 

557,442 

-  795,996 

521,097 

128,345 

243,145 

406,297 

-114,800 

-302,587 

53,350 

10.726 

42,624 

42,624 

4,506,451 

18,599,651 

7,018,181 

16,087,921 

11,581,470 

1,481,782 

8,858 

180,097 

188,955 

180,097 

8,858 

30,445 

30,445 

-  30,445 

-  195,702 

12,720,996 

17,170,375 

18,073,016 

11,818,355 

-902,641 

-  1,335,924 

242,669 

423,968 

206,191 

460,446 

217,777 

51,741 

2,181,157 

2,510,445 

2,051,257 

2,640,345 

459,188 

448,881 

93,796 

269,037 

160,218 

202,615 

108,819 

-  134,428 

58,323 

88,717 

62,363 

84,677 

26,354 

-  142,904 

10,410 

263,471 

5,653 

268,228 

257,818 

10,410 

1,286,284 

358,257 

233,148 

1,411,393 

125,109 

-161,228 

12,918,336 

13,640,864 

11,097,586 

15,461,614 

2,543,278 

4,311,009 

12,036 

70,104 

59,450 

22,690 

10,654 

9,653 

1,467 

1,467 

-  1,467 

-233 

47.896.478 

71.642.028 

55.565.679 

63.972.827 

16.076.349 

-868,126 

14,843,289 

1,301,711 

13,541,578 

-  1,301,711 

-1,288,295 

98,869,176 

103,852,272 

90,998,764 

111,722,684 

12,853,508 

18,010,177 

OTHER  LIABILITIES 


9-5 


Post  Office  unfilled  philatelic  cash  sales 

This  account  represents  the  value  of  unfilled  philatelic  cash 
sales  orders. 

This  account  was  closed  during  the  year  as  a  result  of  the 
conversion  of  the  Post  Office  Department  to  a  Crown  corpora- 
tion effective  October  16,  1981.  The  balance  outstanding  was 
transferred  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  account  (a  deposit 
and  trust  account  in  Section  8  of  this  volume). 


Eldorado  Mining  and  Refining  Limited — Unpresented  capital 
stock 

The  liability  of  the  Government  of  Canada  for  the  value  of 
paid-up  capital  stock  of  the  former  company  which  has  not 
been  redeemed  at  the  close  of  the  year  is  recorded  herein. 


Miscellaneous  departmental  paylist  deductions 

Deductions  from  the  salaries  or  wages  of  certain  employees 
not  paid  by  Central  Pay  Office  are  credited  to  this  account 
pending  transmittal  to  the  department  or  agency  concerned. 


Olympic  account 

This  account  records  transactions  in  accordance  with  the 
Olympic  Act.  Payments  and  other  charges  to  the  account 
represent:  (a)  all  administrative,  merchandising,  distribution, 
promotion  and  other  costs  incurred  by  Canada  in  connection 
with  the  distribution  and  sale  of  Olympic  coins,  as  determined 
by  the  Postmaster  General;  {b)  the  net  costs,  as  determined  by 
the  Minister  of  Finance,  of  any  redemption  of  Olympic  coins; 
and,  (c)  all  amounts  paid  to  the  Olympic  Corporation. 
Receipts  and  other  credits  represent:  (a)  proceeds  less  produc- 
tion costs  derived  by  Canada  from  the  issue  and  sale  of 
Olympic  coins,  and  {b)  the  amount  of  the  net  proceeds  derived 
by  Canada  from  the  sale  of  Olympic  stamps  and  postal  related 
products. 

Contractors'  and  other  holdbacks 

Holdbacks  charged  to  the  relevant  appropriations  of  the 
department  concerned  and  credited  to  this  account  under 
Section  35  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act  are  paid  out  in 
accordance  with  the  contracts  under  regulations  of  the  Trea- 
sury Board. 

Suspense  accounts 

Accounts  in  which  transactions  are  recorded  temporarily, 
pending  their  ultimate  disposition. 


SECTION 


10 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Foreign  Exchange  Accounts 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Exchange  Fund  Account — Advances 10.2 

International  Monetary  Fund — Subscriptions  10.3 

International  Monetary  Fund —  Notes  payable 10.3 

Special  Drawing  Rights 10.3 

Supplementary  statement — 

Exchange  Fund  Account 10.4 


10*2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 

Foreign  exchange  accounts  represent  financial  claims  and 
obligations  of  the  Government  of  Canada  which  are  identified 
with  Canada's  foreign  exchange  operations.  Financial  claims 
and  obligations  denominated  in  foreign  currencies  are  reported 
at  the  Canadian  dollar  equivalent  at  March  31.  Net  gains 
resulting  from  the  translation  of  the  net  assets  denominated  in 
foreign  currencies,  to  Canadian  dollar  equivalents  as  at  March 
31,  are  credited  to  revenue  as  premium  and  discount  on 
exchange,  and  net  losses  are  charged  to  budgetary  expenditure 
as  a  statutory  item  in  the  Department  of  Finance. 


Table  10.1  presents  the  continuity  for  each  foreign  exchange 
account  by  showing  the  opening  and  closing  balances,  as  well 
as  receipts  and  other  credits  and  payments  and  other  charges, 
i.e.  inflow  and  outflow  of  transactions.  It  should  be  noted, 
however,  that  Table  10.1  excludes  unmatured  debt  payable  in 
foreign  currencies,  amounting  to  $4,405  million  as  at  March 
31,  1982  ($4,624  million  as  at  March  31,  1981).  Details 
relating  to  unmatured  debt  payable  in  foreign  currencies  are 
presented  in  Section  1 1  of  this  volume. 


TABLE  10.1 

FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 


April  1/1981 


Receipts  and 
other  credits 


Payments  and 
other  charges 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


Exchange  Fund  Account — Advances  1,938,720,302 

International  Monetary  Fund — Subscriptions  ....       2,961,778,458 

4.900.498.760 
Less:  International  Monetary  Fund — Notes 

payable 2,329,000,000 

Special  Drawing  Rights 1,133,915,173 

3.462.915,173 

Total  foreign  exchange  accounts  (net)  1,437,583,587 


23,652,833,691 

181,538,465 

23.834.372.156 

145,000,000 

145.000.000 


23,890,000,000 

23.890.000.000 

147,513,613 

69,501,896 

217.015,509 


2,175,886,611 
2,780,239,993 
4.956,126.604 

2,326,486,387 
1,064,413,277 
3.390.899.664 


237,166,309 

-181,538,465 

55,627,844 

-2,513,613 
-69,501,896 
-  72,015.509 


-1,263,167,159 

930,802,397 

-  332,364,762 

715,122,527 
174,737,712 
889,860.239 


23,979,372,156    24,107,015,509 


1,565,226,940 


127,643,353   -1,222,225,001 


Exchange  Fund  Account — ^Advances 

This  account  includes  advances  to  the  Exchange  Fund 
Account  for  the  purchase  of  gold,  foreign  currencies,  securities 
and  Special  Drawing  Rights  (SDRs). 

In  1981-82,  payments  and  other  charges  consisted  of  advan- 
ces to  the  Exchange  Fund  Account  in  the  amount  of  $23,809 
million  and  a  revaluation  adjustment  of  $81  million  in  respect 
of  holdings  of  US  and  Swiss  currencies,  while  receipts  and 
other  credits  consisted  of  repayments  of  advances  of  $23,456 
million  and  a  revaluation  adjustment  of  $197  million  in  respect 
of  the  holdings  of  Special  Drawing  Rights  and  other  foreign 
currencies,  resulting  in  a  net  asset  increase  of  $237  million. 


The  assets  of  the  Exchange  Fund  Account,  which  have  been 
translated  to  Canadian  dollar  equivalents  at  the  March  31 
closing  exchange  rates,  are  presented  in  Table  10.2.  Gold  held 
by  the  Account  is  valued  at  35  SDRs  per  fine  ounce  ($47.81 
Cdn  as  at  March  31,  1982  and  $50.93  Cdn  as  at  March  31, 
1981). 

The  financial  statements  of  the  Exchange  Fund  Account  as 
at  December  31,  1981,  together  with  the  Auditor  General's 
report  thereon,  are  found  at  the  end  of  this  section. 


FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 

TABLE  10.2 

EXCHANGE  FUND  ACCOUNT— ASSETS 


us  cash  on  deposit 

US  dollar  short-term  deposits 

US  dollar  investments 

Deutsche  marks  short-term  deposits  

Special  Drawing  Rights 

International  Monetary  Fund  notes 

Gold 

Canadian  cash  on  deposit 

Total  

Less:  income  not  yet  transferred  to  the  Consoli- 
dated Revenue  Fund — 
Deferred  valuation  gains  at  previous  Decem- 
ber 31   576 

Total    income    and    valuation    gains    from 
January  1  to  March  31  

Assets  financed  by  advances  from  the  Consoli- 
dated Revenue  Fund  

These  advances  by  the  Consolidated  Revenue 

Fund  were  denominated  as  follows: 
US  dollars  (1982,  US  $1,800  million;  1981, 

US  $1,800  million)(2) 

Deutsche  marks  (1982,  DM  1,500  million; 

1981,  DM  1,500  million) 

Swiss  francs  (1982,  SF  1,200  million;  1981, 

SF  1,500  million) 

Japanese   yen    (1982,    Y    100,000    million; 

1981,  Y  100,000  million)  

Special  Drawing  Rights  (1982,  SDR  609.7 

million;  1981,  SDR  609.7  million) 

Less:    Canadian    dollar    deposit    with    the 
Receiver  General  for  Canada 

2,176 


March  31/ 

March  31/ 

1982 

1981 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 

46 

66 

207 

1.651 

704 

102 

233 

776 

18 

19 

973 

1.065 

(1) 

1 

3.023 

2,838 

654 


271 
847 

245 
899 

2,176 

1.939 

2,209 

2.132 

763 

842 

762 

920 

496 

560 

833 
5.063 

887 
5.341 

2,887 

3,402 

1,939 


10*3 


Since  the  IMF  was  formed  in  1946,  Canada  has  paid  for  its 
subscription  in  Canadian  dollars,  gold  and  SDRs.  The  IMF 
holds  a  working  balance  in  Canadian  dollars  equal  to  one 
quarter  of  one  per  cent  {Va  of  1%)  of  the  subscription;  this 
working  balance  is  deposited  to  the  credit  of  the  Fund  with  the 
Bank  of  Canada.  The  remainder  of  the  Fund's  Canadian  dollar 
holdings  is  maintained  in  non-interest  bearing  notes  payable  on 
demand;  transactions  in  these  notes  are  based  on  the  IMF's 
needs  for  Canadian  currency. 

Transactions  with  the  IMF  included  maintenance  of  value 
adjustments  of  $147  million  and  a  revaluation  adjustment  of 
$34  million  due  to  the  appreciation  of  the  Canadian  dollar  to 
March  31,  1982.  Canada's  capital  subscription  is  set  in  SDR 
units  of  account  so  that  when  the  Canadian  dollar  depreciates, 
additional  Canadian  dollars  must  be  supplied  to  the  Fund  to 
maintain  the  value  of  Canadian  dollar  holdings  in  terms  of 
SDRs  and  when  the  Canadian  dollar  appreciates,  the  converse 
applies.  Canada's  subscription  is  also  revalued  to  recognize  the 
increase  in  the  Canadian  dollar  value  of  that  portion  of  the 
subscription  which  is  not  offset  by  the  IMF  holdings  of 
Canadian  dollars. 


<"  Less  than  $500,000. 

<2)  Excludes  1962  issue  (1982,  $64,790,880;  1981,  $64,431,360)  and  1968  issue 
(1982,  $122,710,000;  1981,  $118,440,000),  the  proceeds  of  which  were 
advanced  to  the  Exchange  Fund  Account  in  Canadian  dollars. 


International  Monetary  Fund — Notes  Payable 

This  account  records  non-interest  bearing  notes  issued  by 
Canada  to  cover  that  part  of  the  Canadian  dollar  holdings  of 
the  International  Monetary  Fund  in  excess  of  working  balance 
requirements.  These  notes  are  payable  on  demand  and  are 
subject  to  redemption  or  re-issue,  depending  on  the  needs  of 
the  Fund  for  Canadian  currency.  Non-interest  bearing  notes 
were  decreased  by  a  net  amount  of  $3  million  during  the  year. 


International  Monetary  Fund — Subscriptions         Special  Drawing  Rights 


This  account  represents  the  recorded  value  of  Canada's 
quota  (i.e.,  subscription  assigned)  in  the  capital  of  the  Interna- 
tional Monetary  Fund  (IMF). 

Each  member  country  is  assigned  a  quota  in  the  IMF  in 
terms  of  Special  Drawing  Rights  (SDRs),  a  unit  of  account 
defined  in  terms  of  a  "basket"  of  five  major  currencies.  By 
agreement  with  its  members,  the  IMF  establishes  these  quotas 
taking  into  account  a  variety  of  economic  factors.  Quotas  are 
adjusted  from  time  to  time  to  reflect  changing  conditions.  The 
subscription  of  each  member  is  equal  to  the  quota  thus  esta- 
blished and  the  most  current  increase  in  subscriptions  has  been 
paid  to  the  IMF  as  follows: 

(a)  25%  in  SDRs;  and, 

(b)  75%  in  the  member's  currency. 


When  Special  Drawing  Rights  are  allocated  to  Canada  by 
the  International  Monetary  Fund,  Canada  simultaneously 
acquires  a  foreign  currency  asset  and  a  foreign  currency 
liability.  Part  of  the  cumulative  value  of  the  SDRs  so  received 
is  included  among  advances  to  the  Exchange  Fund  Account, 
while  the  remainder  is  included  as  part  of  our  subscription  to 
the  Fund.  Canada's  cumulative  allocation  appears  as  a  deduc- 
tion from  the  above  accounts  since  circumstances  could  arise 
whereby  Canada  could  be  called  upon  to  repay  its  allocation, 
in  part  or  in  total. 

There  was  no  allocation  of  SDRs  by  the  Fund  to  Canada 
during  the  year.  The  recorded  amount  of  $1,134  million  was 
decreased  due  to  a  revaluation  adjustment  of  $70  million  to 
reflect  current  exchange  rates  resulting  in  a  March  31,  1982 
balance  of  $1,064  million. 


10*4 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


SUPPLEMENTARY  STATEMENT 
Exchange  Fund  Account 

(Governed  by  the  Currency  and  Exchange  Act) 
AUDITOR'S  REPORT 

THE  HONOURABLE  ALLAN  J.  MACEACHEN,  P.C,  M.P. 
MINISTER  OF  FINANCE 

I  have  examined  the  balance  sheet  of  the  Exchange  Fund 
Account  as  at  December  31,  1981  and  the  statement  of  income 
for  the  year  then  ended.  My  examination  was  made  in  accor- 
dance with  generally  accepted  auditing  standards  and  accor- 
dingly included  such  tests  and  other  procedures  as  I  considered 
necessary  in  the  circumstances. 

In  my  opinion,  these  financial  statements  present  fairly  the 
financial  position  of  the  Account  as  at  December  31,  1981  and 
the  results  of  its  operations  for  the  year  then  ended  in  accor- 
dance with  the  accounting  policies  set  out  in  Note  2  to  the 
financial  statements  applied  on  a  basis  consistent  with  that  of 
the  preceding  year. 


I  further  report  that,  in  my  opinion,  the  accounting  policies 
of  the  Account  in  respect  of  the  valuation  of  gold  and  accoun- 
ting for  the  realized  gains  on  sales  of  gold  are  not  in  accor- 
dance with  Section  16  of  the  Currency  and  Exchange  Act. 
Gold  is  recorded  at  its  approximate  historical  cost  and  not 
adjusted  to  its  commodity  market  value  as  required,  in  my 
opinion,  by  Section  16.  As  a  result  income  does  not  include 
unrealized  valuation  gains  on  gold  equal  to  the  difference 
between  commodity  market  value  and  approximate  historical 
cost.  Realized  gains  on  sales  of  gold  are  recorded  as  valuation 
gains  and  taken  into  income  in  equal  amounts  over  a  three 
year  period.  In  my  opinion,  Section  16  requires  that  these 
gains  be  entirely  taken  into  income  of  the  year  and,  therefore, 
paid  over  to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  within  three 
months  after  the  end  of  the  year.  Officials  of  the  Department 
of  Finance  are  preparing  proposed  amendments  to  the  Act  to 
provide  explicit  authority  for  the  accounting  treatment  cur- 
rently being  followed  by  the  Account. 

RAYMOND  DUBOIS 

Deputy  Auditor  General 
for  the  Auditor  General  of  Canada 

Ottawa,  Ontario 
March  12,  1982 


BALANCE  SHEET  AS  AT  DECEMBER  31,  1981 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


ASSETS  

us 

Denominated  in  US  dollars 
Cash  and  short-term  deposits  (Note 

3)  599.5 

US  Government  securities  (Note  4)       2,132.9 
International  Bank  for  Reconstruc- 
tion and  Development  bonds 

Denominated  in  other  currencies 
Short-term  deposits  

Denominated    in    Special    Drawing 

Rights 

Special  Drawing  Rights  (Note  5 ) ... .  206. 1 
International  Monetary  Fund  notes 

(Note  6) 15.9 

Gold  (Note  7) 833.7 

1,055.7 
Total  international  assets 3,861.7 

Denominated  in  Canadian  dollars 
Cash  and  other 


1981 


1980 


Cdn 


710.7 
2,528.6 


US 


600.9 
1,110.9 


244.3        495.8 


18.9 
988.4 


17.1 
936.7 


0.7 


4,578.8 


Cdn 


717.4 
1,326.2 


5.6 

6.7 

2,732.4 

3,239.3 

1,717.4 

2,050.3 

73.6 

87.2 

591.9 


20.4 
1,118.2 


1,251.6     1,449.6      1,730.5 
4,578.1      3,167.0      3,780.8 


1.3 


3,782.1 


LIABILITIES 


Consolidated  Revenue  Fund 

Advances  (Note  8)  

Net  income  for  the  year  ... 

Deferred  valuation  gains 


1981 

1980 

Cdn 

Cdn 

3,239.9 
763.2 

2,507.9 
620.2 

4,003.1 

575.7 


3,128.1 
654.0 


4,578.8 


3,782.1 


Approved: 

G.  K.  BOUEY 

Governor,  Bank  of  Canada 

ROBERT  JARRETT 

Chief,  Foreign  Exchange  Operations 
Bank  of  Canada 

IAN  A.  STEWART 
Deputy  Minister 
Department  of  Finance 


FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 

Exchange  Fund  Account — Continued 

STATEMENT  OF  INCOME 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  DECEMBER  31,  1981 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1981 

1980 

Investment  income 

Cash  and  short-term  deposits 

US  Government  securities 

Cdn 

47.4 
168.3 

63.5 
1.4 
2.7 

Cdn 

17.1 
155.7 

Special  Drawing  Rights 

Gold  loans  

56.5 
1.0 

Other 

3.5 

283.3 

233.8 

Net  valuation  gains 
During  the  year  (Note  9) 

401.6 
654.0 
(575.7) 

923  9 

Deferred  from  previous  years 

1165 

Deferred  to  subsequent  years 

(654.0) 

479.9 

386.4 

Net  income  for  the  year,  due  to  the  Con- 
solidated Revenue  Fund 

Cdn 

763.2 

Cdn 

620.2 

10' 5 


NOTES  TO  THE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER  31,  1981 

1 .  Authority  and  objective 

The  Exchange  Fund  Account  is  governed  by  the  provi- 
sions of  the  Currency  and  Exchange  Act,  R.S.,  c.  C-39. 
The  Account  is  in  the  name  of  the  Minister  of  Finance,  is 
administered  by  the  Bank  of  Canada  as  fiscal  agent  and  is 
funded  by  advances  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue 
Fund. 

The  principal  objective  of  the  Account  is  to  aid  in  the 
control  and  protection  of  the  external  value  of  the  Cana- 
dian dollar.  The  Account  is  the  principal  repository  of 
Canada's  official  international  reserves.  Accordingly,  the 
Minister  acquires  for  the  Account  those  assets  which  are 
deemed  appropriate  for  this  purpose  in  accordance  with 
the  Act. 

2.  Significant  accounting  policies 

Valuation  of  assets 

Securities,  including  notes  and  bonds,  and  Special 
Drawing  Rights  (SDRs)  are  recorded  at  cost  adjusted  for 
amortized  premiums  and  discounts,  if  applicable,  and 
include  accrued  interest.  Gold  is  recorded  at  35  SDRs  per 
fine  ounce,  which  approximates  its  historical  cost.  Cash 
and  short-term  deposits  include  accrued  interest  where 
applicable. 

Foreign  currency  translation 

Assets  and  liabilities  denominated  in  US  dollars  and 
other  currencies  are  translated  to  Canadian  dollars  at 
year-end  closing  exchange  rates  in  the  Canadian  foreign 
exchange  market.  Assets  and  liabilities  denominated  in 
SDRs  are  translated  to  US  dollar  equivalents  at  the 
year-end  US  dollar  value  of  the  SDR  as  calculated  by  the 
International  Monetary  Fund  and  to  Canadian  dollars  at 
the  year-end  closing  rate  of  the  US  dollar  in  Canada. 
Investment  income  in  foreign  currencies  is  translated  to 
Canadian  dollars  at  the  foreign  exchange  rates  prevailing 
at  the  date  the  income  is  recorded.  The  assets  and  liabili- 
ties of  the  Account  have  been  translated  to  Canadian 
dollars  at  the  following  year-end  rates: 


1981 


1980 


US  dollar 1.1855  1.1938 

Deutsche  mark 0.5292  0.6050 

Swiss  franc 0.6641  0.6688 

Japanese  yen  0.005398  0.005875 

Special  Drawing  Right 1.37987  1.52258 

Investment  income 

Investment  income  is  recorded  on  an  accrual  basis  and 
represents  interest  earned,  amortization  of  premiums  and 
discounts  and  related  gains  and  losses  realized  on  the  sale 
of  securities. 

Valuation  gains  and  losses 

Valuation  gains  and  losses  include  the  increases  and 
decreases  in  the  value  of  assets  and  liabilities  resulting 
from  the  translation  of  foreign  currencies  and  SDRs 
during  the  year  and  at  year  end.  Valuation  gains  and 
losses  also  include  gains  or  losses  on   transactions   in 


10-6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Exchange  Fund  Account — Continued 

NOTES  TO  THE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER  31,  mi— Continued 

foreign  currencies,  SDRs  and  gold  or  on  the  liquidation  of 
liabilities.  In  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Act, 
valuation  gains  and  losses  for  the  year  are  taken  into 
income  in  three  equal  portions  over  the  current  and  two 
succeeding  years. 

Operating  expenses 

The  Bank  of  Canada  provides,  without  charge,  the 
administrative,  custodial  and  fiscal  agency  services  to 
carry  out  the  objectives  of  the  Act.  Other  expenses  incur- 
red in  the  operation  of  the  account  are  charged  against 
net  income. 

3.  Cash  and  short-term  deposits  denominated  in  US  dollars 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 
1981  1980 


US  dollar  bank  account  balance  US         0.3 

Cash  invested  under  repurchase 

agreements 43.3 

Short-term  deposits 551.0 

Accrued  interest  4.9 


US 


22.4 

126.4 

450.0 

2.1 


US      599.5 


US      600.9 


The  us  dollar  bank  account  does  not  earn  interest  and 
the  balance  consists  largely  of  funds  not  employable  for 
investment  purposes  until  the  next  day.  Amounts  held 
under  repurchase  agreements  are  useable  balances  that 
are  invested  overnight  by  the  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of 
New  York. 


4.  US  Government  securities 


(in  millions  of  dollars) 
1981  1980 


Treasury  bills US  1,927.9 

Treasury  notes 199.9 

Accrued  interest  5.1 

"us 


US 


993.0 

115.7 
2.2 


2,132.9        us     1.110.9 

US  Government  securities  have  an  estimated  market 
value,  excluding  accrued  interest,  of  US  $2,124.5  million, 
Cdn  $2,518.6  million  (1980— US  $1,099.8  million,  Cdn 
$1,312.9  million). 

5.  Special  Drawing  Rights 

Special  Drawing  Rights  (SDRs)  were  created  by  the 
International  Monetary  Fund  (IMF)  to  supplement  inter- 
national reserve  assets.  SDRs  are  allocated  to  member 
countries  in  proportion  to  their  quotas  in  the  IMF  and  can 
be  used  in  transactions  between  participants  in  the  SDR 
Department  of  the  IMF  or  in  transactions  with  the  IMF 
itself.  At  December  31,  1981  one  SDR  was  equivalent  to 
US  $1.16396  (1980— US  $1.27541).  Since  January  1, 
1981  the  value  of  the  SDR  has  been  calculated  by  the 
IMF  as  a  weighted  average  of  the  market  values  of  five 
major  currencies;  previously  it  was  based  on  16  major 
currencies. 


The  liability  to  the  IMF  in  respect  of  cumulative 
allocations  is  the  settlement  obligation  that  would  be 
incurred  upon  the  termination  of  a  country's  participation 
in  the  SDR  Department  or  on  the  liquidation  by  the  IMF 
of  this  Department.  SDRs  allocated  to  Canada  by  the 
IMF  are  advanced  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund 
(CRF)  to  the  Account;  however,  some  SDRs  have  subse- 
quently been  returned  to  the  CRF  and  used  to  pay  part  of 
Canada's  increased  subscription  in  the  IMF. 

The  IMF  pays  interest  on  SDRs  held  by  each  country 
and  charges  interest  at  an  identical  rate  on  the  cumulative 
SDR  allocations.  The  IMF  interest  rate  is  based  on 
short-term  money  market  rates  in  the  countries  whose 
currencies  are  used  to  define  the  value  of  the  SDR. 
Interest  paid  by  the  IMF  on  SDRs  held  by  the  Account  is 
included  in  investment  income.  Since  April  1,  1980  inte- 
rest on  Canada's  cumulative  allocations  has  been  charged 
to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  and  therefore  has  not 
been  recorded  as  an  expense  of  the  Account. 

The  following  is  a  reconciliation  of  IMF  cumulative 
allocations  to  Canada  and  the  SDR  holdings  of  the 
Account. 

(in  millions  of  SDRs) 
1981  1980 


IMF  cumulative  allocations  to 
Canada 

Less  cumulative  use  of  SDRs  by 
Canada  to  pay  for  increase  in 
subscriptions 

Net  advances  to  the  Account 

Less  net  cumulative  sales 

Holdings  at  the  end  of  the  year 

Add  net  accrued  interest 


779.3 


640.9 


169.6 

169.6 

609.7 
460.2 

471.3 
115.9 

149.5 
27.6 

355.4 
33.4 

177.1 

388.8 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 
US      206.1          US      495.8 

6.  International  Monetary  Fund  notes 


(in  millions  of  SDRs) 
1981  1980 


Supplementary    Financing    Facility 

notes 

Accrued  interest  

12.7                      12.7 
1.0                       0.7 

13.7                     13.4 

- 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 
US      15.9          US      17.1 

FOREIGN  EXCHANGE  ACCOUNTS 


10*7 


Exchange  Fund  Account — Concluded 

NOTES  TO  THE  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER  31,  \9U— Concluded 

IMF  notes  represent  Canada's  participation  in  the  Sup- 
plementary Financing  Facility  established  to  assist  mem- 
bers with  balance  of  payments  needs.  These  notes  were 
acquired  in  1979  and  1980,  had  original  terms  to  maturity 
of  five  years,  are  redeemable  on  demand  if  Canada  repre- 
sents that  it  has  a  balance  of  payments  need  and  are 
transferable  to  other  IMF  members. 

7.  Gold 


(in 

thousands  of  fine  ounces) 
1981                     1980 

Holdings  at  the  beginning  of  the 

year 

Sales 

20,982 
519 

22,178 
1,196 

Holdings  at  the  end  of  the  year 

20,463 

20,982 

US 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 
833.7           US    935.7 

As  described  in  Note  2,  gold  is  recorded  at  35  SDRs 
per  fine  ounce  (US  $40.74;  1980— US  $44.64).  The 
year-end  London  market  price  of  gold,  which  varied 
widely  during  the  year,  was  US  $400.00  per  fine  ounce  at 
the  last  fixing  (1980— US  $589.50). 

The  Minister  of  Finance  entered  into  agreements 
whereby  the  Account's  gold  was  loaned  and/or  sold  to  the 
Royal  Canadian  Mint  and  others  at  market  related  prices. 
At  year  end  the  Account's  gold  holdings  included  gold 
loans  of  626,000  fine  ounces  (1980—155,000  fine 
ounces).  There  was  also  a  commitment  to  sell  110,000 
fine  ounces  of  gold  at  market  related  prices. 

Advances  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund 


(in  millions) 

1981 

1980 

Currency 

Cdn$ 

Currency 

Cdn$ 

US  dollars 

US 

1,800 

2,133.9 

US 

2,400 

2,865.1 

Deutsche  marks. 

DM 

1,500 

793.8 

DM 

1,500 

907.5 

Swiss  francs 

SF 

1,500 

996.1 

SF 

1,500 

1,003.2 

Japanese  yen 

Y 

100,000 

539.8 

Y 

100,000 

587.5 

Special  Drawing 

Rights 

SDR 

609.7 

841.3 

SDR 

471.3 

717.6 

5,304.9 

6,080.9 

Less:  Canadian 

dollar  deposit 

with  the  Re- 

ceiver General 

for  Canada 

2,065.0 

3,573.0 

3,239.9 

2,507.9 

9.  Net  valuation  gains  during  the  year 

Net  valuation  gains  on  transactions,  assets  and  the 
liabilities  relating  to  advances  from  the  Consolidated 
Revenue  Fund  were  as  follows: 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 
1981  1980 


10. 


us  dollars 

Assets 

Liabilities 

Cdn 

(9.8) 
70.6 

Cdn 

54.1 
(19.5) 

60.8 

34.6 

Deutsche  marks 

Assets 

Liabilities 

0.6 

113.7 

106.4 

114.3 

106.4 

Swiss  francs 

Assets 

Liabilities 

1.6 
7.0 

94.0 

8.6 

94.0 

Japanese  yen 
Liabilities 

47.7 

(101.7) 

Special  Drawing  Rights 

Assets 

Liabilities 

(73.2) 
87.0 

(10.2) 
11.0 

13.8 

0.8 

Gold 

Gain  on  sales 

Assets 

261.0 
(104.6) 

800.8 
(11.0) 

156.4 

789.8 

Net  valuation  gains  during  the 
year 

Cdn 

401.6 

Cdn 

923.9 

Swap  arrangements  with  the  Bank  of  Canada 

From  time  to  time  the  Account  sells  US  dollars  to  the 
Bank  of  Canada  through  short-term  swaps  and  agrees  to 
repurchase  these  amounts  at  a  predetermined  exchange 
rate.  These  transactions  are  undertaken  to  assist  in  the 
Bank's  management  of  chartered  bank  cash  reserves.  At 
the  end  of  1981  there  were  no  amounts  outstanding  under 
these  swap  arrangements  as  compared  to  US  $190  million 
outstanding  at  the  end  of  1980. 


Advances  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  are 
limited  to  Cdn  $10  billion  by  Order  in  Council  dated 
March  1,  1979  and  are  not  subject  to  interest. 

In  recent  years  the  proceeds  of  Government  of  Canada 
foreign  currency  borrowings  have  been  advanced  in 
foreign  currency  from  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  to 
the  Account.  Such  borrowings  include  foreign  bond  and 
note  issues  and  bank  loans,  as  well  as  borrowings  under 
Standby  Credit  Arrangements  with  Canadian  and  foreign 
banks. 


SECTION 


11 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Unmatured  Debt 


CONTENTS 


Page 


Marketable  bonds 11 

Canada  savings  bonds 11 

Special  non-marketable  bonds II 

Treasury  bills 11 

Notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies 11 

Interest  rates 11 

Maturity  of  Government  debt 11 


10 


11«2 

UNMATURED  DEBT 

Unmatured  debt  represents  financial  obligations  resulting 
from  certificates  of  indebtedness  issued  by  the  Government  of 
Canada  that  have  not  yet  become  due. 

The  Government's  holdings  of  its  own  securities  have  been 
deducted  from  unmatured  debt  to  report  the  amount  of  the 
Government  of  Canada's  liabilities  to  outside  parties. 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Some  tables  in  this  section  present  the  continuity  for  each 
account  by  showing  the  opening  and  closing  balances,  as  well 
as  issues  and  retirements,  i.e.  inflow  and  outflow  of  transac- 
tions. In  addition,  the  term  "accounts  without  current  transac- 
tions" has  been  included  in  some  tables  in  order  to  provide  a 
link  with  figures  published  in  the  previous  year's  edition  of  the 
Public  Accounts  to  show  net  transactions  in  accounts  which 
were  closed  out  in  the  previous  year. 


TABLE  11.1 

UNMATURED  DEBT 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  - ) 


Payable  in  Canadian  currency — 

Marketable  bonds.  Table  1 1.2 

Canada  savings  bonds.  Table  1 1.3 

Special  non-marketable  bonds,  Table  11.4 

Treasury  bills.  Table  1 1.5 

Less:  Government's  holdings  of  unmatured 

debt- 
Marketable  bonds  

Canada  savings  bonds  held  on  account  of 

employees 

Special    non-marketable   bonds   issued    to 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund.... 


Payable  in  foreign  currencies — 

Marketable  bonds,  Table  11.2 

Notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies, 
Tablell.6 

Less:  Government's  holdings  of  unmatured 
debt — 
Marketable  bonds 

Total  unmatured  debt 


April  1/1981 

Issues 

Retirements 

March  31/1982 

1982 

1981 

S 

S 

S 

$ 

S 

$ 

40,794,635,450 
15,811,670,600 
136,381,000 
21,770,000,000 
78.512.687.050 

5,225,030,000 

12,839,478,734 

17,622,000 

58,605,000,000 

76.687.130.734 

2,590,427,500 
3,673,681,034 

61,000,000,000 
67,264,108.534 

43,429,237,950 
24,977,468,300 
154,003,000 
19,375,000,000 
87.935.709.250 

2,634,602,500 

9,165,797,700 

17,622,000 

-  2,395,000,000 

9.423.022.200 

7,894,499,500 

-  2,269,800,200 

22,971,000 

5,445,000,000 
11.092.670.300 

95,462,600 

141,064,291 

126,493,970 

110,032,921 

14,570,321 

-  83,298,425 

107,191,800 

131,004,948 

107,042,148 

131,154,600 

23,962,800 

1,485,700 

136,381,000 
339,035.400 

17,622,000 
289,691,239 

233.536.118 

154,003,000 
395.190.521 

17,622,000 
56.155.121 

22,971,000 
-58.841.725 

78,173,651,650 

76,397,439,495 

67,030,572,416 

87,540,518,729 

9,366,867,079 

11,151,512,025 

2,928,801,360 

445,274,560 

78,785,040 

3,295,290,880 

366,489,520 

-60,915,840 

1,707,690,000 
4,636.491,360 

4,765,250,000 
5,210,524,560 

5,350,570,000 
5.429.355.040 

1,122,370,000 
4,417,660,880 

-  585,320,000 

-  218.830.480 

-3,910,000 
-  64.825,840 

11,844,000 

427,000 

12,271,000 

427,000 

-118,000 

4,624,647,360 

5,210,097,560 

5,429,355,040 

4,405,389,880 

-219,257,480 

-  64,707,840 

82,798.299,010 

81,607,537,055 

72,459,927,456 

91,945,908,609 

9,147,609,599 

11,086,804,185 

Marketable  Bonds 

Marketable  bonds  are  interest  bearing  certificates  of  indebt- 
edness issued  by  the  Government  of  Canada,  and  having  the 
following  characteristics: 

— bought  and  sold  on  the  open  market; 

— expressed  in  Canadian  or  foreign  currency; 

— subject  to  call  or  redemption  by  the  Government  before 
maturity; 

— having  fixed  dates  of  maturity; 

— interest  is  payable  either  in  coupon  or  registered  form; 
and, 


Registered  marketable  bonds  are  transferable  by  endorsement 
and  delivery  by  one  holder  to  another.  Bearer  marketable 
bonds  need  not  be  endorsed. 

Table  1 1 .2  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  marketable  bonds.  Since  most  of  the  marketable 
bonds  are  not  subject  to  call  or  redemption  before  maturity, 
exceptions  only  are  noted  in  the  table. 

The  year-end  balances  of  marketable  bonds  payable  in 
foreign  currencies  were  translated  into  Canadian  dollars  using 
the  closing  rates  of  exchange  at  March  31,  1982. 


-face  value  is  guaranteed  at  maturity. 


UNMATURED  DEBT 
TABLE  11.2 

MARKETABLE  BONDS 


11'3 


Maturity  date 


Issue  date 


Series       Apriil/1981  Issues^^)        Retirements<2)  March  31/1982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


1982 


1981 


Payable  in  Canadian  currency — 

Matured  1981-82 

1981— Apr  1       8W       Apr  1/78 J16 

June  1      8%       June  1/76-Aug  1/76 
May  15/78-July  1/78 
Augl5/78-C>ct  1/78  ....  Jl 

Augl       7W        Aug  1/76 F68 

Decl5     8'/i        Dec  1/76 J4 

1982— Feb  1        9'/4       June  15/74 F84 

Feb  I        9%        Dec  15/78- Feb  1/79 
Mar  15/79-Junc  1/79 
July  15/79 J20 

Maturing  1982-83 

1982— Apr  1  ly*  Feb  1/77-Apr  1/77  J6 

July  1  Vh  July  1/77 F75 

July  1  8  May  15/77-July  1/77 

Sept  1/77 J8 

Oct  15  8  Oct  15/77-Dec  15/77  ..  J12 

Oct  15  10y4  Oct  1/79 J27 

Oct  15  12'/4  Oct  1/80 J47 

Dec  15  11%  Dec  15/79-Feb  1/80  ...  J31 

1983— Feb  1  SW  Feb  1/78-Apr  1/78  J14 

Feb  1  Wh  Aug  1/80 J45 

Mar  15  WV*  June  1/80 J43 

Mar  15  ISV*  Mar31/80-May  1/80  ..  J36 


Maturing  1983-84 
1983— May  15    8y4 


Sept  1 
Oct  15 
Oct  15 
Dec  15 
Dec  15 
Dec  15 
1984— Feb  I 


4'/6 
16 

i8y4 

9 

i2y4 

13'/4 

9y4 


Maturing  1984-85 
1984— Apr  1 
Aprl 
Apr  1 
Apr  1 
June  1 

Aug  1 
Aug  1 
Aug  1 
Octl 
Oct  1 
Oct  1 
Dec  15 
1985— Feb  1 
Mar  15 

Maturing  1985-86 
1985— May  1 
July  1 
Octl 
Octl 
Dec  15 
1986— Feb  1 


8 

9'/4 
16>/4 

10 

i3y4 

16 

15 

8y4 

\Vh 

13'/4 

13y4 


13 

111/4 

9Vi 

10% 

8 

W/i 


May  15/78-July  1/78 

Aug  15/78 J17 

Sept  1/58 T29 

July  1/81 J67 

Oct  15/81  J71 

Oct  1/78 J19 

Feb  1/81  J54 

Dec  1/80 J50 

Dec  15/78-June  1/79 

July  15/79 J21 

Apr  1/74 F39 

Apr  1/79 F81 

Oct  1/74 F87 

June  1/81-July  31/81  ..  J63 

Feb  1/79-Mar  15/79 

Aug  15/79-July  1/80...  J23 

Marl/81 J57 

Feb  1/82 J74 

Mar  31/82 J77 

Oct  1/79 F91 

Oct  1/79 J28 

Oct  1/80 J48 

Dec  15/79-Feb  1/80  ....  J32 

Mar  31/81 J59 

Mar  31/80 J37 

May  1/80-Dec  1/80 J40 

June  1/80  J44 

Oct  1/80 F96 

Aug  1/80 J46 

Dec  15/75-Oct  1/78  ....  F57 
Feb  1/81  J55 


100,000.000 

100,000,000 

-  100,000,000 

1,000.000,000 

1,000,000,000 

- 1,000,000,000 

887,500 

887,500 

-  887,500 

300,000,000 

300,000,000 

-  300,000,000 

592,835,000 

592,835,000 

-  592,835,000 

475,000,000 

475,000,000 

-475,000,000 

2,468.722.500 

2.468.722.500 

-  2.468.722.500 

675,000,000 

675,000.000 

1.151,500 

1,151,500 

900,000,000 

900,000,000 

475,000,000 

475,000.000 

200.000,000 

200,000,000 

150,000,000 

150,000,000 

150.000,000 

875,000,000 

875,000,000 

575.000,000 

575,000,000 

250,000,000 

250,000,000 

250,000,000 

400,000,000 

400,000,000 

400,000,000 

300.000,000 

300,000,000 

150,000,000 

4.801.151.500 

4.801.151.500 

950.000.000 

950.000,000 

950,000,000 

1,992.679,450 

1,992,679,450 

75,000,000 

75,000,000 

75,000,000 

100,000,000 

100,000,000 

100,000.000 

350,000.000 

350,000,000 

275,000,000 

275,000,000 

275,000,000 

200.000,000 

200,000,000 

200,000,000 

1,000.000,000 

1.000,000.000 

4.767.679.450 

175.000.000 

4,942.679.450 

175.000.000 

475.000.000 

69,821.000 

69.821.000 

77.000 

77,000 

322.309.000 

322,309.000 

575,000,000 

575.000.000 

575,000,000 

1.075,000.000 

1.075.000.000 

275,000.000 

450,000.000 

25,000 

449.975.000 

-25,000 

450,000,000 

150,000,000 

150.000.000 

150,000,000 

225.000,000 

225.000,000 

225,000,000 

749,000 

749,000 

300,000,000 

300,000,000 

775,000,000 

775,000,000 

775,000,000 

700,000,000 

700,000,000 

600,000,000 

600,000,000 

600.000.000 

849,995.000 

2,000 

849,993,000 

-2.000 

-5,000 

5.142.951.000 

950.000.000 

27.000 

6.092,924,000 

949.973.000 

2,099.995,000 

1,800,000.000 

1,800,000,000 

1,800.000,000 

450.000.000 

450,000,000 

450,000,000 

1,345,000 

1,345,000 

1,245,000 

325,000,000 

325,000,000 

325,000,000 

116,479,000 

116,479,000 

725,000,000 

725,000,000 

725,000.000 

3.417.824.000 

3,417,824,000 

3.301.245.000 

11>4 
TABLE  11.2 

MARKETABLE  BONDS— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Maturity  date 


Issue  date 


Scries       April  1/1981  Issues<^>        Retirements<^>  March  3 1  / 1 98  2 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


1982 


1981 


Payable  in  Canadian  currency — Continued 


Maturing  1986-87 
1986— May  1 
June  1 
July  1 
Oct  1 


1987- 


Oct  15 
-Febl 
Mar  15 


15'/4 

14y4 


18 

15'A 
15 


Maturing  1987-88 

1987— July  1  8'/4 

Dec  1  8 

1988— Feb  1  8y4 

Maturing  1988-89 

1988— June  1  5 

June  1  5 

1989— Feb  15  6y4 

Maturing  1989-90 

1989— Aug  1  13% 

Oct  1  10 

Oct  1  10'/4 

Dec  15  ll'/4 

1990— Mar  15  13y4 

Maturing  1990-91 

1990— May  1  514 

May  1  5'/4 

Maturing  1991-92 

1991— May  1  U'/i 

Oct  1  18 

Maturing  1992-93 

1992— Sept  1  5y4 

Maturing  1994-95 

1994— June  15  9'/i 


Dec  1 


6'/4 


Maturing  1995-96 
1995— Oct  1        6'/! 
Oct  1         10 


Maturing  1996-97 
1996— Sept  15     3 

Maturing  1997-98 
1997— May  15     9'/4 

(1)       1998— Mar  15     3y4 


Maturing  1999-2000 
1999— Oct  15      9 

Dec  1        13'/6 
2000— Mar  15     13y4 


May  1/81  J61 

June  1/81 -July  31/81  ..  J64 

July  1/81 J68 

Oct  1/69-Feb  15/70 

Apr  1/77 F47 

Oct  15/81  J72 

Feb  1/82 J75 

Mar  31/82 J78 

July  1/77-Sept  1/77 

Dec  15/77 Jll 

Dec  1/80 F79 

Feb  1/78 J15 

June  1/63  AT21 

Feb  1/64 CT9 

Feb  15/71  F61 

Marl/81 J58 

Aug  15/79 J26 

Oct  1/79-July  1/80  J29 

Dec  15/79-Feb  1/80 

June  1/80-Aug  1/80  ....  J33 

July  1/80 J38 

May  1/64-July  1/64 

Sept  1/65 CT12 

Apr  1/67 F12 

May  1/81  J62 

Oct  15/81  J73 

Sept  1/66-Dec  15/66 

Feb  1/67 F6 

June  15/74- July  1/75 
Aug  15/75-June  1/76 

Aug  1/76-Apr  1/77 F85 

Dec  1/67 F23 

Oct  1/68  F33 

Oct  1/75-Dec  15/75 

Feb  1/76-Apr  1/76  F97 

Sept  15/36 PI 

May  15/77-July  1/77 

Sept  l/77-Febl/78 J9 

Sept  15/56 T15 

Oct  15/77-Dec  15/77  ..  J13 

Dec  1/80 J53 

Mar31/80-Mar  1/81 

Mar  31/81 J39 


500,000,000 
900,000,000 
450,000,000 

1,000 

499,999,000 
900,000,000 
450,000,000 

499,999,000 
900,000,000 
450,000,000 

410,380,000 
410.380.000 

400,000,000 

650,000,000 

400,000,000 

3.300.000.000 

2,000 
3.000 

410,380,000 
399,998,000 
650,000,000 
400,000,000 
3.710.377.000 

399,998,000 

650,000,000 

400,000,000 

3.299.997.000 

525,000,000 

7,000 

125,000,000 

650.007.000 

525,000,000 

7,000 

125,000,000 

650.007.000 

6,000 
6.000 

100,000,000 

50,000,000 

150,000,000 

300,000.000 

100,000,000 

50,000,000 

150,000,000 

300.000.000 

200,000,000 
350,000,000 

25,000 

25,000 
200,000,000 
350,000,000 

25,000 

150,000,000 

450,000,000 

5,000 

1.000.005.000 

2,000 
27.000 

450,000,000 

7,000 

1.000.032.000 

2,000 
27.000 

275,000,000 

5,000 

425.005.000 

225,000,000 
125,000,000 
350,000,000 

225,000,000 
125,000,000 
350.000.000 

1,000 
2,000 
3.000 

1,000 
2,000 
3,000 

1,000 
2,000 
3.000 

225,000,000 

225,000,000 

895,745,000 

125,000 

895,870.000 

21,925,000 
21.925.000 

873,820,000 

125,000 

873.945.000 

-21,925,000 
-  21.925.000 

-  43,875,000 

-  43.875.000 

100,000,000 

100,000,000 

824,500,000 
924.500,000 

19,125,000 
19.125.000 

805,375,000 
905,375.000 

-19,125,000 
-19.125.000 

-  25,500,000 

-  25.500.000 

55,000,000 

55,000,000 

1,140,000,000 

197,045,000 

1,337,045,000 

18,000,000 
18.000.000 

1,122,000,000 

197,045,000 

1.319.045.000 

-  18,000,000 
- 18.000.000 

-  36,000,000 

-  36.000.000 

687,000,000 
400,000,000 

10,875,000 

676,125,000 
400,000,000 

-  10,875,000 

-21,750,000 
400,000,000 

750,000,000 
1.837,000.000 

10.875.000 

750,000,000 
1.826.125.000 

- 10,875.000 

500,000,000 
878.250.000 

UNMATURED  DEBT 
TABLE  11.2 

MARKETABLE  BOl^DS— Concluded 


11'5 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


Maturity  date 


Issue  date 


Series       April  1/1981  Issues'^)         Retircmentst^)   March  31/1982 


1982 


1981 


Payable  in  Canadian  currency — Concluded 
Maturing  2000-01 

2000— July  1        15        July  1/81 J70  175,000,000                                  175,000,000  175,000,000 

Dec  15      9%        Dec  15/78 J22              606,250,000  9,375,000        596,875,000  -9,375,000       -18,750,000 

2001— Feb  1        15%      June  1/81-July  31/81  ..  J66  425,000,000                                 425,000,000  425,000,000 

606,250,000  600.000,000          9,375.000     1.196.875.000  590,625,000       -18,750.000 

Maturing  2001-02 
2001— May  1       13         May  1/80-Oct  1/80 

Feb  1/81  J42  1,325,000,000  1,325,000,000  1.325,000,000 

Oct  1        9W        Oct  1/76-Dec  1/76 
Apr  1/78-May  15/78 

July  1/78 J2  1,557,750,000  24,375,000      1,533,375,000         -24,375,000        -48,750,000 

2002— Feb  1        8%        Feb  1/77 J7  279,000,000  4,500,000        274,500,000  -4,500,000         -9,000,000 

Maris     15%      Mar  31/82 J79  200,000,000  200,000,000         200,000,000 

3,161,750,000       200,000.000        28.875.000     3.332.875.000         171.125.000     1.267.250.000 

Maturing  2002-03 
2002— May  1       10         May  1/79-Junc  1/79 

July  15/79 J25  1,850,000,000  1,850,000,000 

Dec  15      1114      Dec  15/79-July  1/80...  J34  1,225,000,000  1,225,000,000  475,000,000 

2003— Feb  1        11%      Feb  1/80- June  1/80 

Aug  1/80 J35  1,700,000,000  1,700,000,000  1,100,000,000 

4,775.000.000  4.775,000.000  1.575.000.000 

Maturing  2003-04 
2003— Oct  1        9V2        Aug  15/78-Oct  1/78  ....  J18  868,500,000  13,500,000        855,000,000        -13,500,000       -27,000,000 

2004— Feb  1        1014      Feb  1/79 

Mar  15-21/79 

Aug  15/79 J24  2,200,000,000  2,200,000,000 

3.068.500.000  13.500.000     3.055.000.000        -13.500.000       -27,000,000 

Maturing  2004-05 
2004— Oct  1         \QVi      Oct  1/79 J30  600,000,000  600,000,000 

Accounts  without  current  transactions -  2,926,126,500 

Total  marketable  bonds  (Canadian  currency) 40,794,635,450     5,225,030,000    2,590,427,500    43,429,237,950       2,634,602,500     7,894,499,500 

Payable  in  foreign  currencies — 

United  States  dollars — 

l983_Aprl         8  Apr  1/78 296,100,000  10,675,000  306,775,000  10,675,000  -2,950,000 

Oct  15      9  Oct  15/78 473,760,000  17,080,000  490,840,000  17,080,000  -4,720,000 

<"       1985— Oct  1         8.2  Apr  1/78 296,100,000  10,675,000  306,775,000  10,675,000  -2,950,000 

(I)       1986— Nov  4        I6'/4  Nov  3/81 368,130,000  368,130,000  368,130,000 

(I)       1987— Oct  15      5  Oct  15/62 64,431,360  2,254,560  1,895,040           64,790,880  359,520  -2,555.840 

(I)       1988— June  1       6%  June  1/68  118,440,000  4,270,000  122,710,000  4,270,000  -1,180,000 

(I)       1998— Apr  1         8%  Apr  1/78 296,100,000  10,675,000  306,775,000  10,675,000  -2,950,000 

(I)       1998— Oct  15      91/4  Oct  15/78 414,540,000  14,945,000  429,485,000  14,945,000  -4,130,000 

1,959,471,360  438,704,560  1.895.040      2.396.280.880  436.809,520  -21.435.840 

Deutsche  marks — 

1983— May  20    4%        May  20/78  336,780,000  31,500,000  305,280,000  -31,500,000  -29,700,000 

(I)      1984— May  10    5           May  10/78    280,650,000  26,250,000  254,400,000  -26,250,000  -24,750,000 

617,430,000  57,750,000  559,680,000  -57.750,000  -54.450.000 

Swiss  francs — 
(I)       1989— Mar  20     3H        Mar  20/79 184,050,000  6,570,000  190,620,000  6,570,000         -9,300,000 

Japanese  yen — 

1984— Mar  27     6.4        Mar  27/79 167,850.000 19,140,000         148.710.000        -19,140,000  24.270.000 

Total  marketable  bonds  (foreign  currencies)  2.928,801.360       445.274.560         78.785.040     3.295.290.880  366,489.520       -60,915,840 

Total 43,723,436,810    5,670,304,560    2,669,212,540    46,724,528,830       3,001,092.020      7,833.583.660 

' ' '  Subject  to  redemption  before  maturity. 

*->  Issues  and  retirements  of  the  marketable  bonds  payable  in  foreign  currencies  include  the  translation  of  these  currencies  to  Canadian  dollars  using  closing  rates  of 
exchange  at  March  3 1 . 


11«6 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Canada  Savings  Bonds 

Canada  savings  bonds  are  interest  bearing  certificates  of 
indebtedness  issued  by  the  Government  of  Canada,  and  having 
the  following  characteristics: 

— issued  to  Canadian  residents; 

— registered  in  the  name  of  the  holder; 

— fixed  date  of  maturity; 

— non-marketable; 

— redeemable  on  demand  by  the  holder  with  accrued  inter- 
est calculated  to  the  end  of  the  previous  month; 


— not  subject  to  call  before  maturity;  and, 

— term  to  maturity  is  seven  years  or  more. 

Certain  series  of  Canada  savings  bonds  include  provisions  for 
cash  bonuses  payable  at  maturity. 


Table  1 1.3  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  Canada  savings  bonds. 


TABLE  11.3 

CANADA  SAVINGS  BONDS 


Maturity  date 


Issue  date 


Series 


April  1/1981 


Issues 


Retirements     March  3 1  / 1 982 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


1982 


1981 


1981— Nov               19'A         1970-71   S25  668,722,350  668,722,350  -668,722,350 

1982— Nov               19'/2         1968-69  S23  235,480,600  7,224,450  228,256,150  -7,224,450 

1983— Nov               19'^         1974-75  S29  2,205,891,150  285,389,650  1,920,501,500  -285,389,650 

1984— Nov               19'/2         1972-73  S27  542,214,450  35,882,600  506,331,850  -35,882,600 

1984— Nov               19'/4         1975-76  S30  1,164,230,300  166,967,450  997,262,850  -  166,967,450 

1985— Nov               \9'A         1973-74  S28  301,103,150  22,802,800  278,300,350  -22,802,800 

1985— Nov               19'/6         1976-77  S31  602,758,900  86,850,900  515,908,000  -86,850,900 

1985— Nov               \9'/z         1978-79  S33  3,850,691,400  507,458,100  3,343,233,300  -507,458,100 

1986— Nov               19'/2         1977-78  S32  530,646,400  67,037,300  463,609,100  -67,037,300 

1986— Nov               19'/^         1979-80  S34  3,007,302,200  595,915,500  2,411,386,700  -595,915,500 

1987— Nov               19'/2         1980-81  S35  2,702,629,700  21,885,736      954,938,736  1,769,576,700  -933,053,000 

1988— Nov               19'/i         1981-82  S36                                       12,817,592,998      274,491,198  12,543,101,800  12,543,101,800 

Accounts  without  current  transactions 

Total 15,811,670,600  12,839,478,734  3,673,681,034  24,977,468,300  9,165,797,700 

'''  These  rates  include,  for  series  S23  to  S31,  cash  bonus  provisions. 


-34. 

-  12. 
-610, 

-52, 
-334, 

-33, 
-154, 
1,076, 
-107, 
1,738, 
2,702, 


729,200 
769,600 
685,500 
665,550 
219,550 
378,350 
720,550 
146,600 
710,400 
161,800 
629,700 


-817,242,800 


2,269,800,200 


Special  Non-Marketable  Bonds 

Special  non-marketable  bonds  are  interest  bearing  certifi- 
cates of  indebtedness  issued  by  the  Government  of  Canada 
exclusively  to  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund,  and 
having  the  following  characteristics: 

— non-negotiable; 

— non-transferable; 

— non-assignable; 


— term  to  maturity  is  20  years  or  less; 

— interest  is  payable  semi-annually;  and, 

— redeemable  at  face  value  plus  accrued  interest. 


Table  1 1 .4  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  these  special  non-marketable  bonds. 


UNMATURED  DEBT 
TABLE  11.4 


11-7 


SPECIAL  NON-MARKETABLE  BONDS 


Net  increase  or  decrease  (  -  ) 


April  1/1981  Issues 

$  $ 

Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund — 

Maturing  1985-86 102,000 

1986-87 1,792,000 

1987-88 3,814,000 

1988-89 5,607,000 

1989-90 4,059,000 

1990-91 5,447,000 

1991-92 6,540,000 

1992-93 7,1 12,000 

1993-94 7,907,000 

1994-95 9,087,000 

1995-96 10,217,000 

1996-97 10,651,000 

1997-98 1 1,351,000 

1998-99 12,015,000 

1999-2000 17,709,000 

2000-01 22,971,000 

2001-02 17,622,000 

Total 136,381,000          17,622,000 


Retirements       March  3 1  / 1 982 


1982 


1981 


102.000 

1,792,000 

3,814,000 

5,607,000 

4,059,000 

5,447,000 

6,540,000 

7,112,000 

7,907,000 

9,087,000 

10,217,000 

10,651,000 

11,351,000 

12,015,000 

1 7.709,000 

22.971.000 

17,622,000 


17,622,000 


22.971,000 


1 54.003,000 


17.622,000         22,971,000 


Treasury  Bills 

Treasury  bills  are  short-term  certificates  of  indebtedness 
issued  by  the  Government  of  Canada  to  pay  a  sum  of  money 
on  a  given  date,  and  having  the  following  characteristics: 

— issued  at  a  discount  in  lieu  of  interest  payments; 

— maturity:  3  months,  6  months  and  12  months; 

— issued  in  Canadian  currency  only; 

— transferable;  and, 

— bought  and  sold  on  the  open  market. 


Three-month  and  six-month  bills  are  usually  issued  weekly, 
while  other  bills  are  issued  every  four  weeks,  usually  for 
periods  of  one  year  or  less. 

The  balance  at  March  31,  1982  consists  of  $9,375  million  in 
three-month  bills;  $6,000  million  in  six-month  bills;  and, 
$4,000  million  in  364-day  bills. 

Table  1 1 .5  presents  a  monthly  summary  of  Treasury  bill 
issues  and  redemptions. 


TABLE  11.5 

TREASURY  BILL  ISSUES  AND  REDEMPTIONS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


April,  1981  

May 

June 

July  

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January,  1982 

February  

March 

Balance  at  April  1,  1981  

Balance  at  March  31,  1982 . 


Is. 

sues 

Redemptions 

3  month 

6  month 

Other 

3  month 

6  month 

Other 

Net 

bills 

bills 

bills 

Total 

bills 

bills 

bills 

Total 

change 

3,190 

1.075 

325 

4,590 

3,035 

965 

325 

4,325 

265 

4,215 

1.740 

400 

6,355 

4.065 

1,590 

500 

6.155 

200 

3,350 

1,195 

400 

4,945 

3,235 

1,055 

500 

4.790 

155 

4,140 

1,280 

675 

6,095 

4,020 

1,120 

550 

5.690 

405 

3,405 

1,100 

325 

4,830 

3,385 

1.105 

325 

4.815 

15 

3,405 

1,100 

325 

4,830 

3,350 

1.100 

300 

4,750 

80 

4,120 

1,325 

275 

5,720 

4,140 

1.410 

300 

5.850 

-130 

3,125 

975 

250 

4,350 

3,405 

1.405 

325 

5.135 

-785 

3,490 

1,000 

225 

4,715 

4,245 

1,445 

300 

5.990 

-  1,275 

2.800 

800 

250 

3,850 

3,280 

1,030 

325 

4.635 

-785 

2.900 

900 

250 

4.050 

3,125 

1,100 

375 

4.600 

-550 

2.975 

1,000 

300 

4,275 

2,790 

1,100 

375 

4.265 

10 

41,115 

13,490 

4,000 

58,605 

42,075 

14,425 

4.500 

61,000 

-  2.395 
21.770 

19.375 


II«8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Notes  and  Loans  Payable  in  Foreign 
Currencies 

This  account  records  borrowings  by  the  Government  of 
Canada  under  various  agreements  with  banks  in  Canada, 
Germany,  Switzerland  and  Japan. 

Transactions  during  the  year  consisted  of  issues  and  retire- 
ments in  United  States  dollars  and  Swiss  francs,  and  revalua- 
tions of  year-end  balances.  The  balances  at  March  31,  1982 
consist  of: 

—400,000,000  DM  ($203,520,000  Cdn)  four  year  loan  from 
the  Deutsche  Bank,  Germany; 

—500,000,000  SF  ($317,700,000  Cdn)  three  year  loan  and 
400,000,000  SF  ($254,160,000  Cdn)  five  year  loan,  from 
various  Swiss  banks;  and, 


—35,000,000,000  Yen  ($173,495,000  Cdn)  ten  year  loan 
and  35,000,000,000  Yen  ($173,495,000  Cdn)  twenty  year 
loan,  from  various  Japanese  banks. 

The  foreign  currency  balances  were  translated  into  Canadi- 
an dollars  using  the  closing  year-end  rates  of  exchange  at 
March  31,  1982. 


Table  1 1 .6  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  the  notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies. 


TABLE  11.6 

NOTES  AND  LOANS  PAYABLE  IN  FOREIGN  CURRENCIES 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


Maturity  date % April  1/1981  Is5ues<'>  Retirements^"     March  31/1982 

S  S  $  $ 

United  States  dollars — 
Notes  payable  to — 
Canadian  banks 355,320,000    4,500,140,000     4,855,460,000 

Deutsche  marks — 

1978-83  5         224,520,000  21,000,000         203,520,000 

Swiss  francs — 

1979-82                           2%      429,450,000  429,450,000 

1979-85                           3         306,750,000  10,950,000  317,700,000 

1982-87                           7'/4       254,160,000  254,160,000 

736.200.000  265.110.000        429.450.000  571.860.000 

Japanese  yen — 

1979-89                           7.1       195,825,000  22,330,000  173,495,000 

1979-99                           7.5      195,825,000  22,330,000  173,495,000 

391.650.000 44.660.000        346.990.000 

Total 1,707,690,000  4,765,250.000      5,350,570,000  1,122,370,000       -585,320,000         -3,910,000 

^"  Issues  and  retirements  include  the  translation  of  foreign  currencies  to  Canadian  dollars  using  closing  rates  of  exchange  at  March  31. 


1982 


-  355,320,000 

-21,000,000 

-429,450,000 

10,950,000 

254,160,000 

- 164.340.000 

-  22,330,000 

-  22,330,000 

-  44.660.000 


1981 
$ 

-  3,540,000 

-  19,800,000 

-21,700,000 
-15,500,000 

-  37.200.000 

28,315,000 
28,315,000 
56.630.000 


Interest  Rates 

Table  1 1.7  sets  out  unmatured  debt  at  March  31,  for  each  of 
the  years  1977-78  to  1981-82  inclusive,  with  the  average  rate 
of  interest  thereon.  For  purposes  of  comparison,  the 
unmatured  debt  is  classified  as  to  marketable  bonds,  non- 
marketable  bonds  (includes  Canada  savings  bonds  and  the 
Canada  Pension  Plan  Investment  Fund),  Treasury  bills  and 
notes  and  loans  payable  in  foreign  currencies. 


Interest  rates  on  new  issues  of  marketable  bonds  payable  in 
Canada  varied  from  a  low  of  13.75%  to  a  high  of  18.75% 
during  the  year. 


UNMATURED  DEBT 
TABLE  11.7 


11«9 


UNMATURED  DEBT  AS  AT  MARCH  31,  1978  TO  1982  INCLUSIVE,  WITH  THE  AVERAGE  RATE  OF  INTEREST 
THEREON 


Marketable  bonds 

Non-marketable  bonds 

Treasury  bills 

Notes  and  loans 
payable  in 

foreign 
currencies 

To 
unmatui 

Canada 
savings  bonds 

Canada 

Pension  Plan 

Investment 

Fund 

tal 

ed  debt 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 

interest 

rate 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 
interest 
rateO) 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 

interest 

rate 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 

interest 

rate 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 

interest 

rate 

Amount 
outstanding 

Average 

interest 

rate 

1982 

$(millions) 
46,724 

% 

10.67 
9.93 
8.96 
8.04 
7.65 

$(minions) 

24,978 
15,812 
18,081 
19,247 
18,011 

% 

19.50 
11.50 
12.00 
9.19 
8.62 

$(millions) 

154 
136 
113 

96 

84 

% 

10.01 
9.31 
8.57 
8.21 
8.01 

S(millions) 

19,375 
21,770 
16,325 
13,535 
11,295 

% 

15.61 
15.11 
12.39 
10.56 
7.19 

$(miltions) 

1,122 
1,707 
1,712 
4,240 
850 

% 

5.65 
7.18 
7.37 
9.10 

7.52 

$(millions) 

92,353 
83,149 
72,121 
66,591 
51,567 

% 
14.03 

1981 

1980 

43,724 
35,890 

11.70 
10.46 

1979 

29,473 

8.95 

1978 

21,327 

7.89 

Where  various  rates  of  interest  are  applicable,  the  interest  rate  in  effect  at  March  3 1  is  used. 

(')  The  rates  for  the  years  1977-78  and  1978-79  have  not  been  adjusted  to  reflect  cash  bonus  provisions  included  in  certain  series  of  Canada  savings  bonds. 


Table  1 1.8  shows  the  average  high  and  low  yields  of  Treas- 
ury bills,  at  tender,  together  with  the  average  yield  on  the 
latest  issues  for  the  years  1977-78  to  1981-82  inclusively. 

TABLE  11.8 

TREASURY  BILLS  AVERAGE  YIELDS  AT  TENDER 


High 

Low 

Last  issue 

Year  ended 
March  31 

% 

% 

% 

Three-month  bills — 

1982 

1981 

1980 

1979 

1978 

Six-month  bills — 

1982                      

20.99 
17.12 
15.24 
10.92 
7.73 

21.07 
16.65 
15.90 
11.00 
8.07 

20.59 
15.82 
14.92 
10.69 
8.26 

14.34 
9.93 

10.76 
8.07 
7.03 

14.18 
10.11 
10.74 
8.34 
7.08 

14.35 
10.45 
10.43 
8.64 

7.35 

14.86 
16.44 
15.24 
10.92 
7.73 

15.46 

1981  

14.85 

1980 

15.90 

1979 

10.96 

1978 

8.07 

Other  bills— 

1982 

1981 

1980 

1979 

1978 

15.61 
15.58 
14.92 
10.60 
8.26 

IIMO 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Maturity  of  Governinent  Debt 

Table  1 1 .9  presents  total  unmatured  debt  arranged  in  order 
of  maturity. 


TABLE  11.9 

MATURITY  OF  GOVERNMENT  DEBT 


Maturity 


Marketable  bonds 


Canada 
savings  bonds 


Treasury 
bills 


Notes  and 

loans  payable 

in  foreign 

currencies 


Total 


Average 

Average 

Average 

Average 

Average 

interest 

interest 

interest 

interest 

interest 

Amount 

rate 

Amount 

rateC) 

Amount 

rate 

Amount 

rate 

Amount 

rate 

S  (millions) 

% 

$  (millions) 

% 

$  (millions) 

% 

$  (millions) 

% 

S  (millions) 

% 

4,801 

9.69 

228 

19.50 

19.375 

15.61 

204 

5.00 

24,608 

14.41 

6,194 

7.86 
12.19 

1,921 
1,504 

19.50 
19.50 

318 

3.00 

8,115 

10.61 

6,347 

8,169 

13.18 

3,725 

11.94 

4,137 

19.50 

7,862 

15.92 

4,079 

14.75 

2,875 

19.50 

254 

7.25 

7,208 

16.38 

2,678 

8.07 

14,313 

19.50 

173 

7.10 

17,164 

17.59 

2,059 

8.97 

2,059 

8.97 

8,411 

10.93 

173 

7.50 

8,584 

10.86 

8,430 

10.58 

8,430 

10.58 

46,724 

10.67 

24,978 

19.50 

19,375 

15.61 

1,122 

5.65 

92,199 

14.04 

122 

9.30 

131 

19.50 

253 

16.50 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

1987 

1988/92 

1993/97 

1998/2002 

2003/05 

Less:  Government's  own 
holdings 


46,602 


10.66 


24,847 


19.50 


19,375  15.61 


1,122 


5.65 


91,946 


14.03 


(')  The  rates  include  cash  bonus  provisions  which  are  part  of  certain  series  of  Canada  savings  bonds. 


SECTION 


12 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Other  Accounts  Reported 
on  the  Statement  of 
Assets  and  Liabilities 


CONTENTS 


Page 


Cash  in  transit 12.2 

Cash 12.2 

Fixed  assets 12.3 

Accumulated  deficit 12.3 

Contingent  liabilities 12.6 


12-2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


OTHER  ACCOUNTS  REPORTED  ON  THE 
STATEMENT  OF  ASSETS  AND 
LIABILITIES 

This  section  contains  information  on  accounts  reported  on 
the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities  that  are  not  included 
elsewhere  in  this  volume.  These  accounts  are: 

— cash  in  transit; 

— cash; 

— fixed  assets; 


— accumulated  deficit;  and, 
— contingent  liabilities. 

Cash  in  Transit 

Table  12.1  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  transac- 
tions for  cash  in  transit. 


TABLE  12.1 

CASH  IN  TRANSIT 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


April  1/1981 

Cash  in  hands  of  collectors  and  in  transit 

Moneys  received  after  March  31  but  applicable 
to  the  current  year 

Total 1,845,775,076 


Credits 


Charges 


March  31/1982 


1982 


1,845,775,076 


1,829,339,209 


1,829,339,209 


16,435,867 


1981 


s 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

1,694,492,562 

1,694,492,562 

1,773,020,158 

1,773,020,158 

78,527,596 

588,820,097 

151,282,514 

151,282,514 

56,319,051 

56,319,051 

-  94,963,463 

103,554,188 

692,374,285 


Cash  in  hands  of  collectors  and  in  transit 

This  account  records  public  moneys  received  by  public 
officers  prior  to  the  closing  of  the  accounts  as  at  March  3 1  but 
not  deposited  to  the  credit  of  the  Receiver  General  for  Canada 
in  the  Bank  of  Canada,  until  after  that  date. 


Moneys  received  after  March  31  but  applicable  to  the  current 
year 

Public  moneys  received  after  March  31,  but  applicable  to 
the  year  ending  on  that  date,  are  recorded  in  this  account. 

This  account  intends  to  accommodate  refunds  of  old  year 
expenditure  received  prior  to  the  closing  of  the  accounts,  and 
receipts  to  be  credited  to  asset,  liability  and  (in  exceptional 
cases)  revenue  accounts  where  the  omission  of  the  credits  in 
the  old  year  would  tend  to  make  the  accounting  incomplete  or 
inconsistent. 


Cash 

The  Government's  cash  account  represents  public  moneys 
on  deposit  at  March  31,  to  the  credit  of  the  Receiver  General 
for  Canada,  with  banks  and  other  financial  institutions. 

The  cash  position  of  the  Government  is  affected  not  only  by 
budgetary  operations  but  also  by  non-budgetary,  foreign 
exchange  and  unmatured  debt  operations,  all  of  which  must  be 
taken  into  account  when  considering  the  full  scope  of  the 
Government's  financial  operations. 

Table  12.2  presents  a  summary  of  the  balances  and  related 
transactions  in  current  and  special  Receiver  General  deposits. 
Transactions  represent  receipts  and  disbursements. 

The  year-end  balances  in  foreign  currencies  have  been  trans- 
lated into  Canadian  equivalents  at  year-end  closing  rates  of 
exchange.  The  foreign  currencies  held  include  United  King- 
dom pounds  sterling.  United  States  dollars,  Belgian,  Swiss  and 
French  francs  and  West  German  marks. 


TABLE  12.2 

CASH 


Net  increase  or  decrease  ( - ) 


April  1/1981 


Receipts 


Disbursements         March  3 1  / 1 982 


1982 


1981 


$ 

Receiver  General — 
Current  deposits — 

Canadian  dollars 5,826,062,032 

Foreign  currencies 48,982,519 

Special  deposits 56,096,900 

Total 5,931,141,451 


182,440,318,180    181,725,509,596   6,540,870,616      714,808,584   2,164,762,744 

1,870,792,202      1,890,593,035     29,181,686     -19,800,833     18,505,894 

251,173,239       257,504,398     49,765,741      -  6,331,159      9,232,136 


184,562,283,621 


183,873,607,029   6,619,818,043 


688,676,592   2,192,500,774 


OTHER  ACCOUNTS  REPORTED  ON  THE  STATEMENT  OF  ASSETS  AND  LIABILITIES 


12'3 


Receiver  General  current  deposits 

The  monthly  balances  of  Canadian  dollar  and  foreign  cur- 
rency deposits  for  the  last  five  years  are  presented  in  the 
following  tables: 

TABLE  12.3 

CASH  IN  CANADIAN  DOLLAR  DEPOSITS 

(in  millions  of  dollars) 


The  fixed  assets  of  the  Government,  which  include  land, 
buildings,  works  and  equipment,  are  charged  to  budgetary 
expenditure  at  the  time  of  acquisition  or  construction  in 
accordance  with  the  accounting  policies  of  the  Government  of 
Canada  which  are  described  in  Note  1  to  the  audited  financial 
statements  (Section  2  of  this  volume).  Their  existence,  how- 
ever, is  acknowledged  on  the  Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabili- 
ties by  reporting  them  at  the  nominal  value  of  $1 . 


Years  ended  March  3 1 


At  end  of 
month  of 


1982 


1981 


1980 


1979 


1978 


April  3,281  1,922  3,400  4,394  2,385 

May 3,825  1,928  3,880  4,667  2,682 

June 2,102  1,108  2,780  4,008  1,879 

July 5,363  1,424  3,015  4,115  2,347 

August 4,068  2,406  2,661  4,213  1,948 

September 3,786  1,920  2,871  5,030  1,842 

October 3,671  3,325  2,573  5,074  2,764 

November 11,236  4,457  2,437  6,178  4,397 

December 7,532  4,138  2,446  6,462  4,726 

January 7,680  4,028  1,823  6,249  5,063 

February 6,278  4,061  812  6,825  5,177 

March 6,541  5,826  3,661  6,375  4,487 


Accumulated  Deficit 

The  accumulated  deficit  is  the  account  recording  the  net 
sum  of  annual  deficits  and  surpluses  since  Confederation, 
together  with  certain  amounts  charged  directly  to  this  account. 
The  accumulated  deficit  is  also  equal  to  the  excess  of  recorded 
liabilities  over  net  recorded  assets. 

Table  12.5  summarizes  the  account  for  the  year. 
TABLE  12.5 
ACCUMULATED  DEFICIT 


TABLE  12.4 

CASH  IN  FOREIGN  CURRENCY  DEPOSITS 

(translated  into  Canadian  dollars) 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


1982 1981 

$  s 

Opening  balance  81,262,727,887        68,595,267,858 

Deficit  for  the  year 13,606,690,356         12,667.460,029 

Closing  balance 94,869,418,243        81,262,727,887 


Years  ended  March  3 1 


At  end  of 
month  of 


April  

May 

June 

July  

August 

September . 

October 

November . 
December  . 

January  

February ... 
March 


1982 

1981 

1980 

1979 

1978 

9 

22 

8 

9 

12 

16 

23 

14 

18 

12 

26 

17 

15 

27 

9 

28 

28 

14 

16 

13 

21 

10 

11 

9 

17 

27 

22 

19 

16 

7 

24 

14 

16 

32 

21 

17 

27 

15 

16 

55 

29 

36 

18 

13 

34 

37 

17 

34 

13 

34 

27 

17 

11 

13 

29 

49 

30 

23 

19 

Receiver  General  special  deposits 

These  are  balances  in  the  hands  of  fiscal  agents  of  the 
Government  for  the  purchase  or  redemption  of  Government 
securities  and  for  the  payment  of  interest. 

Fixed  Assets 

Fixed  assets  are  tangible,  long-term  assets,  including  major 
additions  or  alterations  thereto,  from  which  benefits  are 
expected  to  be  derived  during  their  useful  life. 


A  ten  year  comparative  statement  of  the  accumulated  defi- 
cit in  terms  of  total  liabilities  and  net  recorded  assets  is 
presented  as  follows: 

TABLE  12.6 

STATEMENT     OF     ACCUMULATED     DEFICIT     IN 
TERMS  OF  TOTAL  LIABILITIES  AND  NET  RECORD- 
ED ASSETS^) 
(in  millions  of  dollars) 


As  at  March  31 


Less: 
net 
Total         recorded 
liabilities        assets 


Accumulated  deficit 

Increase  or 
Amount      decrease  (  - ) 


1982 134,107        39,238         94,869  13,606 

1981 118,461         37,198         81,263  12,668 

1980 103,626        35,031         68,595  12,788 

1979 98,023        42,216         55,807  16,185 

1978 80,048        40,426         39.622  10,036 

1977 67,075        37,489         29,586  6,290 

1976 59,802        36,506         23,296  4,021 

1975 62,700        43,425         19,275  1,147 

1974 55.557         37,429          18,128  672 

1973 51.716        34.260          17,456  -481 

*')  Amounts  for  the  years  1972-73  to  1974-75  inclusive  have  not  been  adjusted  to 

reflect  the  presentation  of  assets  and  liabilities  introduced  in  1976-77. 


12*4 

Table  12.7  presents  an  analysis  of  the  accumulated  deficit 
account  from  Confederation  to  March  31,  1982.  A  statement 
of  the  direct  charges  to  accumulated  deficit  from  Confedera- 
tion to  March  31,  1982  is  detailed  in  Table  12.8. 

TABLE  12.7 

ANALYSIS  OF  ACCUMULATED  DEFICIT  ACCOUNT 
FROM  CONFEDERATION  TO  MARCH  31,  1982 

$ 

Accumulated  annual  surpluses  and  deHcits 93,127,008,292 

Direct  charges  to  accumulated  deficit — 

Capital  expenditures 1,168,855,196 

Other 573,554,755 

Accumulated  deficit 94,869,418,243 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 

The  accumulated  deficit  in  per  capita  terms  and  as  a 
percentage  of  the  gross  national  product  is  shown  in  the 
following  charts. 


4000  t- 

3800 

3600 

3400 

3200 

3000 

2800 

2600 

2400 

2200 

2000 

1800 

1600 

1400 

1200 

1000 

800 

600 

400 

200 
0 


ACCUMULATED 
DEFICIT 

Per  Capita 

As  at  March  31 

Dollars 


1,691 


3,345 


1978  1979  1980  1981  1982* 

*  Based  on  population  as  at  October  1 ,  1 981 . 


20 


10 


ACCUMULATED 
DEFICIT 

As  a  Percentage  of 

Gross  National  Product  * 

As  at  March  31 

% 


'*s«V 


?MM 


1978  1979  1980  1981  1982* 

'Based  on  figures  as  at  previous  December  31 . 


OTHER  ACCOUNTS  REPORTED  ON  THE  STATEMENT  OF  ASSETS  AND  LIABILITIES 
TABLE  12.8 


12'5 


STATEMENT  OF  DIRECT  CHARGES  TO  ACCUMULATED  DEFICIT  FROM  CONFEDERATION  TO  MARCH  31, 

1982 


CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES — 

Public  Works  (Canals) — 
Department  of  Public  Works — 

Burlington  Bay  Canal  308,328 

Lake  St  Peter  1,164,235 

Department  of  Transport — 

Chambly  Canal,  Richelieu  River 579,715 

Lachine  Canal 10,526,202 

Murray  Canal 1,248,947 

Ottawa  Works 6,871,215 

Quebec  Canal 34,842 

Rideau  Canal  143,108 

Sault  Ste  Marie  Canals 4,935,810 

St  Anne's  Lock — Railway  Bridge  lie  Perrot 150,000 

St  Lawrence  Canals 34,1 1 1,409 

St  Lawrence  Ship  Canal  133,897 

St  Ours  Locks 614,426 

St  Peters  Canal 492,024 

Tay  River  Navigation 476,129 

Trent  Canal  improvements 559,068 

Trent  River  Navigation 19,079,651 

Welland  Canal  27,244,916 

Welland  Ship  Canal 130,716,890 

Miscellaneous 125 

239.390.937 

Public  Works  (Railways) — 
Department  of  Transport — 
Canadian  government  railways — 

Canadian  government  railways 64,973,475 

Cape  Breton  Railway 104,521 

Caraquet  and  Gulf  Shore  Railway 209,950 

Elgin  and  Havelock  Railway 33,530 

Hudson  Bay  Railway 34,682,535 

Intercolonial  Railway 109,826,449 

International  Railway  of  New  Brunswick 2,681,377 

Lotbiniere  and  Megantic  Railway  336,875 

National  Transcontinental  Railway 160,994,649 

New  Brunswick  and  Prince  Edward  Island  Rail- 
way   361,541 

Newfoundland  Railway 25,080 

Northwest  Communications  System 17,884,025 

Prince  Edward  Island  Railway 6,797,222 

Quebec  Bridge 21,706,664 

Quebec  and  Saguenay  Railway 7,120,896 

Salisbury  and  Albert  Railway 84,390 

St  Martin's  Railway 72,625 

Temiscouata  Railway 480,000 

York  and  Carleton  Railway 20,976 

Other  railways  and  miscellaneous — 
Auto-ferry  vessel  for  service  between  Yarmouth, 

NS  and  the  New  England  States  1,035,733 

Canada  Central  Railway — Peace  River  Bridge 175,000 

Digby  and  Annapolis  Railway 660,683 

Governor  General's  cars 71,539 

Port  Nelson  terminal 6,240,096 

Residue  of  cost  of  steamer  Sheba 78,61 1 

North  Railway  250,000 

North  Sydney,  NS  and  Port-aux-Basques,  New- 
foundland, ferry  and  terminals — 

Dock  and  terminal  facilities.  North  Sydney,  NS  2,880,497 
Dock  and  terminal  facilities,  Port-aux-Basques, 

Newfoundland 2,926,061 

Construction  of  auto-ferry  vessel  6,373,302 

Piers  "A  "  and  "B  "— Ogden  Point— Victoria,  EC  2,847,399 

Prince  Edward  Island  car  ferry  and  terminals 13,069,726 

Residue  of  capital  cost  of  55  Charlottetown 1,194,145 

Construction  of  new  car  ferry 7,032,720 

SS  Scotia  2 348,948 

Residue  of  capital  cost  of  steamers  Drummond 

and  McKee  851,853 

Strait  of  Canso 6,994,146 

Hillsborough  Bridge 1,532,233 

482.959.472 


Public  Works  (Miscellaneous) — 
Department  of  Defence  Production — 

Plant  at  Riviere-du-Loup 

Department  of  National  Defence — 

Military  magazine  danger  zone 

Department  of  Public  Works —  v-M:.\  ■ ,.,-'; 

Bare  Point  breakwater 

Burlington  Channel  improvements 

Canadian  Building,  London,  England  

Canadian  Legation  Building,  Tokyo,  Japan 

Canadian  Legation  Building  and  Site,  Washington, 
DC 

Cape  Tormentine  Harbour 

Esquimau  graving  dock 

Georgian  Bay  to  Montreal  waterway  survey 

Government  buildings,  Ottawa 

Halifax  elevator  site 

Halifax  Harbour  improvements 

Kingston  graving  dock 

Land  and  cable  telegraph  line 

Levis  graving  dock 

Miscellaneous  sites  for  government  buildings 

Miscellaneous  wharves 

Montreal  Harbour  improvements 

New  public  buildings  for  Petitcodiac,  NB 

Ottawa — Expropriations  of  property  between 
Sparks  and  Wellington  Streets,  East  of  Elgin 
Street 

Port  Arthur,  Fort  William  and  River  Kaministikwia 
improvements 

Port  Colborne  Harbour 

Quebec  Harbour  improvements  

Rainy  River  lock  and  dam 

Sorel  Harbour  improvements  

St  Andrew  Rapids  including  Red  River  improve- 
ments   

Saint  John  Harbour  improvements 

Tiffin  Harbour  improvements 

Toronto  Harbour  improvements 

Toronto,  new  Dominion  Building 

Upjjer  St  Lawrence  River — Channel  improvements.. 

Vancouver  Harbour  improvements 

Victoria  Harbour,  British  Columbia — Improve- 
ments   

Victoria  Harbour,  Ontario — Improvements  

Yukon  Territory  works  (part) 

Department  of  Transport — 

Canadian  Government  Trans-Atlantic  air  services .... 

Civil  aviation — Airways,  airports  and  radio  stations 

Eastern  Arctic  patrol  vessel 

General  service  workboat.  Parry  Sound,  Ontario, 
Agency 

General  service  workboat  for  use  at  St  John's,  New- 
foundland  

Government  shipbuilding  program 

Hopper  barge  Chesterfield 

Icebreaker  and  service  vessels 

Lighthouse  supply  and  buoy  vessel  for  the  West 
Coast 

Lighthouse  supply  and  buoy  vessel  for  the  East 
Coast 

Lightship  for  the  Port  of  Saint  John,  NB 

St  Lawrence  River  improvements 

Tug  Ocean  Eagle  

Vessels  for  Pacific  weather  station  "P" 

Yukon  Territory  works  (part) 

National  Harbours  Board — 

Churchill  port  and  terminals 

Halifax  elevator  site 

Prescott  elevator 

Port  Colborne  elevator 

Saint  John  wharf  site 

Land  in  Parish  Ste  Foy  and  Parish  of  St  F6iix  de 
Cap  Rouge — Quebec 


135,209 
4,010 

217,996 
1,392,490 
1,539,073 

200,000 

477,754 

95,000 

7,799,761 

918,797 

35,260,968 

86,512 

13,025,454 

556,589 

348,321 

971,593 

208,012 

1,223,857 

1,060,343 

1 


855,581 

16,249,020 

904,459 

10,326,479 

134 

1,806,541 

1,569,777 
19,300,823 

481,622 
9,331,987 
1,166,647 

468,098 
3,600,079 

2,334,089 

761,802 

1,638,069 

1,670,000 

83,916,341 

3,229,293 

31,385 

64,556 

53,325,521 

233,941 

9,609,996 

923,360 

1,709,767 

663,406 

110,372,850 

91,071 

1,770,097 

283,323 

12,790,681 

21,538 

4,707,440 

2,356,218 

4,531 

13,602 


12*6 
TABLE  12.8 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


STATEMENT  OF  DIRECT  CHARGES  TO  ACCUMULATED  DEFICIT  FROM  CONFEDERATION  TO  MARCH  31, 

mi— Concluded 


CAPITAL  EXPENDITURES — Concluded 
Public  Works  (Miscellaneous) — Concluded 
National  Defence — 

Military  property  and  stores 12,585,705 

Less — Fort  Osborne  Barracks,  Winnipeg  62,947 

St  Helen's  Island,  Barracks,  site 19,783 

436.608.839 

Territorial  accounts — 

Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development — 

Dominion  lands  expenditure  to  March  31,  191 1 10,425,396 

Less — Receipts  from  Dominion  lands  4,275,526 

Northwest  rebellion 826,078 

Northwest  Territories,  organization 1,460,000 

Northwest  Territories,  purchase 1,460,000 

9.895.948 

Total  capital  expenditures 1,168,855,196 

OTHER  NON-ACTIVE  ACCOUNTS— 

Loans — 
Department  of  Transport — 

Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine,  Limited  ..  8,098,389 
National  Harbours  Board — 

Chicoutimi 3,830,286 

Churchill 8,857,289 

Halifax 29,890,788 

Montreal — Jacques    Cartier    Bridge — Advances 

for  payment  for  guaranteed  interest 6,489,605 

Quebec 52,075,243 

Saint  John 34,770,238 

Trois-Rivieres 3,987,356 

147.999.194 


Miscellaneous  non-active  accounts — 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  (old) 62,791,435 

Canadian  National  Railway  stock  359,963,017 

Soybean  Hour  suspense  account  (Trade  and  Com- 
merce)    125,936 

Loans  and  advances — 
Sundry  Government  agencies — 

High  Commissioner's  Office  suspense  (External 

Affairs)  2,043 

Soldier  and  general  land  settlement  loans 7,079 

Other  governments — 

Italian  government — Wheat  purchases,  1915  (Trade 
and  Commerce)  703 

Miscellaneous — 
Abasand  Oils  Ltd  (Energy,  Mines  and  Resources)....  1,801,621 

Victoria  Shipowners  Ltd — Balance  remaining  after 
liquidation  (Transport)  621,987 

Investments — 

Quebec  Turnpike  trust  bonds  (Finance) 20,000 

Grand  Trunk  Railway  preference  stock  (Transport)  121,740 

Department  of  Veterans  Affairs — 
University  Hospital,  Edmonton,  Alberta 100,000 

Total  other  non-active  accounts  573,554,755 

Total  direct  charges 1,742,409,951 


Contingent  Liabilities 

A  contingent  liability  is  a  potential  liability  which  may 
become  an  actual  liability  when  one  or  more  future  events 
occur  or  fail  to  occur. 

The  Government  of  Canada  as  an  accounting  entity  is 
defined  as  all  the  departments  named  in  Schedule  A  of  the 
Financial  Administration  Act;  any  division  or  branch  of  the 
Public  Service,  including  a  commission  appointed  under  the 
Inquiries  Act,  designated  by  the  Governor  in  Council  as  a 
department  for  purposes  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act; 
the  staffs  of  the  Senate,  the  House  of  Commons,  and  the 
Library  of  Parliament;  and,  any  corporation  named  in 
Schedule  B  of  the  Financial  Administration  Act. 

In  accordance  with  the  above  definition,  the  corporations 
named  in  Schedules  C  and  D  of  the  Financial  Administration 
Act  are  excluded  from  the  definition  of  the  Government  of 
Canada  as  an  accounting  entity.  Information  regarding  their 
contingent  liabilities  as  well  as  details  of  their  borrowings  from 
other  than  the  Government  of  Canada  can  be  found  in  Table 


7.4 — "Summary  of  the  Financial  Position  of  Agent  Crown 
Corporations".  In  addition,  some  of  these  corporations  operate 
insurance  programs.  Information  regarding  insurance  pro- 
grams can  be  found  in  Note  4  to  the  audited  financial  state- 
ments of  the  Government  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 

The  contingent  liabilities  of  the  Government  consist  of 
explicit  guarantees  by  the  Government,  i.e.  borrowings  by 
Crown  corporations  and  other  than  Crown  corporations  which 
are  not  agents  of  Her  Majesty,  including  borrowings  guaran- 
teed by  bodies  within  the  accounting  entity  under  various  acts 
and  programs  and  explicit  guarantees  by  the  Government  for 
loans,  financial  arrangements  and  other  potential  liabilities. 
They  also  consist  of  potential  losses  arising  from  pending  and 
threatened  litigation  relating  to  claims  and  assessments  in 
respect  of  breach  of  contract,  damages  to  persons  and  prop- 
erty, and  like  items.  Pending  and  threatened  litigation  is 
reported  in  total  in  the  following  table.  This  table  is  also 
summarized  in  Note  2  to  the  audited  financial  statements  of 
the  Government  in  Section  2  of  this  volume. 


OTHER  ACCOUNTS  REPORTED  ON  THE  STATEMENT  OF  ASSETS  AND  LIABILITIES 
TABLE  12.9 


12*7 


STATEMENT  OF  CONTINGENT  LIABILITIES 
AS  AT  MARCH  31,  1982 


Authorized 
limit 

(where  Contingent 

applicable)  liability 

$  $ 

EXPLICIT  GUARANTEES  BY  THE  GOVERNMENT  OF— 

Borrowings  by  Crown  corporations  which  are  not  agents  of  Her  Majesty — 

Canadian  National  Railway  Company — Bonds  and  notes 174,007,500  174,007,500 

Air  Canada — Bonds  and  notes 28,458,300  4,500,759 

202,465.800  J  78.508.259 

Borrowings  by  other  than  Crown  corporations  which  are  not  agents  of  Her  Majesty — 
From  agents — 
Loans  to  Indians  by  the  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation  and  the  Farm  Credit  Corpora- 
tion, guaranteed  by  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs  and  Northern  Development  for  on-reserve 
housing 100,000,000(2' 

From  other  than  agents  under  the — 

Canada  Student  Loans  Act 1,891,853,876 

Small  Businesses  Loans  Act  (*) 

Farm  Improvement  Loans  Act (*) 

Advance  Payments  for  Crops  Act (<) 

Fisheries  Improvement  Loans  Act  (*) 

Regional  Development  Incentives  Act  and  Regional  Economic  Expansion  Act  9,306,000*') 

Enterprise  development  program  400,000,000 

Loans  to  Indians  by  approved  lenders  guaranteed  by  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs  and  Northern 

Development  for  on-reserve  housing (2) 

Loans  to  Nanisivik  Mines  Ltd  for  development  of  a  town  at  Strathcona  Sound,  Baffin  Island 4,570,000 

Indian  economic  development  program 30,000,000 

Loan  to  the  Ottawa  Civil  Service  Recreational  Association  2,000,000 

2.437.729.876 

Other  explicit  guarantees — <^' 

Insurance  against  accidents  at  nuclear  installations  under  the  Nuclear  Liability  Act  750,000,000 

Guarantee  with  respect  to  loans  to  Canadair  Limited  regarding  development  and  production  of  the 

Challenger  aircraft 1,350,000,000 

Guarantees  with  respect  to  financial  obligations  incurred  by  air  carriers  regarding  The  deHavilland 

Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited  DHC-7  aircraft 230,000,000 

Guarantee  with  respect  to  loans  to  The  deHavilland  Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited  to  finance  the 

development  and  production  of  the  DHC-8  aircraft  and  other  general  obligations  of  the  company 450,000,000 

Guarantees  with  respect  to  loans  made  by  exporters  

Guarantees  against  destruction  or  losses  that  may  be  occasioned  by  the  rental  or  use  of  agricultural 

property  for  research  purposes  30,000  30,000 

2.780.030.000  1.919.915.915 

Total  explicit  guarantees 5,420,225,676  3,524,789,689W 

PENDING  AND  THREATENED  LITIGATION  2.136.552,782('P) 

Total 5,661,342,471 


Percentage 

of  net  claims 

to  outstanding 

guarantees 

(where 

applicable)*" 


48,130,016") 

2.0 

836,537,987 
185,710,436 
147,406,378 
61,180,973 
17,799,719 
8,620,000 
101,117,886 

3.4 

3.0 

.4 

(5) 

1.5 
7.8 
2.6 

10,671,860*') 
4,148,463 
4,029,297*3) 
1,012,500 
1.426.365.515 

20.6 

699,377,773**) 

1,003,300,000 

86,458,142 

85,897,000 
44,853,000 

*')  Represents  the  average  percentage  over  the  most  recent  5  years  of  net  claims  to  the  amount  of  outstanding  guarantees  as  at  March  31,  1982. 

*2)  Authorized  limit  for  loan  guarantees  for  on-reserve  housing  totals  $100,000,000  (shown  above)  for  loans  made  by  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation,  the 

Farm  Credit  Corporation  and  other  approved  lenders. 
*')  Committed  guarantees  exist  for  loans  to  be  made  to  Indians  for  on-reserve  housing  and  for  the  Indian  economic  development  program.  The  amounts  to  be 

guaranteed  are  $14,193,767  and  $61,160  respectively.  As  at  the  reporting  date,  no  loan  instruments  have  been  issued. 
**)  These  Acts  place  limits  on  the  maximum  amount  of  guarantee  for  loans  made  by  eligible  lenders  over  different  time  periods.  The  maximum  amount  of  guarantee 

per  lender  is  expressed  in  legislation  as  a  percentage  of  aggregate  loans  made  to  qualified  borrowers  and  vary  depending  upon  the  dollar  value  range  of  aggregate 

loans  made  by  each  lender. 
<')  Less  than  .1%. 

*')  Represents  total  loan  guarantees  made  for  loans  having  a  balance  outstanding  as  at  March  31,  1982. 
<^)  An  agreement  with  Chrysler  Canada  Ltd  in  the  amount  of  $200,000,000  has  been  entered  into  with  respect  to  future  loan  guarantees.  As  at  the  reporting  date,  no 

loans  have  been  made  under  the  above  agreement  and  consequently,  no  contingent  liabilities  exist. 

A  letter  of  comfort  was  issued  by  the  Department  of  Transport  to  guarantee  loans  made  to  Ridley  Terminals  Incorporated.  These  loans  are  for  the  purpose  of 

construction  of  a  coal  terminal  and  Parliamentary  approval  is  being  sought  to  guarantee  a  loan  of  up  to  approximately  $185,000,000,  representing  80%  of  the  initial 

capital  cost  of  the  project.  As  at  August  31,  1982,  the  total  amount  loaned  to  Ridley  was  $16,200,000. 
*"  There  have  been  no  claims  under  the  Nuclear  Liability  Act  since  its  inception  in  1970.  The  Act  covers  15  Canadian  nuclear  installations  as  at  March  31,  1982. 
*')  In  July  1982,  the  Department  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  disbursed  $126,349,358  to  acquire  62.5%  of  the  outstanding  Series  "D"  preferred  shares  of 

Massey- Ferguson  Limited.  This  purchase  results  from  an  agreement  dated  June  15,  1981,  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  Massey- Ferguson  Limited, 

whereby  the  Government  guaranteed  to  redeem,  upon  request,  five  million  preferred  shares  in  the  event  of  a  failure  by  the  Company  to  pay  a  dividend.  On  June  30, 

1982,  the  Company  defaulted  on  its  dividend  payment. 

Also  in  July  1982,  the  Department  disbursed  an  amount  of  $9,000,000  to  acquire  two  LRC  train  sets  from  Bombardier  Inc.  This  was  the  result  of  Amtrak  not 

exercising  its  option  to  purchase  the  trains  at  the  end  of  a  lease-purchase  agreement  with  Bombardier  Inc  which  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  had  guaranteed. 
*"')The  Post  Office  Department  was  converted  to  the  Canada  Post  Corporation  by  an  act  of  Parliament  on  October  16,  1981.  There  are  certain  valuations  to  be 

determined  for  major  assets  turned  over  to  the  Corporation.  In  addition,  the  transfer  of  titles  to  the  land  and  buildings  turned  over  to  the  Corporation  by  the 

Government  has  not  been  completed.  Therefore,  the  Corporation's  contingent  liabilities  are  reported  in  this  table. 


SECTION 


13 


1981-82 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS 


Supplementary  Information 
Required  by  the  Financial 
Administration  Act 


CONTENTS 

Section  Page 

17(8)      Each  remission  of  a  tax,  fee  or  penalty  of  $1,000  or 

more  granted  by  the  Governor  in  Council 13.2 

18(2)      Obligations,    debts    and    claims    deleted    from    the 

accounts 13.35 

31(4)      Every   accountable  advance  that   is   not   repaid   or 

accounted  for  13.36 

98(3)  Every  payment  out  of  the  Public  Officers  Guarantee 
Account  and  the  amount  of  every  loss  suffered  by  Her 
Majesty  by  reason  of  defalcations  or  other  fraudulent 
acts  or  omissions  of  a  public  officer 13.52 


13*2 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL 
ADMINISTRATION  ACT,  c.  F-10,  R.S.,  as  amended 

SECTION  17(8) 

Each  remission  of  a  tax,  fee  on  penalty  of  $1,000  or  more  granted  by  the  Governor  in  Council 


ENERGY,  MINES  AND  RESOURCES- 
NATIONAL  ENERGY  BOARD 

Order  exempting  from  export  charges  the  exportation 
of  oil  other  than  oil  products  on  condition  that  an 
equivalent  volume  of  such  oil  is  returned  to  Canada. 
Order-in-Council  PC  1976-359  dated  February  18, 
1976  and  amending  Orders-in-Council  PC  1976-3091 
dated  December  16,  1976,  PC  1977-2946  dated  Octo- 
ber 20,  1977  and  PC  1979-1 1 17  dated  April  4,  1979: 


BP  Oil  Ltd/Sun  Oil  Corp 4,988,994 

BP  Oil  Ltd/Murphy  Oil  Corp 43,055,281 

BP  Oil  Ltd/Phillips  Petroleum  Co 3,691,849 

Gulf  Canada  Ltd/Continental  Oil  Co 3,021,250 

Gulf  Canada  Ltd/Murphy  Oil  Corp  379,190 

Imperial  Oil  Ltd/Exxon  Corp 47,313,1 17 

Shell  Canada  Ltd/Continental  Oil  Co 155,198,261 

Shell  Canada  Ltd/Farmers  Union  Central  Exchange  Inc ..  78,714,527 

Shell  Canada  Ltd/Shell  Oil  Co  195,287,539 

Shell  Canada  Ltd/Simmons  Oil  Corp 601,336 

Sunoco  Inc/Continental  Oil  Co 37,630,996 

Texaco  Canada  Ltd/Exxon  Corp 2,054,693 

571.937.033 

Order  exempting  from  export  charges  the  exportation 
from  Canada  of  oil  to  be  used  for  experimental  or 
testing  purposes.  Order-in-Council  PC  1977-2183  dated 
July  28,  1977: 

Alberta  Research  Council 1,751 

Husky  Oil  Operations  Limited 5,740 

Mitsui  and  Co  (Canada)  Ltd  2,736 

Sunoco  Inc 1,689 

Petro-Canada  Exploration  Inc  2,242 

Petrosar  Limited 2,315 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 373 

16.846 

Order  exempting  from  export  charges  the  exportation 
from  Canada  of  certain  oil  products  to  the  extent  that 
equivalent  volumes  of  such  oil  products  are  returned  to 
Canada.  Order-in-Council  PC  1977-308  dated  Febru- 
ary 10,  1977  and  amending  Order-in-Council  PC  1977- 
2184  dated  July  28,  1977: 

Sunoco  Inc 6,161,051 

Order  exempting  the  exportation  from  Canada  to  the 
United  States  of  certain  unleaded  motor  gasoline  from 
export  charges  to  the  extent  that  equivalent  volumes  of 
such  oil  products  are  returned  to  Canada.  Order-in- 
Council  PC  1981-729  dated  March  19,  1981: 


Sunoco  Inc. 


Order  reducing  charges  imposed  on  certain  oil  prod- 
ucts exported  from  Canada  during  August,  1981. 
Order-in-Council  PC  1981-3553  dated  December  17, 
1981: 

Imperial  Oil  Limited 

Gulf  Oil  Canada 


323,396 


360,332 
156,073 


Sipco  Oil  Limited 23,123 

Sunoco  Inc 525,460 

Union  Carbide  of  Canada 838,901 

1.903.889 

Order  reducing  charges  imposed  on  certain  oil  prod- 
ucts exported  from  Canada  during  September,  1981. 
Order-in-Council  PC  1981-3552  dated  December  17, 
1981: 

BP  Oil  Limited 59,369 

Imperial  Oil  Limited 158,610 

Olco  Oil  Limited 102,884 

Sipco  Oil  Limited 13,567 

Sunoco  Inc 662,752 

Union  Carbide  of  Canada 1,142,641 

2.139.823 

Order  reducing  charges  imposed  on  certain  oil  prod- 
ucts exported  from  Canada  during  October,  1981. 
Order-in-Council  PC  1981-3551  dated  December  17, 
1981: 

Imperial  Oil  Limited 156,303 

Olco  Oil  Limited 37,080 

Shell  Canada  Limited  56,461 

Sunoco  Inc 263,203 

Union  Carbide  of  Canada 826,854 

1.339,901 

Total  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources 583,821,939 


NATIONAL  DEFENCE 

Customs  duties  and  taxes  charged  against  goods  pur- 
chased outside  Canada  under  certain  circumstances 
involving  early  termination  of  posting: 


Holt  DC 

TuffL  

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 

Total  National  Defence 


$ 

L244 
2,130 
9,416 


12,790 


NATIONAL  REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE 

Customs  duty  and  excise  taxes  ordinarily  payable  on 
goods  purchased  in  or  imported  into  Canada  by  the 
Government  of  the  United  States  or  its  authorized 
agent  on  behalf  of  the  Government,  to  be  used  in 
connection  with  the  United  States  Government  projects, 
joint  Canada — United  States  projects,  or  United  States 
Government  establishments  in  Canada: 


Canadian  General  Electric,  Toronto,  Ont 201,054 

Cornell  Dublier  Electronics,  Toronto,  Ont 37,756 


X 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13-3 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Dcnlen  Electric  Corporation,  Stone  House,  NS 3,828 

Department  of  Fisheries  and  Oceans,  Sydney,  BC 48,569 

GTE  Sylvania  Canada,  Montreal,  Que 57,100 

ITT  Components  Division,  Downsview,  Ont 131,771 

Marshall,  WF,  St  John's,  Nfld 15[974 

Ministry  of  Transport,  Vancouver,  BC  17,425 

Ontario  Ministry  of  Natural  Resources,  Toronto,  Ont 1,180 

Raytheon  Canada  Limited,  Waterloo,  Ont 33,454 

Transport  Canada  (Canadian  Coast  Guard),  St  John's, 

Nfld 9,711 

Varian  Associates  Incorporated,  Georgetown,  Ont 9,961 

Westinghouse  Canada  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 1,649 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 3,156 

572.588 
Customs  duty  and  excise  taxes  on  articles  and  ma- 
terials for  use  in  contracts  under  defence  production 
and  development  sharing  arrangements  between  the 
Government  of  Canada  and  the  Government  of  the 
United  States  of  America: 

AMP  of  Canada,  Markham,  Ont 5,439 

Aircraft  Appliances  and  Equipment  Limited,  Bramalea, 

Ont 165,746 

ASK  Associates,  Mississauga,  Ont 9,154 

Bayly  Engineering  Limited,  Granby,  Que 4,148 

Beckman  Instruments,  Toronto,  Ont 1,020 

Bell  Aerospace  Canada  Limited,  Grand  Bend,  Ont 718,009 

Canada  Tool  Company  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 7,559 

Canadair  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 70,901 

Canadian  General  Electric  Company  Limited,  Toronto, 

Ont 566,423 

Canadian  Lukens  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont  35,056 

Canadian  Marconi  Company,  Montreal,  Que 3,949 

Cercast  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  19,398 

Chicopee  Manufacturing  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 89,936 

Daf  Indal  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 3,822 

Dahmer  Steel  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 6,265 

Davie  Shipbuilding  Limited,  Lauzon,  Que  11,922 

Donlee  Nuclear,  Toronto,  Ont  21,553 

Eldorado  Nuclear  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 18,759 

Fleet  Industries,  Division  of  Ronyx  Corporation  Limited, 

Fort  Erie,  Ont 105,614 

Garrett  Manufacturing  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont 29,515 

Genelcom  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 5,390 

General   Dynamics   Manufacturing   Limited,   Montreal, 

Que  293,730 

General  Gear  Company,  Toronto,  Ont 49,306 

General  Motors  of  Canada  Limited,  London,  Ont 1,714 

Hawker  Siddeley  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 6,297 

Heede  International  Limited,  Port  Moody,  BC 3,659 

Hermes  Electronics  Limited,  Dartmouth,  NS 170,930 

Heroux  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 18,805 

Hewlett  Packard,  Richmond,  BC 1,160 

Honeywell  Controls  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 19,140 

Irvin  Industries  Canada  Limited,  Fort  Erie,  Ont 13,990 

Joly  Engineering  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 14,610 

Linamar  Machine  Limited,  Ariss,  Ont 207,88 1 

Litton  Systems  (Canada)  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 846,250 

MIC  Manufacture  and  Machine  Works,  Division  of  Oden 

Machine  Works,  Kitchener,  Ont 5,775 

Marathon  Equipment,  Toronto,  Ont  6,786 

McDonnell  Douglas  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont  26,615 

Nova  Scotia  Research  Foundation,  Dartmouth,  NS  1,340 

Oden  Machine  Works  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 2,719 


Premco  Precision  Machinery,  Kitchener,  Ont i  ,46 1 

RJ  Stamping  Company  Limited,  Ville  St  Michel,  Que 102,617 

RJ  Stampmg,  Ottawa,  Ont 21,918 

Raytheon  Canada  Limited,  Waterloo,  Ont 514,399 

Robco  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  2,731 

Shellcast  Foundries  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 14,333 

Spar  Aerospace,  Toronto,  Ont  25,023 

Sperry  Univac  Defence  Systems,  Winnipeg,  Man  131,233 

Supreme  Precision  Casting,  Montreal,  Que 9,992 

The  Queensway  Machine  Products,  Toronto,  Ont 18,877 

Titan  Proform  Company  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont  45,136 

Triplex   Engineering   Company   Limited,   Pointe-Claire, 

Que  8,185 

Versatile  Vickers  Canada  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  ....  60,776 

Vestshell  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 1,688 

Vickers  Canada  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  344,863 

WSW  Tool  and  Die  Company,  Kitchener,  Ont 7,836 

West  Heights  Manufacture  Incorporated,  Kitchener,  Ont  106,058 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 4,757 

5,012.168 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  excise  taxes  paid  on 
imported  goods  which  are  the  subject  of  drawback 
claims: 

Bailey  Meter  Company  Limited,  Pointe-Claire,  Que 

Burroughs  Business  Machines  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 

Dale  Distributing  Limited,  Richmond,  BC 

Industries  PPD  Incorporated,  Sherbrooke,  Que 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 


7,683 
3,887 

10,049 

2,535 

435 

24,589 


Remission  of  excise  duty  on  spirits  lost  due  to  break- 
age in  warehouse  and  while  in  transit: 

British  Columbia  Liquor  Distribution  Branch,  Vancouver, 

BC 21,089 

Liquor  Control  Commission,  Winnipeg,  Man 2,006 

Melville  Distilleries  Limited,  Laval,  Que 1,790 

New  Brunswick  Liquor  Corporation,  Fredericton,  NB  2,978 

Saskatchewan  Liquor  Board,  Regina,  Sask 6,031 

Societe  des  Alcools  du  Quebec,  Montreal,  Que 34,710 

TG  Bright  &  Company  Limited,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont 1,127 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000  (3) 1,380 

71.111 

Remission  of  excise  duty  on  grain  or  food  source 
spirits  other  than  wine  for  shipment  from  distillers  to 
Licensed  Bonded  Manufacturers  (Wine): 

Calona  Wines  Limited,  Kelowna,  BC  1,512,024 

Gooderham  and  Worts  Distillery,  Toronto,  Ont 571,719 

Hiram  Walker  and  Sons  Limited,  Winfield,  BC 1,697,583 

Les  Distilleries  Dumont  Limitee,  Rougemont,  Que 374,777 

McGuinness  Distillers,  Toronto,  Ont 1,298,154 

Melchers  Incorporated,  Berthierville,  Que  1,568,124 

Melville  Distilleries  Limited,  Laval,  Que 65,040 

Rieder  Distillery  Limited,  Grimsby,  Ont 102,776 

St  Lawrence  Starch  Company  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont  10,143,919 

Remission  of  less  than  $1,000  (1) 565 

17.334,681 

Remission  of  customs  duties  and  excise  taxes  in 
excess  of  that  payable  on  1/ 120th  of  the  value  of 
various  vessels  and  aircraft  for  each  month  or  portion 
thereof  they  remained  in  Canada: 

Arctic  Transportation  Limited 1 19,517 

BP  Canada  Limited 2,888,542 


13«4 

SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWEl^VE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

S 

Canadian  Offshore  Marine  Limited 169,167 

Chevron  Standard  Limited 802,568 

Colley  Motorships  Limited 1,983,333 

Crosbie  Offshore  Services  Limited 6,017,678 

Dow  Chemical  of  Canada  Limited 3,905,210 

Fairfield  Industries  Incorporated 63,922 

Federal  Commerce  and  Navigation  Limited 2,580,820 

Golden  Eagle  Canada  Limited 6,929,167 

Gulf  Canada  Limited 2,231,250 

Noranda  Sales  Corporation  Limited  5,797,531 

Robert  Reford  Incorporated 348,075 

Seabase  Limited 884,567 

Shell  Canada  Limited  1,008,045 

Sydney  Steel  Corporation 3,827,833 

Ultramar  Canada 1 1,900,000 

Victory  Soya  Mills  Limited 781,159 

Western  Bridge  Division  (Canron  Limited)  1,437,917 

Yukon  Navigation  Corporation  24,990 

53.701,291 

The  following  Order-in-Council  was  not  acted  upon 
during  the  year  1981-82: 

PC  1966-37/1899,  October  6,  1966 

Remission  of  duties  and  taxes  by  Order-in-Council 
PC  1953-18/894,  dated  June  9,  1953,  on  importations 
of  non-duty  paid  locomotives  and  miscellaneous  railway 
equipment  used  temporarily  in  Canada  by  railway  com- 
panies during  the  year  1981-82: 

Burlington  Northern  Railway 314,873 

Canadian  National  Railway 551,758 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway 306,930 

Chesapeake  Ohio  Railway 109,296 

Consolidated  Rail  Corporation 219,748 

Napierville  Junction  Railway 6,678 

1.509.283 

Partial  remission  of  customs  duty,  sales  and  excise 
taxes  paid  on  domestic  and  imported  parts,  equipment, 
materials  and  commissary  and  passenger  convenience 
items  for  use  by  Canadian  air  carriers  providing  domes- 
tic and  international  air  service  to  the  public: 

Air  Canada,  Winnipeg,  Man 530,803 

Canadian  Pacific  Air  Lines  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 824,306 

Nordair  Limitee,  Montreal,  Que  10,397 

Pacific  Western  Airlines  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 30, 1 5  5 

1.395.661 

Remission  of  customs  duties  in  respect  of  certain 
motor  vehicles  and  in  respect  of  parts  and  accessories 
and  parts  thereof  for  such  vehicles: 

American  Motors  Canada  Limited,  Brampton,  Ont 17,517,057 

International  Harvester  Company  of  Canada  Limited, 

Hamilton,  Ont  29,667,735 

Mack  Canada  Incorporated,  Toronto,  Ont 8,854,262 

Western  Star  Trucks  Incorporated  formerly  White  Motor 

Corporation  of  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 3,773,885 

59.812.939 

Remission  of  duty  and  tax  in  excess  of  that  payable 
on  l/60th  of  the  value  of  certain  goods  for  each  month 
or  portion  thereof  they  remain  in  Canada  during  the 
year  1981-82  and  where  in  all  cases  the  amount  was  not 
less  than  $25: 


AB  Dick  of  Canada 2, 

ABC  Plastic  Moulding 1, 

ABN  Machine  Works 3, 

ADAC  Laboratories 3, 

ADC  Canada  2,i 

ADC  Telecommunications  Canada  6, 

ADK  Pressure  Equipment 7, 

ADP  Network 15, 

AEI  Telecommunications  Limited 1, 

AEL  Microtel  Limited 13, 

AES  Data  Limited 29, 

AH  Environment 1, 

AM  International 7, 

A  &  M  Sail  Service 1, 

AMECRM  Incorporated 2,' 

AMFTuboscope  Incorporated 147, 

AP  Parts  of  Canada 1, 

APV  Crepaco  Montreal  Limited  1, 

APX  Building  Systems  Limited 1, 

Abbott  Laboratories  Limited  3, 

Abercorn  Aero 1, 

Acadian  Distillers  Limited  16,i 

Accent  Home  Products 5,' 

Acco  Company  Limited 9,i 

Accuray  of  Canada  Limited 57, 

Accurcast  Die  Casting ; 5, 

Ace  Controls  Incorporated  3, 

Adcom  Electronics  Limited 45, 

Advanced  Technology  Laboratories 5, 

Adventure-Progressive  Molded  Products 

Aeropulse  9,' 

Aeroquip  Canada  Limited 7, 

Aerovox  Canada  Limited 1, 

Agrico  Canada  Limited 9, 

Agropur  Co-operative  13, 

Ahal  Manufacturing  Incorporated 4,' 

Air  Canada 73, 

Air  France 3, 

Air  King  Limited 19,! 

Air  New  Zealand 1, 

Air  Products 4,i 

Air  Products  &  Chemicals  Incorporated 23, 

Air  Products,  Division  of  Catalytic  Enterprises  4, 

Aisco  Incorporated 1, 

Aisha  Film  Company  Limited 49,i 

Ajax  Magnethermic  Corporation 17, 

Akhurst  Machinery  Limited 26, 

Akron  Manufacturing  Company 3, 

Aladdin  Western  Export  Corporation  34,i 

Alan  Dick  Canada  Limited 2, 

Alan  Wakefield  &  Associates  Incorporated  1, 

Albany  International  Canada  Incorporated 1, 

Alberta  Environment 2, 

Alberta  Government  Telephones  3, 

Alberta  Power  Limited  2, 

Alberta  Traffic  Supply  Limited 1, 

Alcan  Aluminum  Company 1, 

Alcan  Canada  Products  Limited 61, 

Alexander  Tools  Limited 1, 

Alexandria  Footwear  Limited 1, 

Alfa-Laval  Limited  1, 

Algoma  Steel  Corporation  Limited  13, 

Alkaril  Chemicals  Limited 1, 

Alkon  Corporation 1, 

All  Glass  Company  1, 

AUadin  Synergetics  Incorporated 1, 

Allan  Crawford  Associates  Limited 130,: 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRA  TION  ACT 
SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13-5 


NATIONAL  RE\El>iVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Allen  Bradley  of  Canada  Limited 12,268 

Allibert  Industries  Limited 45,384 

Allied  Chemicals  Canada  Limited 188,658 

Allied  Contractors  Incorporated 18,403 

Allis  Chalmers  Canada  Incorporated 38,789 

Almatex  Limited  3,917 

Alpha  Controls  &  Instrumentation  8,269 

Alphatext  Limited  7,313 

Al's  Welding  &  Electric  Limited 2,780 

Altempco  Glass 1,157 

Altendorf  Combining 14,582 

Aluminum  Company  of  Canada  Limited 10,441 

Amcan  Casting 2,638 

Amcar  Metals  Limited  1,407 

Amchem  Products  Incorporated 2,481 

Amdahl  Limited 265,697 

American  Broadcasting  Company 14,005 

American  Can  of  Canada  Limited 7,525 

American  Cyanamid  Company 5,195 

American  Digital 7,568 

American  Monitor  Corporation 2,440 

American  Permac  Incorporated 2,259 

American  Standard  .*. 15,975 

American  Telecom  Incorporated  7,622 

Amerlin  Sales 8,699 

Amerock  Incorporated 6,236 

Amertron  Western  Hemisphere  Incorporated 2,373 

Ammco  Industrial  Equipment  Limited  1,807 

Amoco  Canada  Petroleum  Company  Limited 43,634 

Ampex  Canada  Limited  4,573 

Amsco  Canada 1,324 

Amway  Manufacturing  Company  Limited 13,554 

Amway  of  Canada  Limited 9,325 

Anaconda  Ericsson  Company  Limited 1,085 

Analytech  13,472 

Analytical  Instruments  4,277 

Anchor  Machine  &  Manufacture  Limited  4,881 

Anco  Incorporated 8,109 

Anderson  Blowpipe  Limited 3,003 

Andor  Scientific  Services 2,540 

Angenieux  Corploration  of  Canada  Limited  2,090 

Anglo  Canadian  Scientific  Company  Limited 12,995 

Angus,  R 2,758 

Ann  Arbor — Computer  Division  of  Jervis  B  Webb  2,591 

Anquip  Equipment 1,086 

Apex  Metals  Limited 10,137 

Appaloosa  Horse  Club  of  Canada  15,283 

Apple  Computer  Canada 1,351 

Applied  Electronics  Limited 14,634 

Applied  Research  Laboratories 27,390 

April  Wine  24,180 

Aptec  Engineering  Limited 1,418 

Argus  Machine  Company  Limited 1,183 

Armstrong  Cork  Industry  Limited 73,565 

Aro  Canada 6,702 

Arrow  Plastics 1,288 

Artec  Canada  Limited 1 1,646 

Artel  Corporation 1,622 

Artray  Limited 10,664 

Asea  Limited 26,443 

Associated  Test  Equipment  Limited  37,027 

Atelier  Ropart  Incorporec 2,744 

Atkemix  Incorporated •. 3,539 

Atlantic  Bridge 7,129 


Atlantic  Controls  Limited 9,137 

Atlantic  Packaging  Products  Limited  29,688 

Atlantic  Scale  Company  Limited 2,957 

Atlantic  Stove  Works/ Duomatic  Olsen 14,725 

Atlas  4,191 

Atlas  Steels — Division  of  Rio  Algoma,  Limited 2,381 

Atmospheric  Environment  Service 38,459 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited  7,656 

Atwell  Fleming 1,073 

Aucoin  Management 35,977 

Audiovox  Canada  Limited  4,675 

Aurora  Products  of  Canada  Limited 2,230 

Austin,  Peter  Manufacturing  Company 1,026 

Auteuil  Construction  Limitee 2,01 1 

Autologic  Incorporated 7,179 

Automated  Cheque  Manufacturing 2,658 

Automatic  Tool 1,362 

Avco  Lycoming  Division 5,065 

Aviation  Electric  Limited 58,012 

Avon  Canada  Incorporated 10,240 

Avon  Marathon  International 6,538 

Avtron  International  &  Price  Company  1,121 

Aydin  Control 1,733 

BC  Telephone  Company 4,214 

BCTV 1,758 

BP  Canada  Industries 2,328 

Baader  North  America  5,241 

Babcock  &  Wilcox  Canada  Limited  40,743 

Babine  Forest  Products 2,112 

Babytyme  Products  Limited 3,142 

Bachan  Aero  Space  of  Canada  Limited 2,948 

Bailey  Meter  Corporation 5,537 

Bake-Rite  Foods  Incorporated 5,632 

Bandag  Canada  Limited 22,498 

Banff  Springs  Hotel 66,643 

Baragar  Mechanical 2,005 

Barber  Colman  Company 1,940 

Barda  Electronic 4,999 

Barmac  Enterprises  Limited 4,083 

Barnes,  CF  1,029 

Barnett  International 1,579 

Barnum,  Ron  2,708 

Baron  Rubber  Limited 7,071 

Barry  Wehmiller  Electronics 2,918 

Basic  Computer  Group  Limited 2,101 

Basic  Software  Group  Limited 1,561 

Bates  Manufacturing  Company 6,077 

Batus  Work  Shop 1,143 

Bay  Concrete  Products  Limited 9,453 

Bayly  Engineering  Limited 1,912 

Beachvilime  Limited  7,970 

Beam  of  Canada 2,701 

Beam  Central  Vacuum  1,282 

Beatrice  Foods  Ontario  Limited 2,843 

Beaver  Engineering  1,017 

Beckley,  Chet 3,287 

Beckman  Instruments  Incorporated 9,071 

Beckwith  Bemis  Limited 1,128 

Becton  Dickinson  Canada 2,461 

Bedford  Industries  Limited 9,502 

Bedmarz,  Phil  c/o  Speed  Sport  Show  1,221 

Behlem  Wickes  Company  Limited 6,456 

Behnsen  Graphic  Supplies 3,009 

Behum  America  Corporation 1,312 

Bell  Canada 13,559 

Bell  City  Foundry  (Brantford)  Limited 1,487 

Bell  Helicopter 1,202 


13'6 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWE^VE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Bell  &  Howell  Canada  Limited  3,075 

Bell  Northern  Research  Limited  5,524 

Beloit  Canada  Limited 12,833 

Bendix  HBSL 5,558 

Beneke  Industries  Limited 3,781 

Benjamin,  Art  Associates  Limited 13,175 

Bennett  Limited 5,124 

Benson  &  Hedges  Canada 12,914 

Bentley,  Nevada  Canada  Limited 12,183 

Berger,  Garry  L 2,257 

Besser  of  Canada  Limited 2,081 

Best  Building  Products 1,216 

Better  Packages  2,691 

Big  Wheels  Incorporated 1,504 

Billy  Graham  Evangelistic  Association  3,106 

Binder  Tool  &  Mold  Limited 359,734 

Bingham  Williamette  Limited  25,149 

Bio-Research  Laboratory  1,797 

Bird  Machine  Company  of  Canada 4,944 

Birla  Industries 1,670 

Bishopric  Products  Limited 3,965 

Black  &  Baird  Limited 1,149 

Black  &  Decker  Canada  Incorporated 4,493 

Black  Clawson  Kennedy  Limited 5,704 

Blackstone  Industrial  Products  Limited 102,1 18 

Blackwood  Hodge  Ontario  Limited 35,377 

Blast  Cleaning  Products  Limited 1,399 

Blaw  Mold  Tooling  Limited 1,451 

Block  Brothers  Limited 3,871 

Bobco  Erectors  Incorporated 1,571 

Bobst  Champlain  1,461 

Boeing  Computer  Services 7,100 

Bogardus  Wilson  Division  of  Vanflax  Corporation  Lim- 
ited   1,205 

Boiler  Inspection  and  Insurance  Company  of  Canada 29,063 

Boise  Cascade  Canada  Limited  14,161 

Bombardier  Limitee 3,255 

Borden  Chemical  Canada  Limited 100,375 

Bordigon  Construction  Limited  1,541 

Borig  Hartman  Valve 2,328 

Bow  Plastics  Limited 26,352 

Bowater  Newfoundland  Limited 14,323 

Bowden  Tools 3,333 

Bracor  Associates 4,849 

Bradford  Fuller — Southern  Exposure  Incorporated 8,330 

Brady,  WH  Company  Limited 2,122 

Brander,  Richard 2,451 

Branson  Ultrasonics 1,646 

Brasserie  Molson  6,564 

Bremson  Data  Systems  4,135 

Brenton  Banville  McGrail 2,958 

Brimordyne  Canada  Limited 2,456 

Brinks  Canada  Limited 1,308 

Bripac  Limited 1,814 

Bristol  Aerospace  Limited 1,079 

Broadcast  Video  Systems 1,083 

Broad  Corporation  c/o  General  Motors  Corporation 2,237 

Brock  Electronics  Limited 3,836 

Brocks  Marine  Limited 2,307 

Brown  Boveri  Canada  Limited 29,454 

Brown,  Tim 1,106 

Brunswick  International  Canada  Limited 6,107 

Budd  Canada  Limited 3,013 

Budny  of  Canada  Limited 1,495 


Bueyros  Erie  Company  of  Canada  Limited 3,423 

Buffalo  Point  Development  Corporation  Limited 13,158 

Bufkor  (Canada)  Limited 7,073 

Building  Products  Canada 1,141 

Burlington  Northern  Railway 2,753 

Burlington  Steel  Company  1,868 

Burns  Meats  Limited 5,130 

Burroughs  Business  Machines  Limited 77,050 

Burroughs  Incorporated 3,703 

Butler  Polymet 20,808 

Butterick  Canada  Limited 1,282 

Byron  Jackson,  Division  of  Borg  Warner 3,932 

CAE  Electronics  Limited  3,004 

CAE  Machinery  Limited 8,785 

CAE  Morse  Limited  48,168 

CB  Engineering  Limited 1,441 

CBC  Records  International 31,502 

CD  Nova  Limited 2,499 

CE  Vetco  Pipeline  Service 56,898 

CFTO  TV  Limited 8,045 

CHCH  TV  13,314 

CHUM  Radio  Limited  2,563 

CICG 4,622 

CIL  Incorporated 12,498 

CIP  Daxion  Incorporated  1,423 

C  &  J  Hydraulics 1,417 

CKCKTV 2,128 

CKCO 14,160 

CKLW  Radio  Broadcasting  Company 1,063 

CPAir 1,684 

CRC  Canada  Limited 1,324,203 

C  &  S  Construction 30,757 

CVC  Electronics 1,237 

Cablesystems  Engineering 9,382 

Cabot  Carbon 2,175 

Caelter  Enterprises 3,276 

Calgary  Power  Limited 9,296 

Calgary  Television 1,237 

Cambridge  Instruments  Canada 2,008 

Campbell  Soup  Company  Limited 12,574 

Campeau  Corporation 7,377 

Camping  Show 1,687 

Camsco  Incorporated 1,885 

Canada  Cement  Lafarge  Limited 1,477 

Canada  Cities  Service  Limited 8,464 

Canada  Cup 2,061 

Canada  Lease  Financing  Limited 3,924 

Canada  Packers  Limited 3,515 

Canada  Plastic  Containers  Limited 4,391 

Canada  Post 1,508 

Canada  Wire  &  Cable  Limited  2,005 

Canada's  Wonderland  Limited 40,289 

Canadair  Limited 62,173 

Canadian  Appliance  Manufacturing  Company 1,456 

Canadian  Blower/Canada  Pump  Limited 2,560 

Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation  25,203 

Canadian  Buttons  Limited  2,216 

Canadian  Cinegraph  13,452 

Canadian  Coast  Guard  3,203 

Canadian  Duff  Morton  Company 1,203 

Canadian  Dynamics  Nova 5,768 

Canadian  Electric  Associates 17,234 

Canadian  Engineering  Survey  Company  Limited 1 2,04 1 

Canadian  Equipment  Sales 3,364 

Canadian  Fertilizers 1 1,027 

Canadian  Fine  Color 1,036 

Canadian  Fram  Limited  9,349 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 

SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


13'7 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co/i///iwe(/ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Canadian  Gas  Association 6,733 

Canadian  General  Electric  163,316 

Canadian  General — Tower 5,484 

Canadian  Grain  Commission,  Grain  Research  Laboratory  1,901 

Canadian  Gypsum  Company  Limited 1,070 

Canadian  Hardinge  Machine  Tools  Limited 3,229 

Canadian  Hunter  Exploration 115,063 

Canadian  Industrial  Supplies 6,664 

Canadian  International  Paper  Company 1,388 

Canadian  Linotype  Company 2,154 

Canadian  Liquid  Air  Limited 3,556 

Canadian  Lukens  Limited 2,771 

Canadian  Marconi  Company 27,251 

Canadian  Mini- Warehouse  Properties  Limited  2,329 

Canadian  Mossawippi 34,806 

Canadian  National  Railways  32,229 

Canadian  Occidental  Petroleum 1,374 

Canadian  Opera  Company 55,117 

Canadian  Opera  Supply  Company 70,234 

Canadian  Pacific  Airlines 7,826 

Canadian  Pacific  Limited 25,496 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway 20,286 

Canadian  Reynolds  Metals  Company 6,003 

Canadian  Steel  Foundries 2,121 

Canadian  Superior  Oil  Limited  46,788 

Canadian  Telecommunications  Group 4,756 

Canadian  Thermos  Products  Limited 4,1 13 

Canadian  Totalisator  Company  Limited 192,848 

Canadian  Webcor  Electronics 55,254 

Canadian  Western  Natural  Gas 1,172 

Canadylet  Limited 18,103 

Can  Am  Containers  Limited 1 1,684 

Can  Am  Inspection  2,377 

Can  Am  Telecommunications  Associates  2,205 

Candassco  Appliance  Parts  Limited 2,313 

Can-Eng  Manufacturing  Limited 2,084 

Canix  Sterilizer  Incorporated 1,247 

Cannam,  Gregory 4,524 

Canon  Optics  &  Business  Machines 8,510 

Canplas  Industries  Limited 85,1 10 

Canron  Incorporated 7,077 

Canron  Limited  251,279 

Canstar  Communications  5,414 

Canviro  Consultants  Limited  1,550 

Capco  Equipment  Limited  17,718 

Capco  Incorporated 1,491 

Cape  Breton  Development  Corporation 5,336 

Capilano  Plastics  Company  Limited  5,584 

Capital  Cable  TV  Limited 3,403 

Capital  Records  Incorporated 5,691 

Captel  1,189 

Cargill  Grain  Company  Limited 1,269 

Carrier  Air  Conditioning 12,684 

Carrier  Western 6,439 

Carriere,  Ron 4,062 

Cascade  Hydraulics  Limited 1,914 

Cascade  Plastics  Limited 1,510 

Case,  JI  Company  Limited 4,790 

Castle  Steel  Erectors 31,133 

Caterpillar  Tractor 8,1 19 

Celanese  Canada  Limited 4,163 

Central  Stamping 1,261 

Centre  De  Recherche  pour  la  Defense 17,219 

Century  Geophysical  Corporation  7,129 


S 

Certified  Automotive  Products  Central 9,792 

Certified  Brokes 2,566 

Certo,  Peter  J 2,257 

Cessco  Pipeline 863,419 

Champion  Spark  Plug  Company  of  Canada  Limited 8,530 

Champlain  Power  Products  Limited 10,350 

Charles  Lapierre  Incorporated 1,267 

Charles  Loue  Limited  5,850 

Chatlos  Systems  Incorporated 2,412 

Chem  Wash  Service  Limited 50,787 

Chemagro  Limited 1,044 

Cherney  Mills  Incorporated  31,345 

Chevron  Canada  Limited  1,586 

Chevron  Geoscience  Company 2,095 

Chevron  Standard  Limited 20,798 

Christensen  Bellow  Valvair 32,950 

Christie  Brown  &  Company  Limited 10,836 

Chrysler  Canada  Limited 28,553 

Chubb  Security  Systems  Limited 2,008 

Circle  F  Canada  Limited 4,914 

Cissco 1,492 

Citel  Films 1,591 

City  of  Calgary 4,688 

City  of  Edmonton 3,081 

City  Laundry  &  Dry  Cleaning 1,523 

Clairol  Canada 2,929 

Clark,  Alex  L  Limited 3,012 

Clark  Equipment  of  Canada  Limited 128,994 

Clayton  Environmental 1,081 

Cleyn  &  Tinker  Incorporated 1,141 

Cliffs  of  Canada  Limited 2,168 

Cochran,  JE  53,045 

Cole  Division — Litton  Business  Equipment  Limited 6,452 

Coleco  Canada  Limited 169,672 

CoUey  Motor  Ships  Limited 2,858 

Colt  Canada  Incorporated 3,177 

Columbia  Airlines  1,841 

Columbia  Plastics 28,241 

Columbus  Line  Incorporated  35,530 

Combined  Insurance  Company 13,740 

Combustion  Engineering 3,470 

Combustion  Engineering  Suf>er  Heater  Limited 55,145 

Comdisco  Canada  Limited 1,767 

Cominco  Limited 1,000 

Commetrics  Limited  1,402 

Communaute  Urbaine  de  Montreal 1,902 

Communication  Manufacturing  Company  Canada  Lim- 
ited   53,827 

Communications  Technology  Canada  Limited 59,072 

Compagnie  Tupperware  Limitee  1,742,036 

Compond  Electronics  Limited 11,505 

Comptec  International  Limited  1,340 

Comptel  Distribution  Incorporated  4,508 

Compu  Mark  2,373 

Computer  Image  Canada  1,142 

Computervision  Corporation 25,498 

Comshare  Limited 1,440 

Comtern  Limited 4,917 

Comtest  Communications  Products  Limited 8,264 

Comwill  Construction  Limited 1,141 

Conair  Canada  Limited 18,166 

Con  Force  Products  Limited 10,046 

Conklin  &  Garrett  Limited 35,416 

Conment 1,216 

Consolidated  Aluminum 1,414 

Consolidated  Bathurst  Incorporated 2,999 

Consoltex  Incorporated 2,402 


13*8 

SECTION  ll(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co«/mwe^ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Construction  Du  St  Laurent  Limitee 1,347 

Construction  Products  Incorporated 4,615 

Construction  Specialities  Limited 364,029 

Consumer  Glass  Company  Limited 4,706 

Continental  Group  of  Canada 1,169 

Continental  Hydraulics 10,078 

Control  Data  Canada  Limited  7,485 

Control  &  Metering  Limited  4,689 

Control  Systems 2,603 

Convertext  Incorporated 2,036 

Cooper  &  Patterson  Incorporated  1,499 

Cooper  Craft  Guild  of  Canada 37,691 

Cooper  Energy  Services  Limited  103,737 

Corbin  Les  Bateaux  Incorporee  18,037 

Core  Labs  Canada 3,416 

Corinthian  Pools  of  Canada  Limited 1,188 

Corunna  Petroleum  Limited 2,268 

Coscol  Equipment  and  Chemicals  1,620 

Countryman  Raymond  Excavating  Limited 36,661 

Courtice  Speciality  Steels  Limited 27,225 

Coyle  Tanning  Company  Limited  1,572 

Creators  Canada  Limited  1,286 

Crouse  Hinds  Canada  Limited 23,550 

Crown  Video 1,036 

Crump,  Bill 1,419 

Crystal  Beach  Company  Limited 5,166 

Cummings  Signs  Canada  Limited 1,528 

Curwood  Packaging  Canada  Limited 2,429 

Customs  Glass  Limited 2,484 

Cyanamid  of  Canada  Limited 27,464 

Cybex,  Division  of  Lumex 6,981 

DAF  Plastics  Limited  3,61 1 

DBM  Reflex 1,852 

DCN  Plastics  Incorporated 4,804 

DGH  Television  Systems 1,588 

Daal  Specialties  Canada  Limited 52,250 

Dairy  Equipment  Company 2,304 

Dart  Industries 1,126,904 

Dart  Products  National  Limited 1,679 

Dasco  Data  Products 5,559 

Dasco,  Melvin  H 3,504 

Data  General  (Canada)  Limited  5,041 

Data  Plotting  Services 1,737 

Data  Terminal  Systems  Canada  Incorporated  4,70 1 

Datron  Systems  Limited 2,021 

Dauphin  Alfalfa 2,827 

Davey  Tree  Expert  Company  of  Canada  Limited 6,435 

Davis,  Alfred  H  2,257 

Davis  Engineering  Limited 6,457 

Davis,  Eryou  and  Associates 6,009 

Dawson  Riddel  Canada 195,476 

Dayton  Walther  Canada  Limited 4,500 

Dealtey,  Murray 2,352 

Decca  Records  Company  Limited  24,251 

Deflect-O-Products  Limited 37,365 

Delaval  Company  Limited 2,202 

Delaval  Turbines  Canada  Limited 1,746 

Demers,  Jean 1,921 

Denver  Horn 1 1,288 

Department  of  Energy,  Mines  &  Resources 5,225 

Department  of  Fisheries  and  Oceans 41,140 

Department  of  National  Defence 57,765 

Dero  Enterprises  Limited  16,779 

Derries,  John 4,812 


Detroit  Diesel 2,476 

Devilbiss  Canada  Limited 2,426 

Diamond  Canapower  Limited 42,502 

Diasonics  Incorporated  3,735 

Dick 1,118 

Dickey  John  of  Canada 3,474 

Dicomed  Corporation 8,313 

Dielectric  Communications 1,988 

Diemaco  Incorporated 1,375 

Diemaster  Tool  Incorporated  12,820 

Diesels  Harper  Limitee 19,161 

Dieterich  Post  Company 2,295 

Dietz,  Bill  4,029 

Diffracto  Limited 3,929 

Digiseis  Exploration  Incorporated  4,900 

Digital  Development  Corporation 5,978 

Digital  Equipment  of  Canada 15,011 

Digital  Video  Systems  Incorporated 13,770 

Dillingham  Corporation 386,002 

Dillman,  Bob 3,591 

Dipix  Limited 2,014 

Disco  Incorporated 4,396 

Discraft  Limited 2,605 

Display  &  Exhibit  Company 7,671 

Dix  Performance  Limited 2,274 

Dobco  Enterprises  Limited 5,194 

Doble  Engineering 4,001 

Dome  Petroleum  Limited  10,282 

Dominion  Bridge  Sulzer  Incorporated 41,515 

Dominion  Comb  &  Novelty  Company 9,829 

Dominion  Foundries  and  Steel  Limited 35,286 

Dominion  Textiles  Limited 6,655 

Domtar  Chemicals 7,990 

Domtar  Incorporated 27,943 

Domtar  Packaging  Limited 11,137 

Don  Meirer  Productions  7,063 

Donn  Products  Canada  Limited 1,798 

Donohue  St  Felicien 46,248 

Dorcy  Ashflash  Canada  Limited  1,791 

D'Orlan  Jewellers  Limited  16,121 

Double  A/D  Distributors  1,852 

Douglas  Incorporated 18,243 

Doulton  of  Canada  Limited 54,565 

Dow  Chemical  of  Canada  Limited 17,726 

Dow  Corning  of  Canada  Limited 1,406 

Dreco  Limited 42,888 

Dresser  Clark  Industries 62,859 

Dresser  Industrial  Products  Limited  1,333 

Dresser  Industries  Canada  Limited 4,492 

Drilco  Services — Division  of  Smith  International 2,800 

Duke  Lawn  Equipment  Limited 1,544 

Duplate  Canada  Limited 12,335 

Dupont  of  Canada  66,097 

Duracoll  Incorporated 3,657 

Durametallic  of  Canada  Limited 1,698 

EBA  Engineering 2,059 

EGG  Canada  Limited 4,258 

EGG  Industrial  Division 15,835 

EVI  (Engineered  Vacuum  Incorporated)  8,221 

Eastern  Plastic  Industries 17,340 

Eastern  Precision  Casting  Incorporated 1,531 

Eastern  Provincial  Airways 2,073 

Eastern  Steel  Products 5,831 

Ecoguard  Systems  Limited 3,481 

Economics  Laboratory  Canada 21,374 

Ed  Green/Smith  Hemion  11,475 

Eddy  Forest  Products  Limited  5,496 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


13'9 


NATIONAL  REVENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Edgewind  Sales  &  Manufacturing  Limited 3,017 

Edmonton  Opera  Association 2,872 

Edmonton  Power  Company 2,21 1 

Ekco  Canada  Limited  57,414 

Elan  Tool  &  Die  Limited  4,020 

Eldon  Industries  of  Canada  Incorporated 19,156 

Electralert  Limited  Ontario  Corporation 1,701 

Electro  &  Optical  Systems 2,827 

Electro  Rent  (Canada)  Limited 56,366 

Electrode  Corporation 1,215 

Electronetic  Systems  Limited 13,647 

Electronic  Associates  Incorporated  1,623 

Eli  Lilly  and  Company  (Canada)  Limited 1,150 

Eli  Lilly  Interamericas  Incorporated 6,529 

Elliott  Industrial  Equipment 3,229 

Eltron  Enterprises  Limited 1,208 

Emerson  Electric  Canada  Limited 12,873 

Emerson  Grant  Erectors 2,096 

Emrick  Plastics  Limited  18,807 

Entreprises  Pipe  Line — Montreal 7,535 

Enviroglass  Incorporated 5,531 

Environmental  Research  Group 1,357 

Enviroservice  Incorporated 35,012 

Epicure  1,387 

Equinox  Industries 2,930 

Equipment  Domar  Incorporated 5,559 

Equipment  Veneesa 2,443 

Erco  Industries  Limited 22,955 

Erickson,  Arthur,  Architects 2,217 

Ericsson,  L  M  Limited 1,487 

Esco  Limited 38,674 

Essex  Mold  Incorporated 172,807 

Esso  Resources  Canada 127,926 

Ethyl  Canada 7,101 

Ethyl  Imco  Incorporated 27,488 

Ethyl  Packaging  Limited 7,104 

Euclid  Canada  Limited 16,288 

Eurocan  Pulp  and  Paper  Company  Limited 8,994 

Ex-All-O  Corporation  1,431 

Exacaire  Parts  LS  Limited 3,155 

Executone  Limited 1,286 

Export  Plastics  Limited 9,165 

Export  Scovill  Limited 1,763 

Exxon  Research  and  Engineering  c/o  Imperial  Oil  Lim- 
ited   3,206 

FCM  Division  of  Gulf  &  Western 59,617 

FSI  Geotechnical  Limited 5,858 

FW  Woolworth  Company  Limited 4,200 

Fabricated  Plastics 6,820 

Fabricated  Steel  Products 6,698 

Fab-Tec  Canada  Limited  2,801 

Family  Leisure  Centres  of  Canada 8,687 

Fansteel  VR  Wesson  2,494 

Fauteux  Building  Supplies  Limited 2,327 

Fedco  Audio  Laboratories 10,752 

Federal  White  Cement  Limited 5,656 

Federlein,  HA 4,160 

Ferguson  Supply  Limited  2,764 

Ferronti  Electric — Division  of  NEI  Canada 1,1 18 

Ferro  Technique  Limited 1,595 

Fiba  Canning  Incorporated 2,073 

Fiberco  Marine  Industries  Limited  2,720 

Field  Aviation  Company  Limited 6,192 

Fife  Controls  Canada  Limited  2,641 


Finning  Tractor  Company  Limited  5,303 

Firestone  Canada  Incorporated 4,733 

Firing  Industries  Limited 18,326 

First  Blood  Productions 38,840 

Fish  Scientific  Company 14,916 

Fisher  Controls  Company  of  Canada  Limited 3,357 

Fisheries  Research  Board  4,539 

Fisheries  Resource  Development  Limited 1,677 

Fishery  Product  Limited 2,249 

Fisons — Western  Peat  Corporation 5,490 

Flair  Plastics  International 49,745 

Flakt  Canada  Limited 1,210 

Flangeklamp  of  Canada  Limited 2,640 

Fletchers  Fine  Foods 3,018 

Fletchers  Limited 4,663 

Floating  Point  Systems  22,536 

Flour  Canada 1,928 

Fluid  Air  Components 1,545 

Flyer  Industries  Incorporated 1,434 

Foothills  Industries  Products 5,574 

Foothills  Pipeline  Yukon  Limited 71,673 

Ford  Meter  Box  Incorporated 1,790 

Ford  Motor  Company  of  Canada  Limited 35,120 

Fording  Coal 3,852 

Foreman,  George  J 2,612 

Formica 1,518 

Fortress  Mountain  Resorts  Limited 1 1,068 

Forward  Precision  Tools  Limited 1,542 

Foster  Wheeler  Limited 1,847 

Foxboro  Canada  Limited 8,249 

Fracture  Technology  Incorporated 44,219 

Fram  Canada  Limited 5,663 

France  Film  Company 1,961 

Franklin  Electric  Canada  Limited 2,632 

Franklin  Manufacturing  Company  Canada  Limited 14,950 

Freedland  Industries  Limited 33,174 

Freightmasters  Division 1,552 

Frontier  Helicopters  Limited  2,637 

Fuller  Brush  Company  Limited 1,231 

Funk,  Allen 21,387 

Furncraft  Vehicles  Limited 1 ,452 

GA  Computer  Limited 1 1,270 

GE  Corrigan  Agencies 1,733 

GPR  Industries  Limited  1,162 

GR  Dake  Limited 1,565 

GTE  Sylvania  Canada  Limited 1,288 

GTE  Unistrul  Limited 1 1,710 

Galigher  Canada  Limited 3,892 

Gapco  Incorporated 35,623 

Gardner  Denver  Company  Canada  20,475 

Garett  Manufacturing  Limited 5,168 

Garett  Turbine 1,743 

Garland  Commercial  Ranges  Limited 1,812 

Gasbec  Incorporated  2,452 

Gates  Canada  Incorporated  3,577 

Gates  Rubber  of  Canada  Limited 3,228 

Gatx  Fuller  Limited 3,092 

General  Datacom  Industries  (Canada)  Limited 46,430 

General  Diesel  Incorporated 20,204 

General  Drop  Forge  Limited 1,356 

General  Electric  Company  8,630 

General  Foods  Limited  10,043 

General  Motors  of  Canada  Limited 165,872 

General  Motors — Diesel  Division 1,066 

General  Television  Arts  c/o  Bob  Lo  Island 3,837 

General  Tire  Canada  Limited 14,063 

General  Tire  &  Rubber  Company 3,562 


13' 10 

SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Genpok  Corporation 9,1 12 

Genrad  Limited  75,291 

Genstar  Limited 109,998 

Geometries  Service  Canada 13,180 

Geophysical  Services  Incorporated 68,010 

Georgia  Public  TV 3,935 

Gerber  Scientific  6,240 

Gerr  Elector — Acoustics 1,365 

Gestelner  Incorporated  2,505 

Giga-Tron  Associates  Limited  5,970 

Gimco  Limited 1,226 

Gleason,  Don 12,267 

Gledden  c/o  Canadian  Tire  Corporation 3,200 

Gleder  Guard  Tool  and  Die  Manufacturing 2,700 

Glitsch  Canada  Limited 1,088 

Golten  Marine  Company  Incorporated 5,459 

Goodrich  BF  Canada  Incorporated  15,715 

Goodyear  Canada  Incorporated 2,106 

Gorrie  Advertising  Management  27,762 

Gould  Manufacturing  of  Canada  Limited 9,985 

Grace,  WR  &  Company  Limited 2,124 

Gracious  Living  Incorporated 29,1 18 

Grand  Theatre  de  Quebec  (Le) 2,050 

Grandford  Manufacturing  Company 1,322 

Grarperu  c/o  Practice  Oil 1 1,286 

Gravure  Graphics  Limited  1,132 

Great  Lakes  Airlines 1,582 

Great  Lakes  Carbon  Corporation 7,290 

Great  Lakes  Forest  Products  Limited  2,551 

Greater  Canada  Colour  Printing  Company 2,591 

Greif  Containers  Incorporated  2,566 

Greyhound  Exposition  Service  2,446 

Grief  Containers  Incorporated 1,396 

Griffin  Steel  Foundries  Limited 6,331 

Gross  Machinery  Canada  Limited 3,853 

Guertin  Brothers  (Paint) 1,766 

Gulbransen  Canada 1,846 

Gulf  Canada  Limited 106,680 

Gulf  Canada  Resources 21,173 

HC  Industries  Limited 3,752 

HDC  Industries  5,011 

Halifax  Industries  Limited 5,197 

Hall  Smith  Company  Limited 10,875 

Halliburton 4,439 

Hallmark  Tools  Limited  1,625 

Halpen  Engineering  Limited 4,503 

Hankscraft,  Division  of  Gerber  (Canada)  Incorporated  ....  31,086 

Hanson  Materials  Engineering 3,443 

Hardy  Associates 5,846 

Harkness,  Jan 3,330 

Harnischfeger  Corporation 17,374 

Harris  Corporation 7,530 

Harris  E  Company 9,048 

Harris  Fashion 1,889 

Harris  Systems  Limited 2,718 

Hartford  Fibres  Limited 2,977 

Hartford  Tooling  Limited 2,039 

Harvard  Development  Limited 37,301 

Harvey  Manufacturing  Corporation  of  Canada  Limited ....  2,910 

Hasbro  Industries  Limited  26,741 

Haughton,  CF  Limited  1,568 

Havlik  Enterprises  Limited 4,589 

Hawker  Siddeley  Canada  Limited 5,627 

Hayes-Dana  Limited 2,258 


Hector,  Ernest 1,117 

Henry,  MA  Limited 3,389 

Hercules  Canada  Limited 348,410 

Heritage  Silversmiths  Limited 1,490 

Hershey  Chocolate  Company  of  Canada 1,039 

Herzberg,  Roland  J 1,157 

Heston  Industries  Limited 3,762 

Hewlett  Packard  Canada  Limited  172,554 

Highway  Stamping  (Windsor)  Limited 4,082 

Hitech  Canada  Limited 1,586 

Hoke  Controls  Limited  1,868 

Holmes  Foundry 3,251 

Holophane  Company — Johns  Manville  Canada  Incorpo- 
rated   23,679 

Honda  Canada 4,227 

Honeywell  Controls  Limited 5,931 

Honeywell  Incorporated  2,555 

Honeywell  Limited 21,653 

Horton  CBI  Limited  15,516 

Hosker  Scientific  (Western) 2,728 

Hospital  for  Sick  Children 1,169 

Hosteler,  Mike 12,996 

Hudson  Bay  Oil  and  Gas  Company 7,017 

Hughes,  BJ  Services  Limited  2,174 

Humbert  Lloyd 3,656 

Humphrey  and  Cosburn  26,339 

Hupp  Canada  Manufacturing 4,534 

Huron  Steel  Products  (Windsor)  Limited 39,150 

Hussman  Store  Equipment  Limited 2,345 

Hydro  Quebec 22,767 

Hydro  Space  Marine  Services 49,851 

Hymac  Limitee 2,997 

Hyster  Canada  Limited 3,521 

IBL  Industries  Limited  30,924 

IBM  Canada  Limited  61,928 

ICL  Computers  Canada  3,796 

lEIHolden  4,015 

ITT  Canada  Limited 1 1,335 

ITT  Industries  of  Canada  Limited 3,492 

ITT  McKay  Marine 1,105 

ITT  Terryphone 1,244 

IXL  Industries  Limited 1,535 

Ideal  Builders  Hardware 2,357 

Ideal  Toy  Company  of  Canada  Limited  14,123 

Imasco  Limited 1,726 

Imco  Container  Canada  Limited  193,391 

Imlac  Corporation  3,473 

Im-Pact  Hearing  Conservation 12,421 

Impact  Tool  &  Manufacturing  Limited  3,813 

Impenco  Limited  3,084 

Imperial  Oil  Limited 20,715 

Import  Tool  Company  Limited 1,702 

Imprimerie  Montreal  Magog  1,368 

Inco  Limited 20,150 

Inco  Metals  Company 5,413 

Industrial  Engines  Limited 3,102 

Industrial  Projects  Limited 1,833 

Industrial  Sales  (1979)  Limited 50,160 

Industries  Provinciales 1,626 

Inersap  Incorporated 16,285 

Informart 2,292 

Ingersoll  Rand  Canada  Incorporated 54,744 

Inglis  Limited 1,831 

Inificon  Leybold  Heraeus  3,030 

Inmont  Canada  Limited  3,823 

Innotech  Aviation 138,466 

Insertek  Electronics  Limited 1,442 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13«11 


NATIONAL  REYENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Co/i/mi/e^ 


Instrument  Champagne 6,691 

Instrument  Services  Laboratory 1,406 

Insulation  of  Michigan 15,358 

Insul  Foam — IF  Insulation 1,091 

Intec  Corporation 64,603 

Integrated  Plastics  Limited 9,700 

Integrated  Systems 1,193 

Intel  Semiconductors  Corporation  of  Canada 75,821 

Inter  Environmental  Limited  1,183 

Intercheck  Corporation 1,525 

Intercontinental  Communication  Services 6,640 

Intercraft  Industries 3,101 

Interfax  Systems  Incorporated 41,744 

Interior  Electronics  Limited 1,014 

International  Computers  Limited 2,768 

International  Construction  Equipment  12,140 

International  Harvester  of  Canada 56,105 

International  Jet  Air  Limited 1,546 

International  Paints 5,457 

Interprovincial  Steel  &  Pipe  Corporation 1,119 

Inter-Technology  Limited 19,263 

Inventex  Corporation 5,213 

Ireco  Canada  Limited 8,320 

Irving  Oil 32,356 

Irving  Oil  Transport  Limited  25,897 

Irwin  Toy  Limited 468,940 

Ivaco  Rolling  Mills 9,070 

Iwatser  America  Incorporated  1,097 

JB  Atlas  Company  Limited 6,375 

JFJ  Mold  Processors  Limited 7,226 

JlCase 16,366 

JLG  Industries  Incorporated 14,487 

JM  Huber  Corporation 1,853 

JMR  Instruments 4,348 

JWI  Limited 1,852 

Jacobson  Elevator  Builders 1,899 

Jacuzzi  Canada  Limited 28,714 

Jaddco  Anderson  Construction  Company 65,131 

Jaeger  Fashions  of  Canada  Limited 2,328 

James  Standardbred  Farms 5,544 

Janza,  Steve  13,980 

Jason  Sound  Industries  3,277 

Jay  Plastics  Company  Limited 55,035 

Jeffers,  Keith  3,763 

Jeffery  Moore  Packaging  Machinery 27,636 

Jenson,  Clarence 20,196 

Jerome  &  Francis  Company 1,356 

Jet  Sew  Division  of  Clueth  Peabody 1,067 

Jewish  General  Hospital 1,558 

Jo-Ad  Industries  Limited 6,402 

John  Deere  Limited 39,783 

Johnson  Controls  Limited 8,388 

Johnson  Filaments 1,852 

Johnson  H  &  R  (Canada)  Incorporated  3,297 

Johnson  &  Johnson  Limited 13,469 

Johnson,  SC  and  Sons  Limited 3,577 

Johnson  Terminals  Limited 24,658 

Johnson  Walton  Steamships  Limited 2,942 

Jordan  Ste  Michelle  Cellars  Limited 1 1,575 

Joy  Manufacturing  Company  Canada  Limited 18,852 

Jutan  International  Limited 2,017 

Jutras  Die  Casting 9,745 

KG  Campbell  Corporation  1,265 

KHD  Canada  Limited ........:  1,528 


K  &  K  Tool  Corporation 1,088 

KSH  Incorporated 3,752 

KSM  Canada  Limited 1,553 

KT  Services  Incorporated 1,168 

KTS  Industries 1,860 

KY  Diamond  Limited 4,032 

Karl  Klement  Packaging  Machinery  Company  Limited  ....  10,608 

Kauforan  of  Collingwood  2,497 

Kawnser  Company  Limited 1,879 

Kelcee  Communications  Limited 11,593 

Kellogg  Salada  Canada 1,113 

Kelly  Services  Incorporated  8,118 

Kelsey  Hoyes  Canada  Limited 19,917 

Kemron  Environmental  Services 14,300 

Kemtar  Incorporated 1,243 

Kendan  Manufacture  Limited  1,801 

Kennametal  Limited  1,008 

Kenner  Products  (Canada)  Limited 846,817 

Kero  Sun  Canada  Limited , 1,517 

Keuffel  &  Esser  of  Canada  Limited 12,231 

Kilmer  Van  Nostrand  Company  Limited  7,448 

Kimberly  Clark  Canada  Limited 75,852 

Kimberley,  George 5,221 

Kincaid's  Drywall  Limited  2,862 

King  Enterprises 3,786 

Kingsway  Film  Limited 2,670 

Kinley,  JC  c/o  Shell  Oil  Company 19,278 

Kirby,  WL 8,295 

Kirk  Equipment  Limited 1,934 

Knock  Manufacturing  Company  Limited 1,291 

Kodak  Canada  Limited,  Incorporated 24,476 

Koffman  Foods  Limited 2,123 

Komeline  Sanderson  Limited 14,897 

Kompro  Canadian  Computor 1,286 

Konar  Investments 1,458 

Kongsburg  North  America  Incorporated 1,092 

Kontron  Scientific  Limited 2,344 

Koppers  of  Canada 4,182 

Kord  Products  Limited  58,614 

Kost,  Albert  4,692 

Kraft  Limited 7,022 

Kruger  Incorporated  Pulp  &  Paper 2,493 

Kustoms  Electronics 1,601 

Kwik  Lok  Limited 3,021 

LAF  Varah  Limited 3,099 

LCM  Engineering  2,264 

LGL  Limited  8,305 

LR  Leak  Repairs  Incorporated 5,541 

Laboratoires  Merck  Frosst  3,900 

Lada  Cars  of  Canada  Incorporated 2,1 14 

Lagendyk  &  Company  Limited 9,949 

Lake  Group  Limited  1,199 

Lake  Ontario  Cement  5,032 

Lakeside  Plastics  Limited 4,259 

Lamb-Cargate  Industries  Limited 6,821 

Lamb,  F  Jos  (Canada)  Limited  19,240 

Lamco  Die  Cast  Limited 32,699 

Lamonte  Kounts 2,257 

Landis  and  Gyr  Incorporated 1,454 

La  Presse  Limitee 1,748 

La  Regie  De  La  Place  Des  Arts 21,569 

La  Salle  Machine  Tool  of  Canada  Limited 4,380 

Laserplane  Canada  Limited  1,987 

Laurentide  Controls  (1978)  Limited 2,787 

Lavalley  Industrial  Products  Plastics  Incorporated  5,21 1 

Lawrasons  Chemical  Limited 5,238 

Lawson  Graphics  Pacific  Limited 7,484 


13-12 

SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co/2///iMe(/ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Lawson  Packaging 4,990 

Lawton  Die  Cast  Company  of  Canada  Limited 4,451 

Leasemetrics 18,812 

Leblanc  and  Royle  Communications  Towers  Limited 3,069 

Leco  Industries 2,772 

Lecyer  et  Fils  1,447 

Ledair  Company 4,785 

Lee  Mason  Tools  Limited 3,972 

Leigh  Instruments  5,079 

Leisure  Dynamics  of  Canada  Limited 2,1 14 

Lennox  Industries  (Canada)  Limited 4,845 

Les  Bouteilles  Browns 5,079 

Les  Breuvages  Oka  Limited  1,484 

Les  Broderies  Laval  Limitee 2,410 

Les  Constructions  St  Laurent 6,887 

Les  Diesels  Harper  Limitee 33,822 

Les  Disques  Unisons  Incorporee 2,979 

Les  Entreprises  Givesco  Incorporee 14,833 

Les  Industries  Cascades  Limitee 5,801 

Les  Industries  Morscott 6,473 

Les  Industries  Univor  Incorporee 2,864 

Les  Productions  La  grande  Viree  Incorporee  13,924 

Les  Produits  de  Ciment 44,065 

Les  Systemes  Northern  Telecom  3,041 

Lesters  Delicatessen  Produits 1,301 

Level  Lift  Corporation 1,128 

Levitt  Safety 1,110 

Levitton  Manufactures  of  Canada  Limited 1,810 

Leybold  Heracus  Canada  Limited 4,321 

Libbey  Owens  Ford  Export  Company 1,202 

Libby,  McNeil  &  Libby  of  Canada 2,387 

Libby  St  Clair 5,065 

Lily  Cups  Limited  36,469 

Linamar  Machine  Limited  1,104 

Linotype  Cana,da/Jomar 5,1 14 

Liquid  Carbonic  Incorporated 90,088 

Lisle  Kelco  Limited 4,155 

Litelab  Corporation 9,296 

Litton 6,353 

Litton  Systems  Canada  Limited 82,763 

Loblaws  Limited 1,780 

Lockei  Bras  Limited 6,481 

Lomas,  LV  Chemical  Limited 1,1 10 

Longyear  Canada  Incorporated  1,842 

Loral  Electronics  Systems 9,1 18 

Loram  Maintenance 2,200 

Lortec  10,787 

Losinger  Construction  Systems 1,118 

Louis  Albert  Associates  Incorporated  5,375 

Loundbury  Industrial  Limited  3,767 

Ludwig  Engel  Canada  Limited 3,482 

Lufthansa  German  Airlines 2,967 

Lux  Time  (Canada)  Limited 4,948 

Lynch  Communications  Systems  Incorporated 1 ,8  30 

Lynch  Transcom  Incorporated 9,177 

M  &  K  Plastic  Products  19,660 

MSC  Electronics  Limited 8,420 

MTD  Products  Limited 58,962 

Mabit,  R  Incorporated 5,566 

Macbeth  Color  and  Photometry 3,183 

Machineries  Provinciales 166,649 

Machines  Outils  Elliot 1,332 

Maclean  Hunter  Limited 2,139 

MacMillan  Bloedel 9,701 


MacMillan  Rothesay  Limited 19,326 

Madel  Scientific  Company  Limited 3,065 

Madell,  S  Limited  9,122 

Magic  Pantry  Foods  Incorporated 5,468 

Magnetic  Metals  Limited 3,965 

Maine  &  New  Brunswick  Power  Company 18,560 

Mainland  Elworthy  Limited 2,1 1 1 

Majestic  Wiley  Contractor 8,248 

Major,  David 1,304 

Major  Plastics 7,655 

Malex  Electronics 9,558 

Mandem  Division  of  Asamera  Oil  6,884 

Manitoba  Hydro 4,004 

Manitoba  Opera  Association  Incorporated 2,952 

Manitoba  Rolling  Mills 3,200 

Manitoba  Telephone  System 4,125 

Maple  Leaf  Village  2,071 

March  McBinery 1,105 

March  and  McLemman  Limited  2,169 

Marine  Industries  Limited  7,338 

Marion  Power  Shovel 7,470 

Maritime  Beverage  Limited  1,317 

Maritime  Resource  Management  Services  1 ,965 

Marshall  Macklin  Monaghan  Limited 1,415 

Marthon  Machinery 5,229 

Martin  Food  Mills  Limited 1,854 

Mary  Kay  Cosmetics 160,500 

Massey  Fergurson  Industries  Limited 2,388 

Masthead  International  Incorporated  2,107 

Matrox  Electronic  Systems 1,572 

Mattel  Canada  Limited 158,668 

May  Court  Club  of  St  Catherines  1,045 

McCormicks  Limited 2,325 

McCracken,  Darrell 15,786 

McDonalds  Restaurants  93,592 

McDonnell  Douglas  Canada  Limited 3,243 

McElhanny  Surveying  and  Engineering  Limited 15,098 

McGee- William  Company  5,406 

Mcintosh  Labs  Incorporated 1,671 

McNeil  Laboratories 3,093 

Mcphar  Instrument  Corporation  6,264 

McQuay  Norris  Limited 2,867 

Mead  Packaging  Canada  Limited  3,091 

Mecfab  Incorporated 1,898 

Medina  Oil  Field  Supply  Company  Incorporated 3,325 

Medtronics  of  Canada  Limited 1,003 

Meidinger,  Kenneth 17,359 

Mele,  Anne 1,305 

Memorex  of  Canada  1,025 

Merck  Frosst  Laboratory 29,368 

Merit  Abrasives  15,477 

Merlin  Development  Limited 1,315 

Metallurg  Canada  4,985 

Metermaster 1,626 

Metroplex  Corporation  1,678 

Metropolitan  Life  Insurance  Company 25,546 

Metrospan  Community  Newpapers 2,397 

MicheUn  Tires  Canada  Limited 3,560 

Mico  systems  Incorporated 2,352 

Micom  Company 10,826 

Micro  Component  Tech 3,734 

Microdata  Corporation  1,320 

Micropublishing  Services  Canada  Limited 1 ,044 

Microwave — Division  of  MA  Electronics  7,496 

Migration  Productions  Limited 2,309 

Migration  Records 2,924 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMIN ISTRA  TION  ACT  13.13 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Milchem  Canada 12,325 

Miles  Laboratories  Limited 13,269 

Millmans  Communications  Services  Limited 5,421 

Milton  Bradley  Canada  Incorporated  149,642 

Ministry    of    Transportation    &    Communications    for 

Ontario  7,554 

Minnesota  Valley  Engineering 2,972 

Miscoe  Data  Communication 1,349 

Misiak  Associates  Limited  3,102 

Misner  Marketing  Limited 4,443 

Mitel  Corporation  19,064 

Mitsubishi  Canada 1,480 

Mobil  Chemical  Company 4,856 

Mobil  Oil  Canada  Limited  6,950 

Modern  Mold  Limited 19,1 15 

Modern  Tools  Limited 1,41 1 

Mohawk  Industrial  Uniform  Supply  Incorporated 1,356 

Molex  Electronics  Limited  17,141 

Monarch  Marking  Systems 4,308 

Monarch  Plastics  Limited 1,267 

Moncton  Flying  Club 1,647 

Monenco  Computing  Services  Limited  30,370 

Monroe  Auto  Equipment  Company 5,905 

Monroe-Ritton  Bus  Equipment 4,196 

Monsanto  Canada  Incorporated 15,459 

Montreal  General  Hospital 3,297 

Montreal  Pipe  Line  Limited 7,548 

Montreal  Wilson  Machine  Company 1,228 

Moog  Canada  Limited 1,881 

Moore  Business  Forms  Limited  3,227 

Moore  Corporation 1,760 

Moore  Industrial  Limited  5,333 

Moore  Instrument  Company 1 1,335 

Mordhorst  Automation  Incorporated 5,646 

Morris  Cerullo  World  Evangelism 60,582 

Morse  Chain — Division  of  Borg  Warner  (Canada)  Lim- 
ited   1,496 

Morval  Durofoam 17,710 

Morvue  Incorporated 5,034 

Motherlode  Productions 13,048 

Motor  Wheel  Corporation  of  Canada  Limited 174,458 

Motorola  Canada  Limited 7,362 

Motorola  Military  &  Aerospace  Products 3,430 

Motors  Insurance  Corporation 2,076 

Moulders  Supply  Limited 1 1,475 

Multilek  Incorporated 2,175 

Multilingual  TV 1,693 

Multitone  Electronics  Limited 1,136 

Muncy  Neil  Associates  2,454 

Mundet  Industries  Limited 2,278 

Mundy,  AF  Associates  Canada  Limited 4,459 

Murray,  Albert  E 3,154 

Mylec  Canada  Limited 7,611 

Myroc  Tek  Incorporated 3,690 

N  Dex  Instrument  Limited 1,510 

NB  Electric  Power  Commission 5,605 

NCR  Canada  Limited 12,203 

NDT  Consulting  Registered 1,165 

NEI  Parsons  (Canada)  Limited 8,345 

NL  Rucher  Products 2,823 

Nadle,  Don  and  John 1 1,739 

Nash  Engineering  Company 3,255 

Nashua  Murritt  Limited 5,489 

Natco,  EE  Limited 1 1,221 

National  Arts  Centre 19,771 


National  Auto  Radiator  Manufacturing  Company  Lim- 
ited   245,379 

National  Hardware  Specialties  Limited  2,069 

National  Rubber  Company  Limited 34,757 

National  Steel  Car  Corporation  Limited 1 ,435 

National  Trading  Division  of  Rendafles  Company 1,802 

Navair  Limited 1,861 

Nei  Canada  Limited  5,034 

Neilson,  Wm  Company  Limited 4,733 

Nelson,  Bill 1 1,195 

Nelson  Stied  Welding  2,376 

New  Brunswick  Telephone  Company 3,747 

New  England  Master  Bond  Company 2,615 

New  Holland,  Division  of  Sperry  Rand 10,816 

Neway 1,778 

Newcor  Canada  Limited 2,244 

Newfoundland  Telephone  Company  1,832 

Niagara  Metals  Limited 1,480 

Nicholson  Miendie  Machine  Limited 4,671 

Nickel,  RD  and  Associates  Incorporated 20,891 

Nicolet  Canada  Limited  21,991 

Niles,  Fred  Camera  Service  Company 1 1,939 

Niobec  Incorporated  1,181 

Nippon  Yusen  Kaisha 1,238 

Nissan  Automobile  Company  (Canada)  Limited 4,207 

Nissei  Sangyo  Canada  Incorporated  6,813 

Noranda  Mines  Limited  29,451 

Norango  Computer  Systems 1,987 

Norca  Industries 1,035 

Norcanair 2,940 

Nordair  Limited 17,420 

Nordraft  Reprographics  Limited 3,318 

Nordson  of  Canada  Limited 16,428 

Normad  Machine  &  Manufacture  Limited 5,401 

Norseman  Plastics  Limited 22,953 

North  American  Construction  28,947 

North  American  Controls 14,035 

North  Sea  Products  Limited 9,677 

North  Wire  Limited 5,005 

Northern  Construction  Company 26,388 

Northern  Geophysical 14,875 

Northern  Telecom  Canada  Limited 25,390 

Northridge  Plastics  Limited 1,384 

Northwest  Communications  Limited 1 1 ,426 

Northwest  Pile  Driving  9,940 

Northwest  Survey  Corporation  Limited 8,655 

Northwest  Teleproductions 20,254 

Northwood  Pulp  &  Timber  Limited  2,823 

Nova — Alberta  Corporation 154,106 

Nova  Construction 1,075 

Nova  Scotia  Power  Corporation 2,897 

Nuco  Musical  Instruments  Limited 1,388 

Nu  Dell  Plastics  Limited 5,416 

OB  Canada  Incorporated  2,917 

Ocean  Construction  Supplies  1,144 

Odeco  Drilling  Company 2,220 

Oden  Corporation 4,865 

Offshore  Navigation  (Canada) 1,170 

Offshore  Survey  &  Positioning  Limited 2,042 

Okanagan  Helicopters 5,175 

Olsen,  Laverne 5,780 

Olsen,  WH  Manufacturing  Company  Limited 1,305 

Olsonite  Products  Limited 29,406 

Omnitrode 4,718 

Oneida  Canada  Limited  1,509 

Ontario  Electric  Company 2,001 

Ontario  Hydro 65,003 

Ontario  Ministry  of  Transportation  and  Communications  10,260 


13«14 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Ontario  Sealstor 4,612 

Oral  Roberts  Evangelistic  Association  of  Canada  26,549 

Ortho  Instruments 10,401 

Osakis  Silo  Company 1,474 

Otis  Elevator  Company  Limited 7,720 

Outboard  Marine  Corporation  of  Canada 57,401 

Overdrive  Trips 7,991 

Overseas  Monitor  Corporation 1,151 

Oxford  Development 1,096 

Oxford  Frozen  Foods  Limited 1,723 

POS  Pilot  Plant  Corporation 16,364 

PPG  Industries  Canada  Limited 9,662 

Paccar  du  Canada  2,619 

Pacific  Western  Airlines 1,464 

Pala  International  Corporation 11,864 

Palliser  Furniture 1,140 

Pan  Arctic  Oils  Limited 1 1,286 

Panasonic  Industries  of  Canada 6,969 

Papier  Cascade  Calano  Incorporee 16,530 

Paradyne  Canada  Limited 17,559 

Parker  Brothers  Games  Limited 346,672 

Parker,  Phillip  C 15,388 

Parkway  Manufacturing  Limited 5,226 

Pation  Mines  (Quebec)  Limited 42,539 

Paul  Mueller  Company 4,172 

Paxson  Coil  Systems  Incorporated 1,680 

Payne,  Dale  &  Associates 17,281 

Payton  Associates  Incorporated 4,178 

Peace  Bridge  International  Bridge  Authority 30,812 

Pecco  Cranes  Limited  23,604 

Peerless  Plastics  Limited 19,720 

Pegasus,  Division  of  Koehring 4,818 

Pembina  Explorations  Limited 3,698 

Pennwalt  of  Canada  Limited 47,461 

Pepin,  Jacques 1,907 

Perfection  Automotive  Products 1,227 

Pergamon  Press  Canada  Limited 1,489 

Perimeter  Aviation  Limited 7,587 

Perkin-Elmer  Canada  Limited 4,148 

Perle  Systems  Limited 3,121 

Permanent  Concrete  Division  of  Confarge  Limited 32,381 

Permasteel  Engineering  Limited 1,137 

Peter  J  Lawrence  Enterprises 1,002 

Peter  Kiewit  and  Sons 42,097 

Peters,  Richard 4,334 

Petro  Canada  Explorations 9,484 

Petroleum  Search  Services  Company 1,092 

Petrolite  Corporation  of  Canada  Limited 5,798 

Petrosar  Limited 2,158 

Peugeot  Canada  Limitee 1,441 

Pfizer  Canada  Incorporated  1,436 

Philco  Ford  Canada  Limited 2,969 

Philips  Anderson  Construction 1,151 

Philips  Brothers  6,778 

Philips  Electronics  Limited 14,821 

Philips  Test  &  Measuring  Incorporated  6,979 

Phillips  Cables  Limited 1,463 

Phillips  Extruded  Products  Limited 235,598 

Phillips  Kiln  Services  Company 8,117 

Phillips  Parkway  Corporation 43,764 

Phillips  Products  Incorporated 12,918 

Phillips  Test  and  Measuring  Incorporated 95,101 

Picker  Canada  Limited 9,062 

Pierce  7  Stevens  Limited 3,528 


$ 

Pilkington  Glass  Industries  Limited 7,841 

Pioneer  Grain  Terminal  Limited  2,435 

Pitney-Bowes  of  Canada  Limited 1,431 

Plant  Farm  Company 1,230 

Plantronics  Canada  Limited 3,312 

Plastec  Components  Limited 1,606 

Plastec  Incorporated  5,080 

Plastic  Components  Limited 5,1 13 

Plasticap  Company  Limited  4,323 

Plastocraft,  Division  of  Plasteck  Incorporated  13,352 

Plax  Division  of  Bradley  Fenn 73,201 

Playtex  Limited  5,454 

Playtoy  Industries  Incorporated 4,419 

Plaza  Fiberglass  Manufacture  Limited 2,055 

Polyrim  Manufacturing  Limited 6,978 

Polysar  Limited  9,405 

Porta  Printer  Systems  1,017 

Portion  Packaging  Limited 2,102 

Port  Weller  Dry  Docks  Limited 2,219 

Praire  Public  Television 19,247 

Pratt  and  Whitney  Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited 59,3 1 1 

Precision  Camera 1,514 

Precision  Craft  Limited 1,240 

Precision  Spring  of  Canada 1,526 

Precision  Valve  Canada  Limited 8,488 

Pressmatic  Industries  Limited 2,915 

Preston  Phipps  Incorporated 4,305 

Pretech  Incorporated 25,886 

Prince  Albert  Pulp  Company  Limited 5,630 

Pritchard  Engineering  Company  1,028 

Processed  Plastic  Company  Limited 5,262 

Procter  &  Gamble  Limited 1 1,230 

Production  Plastics  Incorporated 15,064 

Produits  Cailette  Incorporee 2,246 

Professional  Vehicle  Agency 1 3,506 

Progressive  Moulded  Products  1,445 

Promemm  Service  Limited 6,416 

Province  of  New  Brunswick  1,642 

Provincial  Production  and  Die  Incorporated 1,918 

Provost  Cartage  Incorporated 1,423 

Pumps  and  Power  Limited 3,621 

Quality  NDE  1,221 

Quebec  North  Shore  1,034 

Quebecair  Incorporated 34,895 

Queen's  University 1,202 

Quemat  Incorporated 5,507 

Quiet  Floor  Systems  of  Canada  16,462 

Quindor  Products 7,434 

Quisenberry,  Glen  29,032 

Quinton  Instruments  Company 6,281 

RB  Technical  1,022 

RCA  52,273 

RMB  Technical  Service 2,544 

ROR  Associates  Limited 1,227 

Radionics  Limited  18,405 

Ralph,  Clark,  Stone 2,100 

Ralston  Purina  of  Canada 1,701 

Rama  Computers  Limited 1,631 

Ranger  Oil  (Canada)  Limited 1,477 

Rapistan  Systems  Limited 2,525 

Rattie,  Tony 9,933 

Ray  Plastics  Limited 2,345 

Rayco  Stamping  Products  Limited 1 1,490 

Raymond  Concrete  Pile 6,723 

Raytheon  Company  Canada 7,585 

Recognition  Equipment  Limited 1,267 

Record  Plant  Studios 59,990 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRA  TION  ACT  13  •  1 5 

SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


NATIONAL  KE\EN\]E— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Redirack  Industries  Limited 4L050 

Redpath,  JS 4,595 

Reflex  Division  of  International  Tools 33,453 

Regal  Toy  Division  of  General  Mills 15,851 

Reliance 19,853 

Reliance  Electric  Limited 4,012 

Relmach  Manufacturing  Limited 21,157 

Remington  Arms  1,741 

Remington  Rand  Corporation 19,853 

Renault  USA  Incorporated 2,153 

Rental  Electronics  Limited 114,044 

Rexnord  Canada  Limited  2,771 

Reynolds  French  &  Company 8,195 

Rhodnius  Incorporated  6,096 

Richardson  Merrell  Limited 1,999 

Richfield  Properties 39,256 

Ritz  Lace  &  Embroidery  Limited  1,215 

Robert  Bosh  Canada  Limited 2,503 

Robert  Mitchell  Incorporated 5,614 

Roberts,  HH  Machinery  Limited 2,400 

Robertson  White  Engineering  Limited  2,946 

Robins,  AH  Company 1,666 

Robroy  Industries  Limited  2,770 

Robson  George  Construction  Limited 4,899 

Rochester  Instrument  Systems  Limited 1,371 

Rockwell  International  of  Canada  Limited 120,018 

Rohm  and  Haas  Canada  Limited 1,221 

Rolls  Royce  Canada  Limited  5,291 

Romatec— RML  6,853 

Rondar  Services  Limited 44,457 

Ronsco  Supply  Company  Limited  1,651 

Ross  Equipment  Limited 2,200 

Ross  Roy  of  Canada  Limited  5,425 

Rotem  Industrial  Products  2,933 

Roto  Pak  International  2,825 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 2,343 

Royal  Winnipeg  Ballet  of  Canada 3,160 

Rubbermaid  (Canada)  Limited  737,751 

Rubenstein  Brothers  Company 1,484 

Rush  Products 225,295 

Rutherford,  AV  3,659 

Rymer,  JR— C  &  O  Railway 19,086 

Ryka  Blow  Molds  Limited  4,259 

SDRC  Limited 10,343 

SED  Systems  Incorporated 1,1 1 1 

SMI  Industries 6,168 

SPR  Control  Systems  Limited 3,210 

SSI  Computer 8,866 

Safety  Inspection  and  Surface  Incorporated 1,511 

Safety  Supply  Canada 1,153 

Sahuaro  Petroleum  &  Asphalt  Company  131,684 

St  Croix  Pulpwood  Limited 1,922 

Saint  John  Shipbuilding  and  Drydock  Company  Limited  ..  1 1,359 

St  Lawrence  Starch  Company  Limited 4,292 

St  Mary's  Cement  Company 34,538 

Saint  Mary's  University 1,398 

St  Regis  Limited 1,217 

Samsonite  of  Canada 1,41 1 

Samuel  Sons  &  Company  Limited 9,658 

Sanair  33,411 

Sanders  Associates  Limited 45,323 

Sanivan  Incorporated 2,802 

Santel  Communications  Incorporated 3,312 

Sarman  Customs  Metal  Fabrication  Limited 2,476 


Saskatchewan  Telephone 4,278 

Saskatchewan  Wheat  Pool  3,168 

Scamar  Construction  Limited 3,748 

Sceptre  Dredging  Limited 4,318 

Scherer,  RP  Canada 6,406 

Schillumberger  Canada  Limited 3,656 

Schlegel  Linning  Technology  Incorporated 24,496 

Schlumberger  of  Canada  Limited  2,743 

Schmidt  Engineering 14,819 

Schrader  Bellous  Limited 34,906 

Scientific  Atlantic  Canada  18,951 

Scott- Jones  Field  Service  CSPI  1,142 

Scott  Madisson 5,973 

Scott  Maritimes  Pulp  Limited  2,465 

Seafed  Margaree  and  Owners 1,199 

Seaforth  Creamery  Company  Incorporated  1,652 

Seagulf  Marine  &  Industry  Products  Limited  6,636 

Sealand  Sales  Limited 1,01 1 

Seaman,  Virgil 3,920 

Seaquist  Canada — Division  of  Pittway  Corporation 3,685 

Seer  Industries  Limited 5,535 

Sefel  Geophysical 10,146 

Sentral  Systems  8,257 

Serco  Division  of  Smith  International 8,069 

Seville  Machine  &  Tool  Limited  3,253 

Shadrack  Engineering 2,862 

Shaw  Associates  Speed  Sport  82  9,238 

Shaw  Pipe  Protection  Limited 6,834 

Shell  Canada  Limited  153,850 

Shell  Environmental  Group 17,430 

Sheller  Globe  Canada  Limited 5,610 

Shelley,  RG  Limited  1,274 

Sherritt  Gordon  Mines  Limited 3,789 

Sherway  Gardens 1,165 

Shop  Vac  of  Canada  Limited 28,838 

Showalter  Agencies 2,276 

Sidbec  Dosco  Limitee 71,170 

Siddock,  Jerry 2,031 

Siers  Resurfacing  Company 1,404 

Sigmancom  Systems  Incorporated 1,332 

Signatel  Limited 9,548 

Simmonds,  AC  and  Sons  Limited 1,676 

Simplex  International  Time  Equipment  Company  Limited  1 1 ,068 

Simplot  Chemical  Limited  17,800 

Simpson,  RJ  Manufacturing 2,266 

Simpson  Sears  Limited  1,622 

Sinclair  and  Valenite  Company  3,793 

Sioc  Limited 1,592 

Skagit  Equipment 2,226 

Ski-Lok  Leasing  Incorporated  3,381 

Skip  Ishii  Productions 11,049 

Skis  Rossignol  Canada  Limited  3,032 

Slurry  System 36,954 

Smart,  AD  Limited 2,540 

Smithers  of  Canada  Limited 1,752 

Smiths  Industries  North  3,439 

Snemo  Limited 5,758 

Snider  Drilling 1,509 

Societa  Cavi  Pirelli  Spa 19,262 

Societe  Nationale  de  I'Amiante  2,221 

Solar  Turnies  Canada  Limited 37,445 

Solaray,   Division   of  Sunbeam   Corporation   (Canada) 

Limited  106,125 

Solarcells  Limited 2,874 

Solartech  Limited 1,867 

Somerville  Belkin  Industries  Limited 7,734 

Sometech  Electro  Concept  Incorporated 1,442 


13' 16 

SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Sonco  Steel  Products  Limited 2,584 

Sonoco  Limited 1,551 

Sonority  Recording  Company  Incorporated 5,718 

Sony  of  Canada  4,370 

Soquelec  Limited 3,479 

Soundair  Limited 1,672 

Southorn  Murry 2,167 

Sparton  Controls  28,903 

Spatorico,  Frank 2,031 

Specialites  B — Pro  Incorporee  23,487 

Speciality  Cast  Metals  Limited  1,230 

Speed,  Larry  C 2,257 

Speed  Sport  Promotions 33,981 

Speed  Sport  Promotions  West 22,843 

Speed  Sport  Show  1 1,254 

Sperry  Gyroscope — Division  of  Sperry  Incorporated 1 6,292 

Sperry  Incorporated  NewhoUand  Division  3,784 

Sperry  Marine  Engineers  Systems 6,688 

Sperry  Univac 10,222 

Sprague  Electric  Canada  Limited  1,266 

Sprague  Meter  Division  of  Textron  Canada  Limited 1 ,496 

Spruce  Falls  Power  Paper  Limited 3,999 

Square  "D"  Company  of  Canada  Limited 5,852 

Standard  Aero  Limited 21,090 

Standard  Havens  (Canada)  Limited  2,948 

Standard  Industries  Limited 18,661 

Standard  Modern  Tool  Company 3,513 

Standard  Pressure  Pipe  Company  34,690 

Standard  Telefon  Kabel  Fabrile 20,981 

Stangate  Canada  Limited 12,908 

Stanley  Door  Systems  2,102 

Stanley  Precision  Incorporated 1,287 

Star  Headlight  and  Lantern  Company 2,769 

Starborn  International  Limited 2,809 

Starcraft  Recreational  Products  Limited 1 0,442 

Starks,  MW  Dale 6,273 

State  Electric  Company  Limited  1,187 

State  Farm  Insurance  1,282 

State  Farm  Mutual  Auto  Insurance 2,250 

Steel  and  Engine  Products 2,723 

Steetley  Industries  Limited 3,252 

Stelco  Incorporated  11,966 

Sterling  Drug  Company  Limited  1,163 

Stevens  Hepner  Company  Limited 47,944 

Stevens,  WL  Limited 9,972 

Stewart  and  Stevenson 30,738 

Stewart  Warner  Company 4,690 

Storman  Incorporated 8,134 

Stowe  Woodward  Company 4,678 

Streit,  Freddie 51,317 

Strippet  Division  Houdaille 4,359 

Structural  Dynamics  Research 45,533 

Studio  Morin  Heights  Incorporated 1,507 

Sullivan  Strong  Scott  Limited 1,397 

Sulzer  Brothers  Limited  2,576 

Sumito  Canada  Limited  14,734 

Sun  Chemical  Corporation 1,010 

Sunbeam  Corporation  of  Canada  Limited 8,391 

Suncro  Incorporated 32,439 

Sunds  Defibrator  Incorporated 1,194 

Sundstrand  Aviation  4,613 

Sundstrand  Service  Corporation 1,920 

Sunflight  Hobby  Supplies  Limited 2,358 

Sunshine  Transport 23,686 


Superior  Deseronto — Division  of  Sheller  Globe 3,619 

Superior  Fire  Trucks 8,104 

Superscope  Canada  Limited 4,503 

Superseai  Corporation 1,499 

Supreme  Casting  and  Tooling 10,144 

Sure  Alloys  Steel  Corporation  2,173 

Swan  Wooster 1,355 

Swanson,  JN 1,733 

Sweaney,  Tom 4,024 

Sweany,  L 4,579 

Switching  Division  of  Mitel  Corporation 3,117 

Sydney  Steel  Corporation 1,554 

Symaic  Sales  Company  5,105 

Syncrude  Canada  Limited 10,193 

Systron 8,011 

TDW  Sales  and  Service  Limited  10,051 

TRC  Environmental  Consultants 6,439 

TTI  Geotechnical  Resources 3,027 

Tandem  Sales  Service 1,250 

Taro  Gear  Division 3,693 

Tasman  Scientific  Incorporated 8,369 

Techmet  Canada  Limited 1,964 

Technical  Marketing  Associates 2,913 

Technics  Incorporated 7,380 

Techwest  Enterprises 2,752 

Tecumseh  Metal  Productions 1,730 

Teds  Molds  and  Die  Works  Company 2,190 

Tekpak  Division  of  Tekform  Systems  Limited 1 ,40 1 

Tektronics  Canada  Incorporated  35,436 

Tele-Radio  Systems  Limited 4,578 

Telescience  Incorporated 4,463 

Teletone  Limited  1,413 

Teletype  Corporation 3,323 

Telex-Tulsa  Computer  Limited 1,460 

Tellog  Systems  and  Port  Hope  Redi  Mix  Limited 1,382 

Temcor  13,456 

Temfibre  Incorporated 8,431 

Tennant  Company 17,892 

Tesdata  Systems  Canada  Limited  1,866 

Test  Technology 2,795 

Testing  International 1,425 

Texaco  Canada  Incorporated 5,666 

Texas  Steel  Company  of  Canada  Limited 2,481 

Texscan  Communications 1,901 

Textiles  Dionne  Incorporated 1,149 

Textron  Industries  Limited 1,755 

The  Canadian  Press 2,064 

The  Cooper  Tool  Group  Limited  1,752 

The  Davidson  Chemical  Company 1,177 

The  HI  Thompson  Company  of  Canada  Limited 1,151 

The  Regional  Municipality  of  Peel 1,651 

Therman  Canada  Incorporated 3,969 

Thermon  Canada  Limited 3,919 

Thetford  Sanitation  Limited 10,676 

Thompson  Equipment  Company 2,469 

Thomson  CSF  Canada  Limited  17,129 

Thorosystem  Products  of  Canada 9,224 

Three  (3)  M  Canada  Limited 20,189 

Three  (3)  M  Employees  London  Credit 2,912 

Thunderbird  Plastic 1,972 

Tidelands  Geophysical 1,854 

Tilco  Plastics  Limited  5,180 

Tilton,  Roger 6,757 

Timberstand  Service  2,500 

Timeplex  Incorporated 2,613 

Tip  Top  Products 1,089 

Titan  Steel  and  Wire  Company  Limited 5,050 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT  13  •  1 7 

SECTION  17(9)— Continued 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Toga  Manufacturing  Company 14,658 

Tonka  Corporation  Canada  Limited  2,1 12,81 1 

Tookey,  Paul 1,013 

Torin  Manufacturing  (Canada)  Limited 25,184 

Toronto  Plastics  Limited 1,441 

Toronto  Western  Hospital 1,484 

Toshiba  of  Canada 7,037 

Totec  USA  4,377 

Traf — Equipment  Limited  8,411 

Trails  West  Equine  Enterprises  30,103 

Tran  Communications  Limited 14,577 

Trane  Company  of  Canada  Limited 7,099 

Trans  Canada  Pipelines 61,900 

Transcoastal  Enterprises  Limited 7,545 

Tri-Canada  Incorporated 2,927 

Trim  Trends  Canada  Limited 85,666 

Trimac  Transportation  Systems 49,763 

Tri-Steei  Incorporated 22,891 

Triumph  c/o  Triumph  Incorporated  22,913 

Triumph  (Rock  Group) 96,233 

Trow  Group  Limited 3,116 

True  Temper  Canada  Limited  6,733 

Truswall  Systems  Canada  Limited 2,852 

Toucker  Plastic  Products  Limited  34,153 

Turbo  Power  and  Marine  Systems 3,824 

Turmot  Incorporated 12,256 

Turnelle  Video  Incorporated 5,298 

Turzillo  Contracting  Limited 1,491 

Twinpak  Limited  1,305 

Tyler  Refrigeration  International 1,839 

Tyme  Systems  Limited  3,407 

Unican  Security  System  5,972 

Unicor  Industries  Incorporated 23,431 

Uniflo  Systems 1,184 

Union  Carbide  Canada  Limited 68,061 

Union  General  Limited 1,991 

Uniroyal  Limited 4,991 

Unit  Rig  Equipment  Company  Canada  Limited  3,551 

United  Co-op  of  Ontario 8,422 

United  Parcel  Service  Canada  10,891 

Universal  City  Studios 77,061 

Universal  Colour  Laboratory  Limited 1,589 

Universal  Foam  Moulding  Limited  4,173 

Universal  Pipe  Lines  76,286 

Universal  Pipes  Montreal  84,881 

University  of  British  Columbia 2,422 

Unruk,  Anthony 8,941 

Upper  Canada  Manufacture 1,151 

Upton  Bradeen 5,612 

Utilex  Contractors  Limited 1 1,099 

VGK  Spark  Plug  (USA)  Limited 9,480 

VSI  Automation 1,414 

Vachon  Incorporated 2,264 

Vacumm  Anchor  Corporation 67,802 

Valcom  Limited 2,043 

Valentine- Modco  Limited 23,842 

Valiant  Machines  and  Tool  Company  Limited 1,268 

Valley  Blades  1,823 

Vancouver  General  Hospital 1,750 

Van  Dresser  Limited 3,560 

Vannatten,  HE  Limited 1,196 

Varian  Associates  of  Canada  Limited 15,500 

Varian  Canada  Incorporated 1,541 

Vernard  Films 5,494 


$ 

Viceroy  Manufacture  Company  Limited 20,115 

Video  Tek  Limited 2,058 

Viscount  Machine  and  Tool  3,588 

Vitek  Systems  Incorporated  7,394 

Volkswagen  Canada  Limited  5,985 

WA  Whitney  of  Canada 1,688 

WGBM  Associates 1,542 

WSC  (Canada)  Limited 1,188 

Wabco  Equipment  of  Canada 5,438 

Wacher  Canada  Limited 1,050 

Wagner  Electric 1,477 

Wahl  Clipper  Corporation  Canada  Limited 9,738 

Walker  D  Engineering  Service 20,590 

Walt  Disney  Productions 34,499 

Wang  Canada  Limited  4,644 

Wardair  Canada  Limited  9,167 

Waste  Management  Incorporated 2,775 

Waterloo  Metal  Stampings  Limited 3,412 

Weatherhead  Company  of  Canada 3,478 

Webster  Instruments 3,604 

Weldwood  of  Canada 2,727 

Weltronic  Company 1,541 

Wendling,  Mark  Alen 13,580 

Wescom  Canada  Limited  5,905 

Westcan  Conveyor  and  Belting  Limited  7,414 

Westcoast  Transmission  Company 1,633 

Westcoast  Wire  Works 10,594 

Westech  Industries  Limited  6,744 

Westech  Instruments  Limited 4,552 

Western  Instruments  Limited 1,61 1 

Western  Scientific  Services 1,835 

Western  Stress  Relieving  Services  Incorporated 1 1,174 

Western  Totalisator  Company 5,814 

Western  Truck  Body  Manufacturing  Limited 15,584 

Western  Waterproofing 4,380 

Westfair  Foods  Limited 16,790 

Westinghouse  Canada  Limited 100,767 

Wheaton  Glass  Company  1,974 

Wheelabrator  Corporation  of  Canada 19,245 

Wheels  in  Action  Incorporated 8,536 

White  Farm  Equipment 1,205 

White  Mop  Wringer  of  Canada  Limited 1,652 

White  Radio  Company  3,720 

Wickman,  AC  Limited  11,633 

Wil  Rich  Incorporated 11,100 

Wilier  Engineering  Limited 7,642 

William,  AR  Machinery  Company  Limited 4,667 

Williams  Farm  Hardware  and  Rock 1,204 

Williams  Patent 3,273 

Williams  and  Wilson 28,600 

Willie,  G  c/o  Speedsport  82 1,221 

Wilron  Equipment  Limited 1,688 

Windsor  Bumper,  Division  of  Gulf  and  Western  99,557 

Windsor  Mould  Incorporated 17,114 

Winnipeg  Free  Press  2,340 

Wismer  and  Becker  Incorporated 4,034 

Wood  Enterprises 18,177 

Wood,  RH 36,203 

Woodbridge  Moulded  Products  Limited 67,289 

Woodstone  Foods 1,341 

Woodstream  Corporation  76,693 

Wordex  Incorporated 2,957 

World  Computer  c/o  Caisse  Populaire  1,179 

World  Contract  Stress  Corporation 20,500 

World's  Finest  Chocolate  Limited 12,431 

World  Wide  Truck  and  Transportation 2,456 

Wrib  Manufacturing 1,761 


13-18 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Wright,  Pearl  (Mrs) 15,280 

Wylain  of  Canada  Limited 15,388 

XAX  3,291 

Xerox  Canada  Incorporated 2,036 

Xerox  of  Canada  8,242 

Zapata  Offshore  Services  1,199 

Zeiss,  Carl  Canada  Limited  36,938 

Zettel  Manufacturing  Company  Limited  1,630 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 528,328 

34,429.458 


Tariff  items  41100—1,  42700—1,  42700—2, 
42700—3,  42700—4,  42700—5,  42700—9,  42701—1, 
and  42701 — 2  provide  that  in  the  case  of  the  importa- 
tion into  Canada  of  any  goods  enumerated  in  the  items, 
the  Governor  in  Council,  on  the  recommendation  of  the 
Minister  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce,  may, 
whenever  he  considers  that  it  is  in  the  public  interest 
and  that  the  goods  are  not  available  from  production  in 
Canada,  remit  the  duty  specified  in  these  items  appli- 
cable to  the  goods.  Remissions  of  duty  are  less  the  duty 
applicable  to  the  first  $500  of  value  for  duty  in  respect 
of  each  application.  The  following  remissions  were 
granted  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Minister  of 
Industry,  Trade  and  Commerce  and  the  Treasury  Board 
under  the  provisions  of  the  tariff  items,  and  represent 
customs  duty  on  machinery  and  parts  as  described  in 
the  various  remission  orders  and  schedules  thereto,  the 
amounts  shown  representing  that  portion  of  the  remis- 
sion applicable  to  the  machinery  and  parts  imported 
during  the  period  April,  1981  to  March  31,  1982, 
inclusive: 


PC  1970—1904,  November  3,  1970 3,023 

PC  1971—256,  February  9,  1971 1,098 

PC  1972—424,  March  7,  1972 13,427 

PC  1972—1 103,  May  24,  1972 3,970 

PC  1973—1 17,  January  16,  1973 21,143 

PC  1973—215,  January  30,  1973 35,035 

PC  1973—216,  January  30,  1973 6,423 

PC  1973—365,  February  13,  1973 12,991 

PC  1973—366,  February  13,  1973 1,783 

PC  1973—841,  April  3,  1973 3,425 

PC  1973—1416,  June  5,  1973 10,543 

PC  1973—2512,  August  21,  1973  11,601 

PC  1973—3015,  October  4,  1973 10,071 

PC  1973—3172,  October  16,  1973 24,1 13 

PC  1973—3448,  October  30,  1973 35,042 

PC  1973—3622,  November  20,  1973 2,810 

PC  1973—3623,  November  20,  1973 27,630 

PC  1973—3669,  November  20,  1973 1,154 

PC  1973—3767,  December  4,  1973 26,568 

PC  1973—3821,  December  11,  1973 48,959 

PC  1973—4044,  December  18,  1973 164,878 

PC  1974—26,  January  8,  1974 55,986 

PC  1974—27,  January  8,  1974 190,543 

PC  1974—88,  January  15,  1974 107,557 

PC  1974—249,  February  12,  1974 293,093 

PC  1974—250,  February  12,  1974 121,770 

PC  1974—251,  February  12,  1974 62,686 

PC  1974—252,  February  12,  1974 116,534 

PC  1974—397,  February  26,  1974 79,146 

PC  1974—398,  February  26,  1974 92,657 


PC  1974—480,  March  5,  1974 101,968 

PC  1974—548,  March  12,  1974 2,229,164 

PC  1974—684,  March  26,  1974 188,527 

PC  1974—685,  March  26,  1974 252,154 

PC  1974—766,  April  2,  1974 9,206 

PC  1974—767,  April  2,  1974 166,804 

PC  1974—928,  April  23,  1974 165,957 

PC  1974—929,  April  23,  1974 738,758 

PC  1974—1064,  May  7,  1974 36,212 

PC  1974— 1 123,  May  14,  1974 213,475 

PC  1974—1222,  May  30,  1974 381,602 

PC  1974—1223,  May  30,  1974 108,003 

PC  1974—1297,  June  6,  1974 62,455 

PC  1974—1433,  June  20,  1974  258,034 

PC  1974—1434,  June  20,  1974  226,988 

PC  1974—1515,  June  27,  1974  125,807 

PC  1974—1612,  July  16,  1974 87,216 

PC  1974—1658,  July  23,  1974 1 16,218 

PC  1974—1736,  July  30,  1974 737,924 

PC  1974—1737,  July  30,  1974 81,987 

PC  1974—1823,  August  6,  1974  518,282 

PC  1974—1872,  August  14,  1974  1,116 

PC  1974—1873,  August  14,  1974  175,234 

PC  1974—2064,  September  17,  1974  285,374 

PC  1974— 2065,  September  17,  1974  674,113 

PC  1974—2066,  September  17,  1974  233,620 

PC  1974—2138,  September  24,  1974  293,882 

PC  1974—2139,  September  24,  1974  1 13,569 

PC  1974—2185,  October  1,  1974 223,393 

PC  1974—2242,  October  8,  1974 143,666 

PC  1974—2326,  October  22,  1974 171,685 

PC  1974—2327,  October  22,  1974 175,721 

PC  1974—2427,  November  5,  1974 356,924 

PC  1974—2486,  November  12,  1974 145,446 

PC  1974—2520,  November  19,  1974 276,736 

PC  1974—2723,  December  10,  1974 1,000,890 

PC  1974—2724,  December  10,  1974 227,225 

PC  1974—2791,  December  17,  1974 383,512 

PC  1975—34,  January  16,  1975 395,961 

PC  1975—35,  January  16,  1975 884,233 

PC  1975—125,  January  23,  1975 7,733 

PC  1975—126,  January  23,  1975 2,605,416 

PC  1975—187,  January  28,  1975 783,439 

PC  1975—244,  February  4,  1975 128,334 

PC  1975—294,  February  11,  1975 190,173 

PC  1975—408,  February  25,  1975 1 19,91 1 

PC  1975—409,  February  25,  1975 162,391 

PC  1975—500,  March  4,  1975 177,648 

PC  1975—555,  March  1 1,  1975 277,481 

PC  1975—667,  March  25,  1975 242,899 

PC  1975—668,  March  25,  1975 423,876 

PC  1975—769,  April  8,  1975 1 16,326 

PC  1975—836,  April  15,  1975 325.177 

PC  1975—837,  April  15,  1975 219,592 

PC  1975—981,  April  29,  1975 101,263 

PC  1975—982,  April  29,  1975 131,383 

PC  1975—1086,  May  13,  1975 180,058 

PC  1975— 1 153,  May  20,  1975 218,476 

PC  1975—1 195,  May  27,  1975 104,795 

PC  1975—1254,  June  3,  1975 454,028 

PC  1975—1341,  June  12,  1975  95,927 

PC  1975— 1393,  June  17,  1975  196,899 

PC  1975—1512,  June  30,  1975  397,249 

PC  1975—1565,  July  8,  1975 82,739 

PC  1975—1709,  July  22,  1975 201,050 

PC  1975—1838,  July  29,  1975 213,098 

PC  1975—1961,  August  27,  1975  78,010 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 

SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


13'19 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


PC  1975—2027,  August  27,  1975  247,369 

PC  1975—2028,  August  27,  1975  136,855 

PC  1975—2097,  September  1 1,  1975  83,919 

PC  1975—2262,  September  25,  1975  1,198,693 

PC  1975—2388,  October  9,  1975 327,092 

PC  1975—2389,  October  9,  1975 25,688 

PC  1975—2390,  October  9,  1975 92,917 

PC  1975—2551,  October  28,  1975 254,560 

PC  1975—2619,  November  7,  1975 673,150 

PC  1975—2620,  November  7,  1975 9,984 

PC  1975—2702,  November  28,  1975 162,593 

PC  1975—2805,  December  2,  1975 326,696 

PC  1975—2944,  December  18,  1975 33,794 

PC  1975—2945,  December  18,  1975 300,318 

PC  1975—2946,  December  18,  1975 69,804 

PC  1975—3040,  December  23,  1975 143,961 

PC  1976—93,  January  20,  1976 97,883 

PC  1976—94,  January  20,  1976 169,526 

PC  1976—209,  February  3,  1976 602,419 

PC  1976—326,  February  17,  1976 1,040,393 

PC  1976—437,  February  27,  1976 44,779 

PC  1976^38,  February  27,  1976 359,504 

PC  1976—491,  March  2,  1976 133,935 

PC  1976-^92,  March  2,  1976 267,530 

PC  1976—662,  March  25,  1976 53,822 

PC  1976—663,  March  25,  1976 582,891 

PC  1976—664,  March  25,  1976 4,296 

PC  1976—665,  March  25,  1976 108,666 

PC  1976—876,  April  13,  1976 124,307 

PC  1976—877,  April  13,  1976 83,524 

PC  1976—1 109,  May  1 1,  1976 364,764 

PC  1976—1 1 10,  May  11,  1976 942,124 

PC  1976—1  111,  May  11,  1976 132,589 

PC  1976—1 169,  May  18,  1976 137,359 

PC  1976—1385,  June  8,  1976 217,428 

PC  1976—1386,  June  8,  1976 345,703 

PC  1976—1387,  June  15,  1976  268,028 

PC  1976—1453,  June  15,  1976  299,941 

PC  1976—1621,  June  21,  1976  112,041 

PC  1976—1622,  June  21,  1976  107,428 

PC  1976—1730,  July  6,  1976 332,196 

PC  1976—1731,  July  6,  1976 31,397 

PC  1976—1792,  July  13,  1976 383,818 

PC  1976—1873,  July  20,  1976 82,324 

PC  1976—1874,  July  20,  1976 19,643 

PC  1976—1929,  July  27,  1976 71,436 

PC  1976—2005,  August  5,  1976  56,565 

PC  1976—2167,  September  8,  1976  1 15,856 

PC  1976—2338,  September  21,  1976  193,169 

PC  1976—2339,  September  21,  1976  107,273 

PC  1976—2340,  September  21,  1976  588,552 

PC  1976—2341,  September  21,  1976  113,414 

PC  1976—2468,  October  7,  1976 279,327 

PC  1976—2469,  October  7,  1976 293,864 

PC  1976—2528,  October  14,  1976 19,774 

PC  1976—2529,  October  14,  1976 74,502 

PC  1976—2650,  October  14,  1976 73,495 

PC  1976—2651,  October  14,  1976 876,486 

PC  1976—2652,  October  28,  1976 10,270 

PC  1976—2935,  November  25,  1976 95,321 

PC  1976—2936,  November  25,  1976 903,991 

PC  1976—2937,  November  25,  1976 379,713 

PC  1976—3047,  December  9,  1976 62,601 

PC  1976—3202,  December  23,  1976 139,819 


PC  1976—3203,  December  23,  1976  .. 

PC  1977— 37,  January  13,  1977 

PC  1977—138,  January  27,  1977 

PC  1977—139,  January  27,  1977 

PC  1977— 140,  January  27,  1977 

PC  1977— 141,  January  27,  1977 

PC  1977—304,  February  10,  1977 

PC  1977—417,  February  24,  1977 

PC  1977—418,  February  24,  1977 

PC  1977^^19,  February  24,  1977 

PC  1977—546,  March  3,  1977 

PC  1977—612,  March  10,  1977 

PC  1977—613,  March  10,  1977 

PC  1977—688,  March  17,  1977 

PC  1977—689,  March  17,  1977 

PC  1977—690,  March  17,  1977 

PC  1977—691,  March  17,  1977 

PC  1977—692,  March  17,  1977 

PC  1977—876,  March  30,  1977 

PC  1977—877,  March  30,  1977 

PC  1977—878,  March  30,  1977 

PC  1977—981,  April  5,  1977 

PC  1977—982,  April  5,  1977 

PC  1977—1086,  April  21,  1977 

PC  1977—1087,  April  21,  1977 

PC  1977—1249,  May  5,  1977 

PC  1977—1250,  May  5,  1977 

PC  1977—1251,  May  5,  1977 

PC  1977—1252,  May  5,  1977 

PC  1977—1418,  May  19,  1977 

PC  1977—1419,  May  19,  1977 

PC  1977—1420,  May  19,  1977 

PC  1977—1422,  May  19,  1977 

PC  1977—1423,  May  19,  1977 

PC  1977— 1736,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977^1737,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977— 1738,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977— 1739,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977— 1740,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977— 1741,  June  23,  1977  

PC  1977—1927,  July  7,  1977 

PC  1977—1928,  July  7,  1977 

PC  1977—1929,  July  7,  1977 

PC  1977—1930,  July  7,  1977 

PC  1977—2006,  July  14,  1977 

PC  1977—2007,  July  14,  1977 

PC  1977—2083,  July  21,  1977 

PC  1977—2084,  July  21,  1977 

PC  1977—2177,  July  28,  1977 

PC  1977—2179,  July  28,  1977 

PC  1977— 23 14,  August  10,  1977  

PC  1977—2315,  August  10,  1977  

PC  1977— 2316,  August  10,  1977  

PC  1977— 2317,  August  10,  1977  

PC  1977— 2429,  August  31,  1977  

PC  1977— 2430,  August  31,  1977  

PC  1977— 2544,  September  15,  1977 
PC  1977—2545,  September  15,  1977 
PC  1977—2722,  September  29,  1977 
PC  1977—2723,  September  29,  1977 
PC  1977—2724,  September  29,  1977 
PC  1977—2725,  September  29,  1977 

PC  1977— 2895,  October  13,  1977 

PC  1977— 2896,  October  13,  1977 

PC  1977— 3041,  October  27,  1977 

PC  1977— 3042,  October  27,  1977 

PC  1977—3043,  October  27,  1977 


$ 

4,250 
284,850 
308,674 
124,604 
907,613 

34,433 
103,416 
111,093 
105,010 

44,246 

195,375 

117,932 

117,429 

8,016 

68,876 

138,679 

2,613 

2,518 

201,123 

409,319 

11,936 
109,670 
236,502 
106,013 

74,067 

59,969 
294,595 

28,533 

70,556 
163,677 
218,173 

99,044 
153,471 
127,647 
266,303 

72,951 
191,533 

18,030 
505,021 

20,646 
301,234 
264,466 

86,559 

33,584 
314,655 
156,269 

73,171 

50,117 
309,060 
3,747 
212,680 
117,898 
248,060 

21,899 
366,232 
173,383 
357,630 

43,173 
706,173 

90,975 
342,365 
251,228 
358,190 
434,483 

90,935 
202,271 
127,625 


13*20 

SECTION  11(9)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1977- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 
PC  1978- 


-3182,  November  10,  1977 

-3183,  November  10,  1977 

-3184,  November  10,  1977 

-3244,  November  17,  1977 

-3245,  November  17,  1977 

-3368,  December  1,  1977 

-3369,  December  1,  1977 

-3370,  December  1,  1977 

-3371,  December  1,  1977 

-3372,  December  1,  1977 

-3513,  December  15,  1977 1, 

-3514,  December  15,  1977 

-3625,  December  22,  1977 

-3626,  December  22,  1977 

-3627,  December  22,  1977 

-3628,  December  22,  1977 

-3629,  December  22,  1977 

-3630,  December  22,  1977 

-116,  January  19, 1978 

-117,  January  19, 1978 

-201,  January  26, 1978 

-202, January  26, 1978 

-293,  February  2,  1978 

-294,  February  2,  1978 

-363,  February  9,  1978 

-364,  February  9,  1978 

-524,  February  23,  1978 

-525,  February  23,  1978 

-526,  February  23,  1978 

-527,  February  23,  1978 

-528,  February  23,  1978 

-612,  March  2,  1978 

-613,  March  2,  1978 

-614,  March  2,  1978 

-690,  March  7,  1978 

-691,  March  7,  1978 

-770,  March  16,  1978 

-771,  March  16,  1978 

-869,  March  23,  1978 

-870,  March  23,  1978 

-871,  March  23,  1978 

-936,  March  23,  1978 

-937,  March  23,  1978 


-1127,  Apr 
-1128,  Apr 
-1299,  Apr 
-1300,  Apri 
-1301,  Apr 
-1302,  Apr 
-1401,  Apr 
-1402,  Apr 


1  13, 1978 
1  13, 1978 
120,  1978 
120,  1978 
1 20,  1978 
1  20, 1978 
1 27, 1978 
1 27,  1978 


-1576,  May  11,  1978 

-1577,  May  11,  1978 

-1664,  May  18,  1978 

-1665,  May  18,  1978 

-1726,  May  25,  1978 

-1727,  May  25,  1978 

-1976,  June  1,  1978 

-1797,  June  1,  1978 3 

-1822,  June  1,  1978 

-1823,  June  1,  1978 

-1824,  June  1,  1978 

-2019,  June  22,  1978  

-2020,  June  22,  1978  


PC  1978—21 14,  June  29,  1978  6,991 

-.  PC1978— 2115,June29,  1978  541,062 

*  PC  1978— 21 16,  June  29,  1978  52,718 

133,080  PC  1978—2175,  July  5,  1978 397,786 

133,171  PC  1978—2176,  July  5,  1978 36,965 

3,131  PC  1978—2240,  July  13,  1978 709,416 

285,485  PC  1978—2241,  July  13,  1978 54,670 

73,598  PC  1978— 2316,  July  25,  1978 1,006,737 

13,452  PC  1978—2317,  July  25,  1978 39,664 

103,618  PC  1978— 2489,  August  1,  1978  34,679 

93,274  PC  1978— 2490,  August  1,  1978  437,678 

623,346  PC  1978— 2491,  August  1,  1978  287,161 

224,037  PC  1978— 2492,  August  1,  1978  72,514 

,270,536  PC1978— 2493,  August  1,1978  28,158 

12,292  PC  1978— 2569,  August  15,  1978  134,164 

160,700  PC  1978—2570,  August  15,  1978  23,415 

348,476  PC  1978— 28 19,  September  6,  1978  194,251 

156,181  PC  1978— 2820,  September  6,  1978  423,577 

18,616  PC  1978— 2821,  September  6,  1978  103,525 

349,990  PC  1978— 2822,  September  6,  1978  58,195 

83,803  PC  1978—2864,  September  13,  1978  382,  970 

388,430  PC  1978— 2865,  September  13,  1978  74,080 

40,961  PC1978— 2953,  September  27,  1978  231,347 

356,946  PC  1978— 3064,  October  4,  1978 916,581 

92,927  PC  1978— 3065,  October  4,  1978.... 18,045 

183,207  PC  1978— 3115,  October  12,  1978 613,019 

63,527  PC  1978— 3116,  October  12,  1978 223,446 

375,587  PC  1978— 3 145,  October  12,  1978 805,761 

1,221  PC  1978— 3146,  October  12,  1978 3,598 

14,285  PC  1978— 3274,  October  26,  1978 381,131 

209,193  PC  1978— 3275,  October  26,  1978 72,152 

175,275  PC  1978— 3423,  November  9,  1978 448,618 

108,382  PC  1978— 3424,  November  9,  1978 15,291 

85,710  PC  1978— 3554,  November  23,  1978 543,706 

32,193  PC  1978— 3555,  November  23,  1978 67,914 

792,521  PC  1978— 3556,  November  23,  1978 22,472 

242,597  PC  1978— 3557,  November  23,  1978 35,478 

527,632  PC  1978— 3624,  November  30,  1978 390,429 

51,896  PC  1978— 3625,  November  30,  1978 132,899 

94,193  PC  1978—3753,  December  12,  1978 869,426 

16,391  PC  1978—3754,  December  12,  1978 470,546 

9,616  PC  1978—3755,  December  12,  1978 989,686 

143,881  PC  1978—3756,  December  12,  1978 58,391 

134,751  PC  1979— 80,  January  18,  1979 430,293 

80,946  PC  1979—81,  January  18,  1979 1,122,594 

180,377  PC  1979— 82,  January  18,  1979 63,597 

180,321  PC  1979— 83,  January  18,  1979 9,575 

59,554  PC  1979—229,  February  1,  1979 407,873 

310,839  PC  1979—230,  February  1,  1979 132,045 

234,865  PC  1979—231,  February  1,  1979 744,923 

54,728  PC  1979—232,  February  1,  1979 29,007 

140,035  PC  1979—318,  February  13,  1979 634,946 

230,605  PC  1979—319,  February  13,  1979 124,371 

568,715  PC  1979—390,  February  20,  1979 17,728 

248,253  PC  1979—391,  February  20,  1979 438,657 

61,776  PC  1979— 392,  February  20,  1979 33,086 

87,312  PC  1979—493,  February  20,  1979 198,217 

384,166  PC  1979— 494,  February  20,  1979 54,616 

218,425  PC  1979—585,  March  1,  1979 208,083 

138,402  PC  1979—586,  March  1,  1979 93,279 

324,266  PC  1979—669,  March  8,  1979 173,202 

,543,273  PC  1979—670,  March  8,  1979 24,801 

17,927  PC  1979—766,  March  15,  1979 288,740 

392,670  PC  1979—767,  March  15,  1979 22,323 

289,080  PC  1979— 841,  March  22,  1979 9,555 

230,388  PC  1979— 842,  March  22,  1979 156,459 

70,200  PC  1979—1039,  March  28,  1979 498,120 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13'21 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co/i///i«e^ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 
PC  1979- 


-1040, 
-1162 
-1163 
-1229 
-1230 
-1305 
-1306 
-1307 
-1308 
-1421 
-1422 
-1423 
-1512 
-1513 
-1578 
-1579 
-1826 
-1827 
-1828 
-1829 
-1830 
-1831 
-1832 
-1985 
-1986 
-1987 
-1988 
-1989 
-1990 
-1991 
-1992 
-2287 
-2288 
-2349 
-2350 
-2351 
-2352 
-2353 
-2354 
-2613 
-2614 
-2615 
-2616 
-2617 
-2618 
-2619 
-2702 
-2703 
-2736 
-2737 
-2826 
-2827 
-2891 
-2892 
-3035 
-3036 
-3174 
-3175 
-3176 
-3177 
-3178 
-3241 
-3242, 
-3513 


March  28,  1979 206,489 

April  4,  1979 628,977 

April  4,  1979 258,623 

April  11,  1979 739,727 

April  11,  1979 18,471 

April  25,  1979 634,412 

April  25,  1979 261,258 

April  25,  1979 90,644 

April  25,  1979 4,027 

May  9,  1979 666,104 

May  9,  1979 132,776 

May  9,  1979 22,235 

May  17,  1979 , 439,952 

May  17,  1979 126,485 

May  24,  1979 75,957 

May  24,  1979 1,206 

July  5,  1979 236,261 

July  5,  1979 458,545 

July  5,  1979 273,133 

July  5,  1979 835,295 

July  5,  1979 40,671 

July  5,  1979 5,637 

July  5,  1979 59,1 16 

July  26,  1979 882,291 

July  26,  1979 603,591 

July  26,  1979 986,099 

July  26,  1979 1,216,212 

July  26,  1979 4,140 

July  26,  1979 16,809 

July  26,  1979 41,555 

July  26,  1979 187,785 

August  24,  1979  195,154 

August  24,  1979  49,868 

September  6,  1979  621,749 

September  6,  1979  781,083 

September  6,  1979  186,124 

September  6,  1979  47,114 

September  6,  1979  74,343 

September  6,  1979 17,837 

September  26,  1979  138,567 

September  26,  1979  947,975 

September  26,  1979  2,669,013 

September  26,  1979  1,742,293 

September  26,  1979  63,147 

September  26,  1979  40,100 

September  26,  1979  149,064 

October  4,  1979 851,843 

October  4,  1979 17,490 

October  11,  1979 556,025 

October  11,  1979 5,540 

October  18,  1979 145,564 

October  18,  1979 106,445 

October  25,  1979 651,303 

October  25,  1979 25,898 

November  8,  1979 1,134,149 

November  8,  1979 26,551 

November  22,  1979 22,517 

November  22,  1979 259,936 

November  22,  1979 365,731 

November  22,  1979 58,854 

November  22,  1979 54,973 

November  29,  1979 9,486 

November  29,  1979 779,610 

December  19,  1979 773,865 


PC  1979— 35 14,  December  19,  1979 

PC  1979—3515,  December  19,  1979 1 

PC  1979— 3516,  December  19,  1979 

PC  1979— 3517,  December  19,  1979 

PC  1979— 3518,  December  19,  1979 

PC  1980— 163,  January  11,  1980 

PC  1980—164,  January  1 1,  1980 1 

PC  1980— 165,  January  11,  1980 

PC  1980—281,  January  25,  1980 

PC  1980—282,  January  25,  1980 

PC  1980-^48,  February  8,  1980 

PC  1980—449,  February  8,  1980 

PC  1980—450,  February  8,  1980 

PC  1980—451,  February  8,  1980 

PC  1980—685,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—686,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—687,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—688,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—689,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—690,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—691,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—692,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—693,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—694,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—695,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—696,  March  20,  1980 1 

PC  1980—697,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—698,  March  20,  1980 

PC  1980—798,  March  27,  1980 

PC  1980—799,  March  27,  1980 

PC  1980— 936,  April  10,  1980 

PC  1980— 937,  April  10,  1980 


PC  1980—1016,  April  17,  1980 2 

PC  1980— 1017,  April  17,  1980 

PC  1980— 1129,  May  1,  1980 

PC  1980—1130,  May  1,  1980 

PC  1980—1234,  May  8,  1980 

PC  1980—1235,  May  8,  1980 

PC  1980—1236,  May  8,  1980 

PC  1980—1237,  May  8,  1980 

PC  1980—1308,  May  15,  1980 

PC  1980—1309,  May  15,  1980 

PC  1980—1362,  May  22,  1980 1 

PC  1980—1363,  May  22,  1980 

PC  1980—1518,  June  5,  1980 

PC  1980—1519,  June  5,  1980 

PC  1980—1570,  June  5,  1980 

PC  1980—1571,  June  5,  1980 

PC  1980—1647,  June  19,  1980  1 

PC  1980— 1648,  June  19,  1980  

PC  1980—1785,  July  3,  1980 

PC  1980—1786,  July  3,  1980 

PC  1980— 1845,  July  10,  1980 

PC  1980— 1846,  July  10,  1980 

PC  1980—2072,  July  31,  1980 1 

PC  1980—2073,  July  31,  1980 3 

PC  1980—2074,  July  31,  1980 

PC  1980—2075,  July  31,  1980 

PC  1980—2204,  August  27,  1980  

PC  1980— 2205,  August  27,  1980  

PC  1980— 2384,  August  27,  1980  

PC  1980— 2385,  August  27,  1980  

PC  1980— 2451,  September  12,  1980  2 

PC  1980— 2452,  September  12,  1980  

PC  1980— 2453,  September  12,  1980  

PC  1980— 2454,  September  12,  1980  

PC  1980— 2494,  September  18,  1980  


$ 
170,256 
,251,308 
230,217 
3,229 
802,742 
7,000 
,070,308 

99,835 
419,944 

22,516 
,503,922 
906,487 

81,489 

28,525 
,054,699 
170,825 
450,433 
410,079 
,492,579 
218,017 
628,623 

22,871 

144,869 

7,879 

95,798 
,065,433 

77,972 
220,919 
850,705 

25,420 
920,699 

34,160 
,235,097 

82,784 
335,939 
246,926 
568,017 
,727,905 

26,847 
215,840 
496,466 
164,817 
,298,745 

34,136 
340,063 

53,178 
546,419 
206,655 
,023,218 

66,306 
351,163 

80,610 
189,612 

10,090 
,124,267 
,305,075 

17,028 

74,497 
278,390 

40,234 
745,877 

86,410 
,631,202 
978,058 
343,069 
1,693 
446,367 


13  "22 

SECTION  11{S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

PC  1980—2495,  September  18,  1980  265,840 

PC  1980—2620,  October  2,  1980 1,753,084 

PC  1980—2621,  October  2,  1980 51,752 

PC  1980—2675,  October  9,  1980 2,199,525 

PC  1980—2676,  October  9,  1980 242,031 

PC  1980—2852,  October  23,  1980 565,788 

PC  1980—2853,  October  23,  1980 1,955,485 

PC  1980—2854,  October  23,  1980 276,088 

PC  1980—2855,  October  23,  1980 623,905 

PC  1980—3038,  November  6,  1980 13,227 

PC  1980—3039,  November  6,  1980 4,139,026 

PC  1980—3040,  November  6,  1980 724,887 

PC  1980—3199,  November  27,  1980 1,845,71 1 

PC  1980—3200,  November  27,  1980 3,599,829 

PC  1980—3201,  November  27,  1980 195,237 

PC  1980—3202,  November  27,  1980 291,951 

PC  1980—3467,  December  18,  1980 1,018,905 

PC  1981—35,  January  8,  1981 1,835,075 

PC  1981—36,  January  8,  1981 1,260,804 

PC  1981—37,  January  8,  1981 1,933,016 

PC  1981—38,  January  8,  1981 1,577,413 

PC  1981—228,  January  29,  1981 2,219,762 

PC  1981—235,  January  29,  1981 1,886,31 1 

PC  1981—297,  February  5,  1981 3,889,479 

PC  1981—435,  February  19,  1981 1,777,754 

PC  1981—592,  March  5,  1981 1,745,426 

PC  1981—593,  March  5,  1981 2,965,264 

PC  1981—666,  March  12,  1981 4,498,495 

PC  1981—667,  March  12,  1981 1,923,678 

PC  1981—837,  March  26,  1981 1,21 1,503 

PC  1981—905,  April  2,  1981  2,796,778 

PC  1981—978,  April  9,  1981  2,421,033 

PC  1981—979,  April  9,  1981  1,882,781 

PC  1981— 1183,  May  7,  1981 5,733,562 

PC  1981—1184,  May  7,  1981 2,081,800 

PC  1981— 1185,  May  7,  1981 3,290,606 

PC  1981—1495,  June  4,  1981 2,761,412 

PC  1981—1496,  June  4,  1981 4,101,946 

PC  1981—1497,  June  4,  1981 3,683,576 

PC  1981—1555,  June  1 1,  1981  4,466,029 

PC  1981—1649,  June  18,  1981  2,017,570 

PC  1981— 1734,  June  25,  1981  3,972,788 

PC  1981—1961,  July  16,  1981 2,836,792 

PC  1981—1962,  July  16,  1981 2,921,796 

PC  1981—2130,  July  29,  1981 1,160,757 

PC  1981—2131,  July  29,  1981 587,253 

PC  1981—2244,  August  19,  1981  2,549,410 

PC  1981—2245,  August  19,  1981  2,148,152 

PC  1981— 2246,  August  19,  1981  1,351,594 

PC  1981— 2395,  September  3,  1981  1,547,658 

PC  1981— 2458,  September  3,  1981  1,492,355 

PC  1981— 25 50,  September  16,  1981  1,929,353 

PC  1981— 2630,  September  23,  1981  1,232,059 

PC  1981—2738,  October  8,  1981 1,060,379 

PC  1981—2739,  October  8,  1981 3,880,892 

PC  1981—3038,  October  29,  1981 2,842,737 

PC  1981—3137,  November  5,  1981 1,045,261 

PC  1981—3265,  November  19,  1981 923,004 

PC  1981—3360,  November  26,  1981 1,970,036 

PC  1981—3423,  December  3,  1981 728,317 

PC  1981—3563,  December  17,  1981 640,282 

PC  1981—3564,  December  17,  1981 578,473 

PC  1982—82,  January  14,  1982 1,230,753 

PC  1982—87,  January  14,  1982 1,100,045 


$ 

PC  1982—204,  January  21,  1982 550,255 

PC  1982—264,  January  28,  1982 726,167 

PC  1982—347,  February  4,  1982 186,284 

PC  1982—397,  February  11,  1982 331,925 

PC  1982—612,  February  18,  1982 87,613 

PC  1982—698,  March  4,  1982 56,725 

PC  1982—699,  March  4,  1982 82,008 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 11,960 

276,314,130 

PC  1971—2727,  December  14,  1971,  amended  by 
PC  1973—4030,  December  18,  1973,  PC  1974—547, 
March  12,  1974,  PC  1975—2943,  December  18,  1975, 
PC  1977—2546,  September  15,  1977,  PC  1977—3373, 
December  1,  1977,  PC  1979—3466,  December  19, 
1979  and  PC  1981—69,  January  15,  1981,  remits  the 
duty  payable  under  Schedule  A  of  the  Customs  Tariff 
on  certain  parts  classified  under  tariff  item  42700 — 1 
and  42701 — 1  entered  for  consumption: 

(a)  in  1981  and  that  are  either  for  machines,  or  for 
accessories  or  attachments  for  machines,  that  were 
imported  under  a  remission  of  duty  authorized 
during  1971,  1972,  1973,  1974,  1975,  1976,  1977, 
1978,  1979  or  1980; 

(b)  in  1 982  and  that  are  either  for  machines,  or  for 
accessories  or  attachments  for  machines,  that  were 
imported  under  a  remission  of  duty  authorized 
during  1972,  1973,  1974,  1975,  1976,  1977,  1978, 

1979  or  1980 8,166,246 

PC  1970—1200,  July  8,  1970,  remits  the  sales  tax 
paid  or  payable  on  goods  in  respect  of  which  customs 
duties  have  been  remitted  pursuant  to  tariff  item 
42700 — 1  and  which  are  entered  for  consumption  on 
and  after  July  8,  1970,  in  an  amount  equal  to  the 
difference  between  the  sales  tax  calculated  on  the  duty 
paid  value  of  the  goods  and  the  value  for  duty  of  the 

goods 4,249,117 

12.415.363 

Customs  duties,  excise  duties  and  sales  tax  on  sales 
made  to  NATO  Forces  and/or  NATO  personnel  in 
Canada: 

Alberta  Liquor  Control  Board,  Edmonton,  Alta 44,047 

British  Columbia  Liquor  Distribution  Branch,  Vancouver, 

BC : 5,509 

Liquor  Control  Board  of  Ontario,  Toronto,  Ont 48,609 

New  Brunswick  Liquor  Corporation,  Fredericton,  NB  4,219 

Newfoundland  Liquor  Corporation,  St  John's,  Nfld  4,095 

Nova  Scotia  Liquor  Commission,  Halifax,  NS 15,962 

Saskatchewan  Liquor  Board,  Regina,  Sask 1 ,740 

Societe  des  Alcools  du  Quebec,  Montreal,  Que 1 ,497 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000  (2) 225 

125,903 

Order  respecting  the  remission  of  customs  duty  on 
goods  imported  for  processing  and  subsequent  export. 

Order-in-Council  PC  1979—615  dated  March  1, 
1979: 

A-2  Manufacturing  Company  Limited,  Calgary,  Alta 7,570 

AEL  Microtel  Limited,  Brockville,  Ont 49,602 

AES  Data  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  74,173 

AHA  Manufacturing  Company  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 2,449 

ARD    Industries    Limited,    Friction    Welding    Division, 

Cambridge,  Ont 11,797 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMIN ISTRA  TION  ACT 
SECTION  11  (S)— Continued 


13*23 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Co/i/mwe^ 

$ 

AVL  Digital  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont 1,666 

Accurpress  Manufacturing  Limited,  Richmond,  BC 31,167 

Acier  Casteel,  Longueuil,  Que  302,1 12 

Acme  Manufacturing  Canada  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont  ....  35,839 

Alberta  Distillers,  Calgary,  Alta 84,610 

Allen  Industries  Canada,  Hamilton,  Ont 226,579 

Allied  Trailer  Equipment  Limited,  Beamsville,  Ont 8,920 

Alpha  Engineering  Corporation  of  Ontario,  Windsor,  Ont  1,726 

Aluminum  Company  of  Canada  Limited,  Kitimat,  BC 952,944 

Anthes  Industries  Incorporated,  Renn  Division,  Calgary, 

Alta  62,074 

Aradco  Management  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 20,874 

Arconas  Corporation,  Mississauga,  Ont  12,591 

Arctic  Gardens  Incorporated,  Deseronto,  Ont  88,689 

Arpeco  Engineering  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 23,518 

Atco  Pacific — A  Division  of  Atco  Industries  (NA)  Lim- 
ited, Penticton,  BC 98,950 

Atlas  Steels,  Division  of  Rio  Algom  Limited,  Welland, 

Ont 11,173 

Audia  Analysts  Incorporated,  St  Laurent,  Que  12,137 

Audor  Communications  Incorporated,  Ottawa,  Ont  16,612 

Avon  Products  Limited,  Pointe-Claire,  Que 30,220 

BG  Checo  International  Limitee,  Montreal,  Que 26,326 

BX  Industries  Corporation,  Valleyfield,  Que  1,305 

Bachan  Aerospace  of  Canada  Limited,  Emeryville,  Ont ....  25,925 

Barker-Thorne  Limited,  Weston,  Ont 45,006 

Baron  Caoutchouc  Limitee,  St  Jerome,  Que 54,137 

Bar- Well  Foods  Limited,  Trenton,  Ont 9,919 

Basic  Structure  Steel  Fabricators  Limited,  Welland,  Ont ..  2,082 

Bauer  Brothers  Company,  Brantford,  Ont 142,468 

Baycoat  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 19,620 

Baycoat  Technical  Services  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 56,346 

Bayly  Engineering  Limited,  Ajax,  Ont  11,633 

Beer  Precast  Concrete  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont 30,780 

Beloit  Canada  Limitee,  Sorel,  Que 7,241 

Bernard  Mould  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 10,550 

Binder  Tool  and  Mould  Incorporated,  Windsor,  Ont 716,173 

Birla  Industries,  Windsor,  Ont 1 10,373 

Blue  Bell  Canada,  Renfrew,  Ont  151,568 

Blue  Bell  Canada  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 28,576 

Bluebird  International  Incorporated,  Brantford,  Ont 1,595,139 

Bolton's  Die  Company  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 14,945 

Bombardier  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 1,794,253 

Bombardier  Limitee,  Division  du  Transport  en  Commun, 

La  Pocatiere,  Que 783,439 

Bose  Canada  Limited,  Ste  Marie,  Que  154,537 

Brighton  Yachts  Limited,  Brighton,  Ont 9,323 

British  American  Bank  Note  Company  Limited,  Ottawa, 

Ont 128,475 

British  Columbia  Packers  Limited,  Richmond,  BC 40,421 

Brookside  Farms  Limited,  Abbotsford,  BC 49,089 

Brown  Boveri  Canada  Limited,  Pointe-Claire,  Que 34,627 

Budd  Canada  Incorporated,  Kitchener,  Ont 876,536 

Build-A-Mould  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 52,457 

Burcan  Industries  Limited,  Whitby,  Ont 7,548 

Butler  Metal  Products,  Cambridge,  Ont 1 19,162 

CAE  Aircraft  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man  2,518 

CAE  Electronics  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 37,083 

CAE  Machinery  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 391,067 

Calona  Wines  Limited,  Kelowna,  BC  9,452 

Calvert  of  Canada  Limited,  Waterloo,  Ont 593,431 

Camions  Pierre  Thibault  Incorporee,  Pierreville,  Que 37,127 

Canada  Forgings,  A  Division  of  Toromount  Industries 

Limited,  Welland,  Ont 6,074 


Canada  Hair  Cloth  Company  Limited,  St  Catharines, 

Ont 34,215 

Canadair  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 809,855 

Canadian  Astronautics  Limited,  Ottawa,  Ont  19,777 

Canadian  General  Electric  Company  Limited,  Peterbor- 
ough, Ont  10,199 

Canadian  Heat  Treaters  Canada  Limited,  Richmond  Hill, 

Ont 104,593 

Canadian  Lukens  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont  21,138 

Canadian  Marconi  Company  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  1,143,784 

Canadian  Mist  Distillers  Limited,  CoUingwood,  Ont 182,279 

Canadian  Steelmaster  Company,  Toronto,  Ont  43,928 

Canadian  Webcor  Electronics  Limited,  Kingsville,  Ont  ....  68,862 

Canpotex  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 30,149 

Canron  Incorporated,  Vancouver,  BC 1,477 

Center  Tool  and  Mould  Company  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  327,812 
Central   Bridge  Company  Division  of  TIW   Industries 

Limited,  Trenton,  Ont 61,618 

Central  Stampings  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,576 

Cercast  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  353,911 

Chemical  Resins  Corporation,  Toronto,  Ont 12,574 

Cheminees  Securite  (Canada)  Limitee,  Chomedey,  Que....  10,764 

Chemique  Canada  Limited,  Malton,  Ont 24,21 1 

Chrome-Tek  Plastics  Limited,  Chatham,  Ont 77,314 

Chrysler  Canada  Limited,  Ajax,  Ont 74,261 

Chrysler  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,438,393 

Codalex  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 101,148 

Computing  Devices  Company,  Division  of  Control  Data 

Canada  Limited,  Ottawa,  Ont  321,865 

Concord  Manufacturing  Company  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  4,314 

Contempra  Mold  Windsor  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 13,400 

Continuous  Color  Coat  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont 60,691 

Control  Data  Canada  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 365,131 

Cooper  Energy  Services,  Stratford,  Ont  1,907,051 

Copes-Vulcan  (Canada),  Division  of  Escodyne  Limited, 

Orillia,  Ont 32,907 

Corma  Incorporated,  Concord,  Ont 126,758 

Crane  Canada  Limited,  Trenton,  Ont 15,013 

Grossman  Machinery  Company  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC  24,007 
DC  Chrome,  Division  of  Torcad  Limited,  Stoney  Creek, 

Ont 732,910 

DGM  Dominion  General,  Rexdale,  Ont  55,726 

Deep  Steam,  Montreal,  Que 7,905 

Delta  Furniture  Company  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 15,759 

De  Sede  Nienkamper  Manufacturing  Incorporated,  Scar- 
borough, Ont 6,564 

Diesel   Division,  General   Motors  of  Canada   Limited, 

London,  Ont 4,170,350 

Digital  Equipment  of  Canada  Limited,  Ottawa,  Ont 1,748,155 

Distillers  Corporation  Limited,  La  Salle,  Que  301,643 

Dofasco  Incorporated,  Hamilton,  Ont 135,967 

Domex  Packaging  Limited,  West  Vancouver,  BC  239,829 

Dominion  Bridge  Company  Limited,  Lachine,  Que 10,1 18 

Dominion  Bridge  Company  Sulzer  Incorporated,  Mon- 
treal, Que 147,899 

Dominion  Engineering  Works  Limited,  Lachine,  Que 5,940 

Dominion  Forge  Company  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  227,090 

Dominion  General  Manufacturing  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont  1,700 

Donlee  Manufacturing  Industries  Limited,  Weston,  Ont...  40,019 

Dyer  Equipment  Manufacturing  Limited,  Calgary,  Alta  ..  189,099 

EBCO  Industries  Limited,  Richmond,  BC  70,567 

EDAC  Incorporated,  Don  Mills,  Ont 250,881 

EDCO  Garment  Industries  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 1,402 

ES  Fox  Limited,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont 14,549 

Edoco  Healey  Technical  Products  Limited,  Vancouver, 

BC 2,722 


13*24 

SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co/i/mwe^ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


El  Chem  Construction  Company  Limited,  Burlington, 

Ont 20,847 

Electrical  Contacts  Limited,  Hanover,  Ont 134,895 

Electrohome  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 2,503,091 

Entreprises  A  Taugas,  Montreal,  Que 1,189 

Ernst  Leitz  (Canada)  Limited,  Midland,  Ont 45,361 

Euclid  Canada  Limited,  Guelph,  Ont  83,541 

Eureka  Coach  Company  Limited,  Downsview,  Ont 14,637 

Eurowide  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 120,258 

Everlasting  Valve  Company  Limited,  Guelph,  Ont  5,660 

Evin  Industries  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  11,760 

Excelsior  Steel  Polishing  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 32,176 

Exeltor  Incorporated,  Bedford,  Que 120,251 

F  Jos  Lamb  Company  of  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont ..  4,898,364 

Fab  Tec  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 316,014 

Faber  and  Company  Incorporated,  Loretteville,  Que 4,1 15 

Fabricated  Steel  Products  (Windsor)  Limit«d,  Windsor, 

Ont 278,335 

Falcon  Tool  and  Die  (1979)  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  27,148 

Farm  Choring  Limited,  Nisku,  Alta 43,292 

Fibracan  Incorporated,  Laval,  Que  69,314 

Fontaine  Body  Limited,  Cowansville,  Que 28,424 

Freedland  Industries  Limited,  Kingsville,  Ont  960,986 

Freightliner  of  Canada,  Burnaby,  BC  13,468 

Freight  Master  of  Canada  Limited,  St  Stephen,  NB 429,744 

Funcraft  Vehicles  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 1,999 

Furnitrad  Incorporated,  St  Hyacinthe,  Que  49,387 

GSC  Electronics  Limited,  La  Salle,  Que 82,594 

Gaco-Sternson  Limited,  Brantford,  Ont  253,326 

Gardner-Denver  Canada  Incorporated,  Woodstock,  Ont....  171,615 
Gearmaster  Company,  Division  of  Paccar  of  Canada  Lim- 
ited, Surrey,  BC 2,847 

Gearmatic  Company  Limited,  Surrey,  BC  4,920 

General  Crane  Industries,  London,  Ont 21,537 

General  Wire  and  Cable  Company  Limited,  Cobourg, 

Ont 2,573 

Glenayre  Electronics  Limited,  North  Vancouver,  BC 78,1 13 

HE  Vannatter  Limited,  Wallaceburg,  Ont 620,304 

HJM  Enterprises  Corporation  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 4,605 

H  &  R  Johnson,  Division  Norcross  Industries  Limited, 

Hamilton,  Ont  22,781 

Hallmark  Tools  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 202,746 

Hartford  Fibres  Limited,  Kingston,  Ont 73,245 

Harusch    Skitow    and    Equipment    Company    Limited, 

Squamish,  BC 6,290 

Hawker  Siddeley  Canada  Incorporated,  Trenton,  NS 249,900 

Heede  International,  Port  Moody,  BC 1,595 

Highway  Stamping  (Windsor)  Limited,  Tecumseh,  Ont ....  105,876 

Hiram  Walker  and  Son  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,788,720 

Holiday  Juice  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  15,456 

Holmes  Foundry  Limited,  Sarnia,  Ont  49,543 

Horst  Klaus  International  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 6,472 

Husky  Injection  Molding  Systems  Limited,  Bolton,  Ont....  4,127 

Huyck  Canada  Limited,  Arnprior,  Ont 1,646 

IBM  Canada  Limited,  Don  Mills,  Ont 12,145,436 

IBM  Canada  Limitee,  Bromont,  Que 26,260,985 

IIL  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 5,121 

IMO  Foods  Limited,  Canada,  Yarmouth,  NS  68,021 

Ideal  Mold  Corporation  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 369,697 

Imasa  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 48,696 

Imprimerie  Montreal-Granby,  Granby,  Que 444,982 

Inco  Limited,  Port  Colborne,  Ont 21,200 

Industrial  Mineral  Products  (BC)  Limited,  New  West- 
minster, BC 14,263 


Innovative  Metal  Incorporated,  c/o  Kinetics  Furniture, 

Downsview,  Ont 13,880 

Interiors  International  Limited,  Weston,  Ont 5,400 

International  Machine  Works,  Montreal,  Que 88,594 

International    Submarine    Engineering    Limited,    Port 

Moody,  BC 371,990 

International  Tools  (1973)  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  1,876,255 

Iron  Ore  Company  of  Canada,  Sept  lies.  Que 381,020 

JB  Systems  Limited,  Stoney  Creek,  Ont 6,194 

JTL  Machine  Limited,  Port  Colborne,  Ont 26,131 

Jaeger    Machine    Company    of    Canada    Limited,    St 

Thomas,  Ont 82,098 

Jet  Chemical  Products  Limited,  St  Laurent,  Que 3,947 

John  Matthey  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 2,086,224 

John  T  Hepburn  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont  264,148 

Judricks  Enterprises  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 96,00 1 

Kanter  Yachts  Corporation,  Port  Stanley,  Ont 1,961 

Kasle  Steel  Company  of  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  ..  624,216 

Kendan  Manufacturing  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,258,107 

Kerr  Controls  Limited,  Truro,  NS 6,628 

Kingston  Spinners  (Canada)  Limited,  Kingston,  Ont  29,902 

LP  Marcotte  &  Fils  Limitee,  Longueuil,  Que 8,251 

La  Compagnie  De  Papier  QNS  Limitee,  Baie  Comeau, 

Que  6,106 

LaSalle  Machine  Tool  of  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont..  1,874,961 

Laval  Phillips  Tool  &  Mold  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  77,407 

Lawson  Packaging  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 36,0 1 8 

Le  Groupe  Christie  Limitee,  St  Eustache,  Que 44,994 

Le  Manufacturier  Grandford  Incorporee,  St  Alphonse  de 

Granby,  Que 51 1,166 

Les  Ateliers  PAT  Incorporee,  Pointe  Aux  Trembles,  Que ..  11 2,228 

Les  Fabrications  Gilles  Drolet,  Montreal,  Que 2,43 1 

Les  Industries  de  Vetements,  Montreal,  Que  10,166 

Les  Machineries  Tenco  Limitee,  St  Valerien,  Que 13,279 

Libby  Manufacturing  Company  Limited,  Tecumseh,  Ont..  30,957 

Lomex  Incorporee,  Montreal,  Que 31,111 

Long  Manufacturing  Division,   Borg-Warner  (Canada) 

Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont  208,887 

March  Manufactured  Products,  St  Laurent,  Que 1 13,962 

Marcon  Custom  Metals  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 8,343 

Marhagen  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 1 1,516 

Marimac  Textiles  Incorporated,  St  Laurent,  Que 38,690 

Marine  Industries  Limitee,  Sorel,  Que 181,900 

Massey  Ferguson  Industries  Limited,  Brantford,  Ont 121,118 

McNeil  Laboratories  Canada  Limited,  Stouffville,  Ont  ....  48,084 

Metalix  Products  Limited,  Richmond,  BC  21,879 

Metcan  Fabricators  Incorporated,  Nepean,  Ont 8,577 

Midwest  Detroit  Diesel  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man 210,565 

Mitel  Telecom  Products,  A  Division  of  Mitel  Corporation, 

Kanata,  Ont  18,456 

Modern  Mold  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 19,803 

Mohawk  Structural  Steel,  Caughnawaga,  Que 1 4,893 

Morse  Electro  Products  (Canada)  Corporation  Limited, 

St  Laurent,  Que 101,254 

Moteurs  Leroy-Somer  Canada  Limitee,  Granby,  Que 13,967 

Motor  Coach  Industries  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man 1 18,379 

Muskol  Limited,  Truro,  NS  18,362 

Nabors  Drilling  Limited,  Calgary,  Alta 463,744 

National    Radiator   Manufacturing   Company   Limited, 

Windsor,  Ont  6,881 

Nato,  CE,  Calgary,  Alta 182,852 

Nelbro  Packing  Company,  Steviston,  BC  432,133 

Nelson  Steel  Company,  Stoney  Creek,  Ont 2,486 

Neo  Industries  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 1,359,299 

Newcor  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 68,304 

Niagara  Forge  Incorporated,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont 8,425 

Nicholson  Murdie  Machines  Limited,  Victoria,  BC 3,917 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMA TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRA TION  ACT 
SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13-25 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


North  American  Wallpapers  Limited,  Bramalea,  Ont 163,279 

Northern  Telecom  Canada  Limited,  Aylmer,  Que 219,986 

Northern  Telecom  Canada  Limited,  St  Laurent,  Que 94,212 

Northern  Telecom  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 207,610 

Nystone  Chemicals  Limited,  Debert,  NS  7,647 

Omnimar  Limitee,  Sorel,  Que 7,860 

Opera  Leather  Garment  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  2,564,403 

Optical  Art  Camera  Corporation,  Ottawa,  Ont 2,315 

Outboard  Marine  Corporation  of  Canada  Limited,  Peter- 
borough, Ont 140,887 

Pacific  Automation  Instruments  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC  2,429 

Paragon  Tools  Company,  Windsor,  Ont  1,939,850 

Paul  Demers  et  Fils,  Montreal,  Que 56,588 

Persta  Canada  Incorporee,  Bale  d'Urfe,  Que  457,381 

Poly  Ink  Limitee,  St  Jerome,  Que  35,764 

Porta-Test  Systems  Limited,  Edmonton,  Aha 7,309 

Power  Motion  Manufacturing  Limited,  London,  Ont  6,733 

Pratt  and  Whitney  Aircraft  of  Canada  Limited,  Mon- 
treal, Que 133,243 

Precision  Spring  of  Canada  Limited,  Amherstburg,  Ont....  94,912 

Prestcold  North  America,  Montreal,  Que 4,642 

Price  Steel  and  Engineering,  Kelowna,  BC 5,383 

Proctor  and  Gamble  Incorporated,  Belleville,  Ont 163,617 

Professional  Bowling,  A  Division  of  Firam-Glendale  Cor- 
poration, Oakville,  Ont  25,078 

Protein  Foods  Corporation  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 76,532 

Provincial    Crane — Amca    Heavy    Equipment    Limited, 

Niagara  Falls,  Ont 38,891 

Rapid  Industrial  Textile  Limited,  Stoney  Creek,  Ont 62,046 

Raul  Construction  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont  129,560 

REF  Automation  Limited,  Downsview,  Ont 27,81 1 

Regal  Tool  and  Mould  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 17,598 

Remtec  Incorporated,  Chambly,  Que 243,023 

Richler  Hydraulics  Incorporee,  St  Laurent,  Que 23,488 

Richmond  Pump  Parts  and  Service  Limited,  Vancouver, 

BC 2,835 

Ricivil  Limited,  St  Thomas,  Ont 7,220 

Ridgewood  Industries  Limited,  Laval,  Que 24,488 

Riello  Canada  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 1 16,107 

Robert  Hunt  Corporation,  London,  Ont 3,458 

Robert  Mitchell  Incorporee,  St  Laurent,  Que 85,072 

Rockford  Automation  Canada  Incorporated,  Weston,  Ont  13,033 

Ross  Hill  Controls  Limited,  Nisku,  Alta 76,503 

Royal/Amcan  Plastics,  Weston,  Ont 2,558 

Royal  Canadian  Mint,  Winnipeg,  Man 412,081 

Rumble  Canada  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont  2,450 

SKD  Manufacturing  Company  Limited,  Amherstburg, 

Ont 252,158 

SPB  Canada  (1979)  Incorporee,  Montreal,  Que 6,978 

St  Clair  Tool  and  Die  Limited,  Wallaceburg,  Ont 144,953 

St  Denis,  ER  and  Sons  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 21,863 

Schegel  Canada  Incorporated,  Oakville,  Ont  5,382 

Seagram  Company  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 133,655 

Security  Credit  Systems  Limited,  Markham,  Ont 5,041 

Seflna  Industries,  Ste  Rose,  Que  12,273 

Shaw-Almex  Industries  Limited,  Parry  Sound,  Ont 1,286 

Shell  Canada  Resources  Limited,  Dartmouth,  NS 18,526 

Shellcast  Foundries  Incorporee,  Montreal,  Que 71,360 

Sheres  Company  Limited,  Ville  D'Anjou,  Que 58,740 

Smith  and  Nephew  Incorporated,  Lachine,  Que 450,810 

Snyder  et  Fils  Incorporee,  Bedford,  Que 13,677 

Sontrol  Systems  Incorporated,  Etobicokc,  Ont 34,741 

Sorrell  Ridge  Farm  Limited,  Rollingdam,  NB 1,878 


Spartan  of  Canada,  Division  of  Shostal  Limited,  Mon- 
treal, Que 4,207 

Sperry  Gyroscope  Division,  Sperry  Incorporated,  Ottawa, 

Ont 1,149 

Sperry  Univac  Development,  Dorval,  Que 493,059 

Standard  Tube  Canada  Limited,  Woodstock,  Ont 1 26, 1 67 

Stayment  Industries  Company,  Montreal,  Que 25,854 

Steel  Cylinder  Manufacturing  Limited,  Tilbury,  Ont 1,723 

Sterling  Automotive  Supplies  Incorporated,  Windsor,  Ont  3,965 

Stowe- Woodward  Company  Limited,  Sherbrooke,  Que 331,298 

Strudex  Fibres  Limited,  Waterloo,  Ont 51,128 

Superior  Bus  Manufacture  Limited,  Morris,  Man 1,440,414 

Sylvania  Indoor  Lighting,  Montreal,  Que 18,685 

TRW  Ripa  Canada  Limited,  Belleville,  Ont 107,671 

TST  Limitee,  Montreal,  Que  1,240 

Taltek  Electronics  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 20,460 

Tanner  Eye  Limited,  Charlottetown,  PEI 140,471 

Technique  Die  and  Machine  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 8,667 

Techwest  Enterprises  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 52,417 

Tecumseh  Tool  and  Die,  Tecumseh,  Ont 3,554 

Teepak  Canada  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont 1,997 

Tektronix  Canada  Incorporated,  Vancouver,  BC 1,262 

Tele-Devices  Limited,  St  Laurent,  Que 20,298 

Texcom  Marketing  Services,  Markham,  Ont 1,722 

Texpack,  Division  of  McGaw  Supply  Limited,  Brantford, 

Ont 37,289 

The  Bauer  Brothers  Company  (Canada)  Limited,  Brant- 
ford, Ont 1,450 

The  Seagram  Company,  Amherstburg,  Ont 1 ,646,223 

The    Valley    City    Manufacturing    Company    Limited, 

Dundas,  Ont 10,983 

Thomas  Built  Buses  Canada  Limited,  Woodstock,  Ont 753,606 

Tidy  Welders,  Langley,  BC 220,838 

Toga  Manufacturing  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 27,137 

Treco  Incorporated,  St  Romuald,  Que 12,470 

Trend  Millwork  and  Cabinets  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 4,175 

Triangle  Die  and  Tool  Company  Limited,  St  Catharines, 

Ont 9,287 

Tricot  Beaver  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 12,991 

Trio  Tool  and  Mold  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 7,159 

Tri-Par  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 14,860 

Tri-Star  Industries  Limited,  Yarmouth,  NS 78,961 

Tri-Way  Machine  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 843,744 

Ultra  High  Vacuum  Instruments  Limited,  Burlington, 

Ont 2,736 

Uniflex  Rig  Company  Limited,  Brooks,  Alta 143,218 

Uniroyal  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont  299,961 

Uniroyal  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 70,622 

United  Tire  and  Rubber  Company,  Rexdale,  Ont  202,530 

Universal  Package  Corporation,  Montreal,  Que 214,648 

Universal  Telecommunications  Systems  Limited,  Pointe- 

Claire,  Que 971,1 18 

Unlimited  Textures  Company  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 8,763 

Valera  Electronics  Incorporated,  Ottawa,  Ont 12,465 

Valon  Kone  Canada  Limited,  North  Vancouver,  BC 14,987 

Varta  Batteries  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont  38,702 

Varta  Batteries  Limited,  St  Thomas,  Ont 44,002 

Velan  Engineering  Limited,  Granby,  Que 1,807,357 

Velan  Engineering  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  577,455 

Versatile  Machine  and  Tool   Manufacturing  Company 

Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 7,629 

Vestshell  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 79,551 

Vickers  Canada  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  203,529 

Vicom  and  Company  (Canada)  Limited,  Kingston,  Ont ....  26,232 
Victor  Woolen  Products  Limited,  St  Victor  de  Beauce, 

Que  26,300 


13«26 

SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

$ 
Victoria  Machinery  Depot  Company  Limited,  Victoria, 

BC 33,249 

Viscount  Machine  and  Tool  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  43,770 

Vulcan  Equipment  Company  Limited,  Scarborough,  Ont ..  38,575 

Waterville  Cellular  Products  Limited,  Waterville,  Que 1 6,005 

Welles  Corporation  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont  181,718 

Westinghouse  Canada  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 1,049,103 

Wilco  Canada  Incorporated,  London,  Ont  67,287 

Willco  Industries  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 47,896 

Windsor  Chrome,  Windsor,  Ont 287,961 

Windsor  Match  Plate  and  Tool  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 3,232 

Windsor  Mold  Incorporated,  Windsor,  Ont  78,727 

Wolverine  Division — UOP  Limited,  London,  Ont 39,842 

XYZ  Protective  Coatings  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 3,704 

Xypex  Chemical  Corporation,  Richmond,  BC  1 1 ,80 1 

Zollner  Canada  Limited,  Leamington,  Ont 47,912 

115.888.798 

General: 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  partial  tax  on  defence 
supplies: 

PC  1966—2184,  November  24,  1966: 

Canadian  Arsenals  Limited,  Le  Gardeur,  Que 2,924,077 

Department  of  National  Defence,  Ottawa,  Ont  10,929,998 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  certain  goods  used  in 
the  production  of  components  for  certain  aircraft  in 
substitution  therefor: 

Boeing  of  Canada,  Winnipeg,  Man  1,090,272 

Canadair,  Montreal,  Que 2,516 

Enheat  Limited,  Amherst,  NS 1,236 

Fell  Fab  International  Incorporated,  Hamilton,  Ont 161,998 

Fleet  Industries,  Division  of  Ronyx  Corporation,   Fort 

Erie,  Ont 31,818 

MacDonnell  Douglas  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont  306,225 

North  West  Industries,  Edmonton,  Alta 7,245 

Pacific  Western  Airlines  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 40,648 

Remission  of  all  customs  duty  paid  or  payable  on 
materials,  toolings,  jigs,  fixtures,  blueprints  and  attend- 
ant specifications  and  used  in  the  development  and 
manufacture  of  aerospace  for  the  Lockheed  L  1011 
Aircraft  produced  in  Canada  for  export: 

Bristol  Aerospace,  Winnipeg,  Man 9,954 

Remission  of  customs  duties  paid  or  payable  on  goods 
used  in  the  development  and  manufacture  of  space 
shuttle  remote  manipulator  systems: 

CAE  Electronics  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 66,818 

Spar  Aerospace  Products  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 609,568 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  sales  tax  on  goods 
imported  in  connection  with  the  acquisition  of 
armoured  vehicles  and  general  purpose  defence  supplies 
associated  therewith: 

Birla  Industries  Incorporated,  Windsor,  Ont 1,724 

CHT  Steel  Company,  Richmond  Hill,  Ont 28,108 

Canadian  Heat  Treaters  Limited,  Richmond  Hill,  Ont 8,740 

Department  of  National  Defence,  Ottawa,  Ont  202,974 

Dilmont  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 3,610 

Dunlop  Industrial  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont  6,716 


$ 

Duplate  Canada  Limited,  Oshawa,  Ont 1,788 

ETA  Circuit  Breakers  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 1,409 

Galtaco  Incorporated,  Cambridge,  Ont 4,881 

General  Motors  of  Canada,  London,  Ont  1,575,309 

Ingersoll  Machine  and  Tool  Company  Limited,  Ingersoll, 

Ont 17,234 

Rank  Precision  Industries,  Mississauga,  Ont  171,752 

Robert  Bosch  Canada  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont  15,891 

Telefiex  Canada  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 3,656 

Triplex  Engineering,  Pointe-Claire,  Que 21,788 

Vankirk  Heating  Systems  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 24,101 

Western  Foundry  Company  Limited,  Wingham,  Ont 3,206 

Williams  Fluidaire  Corporation  Limited,  Westhill,  Ont  ....  3,496 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 3,127 

Order  respecting  the  remission  of  customs  duty  on 
perfluorinated  ion-exchange  membranes: 

Alchem  Incorporated,  Burlington,  Ont  1,286 

Asahi  Chemicals  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 126,669 

Great  Lakes  Forest  Products  Limited,  Thunder  Bay,  Ont..  162,693 

St  Anne  Chemical  Company  Limited,  Nachawic,  NB 35,284 

Saskatoon  Chemicals,   Division  of  Prince  Albert   Pulp 

Company,  Saskatoon,  Sask 2,660 

Remission  of  customs  duties  and  taxes  paid  on  ma- 
chinery and  equipment  imported  by  various  companies: 

American  Motors  of  Canada  Limited,  Bramalea,  Ont 1 50, 1 08 

F  Jos  Lamb  Company,  London,  Ont  87,877 

Fab-Tech  Canada  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 50,891 

Freedland  Industries  Incorporated,  Kingsville,  Ont 5,842 

Gabriel  of  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 86,198 

General  Motors  of  Canada,  Windsor,  Ont 27,684 

International  Harvester  of  Canada,  Hamilton,  Ont 8,618 

Jeep  Corporation,  London,  Ont  12,025,189 

LaSalle  Machine  Tool  of  Canada,  Windsor,  Ont 12,872 

Livingston  International  Incorporated,  Tillsonburg,  Ont ....  1 ,362,3 1 8 

Tri-Way,  Windsor,  Ont 48,444 

Van  Dresser  Limited,  Waterloo,  Ont 10,920 

Windsor  Bumper,  Division  of  Gulf  and  Western  Canada 

Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,132 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  sales  tax  on  buses, 
parts  and  accessories  and  parts  thereof: 

AP  Parts  of  Canada  Limited,  Rexdale,  Ont  1,542 

American  Motors  Canada  Limited,  Brampton,  Ont 18,620,628 

Aurora  Cars,  Division  of  Grove  Ridge  Incorporated,  Rich- 
mond, Ont 3,349 

Canrep  Incorporated,  Toronto,  Ont 12,183 

Diesel,  Division  of  General  Motors  of  Canada,  London, 

Ont 1,699 

International  Harvester  Company  of  Canada  Limited, 

Vancouver,  BC 296,252 

Jeep  Corporation,  c/o  Livingston  Industries,  London,  Ont  673,272 

Mack  Canada  Incorporated,  Burnaby,  BC 160,868 

Motor  Coach  Industries  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man 8,203,425 

Ontario  Bus  Industries,  Mississauga,  Ont 329,720 

Ontario  Bus  and  Truck  Industries,  Toronto,  Ont 2,123 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 1,701 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  used  foundry  patterns 
and  related  jigs  and  fixtures: 

Acier  Sorel  Incorporee,  Sorel,  Que 3,319 

Beloit  Canada  Limited,  Sorel,  Que 3,123 

Benn  Iron  Foundry  Limited,  Wallaceburg,  Ont 5,359 

Canada  Alloy  Castings  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont  9,847 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMIN ISTRA  TION  ACT 
SECTION  11  (»)— Continued 


13 '27 


NATIONAL  RE\EN\JE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Canadian  Steel  Foundries,  Montreal,  Que  14,141 

Canron  Incorporated,  Hamilton,  Ont 19,956 

Cercast  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que  33,743 

Cercor  Incorporated,  Montreal  Que 1,652 

Crowe  Foundry  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 12,414 

Dart  Foundries  Limited,  Stevensville,  Ont  12,358 

Fonderie  Laperle  Limitee,  St  Ours,  Que 1,441 

Galtaco  Incorporated,  Cambridge,  Ont 2,300 

Haley  Industries  Limited,  Haley,  Ont 2,261 

Mainline  Elworthy,  Vancouver,  BC 2,295 

Metallurgie — Lynn  McLeod  Limitee,  Sherbrooke,  Que  ....  14,472 

Mitchell,  Robert  and  Company  Limited,  St  Laurent,  Que  1,565 

Monarch  Industries  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man 1,469 

Procast  Foundries  Incorporated,  Elmira,  Ont 15,341 

Shellcast  Foundries,  Montreal,  Que 5,318 

Specialty  Cast  Metals,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont 8,034 

Texas  Steel  Company  of  Canada  Limited,  St  Stephen, 

NB 3,264 

Vestshell  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 3,324 

Welmet  Industries,  Welland,  Ont 28,233 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 8,234 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  sales  tax  on  certain 
pleasure  cruisers: 

Canoe  Cove  Manufacture,  Sydney,  BC 317,760 

Craft  and  Beau  Industries,  Vancouver,  BC 13,016 

Grew  Corporation,  Penetanguishene,  Ont 241,617 

Marineland  Yacht  Sales,  Vancouver,  BC  83,446 

McQueens  Boat  Sales,  Vancouver,  BC  146,813 

Mountain  Pleasure,  Vancouver,  BC 144,625 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 26 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  sales  tax  on  certain 
front  end  wheel  loaders  and  their  parts: 

Caterpillar  of  Canada  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont  8,883,670 

Clark  Equipment  of  Canada  Limited,  St  Thomas,  Ont 1,637,260 

Diesel  Division  of  General  Motors,  London,  Ont 507, 1 02 

General  Motors  of  Canada  Limited,  Oshawa,  Ont 102,820 

George  W  Crothers  1965  Limited,  Concord,  Ont 11 3,358 

International  Harvester,  Montreal,  Que  1,783,741 

International  Harvester  of  Canada  Limited,  Hamilton, 

Ont 296,378 

SMI  Industries  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 3,069 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  diesel  engines  and 
parts  thereof  for  crawler  loaders  and  crawler  dozers: 

Angus,  R  Limited,  Edmonton,  Alta 5,268,782 

A  Pickard  Machinery  1971  Limited,  Charlottetown,  PEI ..  6,842 

Costello  Equipment  Company  Limited,  Calgary,  Alta 8.203 

Fiat  Allis  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont  4,255 

Finning  Tractor  Company,  Vancouver,  BC 9,333 

Komatsu  Canada  Limited,  Richmond,  BC 72,725 

Kramer  Tractor,  Vancouver,  BC  6,724 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 3,610 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  parts  and  materials  in 
production  of  vehicles  for  off  highway  use: 

AMF  Canada  Limited,  Guelph,  Ont 1,897 

BF  Goodrich  Canada  Limited,  Kitchener,  Ont 10,967 

Bata  Engineering,  Batawa,  Ont  7,035 

Brute  Manufacturing  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 16,078 

Cadel  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 9,033 


$ 

Canadian  General  Electric,  Peterborough,  Ont  2,424 

Chicago  Rawhide  Products  Canada  Limited,  Brantford, 

Ont 2,669 

Cutler  Hammer  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 14,443 

Eaton  Yale  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 6,791 

Euclid  Canada,  Division  of  White  Motor  Corporation, 

Canada,  Guelph,  Ont 3,920,504 

Firestone  Canada  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont 6,780 

Firestone  Steel  Products,  London,  Ont  1,231 

General  Motors  of  Canada,  Diesel  Division,  London,  Ont..  482,680 

General  Motors  of  Canada,  London,  Ont  2,069,945 

General  Tire  and  Rubber  Company  Limited,  Windsor, 

Ont 10,142 

Goodyear  Canada  Incorporated,  Islington,  Ont 134,334 

Industrial  Rubber  Products  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 7,054 

King  Hydraulic  Power,  Woodstock,  Ont 10,364 

L  and  M  Radiator,  Winnipeg,  Man 6,543 

Lincoln  Engineering  Company  of  Canada,  Rexdale,  Ont  ..  25,948 

Metal  and  Wood  Fastening  Devices,  Montreal,  Que 1,834 

Paccar  Canada  Limited,  Ste  Therese,  Que 35,445 

Pacific  Truck  and  Trailer  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 253,544 

Patlon  Aircraft  and  Industries  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 4,127 

Romatec  RML  Division,  Willowdale,  Ont  1,774 

Service  de  Pneus  CTR  Limitee,  Quebec,  Que 1,571 

Stratofiex  of  Canada  Limited,  Etobicoke,  Ont 54,740 

Teledyne  Canada  Metal  Products,  Woodstock,  Ont 3,398 

Unit  Rig  and  Equipment  Company,  Canada  Limited, 

Niagara  Falls,  Ont 1,919,256 

Wabco  Equipment  of  Canada,  Paris,  Ont 2,494,113 

Weiss,  John  G  Company  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 3,492 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 9,131 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  coated  titanium  anodes 
that  are  for  use  in  the  production  of  chlorine  sodium 
hydroxide  or  sodium  chlorate: 

BC  Chemical  Limited,  Prince  George,  BC 36,404 

CIL  Incorporated,  Becancour,  Que  275,817 

Canadian  Occidental  Petroleum,  Vancouver,  BC 2,375 

Chemetics  International  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 47,224 

Dow  Chemical  of  Canada  Limited,  Sarnia,  Ont 19,220 

Erco  Industries  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 27,074 

FMC  of  Canada  Limited,  Squamish,  BC  1 14,236 

Great  Lakes  Forest  Products  Limited,  Dryden,  Ont 1,1 22,663 

Prince  George  Pulp  and  Paper  Limited,  Prince  George, 

BC 94,763 

Quebec  North  Chemicals  Limited,  Montreal,  Que 1,637 

Quenord  Chemicals  Limited,  Montreal,  Que  17,151 

Stanchem,  Montreal,  Que 35,076 

Titanium  Limited,  St  Laurent,  Que 35,886 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 154 

Remission  of  customs  duty  in  certain  bleaching  solu- 
tions for  newsprint  in  substitution  thereof: 

Abitibi  Price  Incorporated,  Pine  Falls,  Man 12,805 

Abitibi  Price  Incorporated,  Thunder  Bay,  Ont 12,179 

Boise  Cascade  Canada  Limited,  Fort  Frances,  Ont 19,568 

Boise  Cascade  Limited,  Kenora,  Ont 20,074 

Bowater  Newfoundland  Limited,  Corner  Brook,  Nfld 28,549 

Crown  Zellerbach  Canada  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 31,840 

Domtar  Incorporated,  Donnacona,  Que 36,206 

Gaspesia  Pulp  and  Paper  Company,  Chandler,  Que 9,638 

Great  Lakes  Forest  Products  Limited,  Thunder  Bay,  Ont ..  26,588 

MacMillan  Bloedel  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC  80,069 

New  Brunswick  International  Paper  Company,  Dalhousie, 

NB 10,641 

Ontario  Paper  Company  Limited,  Thorold,  Ont 63,996 


13*28 

SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Co«/mue^ 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 


Soucy,  FF  Incorporated,  Riviere  du  Loup,  Que 20,279 

Virchem  Limited,  Moncton,  NB 33,288 

Virchem  of  Canada  Limited,  Cornwall,  Ont 64,627 

Remission  of  customs  duty  and  sales  tax  on  specified 
commercial  vehicles,  parts  and  accessories  and  parts 
thereof: 

Alforge  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 6,059 

Caelter  Enterprises  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 2,557 

Canadian  Disposal  Equipment  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 1 4,949 

Central  Truck  Body  Company  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont 3,832 

Dresser  Canada  Incorporated,  Cambridge,  Ont 96,595 

Firestone  Steel  Products  of  Canada,  London,  Ont 2,025 

Funcraft  Vehicles  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont 2,957 

General  Motors  of  Canada  Limited,  London,  Ont 44,894 

Halvey  Industries  Limited,  Calgary,  Alta 9,916 

Interiors  International,  Toronto,  Ont 1,008 

Les  Fourgons  Transit  Incorporated,  Montreal,  Que 5,884 

Mack  Trucks,  Toronto,  Ont  3,591,613 

Pettibone  Canada  Limited,  Mississauga,  Ont 199,555 

SMI  Industries,  Bathurst,  NB  63,290 

Teal  Manufacturing  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont 1,177 

Truck  Equipment  and  Service  Company  Limited,  Agin- 

court,  Ont 3,029 

Universal  Handling  Equipment  Company,  Hamilton,  Ont  36,870 

Western  Star  Trucks  Incorporated,  Mississauga,  Ont 1,274,546 

White  Motor  Corporation  of  Canada,  Toronto,  Ont  32,197 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 2,535 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  imported  equipment 
and  materials  used  in  the  construction  of  exported 
vessels: 

Bel- Aire  Shipyards  Limited,  North  Vancouver,  BC 24,954 

Marystown  Shipyard  Limited,  Marystown,  Nfld 24,053 

Motsumoto  Shipyards,  Vancouver,  BC 51,850 

Pacific  Winches,  Vancouver,  BC  2,403 

Vancouver  Shipyards,  Vancouver,  BC 347,211 

Remission  of  customs  duty  on  certain  fruits  and 
vegetables  imported  for  processing  during  1981-82: 

Bicks  Pickles,  Scarborough,  Ont 10,196 

Campbell  Soup  Company,  Toronto,  Ont 38,977 

Canadian  Canners  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont  150,653 

David  Lord  Limitde,  Montreal,  Que 17,121 

Eraser  Valley  Frosted  Foods  Limited,  Chilliwack,  BC 10,829 

Graves,  M  W  and  Company  Limited,  Berwick,  NS 1,753 

Hostess  Food  Products  Limited,  Cambridge,  Ont  5 1 ,566 

Humpty  Dumpty  Foods  Limited,  Hartland,  NB 58,391 

McLaren  Foods,  Hamilton,  Ont 5,901 

Mrs  D  L  Milne  Company,  Summerland,  BC  39,945 

Nalleys  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 6,635 

Swartz  Brothers,  Vancouver,  BC 102,302 

Westvale  Foods  Limited,  Mission,  BC 2,882 

Yum  Yum  Potato  Chips,  Warwick,  Que 6,827 

Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 566 

100.843.785 

Total  Customs  and  Excise 679,451,748 

Other  remissions  were  granted  as  follows: 

PC  1952—1945,  April  4,  1952,  goods  for  sale,  use  or  free 
distribution  by  the  United  Nations  or  its  Agents. 


PC  1952 — 4282,  October  15,  1952,  remission  in  respect  of 
goods  originating  in  countries  enjoying  the  privileges  of  British 
Preferential  Tariff  when  transhipped  to  a  foreign  port  owing  to 
circumstances  beyond  the  control  of  the  importers. 

PC  1955—1/350,  March  12,  1955,  goods  imported  into 
Canada  solely  and  exclusively  for  the  construction,  mainte- 
nance and  operation  of  project  dew  line. 

PC  1959 — 1624,  December  22,  1959,  remission  in  respect  of 
goods  donated  by  persons  resident  abroad  to  religious,  chari-' 
table  and  educational  institutions  in  Canada,  a  remission  of 
customs  duties  and  excise  taxes  and  in  respect  of  items  of 
official  militia  uniform  dress  or  accoutrement  not  available  in 
Canada,  a  remission  upon  importation,  of  customs  duty  other- 
wise payable. 

PC  1963—15/1854,  December  20,  1963,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  and  excise  taxes  in  respect  of  machinery  and 
apparatus  and  parts  thereof  (including  motive  power)  of  class 
or  kind  not  made  in  Canada  and  drilling  mud  when  imported 
or  diverted  for  use  exclusively  in  the  extraction  of  potash  from 
an  underground  deposit  by  the  solution  method  within  the  time 
limits  specified  in  the  Order-in-Council. 

PC  1964 — 235,  February  13,  1964,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  on  goods  that  are  not  as  ordered. 

PC  1964 — 1436,  September  17,  1964,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  on  consumable  goods  imported  into 
Canada  by  scientific  expeditions. 

PC  1966 — 545,  March  23,  1966,  provided  remission  of 
excise  taxes  on  Canadian  engines  returned  to  Canada  after 
having  been  exported  for  repair  purposes. 

PC  1966—23/2179,  November  24,  1966,  remission  of  the 
customs  duties  payable  on  tires  and  tubes  exported  by  Canadi- 
an manufacturers  and  installed  as  original  equipment  on  vehi- 
cles shipped  to  Canada  and  the  sales  taxes  payable  on  the  duty 
paid  value  and  that  calculated  on  the  value  for  duty. 

PC  1966—19/2200,  December  1,  1966,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  and  excise  taxes  on  passover  bread  or  matzos 
imported  for  use  during  the  Passover  holidays  and  entered  at 
customs  during  the  period  commencing  two  months  prior  to 
the  eve  of  the  Passover  festival  and  terminating  on  the  last  day 
of  the  festival. 

PC  1967—30/128,  January  26,  1967,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  payable  on  goods  imported  for  use  by 
the  international  Pacific  Salmon  Fisheries  Commission. 

PC  1967—23/261,  February  16,  1967,  remission  before  the 
liability  therefore  arises  of  all  customs  duties  and  excise  taxes 
that  would  otherwise  be  payable  in  respect  of  vehicles  and 
equipment  imported  into  Canada  by  international  bridge 
authorities  solely  and  exclusively  for  the  maintenance  and 
operation  of  the  Canadian  portions  of  international  bridges 
and  their  approaches. 

PC  1967—38/393,  March  2,  1967,  remission  effective 
January  1,  1967,  to  Canadian  distillers  the  duty  payable  on 
used  white  oak  whiskey  barrels  imported  into  Canada  for 
export  production  purposes  and  the  amount  of  sales  tax  be- 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  n(S)— Continued 


13*29 


NATIONAL  REVENVE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

tween  the  sales  tax  payable  on  the  duty  paid  value  and  that 
calculated  on  the  value  for  duty. 

PC  1969 — 1224,  June  17,  1969,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  in  respect  of  certain  goods  used  for  the 
NATO  Infrastructure  Project. 

PC  1969—1785,  September  17,  1969,  remission  for  spare 
parts  and  equipment  for  ground  service  to  aircraft  for  foreign 
airlines  operating  into  Canada  on  international  routes. 

PC  1970—1786,  October  14,  1970,  remission  of  duties  and 
sales  taxes  otherwise  payabe  on  ballet  slippers  and  pointed  toe 
shoes  when  purchased  by  ballet  schools  for  the  use  of  their 
students  and  by  ballet  companies  for  the  use  of  their 
performances. 

PC  1970—1835,  October  21,  1970,  provided  under  pre- 
scribed conditions  with  respect  to  Canadian  articles  exported 
and  re-imported  for  the  remission  of  all  or  part  of  the  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  payable  in  excess  of  the  amounts 
properly  assessed  on  the  cost  of  repairs  made  processing  or 
equipment  added  outside  of  Canada. 

PC  1972 — 1244,  June  6,  1972,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  on  certain  goods  imported  through  customs 
postal  branches. 

PC  1972 — 2516,  November  9,  1972,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  in  respect  of  Computer  Generated 
Mailing  Lists. 

PC  1973 — 228,  January  30,  1973,  remission  of  sales  taxes 
on  domestically  manufactured  aircraft  used  for  demonstration 
to  prospective  customers. 

PC  1973 — 745,  March  27,  1973,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  in  respect  of  the  temporary  entry  of 
specified  articles  imported  for  the  special  uses  set  forth  in 
Schedule  «A)>  to  the  order. 

PC  1973— -837,  April  3,  1973,  order  respecting  the  privi- 
leges and  immunities  in  Canada  of  the  International  Atomic 
Energy  Agency. 

PC  1973—4/1179,  May  22,  1973,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  sales  taxes  on  certain  domestic  sewing  machines. 

PC  1973 — 1361,  May  29,  1973,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  in  respect  to  goods  imported  for  meetings  in 
Canada  or  foreign  organizations. 

PC  1973—2529,  August  21,  1973,  order  respecting  the 
remission  of  customs  duties  and  excise  taxes  on  goods  for  use 
in  cases  of  emergency. 

PC  1973—3568,  November  13,  1973,  remission  granted  of 
the  customs  duties  paid  or  payable  under  the  customs  tariff  on 
carbon  fibres  and  filaments  imported  into  Canada  during  the 
period  commencing  on  January  1,  1973  and  ending  on  Decem- 
ber 31,  1976. 

PC  1974 — 34,  January  8,  1974,  remission  of  a  portion  of  the 
customs  duties,  sales  taxes  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  on 
goods  grown,  produced  or  manufactured  in  Australia. 


PC  1974 — 406,  February  26,  1974,  regulations  respecting 
the  application  of  item  99215-1  of  the  customs  tariff  to  used  or 
second  hand  motor  vehicles. 

PC  1974 — 2246,  October  8,  1974,  remission  of  excise  taxes 
payable  by  diplomats  and  others  representing  another  country. 

PC  1974 — 2522,  November  19,  1974,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  on  certain  kinds  of 
advertising  materials. 

PC  1974 — 2523,  November  19,  1974,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  on  commercial  samples 
temporarily  imported  for  exhibition  or  demonstration. 

PC  1975 — 287,  February  11,  1975,  partial  remission  of  sales 
taxes  on  aircraft  temporarily  exported  from  Canada  in  fulfil- 
ment of  a  contract  for  commercial  air  service. 

PC  1975 — 1024,  May  6,  1975,  remission  of  a  portion  of  the 
customs  duties  and  sales  taxes  payable  on  automobiles  pro- 
duced in  a  foreign  country  by  a  manufacturer  who  has  import- 
ed for  installation  on  the  automobiles,  Canadian  manufactured 
automobiles  components. 

PC  1975 — 1903,  August  6,  1975,  remission  of  sales  taxes 
paid  or  payable  in  respect  of  machinery  and  apparatus  import- 
ed into  or  purchased  in  Canada  on  or  after  June  1,  1974  by 
Livingston  Industries  Limited,  Tillsonburg,  Ontario  for  pack- 
aging and  repackaging  of  goods  for  export. 

PC  1975—1973,  August  27,  1975,  remission  of  customs 
duties  paid  or  payable  on  railway  rolling  stock  imported  for 
use  in  Canadian  domestic  service  substitution  therefor. 

PC  1975 — 1974,  August  27,  1975,  remission  of  customs 
duties  paid  or  payable  on  railway  rolling  stock  manufactured 
in  Canada  imported  for  use  in  international  service  in  substitu- 
tion therefor. 

PC  1976 — 259,  February  10,  1976,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  machinery,  apparatus  and  parts  used  in  the  construc- 
tion, equipment  and  repair  of  two  plants  for  the  direct  reduc- 
tion of  iron  ore. 

PC  1976 — 957,  April  27,  1976,  remission  of  sales  and  excise 
taxes  on  imported  aircraft  used  for  demonstration  to  prospec- 
tive customers. 

PC  1976 — 1174,  May  18,  1976,  remission  of  customs  duties 
paid  or  payable  on  goods  used  in  the  manufacture  of  electronic 
sub-systems  for  communication  satellites  for  export. 

PC  1976 — 1314,  June  1,  1976,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  payable  on  Canadian  exposed  and  processed 
film  and  recorded  video  tape. 

PC  1976—1884,  July  20,  1976,  authorized  in  respect  of 
circuses  and  other  amusement  devices,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  payable  in  excess  of  certain  minimum 
amounts  assessed  for  the  period  of  time  the  goods  remain  in 
Canada. 

PC  1976 — 1930,  July  27,  1976,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  underpaid  due  to  entry  error. 


13-30 

SECTION  17  (S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Continued 

PC  1976 — 2345,  September  21,  1976,  remission  of  sales 
taxes  paid  or  payable  on  seed  drill  transports  and  swather 
carriers  imported  into  Canada  or  sold  after  December  31, 
1975. 

PC  1976 — 2984,  December  2,  1976,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  on  samples  of  negli- 
gible value. 

PC  1976—17/3066,  December  9,  1976,  remission  of  air 
transportation  tax  paid  or  payable  in  accordance  with  Part  II 
of  the  Excise  Tax  Act  with  respect  to  the  transportation  of 
United  States  personnel  to  or  from  the  joint  Canada — United 
States  defence  project  "Dew  Line"  for  the  purpose  of  its 
construction,  maintenance  or  operation. 

PC  1976—3175,  December  23,  1976,  order  respecting  the 
remission  of  customs  duties  on  tooling  for  use  in  the  produc- 
tion of  fibre  reinforced  plastic  components  for  Boeing  747  SP 
Aircraft. 

PC  1977 — 435,  February  10,  1977,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  sales  taxes  payable  on  air  pollution  monitoring 
stations  and  equipment  temporarily  imported  by  or  on  behalf 
of  the  Detroit  Edison  Company. 

PC  1977—3/2692,  September  22,  1977,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  paid  or  payable  in  an  amount  not  exceeding 
$150,000  on  parts  and  materials  for  use  by  Westinghouse 
Canada  Limited,  in  the  manufacture  of  Sonar  Equipment  for 
sale  and  export  to  the  Netherlands  Navy. 

PC  1977—3/3327,  November  24,  1977,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  paid  or  payable  in  respect  of  parts  and  materials  to 
Canadian  Vickers  Limited  for  use  in  the  manufacture  of 
forty-six  electric  rapid  transit  railway  passenger  cars  for  the 
Delaware  Port  Authority. 

PC  1977 — 3574,  December  12,  1977,  remission  of  the  cus- 
toms duties  on  man-made  staple  fibres,  tow  or  filament  yarns 
1977. 

PC  1978—4/151,  January  19,  1978,  remission  to  Bristol 
Aerospace  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  of  the  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  on  the  importation  of 
materials  or  components  used  in  the  manufacture  of  the  Black 
Brant  Upper  Atmospheric  Research  Vehicles  during  the 
period  January  1,  1978  to  December  31,  1980. 

PC  1978 — 1 136,  April  13,  1978,  remission  of  customs  duties 
in  respect  of  vessels  chartered  by  CN  Marine  Corporation  for 
the  Atlantic  Region  Ferry  Service. 

PC  1978—1412,  April  27,  1978,  remission  of  50%  of  the 
sales  taxes  paid  or  payable  on  certain  retail  scales  capable  of 
being  converted  to  metric,  imported  or  sold  during  the  period 
April  1,  1977  and  June  30,  1981. 

PC  1978—2023,  June  22,  1978,  remission  of  customs  duties 
and  excise  taxes  on  vehicles  and  baggage  temporarily  imported 
by  non-residents. 

PC  1978—2644,  August  23,  1978,  order  respecting  the 
remission  of  customs  duties  on  soluble  coffee  produced  in 


countries  entitled  to  the  benefits  of  the  General  Preferential 
Tariffs. 

PC  1978—1/2759,  August  30,  1978,  order  respecting  the 
remission  of  customs  duties  and  sales  taxes  on  the  duty  on 
goods  incorporated  into  a  gondola  lift  system  at  Sunshine 
Village,  Banff,  Alberta. 

PC  1978—2963,  September  27,  1978,  remission  of  sales  and 
excise  taxes  on  motor  vehicles  purchased  or  imported  by 
diplomatic  and  other  representatives  of  foreign  countries  with- 
out payment  of  sales  and  excise  taxes  and  after  two  years 
diverted  to  taxable  use. 

PC  1978—3/3021,  September  27,  1978,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  on  parts  and  materials  for  use  in  the  manufacture 
of  Rapid  Transit  cars  for  export. 

PC  1978—3279,  October  26,  1978,  remission  of  penalties  of 
less  than  $10  in  respect  of  late  payment  of  tax  imposed  under 
the  Excise  Tax  Act. 

PC  1978—3329,  November  2,  1978,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  sales  taxes  on  television  sets  imported  by  Canadian 
Admiral  Corporation  Limited. 

PC  1978 — 3728,  December  14,  1978,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  on  wines  used  exclusively  for  blending 
purposes. 

PC  1978—3762,  December  14,  1978,  partial  remission  of 
customs  duties,  sales  and  excise  taxes  paid  on  parts,  equipment 
and  other  items  for  use  by  Canadian  Air  Carriers  providing 
international  commercial  air  service. 

PC  1978—6/3898,  December  21,  1978,  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties  paid  or  payable  on  used  patterns  to  Worthington 
(Canada)  Limited,  Brantford,  Ontario,  for  use  in  the  manu- 
facture of  Sies-Batch  double  screw  rotary  pumps. 

PC  1979 — 28,  January  18,  1979,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  sales  taxes  on  certain  goods  imported  to  support  the 
CP-140  Aurora  Aircraft. 

PC  1979—3/182,  January  25,  1979,  remission  of  customs 
duties  paid  or  payable  on  materials  and  components  imported 
for  use  by  CAE  Electronics  Limited,  in  the  production  of  five 
MRCA  aircraft  flight  simulator  systems. 

PC  1979 — 395,  February  15,  1979,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  excise  taxes  in  respect  of  non-commercial  importa- 
tions in  connection  with  warranty  or  guaranty  adjustments. 

PC  1979—6/798,  March  15,  1979,  remission  to  National 
Semiconductors  Limited,  Montreal,  Quebec,  of  the  customs 
duties  paid  or  payable  in  respect  of  vacuum  evaporator  masks 
which  are  employed  in  the  production  of  photocells. 

PC  1979—1028,  March  28,  1979,  remission  of  the  customs 
duties  on  man-made  staple  fibres,  tow  or  filament  yarns. 

PC  1979 — 1098,  March  29,  1979,  remission  of  sales,  excise 
and  air  transportation  taxes  from  March  27,  1979  in  accord- 
ance with  the  reductions  proposed  in  Bill  C-38,  an  Act  to 
amend  the  Excise  Tax  Act,  given  first  reading  January  29, 
1979. 


SUPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


13'31 


NATIONAL  KEWENME— Continued 
CUSTOMS  AND  EXCISE— Concluded 

PC  1979—1965,  July  26,  1979,  order  respecting  the  remis- 
sion of  customs  duties  and  sales  taxes  on  computer  equipment 
and  parts. 

PC  1979—3494,  December  19,  1979,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  television  chassis  and  components. 

PC  1980—325,  February  1,  1980,  partial  remission  of  cus- 
toms duties,  sales  and  excise  taxes  on  sparkling  cider  effective 
December  12,  1979.  PC  1980—1056,  April  18,  1980  revoked 
this  Order  effective  April  21,  1980. 

PC  1980—3160,  November  27,  1980,  remission  of  a  portion 
of  the  customs  duties,  sales  taxes  and  excise  taxes  paid  or 
payable  on  goods  grown,  produced  or  manufactured  in  New 
Zealand. 

PC  1981—765,  March  19,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  lubricating  oil  blending  stocks. 

PC  1981 — 1/923,  April  2,  1981,  remission  of  customs  duties 
paid  or  payable  on  material  or  components  imported  by  CAE 
Electronics  Limited. 

PC  1981—9/1336,  May  21,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  goods  incorporated  into  twenty  seven  light  rail 
vehicles  for  the  City  of  Calgary. 

PC  1981 — 1651,  June  18,  1981,  remission  of  customs  duties, 
sales  and  excise  taxes  paid  or  payable  by  Westinghouse 
Canada  Limited. 

PC  1981—5/1813,  July  2,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties,  and  sales  taxes  on  the  duty,  on  domestic  sewing 
machines  imported  by  Singer  Company  of  Canada  Limited. 

PC  1981—1883,  July  9,  1981,  remission  of  sales  taxes  and 
any  penalty  incurred  thereon,  on  steel  held  in  inventory  on 
November  18,  1974,  used  in  the  manufacture  or  production  of 
fabricated  structural  steel  referred  to  in  paragraph  26(4) (d)  of 
the  Excise  Tax.  Act. 

PC  1981—5/1992,  July  16,  1981,  remission  of  the  customs 
duties  paid  or  payable  on  the  importation,  by  Atomic  Energy 
of  Canada  Limited,  between  January  1,  1980  and  December 
31,  1981,  of  up  to  5,000  stainless  steel  drums  for  use  in  storing 
deuterium. 

PC  1981—7/2025,  July  23,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties  and  a  partial  remission  of  sales  and  excise  taxes  paid  or 
payable  by  the  Department  of  External  Affairs  upon  the 
temporary  importation  of  seven  armoured  vehicles. 

PC  1981—2101,  July  29,  1981,  remission  of  customs  duties, 
and  sales  taxes  on  the  duty,  on  communications  equipment 
imported  by  Bell  Canada. 

PC  1981—2256,  August  19,  1981,  remission  of  fifty  per 
cent  of  the  sales  taxes  on  communications  equipment  imported 
by  Bell  Canada. 

•PC  1981—1/2322,  August  19,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties  paid  on  a  high  frequency  welder  imported  by  Sonco 
Steel  Tube  Limited. 


PC  1981—5/2578,  September  16,  1981,  remission  of  the 
customs  duties  paid  by  Wafios  Canada  Limited. 

PC  1981—8/3076,  October  29,  1981,  remission  of  customs 
duties  paid  by  Victory  Soya  Mills  Limited. 

PC  1981—3171,  November  5,  1981,  revoked  the  Steel  for 
Manufacture  or  Production  Inventory  Remission  Order 
approved  by  Order-in-Council  PC  1981—1883  of  July  9, 
1981,  and  made  in  substitution  therefor,  an  Order  respecting 
the  remission  of  sales  taxes  and  any  penalty  incurred  thereon, 
on  steel  held  in  inventory  on  November  18,  1974,  used  in  the 
manufacture  or  production  of  fabricated  structural  steel 
referred  to  in  paragraph  26(4) (d)  of  the  Excise  Tax  Act. 

PC  1981—4/3381,  November  26,  1981,  order  respecting 
the  remission  of  customs  duties  on  unfinished  embossed  hard- 
board  doorskins  imported  by  Masonite  Canada  Incorporated. 

PC  1982 — 52,  January  14,  1982,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  lamp  bulbs  for  Christmas  lighting  sets. 

PC  1982—191,  January  21,  1982,  order  respecting  the 
remission  of  customs  duties  on  certain  imports  from  Greece. 

PC  1982—2/231,  January  21,  1982,  remit  to  the  companies 
mentioned  in  the  schedule  the  customs  duties  on  Vinegar. 

PC  1982—3/231,  January  21,  1982,  remit  to  the  companies 
mentioned  in  the  schedule  the  customs  duties  on  glass  tube  air 
heaters  for  use  in  the  production  of  Malt. 

PC  1982—386,  February  11,  1982,  remission  of  customs 
duties  on  certain  vacuum  evaporator  masks  made  from  stain- 
less steel  and  employed  in  the  production  of  photocells. 

TAXATION 

$ 

Remissions  of  income  tax: 

Andre  Viens  Inc,  Victoriaville,  Que 1,619 

PC  1982—3/605  dated  February  25,  1982,  remits 
income  tax  of  $1,603  plus  relevant  interest  in  respect  of 
the  1975  taxation  year. 

The  taxpayer  is  a  manufacturer  of  farm  equipment 
who  in  February  1980,  filed  amended  returns  for  the 
years  1975  to  1978  to  claim  a  deduction  for  manufac- 
turing and  processing  which  had  not  previously  been 
claimed. 

The  Department  thought  that  the  1975  return  was 
statute-barred  under  paragraph  164(l)(a).  However,  it 
was  not  statute-barred  by  virtue  of  paragraph  152(4)(6) 
until  1980. 

Therefore,  a  remission  has  been  granted. 
Andrews,  William  G,  Toronto,  Ont 2,888 

PC  1981—8/1673  dated  June  18,  1981  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amount  of  $2,381  plus  relevant 
interest  payable  in  respect  of  the  1973  taxation  year. 

William  G  Andrews  filed  Notices  of  Objection  in 
respect  of  disallowed  expenses  for  1971  and  1972.  The 
reassessments  were  confirmed  and  it  was  recommended 
that  the  1973  return  be  similarly  adjusted. 

In  January  1979,  by  Consent  to  Judgement,  the 
expenses  were  allowed  in  part.  By  correspondence  and 
discussions,  the  taxpayer's  representatives  were  led  to 


13*32 

SECTION  11(S)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REWENVE— Continued 
TAXATION— Continued 


believe  that  the  1973  return  would  be  included  in  the 
adjustment.  The  Department  of  National  Revenue 
failed  to  request  a  waiver  for  the  1973  return  which 
became  statute-barred  on  May  22,  1978  predating  the 
consent. 

Due  to  the  amount  of  tax  and  the  failure  of  the 
Department  to  request  a  waiver,  a  remission  has  been 
recommended. 

Berkinshaw,  Estate  of  Ora  Jane,  Toronto,  Ont 


PC  1980—2/2475  dated  September  12,  1980  remits 
estate  tax  of  $42,093. 

Richard  C  Berkinshaw,  deceased  May  4,  1 970,  creat- 
ed a  trust  settlement  whereby  the  income  was  payable 
to  his  spouse  Ora  Jane  Berkinshaw.  The  trust  provided 
that  on  her  death,  the  capital  would  be  distributed  to 
charity. 

At  Richard's  death,  the  trust  was  exempt  from  estate 
tax  and  it  was  deemed  to  be  property  passed  to  the 
spouse. 

On  the  death  of  Ora  Jane  Berkinshaw  on  September 
25,  1970,  the  trust  settlement  was  subjected  to  estate 
tax  of  $42,093  as  the  gift  to  charities  was  not  applicable 
to  her  but  to  her  predeceased  husband. 

The  Minister  of  Finance  in  1969  adknowledged  that 
such  a  situation  was  a  defect  in  the  Estate  Tax  Act  and 
proposed  an  amendment  to  the  legislation  and  to  remit 
any  taxes  that  might  become  payable  in  the  interim  as  a 
result  of  this  defect.  The  amendments  were  never  intro- 
duced as  the  federal  government  vacated  the  estate  tax 
field  in  1972. 

In  view  of  the  proposed  amendment,  it  was  recom- 
mended that  the  estate  taxes  paid  should  be  remitted. 

Bodie,  John  L,  Hamilton,  Bermuda 

PC  1981—10/1673  dated  June  18,  1981  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amount  of  $6,222  in  respect  of  the 
1976,  1977  and  1978  taxation  years. 

John  L  Bodie  at  age  65  ceased  to  be  a  Canadian 
resident  and  became  a  resident  of  Bermuda  in  June 
1975. 

He  received  Registered  Pension  Plan  payments  from 
Genstar  Limited  but  these  payments  were  transferred 
to  a  RRSP  in  the  period  of  mid- 1977  to  June,  1978. 

In  respect  of  the  RPP  payments  received  in  1976, 
1977  and  1978,  the  taxpayer  was  assessed  $6,222 
income  tax  in  July  1978. 

In  1979,  funds  amounting  to  $143,581  were  with- 
drawn from  the  RRSP  and  non-resident  tax  of  $35,895 
was  withheld.  This  withdrawal  included  the  amount 
transferred  from  the  RPP  on  which  income  tax  of 
$6,222  had  previously  been  paid. 

As  this  is  a  duplication  of  income  tax,  a  remission  in 
the  amount  of  $6,222  has  been  recommended. 

Buck,  W  Keith,  London,  England 

PC  1981—5/2459  dated  September  3,  1981,  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amount  of  $11,861  for  1977  to  1981 


42,093 


6,222 


19,769 


taxation  years  under  Part  XI  and  $7,908  accruing  in 
1981  taxation  year  under  Part  XIII. 

The  taxpayer  served  with  the  Canadian  High  Com- 
mission in  London.  In  1977,  he  became  an  employee  of 
the  United  Nations  in  London.  He  enquired  from  the 
Ottawa  District  Office  as  to  his  residency  status  and 
was  informed  that  he  would  be  a  continuing  resident. 
On  the  basis  of  this  opinion  he  deposited  his  Civil 
Service  pension  in  a  registered  retirement  pension  plan. 

As  his  actual  status  was  a  non-resident,  he  was 
taxable  on  excess  contributions  and  also  on  the  amount 
to  be  refunded  to  him. 

As  the  Department  erred  in  advising  him  on  his 
residency  status  and  the  resulting  tax  is  material,  a 
remission  has  been  recommended. 

Canadian  Forest  Products  Limited,  Vancouver,  BC 

PC  1981—9/1673  dated  June  18,  1981  remits 
income  tax  payable  in  the  amount  of  $93,072  in  respect 
of  the  1973  taxation  year. 

Canadian  Forest  Products  Limited  1973  income  tax 
return  was  assessed  allowing  a  logging  tax  deduction 
based  on  logging  operations  income  reported. 

The  taxpayer  was  re-assessed  in  1979  by  the  Province 
of  British  Columbia  with  an  increased  logging  tax  of 
$385,528  in  order  to  correct  an  error  on  the  original 
assessment.  This  error  came  about  because  of  a  1972 
strike,  a  price  increase  and  the  practice  of  log  trading. 

At  the  time  of  the  provincial  reassessment,  the  tax- 
payer's 1973  taxation  year  was  statute-barred.  The 
taxpayer  has  referred  to  a  prior  case  PC  1970 — 7/831, 
May  12,  1970  where  a  remission  was  granted  when  a 
company  was  re-assessed  for  Quebec  Logging  Tax  at  a 
time  when  its  relevant  taxation  year  was  statute-barred. 

Accordingly,  a  remission  of  $93,072  income  tax  has 
been  recommended. 

Coons,  L  Gilbert,  Toronto,  Ont 

PC  1981—9/3076  dated  October  29,  1981  remits 
income  tax  payable  of  $163,584  plus  relevant  interest  in 
respect  of  the  1977  taxation  year. 

The  taxpayer  and  J  Arthur  Jobin  owned  15%  of  the 
issued  and  outstanding  common  shares  and  a  number  of 
$10  par  value  preference  shares  of  Pitt  Steel  Ltd. 

In  1967-69,  the  taxpayer  contributed  5,999  common 
shares  and  1,275  preference  shares  to  his  self-adminis- 
tered RRSP. 

In  1976,  the  taxpayer,  Mr.  Jobin  and  another  share- 
holder purchased  an  additional  40%  of  the  common 
shares  at  an  approximate  price  of  $65  per  share.  In 
order  to  finance  this  purchase,  it  was  necessary  to 
borrow  $900,000  and  as  a  part  of  the  transaction,  all 
shares  in  Pitt  owned  directly  or  indirectly  were  required 
as  security. 

The  shares  in  the  RRSP  accounts  were  given  a  value 
of  $1  per  common  share  and  $10  per  preference  share 
and  were  made  available  for  security  purposes.  Con- 
sideration was  not  given  to  the  income  tax  implications 
as  investments  in  an  RRSP  cannot  be  used  for  security 
purposes.  When  the  implications  were  realized,  the 
particular  shares  were  released  and  placed  in  trust  with 
a  Trust  Company. 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRA TION  ACT 
SECTION  \1{%)— Continued 


13*33 


NATIONAL  KEVE^\JE— Continued 
TAXATION— Continued 


Pitt  Steel  Ltd  has  had  cash  flow  problems  and  in 
refinancing,  the  shareholders  have  been  put  into  the 
position  of  receiving  limited  flnancial  remuneration  in 
salary  and  restrictions  in  dividends  and  redemption  of 
shares. 

If  the  tax  flnancial  penalty  is  imposed  on  the  use  of 
the  RRSP  shares  as  security,  the  taxpayers  may  become 
bankrupt  and  this  could  in  turn  affect  the  solvency  of 
Pitt  Steel  Ltd  resulting  in  employee  lay-offs. 

The  shares  have  been  restored  to  the  RRSP  accounts 
and  therefore  the  remission  has  been  granted. 

Emballage  DH  Ltd,  Montreal,  Que 

PC  1981—3/2444  dated  September  3,  1981,  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amount  of  $10,111  plus  relevant 
interest,  if  any,  in  respect  of  the  1975  taxation  year. 

On  the  1975  and  1976  returns,  the  taxpayer  allocated 
amounts  for  the  small  business  deduction  for  itself  and 
associated  corporations.  When  the  returns  were  re- 
assessed, the  Department  did  not  use  the  original  calcu- 
lation and  thus  miscalculated  the  tax  payable  by  not 
allowing  the  small  business  deduction  to  which  it  was 
entitled. 

The  taxpayer  did  not  realize  that  an  error  had  been 
made  until  1980  and  by  that  time  the  1975  return  was 
statute-barred. 

Because  the  Department  was  at  fault  at  the  time  of 
re-assessment,  a  remission  has  been  recommended. 

Employment  Tax  Credit  Remission  Order 

PC  1981—2008,  July  17,  1981  in  respect  of  the  1981 
taxation  year  remits  income  tax  payable  for  certain 
eligible  employers  in  respect  of  employment  by  them  of 
eligible  workers  in  eligible  employment. 

Isolated  Posts  Beneflts  and  Allowances  Remission  Order 

PC  1980—2948,  October  30,  1980  in  respect  of  the 
1 98 1  taxation  year  remits  income  tax  payable  on  subsi- 
dized housing,  allowances  and  travel  assistance  pay- 
ments for  persons  employed  north  of  the  60th  parallel 
or  in  a  location  designated  as  an  isolated  post. 

Jobin,  J  Arthur,  Toronto,  Ont 

PC  1982-^/285  dated  January  28,  1982  remits 
income  tax  payable  of  $57,566  plus  relevant  interest  in 
respect  of  the  1 977  taxation  year. 

The  taxpayer  and  L  Gilbert  Coons  owned  1 5%  of  the 
issued  and  outstanding  common  shares  and  a  number  of 
$10  par  value  preference  shares  of  Pitt  Steel  Ltd. 

In  1967-69,  the  taxpayer  contributed  2,500  common 
shares  and  530  preference  shares  to  his  self-adminis- 
tered RRSP. 

In  1976,  the  taxpayer,  Mr  Coons  and  another  share- 
holder purchased  an  additional  40%  of  the  common 
shares  at  an  approximate  price  of  $65  per  share.  In 
order  to  flnance  this  purchase,  it  was  necessary  to 
borrow  $900,000  and  as  a  part  of  the  transaction,  all 
shares  in  Pitt  owned  directly  or  indirectly  were  required 
as  security. 


10,489 


The  shares  in  the  RRSP  accounts  were  given  a  value 
of  $1  per  common  share  and  $10  per  preference  share 
and  were  made  available  for  security  purposes.  Con- 
sideration was  not  given  to  the  income  tax  implications 
as  investments  in  an  RRSP  cannot  be  used  for  security 
purposes.  When  the  implications  were  realized,  the 
particular  shares  were  released  and  placed  in  trust  with 
a  Trust  Company. 

Pitt  Steel  Ltd  has  had  cash  flow  problems  and  in 
reflnancing,  the  shareholders  have  been  put  into  the 
position  of  receiving  limited  flnancial  remuneration  in 
salary  and  restrictions  in  dividends  and  redemption  of 
shares. 

If  the  tax  flnancial  penalty  is  imposed  on  the  use  of 
the  RRSP  shares  as  security,  the  taxpayers  may  become 
bankrupt  and  this  could  in  turn  affect  the  solvency  of 
Pitt  Steel  Ltd  resulting  in  employee  lay-offs. 

The  shares  have  been  restored  to  the  RRSP  accounts 
and  therefore  the  remission  has  been  granted. 

Kagna,  Harvey,  Montreal,  Que  50,441 

PC  1981—10/2601  dated  September  24,  1981, 
remits  gift  tax  in  the  amount  of  $28,857  plus  relevant 
interest  in  respect  of  the  1963  taxation  year. 

The  taxpayer  purchased  an  interest  in  an  industrial 
building  from  the  proceeds  of  flre  insurance  from  a 
previously  operated  business.  This  interest  in  the  build- 
ing was  sold  to  flnance  purchase  of  shares  for 
$2,800,000  in  the  Verdun  Industrial  Building  Corpora- 
tion. Subsequently,  he  accepted  an  offer  to  sell  these 
shares  for  $3,100,000. 

The  taxpayer  was  assessed  on  the  profits  and  the  Tax 
Appeal  Board  concurred  that  the  assessment  was  cor- 
rect. A  further  appeal  reversed  this  decision  and  held 
that  the  gain  was  a  capital  gain  and  further  that  part  of 
the  gain  belonged  to  his  wife  and  children. 

The  taxpayer  was  also  assessed  gift  tax  in  respect  of 
proceeds  of  the  gain  received  by  his  wife  and  children. 
This  was  appealed  to  the  Tax  Appeal  Board  and  the 
assessment  confirmed  but  was  inadvertently  not  includ- 
ed in  the  further  appeal. 

In  view  of  the  results  of  the  appeal  of  the  income  tax 
assessment  and  the  advanced  age  of  the  taxpayer,  a 
remission  of  the  gift  tax  is  recommended. 

Lago,  Edward  A,  Thunder  Bay,  Ont 1,523 

PC  1981—2/2444  dated  September  3,  1981,  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amounts  of  $645,  $506  and  $372  in 
respect  of  the  1973,  1974  and  1975  taxation  years. 

The  taxpayer  has  been  totally  disabled  by  rheumatoid 
arthritis  since  December  1972.  For  the  years  1973  to 
1979,  he  included  disability  benefits  in  his  income  on 
the  advice  of  the  District  Office.  Such  benefits  were  not 
taxable  because  of  ITAR  19. 

In  1980,  the  taxpayer  realized  his  error  but  the  1973 
to  1975  years  were  statute-barred. 

Because  the  taxpayer  included  these  benefits  on  his 
income  even  though  he  was  not  in  receipt  of  a  T4A  Slip, 
it  appears  that  incorrect  information  was  provided  by 
the  Department.  Due  to  this  error  and  the  poor  health 
of  the  taxpayer,  a  remission  has  been  recommended. 


13*34 

SECTION  n(S)— Concluded 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


NATIONAL  REVENUE— Concluded 
TAXATION— Concluded 

S 

McConnell,  Harold  W,  Yarmouth,  NS 12,125 

PC  1981—5/3286  dated  November  19,  1981,  remits 
income  taxes  payable  in  the  amounts  of  $3,627,  $4,186 
and  $4,312  in  respect  of  the  1971,  1972  and  1973 
taxation  years. 

The  taxpayer  and  his  son  sold  a  business  and  the  son 
invested  his  share  with  a  Trust  Company.  The  taxpayer 
created  a  trust  for  his  two  minor  children  with  the  same 
Trust  Company. 

The  Trust  Company  issued  T5  Slips  for  the  older 
son's  interest  income  in  error  to  the  taxpayer  and  the 
amounts  were  included  in  his  income  for  the  1971  to 
1976  taxation  years.  The  son  also  included  these 
amounts  in  his  income. 

As  there  was  double  taxation  and  the  1971  to  1973 
returns  were  statute-barred,  a  remission  has  been 
recommended. 

Provincial    Social    Assistance    Payments,    Income    Tax 
Remission  Order,  1980 

PC  1982-622,  February  25,  1982,  in  respect  of  the 

1 980  taxation  year  remits  income  tax  payable  in  respect 
of  certain  social  assistance  payments  made  pursuant  to 
the  legislation  of  the  Provinces  of  British  Columbia, 
Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  Ontario,  Quebec,  New  Bruns- 
wick and  Nova  Scotia  not  already  excluded  from  the 
income  of  recipients  for  income  tax  purposes  under  the 
Income  Tax  Act. 

Railway  Transportation  Pass  Remission  Order,  1981 

PC  1982—286,  January  28,  1982  in  respect  of  the 

1 98 1  Taxation  Year  authorized  the  remission  of  income 
tax  to  holders  of  passes  authorizing  free  carriage  in  that 
the  value  of  the  benefit  is  to  be  excluded  from  taxable 
income  for  the  1981  taxation  year. 

Ruppel,  Ruby  L,  Cambridge,  Ont  2,807 

PC  1981—8/2025  dated  July  23,  1981,  remits 
income  tax  in  the  amount  of  $2,807  in  respect  of  the 
1974  taxation  year. 

The  taxpayer  was  widowed  in  1974  and  included  in 
her  income  $11,540  insurance  benefits  from  the  death 
of  her  husband.  This  amount  was  not  taxable. 

As  Mrs  Ruppel  was  a  housewife  and  had  not  previ- 
ously had  taxable  income  and  this  was  her  first  return 
filed,  the  District  Office  should  have  questioned  the 
inclusion  of  such  benefits.  When  the  taxpayer  realized 
her  error,  the  1974  return  was  statute- barred. 

As  the  taxpayer's  income  is  limited  and  the  amount  is 
material  to  her,  a  remission  has  been  recommended. 

Remission  of  less  than  $1,000(1) 147 

Total  Taxation 243,195 

Total  National  Revenue 679,694,943 


SECRETARY  OF  STATE 

Fees  ordinarily  payable  for  applications  for  proof  of 
Canadian  Citizenship  filed  by  a  person  who  has  been 
invited  by  a  Club  or  Organization  to  take  part  in  a 
ceremony  for  the  promotion  of  citizenship: 


Remissions  of  less  than  $1,000 
Total  Secretary  of  State 


$ 

1,194 


1,194 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  18(2) 

Obligations,  debts  and  claims  deleted  from  the  accounts 


13-35 


Department  and  agency 


Treasury  Board 
authority 

Ministerial 
authority 

To 

Accounts  not  in 
excess  of  $5,000 

Accounts  not  in 
excess  of  $2,000 

tal 

No             Amount 

No 

Amount 

No 

Amount 

% 

$ 

$ 

218 

128,072 

218 

128,072 

1 
31 

lis 

587 

80 
695 

1,575 
8,210 

1 

31 

115 

587 

80 

695 

1,575 
8.210 

98 

11,045 

98 

11,045 

9               29,294 

9,468 

547,752 

9,477 

577.046 

26 

511 

26 

511 

1                      19<'> 

21 

1,671 

22 

1.690 

1                 4.952 

373 

52,657<') 

374 

57,609 

63 

1.560 

63 

1,560 

482 

16,781 

482 

16,781 

31               38,386 

139 

18,416 

170 

56,802 

31 

18,720 

31 

18.720 

7 

1,260 

7 

1.260 

4 

814 

4 

814 

4               11,265 

1,089 

77.260 

1,093 

88.525 

4               11,526 

9,941 

386,143 

9,945 

397.669<2) 

75             243,255 
1,289          4,154,107 

676 
7,971 

211,911 
4,555,290 

751 
9.260 

455.166 
8,709,397 

7 

1,606 

7 

1,606 

2                 7,777 

10 

1.365 

12 

9,142 

13 

2.442 

13 

2,442 

5 

764 

5 

764 

1                2,208 

10 

314 
80 

1,555 
5,800<') 
26,602 

10 

314 

81 

1,555 

5,800 

28,810 

478 
51 

11,344 
3,128 

478 
51 

11,344 
3,128 

1                2,613 

335 

35,093 

336 

37,706 

86             251,365 

1,120 

492,130 

1,206 

743,495<2) 

1,504           4,756,767 

33,764 

6,622,252 

35,268 

11,379,019 

AGRICULTURE 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department  a., 

National  Library 

National  Museums  of  Canada 

Public  Archives 

CONSUMER  AND  CORPORATE  AFFAIRS 

EMPLOYMENT  AND  IMMIGRATION— 
Canada  Employment  and  Immigration  Commission 

ENERGY,  MINES  AND  RESOURCES 

ENVIRONMENT 

EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS 

FINANCE— 

Insurance , 

FISHERIES  AND  OCEANS .., 

INDIAN  AFFAIRS  AND  NORTHERN  DEVELOPMENT 

INDUSTRY,  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

JUSTICE— 
Supreme  Court  of  Canada 

LABOUR 

NATIONAL  DEFENCE 

NATIONAL  HEALTH  AND  WELFARE  

NATIONAL  REVENUE— 

Customs  and  Excise 

Taxation 

PUBLIC  WORKS  

REGIONAL  ECONOMIC  EXPANSION 

SCIENCE  AND  TECHNOLOGY— 

National  Research  Council  of  Canada 

SECRETARY  OF  STATE— 

Public  Service  Commission 

SOLICITOR  GENERAL— 

Department  

Correctional  Services 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police 

SUPPLY  AND  SERVICES— 

Department  

Statistics  Canada 

TRANSPORT 

VETERANS  AFFAIRS 


('^  Deletions  were  from  departmental  accounts  receivable  with  the  following  exceptions:  Environment,  1  item  of  $19  pertaining  to  the  asset  account  "Departmental 
petty  cash" — External  Affairs,  14  items  totalling  $318  pertaining  to  the  Passport  Office  revolving  fund — Solicitor  General,  Correctional  Services,  314  items  totalling 
$5,800  pertaining  to  the  asset  account  "Parolees". 

^^'  The  above  figures  exclude  the  following:  National  Health  and  Welfare,  35,871  items  totalling  $6,915,441  pertaining  to  remission  of  debts  under  Section  22(3)  of  the 
Old  Age  Security  Act — Veterans  Affairs,  7,775  items  totalling  $3,341,000  pertaining  to  remission  of  debts  under  Section  19(2)  of  the  War  Veterans  Allowance  Act. 


Further  details  regarding  accounts  receivable  and  deletions  can  be  found  in  Section  32  of  Volume  II. 


13-36 

SECTION  31(4) 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Every  accountable  advance  that  is  not  repaid  or  accounted  for  (including  those  repaid  or  accounted  for  after  April 
30  but  recorded  in  the  old  year  accounts) 


Name 

Charged 

to 

Vote 

Amount"' 

Settled 

in 
1982-83 

To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 

AGRICULTURE 

Adsett  R 

20 

$ 

200 

527 

200 

1,100 

215 

400 

29 

54 

4 

1,100 

44 

1,500 

19 

16 

77 

7 

475 

100 

30 

63 

450 

1 

500 

200 

1,680 

35 

17 

430 

34 

1,000 

14 

10,521 

$ 

527 

1,100 

400 
29 

1,500 

16 

77 

7 

475 

30 

450 

1 

300 

34 
4,946 

$ 
200 

Aubin  R 

5 

Balser  W 

20 

200 

Bielanski  A 

20 

BrouillardC 

5 

Carnafan  A  

1 

Esdale  G 

1 

GillisWA    

5 

Gowe  RS 

5 

Hadley  B  

Henri  M        

5 
5 

Hergenheiun  D  

Huff  B  

20 

5 

19 

Kirk  B      

5 

KirklandD 

1 

Lyman  S 

Madosingh  C 

Molnar  J 

Ottson  D 

1 
5 
5 
1 

100 

Parrington  W 

RitchieS 

Slusar  M 

1 
1 
5 

Smyeniuk  A 

Stewart  J  

20 

20 

500 
200 

Trant  G 

5 

1,205 

TremblayC 

Van  Humbeck  E 

5 
5 

Van  Zinderen  Bakker  E 

5 

430 

WaitheD 

5 

Ward  D 

20 

1,000 

Wardrop  J  

5 

3,854 

Name 


COMMUNICATIONS- 
DC  partment 

Decary  M I 

HuyckeS 15 

Ostry  B 1 

Parker  L 1 


Canadian  Film  Development 
Corporation 

Brown  A 50 

Gousse  M 50 

Johnson  J  P  50 

Lamy  A  50 

Langlois  C 50 

McCann  J 50 

McDougall  1 50 

Mitchell  H 50 

Mycyck  P 50 

Paisley  G  50 

Pearson  B 50 

Rosenberg  K  50 

Canadian  Radio-television  and 
Telecommunications  Commission 

Goodridge  E 55 

Hughes  J  55 

Springs 55 

National  Museums  of  Canada 

Clement  P 75 

LaingC 75 

Lauriault  J 75 


3,090 

3,090 

20 

20 

1,008 

1,008 

65 

65 

4.183 

85 

4.098 

374 

374 

500 

500 

2,435 

2,435 

1,000 

1,000 

200 

200 

250 

250 

518 

518 

200 

200 

354 

354 

440 

440 

410 

410 

110 

110 

6.791 

6.791 

275 

275 

50 

50 

275 

275 

600 

600 

82 

82 

1,500 

263 

263 

Lundholm  M  . 
Richardson  D. 
RobitailleG... 

St  Jean  M 

Thom  I 

Tolmatch  E  ... 


Charged 

Settled 

To  be 

to 

in 

settled 

Vote 

Amount"' 

1982-83 

in  1982- 

$ 

S 

$ 

75 

1,375 

1,000 

75 

1,000 

1.000 

75 

115 

75 

10 

75 

700 

700 

75 

26 

26 

5.071 

263 

2.808 

CONSUMER  AND 
CORPORATE  AFFAIRS 

Aitken  N  

Arena  M 

Bruce  R  

Burnham  W 

Campbell  D 

Cantin  J  M 

Chutharatkul  C 

CCA  (Alberta)  

Dhingra  S 

Freeman  M  

Gallagher  K 

Gaul  A 

Hannis  P 

Hendricks  K  F 

Kendall  B 

LabelleM 

Lalonde  H  

Leblanc 

Leduc  C 

LeeR  

Legault  A 

Legault  D 

Milton  M  J 

Murnahan  R  

NimeckO 

Pauely  W 

Pigeon  Y 

Pinsonnault  P 

Saunders  G 

Statistics  Canada 

Taggart  W 

Weircinski  A  


ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT— 

Northern  Pipeline  Agency 

CitynskiS 25 

Denemoustier  A 25 

DeyellD 25 

GeeD 25 

GrayB 25 

GreyB  25 

Jackson  R 25 

LonglitzD  25 

Low  D 25 

NichollsJ 25 

VinetteN 25 

Yarranton  G 25 


16,645 


7,739 


6,906 


1          1,216 

1,216 

1             317 

317 

1            954 

954 

1            375 

375 

1            375 

375 

1             200 

200 

1          1,398 

1,398 

1               57 

57 

1             125 

125 

1             125 

125 

1             100 

100 

1            225 

225 

1            350 

350 

1              50 

50 

1             100 

100 

1            300 

300 

1             156 

156 

1            973 

973 

1            250 

250 

1              86 

86 

1            489 

489 

1            500 

500 

1             150 

150 

1            600 

600 

1            575 

575 

1          1,238 

1,238 

1            300 

300 

1           1,600 

1,600 

1             500 

500 

1         10,340 

10,340 

1           1,924 

1,924 

1             587 

587 

26,535 

11,301 

15,234 

121 

121 

95 

95 

368 

368 

62 

62 

8 

8 

18 

18 

43 

43 

205 

205 

98 

98 

350 

350 

1,515 

1,515 

16 

16 

2,899 

2,856 

43 

SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  i\{4)— Continued 


13«37 


Name 


Charged 
to 
Vote     Amount"* 


Settled 


EMPLOYMENT  AND 
IMMIGRATION— 

Canada  Employment  and 
Immigration  Commission 

Adams  R  5 

AddyR 10 

Airhart  H 10 

Albert  D 10 

AliardN 5 

Amiot  R 5 

Andre  E 10 

AntaiJ 10 

Archbold  T 10 

Attanasio  F  5 

Audet  J 10 

Bacon  O  H 20 

BankTD 10 

Barber  R  J 5 

Baril  D 5 

Barkwell  J  10 

Bastow  G 10 

Bastow  G  10 

Beaudoin  L 10 

Beau  pre- La  forest  G 10 

Bedding  K  10 

Bedding  M 5 

BelandG  5 

BelangerJ  10 

Belanger  P 20 

Belanger  R 10 

Belleville  M 5 

Belisle  M  5 

Belisle  Y 10 

Bergevin  S 5 

BerlassoS  M 10 

Bertrand  M  10 

Besson  J  G 10 

Billings  PE  20 

Bilodeau  A 10 

Blanchard  A 10 

Blundell  B 10 

Bondolo  E 10 

Boon  J 10 

Bouchard  J 10 

Bouchard  J 20 

Bouchard  R  10 

Boudereau  C  10 

Bourdaged  J 20 

Bouvier  W  W 10 

Boynes  M 5 

BradfieldBW 10 

Bradfield  B  W 10 

Bragg  T  20 

Brand  C  J 5 

Brascoupe  A 10 

Brascoupe  A 10 

Briffett  W 10 

Brousseau  D 10 

Brown  D  R 10 

Burton  F 10 

Busseri  T  10 

Button  N  10 

Campbell  D 10 

Campbell  R 10 

Campeau  A  10 

Carew  G 10 

Carey  K  5 

Carlos  G 5 

Carreau  L 20 

Carson  L 10 

Carswcll  J 10 

Cassidy  L 20 

Cassivi  J 10 

CayaR 10 

Cecyre  J 5 

Chandler  V  S 5 


1982-83 


To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 


461 

461 

263 

263 

11 

11 

133 

133 

252 

252 

27 

27 

45 

45 

75 

75 

150 

150 

2 

2 

60 

60 

144 

144 

183 

183 

50 

50 

1,000 

1,000 

175 

175 

85 

85 

35 

35 

75 

75 

316 

316 

200 

200 

383 

383 

476 

476 

1,560 

1,560 

50 

50 

250 

250 

356 

356 

100 

100 

250 

250 

152 

152 

156 

156 

350 

350 

300 

300 

160 

160 

200 

200 

92 

92 

36 

36 

126 

126 

230 

230 

40 

40 

2,000 

2,000 

75 

75 

200 

200 

350 

350 

500 

500 

642 

642 

100 

100 

5 

5 

300 

300 

37 

37 

50 

50 

150 

150 

51 

51 

5 

5 

405 

405 

50 

50 

180 

180 

17 

17 

36 

36 

100 

100 

500 

500 

13 

13 

5 

5 

250 

250 

449 

449 

350 

350 

297 

297 

260 

260 

1,000 

1,000 

8 

8 

311 

311 

Name 


Charged 
to 
Vote     Amount*" 


Settled 


1982-83 


Charette  L 10 

Charland  M 5 

Chatterton  R 10 

Chayton  C  R 5 

Chisholm  J 10 

Choronzey  Y 20 

Clarkson  W  G 10 

Cichos  A 10 

Coakcr  J lo 

Connoly  J lo 

Constantineau  P  1 

Cooper  H 10 

Cordeau  C lO 

Corey  RW 5 

Cossadom  M  lO 

Cotte  M  10 

Court  B 10 

Courtoreillc  E  10 

CronierJY  10 

Crozier  H 10 

Crozier  H 10 

CyrL  10 

Cyr  M 10 

Cyr  M 10 

Dalton  J 10 

Davies  J  W 5 

De  Pauls  M  lO 

Demers  G 10 

Dennis  C 10 

Dique  J 5 

DomanskiJ  10 

Dosue  Y 10 

Dowbiggin  F 10 

Drager  E 10 

Driscoll  W 20 

Drouin  L 10 

Drouin  R  5 

Dubois  L 20 

Ducarme  D 10 

DufaultJ  10 

Dumuuchelle  A  W 10 

Dunlop  J  S 10 

DutkiewiczJ  10 

Dyer  W  G 10 

Elliot  J  10 

Emley  N 10 

Emond  J  M  5 

Emond  J  M  10 

Evans  J  S 10 

FalluP 1 

Favron  P 10 

Fcls  J 10 

Filiatrault  R 10 

Filiatrault  R 10 

Filion  D  5 

Forest  A 5 

FoxP 10 

Freake  D 10 

Freeze  R  C 5 

Frostad  K 10 

Fulsom  L 20 

Funk  F 10 

Furlong  F 20 

Gagn6  P lO 

Galloway  R  H 5 

Garcy  M 10 

Garneau  R 10 

Gaudreau  N IQ 

Gauthier  M 10 

GelokK  10 

George  C I0 

Gillies  I  H  5 

Gilligan  E 5 

Gingrich  T 10 

Godbout  F 10 

GogoJ  10 

Gosselin  D 20 


To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 


202 

202 

600 

600 

250 

250 

60 

60 

125 

125 

175 

175 

350 

350 

420 

420 

177 

177 

132 

132 

150 

150 

321 

321 

85 

85 

170 

170 

10 

10 

372 

372 

780 

780 

540 

540 

147 

147 

90 

90 

197 

197 

250 

250 

300 

300 

250 

250 

500 

500 

75 

75 

234 

234 

56 

56 

425 

425 

100 

100 

345 

345 

95 

95 

182 

182 

27 

27 

16 

16 

747 

747 

7 

7 

22 

22 

150 

150 

782 

782 

2,000 

2,000 

382 

382 

186 

186 

150 

150 

250 

250 

160 

160 

120 

120 

150 

150 

350 

350 

361 

361 

583 

583 

126 

126 

126 

126 

186 

186 

285 

285 

50 

50 

99 

99 

111 

111 

130 

130 

130 

130 

500 

500 

5 

5 

95 

95 

65 

65 

310 

310 

383 

383 

80 

80 

75 

75 

82 

82 

10 

10 

210 

210 

194 

194 

300 

300 

125 

125 

125 

125 

28 

28 

13 '38 

SECTION  31(4)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Name 


Charged 

Settled 

To  be 

to 

in 

settled 

Vote  Amount'" 

1982-83 

in  1982-83 

Name 


Charged 
to 
Vote    , 


EMPLOYMENT  AND 
IMMIGRATION— Co«/«Me</ 

Canada  Employment  and 
Immigration  Commission — 

Continued 

Grady  J 10 

Graham  M I 

Graham  T 20 

Gratton  T 10 

Gravel  G 10 

Green  J  R 10 

Green  R 10 

Grenier  M  10 

Groat  B 10 

Hall  D 10 

Hammond  C  10 

Hardy  S 20 

HasuloS 10 

Healey  L 20 

Healey  L 20 

HebertRS 20 

Heggtviet  D 10 

Heinen  N 10 

HeislerT  10 

HeimBD 5 

Henri  D  10 

Herron  D 10 

Hierlihy  V  10 

Hookey  B 5 

Howarth  G 10 

HoweB 5 

Hudson  A  A 10 

Huet  L 5 

Inman  RS 10 

IsbesterJ  10 

Jackson  A 10 

James  J 10 

Joanis  Y 10 

Jobin  A  J  5 

Jones  D  S 20 

Jones  S  E 10 

Jones  SE 10 

Kaufman  M 20 

Kelly  P 10 

Kelly  WH 10 

KerrD  10 

KingE  10 

KingM 10 

Kingham  J  E 10 

KirlewR 10 

Knight  D  10 

Labine  J 10 

LabrieJ  10 

Laflamme  L 5 

LafleurP 10 

LajoieC 10 

Lancop  A 10 

Landon  L 10 

Landry  J 10 

Lariv6eC 5 

Laroche  B 10 

Latourelle  R 10 

Lavoie  L 5 

Lawlor  J 10 

Lebrun  F  20 

Legault  J  10 

Legault  R 10 

Legros  J  M 10 

Lemieux  J 5 

Lemire  M 10 

Letourneau  M 5 

Letourneau  M 5 

Lewis  A 20 

LindleyDJ  5 

Lindsay  R  B  N 10 

Lizotte  H  10 


10 

10 

29 

29 

36 

36 

400 

400 

1.055 

1,055 

35 

35 

22 

22 

180 

180 

450 

450 

32 

32 

250 

250 

111 

111 

122 

122 

200 

200 

272 

272 

420 

420 

65 

65 

95 

95 

75 

75 

211 

211 

146 

146 

25 

25 

9 

9 

513 

513 

5 

5 

100 

100 

673 

673 

336 

336 

120 

120 

36 

36 

280 

280 

2 

2 

160 

160 

110 

110 

200 

200 

30 

30 

235 

235 

700 

700 

600 

600 

150 

150 

42 

42 

88 

88 

117 

117 

140 

140 

9 

9 

48 

48 

72 

72 

395 

395 

197 

197 

18 

18 

150 

150 

10 

10 

5 

5 

68 

68 

6 

6 

532 

532 

228 

228 

360 

360 

250 

250 

175 

175 

250 

250 

100 

100 

10 

10 

350 

350 

233 

233 

54 

54 

26 

26 

309 

309 

200 

200 

Loder  T 10 

Lopes  B 10 

Lortic  F 5 

LorticP 5 

LoughrenFG  20 

Loutit  L 10 

Love  S  J 10 

LozierJO  10 

Lynch  R 10 

MacGibbon  B  10 

MacKay  B 10 

MacKinnon  K  10 

Mahon  N  R 10 

MaloT 10 

Maltais  M  10 

ManthaR 10 

Marche  G 10 

Marshall  WC 20 

Martin  N  10 

Masse  R 10 

Matte  D 10 

McCann  A 10 

McCord  D  A 20 

McEachern  M 10 

McEwcn  J  10 

McFadden  M 5 

McFarlaneP 10 

McGill  B 10 

McGroartyS 10 

McIverD 10 

McKee  S 10 

McLaren  J  G 10 

McNee  D 10 

Mercredi  A 10 

Merrithew  P  A 10 

Michaud  M  10 

Migneault  R 10 

Miller  G 5 

Miller  G 10 

Milne  DC  5 

Moore  C 10 

Moreau  R 10 

Moreau  R 10 

Morris  N  10 

Murphy  AD  10 

Murphy  M 10 

Naraine  L 10 

Neegan  T 5 

NcsbittGN 5 

Nicholas  S 10 

Nicholas  S 10 

Noble  J 10 

North  G 10 

Nunes  H  V 10 

O'Connell  J  10 

Odowda  J  P 10 

Olson  D 5 

OrserG 10 

Osborne  T 10 

Pacific  Western  Airways  10 

Palmer  G 20 

Paquet  J  M 10 

Paquette  B 10 

Paquette  G 10 

Paris  G 10 

Parker  G 10 

Parkinson  D 10 

Parsons  W  10 

Pascal  E 10 

Patrick  G 20 

Peacock  I 10 

Pechat  L 5 

Pender  C 10 

Perin  R  L 10 

Perrault  W 5 

Perrault  W 10 

Perrault  W 10 


Settled 

To  be 

in 

settled 

Amount*" 

1982-83 

in  1982-83 

$ 

$ 

S 

50 

50 

20 

20 

300 

300 

95 

95 

150 

150 

225 

225 

235 

235 

300 

300 

2 

2 

75 

75 

5 

5 

435 

435 

320 

320 

225 

225 

1,200 

1.200 

65 

65 

42 

42 

9 

9 

353 

353 

225 

225 

350 

350 

350 

350 

1,836 

1,836 

500 

500 

128 

128 

411 

411 

200 

200 

117 

117 

200 

200 

800 

800 

88 

88 

500 

500 

63 

63 

580 

580 

130 

130 

800 

800 

1,089 

1,089 

161 

161 

247 

247 

51 

51 

143 

143 

42 

42 

200 

200 

300 

300 

145 

145 

74 

74 

250 

250 

90 

90 

1,100 

1,100 

300 

300 

215 

215 

18 

18 

45 

45 

34 

34 

1,000 

1,000 

800 

800 

50 

50 

237 

237 

529 

529 

300 

300 

45 

45 

250 

250 

311 

311 

2 

2 

122 

122 

400 

400 

250 

250 

60 

60 

400 

400 

86 

86 

1,000 

1,000 

130 

130 

30 

30 

85 

85 

47 

47 

700 

700 

SVPPLEMENTARY  IN  FORMA  TION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMIN ISTRA  TION  ACT 
SECTION  31(4)— Continued 


13*39 


Name 

EMPLOYMENT  AND 
IMMIGRATION— Com-/«</e</ 

Charged 

to 

Vote 

...      10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

5 
...  20 
...  10 
...      10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...      10 

5 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  20 
...       10 

1 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

5 
...  10 
...  10 
...       10 

Amount*'* 
$ 

70 

67 

67 

225 

950 

290 

4 

31 
198 
550 

92 
100 

58 
100 
2.000 
150 
1.300 
216 
217 

78 

179 

681 

8 

5 

2 

41 

10 

45 

35 
228 
140 

66 
106 

17 
127 

too 

90 

2 

215 

567 

53 
150 

70 
320 

99 
500 
1.500 
500 
105 
161 

53 

50 
185 
465 
200 
422 

43 
114 

22 
400 
600 
618 

73 

250 

163 

220 

9 

87 
250 

28 
150 

Settled 

in 
1982-83 

S 

67 
67 

290 

31 
198 
550 

92 
100 

78 

179 

681 

8 

5 

2 

41 

10 

45 

228 

2 
567 
150 

99 
500 

161 

465 
200 

422 

9 

87 

28 
150 

To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 

S 

70 

225 
950 

4 

58 
100 

2.000 
150 

1,300 
216 
217 

35 

140 
66 

106 
17 

127 

100 
90 

215 

53 

70 
320 

1,500 
500 

105 

53 

50 

185 

43 
114 

22 
400 
600 
618 

73 
250 
163 
220 

250 

Name 

Therrien  J 

Thibeault  F      

Charged 

to 

Vote 

10 

10 

Amount*'* 
S 

205 

175 

3.077 

155 

22 

9 

70 

91 

750 

493 

120 

1.000 

123 

9 

2 

282 

85 

120 

60 

1.633 

50 

50 

1 

262 

188 

150 

3.000 

59 

128 

3 

1.000 

102.471 

56 

1,101 

120 

187 

38 
376 
275 
300 

38 

19 

19 
135 
325 

25 

1.300 

602 

84 
328 
5 
152 
350 
124 

13 

97 
307 
245 

76 

238 

199 

1.114 

26 

44 
481 

21 
140 
2.550 
275 
217 
129 

24 

Settled 

in 
1982-83 

$ 

205 

175 

70 
91 

493 

9 
85 

1,633 

1 

59 
3 

38,838 

1,101 
120 

300 
38 
19 

135 

25 

328 
5 

238 

1,114 
26 

21 

275 

129 
24 

To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 

$ 

Thistle  B      

5 

3,077 

Canada  Employment  and 

Thomas  H     

10 

155 

Immigration  Commission — 

Townscnd  T 

10 

22 

Concluded 

Trahan  P    

10 

9 

Ferris  D  

5 

Perry  M  

Turcotte  B 

10 

Perry  M  

Turcotte  G 

10 

750 

PetroK 

Turcotte  R 

10 

Phillips  G 

Vanioon  M 

10 

120 

Pike  J 

Van  Montfort  A 

5 

1,000 

Pilon  A 

Vansicicle  J 

Verheijen  H 

VescioD              

10 

10 

10 

123 

Plante  P 

Poirier  P 

2 

Poisson  Y 

VigeursW  

Villeneuve  M 

10 

10 

282 

PongracC 

Porter  R     

VoilceningG  W 

Voth  A                

20 

10 

120 

PosteSC 

60 

PrettyJ 

PurdyJH 

Wager  L 

Walker  M 

5 
5 

50 

Puschel  S  B  

Wasquase  R 

Weidner  H 

10 

10 

50 

Renaud  R  V 

Rcshnyic  K 

WeilerD 

10 

262 

Ricciardi  V 

Wharton  L 

10 

188 

Richard  M 

Wilczynski  C 

Wilson  T 

WitletR 

10 

20 

10 

150 

Richard  R 

3,000 

Richard  R 

Riedman  A 

Worsens  

10 

128 

Riou  M 

YendallK 

10 

Rioux  A       

Zeiinski  M  J 

10 

1,000 

Robert  A     

ENERGY.  MINES  AND 
RESOURCES 

Appleby  W 

Bandzierz  R 

5 

Robichaud  M 

63,633 

Robichaud  M 

Robinson  J 

Robitaille  C 

RomeN 

56 

Rondeau  B  

Benard  M 

Rousseau  M 

Blackburn  R  G 

187 

RullerSD    

Brandon  L  V            

38 

RyeH 

Savage  C  

Bretcher  B 

376 

Butler  M 

275 

Schlievert  J 

Caron  R 

Schultzl 

EwingH 

Scott  P 

Fernback  R  

Seguin  R 

Ficner  C 

19 

Shognosh  N 

Sinnott  C  

Eraser  I 

Freeman  G 

325 

Sirois  C 

Garceau  G 

SiroisP 

Garneau  J 

Gauthier  M 

55 

1.300 
602 

Sluggett  J 

Smiley  T  A 

HallN  

84 

Smith  E  

Hanrahan  G 

45 

SmithP 

Harris  C 

Soucie  M  J 

Harrison  R  J  

152 

SpoonerT 

St  Jean  M 

Harshaw  J 

350 

Hickey  K 

HookcJ  

124 

St  Laurent  G 

13 

St  Pierre  P 

HuttonC 

97 

St  Pierre  P 

Imbeault  M 

307 

StallardK 

HargG 

KnappB 

Lamanque  M 

Laureys  H  

Lepine  F 

Limoge  M 

Manders  P 

245 

SteeleS 

Stoneman  O 

76 

SullogGFC 

199 

SulzR 

SulzR 

SulzR..  . 

44 

Sutherland  K 

Mar  J 

481 

Sutton  M  L 

McAteerK 

Taher  R     .    .. 

McCann  D 

140 

Tanner  J  Z 

McGill  H 

2.550 

TardifN 

MertaJ 

MilneP 

Minhas  K  M  

Terry  J 

Tessier  M 

217 

Theriault  J  C 

MokhtarH 

13 '40 

SECTION  31(4)— Continued 


PUBLIC  ACCOUNTS,  1981-82 


Name 

Charged 

to 

Vote 

Amount^'' 

Settled 

in 
1982-83 

To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 

ENERGY,  MINES  AND 
RESOURCES— Concluded 

MungallC 

$ 

739 
266 

16 
250 

37 
200 
165 
365 

10 
5 
600 
375 
130 
468 
4.000 

15 
468 
160 

$ 

37 

218 

S 

739 

O'Brien  SE 

266 

OlsonD 

OrecklinM 

16 
250 

Ottens  J  

PashoD  

200 

RayPH 

165 

Sixt  F 

365 

Skinner  D 

10 

Smith  J 

Starr  TG 

5 
600 

Stinson  R 

375 

StosicN 

130 

StrongD 

Takach  G  

468 
4,000 

VaillantC 

WhclanD 

15 
250 

Winstanley  G 

160 

Name 


20,424 


ENVIRONMENT 

Anderson  K 5 

Aguilar  D 5 

Austin  H 5 

Bancroft  D 5 

Banner  J 5 

BcllandY 5 

BestR 5 

Bishop  R 5 

Bisson  R 5 

Bland  D  20 

Bouchard  A 5 

Boudrias  M  5 

Bowyer  P 5 

BurakS 5 

Connor  P 5 

Craig  D 5 

Cullcn  B 20 

CullenD 5 

DarrM 5 

Dawson  N  D  5 

DesgrangesJL  5 

Dicenzo  C 5 

Dixon  D 5 

Drapeau  G  J 5 

Duffy  A  5 

Duncan  K 5 

Ferguson  H  L 5 

Findleton  I 5 

Forsyth  D  J  5 

GadalJ 5 

Gallant  A 5 

Gates  M 20 

GergycA 5 

Gervais  Y 5 

Gibson  G  5 

Gorman  B 5 

Goudie  J 5 

GuayD 5 

Hayward  W 5 

HesIipB 5 

HiggsR  5 

HodginsonG 20 

Hoogerbrug  R 5 

IlzinsG 5 

Isaac  G 5 

KeefeJ 5 

KierstcadG 5 

KobelkaW 5 

KoshykN 5 

KrugerH 5 

LacroixP 5 

Langueux  L 5 


337 

22 
223 
1,611 
800 
972 
145 
300 
400 
151 
196 

54 
1,141 
147 
400 
500 
120 
400 
550 
200 
200 
748 
500 
2,412 
545 

80 

100 

800 

1,500 

315 

32 
136 
713 
375 

68 

50 

450 

1,800 

420 

6,000 

1,200 

50 
139 
415 

35 
200 
300 
100 
496 
3 
325 
130 


4,153 


223 

800 

145 
300 
400 
151 
196 
54 
1,141 
147 


550 
200 


748 
2,412 


100 
800 


32 
136 

375 

50 
450 

1,800 
420 

6,000 


139 
415 
35 
200 
300 
100 


16,271 


337 
22 

1,611 

972 


400 
500 
120 
400 


200 
500 


545 
80 


1,500 
315 


713 
68 


1,200 
50 


496 

3 

325 

130 


Laverdiire  M 

LceR 

Lefebvre  P 

Lehoux  D 

Lemire  F 

Lennox  D  

LuchakO 

LupackS  

MacDonald  M 

Manning  E 

Massaroni  R 

McKay  D 

McLaughlin  G 

McNairCS 

Meianson  L 

Metcalfe  J  

Mongeon  B 

Morris  K 

Mulroy  J 

NigamPC 

OlafsonR 

Peakall  D 

Peteherych  S 

Picard  L 

Power  J 

Rahill 

Ranahan  W 

Risbey  F 

Rosa  J 

RossT 

Sachau  G  

Saunders  R 

Sherman  T 

Smith  D  R 

Staines  J 

Stanski  H 

Stewart  K 

Stogaitis  G 

Strutt  R 

Tremblay  A 

Trivett  N  

TseD  

Van  Everdignen  R  O. 

Vcrmcer  K 

Wardle  D 

Wartman  D 

WcyerK 

Whatmore  B 

White  C 

White  T 

WiebeK 

Wilder  D 

Willoughby  L 

Wright  A 


EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS— 

Department 

AlixR 

Allen  J  

Anderson  R  C 

Anstis  C 

Auger  S  

Bareham  R 

Bastien  J  J 

Beaulieu  R 

Belcourt  H  B 

Belliveau  R 

Bernard  C 

Bobinski  E  L  

Borrowman  L 

Bradley  T 

Bredin  J 

BriandD 

BujoIdR 


Charged 

Settled 

To  be 

to 

in 

settled 

Vote 

Amount'" 

1982-83 

in  1982-83 

S 

$ 

$ 

5 

1,000 

1,000 

5 

159 

159 

5 

350 

350 

5 

1,000 

1,000 

5 

231 

231 

5 

700 

700 

25 

109 

109 

5 

275 

275 

1 

489 

489 

5 

150 

150 

5 

40 

40 

5 

300 

300 

20 

100 

100 

5 

1,340 

1,340 

5 

687 

687 

5 

200 

200 

5 

885 

885 

5 

450 

450 

5 

672 

672 

5 

500 

500 

5 

237 

237 

5 

150 

150 

5 

735 

735 

5 

100 

100 

5 

6,864 

6,864 

5 

385 

383 

2 

5 

200 

200 

5 

600 

600 

5 

1,000 

1,000 

20 

29 

29 

5 

2,100 

800 

1,300 

5 

625 

625 

5 

500 

500 

5 

220 

220 

5 

129 

129 

5 

200 

200 

5 

500 

500 

5 

1,900 

1,900 

20 

44 

44 

5 

15 

15 

5 

50 

49 

1 

5 

350 

350 

5 

1,690 

1,690 

5 

872 

872 

5 

1.200 

315 

885 

5 

713 

713 

5 

305 

305 

20 

100 

100 

5 

950 

950 

5 

1,100 

1,100 

5 

300 

300 

5 

1,275 

1,275 

5 

425 

425 

5 

100 

100 

64,906 


316 
323 

3,971 
179 
984 

1,499 
78 

1,500 

5,773 
187 
708 

1,855 
531 

1,250 
275 

1,000 
500 


32.662 


300 

323 


179 


32.244 


531 
275 
500 


16 

3.971 

984 

1,499 

78 

1.500 

5.773 

187 

708 

1.855 

1.250 

1.000 


SUPPLEMENTARY  INFORMATION  REQUIRED  BY  THE  FINANCIAL  ADMINISTRATION  ACT 
SECTION  31(4)— Continued 


13'41 


Name 


Charged 
to 
Vote    Amount^'^ 


Settled 

in 
1982-83 


To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 


Name 


Charged 
to 
Vote    Amount^') 


Settled 


1982-83 


To  be 

settled 

in  1982-83 


EXTERNAL  AFFAIRS— 
Continued 

Department — Concluded 

Burton  BE 

Caldcr  J 

Campbell  J  A 

ChistoffOA  

Costy  N  C  

Craig  J  G 

Daiglc  R  J  

Danard  C  R 

Decelles  C  

De  La  Fayette  L  

DclanocGS 

Denault  J 

Deschenes  A 

Digangi  J  

Dougan  M  

Drapeau  J  H  

Duffield  D  L  

Dupras  M 

Elliott  R 

Foley  D 

Foster  G  R 

Friesen  M  J 

Glasgow  R 

Gordon  R 

Gray  AH 

Greenaway  L 

Grccnhill  D  W  P 

Greenway  W  J 

Hall  AD 

HallcttC  

Halstead  J  G  H 

Hankey  BG 

HartM 

HebcrtCMR 

Hnatyshyn  R 

Irwin  R 

Jackson  R  D 

Jacoby  G  T 

Johnstone  B  V 

JurschewskyS 

Kaszuba  J 

KingF 

KnoxHL 

Labelle  M 

Lacoste  G  A 

Lahey  D  A 

Lambert  C 

Landry  L  

Laplante  R 

Laurent  R 

Lebianc  K 

Lemay  M 

Lemelin  M  R 

Lepine  L 

Letourneau  A 

Licari  WG 

LiskGE 

MacBeth  M 

MacDonald  D  

MacKinnon  KW 

MacLaineS 

MacLean  R  S 

Martin  N 

Mathieu  G 

Mathys  F 

McAdam  B 

.     McBridcM  

McDonald  DO 

McDonald  J 

McDougall  R  P 

McKay  KD 

McLaine  A  P 

McLaren  R  


1     101 

101 

1     854 

854 

1     262 

262 

1    1,000 

1,000 

1      41 

41 

1    2,000 

2,000 

1      82 

82 

1      20 

20 

1    1,000 

1,000 

1     280 

280 

1    1,600 

1,600 

1     980 

980 

1     675 

675 

1     901 

901 

1     151 

151 

1     815 

815 

1     109 

109 

1    1,200 

1,200 

1    2,915 

2,915 

1     955 

955 

1     600 

600 

1     999 

999 

1     482 

482 

1    1,290 

1,290 

1     982 

982 

1     250 

250 

1    1,344 

1,344 

1       6 

6 

1     250 

250 

1     211 

211 

1    1,220 

1,220 

1    1,515 

1,515 

1     178 

178 

1      36 

36 

1     100 

100 

1     116 

116 

1       4 

4 

1      58 

58 

1     964 

964 

1     349 

349 

1     500 

500 

1     252 

252 

I     430 

430 

1    2,033 

2,033 

1    2,237 

2,237 

1      23 

23 

1    1,600 

1,600 

1     706 

706 

1    1,001 

1,001 

1     210 

210 

1    1,981 

1,981 

1     557 

557 

1    1,078 

1,078 

1      61 

61 

1     210 

210 

1     356 

356 

1     694 

694 

1    3,425 

3,425 

1     500 

500 

1      95 

95 

1     250 

250 

1    3,441 

3,441 

1      24 

24 

1     266 

266 

1    6,092 

6,092 

1    2,500 

2,500 

1     500 

500 

1    6,996 

6,996 

1     500 

500 

1     882 

882 

1    1,531 

1.531 

1     410 

410 

1    1,329 

1,329 

23 
31 


875 


McLaren  RW 1  332 

McLaughlin  J  1  126 

McLean  1 1  350 

McPhailDS 1  231 

Mcthe  P 1  336 

Middleton  R 1  1.192 

MiloGW 1  31 

Moher  M 1  4.222 

Molloy  M  J  1  1.244           1,244 

MurtaJ  I  1,200 

MyattDG 1  1,430 

MysakD 1  3,909 

OgleB 1  1,200           1,200 

O'HaganL 1  6,001 

O'MearaPT 1  2.784           1,509 

O'Reilly  T 1  800 

PaiementV 1  111 

PaproskiS 1  657             657 

PaquctG  1  25               25 

Parks 1  1.702 

Picard  M  I  3,089 

Prud'HommeM  I  1,800 

Pursey  F  G  W I  1,894 

ReidJM  1  303 

Rejhon  G I  237 

Roche  D I  1,800 

Rossi  C I  600 

Ryan  D  J  I  2,727 

Sanchez  E I  68 

Sarzynski  A I  2,024 

Schellenberger  M  A  1  23 

Scott  J  A  I  31 

Shea  J I  1,439 

Shcardown  J I  3,193 

ShottKE I  2,088 

ShuckburgA I  266 

SimardJ 1  875 

Sirois  C  J  R I  879 

Skinner  G I  391 

SkuntaZ  1  2,803 

Small  M 1  6 

Smith  AC  H 1  472 

Smith  GB  I  950 

Smith  GC 1  2,560 

Smith  H  E 1  1,435 

SnowFG 1  1,232 

SpringettG  1  621 

St  Laurent  M I  534 

Steward  GH 1  975             975 

Stewart  LG 1  33                33 

Storms  TH  1  1,100 

Sutherland  J  A I  235             235 

Taylor  G 1  53 

ThibcrtJ 1  13 

TremblayG 1  2,600 

Turner  C I  1,800           1,800 

ViellardT I  2,183          2,183 

WannupB 1  4,174 

WaughRN 1  587             587 

Webster  J I  30 

WenmanR I  1.000 

Willis  LA  I  12 

WodinskyM  I  38               38 

WojtowiczGS 1  461 

Wright  I I  514 

168.525        18,484 

Caoadian  Intematioaal 
Development  Agency 

Anderson  B  30  35 

ArsenaultR 30  393              393 

Bailey  B 30  558              426 

BanerjeeN 30  1,951            1,951 

Baran  E  30  734 

Beadle  R 30  344              344 

Beaudry-Somlynsky  M 30  3,000          3,000 

BedardJ 30  500 


332 
126 
350 
231 
336 

1.192 
31 

4,222 

1,200 
1,430 
3,909 

6,001 

1,275 

800 

III 


1,702 

3.089 

1.800 

1^94 

303 

237 

1.800 

600 

2,727 

68 

2,024 


1,439 

3,193 

2,088 

266 

879 

391 

2.803 

6 

472 

950 

2,560 

1,435 

1032 

621 

534 


1.100 

53 

13