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-VUEPOINT” 


Politics: down with brown 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 
he great thing about looking at politics with a mind to calling bullshit is 
that in any given week there is more of the brown stuff flying around 
than one can possibly shovel—a point driven home on Aug 26. 

At the provincial level, Finance Minister Iris Evans announced yet another “sur- 
prise” surplus in her first-quarter update, making a $7-billion upward adjustment 
to the predicted surplus, bringing it to a staggering $8.5 billion for the fiscal year. 

But despite the policy put in place by Premier Ed Stelmach to devote one-third 
of unbudgeted monies to savings, one-third to capital projects and one-third to 
the maintenance of existing infrastructure, Evans committed a paltry $525 million 
to the Heritage Savings Trust Fund—leaving $2.5 billion unallocated and ripe for 
the political picking—and dedicated almost nothing to maintenance. 

The layers of bullshit run deep; first, there is the continuation of the insulting 
annual tradition of intentionally underestimating revenues. Then there is the 
quizzical ignoring of even the government's own insufficient plan for savings at a 
time when practically everyone is saying we need to sock away far more of our 
windfall resource revenues for the future. And let's not even get into the confir- 
mation of a $2 billion handout to industry for carbon capture and storage. 

At the federal level, Prime Minister Stephen Harper all but confirmed that 
Canadians will be going to the polls in October when he announced he had 
asked Governor-General Michaélle Jean to cancel next week's scheduled trip to 
the Paralympic Games, presumably so she'll be around to dissolve Parliament 

For weeks Harper has been talking tough to opposition leaders and piling the 
bullshit to the rafters to give himself an at-least-moderately plausible excuse to 
ignore his own fixed-election-date law. Despite his rhetoric of an increasingly 
“dysfunctional” minority Parliament and the need for a new mandate to imple- 
ment his agenda, the reality is that Harper has simply come to the same conclu- 
sion as have past prime ministers: the ability to choose when to head to the polls 
is a great advantage, especially when heading a minority government with dwin- 
dling support numbers in a country with a looming recession. 

The biggest load of bullshit: the forthcoming navel-gazing about why the 
country has such abysmally low voter turnout. v 


Issue No 671 / Aug 28 - Sep 3, 2008 / Available at over 1400 locations 


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THIS WILL HELP YOU 
THI but NY PR 


= LETTERS 


INQUISITION INSPIRATION 


| enjoyed Bryan Birtles’s inquisition 
("How Fringe is Fringe?,” Aug 14 - 
Aug 20, 2008) and feel inspired by it. 

| am a modern dancer by trade and 
have been swept into this wild band 
of Fringe gypsies this summer, and we 
are here in Edmonton to perform in 
the festival. The work is a collabora- 
tion with acting, live music and 
dance, and | have had many revela- 
tions in this process. 

As | have worked with this talented 
live musician, physically talented 
actors and collaborators, | was intro- 
duced to more humour than | would 
have ever chosen to put in my own 
work, but something magical hap- 
pened. Perhaps balanced by our diver- 
sity as a group, humour became more 
thoughtful and poignant and actually 
a gateway to things that | think are 
difficult to digest—maybe not politi- 
cally difficult and not mentally chal- 
lenging, but more emotionally and 
intuitively. The humour in this show 
feels like it is not simply to get a good 
laugh, but more to develop character 
and to add dynamic to tragedy. A very 
rich kind of humor—not dark, and not 
simply standup either. 

What is challenging about this is 


-_NUEPOINT: J 


DERAL 


Neat \ON 


that the hardcore storyline dra- 
maturges feel like we are missing a 
linear story and the more abstract 
artists either think it is a bit too lin- 
ear or they love where it guides you 
while leaving room for you to unfold 
for yourself. 

| diverge ... it's so easy with this 
topic! In relation to the article, | won- 
der if often people are diving full 
force into a particular type of work— 
like. comedy—because it is trendy at 
the time. 

But my hope is that if people go 
deeply into whatever it is they are 
doing, then they will have that infor- 
mation for future work that will then 
have the capability of including many 
layers of style while still holding the 
integrity of each individual style at 
the same time. 

| have been involved in art on 


such a different end of the spec-- 


trum with modern dance and now 
seeing the work at the Fringe fes- 
tivals (the newbie that | am) | can 
see the kind of work that would 
both challenge and treat audi- 
ences. | hope to add that kind of 
work to this particular festival 
someday, but now | think that not 
only can that type of challenging 
work be done, it can also be lay- 
ered with comedy and spectacle 
Much gratitude for giving me the 
inspiration to try to write about it all 
and get a little clearer on it all! 
TAMARA OBER 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
whether critical or complimentary. Send 
your opinion by mail(Vue Weekly, 10303 
- 108 Street, Edmonton AB T5J 1L7), by 
fax (780.426.2889) or by email (let- 
ters@vueweekly.com). Preference is 
given to feedback about articles in Vue 
Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for 
length and clarity. 


CORRECTION 


In an article on art show Oil, Science 
and Soil ("End of An Era,” Aug 21 - 
Aug 27, 2008) Mary Christa 0’Keefe 
stated the show was not “receiving 
funding,” incorrectly implying that the 
show was unsupported. Artists Sherri 
Chaba and Lyndal Osborne wish to 
clarify their support from their host 
venue, Capital Arts Building Arts 
Branch, home to the Alberta Founda- 
tion of the Arts (AFA). . 

“In working with the staff of the Arts 
Branch we found tremendous support 
throughout the process. [The Arts 
Branch covered] technical and design 
assistance [and] insurance of the work 
and fully fund[ed] the publicity and pro- 
motion as well as the opening reception 
costs for 200 visitors. We appreciated 
their generosity and willingness to give 
us an early opportunity to bring our 
work to public attention in their new 
gallery.” (Lyndal Osborne via email) 

Vue regrets the error and apolo- 
gizes for any confusion it may have 
caused. = 


RIS / scott@vueweekly.com 


re live in an era of 
unprecedented bullshit 
production,” writes Laura 


to open her 2005 bestseller Your 
; is Important to Us: The Truth About 
_ Bullshit. “Never in history have so 
_ many people uttered statements that 
_ they know to be untrue ... saying not 
what they actually believe, but what 
they want others to believe—not what 
is, but what worl 
_ The sheer volume of falsehoods 
which barrage us all on a daily basis 
has spawned something of a protec- 
tive adaptation, a savvy, knowing 
‘cynicism through which we view and 
' filter the myriad messages aimed our 
way. We have become, in many ways, 
bullshit detectors. 

As voters, we have developed a 
distrust for the rehearsed lines and 
the inevitably empty pledges of politi- 
cians, As consumers, we have learned 
that the promises offered by compa- 
nies in their advertising—while they 
may still persuade us to buy—are at 
best half-truths. 

But while we may be suspicious, 
we're not universally distrustful. Stud- 
ies show that what we believe 
depends to a great extent on who we 
hear it from—doctors, scientists, aca- 
demics and our fellow citizens can be 
trusted; lawyers, salesmen, politicians 
and corporations cannot. 

If McDonald's says that we should 
all eat more hamburgers, we call bull- 
shit without hesitation. But if the 
same message comes to us from, say, 
a non-profit group called Nutritionists 
for Food Options? Well ... 

“One term that’s sometimes used in 
the public relations trade to describe 
this is what they call the ‘third-party 
technique,’ which is to put your 
client’s message in someone else's 
mouth,” explains Sheldon Rampton, 
the research director with the Center 
for Media and Democracy, a US-based 
watchdog group focused on the activ- 
ities of the multi-billion-dollar-a-year 
public relations industry. 

“One way to do that is to get your 
client's message in the news so that it 
looks like a news story. Another com- 
monly used technique is the third-party 
expert—someone who is presented to 
the public as an independent expert on 
some issue, such as tobacco and 
health or global warming or food safe- 

(ee and either not dis- 
ae piles downplaying and 


netmentaning fact that this per- 
on has ac 
often 


ually been recruited and 
¢ by the industry itself to 
" While it’s no secret that coments 
ler time and resources 


atch-all category of efforts 
y peecens cole releases 


these efforts have come to dominate 
the media we consume. 

“In terms of how pervasive that is 
in society, well, studies have been 
done of newspapers and their con- 
tents that typically find that approxi- 
mately half of the content of the daily 
newspaper originated with some PR 
firm in some fashion or another— 
through news releases or other forms. 
It’s really a strikingly high percentage 
of the information that the public gets 
as news that’s actually something that 
started from someone deciding that 


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PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 


they wanted to push that. message out 
to the public.” 


OVER THE PAST CENTURY, the public 


relations industry has grown from a 
small number of individuals offering 
consulting services to clients to help 
them get their message out to become 
an industry that operates largely out 
of public view to shape everything 
from the cars we buy to the politicians 
we elect to the opinions we hold. 

While public relations has roots in 
the colourful publicity stunts of travel- 
ling carnival hawkers and circus pro- 
moters, Rampton says the industry as 
we know it really began in the United 
States in 1917. 

“During the First World War, 
Woodrow Wilson set up something 
called the Committee for Public Infor- 


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mation to mobilize support for the war 
effort. And they invented a lot of the 
techniques that later got taken up by 
the PR industry,” he explains. “A num- 
ber of the people who went on to 
become founders of the public relations 
industry worked for the Committee for 
Public Information, and after the war 
ended they realized that there was a 
market and money to be made by pro- 
viding similar services to companies.” 
The man often credited as being the 
“father of PR,” Edward Bernays, opened 
his first office in 1919. One of his early 


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clients was American Tobacco, which 
was eager to increase demand for its 
cigarettes by reaching the largely 
untapped market of female smokers. 
Bernays staged an event which has 
become lore in the history of PR: send- 
ing a group of smoking models down 
Fifth Avenue challenging the patriarchy 
of the era with their “torches of free- 
dom.” By 1930; Lucky Strike, American 
Tobacco’s main brand, had become the 
number one brand of cigarettes. 

Over the next 40 years, Bernays 
worked for an estimated 400 clients, 
including General Motors, Proctor & 
Gamble and General Electric, pioneer- 
ing and refining techniques such as 
product placement, direct marketing, 
product tie-ins and public opinion 
polling, while integrating elements of 
sociology and psychology into what he 
unapologetically called propaganda. 

Bernays early involvement with 
American Tobacco also began a long 
relationship between the PR industiy 
and big tobacco. In the 1980s and 
‘90s, American PR giant Burson- 
Marsteller helped Philip Morris and 


osing the bullshit industry 


h groups shine the light on the public relations spin 


other tobacco companies delay the 
introduction of public smoking bans 
and other restrictions on smoking and 
cigarettes by helping form industry 
front-groups like the Advancement of 
Sound Science Coalition and fake 
grassroots citizens groups (termed 
Astroturf groups) such as the National 
Smokers Alliance. 

While the tide eventually turned 
against the tobacco industry and 
restrictions on smoking are now 
widespread in North America, success 
in delaying the introduction of legisla- 
tion by years through the covert use 
of third-parties has become a main- 
stay of the PR industry. 


SIMILAR TECHNIQUES have beeh used to 


great effect for two decades by indus- 
tries opposed to action on climate 
change through measures such as a 
reduction in the use of fossil fuels and 
implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. 

Kevin Grandia is the project man- 
ager of DeSmogBlog.com, a PR-watch 
organization formed in 2005 by Jim 
Hoggan—himself a PR professional for 
over 35 years who became frustrated 
with what he calls “one of the boldest 
and most extensive PR campaigns in 
history, primarily financed by the 
energy industry and executed by 
some of the best PR talent in the 
world’—to “clear the PR pollution that 
clouds the science of climate change.” 

He says the aim of the “climate 
denial” industry hasn't been to change 
people's behaviour so much as to pro- 
mote a false debate, first questioning 
the scientific consensus about anthro- 
pomorphic climate change and more 
recently about solutions. 

“In this case all they were trying to 


» do—and they still do—is try to create 


seeds of doubt,” he says. “The goal is 
not to persuade. Persuasion is much 
more difficult—to actually make peo- 
ple change the way they think or 
change the way they do things is 
much harder than just giving people a 
reason not to do something, like be 
concerned about an issue. 

“And doubt is very easy to create by 
creating a debate in the media around 
the science of climate change,” he 
continues, “which 10 years ago may 
haye been somewhat legitimate, but 
now we're seeing not only the effect 
that the climate scientists were pre- 
dicting, we're also seeing certainty 
levels higher than ever before-and still 
the only ‘scientific argument’—and I 
wouldn't even call it that, I'd call it an 
argument—is being played out against 


climate change in the media, notin . 


the scientific literature.” 

In the late-2002 lead up to Cana- 
da‘s ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, 
Burson-Marsteller's Canadian PR affil- 
jate, National Public Relations, spear- 
headed the creation of the short-lived 
and unsuccessful industry front-group 
Canadian Coalition for Responsible 
Environmental Solutions to try to 


scuttle ratification by pressing for a | 


"made in Canada” solution. 

Grandia says that groups in Canada 
like the Calgary-based Friends of Sci- 
ence and the Natural Resources Stew- 
ardship Council, along with similar 
groups in the US like the Cooler Heads 
Coalition, the American Coalition for 
Clean Coal Electricity and the Competi- 
tive Enterprise Institute, are continuing 
industry efforts to delay action on cli- 
mate change, but have largely moved 
on from denying the problem exists. 

"It's really started to move away 
from the denial of the climate science 
That has changed now to ‘Oh, well it’s 
happening, but it’s natural.’ They 
don’t actually have any science, but 
they have their own opinions of that. 
Outside of that kind of argument 
that’s really fringe—just a few strange 
people who just can’t let go or have 
been convinced by people who can't 
let go—the argument is really moving 
towards the solution-side of things 
and you're seeing industry and gov- 
ernment coming in on that,” he says 

“So you're seeing arguments 
around the carbon tax, of course. 
[Stephen Harper has] been saying it's 
going to kill the economy, but he has 
no proof of that. You're seeing argu- 
ments around why we shouldn't be 
doing renewable energy. You're see- 
ing dirty energy sources, like the tar 
sands, being spun to be environmen- 
tally friendly.” 

Rampton says that efforts by indus- 
try and PR firms to promote and push 
concepts like “clean coal” are another 
important part of PR. 

“Language is something that, of 
course, is very important in framing 
issues for people. And that’s a term 
that a lot of PR people use in talking 
about how they use language: fram- 
ing. Quite a bit of effort goes into fig- 
uring out the right terminology to talk 
about issues.” 

He points to similar examples such 
as the rebranding of sewage sludge as 
“biosolids” and the Bush Administra- 
tion's “no child left behind” program. 

“Who can be against the idea of not 
leaving a child behind? The very names 
of things become advertisements for 
them instead of descriptions as a result 
of these kinds of things,” he says. 
“That's, of course, something George 
Orwell talked about quite a bit in his 
book /984—that if you can control the 
vocabulary people use to talk about 
things then you can control the way 
they think about them as well.” 


WHILE RAMPTON believes many of the 
activities PR firms undertake on 
behalf of their clients—things like cri- 
sis management, publicity for product 
launches and providing information 
about their clients’ activities to the 
public—are legitimate, he believes 
that more covert efforts deserve far 
more public scrutiny. 

“Where I have a problem with it is 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 12 


Ending the CEMA sham 


RICARDO ACUNA / ualberta.ca/parkland 

Before you can assess the effectiveness 
of an organization, you must have a very 
clear understanding of its purpose. That 
can be difficult in Alberta because the 
stated purpose behind agencies and 
organizations is so often the exact oppo- 
site of their actual political purpose. 

In 2000, Alberta Environment led the 
creation of the Cumulative Environmental 
Management Association (CEMA). CEMA 
was set up as a non-profit, non-govern- 
mental organization to “study the cumula- 
tive environmental effects of industrial 
development in the region and produce 
guidelines and management frameworks.” 

The organization was composed of, 
and managed by, some 50 members rep- 
resenting “all levels of government, 
industry, regulatory bodies, environmental 
groups, Aboriginal groups, and the local 
health authority, which have an interest 
in protecting the environment in the 
Wood Buffalo region.” 

The idea was simple: there was a 
boom of investment coming to Alberta's 
tar sands, and it would be necessary to 
establish guidelines to protect the envi- 
ronment inthe Wood Buffalo region from 


the cumulative impacts of that much 
development happening that quickly. 

Eight years later, the CEMA website 
boasts that the organization has produced 
hundreds of reports and seven manage- 
ment frameworks. The reality, however, is 
that not a single enforceable guideline or 
regulation has been implemented as a 
result of CEMA\s work. 

The cumulative effects of tar sands 
developments are still not being consid- 
ered in the granting of new tar sands 
leases and approvals, and the govern- 
ment has yet to clearly articulate what 
the carrying capacity of the local environ- 
ment is in terms of development. In other 
words, after eight years, hundreds of 
reports and seven management frame- 
works, we still don’t know at what point 
the level of tar sands development will 
begin doing irreversible damage to the 
environment. 

For all we know, we may have passed 
that critical point five years ago, yet gov- 
ernment and regulatory bodies continue 
to issue new leases and approve new 
projects. How does this make sense? 

It doesn't. For a government that is 
very concerned with the environmental 


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impacts of development in the north and 
genuinely wants to ensure environmental 
sustainability in the area, it makes no 
sense to continue issuing approvals with- 
out knowing the limits. 

Unfortunately, we don’t have that gov- 
ernment, What we have is a government 
which is very concerned with getting as 
Many tar sands projects approved and off 
the ground as quickly as possible while 
paying lip service to the environment and 
the well-being of First Nations communi- 
ties in the area. 


ONCE WE GET BEYOND the-thetoric and 
acknowledge that as the provincial gov- 
ernment’s real motivation, then it 
becomes clear that CEMA has been a 
tremendous success. 

This conclusion is reinforced by a 
dynamic that has developed in the last 
couple of years at joint federal-provincial 
regulatory panels considering applica- 
tions for new tar sands projects. These 
panels, which are required to look at the 
environmental impacts of the proposed 
projects, have simply begun referring to 
CEMA and then approving the projects. 

In other words, despite the fact that 


las 


=STUDENTS' 
2 ASSOCIATION 


S 


eae tio 


§ WaweweEemy 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


FRONT 


CEMA has accomplished virtually noth- 
ing, and no clear limits have been set, 
regulatory bodies are now saying that 
environmental impacts are being dealt 
with by CEMA so the project can be 
approved. In the recent hearings on Impe- 
tial's Kearl Oil Sands Project, for example, 
the panel went so far as to acknowledge 
that no limits had been set, and that 
CEMA had not done its work, but the 
project was approved anyway. 
Apparently, the mere existence of 
CEMA is now enough for government and 
industry to jump through the requisite 
environmental hoops and get projects 
approved. And up until recently, the gov- 
ernment could claim further legitimacy to 
this process by pointing out the participa- 
tion of high-profile environmental groups 
and the affected First Nations in CEMA. 
At the recent Keepers of the Water con- 
ference in Fort Chipewyan, however, some 
of that perceived legitimacy was finally 
taken away from this incredibly effective 
smokescreen. First, a group of First 
Nations leaders reminded delegates that 
they had already ended their participation 
in CEMA and announced they would now 
be challenging the government in court for 


failure to consult on tar sands develop- 
ment. Then, three of CEMAs high-profile 
environmental groups (Pembina Institute, 
Toxics Watch and the Fort McMurray 
Environmental Association) announced 
that they would no longer be a party to 
legitimizing a flawed process, and that 
they were also leaving CEMA effective 
immediately. 

At last, someone on the “inside” has 
stood up and called CEMA and the 
entire consultation process what they 
are—a sham. The ball is now in the 
government's court. Will they continue 
to pretend that CEMA—now made up 
almost entirely of industry and govern- 
ment—is actually making a difference, 
or will they take the steps necessary to 
reform the system and deal with the 
environmental impacts of the tar sands? 
Time will tell, but history suggests that 
Albertans should keep their eyes open 
for yet another high-profile, well-funded 
public relations smokescreen. w 


Ricardo Acuna is executive director of the 
Parkland Institute, a non-partisan public 
policy research institute housed at the 
University of Alberta. 


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& | DYER STRAIGHT 


FS GWYNNE DYER 
gwynne@vueweekly.com 


Cynicism and hypocrisy are always part of interna- 
tional politics, but in the case of Poland and the anti- 
ballistic missile (ABM) 
missiles everybody Is 
over-fulfilling their norm. 
Nobody involved in the 
controversy, Polish, Russ- 
ian or American, believes 
a single word they are 
saying about this misbe- 
gotten missile defence 
system, whose principal 
characteristic is that it 
doesn’t work—never has, 
and probably never will. 
And yet.we're all expect- 
ed to report what they 
say as if it mattered, 
Washington insists 
that the ABM missiles 
are being put into Poland 
to protect the United 
States and its allies from 
|ran’s long-range ballistic 
missiles (which do not 
exist) tipped with nuclear 
warheads (which Iran 
doesn’t have either). Yet 
after months when US- 


diplomatic confrontation over Georgia is clear to 
everybody, and Moscow is reacting to that. Even so, 
to threaten a nuclear strike against Poland sounds a 
bit extreme—except that in reality it doesn’t mean a 
thing, and everybody knows that, too, 

Poland is already a target for nuclear strikes in 
the most improbable event of a Russian-American 
nuclear war. Everybody in the American-led NATO 
alliance is. Yet they 
don’t lose much sleep 
over it, because such a 
war is so very unlikely. 
General Nogovitsyn did- 
n't announce a new poli- 
cy; he just spoke more 
frankly than usual about 
a permanent reality, in 
the hope of intimidating 
the more naive sections 
of the Polish population. 


1 WOULD MAKE about 
as much sense militarily 
if this mini-crisis were 
about the basing of a 
crack American team of 
kung fu dancers in 
Poland. The new Ameri- 
can missile defence 
base in Poland gives all 
the interested parties a 
way to make their politi- 
cal points, while having 
no serious strategic 
importance whatever 


Polish talks on the sub- 
ject were stalled, 
suddenly on Aug 20 Warsaw agreed to provide a 
base for the “missile defence system’—because it 
would infuriate the Russians. 

The Poles, who are anxious about Russia's inten- 
tions in the light of recent events in Georgia, want to 
send a signal of defiance to Moscow and get a per- 
manent American military base of some kind on their 
soil. They‘re not worried about non-existent Iranian 
missiles—and if they do occasionally worry about 
very real Russian missiles, they are not so foolish as 
to believe that this American missile defence system 
would actually protect them. It doesn’t work. 

So why are the Russians so upset about all this? 
Why did General Anatoly Nogovitsyn, deputy chief of 
the Russian general staff, publicly warn Poland last 
week that hosting the American interceptors could 
make it the target for a nuclear strike? Don’t the Rus- 
sians know they don’t work? 

Of course they do, but the Russian military, like 
any professional military force, need a dramatic for- 
eign threat to justify their demands on Russia's 
resources, and for that purely political purpose the 
American missiles work fine. Russian strategists 
claim that this system is actually intended to shoot 
down Russian ballistic missiles, and so undermine 
Russia's ability to deter an American attack by 
destroying its ability to strike back. 

It's nonsense, of course. Even if the American 
ABM missiles did work as advertised, 10 launchers 
on Poland's Baltic coast are not going to make much 
difference given Russia’s 848 long-range ballistic 
missiles, including hundreds that can be launched 
from’submarines that are much closer to the US than 
the interceptors in Poland. The Russians are only 
pretending to be worried about the ABM missiles in 
Poland, although they are seriously annoyed by US 
military bases there. 

The symbolic importance of the US opening a new 
military base so close to Russia in the midst of the 


But why has the United 
States spent between 
$120 billion and $150 billion on this ludicrous white 
elephant of a system since then-president Ronald 
Reagan first launched the “Star Wars” project in 
1983? 

Precisely because ever since 1983 the missile 
defence project has provided American senators, 
congressmen and presidents with the opportunity to 
pour enormous amounts of money into the pockets 
of defence industry, in return for much smaller but 
politically vital campaign contributions by those 
same companies. The technology can never be made 
cost-effective, but the project is impossible to kill 
because so many politicians benefit from it. 

How can we know that the technology will never 
be cost-effective? Because-even if the technology 
could finally be made to work to specifications, the 
whole notion of ballistic missile defence is ridicu- 
lous. It will always be 10 to 100 times cheaper to 
evade the ABM defences by adding decoys and 
other “penetration aids” to the incoming warheads, 
making them manoeuvrable, ete. than it is to 
upgrade the performance of the interceptors. 

That performance, after a quarter-century’s work, is 
so poor that only two out of the last five tests worked. 
And those tests are rigged in the ABM system's 
favour, with the defenders knowing the incoming mis- 
sile's type, trajectory and destination. In more recent 
tests, they have used no decoys at-all in an attempt to 
get the hit rate up. And yet they have deployed the 
system anyway, first in Alaska and now in Poland. 

This is fantasy strategy in the service of the mili- 
tary-industrial complex, and no strategist in the 
know takes it seriously. But it does allow the owner 
to make quite impressive symbolic gestures, albeit 
rather expensive ones. w 


Gwynne yer is a London-based independent jour- 
nalist whuse articles are published in 45 countries. 
His column appears each week in Vue Weekly. 


Y AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


FRONT 


a 


. 


ih MOUALLEM / omar@yueweekly.com 
‘JX 1987, a distinctive man looking 
like a suited Charles Darwin—or 
Santa—sat in The Tonight Show 
r next to Johnny Carson to pre- 

nlere a video clip. Usually such a 
setup is reserved for an actor on press 
tour, but paranormal investigator and 
world-famous magician James Randi, 
“The Amazing Randi,” was a guest 
_ promoting only truth. That is, the truth 

about TV faith healer Peter Popoff. 

The clip shown was of a typical 
Popoff stunt: God divinely tells him the 
name of an audience member, their ail- 
ment and their address, and Popoff 
palms their foreheads and they‘re 
healed. But after the segment finished, 
Carson and Randi played it again with 
one small addition: an audio recording 
picked up in the church with a radio 
receiver by Randi’s informant. The evi- 
dence clearly showed that through 
Popoff’s unassuming earpiece, he was 
being read the information of sick peo- 
ple sitting before him. 

“It turns out that... Godisa 
woman,” said Randi to Carson, “and 
sounds exactly like Popoff’s wife.” 

“We exposed him very definitively. 
We showed exactly how he worked, 
what he was doing, how he was doing 
it, and how callous and cruel the whole 
operation was,” recalls Randi, 21 years 
after he exposed Popoff on The Tonight 
Show. “Well the evidence is in even fur- 
ther—and I'm glad Johnny didn't live to 
see this—the latest reports are that 
Peter Popoff made $10 million dollars 
last year—more than he did in the year 
we exposed him.” 

Earlier this month, shortly after his 
80th birthday, the Canadian expat 
announced that he was stepping down 


as president of the James Randi Educa- _ 


tional Foundation, “an educational 
resource on the paranormal, pseudosci- 
entific, and the supernatural,” and pass- 
ing the crown onto Phil Plait, author of 
the book and blog Bad Astronomy. 

In Randi’s 30-plus years of paranor- 


=ISKEPTICS 


mal investigations, debunking fraudu- 
lent claims has been an uphill battle 
brimming with countless lawsuits and 
struggles to get backing for his books 
amongst a paranormal-loving market. 
He has, though, also enjoyed numer- 
ous triumphs by exposing faith healers, 
mentalists, psychic surgeons and other 
contemporary snake oil salespeople. 

There are few people like Randi, 
who choose to make a career out of 
challenging charlatans, but to show 
just how serious he was about it, 
Randi famously started walking 
around with a $10 000 cheque in his 
pocket, ready for the first person able 
to prove a paranormal claim “to an 
independent panel.” Over time, the 
$10 000 ballooned into The One Mil- 
lion Dollar Paranormal Challenge. 

Everyone from mentalist Uri Geller 
to spiritualist-cum-psychic Sylvia 
Brown have been challenged to take 
his million dollars, but nobody serious 
seemed to want his money, and over 
the years he only attracted the atten- 
tion of inexperienced loons. 

“Sylvia Brown did agree to take the 
challenge eight years ago ... on the 
Larry King show, but she then said 
that she couldn't. She said she didn’t 
know how to contact me. Shé talked 
to the dead but she can’t contact me— 
and I'm in the phonebook.” 

The money has stayed safe in an 
account, where it will until March of 
2010, when the challenge will be dis- 
continued to free up the money for bet- 
ter causes such as college scholarships. 

But why dedicate a legacy to suffo- 
cating the fancies of so many people 
desperate looking for an alternative 
reality? What's the harm in believing 
someone can mentally bend spoons 
or we can contact our dead loved 
ones through a medium, anyway? 

“Well, what’s the harm of putting 


someone on heroin and supplying 
them for the rest of their lives?” 
Randi counters. 

Randi readily admits that he can’t 
relate very much to believers. 

“Since I was a very tiny child in 
Sunday school, | started to ask ques- 
tions about what they were claiming 
to be true,” he recalls. “And I was told 
not to ask questions ... They threw me 
out of Sunday school.” 

Randi wishes that he did have the 
personal experience of having to shed 
some sort of paranormal belief, 
because he says it would provide him 
a useful insight. 

"I consider it an advantage because 
then you can understand why people 
believe in strange things.” 


DR MICHAEL SHERMER knows why peo- 
ple believe in strange things. In fact, he 
wrote a book on it, entitled Why People 
Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, 


Superstition, and Other Confusions of 


Our Time, which de-mythed everything 
from alien abductions to creationism to 
Jewish holocaust denialism 

Unlike Randi, Shermer does have 
the advantage of once having been a 


aking a living of bullshit detecting 


et the professional Skeptics who call it when they smell it 


true believer. In his youth, he was an 
evangelical Christian, and, in his adult 
years as a marathon bicyclist, he 
experienced an alien abduction 
“Decause of sleep depravation.” 
Shermer would later go on to publish 
Skeptic magazine and found thé Skep- 
tics Society, of which there are now 
approximately 55 000 members, includ- 
ing subscribing newsstands and book- 
stores. Shermer can be found more 
recently as one of several scientists 
coaxed into interviews for the anti-evo- 
lution documentary Expelled: No Intelli- 
gence Allowed, only to be portrayed as 
an uninformed, arrogant know-it-alls. 
Shermer has been a long-time 
enemy of creationists. His book Why 
Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intel- 
ligent Design, a point-by-point break- 
down of the logical fallacies in 
intelligent design, is one of his great- 
est triumphs, along with his work 
debunking “the holocaust deniers.” 
More recently, his enemies have 
risen from the ashes of the World Trade 
Center in the form of 9/11 “Truthers.” 
After a 9/11 conspiracy-themed issue 
of Skeptic irked Truthers, he found them 
popping up everywhere, heckling him 


along his latest national book tour. 

Shermer says heaps of evidence 
against the Truthers’ claims is unnec- 
essary. 

“You know how we know that the 
Bush administration did not orches- 
trate 9/11? Because it worked.” 

The Skeptics Society is now 16 
years old and members include Bill 
Nye “The Science Guy,” Saturday Night 
Live alumnus Julia Sweeney, biol 
Richard Dawkins and popular 
astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson 


DR STEVEN NOVELLA, an academic clin- 


ical neurologist at Yale University, is 
not a member. Instead, he co-founded 
the his own organization, the New 
England Skeptical Society. After the 
Society plateaued in terms of member- 
ship and the maintenance of newslet- 
ter wniting and distributing became too 
heavy, he started the Skeptics Guide to 
the Universe (SGU) podcast 

Perhaps no program has been more 
successful in popularizing scientific 
skepticism the way SGU has. Novella 
hosts SGU with his panel of comical 
skeptic “rogues,” which include his 
brothers Jay and Bob, Even Bernstein 
and Rebecca Watson—who also oper- 
ates Skepchic.org and has become the 
Lucy Lawless of science geek circles 
SGU consistently sits in iTunes’ top 10 
science podcasts and enjoys a weekly 
listenership of about 40 000 

If Randi and Shermer have turned 
detecting bullshit into professions, 
Novella has turned it into an all-out 
obsession. Not only does he run 
NESS, host and produce SGU as well 
as a second skeptical podcast, but he 
also contributes to three thorough 
critical thinking blogs and stars in The 
Skeptologists, a television pilot cur- 
rently being shopped around 

“Skepticism is empowering,” he 
says, “because it enables you to see 
through the BS and arrive at a conclu- 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 11 


Top 5 scam artists 


e all been hustled. Whether it was buying an oregano-filled joint 


2. DR MATTHIAS RATH'S prescription for everything—cancer, strokes, 
atheroselerosis—is vitamins. According to his website, “Dr Rath has 
made scientific discoveries that rank among the most important discov- 
eries of all time in the field of medicine.” Rath dismisses his opponents 
as pharmaceutical minions. Banned from advertising in most western 
nations, Rath took to South Africa, where he claimed antiretroviral drugs 
for treating HIV were “poison” and his vitamin soup was better. It is 
unknown how many people died because they replaced the proper treat- 
ment with his, however, last June the South African government joined 
the list of nations banning Rath’s medical trials. 


3. DICK DEVOS AND STEVE VAN ANDEL are the inheritors of Quixtar, the 
any left to them by their billionaire fathers. Call it a pyramid 
me, call it multi-level marketing, or, better yet, call it by its original 


4. KEVIN TRUDEAU'S ubiquitous infomercials peddle books with weight, 
debt and illness cures “They Don’t Want You to Know About. Why is he 
selling books? Because it's all that the FIC allows him to sell. After losing 
his licence to a trove of scam products like the Mega Memory System, 
which promised to teach impeccable visual memory techniques, and Hair 
Farming, which claimed to prevent hair loss, Trudeau sells books because 
they're protected by the First Amendment. But that's just the first loophole; 
the books are supposed to uncover government and corporate conspiracies 
withholding cures to diseases and illnesses, but the chapters usually lead 
to his pay-formembership-only website for more information. 


5. SYIVIA BROWN is not much different from other psychic mediums 
except that she doesn't always please the bereaved people desperately 
seeking her heavenly connections. On YouTube you can find videos of her 
trying to convince a widow that her husband drowned to death (he was 2 
fireman killed on 9/11), telling the parents of a missing boy their son was 
dead (he was later discovered alive) and informing a woman that her 
granddaughter had been sold into Japanese sex slavery (she was, unfortu- 
~ nately, dead ... in America). Brown has sold millions of books and has 

) her “powers” on to her apprenticing son, Chris Dufresne. 


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e. 


sion that is more likely to be true.” 
AS a neurologist, he often sees ail- 
ing patients who've been duped by 
; Saeeaents medicine, and 
ecause they delayed mainstream 
medical treatment, found their ail- 


_ Ments had spread beyond repair. 


He’s been an strong opponent of 
seudoscientific medicine and pur- 
eyors of anti-vaccination propagan- 


_ da, especially the autism and vaccine 


linkage conspiracy theory. On occa- 

ion, he says, patients who believe in 

‘connection between vaccines 
and autism confront him. 

“{They] seem to be driven by the 
negative, visceral reaction to injecting 
children with drugs ... But I just relay 
the evidence.” The evidence, argues 
he and Michael Shermer, is in the 
removal of thimerosal mercury (the 
alleged autism-causing agent) from 
vaccines in 1999, and a rise in the 
number of autism diagnoses over the 
same period. The problem is obviously 
not the mercury additive, he argues, 
but more likely a broadening of the 
definition of autism—knowledge 
resulting from medical science and 
scientific inquiries. 

But Novella says he can’t stop 
everyone because most proponents 
of pseudoscientific alternative medi- 
cines and such “have already bought 
into the belief system ... they've 
already drank the Kool-Aid.” 

An admitted nerd with “full sci-fi 
geek cred,” Novella sees parallels 


between the psyche of the believers 
and role playing. - 

“I've been involved in the past in 
live action role playing, and it’s lots of 
fun,” he says like a proud sinner in 
confession. “But you know that it’s 100 
per cent fantasy. [For believers] this is 
their fantasy—like ghost hunting is 
what they do on the weekends to 
entertain themselves, when they 
should just play D&D and get it out of 
their systems.” 

Richard Wiseman, fellow skeptic 
and author of Quirkology, recently 
remarked at The Amazing Meeting— 
a skeptics convention hosted by 
Randi’s foundation—that “skeptics 
are punching way above their 
weight.” That's something Novella 
not only acknowledges, but 
embraces. 

“For the number of people that we 
are, we are having a disproportion- 
ately large effect on the public con- 
versation that’s taking place.” 

He points to hit TV shows like 
Penn & Teller: Bullshit! and Myth- 
Busters as a testament to the impact 
of skeptics, but says the most impor- 
tant factor is the advent of Web 2.0, 
which through blogs, videos and 
podcasts has allowed their often- 
smothered voices to vociferate 
across the universe, and scream 
“Bullshit!” when they see or smell it. 

“Ten years ago, if 1 cashed a 
cheque at the bank from the ‘New 
England Skeptical Society,’ that 
would almost universally provoke a 
giggle. Now they get it: "You're the 
guys that don’t believe in ghosts!” v 


Tar sands an ET plot 


Suffering from €co-anxiety? Don’t fret, blame the aliens 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 


e’re all screwed. For the 
sake of a booming econo- 
my, we Albertans have 


taped our own environment. And 
now the guilt reeks like a spilled jer- 
tycan. The least Stelmach can offer 
us is some €co-anxiety therapy or a 
Support group to help us live with 
ourselves, 

But wait! The editors of The 
Canadian have uncovered a secret 
So dangerous, so mysterious, so 
wonderfully absolving that we may 
never have to spit at our own 
reflections again 

According to an article published 
some months ago on their website— 
"Gnostic insights illuminate Alberta 
Tar Sands prosperity as an apparent 
Manipulative Extraterrestrial Virtual 
Reality illusion” [sic]|—blaming our- 
selves, the Tories or even Syncrude 
will get us nowhere. The real ene- 
mies are aliens 

The secret, “documented in great 
detail by the ancient Gnostics, as 
revealed by Dr John Lash” then 
regurgitated by journalist Peter 
Tremblay, claims the Alberta tar 
sands and its consequential environ 
mental damage is just one of many 
elements in a virtual reality set up by 


~ RANDOM 


an alien race determined to witness 
our self-destruction. 

"The artificial alien intelligence 
identified by the Gnostics has used 
the basic principles associated 
with the motivational virtual reali- 
ty features of a video game 

jected that into a Three-Dimen- 
sional context on top of our planet 
Earth,” writes Tremblay. “The 
Stephen Harper government . a 
further layer of a virtual reality 
fantasy.” 

In another article for The Canadi- 
an, Tremblay suggests that the same 
cunning aliens are to blame for 
homelessness 


~ AS STEVEN NOVELLA, president of 


the New England Skeptical Society, 
pointed out in his Skeptics’ Guide To 
The Universe podcast, the article is 
“unfalsifiable"; “Any evidence that 
contradicts this [can be interpreted 
as] a virtual reality evidence planted 
by the aliens.” 

Another critic, Armando Duke 
of AXcess News, dismisses the vir- 
tual reality claims, but doesn’t 


With well over 63,000 members, AUPE is Alberta's Largest Union. 
AUPE represents more than 7,500 support staff members at 14 Alberta post-secondary institutions and 3 school districts. 


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AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


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HEALTH 


Some consider my words BS; | consider 
much mainstream health coverage, 
though perhaps not quite BS, definitely in 
need of balance and clarification. My list 
of commonly accepted wisdoms to be 
taken with a generous sprinkling of salt 
includes the following. 

“Medical journals deliver the truth as 
revealed by good science.” Sometimes, 
though they also deliver articles ghost- 
written by Pharma reps. 

“Drug benefits outweigh the risks.” 
Sometimes, though not nearly as often as 
we'd like to believe. The Canadian Med- 
ical Association Journal (CMAJ) reports 
that 23 000 Canadians die annually from 
drug-related problems. Fourteen million 
emergency room visits each year are due 
to adverse drug events, and the leading 
cause of liver disease and liver failure— 
ahead of viral hepatitis—is drug toxicity. 

“Pot is dangerous and has earned its 
status as an illegal substance.” There’s 
plenty of evidence of pot’s therapeutic 
value for many things, a list that goes 
way beyond the few extremes of illness 
that can earn us a license for medical 
use. And to achieve the same therapeutic 
value delivered by a couple of hits of rela- 
tively low-strength two to four per cent 
THC pot, the recommended dosage of 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 


when PR works to conceal the rela- 
tionship between the client and the 
message,” he says. “Usually when 
they're doing that it's because there's 
something about the message that is 
suspect. | find that, in general, the 
worse the behaviour of the corpora- 
tion, the more likely they are to use 
suspect methods. The more good a 
company is doing and the less harm, 
the less need it has to resort to covert 
methods to get its message out.” 
While he thinks that there should 
be more government oversight to 
ensure transparency and disclosure 
about the source of things like video 
news releases that PR firms provide to 
news outlets, which often run them 
unedited and without attribution, he 
cautions against too much regulation. 
“1 think people do need to be care- 


Marinol must be multiplied eight times. 
“The flu kills thousands of us each year; 
the flu shot is the answer.” The Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
reports 63 000 deaths due to influenza 
complications, but according to those who 
have looked more closely at CDC statistics, 
the flu kills infinitely fewer than that, more 
like about 1000 each year, most cases 
involving those who are already immune- 
compromised and very likely not potential- 
ly helped by a vaccine either. But it is the 
job of public health departments to per- 
suade the masses to get vaccinated, and 
fear is the most powerful way to achieve 
that goal. And ironically, very few of us 
know the significant little fact that 
increasing our vitamin D intake reduces 
the incidence of flu by 70 per cent. 
“They're looking for a cancer cure.” 
Sort of. But a cure would kill the medical- 
industrial complex, and the truth is that 
those who speak about things that truly 
cure or prevent are marginalized, dis- 
missed and silenced, much like political 
dissidents are put on watch lists. 
“Tamoxifen blocks estrogen receptors 
and is an excellent breast-cancer fighting 
tool.” It also increases risk for a number of 
cancers, now possibly including risk of the 
very cancer it's supposed to be preventing. 


“STATINS ARE A SAFE heart-disease prevention 
tool.” Science has clearly shown otherwise. 
“SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake 
inhibitors) are a safe and effective treat- 
ment for depression and related disorders.” 


ful about regulation because a lot of 
the techniques of public relations are 
really using communications tools 
that are guaranteed to everyone in a 
democracy. And I think we do have to 
be careful about not restricting use of 
those tools in a way that would 
undermine democracy itself. Free 
speech is pretty important.” 

He says that the efforts of organi- 
zations such as the Center for Media 
and Democracy and 
DeSmogBlog.com in exposing the 
activities of the PR industry can go a 
long way in limiting the influence on 
the public of covert forms of PR. 

“People would do well to just gen- 
erally have a careful attitude about 
information that they get from the 
media in particular—to realize that 
the information may have an agenda 
behind it,” he says. “Simply realizing 
that will sometimes help in identify- 
ing who is the source of the message. 
Understanding the techniques used 


abour 


Happy 


FRONT 


Labour Day! 


They come with significant risk of suicide, 
diabetes, irreversible neurological damage, 
weight gain, loss of libido and cancer. 

“Natural and alternative health 
approaches are either unsafe, or ineffec- 
tive, or both.” They are most often both 
safe and effective, and need to make 
their way into the hands and knowledge 
base of doctors. They don’t need to be 
marginalized and treated as quackery. 

“Health Canada has listened to the 
voices of Canadians regarding C-51 and 
will keep natural health products com- 
pletely separate from drugs and regu- 
late them in ways appropriate to their 
low risk.” Separate, but not. Director of 
Offices of Patented Medicines and Liai- 
son David K Lee tells me, “NHPs will be 
regulated separately by the Natural 
Health Products Directorate. But they 
will remain under the umbrella of thera- 
peutic products.” 

“Low-Carb eating is unsafe.” For some, 
low-carb eating is the only way to man- 
age high-insulin production, the only way 
to keep weight down and reduce the risks 
associated with obesity. 

The truth is that the way to keep 
deceit going is through repetition. As 
Vladimir Lenin said way back when, “A 
lie told often enough becomes the 
truth.” Those in power and in the 
money know that. And as Bertrand Rus- 
sell said in 1950, “There is no non- 
sense so arrant that it cannot be made 
the creed of the vast majority by ade- 
quate governmental action.” w 


by the PR industry, understanding 
that some of it is designed to look 
like independent news and approach- 
ing the information you get with 
something of a skeptical eye, I think 
goes a fair way to helping people see 
what's going on.” 

“The best advice a good PR person 
can give is the first thing you have to 
do is do the right thing,” adds 
Grandia. “No amount of greenwash, 
no amount of public relations ‘spin’ is 
going to help your company in the 
long term. You will be found out, just 
like the tobacco companies were. 
Start doing the right thing and start 
telling people you're doing the right 
thing—that’s not greenwashing if 
you're actually doing the right thing. 
You can communicate that and you 
can communicate it well and people 
will believe it over time if you contin- 
ue to prove that what you're saying is 
what you're actually doing. That’s 
how you build a good reputation.” vw 


Pixels of bullshit 


INFINITE LIVES 


= | infinitelives@vueweekly.com 


Downtown Toronto mega-club (well, kilo- 
club, at least; I'm not quite sure how high 
the bar for “mega” is set these days) 
packed with XBoxen, geek-media corre- 
spondents, game-makers and PR wranglers 
... This is the X08 press event, showcase 
for the 360's seasonal slate. Loud and 
flashy, high-def death and drama on count- 
less flat screens, gunfire and chatter mix- 
ing with dozens of different soundtracks 
and whatever's whumping out of the house 
system ... and it's hot soggy hot. The aircon 
strains to cope, keeping steam-table 
atmosphere of August Ontario out while 
simultaneously whisking away the waste 
heat of a hundred consoles and two or 
three times that many excited young men. 
Thank God for complimentary cold beer. 

In the relative calm of the upper 
lounge, between the impressive life-sized 
Master Chief statue and the table of vul- 
ture-ravaged sandwiches, | help myself to 
a King of Beers and check my email. A 
note from my esteemed editor, reminding 
me this is the Bullshit Issue: “If there's 
some bullshit in the gaming world ...” 

I'm sitting in the centre of an event engi- 
neered specifically to convert raw bullshit 
into usable hype; | figure I've got it made, 
this week. But ... maybe the BS here is too 
raw. PR is bullshit in its purest form; how do 


you call bullshit on bullshit? It is what it is, 
I've got to get deeper ... below the surface 
of this lake of bullshit run stronger, stranger 
currents to be sniffed out... 

OK, first of all—or, first of all for the sec- 
ond time; | called this one four years ago, 
after the last X-event | attended call bull- 
shit on nerd hygiene. Now, nerds have 
improved over the years; we've finally got the 
“how to maybe, possibly get laid someday” 
memo. Todays nerd is pretty good about pit- 
Stick, monitors his breath carefully, works 
hard to keep his complexion clear, wears 
clean clothes, polishes his glasses and keeps 
his hair tidy if maybe a bit over-gelled. On a 
deeper level, though, it gets depressing, 

On account of the free beer, | had multi- 
ple occasions to visit the club's restrooms. 
Each time, | lingered at the sink a bit longer 
than | had ta (but not long enough to be 
creepy), observing the toilet habits of my 
people. No fewer than two-thirds left with- 
out washing their hands—hands that 
would go on to touch every controller in the 
place. Even after, you know ... number two, 
66 per cent of the assembled boy-men were 
so eager to get back to their ninjas and 
Space-guns that they couldn't be bothered 
to wash. Disgusted, | went handwashed 
OCD-style for the rest of the afternoon. So: 
bullshit on that, nerds; your fauxhawks and 
body sprays mean nothing if you've got poo- 
molecules all over your mitts. 


AND, HEY, speaking of “ninjas?” Bullshit on 
Naruto. Sure, the Naruto game Ubi showed 
here seemed pretty cool and all, but I'l! be 


Ph ouanye kane 
LESSONS ROW 4 
NEW ABDRESS: 16811-1606 AVE 


fucked if I'm going to dignify a yappy little 
acrobat in a diaper-ass neon-orange jumpsuit 
with the name “ninja.” This kid's popularity is 
wrecking ninjadom for an entire generation. | 
Mean, what would Snake-Eyes say? 

Trick question, sucker! Snake-Eyes 
wouldn't say anything, because Snake- 
Eyes is a goddamn ninja! Hey speaks only 
through his actions, and his action only 
whisper “DEATH.” 

Also bullshit: "RPG elements.” Look 
here, game developers; role-playing games 
involve creating a character, inhabiting 
that character, making story-changing 
decisions based on that assumed persona, 
and developing the character as the story 
progresses. You can’t just tack some 
manky skill tree onto any old game and 
expect RPGers to drool over the pile you're 
shovelling. Telling me | ought to get excit- 
ed for your off-the-shelf hack-and-slash 
action title because it has “APG elements” 
is like telling me | ought to get excited 
about losing the use of my legs because 
wheelchairs have “Lamborghini elements” 
agricultural-grade bullshit. 

Well, the event's winding down and 
they've closed down the open bar—kind 
of bullshitty, but | can’t really complain 
Hot ‘n’ summery evening's coming on and 
I'Ve got some Torontonian pals to meet; 
maybe I'll just pop over to a liquor store 
and pick up a little .. 

oh, wait. | can’t do that, because it's 
evening on a Saturday, and Ontario's 80- 
year-old post-Prohibition liquor laws are 
complete and utter bullshit. w 


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DISH 


Lose weight the hard way 


If it’s all so easy, why are we all so big? 


JAM HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 

might as well start by apologizing 
[= advance to everyone that | am 

about to offend. But seriously, 
“Lose Weight Easily” has got to be 
the dumbest, most inane and contra- 
dictory statement ever. I guess the 
millions of people whose fat rolls 
bounce happily along with each step 
choose to be that way ‘cause they like 
it, not ‘cause dieting or exercising is 
hard or time-consuming or just flat- 
out impossible sometimes. Google the 
phrase and you get 90 400 hits. Yikes. 
Maybe what's even dumber Is us, 
believing it over and over—and over 
again. And “Lose Weight Quickly” 
doesn’t fare much better on the stu- 
pidity scale. 

Here are some pretty startling num- 
bers, courtesy of Statistics Canada; in 
2007, 16 per cent of Canadian adults 
(excluding those in the Northwest Ter- 
rorities—don't ask me why) aged 18 
and over reported themselves as 
obese, and 32 per cent reported them- 
selves as overweight; in 2004, 26 per 
cent of children and adolescents 
between two and 17 were either over- 
weight or obese. And remember peo- 
ple, these are self-reported 
statistics—the real numbers could be, 
and probably are, higher. 

I guess all those people would sim- 
ply rather not take that magical pill or 
down that miraculous potion. They 
prefer to play Russian roulette with 


=/LOSE WHGHT 
EASILY 


their bodies and subject themselves to 
the myriad of health risks that go 
hand-in-hand with obesity; diabetes, 
heart disease, stroke, cancer, arthritis 
and high blood pressure are just a 
small drop in a big bucket of associat- 
ed ailments. 

Sorry, but that just doesn’t make 
sense, no matter how you look at it. 
Yes, in a way we do choose to be fat— 
we eat too much and we move too lit- 
tle. Hand-to-mouth action doesn't 
count as strenuous activity. And yes, a 
big chunk of us do choose not to do 
anything about it. Well, maybe it’s not 
quite as simple as that—maybe it's 
because losing weight and keeping it 
off is hard, so the majority of us are 
unsuccessful at it. We do try, some of 
us anyway. It seems like we, as a 
society, are always on diets. However, 
it just takes a tiny bit of common 
sense to figure out that if there was 
anything quick or easy about losing 
weight, we wouldn't be facing an obe- 
sity crisis. 


$0 WHY, brilliant as we are, do we 
spend so much of our hard-earned 
money on such bogus products? 


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Alexandra Senkow of Defining Eve 
says it’s a reflection of our society as a 
whole—the focus is on “instant gratifi- 
cation” and has moved away from 
“long-term planning.” When we want 
something, we want something now. 

But Alexandra says there are no 


quick fixes, especially when it comes to 
weight-loss. Our society's penchant of 


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streamlining everything in its quest to 
make it more efficient has people 
underestimating the amount of work 
they need to do for their health. She 
says you need to exercise—for either 30 
minutes a day or for an hour 3-4 times 
a week. And you need to follow a 
healthy diet. There’s no getting around 
the fact that it takes time and effort. 


rivate Di 


You also need to be realistic: peo- 
ple are surprised when she tells them 
that most women can't safely lose 
weight at a rate of more than half a 
pound to a pound a week. Seriously. 
We've been inundated with so many 
false claims that we've set our expec- 
tations so much higher, and that ulti- 
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failure. We don’t gain weight 
overnight and it makes sense that the 
opposite is also true—we don't lose it 
overnight either. So don’t believe 
those 10 pounds in 10 days ads. More 
importantly, don’t waste your money 
on the products they are hyping. 

I wanted to get a dietician’s take 
(actually, make that five dieticians) on 
this whole “lose weight quickly and 
easily’ phenomenon but, for whatever 
reason, I was deemed unworthy of 
their time. I'm choosing to give them 
the benefit of the doubt and believe 
that they would have loved to have 
offered me their professional opinion 
but were simply too busy helping a 
multitude of people sort through the 
nutritional maze that we all face on a 
day-to-day basis. 

My strictly non-professional opin- 
ion is that they would have echoed 
Alexandra's opinion. | believe they 
would have said that there is no such 
thing as quick and easy weight-loss 
and that it takes time, energy, exercise 
and a healthy eating plan. If I'm 
wrong, which I don’t think | am, I’m 
definitely open to input. 

So why are there so many products 
with such unsubstantiated claims 


DISH 


FOOD NEWS! 


AIN'T NO HARVEST LIKE 

A UKRAINIAN HARVEST 

Break out the sour cream and grab your 
Baba, the Ukes are having a good, ol’ 
fashioned harvest feast. On Sun, Sep 7, 
from 10 am to 6 pm, the Ukrainian 
Cultural Heritage Village—just east of 
Edmonton, on the road to the world's 
largest kubasa and pysanka—is hosting 
their annual Harvest of the Past and 
“Taste. -of Heritage Food Fest. Featuring 


riser pancake breakfast and a 


WEEKLY 


activities, as well as an- 


bombarding us around every corner? 
Because we, with our copious amount 
of so-called brain cells, continue to 
believe—or want to believe—in fairy- 
tales. We want to believe that there is 
a quick fix, that we can simply throw 
money at it and voila, problem solved. 
As long as we spend a gazillion dol- 
Jars every year supporting the prod- 
ucts and people that make those 
claims, they are going to continue to 
make more. Stop buying the stuff and 
see what happens. 

Sorry, this is turning into a rant but 
‘seriously everyone, there is no quick 
or easy way to lose weight. Don’t 
waste your money. Don't support that 
industry. Don’t buy into it. Period. 

It doesn’t take a Harvard education 
to figure out that these assertions 
couldn't possibly have evena 
smidgen of truth to them—because, if 
they did, why would our collective 
butts be increasing in size at such an 
alarming rate? 

As Michael Pollan suggests in In 
Defense of Food: "Eat food. Not too 
much. Mostly plants.” And while it’s 
not quite as simple as that, it is cer- 
tainly a good start. Just move your 
body while you're doing it. w 


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No 1 for summer 


fe: || HARDLY KNOW ‘ER 
| HANNE CH 
= | HARDLY ovMEWEEKLY COM 


L 


| always have the best intentions for sum- 
mer. In the spring, as the days get longer 
and warmer, |. make plans and resolu- 
tions, imagine camping trips and barbe- 
ques, dream up fantastic meals thrown 
together with the freshest ingredients. 
And then | blink, and it's August and my 
summer plans are used up, neglected or 
discarded. This is a bittersweet time of 
year, when we realize we have weeks, 
not months, of summer left to savour. 

Maybe today's the day you should 
relax, take in some sun, and enjoy a clas- 
sic summer drink. Summer drinks are usu- 
ally associated with hot places: Spanish 
sangria, Brazilian mojito, Caribbean rum 
punch. These places know sun, but their 
people aren't familiar with lack of light. 
For a change, why not try a drink that is 
truly bittersweet? Pimm’s No 1 is a sum- 
mer classic from the Brits, who, like us, 
know what it's like to store up sun in 
preparation for grey days to come. 

Pimm’s has a long history, originating 
in 1823. James Pimm created and served 
the gin-based beverage as a digestive 
tonic at his oyster bar. Its composition is 
based on the sling, an old mixed-drink 
category. Before the cocktail, there was 
the sling, a basic-as-you-want-it-to-be 
mix of alcohol, sugar, water (sparkling or 
still), and possibly fruit, especially citrus. 
Pimm used this model, infusing a mix of 
herbs to create his secret recipe. The 
drink caught on, and Pimm soon began 
selling a bottled version to neighbouring 
bars. Variations of the drink, numbered 2 
through 6 and based on different spirits, 
were developed and eventually aban- 
doned. Pimm’s No 1 remained, and 
became an old standby. 


LOOKING AT PIMM’S and its rich tea- 
brown colour, it’s not hard to see its Eng- 
lishness. The flavour has citrus 


sweetness and herbal complexity, Neither 
too sweet nor too bitter, the taste of 
Pimm’s is light and refreshing, Britishly 
restrained. It can be served alone on ice, 
Or, most commonly, in the drink that 
defines English summer—the Pimm’s 
cup. Last year, 150 000 glasses of Pimm’s 
Cup were sold at Wimbledon alone. 

The Pimm’s Cup is a good sangria 
alternative, as it's highly decorative, filled 
with farmer's market bounty. Think 
berries, apples, even cherries if you want. 
It's a riot of summer. Toss in slices of 
orange and lime, don’t forget the essen- 
tial cucumber, and don’t neglect your gar- 
nish. Mint is perfect, and you can always 


PIMM'S NO 1 CUP 

This drink can be any size you want. ~ 
Make it by the glass or by the pitch- 
er. Add any fruits and herbs you 
want, or keep it simple, but don't 
leave out the cucumber: its watery 
crunch is a great addition. If you 
have the time or inclination, let the 
fruit sit in the Pimm’s for a bit to 
soak up some extra flavour before — 
you start mixing. 


1 part Pimm’s No 1 

2 parts lemon-lime soda, ginger ale 
or ginger beer 

A slice or wedge of cucumber 

Fruit: slices of orange, lime, apples; 


halved strawberries; anything else you feel like 


Sprigs of mint 


drop some in to steep in the alcohol as 
well. It compliments the herbal flavours 
of the liquor, and of course is a gorgeous 
summer green. 

Pimm’s goes with bubbles. The Pimm’s 
Cup is great with lemon-lime soda (British 
lemonade), ginger ale or (my favourite, 
because it’s got a bit more personality), 
ginger beer. If you're looking for a brunch 
choice, try Pimm’s and champagne for a 
Pimm’s Royale. 

Because of its low alcohol content (25 
per cent), Pimm’s is a perfect afternoon or 
pre-dinner sipper. Add fruit and cucumber 
and you can savour it for hours without 
losing your stiff upper lip. w 


Measure Pimm’s into a glass or pitcher. Add your fruits, and some mint if you want. 
layer a generous amount of ice over the alcohol and fruits, then top-up your glass 
with the soda of your choice. Mix, then add a slice or wedge of cucumber and serve. 


PIMIM'S ROYALE 

1 part Pimm’s No 1 

Fruit: slices of orange, lime, lemon, apple Fresh Mint 
Dry champagne or cava 


Add one part of Pimms to 6 champagne glass, drop in fruit slices, then top the glass 
with champagne. Finish with a sprig of mint. 


The Grand Canyon 
of Appetizers! 


Bring the entire posse today. 


AUG 28 - SEP 3.2008 


’ 200+ years, 20th anniversary 


&3/GREAT HEAD 


Sus FOSTER 
73 | preathead @vueweekly.com 


SLEEMAN NO 20 
SLEEMAN BREWING COMPANY, GUELPH, 
12.75 FOR SIX PACK 


| have seen the billboards around town— 
clearly Sleeman was celebrating 20 years 
of something and they were releasing a 
special beer to commemorate it. But 
haven't they been brewing beer in Canada 
since 1834? | was confused. 

So confused | decided to contact the 
brewery, just to get some clarifications. Lit- 
tle did | know that my call would be 
returned by Sleeman CEO John Sleeman, 
Nothing like getting it from the head 
poobah to find out what is going on. 

Actually, John Sleeman says, the 
Sleeman family has been brewing beer 
since the 1700s, starting back in Corn- 
wall, England. When they emigrated to 
Canada, they kept up their brewing tradi- 
tion, starting their first brewery (under 
the family name of course) in 1834 and 
moving it to Guelph in 1850. 

They were a successful regional brewer 
until Prohibition in the 1920s, when they 
were shut down like everyone else. Prohi- 
bition in Canada lasted until 1929, and 
when it was over the Sleemans immediate- 
ly started back up. 

“And just like the Bronfman’s and many 
others, they looked south of the border, 
where Prohibition continued until 1933 and 
Saw a chance to make money,” says Slee- 
man. The brewery worked out an arrange- 
ment with Al Capone and other gangsters 
to illegally ship beer into the US. When 
they were finally caught, it was not by 
Elliot Ness and his team, but by Revenue 
Canada. “It was the Canadian government 
that finally caught them. It wasn’t illegal to 
ship beer to the US under Canadian law, 
but it was illegal to not report the income.” 

The Sleemans were convicted of tax 
evasion and lost their brewing license— 
and the days of the family business were 
over. “Family lore tells it that the Ontario 
Liquor Commission said it wouldn't let any- 
one with the last name Sleeman receive a 
brewing license again,” notes Sleeman. 

This is all a fascinating story, but it does 
little to explain why the 20th anniversary 
this year—yet. Fast-forward 50 years. 

“My aunt had kept hold of my grandfa- 
ther’s recipe book and one beer bottle,” 
notes Sleeman, who in his early adulthood 
Tan a British-style pub and owned a beer 
import business. “I decided | wanted to get 
into brewing. My aunt handed the recipe 
book and bottle to me and encouraged me 


to resurrect the family business.” 

Clearly after 50 years, the Ontario Liquor 
Commission had mellowed, and they gave 
John Sleeman a license—that was in 
August 1988, 20 years ago this summer 
and the reason for the beer. “It is the 20th 
anniversary of Sleeman’s Version Two,” 
says Sleeman. 


TODAY, SLEEMAN'S is Canada’s third largest 
brewery, far bigger than any micro-brewery 
but still dwarfed by Molson and Labatt. Part 
of its brewing operations include Québec’s 
Unibroue and BC’s Okanagan Springs, which 
allows the company to take advantage of 
National economies of scale but still respond 
to regional tastes. The whole company was 
also bought out a couple years ago by 
Japanese giant Sapporo. 

“| thought they would send me off to the 
beach somewhere, but instead they said, 
"We don’t know how you are doing it, but 
you are making money, so keep it up,’ and 
left,” says Sleeman. “They've been pretty 
hands off.” 

As for No 20, Sleeman says, “Il wanted to 
brew a celebratory beer that would be appre- 
ciated by many but would still stand out.” 

Sleeman says the goal was a “tradition- 
al mild, low-hop British ale.” They imported 
hops from Britain and used a traditional 
British ale strain. “We stuck with Canadian 
barley, though, as it is some of the best in 
the world.” 

After the interview | picked up a six- 
pack and tried one. It's a medium gold beer 
with an impressive white head. It’s bril- 
liantly clear. | find it a very attractive and 
inviting beer to look at. 

The aroma is quiet, providing some light 
pilsner and grainy malt sweetness, mostly 
of specialty crystal malt quality. The flavour 
is similarly delicate. It is a gently malty 
beer with a soft grain sweetness. It has 
only the slightest touch of bitterness, bare- 
ly above perception: The beer finishes a bit 
bigger than it looks, offering some sub- 
stance in the palate. 

It also offers a subtle fruitiness along the 
middle—which is the hallmark of a British 
ale. The fruity esters are formed by the 
yeast and give the beer a classic British feel. 


WIN 


OVER $500 
IN RESTAURANT 


There is no mistaking this as a pleasant, 
summery beer. It offers slightly more body 
than a pale lager, and will be received well 
by those who dislike bitterness. Personally 
| would have upped the hopping level a bit 
to give the beer a more multi-layered expe: 
rience. I'm not talking about turning it into 
a pale ale, just enough to increase the 
complexity of the beer. 

While it is a satisfying drink, | find 
myself wondering if it rates a “20th 
Anniversary” moniker. It is subtle, clean 
and pleasant but doesn’t jump out as a 
once-in-a-lifetime beer. Which is because 
maybe it isn’t 

lasked John Sleeman whether No 20 is 
a one-time beer. “We don’t know,” was his 
reply. “We will commit to it this summer 
and see how it goes. If people like it, it 
might return.” 

No 20 might soon be the latest addition to 
the Sleeman’s line-up. Only time will tell. w 


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Monorail! Monorail! Monorail! 


High-profile projects like the AGA and the arena go 
about building a world-class city the wrong way 


MATTHEW HALLIDAY / matthew@vueweekly.com 
ullshit might be too strong a 
Be= but Randall Stout's $88- 
million-dollar redesign of the 
Art Gallery of Alberta is at least, | 
don't know, bullspit. 

Don't get me wrong. On some lev- 
els, it's a pretty damn exciting project, 
and here's hoping it’s a great big roar- 
ing success. But while Edmonton 
hemorrhages new subdivisions like 
an urban hemophiliac and lets its 
already thin-on-the-ground historical 
treasures fall into shameful disrepair 
(is anyone even trying to do anything 
to save the sad wreck of the Arlington 
Apartments?), there seems to be a 
contingent at City Hall and in the 
media (*cough* Scott McKeen 
*cough*) who believe that Edmon- 
ton’s future as a big-league urban 
player lies not in cultivating a more 
sustainable, neighbourly, close-knit 
city, with walkable streets and old- 
fashioned urban neighbourhoods, but 
in a few grandiose civic gestures. The 
point of view is pretty well summed 
up by this little bit of hyperbole from 
the AGA website: “The gallery in itself 
will be a work of art that will comple- 
ment and complete the cultural 
precinct surrounding Churchill Square 
and solidify Alberta’s Capital as a 
world-class city, epitomizing Edmon- 
ton’s 2007 Cultural Capital of Canada 
designation.” 

Did you hear that? World class! Oh 
boy! The thinking seems to be that a 
few landmark attention-grabbers like 
this (the proposed downtown arena 
being another) will catapult us to the 
urban big leagues, and I’m not sure 
what's sadder: that misguided belief, 
or the fact that we think Randall 
Stout’s incoherent, discordant slab of 
ugly is just such a landmark. 

Stout, of course, is a one-time 
understudy of starchitect Frank Gehry, 
the man who helped kicked off the lat- 
est craze for tourist-magnet civic insti- 
tutions with his Guggenheim museum 
in Bilbao in 1997, of which the new 
AGA looks like a stillborn sibling. Stout 
takes Gehry’s sensuous, shimmering 
ribbons of steel and concrete and puts 
a bargain-basement spin on them. 
(Even more galling is the fact that 
we're paying $88 million for his sec- 
ond-rate services, when we just turned 
down local architect Gene Dub's ethe- 
real, beautiful city entrance pyramids, 
a relative bargain at $2 million.) 

The AGA’s website calls Stout's 


= BiG BUILDINGS 


design an “architectural icon [that] 
will draw visitors from around the 
world.” Oh, c'mon. Not one person, 
anywhere, is going to be sufficiently 
intrigued by Stout's work to snap up a 
plane ticket and fly out here. At least, 
not when they could visit his nearly 
identical ugly-making projects in such 
cultural epicentres as Chatanooga, 
Tennessee and Roanoke, Virginia. (Do 
a Google image search for “Hunter 
Museum of American Art” in Chat- 
tanooga. From some angles it looks 
like a Borg spaceship, while from oth- 
ers it looks like three ugly buildings 
melted into super-ugly one.) And as 
Globe and Mail architectural critic Lisa 
Rochon pointed in a 2005 piece, only 
9000 square feet of the museum's 
new space will be dedicated to art. 
More than 20 000 will go to retail, 


20 


SWEEKIY 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


restaurants and “public space,” pre- : 


sumably so we can buy mugs and T- 
shirts with the AGA logo—though to 
be fair, there will be substantially 
more classroom space in the new 
building. 


EVEN MORE UNFORTUNATE is the fact 


that superior proposals were passed 
up. Will Alsop’s weird and wonderful 
multi-hued box design, reportedly the 
early favourite, was booted to the curb 
(maybe because Alsop was reported to 
have had some harsh words for 
Edmonton, saying to the jury responsi- 
ble for choosing the design, “I have to 
say | hated Edmonton’). 

But all that aside, the AGA’s biggest 
problem isn’t whether or not it’s 
housed in a building worthy of being 
featured in Architectural Digest. Its 
biggest worry should be bringing in 
patrons. 

The biggest exhibit of the past few 
years was probably Jesse Sherburne’s 


ARTS 


CaS 


Art Bar, which was likely so successful 
because it enabled scenesters to get 
drunk in an environment more preten- 
tious—and therefore more self-satisfy- 
ing to one's personal vanity—than the 
Black Dog. Besides that, has there 
been anything close to a blockbuster 
exhibit? Not that an art gallery’s man- 
date is to draw enormous crowds, but 
for a city of over a million people to 
only draw 35 000 people to its art 
gallery in a given year, many of whom 
are undoubtedly out-of-towners and 
repeat customers, is fairly pathetic. 
(Consider that the Vancouver Art 
Gallery drew over 200 000 patrons for 
a single exhibit last year. Vancouver's 
bigger, but not that much bigger.) The 
AGA is expecting 120 000 to 150 000 
annual visitors once the new building 
is opened, but their logic seems lack- 
ing. Certainly the new building will 
draw the curious for a few months, but 
will it really translate into a permanent 
five-fold increase in patronage? 


Sounds like wishful thinking to me. 

Please don’t take this the wrong 
way, AGA. I love you. I’m one of your 
best customers, in fact. Every time a 
new exhibit opens, I’m there. But all 
too often, I’m disappointed. When the 
Projections exhibit was going on this 
spring, what was up with the broken 
projectors, and the noisy installations 
in too-close proximity to one another? 
Or the undercooked Generation show? 
And what to make of the frequently 
alienating, academic tone the gallery 
takes in promoting itself? A major pub- 
lic gallery can’t appeal only to the MFA 
crowd. Take this description of the See- 
ing Through Modernism taken from the 
AGA’s website: “During the 1970s and 
1980s, Edmonton was recognized 
internationally as a centre for the cre- 
ation and collection of modernist 
painting and sculpture. For many 
artists, curators and collectors, the 
legitimization of the primary principles 
of modernism—medium specificity and 
aesthetic autonomy—that were sup- 
ported by the city’s two largest art 
institutions—The Edmonton Art 
Gallery and the University of Alberta— 
was a welcome refuge from the post- 
modernist discourse that was effecting 
[sic] art production elsewhere.” 

Allow me to try and penetrate the 
jargon: “During the 1970s and 1980s, 
Edmonton was several decades 
behind an international art scene that 
had left modernism behind decades 
ago. Now here's a graceless, jargon- 
heavy sentence few of you will 
understand.” 

All the hullabaloo over the new 
AGA, or a downtown stadium, or a 
casino, or whatever else, sort of 
reminds me of that episode of The 
Simpsons in which a slick huckster 
tries to sell the people of Springfield 
on a big-city-style monorail system, 
only to deliver a shoddy, second-rate 
piece of crap before he splits town. 
And the the monorail wasn’t Spring- 
field’s only folly—other ambitious but 
stupid projects included a giant mag- 
nifying glass, a popsicle stick sky- 
scraper and an escalator to nowhere. 

Is the AGA our popsicle stick sky- 
scraper? Is a downtown arena our 
escalator to nowhere? A great city 
isn’t made of hype, it's made of streets 
and neighbourhoods and people. The 
museums and galleries and monu- 
ments to our greatness will only come 
when we are great. For now, let's just 
try and build ourselves a real city. v 


GOOD DESIGN, POOR TASTE. 


BRYAN HUMPHREY — MDES INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 


OPENING RECEPTION 


SATURDAY AUGUST 30 2008 7:00PM 
LOCATIONy 29ARMSTRONG 10129 104ST 


S, ALBERTA RTS  ART&DESIGN 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 «= WUE WIEEKUS 


Art attack! 


Art is awesome, but art bullshit stinks 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / i 

ooray for art! Unfortunately, it 

comes with a heaping helping 

of bullshit, some endemic to 
the art industry on a global scale, 
some regionalized or limited to a 
genre or sector of the community. 
Here are things that'd clear the air if 
we could put them on the dung-heap. 


MID-CAREER LEAD CEILING 

Around eight years into the industry, 
opportunities and tasks begin to feel 
repetitive and limited, and you yearn 
for new responsibilities and to put 
ideas into play without having to run 
the gauntlet of “no.” But there's a bot- 
tleneck in smallish art scenes like 
ours. People in key positions in estab- 
lished institutions and organizations 
are entrenched, perhaps for life, and 
there's an endless litter of the young 
and hungry willing to work Dicken- 
sian conditions below you. Mid-career 
arts people (and often artists) get 
sandwiched between them, usually 
saddled with student debt, with little 
room to develop or make a wage that 
allows them to sleep on a mattress 
that’s off the floor. And that’s the 
point when many leave the city or 
cultural sector — taking their skills and 
talent with them. I'm not suggesting 
Logan’s Run culling, but we should 
address this as a community. 


“EVERYONE'S AN ARTIST’ MEME 


Despite a gajillion feel-good books 
about unleashing your inner artist, it’s 
a cultural misunderstanding that 
simultaneously mythologizes art while 
dismissing its importance. This has lit- 
tle to do with skill and formal train- 
ing—there are self-taught and 
academic artists; fantastic ones who 
can't draw a convincing snake and 
artistically sterile technical adepts. 
There's no disputing humans have 
innate creativity and can experience 
the pleasure of drawing or printmak- 
ing or whatever. But we're failing to 
communicate what art is to the public 
and invite participation in a way that 
doesn't minimize the cultural function 
of genuine artists—professionals 
engaged with interpreting the forces of 
society through their unique practices, 
holding up a wonderland mirror and 
beckoning us to explore ourselves. 


ARTISTS AS SHOCK TROOPS FOR 
GENTRIFICATION 

This may soon be mitigated by EAC 
Cultural Plan recommendations, but 
it’s frustrating to root in marginal 
neighbourhoods, accept those risks 
and conditions, and be priced out by 
developers benefiting from your 
community-building at your 
expense. It’s bitter when you're also 
having to defend the raison d’étre of 
art to the same people 


SOCIAL CONTRACT 101 


Everyone in the arts is a de facto 
ambassador for the arts. We need to 


switch the script from defensive to fac- 
tual: interpreting our society through 
multiple views matters. Just because 
culture relies on public money in 
Canada doesn’t mean we have to 


apologize for it. Challenge people to 
imagine a world where the only cul- 
ture they encounter is advertising- 
based and _ dictated by 
demographics—or maybe just drop 
them off at South Edmonton Common 
without pants, call it a performance 
piece and get a grant for it. 


ARTIST STATEMENTS 


Sometimes these are insightful doc- 
uments that deepen our understand- 
ing and appreciation of work. Often 
they're just grant- or academic-ori- 
ented jargon-heavy baubles that 
become a barrier to non-artmakers. 


OVER-RELIANCE ON THEORY 


I've read critical/cultural theory— 
Derrida, Barthes, Irigaray, semioti- 
cians, the post-humanists, cultural 
relativists, etc. Some of their ideas 
and writing were beautiful and 
evocative, but some were self-justify- 
ing intellectual fictions by very smart 
people. Actually, the real problem is 
how they're used as weapons by peo- 
ple trying to control discourse around 
art and culture. Intellectuals are 
informed by historical and contempo- 
rary work worldwide, but carrying 
Speculum of the Other Woman around 
doesn’t automatically transform 
today’s Edmonton to Paris in the ‘70s, 
and no one has the right to fossilize 
thought based on an awesome book 
they're totally into. Post-modernists 
and relativists have enabled anti-sci- 
ence attitudes with real-word conse- 
quences, and we're complicit in 
distancing art from the public sphere, 
because for a while, if you couldn't 
speak Lacan-ese, you were excluded 
from the discussion. Their propo- 
nents basically locked “regular” peo- 
ple out of art and culture, and bear 
some responsibility for the general 
dumbing down of popular culture 
because of that. 


THE CLEMENT GREENBERG EXPERIENCE 
So people in Edmonton had him over 
for dinner sometime in the '70s. It 
doesn’t make him relevant now, and I 
bet a New York critic with a sky-high 


> 


ego wouldn’t be having dinner in 
Edmonton in the '70s if he were still 
relevant in New York at the time. Yes, 
he defined part of mid-20th century 
art and art criticism. Yes, he’s a writer 
with provocative ideas. Yes, his con- 
nection with the Edmonton Art 
Gallery shaped the AGA collection 
and influenced university depart- 
ments, so he’s a legitimate part of our 
history and continuing dialogue on 
art, But it’s pathetic he’s considered 
the end point of all artistic develop- 
ment by a vocal minority of our art 
community. Art is an onward story 
with multiple threads, not a mau- 
soleum of ideas with one heroic 
thrust inherited from New York or 
London. Focusing on an iconic figure 
the rest of the universe already put in 
proper historical context isn't world- 
ly—it’s the definition of provincial. 
Anne Whitelaw did a fine job this 
year of dealing with Greenberg's local 
legacy—now let’s move on. 


WHIPLASH CULTURE 


I love Edmonton’s refreshingly non- 
uptight DIY backbone—makeshift gal- 
leries, rock & art shows, 
genre-bending collaborations. But I 
wonder if the roiling creative energy 
pressures artists to show without hav- 
ing breathing space to let interesting 
ideas fully flower. Maybe this is a 
byproduct of digital culture and social 
networking, making us perceive con- 
stant competition. Nevertheless, I'd 
like to see ideas pushed further before 
being discarded for something else. ! 
get that new projects are exciting and 
bring in opportunity and sometimes 
money, and in-process ideas should 
absolutely remain a component of Dirt 
City culture, but let’s apply DIY to solu- 
tions that let us stay creative and flexi- 
ble while feeding our practices. Can 
we organize informal artist swaps 
with cities like Victoria and Winnipeg 
so we can share a body of work while 
crafting another without relying on the 
whims of established organizations or 
over-showing here? DIY residencies? 
Establish a fund based on a 
microloans model to address gaps in 
our funding? v 


JOSEF BRAUN 
hopscotch@vueweekly.com 


= HOPSCOTCH 


A nation is a living thing, and as a living 
thing—not to mention a thing of tremen- 
dous potential for both prosperity and 
peril—it requires ongoing examination. 
Definitions of nations are useful, yet they 
are not fixed, and as the US rapidly builds 
toward a new opportunity to redefine 
itself following a tumultuous period 
simultaneously characterized by unprece- 
dented power and influence and unprece- 
dented international disdain, it's as good 
a time as ever to take the long view. 

With What is America?: A Short 
History of the New World Order 
(Knopf, $29.95), essayist Ronald Wright, 
author of Time Among the Maya, Stolen 
Continents and A Short History of 
Progress, does just that, surveying the 
trends in American life from the arrival 
of the first Europeans and the gradual 
crushing of the old Americans by the 
new. The national character as 
described in this new book’s pages— 
one that is forever “losing its innocence” 
thanks to an unusually strong penchant 
for historical amnesia—is not very much 
flattered to say the least, and Wright's 
aim is not to pat anyone on the back but 
rather to flush out the essential, long- 
circulating venom that plagues the heart 
of what, like it or not, is our world’s best 
hope. (Okay, them and maybe the Euro- 
pean Union, but that would surely call 
for another book.) 

What is America? is, as Wright 
admits, an eccentric book. As concise in 
volume as it is expansive in chronology, 
it spends precious little ink reiterating 
certain historical events, however enor- 
mous in implication, that have been 
exhaustively dealt with elsewhere. Thus 
slavery and the Civil War, to name two 
sweeping examples, are duly accounted 
for in the book's thesis but left largely 
undiscussed in favour of more icono- 
clastic takes on other, still more unruly 
histories, such as that of the centuries- 
in-the-making extermination of Native 
Americans. Wright emphasizes the fact 
that it was not simply that white set- 
tlers usurped their territory and deci- 
mated their rank but that this territory 
was already being occupied by organ- 
ized, sophisticated, agrarian peoples— 
not ranging savages standing in the 
path of civilization. He does this to 
make clear just how much the New 
World was founded upon not just the 
raw terrain but the time-tested develop- 
ments of the Old: “The Pilgrims thanked 
their God for saving them in a ‘wilder- 
ness,’ but the feast speaks for itself: 
turkey, corn, beans, pumpkin, cranber- 
ries, potatoes and the rest came from 
thousands of years of New World civi- 
lization. It was the heathen, not the 
Lord, who saved them.” 

Wright aligns the spin doctoring and 
self-deceit that facilitated the extermi- 
nation of the Indians with like contem- 
porary practices, aligning the rhetoric of 
Andrew Jackson with Ronald Reagan, or 
that of William McKinley, who needed 
to consult directly with God in order to 
allow him to justify invading the Philip- 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


ARTS 


na 


2 
C 


1 & 


pines, with George W Bush. Wright also 
gives a gracious nod to the work that 
fellow contemporary writers for laying 
the groundwork for some of his thesis, 
such as Jon Krakauer, whose Under the 
Banner of Heaven, a history of violence 
in Mormonism, is cited in Wright's 
exploration of the continuous role of fun- 
damentalist religious thinking, not to 
mention paranoia, in the development of 
America’s march toward self-realization. 


YET WHILE its list of dishonourable patri- 
ots is impressive, part of What is Ameri- 
ca? is also given over to paying tribute to 
the countless voices of intelligent dissent 
that are equally intrinsic to American 
identity. Besides Krakauer, Wright also 
draws upon the barbed lamentations of 
such luminaries as Herman Melville, 
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Benjamin Franklin, 
Gore Vidal, Davy Crockett, Henry David 
Thoreau and Alexis de Tocqueville. And 
were he to take a gander at some of the 
other titles sharing the new releases sec- 
tion with What is America?, perhaps 
Wright would go on to include Paul 
Auster in his list, since Man in the Dark 
(Henry Holt, $26), Auster’s latest novel, is 
also in a sense a work of American his- 
torical revisionism and Auster’s most 
clearly politically charged work since 
1992's Leviathan. 

“lam alone in the dark, turning the 
world around in my head as | struggle 
through another bout of insomnia, 
another white night in the great Ameri- 
can wilderness.” These are the first 
words of Man in the Dark, which reads 
as the testimony of a 72-year-old retired 
book critic named August Brill. The 
wilderness he writes about is figurative, 
a vast landscape of relentless shadows, 
while the literal space he inhabits for 
the whole of the novel is but the single 
darkened room where he lies, his leg 
shattered by an accident, his mind roil- 
ing with persistent ghosts: those of his 
wife, deceased, his son-in-law, separat- 
ed from his daughter, and his. grandson- 
in-law, killed horrifically on foreign soil. 
Brill makes up stories to ward off mis- 
ery, and the one he’s working on as 
Man in the Dark begins concerns an 
America embroiled in a new Civil War, 
one ignited by the corrupt presidential 
election of 2000. 

Stories within stories are the gleam- 
ing mulch of Auster’s garden of ideas 
that deliberately slip away when sifted 
for singular meanings, but one of the 
things that | think ennobles Man in the 
Dark in particular is how boldly it exudes 
a faith in the redemptive power of story- 
telling, and how it locates the story- 
telling capacity in not just writers but in 
every one of us. The novel lights upon a 
dizzying catalogue of hot-button issues, 
from the war in Iraq to the erosion of 
civil liberties, yet it is the confluence of 
Brill’s imaginings with the stories he'll 
later share with his grieving grand- 
daughter about their family's past that 
provides Auster with the meatier politi- 
cal statement, one founded in this crazy 
notion that a democracy really is meant 
to empower the individual, and that the 
access to individual dreams, to the inner 
lives of others, is the gift that novels 
give to readers to sustain them through 
troubled times. w 


hk 


CONTEMPORARY ABORIGINAL ARTISTS 


KC ADAMS « LORI BLONDEAU * DANA CLAXTON » TERRANCE HOULE * MARIA HUPFIELD » KENT MONKMAN + ADRIAN STIMSON * JEFF THOMAS 


JUNE 21-SEPTEMBER 21, 2008 


Dana Claxton, Baby Boy Gotta Indian Horse, 2008. Digital Print. 60 x 48° 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA 


Enterprise Square, 100 -10230 Jasper Ave | Edmonton, AB | 780.422.6223 | www.artgalleryalberta.com 
Mo Se @ ses sore Brain = WUEWEEKLY 


ARTS AUG 28-SEP 3.2008 | 7 23 


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There are many great reasons to join 
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For , your support 
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to learn more, register for the Walk or make a donation. 


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ue moet 


Friday Aug 29 
Saturday Aug 


Art of Living 


Edmonton’s artists have to 
get more involved in the community 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 

Editor's note: in an effort to stimulate 
discussion about the business of art in 
Edmonton, Vue presented a series of 
articles on the Edmonton Arts Council's 
10-year cultural plan, The Art of Living. 
This is the last of the series, summing up 
our take on the plan and the communi- 
ty’s response to it. For more information 
on the plan, you can visit the EAC’s web- 
site at edmontonarts.ab.ca. 


"T eamontn our discussions with 
Edmonton’s arts communities 
about the EAC's Art of Living 
plan, we consistently ran into a formi- 
dable roadblock: few of the artists we 
tried to talk to had read the actual 
plan. Considering this is the plan that 
will set the cultural agenda for 
Edmonton for the next 10 years, that’s 
disturbing, to say the least. 

What it wasn’t, unfortunately, was 
terribly surprising. Though there are, 
of course, a few prominent and wel- 
come exceptions, Edmonton artists as 
a whole seem to be greatly uninter- 
ested in the practical side of making 


Nick Green, 
Darrin Hagen 
& Trevor Schmidt 


Nick Green 
Maralyn Ryan 


& Trevor Schmidt 


= THE ART OF LIVING 
FIMALTHOUGHTS 


one’s living as an artist: the extent of 
their involvement and knowledge of 
the political realm, in particular, 
seems to be limited to writing grant 
proposals. Obviously, this attitude has 
to change if Edmonton is going to 
grow as an artistic community. 

No one goes into an artistic pursuit 
with the goal of sitting on committees 
and drafting proposals to various lev- 
els of government: it is, and should 
be, about personal expression. Never- 
theless, art is not created in a vacu- 
um, and ignoring the circumstances 
surrounding its creation is only going 
to make life harder for artists—all 
artists—in the long run. 

As the recent cuts made bythe 
Harper government should remind us, 
the public funds that support so many 
of our artistic pursuits are precarious 
at the best of times. If artists them- 
selves are not willing to stand up and 
fight for—or at least openly care 
about—the government support that 
is often so vital for their work, though, 
they can hardly complain when fund- 
ing starts to dry up. 


THE ART OF LIVING in and of itself is 
not perfect. As with any document of 
this nature, its broad scope is sure to 
please all of the people only some of 
the time. One of its most important 
thrusts, though, is the necessity of 
getting the art of Edmonton out into 
the broader community, showing 
Edmonton the vitality and talent that 
exists within its own borders. 

But such a task is not going to be 
easy if Edmonton's artists aren't willing 
to first get involved with their own 
community. If we are to spend all of 
our time cooped up in our own stu- 
dios/rehearsal spaces/offices, it will 
only be a matter of time before the rest 
of the world pays as little attention to 
us as we do to it. Political involvement 
may be one more thing added to an 
already difficult life, but if more of us 
don't take it up, few of us will have to 
worry about the stresses that come 
with being a working artist. w 


Aire. Sep anne 


¥.COM 
DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AF 3 PM 


0 ae eee 
CAPOEIRA RODA - CAPOEIRA ACADEMY 
EDMONTON In front of Arts Building Rain location: 
‘Foyer of Arts Building * Part of Brazil Week ® Sept, 
10 (4pm) * www.humanities ualberta.ca/mics/ 


GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


a 
AGNES BUGERA GALLERY 12310 Jasper Ave (780- 
eee enn Tue-Sat 10am-Spm 

PERSPECTIVES ON LANDSCAPE: Artworks by Jane 
Brookes, Adrian Livesley, Ken Wallace © Until Aug. 29 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10185-106 St (780-489- 
6611) * ELEMENTAL CONNECTIONS: An Exhibition 
of Sustainable Craft; until Sept. 27 * Discovery 
Gallery: REMIVANTS OF COMMUNITY: Small scale 
landscapes in bronze, copper, silver and stainless 
Steel; based on historic and culturally significant 
Country churches; until Aug. 30 © /SABELLE’S 
re “ald Felted imagery by Tracey Kuffner; until 

ig. 30, 


ART BEAT 26 St Anne Street, St Albert (780-459- 

3679) # City scapes by Christopher J. Hrynyk # 

Paintings by Rose-Marie Cameron and Ina Raatz-von 

Hirschhausen; until Aug. 30 © Paintings by Randy 

ay Sept. 4-20; opening recepetion: Thu, Sept, 4 
pm, 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA Enterprise Square, 
100, 10230 Jasper Ave (780-422-6223) ¢ Open Mon- 
Fri 10:30am-5pm; Thu 10:30am-8pm (4-8pm free); 
Sat-Sun 11am-Spm © WORKS OFA RENAISSANCE 
MASTER: THE PRINTS OF ALBRECHT DURER: Until 
Nov. 2 © FACE THE NATION: Artworks by eight 
Aboriginal artists from across Canada whose works 
address issues of history, representation and identity; 
until Sept. 21 ¢ REAL: Abstract sees yape 
artists; until Sept. 21 ¢ EDMONTON: EXPLORED: 
Curated by Amy Fung: opening reception: Fri, Sept. 5 
(7-Spm); curator’s talk: Sat, Sept. 6 (1pm); Sept, 6- 
Nov. 2 # Free (members); $10 (adult)/$7 (senior/stu- 
dent); $5 (6-12yrs)/free (Syrs and under}/$20 (fami- 
ly-2 adults, 4 children) 


ARTSHAB STUDIO GALLERY 31d F!, 10217-106 St 
(780-439-9532/780-423-2966) * Open Thu 5-8pm, or 
by appointment * New work by ArtsHab Artists 


CANADA PLACE 2nd F1, 9700 Jasper Ave (780-426- 
4035) Paintings by various artists, Bruce Allen, 
Bruce Thompson, Frances Alty Arscott, Nel 
Kwiatkowska, Barb Brooks, Joseph Drapell, and 
many others 


CENTRE D'ARTS VISUELS DE L'ALBERTA 9103-95 
Ave (780-461-3427) © Mon-Fri 10am-6pm; Sat 10am- 
pa © INTERPRETATION: Artworks by Emma Cayer, 

lathalie Shewchuk-Paré, Sylvia Grist, Daniéle Petit 
and Jody Swanson * Until Sept.3* Stephen 
Fouquet, Annette Ayre, Louise Rae, Suzanne Gaultier 
and Louise Madeleine Cormier; opening: Sept. 5 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621 

Whyte Ave (780-498-1984) « Open Mon-Fri 11am- 
5pm * Summer Salon and Sale—a selection of new 
urbanscape and favourite paintings from the past © 


SOME 
OLD TUNES 


ckua 


acts itelat-tanzela.t 


Until October 


CROOKED POT GALLERY 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain 
(780-963-9573) * Open Tue-Sat 10am-5pm =" 
CASSEROLE CRAZY. Clay works by Rita Hopner. 
diy * BOTTOMS UP ON SUMMER: Drink 
ware by award winning potters; through September 


DELTA SOUTH HOTEL Lobby, 4404 Gateway Bivd 
(780-426-4035) Watercolours by Henry DeJager, 
paintings by Kathryn Sherman, Elaine Berglund and 
Audrey Pfannmuller 


ELECTRUM DESIGN STUDIO AND GALLERY 
12419 Stony Plain Rd (780-482-1402) « Open Tue by 
eprotatent, Wed-Fri 11am-5;30pm: Sat 11am-4pm; 
closed long weekends * COLLECTION 2008: New 
works by various artists 


FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY Room 1-1, Fine 
Arts Building, 112 St, 89 Ave (780-492-2081) « Open 
Tue-Fri a eae Sat 2-5pm © AATIST BOOKS 
FROM THE HOME MUSEUM; Gurated by Megan 
Bertagnolli ¢ WAITING ROOM: Printwarks by Caitlin 
Wells (MFA Printmaking) # Until Aug, 30 


FRINGE GALLERY Paint Spot basement, 10618 
Whyte Ave (780-432-0240) © Art Walk; through 
August * John, Mark, Peter and Paul Freeman; 
through September 


FRONT GALLERY 12312 Jasper Ave (780-489-2952) 
* Annual Salon Sale © Aug. 28-Sept. 6 


GALLERY AT MILNER-STANLEY A. MILNER 
UBRARY Main Fi, Sir Winston Churchill Sq (780- 
496-7030) * Open Mon-Fri 9am-9pm; Sat Sam-6pm; 
Sun 1-Spm * CARSCAPES: Photographs by Evelyn 
Bergk; until Aug. 30 © RIDE OF THE CENTURY: 
Edmonton Transit 100 years- Historic photographs 
and artifacts; Sept. 2-30 


GALLERY IS 4930 Ross St, Red Deer (403-341-4641) 
* A WEEK AT THE LAZY M: Group show; until Aug 
30 © ENCHANTED BY THE SEASONS: Artworks by 
Elizabeth Ferchuk, solo show; Sept. 1-27; opening 
reception: Fri, Sept. 5 (6-8pm) 


HARCOURT HOUSE 10215-112 St (780-426-4180) © 
Open Mon-Fri 10am-5pm; Sat 12-4pm ¢ Main 
Space: LUC/OLE: Fiqurative drawings by 
Francophone artist Jacques Clément, until Aug. 30 
Front Gallery: DRAWING INTO SCULPTURE 
Clay sculptures in progress, still supported by their 
extemal armatures, and finished bronze sculptures 
together with their source drawings by Richard 
Tosezak; until Aug. 30 


JEFF ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place Senior 
Centre, 10831 University Ave (780-433-5807) Open 
Mon-Fri Sam-4pm © INSTRUCTORS SHOWTIME 
Artworks by the instructors for the upcoming 
fall/winter session; until Sept. 25 © INSTRUCTORS 
SHOWTIME: Artworks, including paintings, pottery, 
fibre art and woodwork; Sept. 1-25 


JOHNSON GALLERY (NORTH) 11817-80 St (780- 
479-8424) Open Tue-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm; Sat 9:30am- 
4pm * Artworks by Don Sharpe, Andrew Besse and 
others; Ladies of the Lake paintings by Kathy 
Meaney 


JOHNSON GALLERY (SOUTH) 7711-85 St (780- 
465-6171) ¢ Open Mon-Fri Sam-5pm; Sat 10am-Spm 
* Artworks by Ada Wong, Glenda Beaver and others 
© Through August 


KAMENA 5718 Calgary Tr S (780-944-9497) * Mon- 
Wed, Fri 10am-6pm; Thu 10am-7pm, Sat 10am-5pm 
© Featuring artworks by local and international 
artists, home décor and gift items 


KAMENA AND CHAGALL GALLERY Winspear 
Centre, Sir Winston Churchill Square ® TIMELESS 
VISIONS OF NEW CONTEMPORARY ART: Wed, Sept. 
3 open to the public Evening Gala: Tue, Sept. 2 
(6pm) * $25, at 780.944.9497 
www.KamenaGallery.net 


LATITUDE 53 10248-1065 St (780-423-5353) « Open 
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm; Sat noon-Spm * ROCK 
CITY/DIAT CITY: Group show featuring artworks by 


94.9 


local artists exploring Edmonton's love of rock and 
Toll music, curated by Tadd Janes; until Sept. 6 


LOFT GALLERY 4. J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 
Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park (780-998-3091 /467- 
7356) * Open Thu 5-9pm, Sat 10am-4pm # PEOPLE, 
BIRDS AND ANIMALS: Paintings by artists from the 
Art Society of Strathcona County; until Aug. 28 © 
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 08 SHOW: Artworks by Willie 
Wong, Dianna Sapara, Janet Kraemer, Sonja 
Marinoske, Tony Goobie, Janice Bonsant-Wilson and 
Margaret Klappstein; Sept-Oct 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St 
(780-407-7152) © pie Mon-Fri 10am-8pm; Sat-Sun 
1-8pm * FORM UNFOLDING: Artworks by members 
of the Sculptor’s Association; Aug. 30-Oct. 26 « 
Opening reception: Sept. 4 (7-Spm) 


MCPAG 5411-51 St, Stony Plain (780-963-2777) « 
Open Mon-Sat 10am-4pm; Sun 10am-6:30pm © TIME 
a Paintings by Beverly Bunker © Until 

ept 


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES—JASPER Jasper Park 
Lodge, aor leries.com (780-852-5378) 
* Open daily * Artworks by Diane Way 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 Ste Anne Street, 
St. Albert (780-459-1528) © DINO DEN: Tue-Sat 
(11am-3pm) 


NAKED CYBER CAFE 10354 Jasper Ave * WAR 
AND PEACE: TEN YEARS OF EDMONTON: Protest 
graphics from the ESPA Archives and the Raise My 
Voice independent media photo-archive: until Aug. 30 
* COLLAPSING COLONIES: Featuring works by the 
Beehive Collective. Featured for the North of 
Nowhere Expo as part the exploration of Colony 
Collapse Disorder ® Sept. 1-Noy, 1 


NINA HAGGERTY STOLLERY GALLERY 9704-111 
Ave (780-474-7611) * Open Mon, Wed, Fri 9°30am- 
2:30pm; Tua, Thu 9:30-4pm, 6:30-8:30pm © CAP: 
Project Greed and Other Work * Aug. 28-Sept. 26 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 10193-112 St (780 
452-0286) * Open Tue-Sat 10am-5:30pm * Paintings 
by Jonathan Forrest 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 2 12304 Jasper Ave 
(780-455-7479) ¢ Open Tue-Sat 11am-5pm © 
Paintings by Linda Lindemann 


PORTAL GALLERY 300, 9414-91 St (780-702-7522) 
* LOST AND FOUND: Marcie Rohr, artworks focusing 
on childhood * Until Sept. 12 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, St 
Albert (780-460-4310) * Open Tue-Sat (10am-Spm), 
Thu (10am-8pm) © STILLNESS AND FLIGHT: Artworks 
by Scott Cumberland, Jeff Holmwood, and Chris 
Stroemich; until Aug. 30 * GUILDED: Artworks by 
susan Casault, Joanna Dummond, Audry Hewlett, 
Marilyn Hodysh, Heather Howard and others; Sept 
4-27, opening reception: Sept. 4 {6-Spm) 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA 2555 Roper 
Rd (780-427-1750) © Open: Tue-Sat Sam-4:30pm, 
Wed Sam-Spm_* LES FRANCOPHONES EN ALBERTA 
COURAGE ET DETERMINATION: Learn about the his- 
tory of Francophones in Alberta through archival 
records ® Until Sept. 6 


ROWLES AND COMPANY LeMarchand Mansion, 
108, 11523-100 Ave (780-426-4035) * Featuring 
paintings by Frances Alty Arscott, Bruce Allen, 
Audrey Pfannmuller, Bi Cheng; Ty i by Prairie 
Isle Glass Works, Susan Gottsel it Jan Benda, Mark 
Gibeau, Brain Kelk. Dan Vargas, Darren Petersen, 
Michael Trimpol, and James Norton 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave (780- 
453-9100) # Open daily 9-Spm * Government 
House: Public tours Sat and Sun and statutory hols 
(1am-4:30pm); ph 427-2281 info * exhibition 
llery: DRAG INS: BETWEEN SCIENCE AND FIC- 
ON: Artifacts from museums and private collections 
from around the world. Explore the magical powers 
of dragons and how different cultures have imagined 
dragons throughout the centuries; until Sept. 14 « 
HIP, RECOVERED VOYAGES: THE 


- gala and silent auction; Aug. 30 


OF IRELAND: Artifacts salvaged from 
the wreck of the Empress of Ireland: until Oct. 5 « 
front terrace: Peter Hide Sculptures: Until Oct. 5 


ST ALBERT ARTWALK Art Beat Gallery, The 
Bookstore On Perron, Cargo and James Ltd, Concept 
Jewelry Design, Crimson Quill Gifts, Gemport, 
Profiles Public Art Gallery, St Thomas Coffee House 
Gallery, Studio Gallery and Wares « Sept. 4(6-Spm) 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St (780-488-3619) « 
Open Tue-Sat 10am-5pm ¢ AUGUST GROUP 
HIBITION: Introducing artworks by Jacques 
Clément, also floral paintings by Phyllis Anderson 
Robert Sinclair’s watercolours, textiles by Martha 
Cole and paintings by Jim Visser and Arlene 
Wasylynchuk; until Sept. 2 * EARTHBOUND: Abstract 
paintings by Arlene Wasylynchuk; Sept. 6 -23 


SNAP GALLERY 10309-97 St (780-423-1492) « 
Open Tue-Sat 12-5pm * Main Gallery: THE 
AUVOO SUITE. Works by David Poolman and Self- 
trait 60 and 35: Works by Slawomir Grabowy. 
ntil Sept. 6 © Studio Gallery: DISLOCATIONS 
Works by Michelle Lavoie: until Sept.6 * LOVE 
THOSE CLOTHES OPEN STUDIO DAYS Fundraising 


SPOT LIGHT GALLERY 107, 25 Chisholm Ave, St 
Albert (780-419-2055) * ARTISTS IN ACTION, 
Members of the new St. Albert Artists Colony creat- 
1Ng artworks on location that will be added to the 
exhibit in the gallery * Until Sept. 15 


SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY 35-5 Ave, Spruce 
Grove (780-962-0664) © SIMALL IS ALL: Artworks by 
Alberta Society of Artists; until Sept. 6 » OPEN AAT 
COMPETITION: Sept. 6; opening reception: Sept. 12 


STUDIO GALLERY 1) Perron St (780-460-5993); 143 
Grandin Park Plaza, 22 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St 
Albert (780-460-5990) * Open Thu 12-8pm, Fri 
1Gam-6pm, Sat 10am-5pm * COLOUR, WET PAINT: 
Featuring oil paintings, watercolours, drawings and 
mixed media artworks by a variety of artists 


SUN LIFE BUILDING Lobby, 10123-99 St (780-426- 
4035) © Paintings by Bi Y. Cheng 


WORKS GALLERY 200 10225— 100 Ave * Oper 
Mon-Fri 12-5pm * DEAD OF NIGHT: Photos by Nick 
Rudnicki ¢ Closing reception: Thu, Sept. 4 (7pm) 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St (780. 
452-9100) * Wired to Win:\MAX film. Also playing 
in IMAX: Human Body; Dinosaurs Alive! ¢ BODY 
WORLDS 1: The Original Exhibition of Real Human 
Bodies; feature exhibit * Canadian Blood Services 
Aug. 30 {10am-Spm) * IMAX films: Coral Reef 
Adventure; Wired to Win; Human Body; Dinosaurs 
Alivel, daily * Dawn of the Space Age: Margaret 
Zeidler Star Theatre; daily 

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Foyer of Rutherford 
Library (South) * Book Display of Portuguese 
Language Collections © Part of Brazil Week @ Sept 
8-11 © www.humanities.valberta.ca/mics/ 


WORLD TRADE CENTRE 9990 Jasper Ave (780- 


426-4035) © Paintings by Keith Nolan; soapstone 
and lava rock sculptures by Mark Totan 


LITERARY 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave (780-469-8755) 
Story Slam: An opportunity for writers to share their 
work, explore their talents and show off # 3rd Wed 
every month © $5 (donation) 


HAPPY HARBOR COMICS © Vol. 1, 10112-124 St 
Trina Robbins (underground comix movement) audio: 
visual presentation; Thu, Aug. 28 (7pm) * Vol. 3, 10826- 
81 Ave: Trina Robbins book signing; Fri, Aug. 29 (5-7pm) 
HULBERT'S 7601-115 St (780-436-1161) * The 
Olive Reading Series: Poetry, politics and discussion; 
an open mic to follow for new poets * 2nd Tue 
each month (7pm) 

POPULAR PRINT CULTURES CONFERENCE AND 
FESTIVAL Humanities Centre, U of A, www.arts.ual 


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berta.ca/popprint ® Join in on th 
Battle or any of the free daily 
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by best-selling author Jane 
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FESTIVAL Fort Edmonton Pari 
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e prof 
am-1:15pm); info e-mail 
bewell.2008@gmail.com * $10 (donation 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Tory 2 
Poetry and music recital feat 
Clara Munoz (Oswal 
os Drummond 
anuel Bandi 
read by Alice Flecha, follov 
Bossa Nova and MP8 cl 
Dissonante © Part of Br 


UPPER CRUST CAFE 
© The Poets’ Haven: Mon 
series presented by Stroll of Poe’ 
(7pm) * $5 (door) 


LIVE COMEDY 
CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS CO! HOUSE 
9351 - 118 Ave, www.thecarrotca © in Pants 
Comedy Improv Troupe ® First Th nth 


COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Ga 
469-4999) © Thu 8:30pm, $1 
8pm and 10:30pm 
Leif Skyving: Sept 
COMIC STRIP 1646 Bourbon St, WEM 
(780-483-5999) * Open nightly 8 
Kivi Rogers, Mike Harrison a 
until Aug. 31 © Hit o 
Altemative Tue, Sept. 2 


THEATRE 


CSI: EDMONTON “LITTLE MURDER ON THE 
PRAIRIE” Jubilations Dinner Theatre 2-170 Si 
Phase I!!, West Edmonton Mall (7 
greatest forensic specialists have 
Vegas, Miar York and Moos: 
Oct. 26 (Wed-Sat 6:30pm; Sun 5pm) 
HAPPY TOES—TEATRO AT THE FRINGE Varsc 
Theatre, 10329-83 Ave (780 433-3399) e 
Quindicina * A contemporan 
Haslam, Ron Peders 


0:30pm 
‘amiak 
1Re 


LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Mayfield Dinner 


Theatre, 16615-109 Ave (780.483 Book and 
lyrics by Howard Ashman, lyrics by 
Aug, 29-Nov. 2 


2 QUEENS AND A JOKER Varscona Th: 
10329-83 Ave ® Fringe hold over starring 
Schmidt as Elizabeth |, Nick Green a: 
Scots, and Maralyn Ayan as Don 
messenger torn between mona 
Darrin Hagen * Aug. 29-30 (Spm) ¢ 
guise.com @ Tickets at TIX on the 
1757 and at the door 


SAME 
OLD TUNES 


ckua.com 


AiG 28- SEP 3, 2008 


VuEWwEEy 2p 


VIN BIESEL 


| 


— a 
STARTS FRIDAY 


Check directory or log onto veww.cineplex.com, 


werw.ermpiretheatres.com or www, tribule.ca 
for locations and showlimes 


> 


FILM CAPSULES / 28 
DVDETECTIVE / 20 


Dial “B’ for Bullshit 


Four things about films that don’t deserve their reputations 


DIDACTISM 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 


There's no teeth-gritting, guile-gur- 
gling disdain quite like the sort that 
overcomes you when someone who 
shares your politics expresses those 
same politics in a shallow, dunder- 
headed or deeply unpersuasive way. 
It’s one thing to have an idiot speak for 
your ideological opponent, and some- 
thing else altogether to have that idiot 
batting for your team. Especially if that 
idiot gets a lot of attention. 

In the last century, one such idiot, if 
you'll excuse the personification, has 
been the movies. Movies can thrill us, 
stimulate us, challenge us, move us, 
and yes, even teach us something. But 
they do so most compellingly when 
their messages obey the dictates of 
the fundamental goal: to be art, to be 
entertainment, hopefully both. When 
movies decide to focus all their ener- 
gies on giving us a lesson they nearly 
always tumble headlong into the 
arena of bullshit. 

Admittedly, there are degrees to 
which such didacticism can spoil a 
movie. In the case of some Spike Lee 
movies, like Bamboozled, didacticism 
can be framed so audaciously that it 
works in spite of itself. In the case of 
two movies reviewed in this very 
issue, Traitor and The Edge of Heaven, 
the didacticism is annoying, yet the 
damage is somewhat offset by how 
heartfelt certain characterizations 
come across. This goes for dozens of 
message movies, which habitually 
draw in good actors seeking to “give 
something back”: folks like Sidney 
Poitier, Don Chealde, Jimmy Stewart, 
Jodie Foster or Sean Penn—one actor 
who really needs to distinguish 
between a genuinely political movie 
and a movie that’s just about politicos. 
In Crash, a movie referenced in my 
review of The Edge of Heaven, didacti- 
cism is taken to such obnoxious, facile 
heights that it becomes a tidal wave of 
bullshit sweeping everything poten- 
tially appealing away—including per- 
formances by a truckload of fine, no 
doubt well-intentioned actors. A bad 
guy is nice to his incapacitated dad, 
and we're meant to have a revelation 
about the complexity of human nature 
for Christ’s sake. 

But didacticism is hardly confined 
to the likes of Stanley Kramer, Paul 
Haggis or Norman Jewison. The often 
brilliant Michael Haneke's stupidest 
movies, both the original German ver- 
sion and recent English-language 
remake of Funny Games, are as dark 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


ow 
co 


and nihilistic as his best—the differ- 
ence being that, provocative and pep- 
pered with weird, fitfully interesting 
details as they are, they have little to 
ponder other than their titanic moral 
about the supposed death of affect. 

I guess the essential point here is 
that anyone can pick an issue, take a 
(usually safe) stance on it, and throw 
together a story that rams home the 
message, usually condescending to its 
audience along the way. It takes a real 
artist/entertainer to make a movie 
that lets us figure something out on 


our own—which is the only way any- 
one ever really learns anything. 


LARRY KING 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 


Bringing Down the House has a Rotten 
Tomato rating of 34 per cent, but if 
you were perusing Blockbuster’'s 
shelves for the perfect romantic com- 
edy about a sassy black woman and 
an uptight white man, you might 
leave the store with the DVD in tow, 
thinking you've made the best deci- 
sion all weekend. After all, one critic 
paraded confidently on the cover says 
it’s “One of the funniest movies ever.” 
The same critic called Home of the 
Brave (Rotten Tomato: 24 per cent) 
“First-rate” and K-19: The Widowmak- 
er (Rotten Tomato: 60 per cent) “A 
masterpiece.” Who is this movie-lov- 
ing movie-quote whore? He happens 
to be the most recognizable man in 
media, Larry King. 

But Larry King is not a movie critic, 
he's a talk show host—or, at the very 
least, a caricature. His quotes are not 
attributed to any TV program, print or 
radio show, only his name. For all we 
know, his comments could have been 
overheard from a bathroom stall. 

Last year, King was called on his 
promiscuous quoting by EW.com 
when he said about Breach, “There 
isn’t a dull moment,” even though he 
was spotted repeatedly taking cell 
phone calls and exiting the theatre 
during the screening. Although Breach 
was a very well-received movie, for 
King, there obviously were dull 
moments aplenty. 

All critics are guilty of overly gener- 
ous quote-whoring. I once gave 
School for Scoundrels a top rating and 


ALM 


called its maker, “a fantastic character 
writer.” (I still haven't showered 
enough to cleanse myself of that.) But 
at least we can be called on it as crit- 
ics. Larry King is a talk show host 
who once let Jenny McCarthy co-host 
Larry King Live 

So the next time you're looking for 
a take-home movie and you see any 
two quotation marks proceeded by a 
dash and King's name, be weary; it 
probably means that not a single rep- 
utable critic had a positive thing to 
say, so they resorted to unrecorded 
comments by a man in suspenders. 


THE QUEEN 
BRIAN GIBSON / brian@vueweekly.com 


To update the Sex Pistols (with a little 
help from Obama's ex-pastor), God 
Damn The Queen! Let's hope The 
Queen, inexplicably one of the best- 
reviewed films of 2006, will soon be 
forgotten, even though it crowned 
Helen Mirren at the Oscars. 

What was the point of this nicely 
acted piffle? To make us see that Tony 
Blair and Her High and Mighty-ness 
are actually human? But we know 
that—the problem is that the real Blair 
and Queen so rarely act human. 

Suddenly, from a director who's 
made gritty, messy dramas at street 
level (My Beautiful Laundrette),, came 
this disappointingly claustrophobic 
play at sympathy for someone so out 
of touch with her “subjects.” And why 
blow it up for the big screen? Mirren 
was far better as a more complicated, 
compromised boss in both Elizabeth I 
and Prime Suspect: The Final Chapter, 
two TV miniseries that were more 
visually glorious on the box than The 
Queen was in the cineplex. 

And both those shows offered a 
more multi-storied cross-section of 
England than Stephen Frears’ film, 
whose best moments are its footage 
of the public mourning Diana in the 
streets. But that stunning mass reac- 
tion is left as backdrop. Instead the 
film dwells on aloof Elizabeth Il and 
her misreading of that public, her 
Wordsworth-ian encounter with a 
stag on her massive Highlands 
estate, and her oh-so-sad imprison- 
ment by her role. 

But it’s a fate devoid of tragedy— 
she’s been simply, unluckily born into 
her life, but so are we all, for better or 
worse, She's no more alone than mil- 
lions who don't have her millions. 
Where's the arc? The tragic flaw? The 
ebbs and flows to her character? If The 
Queen had found its true ancestral 


home—on PBS’ Masterpiece Theatre— 
she would have been, rightly, seen as a 
middle-of-the-pack chamber drama. 


THE RAZZIES 


JONATHAN BUSCH / jonathan@vueweekly.com 


I'm choosing to cut down the out-of- 
date insensitivity of the Golden Razzie 
awards, most eloquently demonstrated 
by the sweep of statues by I Know Who 
Killed Me, a unique effort by director 
Chris Sivertson and Lindsay Lohan 
made infamous by the unfortunate tim- 
ing of its starlet’s relapse into alco- 
holism. I'm more often one to indulge 
in glitzy train wreck moments of Holly- 
wood’s leading ladies, but such 
occurred in accordance with a rather 
interesting film that daringly suspended 
restrictively normalized notions of 
quality to experiment with genre and 
performance. : 

In the film, Lohan stars as Aubrey, a 
suburban teen survivor of a violent 
kidnapping—or so we are to believe, 
as she actually claims to be Dakota, 
skid row stripper from a completely 
different family than the ones who 
take her home after the incident. / 
Know Who Killed Me borrows ele- 
ments of Brian de Palma’s early pervy 
Hitchcockian work like Sisférs and 
Dressed to Kill, thwarting the narrative 
into often unseen directions that both 
aggravate and entice the viewer. The 
irregularity of Lohan's performance is 
more than a step into self-parody, as 
she allows an awkward script to por- 
tray her as a sensual, dramatic force 
within a film that very much knows it 
is a film. So often, a film must either 
bear the tiring illusion of realism or a 
blatant indie-style reflexivity of 
“breaking the fourth wall” that there is 
no room for forms of creativity that 
inspire curious, inexplicable feelings. 

In that sense, one-joke institutions 
like the Golden Razzies gather togeth- 
er a number of misunderstood works 
to “celebrate” a year of bad cinema. 
This year | Know Who Killed Me won 
eight of the nine awards it was nomi- 
nated for, including “Worst Remake or 
Rip-off,” with the organizers citing 
Hostel, Saw, and The Patty Duke Show 
as its sources, a juvenile cut-down 
less funny than Killed Me’s biggest 
competitor, Norbit. Since then, I've left 
several parties drunk and angry that 
nobody would buy my recommenda- 
tion of | Know Who Killed Me as 
valid—an imaginably similar experi- 
ence to that of abstractly minded crit- 
ics when Mommie Dearest won Worst 
Picture in 1982. ¥ 


 - 
to remind us we're all connected 


a 
 JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 


> t the start of two of its three 
chapters, Fatih Akin's The 
dge of Heaven (Auf der 


anderen Seite) does a couple of very 
curious things, each highly emblematic 
of the movie's underlying spirit. Firstly, 
with, happily, no “spoiler alert” warning 
anywhere in sight, the chapters in 
question are titled so as to unambigu- 
ously announce the climactic death of 
a central character. Secondly, they 
depict the arrival by plane of a coffin 
from another land. In one coffin lies the 
remains of a Turk killed in Germany, in 
the other a German killed in Turkey. As 
the stories of the coffin’s contents are 
revealed, this morbid foreign exchange 
program proves to be riddled with 
potent themes of dislocation and mis- 
understanding, intolerance and inter- 
generational breakdown. 

There is certainly no mistaking the 
ambitions toward profundity and time- 
liness invested here. Neither can one 
say that intense emotions have not 
been shaken to life to make it all hap- 
pen. Yet as I watched The Edge of 
Heaven | could never quite shake off 
the sense that no single pursuit was 


plo) Mei, | 7.19) 8 5 


ge of Heaven tries too hard 


‘being served so arduously as that of 
what is finally kind of a cheap and, 
these days, over-extended device: dra- 
matic irony, that indispensable tool for 
many an ostensibly important, dra- 
maturgically overcooked movie of our 
new century. From Crash to Babel, our 
most literal-minded liberal filmmakers 
have been trying to show us how, in 
the age of globalization, everything is 
connected, and they convey this by, 
well, literally connecting everybody in 
their movies, as though the audience is 
entirely incapable of making such con- 
nections on their own. Akin’s latest 
isn’t quite as overbearing in its 
approach as the above high-profile 
examples, as he endows certain 
scenes with a genuinely affecting level 
of intimacy. But it’s this very intimacy 
that instills our viewing experience 
with that much deeper a sense of 
betrayal once the writer/director’'s 
heavy hand enters the frame. 


IN ONE STRAND of The Edge of Heaven 
we see Ali (Tuncel Kurtiz), a retired 
widower, fall in serious-like with Yeter 
(Nursel K6se), a spunky 40ish prosti- 
tute. Both are Turks living in Germany, 


ie 


OPENS FAI, AUG 29 


THE EDGE OF HEAVEN 
WRITTEN AND OVRECTED BY FATIMA 
STARRING BAK DAVRAK, MURGULESICAY, 
PATRYCA ZIDLKOWSKA, HANNA SCHYGULLA 
kok 


FOREIGN 


their common national heritage filling 
in a few of the gaps in their very differ- 
ent backgrounds and sensibilities. Ali 
convinces Yeter to quit the racket and 
come live with him as a kept woman 
he can screw whenever the wind’s in 
his sails. She's got a daughter back 
home to support. She surely doesn't get 
off on hooking and probably wouldn't 
mind escaping the muttered threats of 
the neighbourhood fundamentalist 
Muslims who broodingly disapprove of 
the work. So she agrees. But things, as 
they will, get more complicated 

In another strand Yeter’s daughter 
Ayten (Nurgul Yesilcay), a young, 
aggressive political activist, flees 


GUY PEARCE 


TRAITOR 


THE ONLY PERSON HE CAN TRUST IS HIMSELF. 


traitor-themovie.com 


NORTH EDMONTON TON a | GIVCEMIRE Ss MIRE 9 * | SAREVIEW 10s | mW 10% 


Felli Fol alet-)illeut-teielau) 


Turkey, hoping to find her mom in 
Germany. She finds instead Lotte 
(Patrycia Ziolkowska), a student who 
becomes smitten by this rough-edged 
foundling and takes her in—even if 
Lotte’s mom Susanne (Fassbinder vet 
eran Hanna Schygulla) isn’t all that 
cool with the interracial panty party 
going on under her roof. Yet 
Susanne’s wishes for Ayten’s expul- 
sion come alarmingly true once 
Ayten’s sent back to Turkey and 
imprisoned, followed by lovestruck 
and hell-bent-on-justice Lotte 

The third chapter wrangles both 
threads together, thanks in part to the 
very handy link of Nejat (Baki Davrat), 
Ali’s son, who over the course of the 
film gives up his academic career in 
Germany to rediscover his ethnic 
roots, taking over a German book- 
store in Istanbul. The Edge of Heaven 
slips in these shots here and there to 
provide a few big a-ha! moments of 
missed opportunity, before finally 


nsgate.« 


nV disastermovie %, ry IROSY 


building up to the climax, where sol-, 
ace is to be found in the knowledge 
that, in the end, tragedies at least 
have some meaning once their trajec- 
tories are unearthed 

But in the search for solace, here 
too, Akin, for taste at least, tri 
little too hard th S 
to generate catharsis 
prolonged, agonized weeping 


might characterize as the pornograp 
of the middlebrow moviegoer. Ther 
a point where emoting tra 
empathy and becomes simply 
ing, and sitands 
know of course that some Pee le 


AKIN cros 


We iy to expla the film's a ee 
awards. But such accolades may 
partly result from a co e des 
see a dream come to one where 
even the most opr tional hostile 
forces might unite into a patchwork 
brotherhood, a united Europe founded 
as is often the case, in bloodshed. v 


NOR PARK Wace 


CINEPLEX ENTESTAINMENT 


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Aug 28-S 3,208 wwEweexmy 27 


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THE EDGE OF HEAV 


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VISIT US ON LINE @ MAGICLANTERNTHEATRES.CA 


15PM NIGHTLY @ 6:50 & 9:10PM 
@ 2:00 PM SAT, SUN. & MON MATINEES @ 2:30 PM 


VISIT US ON LINE @ MAGICLANTERNTHEATRES.CA 


PRESENTS: 


BEAUTIFUL LOSERS 
SCREENING OCTOBER 11-1 


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For more information, call 42! 


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12. or log on to www.metrocinema.org 


Conseil: des Arts 


Canada Council 
* du Canada Ow Arts 


for the Arts 


FILM 


CAPSULES 


OPENING THIS WEEK 


OIL ON WATER 

OIRECTED BY PETER MATTHEWS 

WITTEN BY ELLE MATTHEWS 

STARRING BIANCA LISHANSKY, ST JOHN ALEXANDER 
SAT, AUG 30- SUN, AUG 31 (7 PM) 

STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY 

* 


JONATHAN BUSCH / jonathan@vueweekly.com 
We're all sensitive to other people's seri- 
ous medical issues when we see them on 
screen, as is evident by the episode of 
Degrassi Junior High when Caitlin has an 
epileptic seizure at a slumber party. But a 
film's navel-gazing:can really run itself 
into the ground, and Oi! on Water, the 
story of a young female writer caught in a 
relationship with a paranoid schizo- 
phrenie artist, does more than smiling at 
its own belly button—it faces its reflec- 
tion in the bathroom mirror and french- 
kisses it. What starts as a modest love 
story about art and mental illness turns 
into a dreadful fantasy wank about what 
it might be like to paint naked women in 
a seaside home and hear voices in one’s 
head, a weaker choice of cinema the con- 
temporary viewer might find to inform 
themselves of schizophrenia 


GARNEAU 


Nicky C ristina Barcelona 


VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA 


NIGHTLY @ 7:00 & 9:00 PM 
SAT, SUN & MON MA MATINEES @ 2:00PM 


VISIT US ON LINE @ MAGICLAMTERNTHEATRES: cA 


ANNUAL CLASSES STARTING IN SEPTEMBER CALL 780-429-1671 :: :: 


basics of 


16mm 


pbb baabasted atates 


we 


After a quiet afternoon posing nude, 
Anna (Bianca Lishansky) reflects on how 
she met the man of her dreams Max (St 
John Alexander), a thoughtful, brooding 
painter who, after meeting Anna at a 
group drawing session, asks her to 
become his muse. Soon enough, they're 
sharing their creative hopes and dreams 
with each other, herself being a confused 
journalist and him being withdrawn and 
misunderstood by friends and family. But 
in their creative woes, they find a com- 
mon ground and move in together, despite 
Anna's consistent worries that it might 
not work out. More and more, Max starts 
to appear tormented by something out- 
side of Anna’s control, something which 
his brothers and temptress neighbor 
Natalie (Nadia Geyser) raise their eye- 
brows at. But Anna tells them that Max is 
merely stressed and working too hard, 
though she suspects if she does not inter- 
vene soon, there may be consequences. 

Oil on Water visually shares both the 
symptoms of Max's schizophrenia and its 
emotional impact on Anna through a vari- 
ety of illustrious settings: while she pon- 
ders the errors of her ways on a sunset-lit 
balcony, he tries to block haunting whis- 
pers and grotesque hallucinations in his 
studio or at the floor of their swimming 
pool. Anna's narration guides most of the 
film, endlessly sharing earnest yet insipid 
observations on love and death, all the 
while backgrounded by a series of cheap 
sounding pop vocals. The film is so 
obsessed with providing the most majes- 
tic and luxurious scenery that it feels like 
an advertisement for tampons or anti- 
depressants more than a compassionate 
dramatization of its apparent in-depth 
research of the condition. It’s not a far cry 
to report that some viewers might find 
Oil on Water a frustrating and offensive 
soap opera, and would rather find a less 
patronizing documentary on the subject. 


TRAITOR 

DIRECTED BY JEFFREY NACHMANOFF 

WRITTEN BY NACHMANOFF STEVE MARTIN 

STARRING DOW CHEADLE, GUY PEARCE, SAID TAGHMAGUI 
Sete 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 

The brief prelude is set in Sudan, 1978, 
and conveys an essential bit of exposi- 
tion: a child witnesses his father get 
blown to bits in a car bombing. As the 
camera holds on the child's shocked face 
we transit to present-day Yemen, where 


introduction to 


Starts Sept 8th 


THE UNKOWN WOMAN 


SCREEWRITING 


the story proper begins and that child is 
now a man named Samir Horn (co-pro- 
ducer Don Cheadle) who, in a bold bit of 
dramatic irony, is now selling explosives 
to Islamic terrorists. What's interesting in 
this is that Samir’s childhood trauma is 
actually mentioned in later scenes, which 
calls into question whether or not we 
needed to actually see the event, 
arguably one more spectacular and emo- 
tionally fraught moment in a movie 
stuffed with them. But like a lot of 
thrillers, Traitor is very much about 
seeming, the sort of film in which what 
we see and what we're told demand to 
be distinguished, both for the sake of 
tension and to deepen our understanding 
of it's message, because, make no mis- 
take, Traitor is also very much a mes- 
sage-laden film. 

The term “didactic” is almost always 
used as a pejorative, and needn't always 
be the case. Like Hote! Rwanda, another 
film that found Cheadle portraying an 
African-born protagonist in a desperate, 
topical situation, Traitor, helmed by Jef- 
frey Nachmanoff, is decidedly main- 
stream, its approach to storytelling and 
directorial style being well-crafted boiler- 
plate. But it’s also the sort of film, like 
Hotel Rwanda, that wouldn't mean much 
if it didn't have the capacity to reach the 
largest possible audience. Based on a 
story by Steve Martin—yep, that Steve 
Martin—it’s told largely from the per- 
spective of Samir, a devout Muslim with 
extensive military experience and expert- 
ise in explosives, who gradually joins up 
with Islamic terrorists. He's not the first 
terrorist to be ostensibly empathized in 
movies, but he is the most identifiable, 
embodied in a beloved, charismatic Holly- 
wood actor. 

Samir has a parallel character in G-man 
Roy Clayton (Guy Pearce), a noble South- 
erner whose daddy was a minister, who 
majored in Islamic studies and who can 
quote the Koran at the drop of a hat. More 
capable than his fellow feds because of 
his understanding of the enemy, he’s at 
once Samir's nemesis and ally. He's also 
crucial to ramming home Traitors appeals 
for greater tolerance in times of crisis, 
with dialogue about how ineffective racial 
profiling is or overwrought lines like 
“Seems every religion has more than one 
face.” Clayton's role as explicator for fun- 
damentalist Islam's seeming psy- 
chopathology is compromised by the fact 
that Samir; through no fault of the superb 


FAVA’ 


PILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY: ALBERTA 


REGISTER TODAY! 


CO dmonton 


ay to advance the cause of 
But Traitor, as sly in certain 
{ 4s it is unsubtle, finds its ways of 

g with this problem, and by the time 
b distracted by such contradic- 
manoff is shifting into high- 
fe dynamics, stacking up 
and building suspense suffi- 
) keep us engaged. In any case it 
interest long enough for me to 


WOMAN 
ECTEO BY GUISEPPE TORNATORE 
NIA RAPPAPORT, MICHELE PLACIDO 


BUSCH / jonathan@vueweakly.com 
t film since 2000's Malena, 
-winning director Guiseppe Torna- 
‘Cinema Paradiso) pulls a much dark- 
er stunt in his exploration of the psyche 
of a harshly wronged Ukrainian woman 
hiding out as a housekeeper for a 
respected Italian jeweler family. The 
influence of recent French thrillers is 
apparent in Tornatore’s film, which is 
_ unsettling but equally compassionate in 
the literal formation of an identity for its 
title character through the noirish pro- 
_ gression of its story. 
The Unknown Woman opens ina 
scene that American audiences might 
very well liken to the risqué orgy 
sequence in Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide 
Shut—a row of women in masks and 
skimpy lingerie stand before the viewer, 
as a voice commands each of them away 
except for one, whom is then forced to 
undress, pardon the mask. It initially 
abstracts, yet appropriately introduces 
the character of Irena (Ksenia Rappaport), 
whom shortly into the film is revealed as 
a woman with a troubled and complicat- 
ed past, obscured in the film by a time- 
shattered method of storytelling. Upon 
her present-tense arrival in a provincial 
northern Italian city, this said past is 
revealed piece by piece through memo- 
ries triggered by varied fleeting sensa- 
tions that Irina encounters in her 
mysterious pursuit of employment by a 
particular family. 
But each answer regarding Irena’s 
motivations provide other shadows to 
be cast over what we thought we 
understood—part of the intensity of 
The Unknown Woman is the constant 
jerking in different emotional direc- 
tions. Irena meets Thea (Clara Dossena, 
‘quite the trooper), the young gir! she is 
hired to care for, and with whom she 
soon earns a bond kept quiet from her 
parents. But after Thea gets abused by 
choolmates, Irena quickly attempts 
nd herself through 
methods Scarlett 


FILM WEEKLY 


Ri, AUGUST 29-THU, SEPT R 


7, i 
BSeSSSSRBSSSSRSSESRBSERBERBSSS 


All showtimes are subject to at 
any tino: Pease cota eat Co 


__CHABA THEATRE-JASPER 


TRUOPIC THUNDER(1 4A, coarse lan- 
). Crude Content) Fri-Sun 1:30; 
7:00, 9.05 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE 
DRAGON EMPEROR (PG, frightening 
scenes, violence) Fri-Sun 1:30; 

7:00, 9:05 


CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 


BRIDESHEAD REVISITED (PG, sexu- 
al content, mature themes) Fri-Sat 9:20 
12:05; Sun-Thu 9:20 


SPACE CHIMPS (G) Fri-Thu 1:05 3: 
ecm (G) u 1:05 3:05 


HELLBOY Il: THE GOLDEN ARMY 
(14A) Fri-Sat 1:40 4:25 7:20 9:55 
12:20; Sun-Thu 1:40 4:25 7:20 9:55 
WANTED (184A, gory scenes, brutal 
violence) Fri-Sat 1:35 4:10 7.05 9:45 
12:10; Thu 1:35 4:10 7:05 9:45 


THE LOVE GURU (14A, crude con- 
tent) Fri-Thu 1:65 7:25 


THE HAPPENING (144, gory scenes) 
Fri-Thu 4:45 9:30 


THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG, vio- 
lence, pantenlg scenes) Fri-Sat 1:45 
4:35 7:15 10:05 12:20; Sun-Thu 1:45 
4:35 7:15 10:05 


YOU DON'T MESS WITH THE 
ZOHAN (14A, sexual content) Fri-Sat 
4:40 10;00 12:15; Sun-Thu 4:40 10:00 


KUNG FU PANDA (PG) Fri-Sat 1:20 
2:00 4:00 4:30 7:00 9:10 11:25; Sun- 
Thu 1:20 2:00 4:00 4:30 7:00 9:10 


SEX AND THE CITY (184) Fri-Thu 
3:50 6:50 9:40 


INDIANA JONES AND THE KING- 
DOM OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) Fri-Sat 
1:30 4:20 6:30 7:10 9:15 9:50 12:00; 
See! 1:30 4:20 6:30 7:10 9:15 


THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: 
PRINCE CASPIAN (PG, violence) Fri- 
Sat 1:15 4:40 7:35 10:45; Sun-Thu 
1:15 4:40 7:35 


WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS (PG, not 
rec, for children, coarse language) Fri- 
a 250 6:55 11:35; Sun-Thu'1:50 


IRON MAN (PG, not rec. for young 
children, Violence) Fri-Sat 1:25 4:15 
7:00 9:50 12:15; Sun-Thu 1:25 4:15 
7:00 9:50° 


DR. SEUSS' HORTON HEARS A 
WHO! (G) Fri-Thu 1:35 


CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


14231_137th Avenue, 780-732-2238 


BABYLON A.D. (144, violence) no 
passes Fri-Thu 1:45 4:40 7:20 10:00 


COLLEGE (18A. cruda content, 
coarse ) Fri-Thu 1:50 5:20 
7:45 10:35 


TRAITOR (14A, violence) Fri-Thu 1:00 
4:00 6:40 9:10 


DEATH RAGE (144A, gory scenes, 
coarse langue, brutal violence) no 
Fd 2:00 5:15 8:00 10:40; Sat- 
u 2:00 §:15 8:00 10:40 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 
ng children, coarse language) Fri- 
1:10 4:10 650 9:20 


HAMLET 2 (14A, coarse a) Fri- 
Mon,Wed-Thu 1:30 4:30 7:10 9:30; 
Tue 4:30 7:10 9:30 : 
HAMLET 2 (14A, coarse tah 
Star and Strollers screening Tue 13 
“THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
| FrieThu 12:30 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Fri-Thu 12:20 2:40 5:00 7:30 


‘MIRRORS: soenes) Fri-Thu 
Bo (18A, gory 


| TROPIC THUNDER (144. coarse lan- 
10:30 


Fri-Thu 1:20 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE 
DRAGON EMPEROR (PG, frightening 
Scenes, violence) Fri-Thu 7:05 9:50 


STEP BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 
|, not rec. for children, crude con- 
tent) Fri-Thu 2:50 5:10 7:35 10:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
Scenes,not rec. for young children, vio- 
lence) Fri-Thu 1210 3:30 7:00 10:15 


MAMMA MIA! Fri-Thu 12:50 3: 
6:30 9:00 (PG) iu 12:50 3:40 


JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH (PG, not rec. for 
children) Fri-Thu 1:40 4:15 Tae gab 


WALL-E (G) Fri-Thu 12:00 


CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violence) no 
.passes Fri-Thu 12:50 3:40 6:40 9:20 


COLLEGE (184A, crude content, 
coarse language) Fri-Thu 2:10 4:50 
7:45 10:15 


TRAITOR (14A, violence) Fri-Thu 2:00 
4:40 7:40 10:30 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, crude con- 
tent) Fri-Thu 1:00 4:20 7:20 9:50 


MAMMA MIA! SING-A-LONG (No 
Bating) Fri-Mon,Wed-Thu 1:10 4:10 
7:15 9:40; Tue 4:10 7:15 9:40 


MAMMA MIAI SING-A-LONG (No 
Rating) Star and Strollers screening 
Tue 1:00 


DEATH RACE (14A, gory 
scenes,coarse Pelt vio- 
ence) no Tl 1:15 3:45 6:45 
9:15; Sat-Thu 1:15 3:50 6:45 9:15 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 
young children,coarse language) Fri- 
Thu 1:50 4:15 7:30 9:50 


THE LONGSHOTS (PG) Fri-Thu 12:20 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
Fri-Thu 4:40 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Fri-Thu 1:45 4:30 7:10 9:30 


MIRRORS (18A, gory scenes) Fri-Thu 
7:30 10:20 


TROPIC THUNDER (144A, coarse lan- 
guage,crude content) Fri-Thu 1:20 
4:00 7:00 9:45 


THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAV- 
ELING PANTS 2 (PG) Fri-Thu 3:10 
6:40 9:15 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, sub- 
alates abuse) Fri-Thu 12:30 3:00 6:30 
10 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE 
DRAGON EMPEROR (PG, frightening 
scenes, violence) Fri-Thu 12:45 3:20 
6:20 9:00 


STEP BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, not rec. for children, crude con- 
tent) Fi-Thu 12:40 3:15 7:30 10:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
scenes, not rec. for young children, 
violence) Fri-Thu 12:15 3:30 6:50 
10:00 

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH (PG, not rec. for young 
children) REALD Fri-Thu 1:30 3:45 
7:10 9:30 


WALL-E (G) Fri-Thu 1:40 


CINEPLEX WEST MALL 8 


8882-170 St, 780-444-1829 
LAKH PARDESI! HOIYEY Mtoe as 


W/E.S.T, , coarse 2, Vio- 
lence) ares aro Bd0: at-Mon 
1:40 6:30 9:20 


SPACE CHIMPS (G) Fri 4:30 6:40; 
Sat-Mon 1:10 E20 6:40; Tue-Thu 6:40 


THE LOVE GURU (144, crude con- 
tent) Fri 4:25 7:00 9:45; Sat-Mon 1:35 
4:25 7:00 9:45; Tue-Thy 7:00 9:45 


0- 
lence, fri scenes) Fri 4:20 6:45 
9:10; oon B26 4:20 6:45 9:10; 
Tue-Thu 6:45 9:1 


SEX AND THE CITY (184) Fri-Thu 
9:00 


JONES AND THE KING- 
IMO OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL (PG, 


violence, frightening scenes) Fri 4:10 
6:50 9:40; Mon 1:30 4:10 6:50 
9:40; Tue-Thu 6:50 9:40 


THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: 
PRINCE CASPIAN (PG, violence) 
Fri,Tue-Thu 6:20 9:15; Sat-Mon 2:00, 
6:20 9:15 


IRON MAN (PG, not rec. for yor 
children, violance) Fri 4:40 7:20 9:50; 
Sat-Mon 1:45 4:40 7:20 9:50; Tue-Thu 
7:20 9:50 


CITY CENTRE 9 
10200-1002 Ave, 780-421-7020 
COLLEGE (184, crude content, 


coarse language) Fri-Thu 12:50 3:50 
7:10 9:40 


BABYLON A.D. (144, violence) Fri- 
Thu 12:15 3:35 6:40 9:00 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, sub- 
oe abuse) Fri-Thu 1:00 4:10 6:50 


TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) Fri-Thu 12:30 
3:40 7:15 9:50 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 


ing childran, coarse language) Fri- 
Thu 12:40 4:00 7:20 9:25 “2 


HAMLET 2 (144A, coarse language) Fri- 
Thu 1:10 4:15 7:30 9:45 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
Fri-Thu 12:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 
fightening scenes, nol rec. for young 
children) Fri-Thu 3:00 6:30 9:30 


TRAITOR (144A, violence) Fri-Thu 
42:00 2:20 4:40 7:25 9:55 


DEATH RACE (14A, gory scenes, 
coarss language, brutal violence) Fri- 
Thu 12:20 3:10 7:00 9:20 


CLAREVIEW 10 
4211-129 Ave, 780-472-7800 
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 


mentee scenes, not rec. for young 
children) Fri-Thu 4:30 8:00 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (18A, sub- 
stance abuse) Fri-Mon 1:00 7:05 9:35; 
Tue-Thu 7:05 9:35 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
juage, crude content) Fri-Mon 1:10 
et 6:45 9:20; Tue-Thu 3:50 6:45 
32 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Fri-Mon 12:50 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
Fri-Thu 4:15, 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 
young children, coarse language) Fri- 
Mon 1:20 4:20 6:40 9:00; Tue-Thu 
4:20 6:40 9:00 


DEATH RACE (144A, gory scenes, 
coarse language, brutal violence) Fri- 
Mon 1:40 4:10 7:20 9:45; Tue-Thu 
4:10 7:20 9:45 


HAMLET 2 (144, coarse language) Fri- 
Mon 2:10 4:45 7:30 9:55; Tue-Thu 
4:45 7:30 9:55 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violence) Fri- 
Mon 1:50 4:50 7.10 9:30; Tue-Thu 
4:50 7:10 9:30 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude con- 
tent) DIGITAL PRESENTATION Fri-Mon 
2:00 4:25 7:25 9:40; Tue-Thu 4:25 
7:25 9:40 


COLLEGE (184, crude content,coarse 
language) Fri-Mon 1:25 4;40 7:00 
9:80: Te-Thu 4:40 7:00 9:50 


TRAITOR (144, violence) Fri-Mon 1:30 
4:00 6:50 9:10; Tue-Thu 4:00 6:50 
9:10 


GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 


BABYLON A.D. (14, violence) no 
Fri-Mon 12:10 2:30 4:40 7:30 
10:00; Tue-Thu 7:30 10:00 


COLLEGE fen ce ae a on 
coarse language) Fri-Mon 1:20 4: 
7:00 10:20; Toe-Thu 7:00 10:20 
DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude con- 
tent) Fri-Mon 12:20 2:40 4:50 7:40 
10:30; Tue-Thu 7:40 10:30 
DEATH RACE GAA. gon oon a 
Fri 1:30 4:30 7:20 10:10; Sat- 
Mon 1:30 4:30 7:20 10:10; Tue-Thu 
7:20 10:10 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 


young children,coares language) Fri- 
im 1:00 4:15 7:10 9:50; Tue-Thu 
7:10 9:50 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Fri-Mon 4:00 7:05 9:30; Tue-Thu 
7:05 9:30 


TROPIC THUNDER (144A, coarse lan- 
guage,crude content) Fri-Mon 1:10 
4:10 7:15 9:45; Tue-Thu 7:15 9:45 


THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAV- 
ELING PANTS 2 (PG) Fri-Mon 12:40 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, sub- 
stance abuse) Fri-Thu 9:40 


STEP BROTHERS (144, coarse lan- 
guage, not rec. for children, crude con- 
es Fri-Mon-12:50 3:45 6:45; Tue-Thu 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
scenes, not rec. for young children, 
violence) Fri-Mon 12:00 3;30 6:50 
10:10; Tue-Thu 6:50 10:10 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Fri-Mon 12:30 
3:50 6:40 9:20; Tue-Thu 6:40 9:20 


5712-109 St. 760-433-0728 
VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA (144) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00; Sat-Mon 2:00 
GRANDIN THEATRE 
iM Awe, St. 
Albert, 780-456-9822 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
uage, crude content) Dally 1:10, 3:15, 
235, 7:35, 9:35 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (158A, sub- 
Stance abuse) Daily 5:20, 9:30 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Daily 1:05, 3:20, 
7:25 

DISASTER MOVIE (1 4A. crude con: 
tent) Daily 1:15, 3:10, 5:00, 7:00, 8:55 


HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not rec. for 
young children, coarse language) Daily 
12:40, 2:25, 4:10, 6:00, 7:50, 9:40 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Daily 1:00, 3:00, 6:45 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Daily 4:50, 8:45 


DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 


980148 Ave. Camrone, 780-605-2144 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, coarse lan- 
guage, not recommended for young 
children) Daily 7:20, 9:15; Sat, Sun, 
Tue, Thu 2:20 


TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
age, crude content) Daily 7:10, 
$50: Sat, Sun, Tue, Thu 2:10 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, sub- 
stance abuse) Fri-Thu 9:05 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
ia bely 7:00; Sat, Sun, Tue, Thu 
2 


| LEDUCCINEMAS 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, coarse lan- 

1, not recommended for young 
Children) Fri-Mon, 1210, 3:25; Daily 7:00, 
9:30 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, crude content) 
FrisMon 1:05, 3:25; Dally 7:05, 9:25 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content} Daily 7:10, 9:35 


COLLEGE (18A, coarss language, 
crude content) Fri-Mon 12:55, 3:20; Dally 
6:55, 9:20 


WALL-E (G) Fri-Mon 1:00, 3:30 


PARKLAND CINEMA 7 
190 Century Crossing. Soruce Grove, 780- 


972-2332, Serving Snruce Grove, Stony 
Plains Parkland County 


AD (144, violence) Daily 
7:00, 9:15; Sat-Tue 1:05, 3:10 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude con- 
tent) Daily 6:50, 9:00; Sat-Tue 1:15, 3:30 


STAR WARS THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Sat-Tue 1:10, 3:20 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG. coarse lan 

8, not recommended for young 
Sadren) Dally 6:55, 9:05; Sat-Tue 12:59, 
$05 


STEP BROTHERS (144, coarse Isn- 
, crude content, not recommend- 
Soitor chikdren) Dally &:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence 
frightening scenes, not recommended 
for young children) Daily 8:00 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Daity 6:45; Sat-Tus 
1,00, 3:15 


MOVIES FOR MOMMIES MAMMA 
MIA (PG) Tue Sept 2 1:00 


DEATH RACE (144, brutal violence, 
coarse language, gory scenes) Daily 
7:05, 9:20; Sat-Tue 12:45, 3:25 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 
Daily 7:10, 9:25; Sat-Tue 12:50, 3:00 


10937-62 Ave. 780-433-0728 
EDGE OF HEAVEN (14A) Daily 6:45, 
9:15; Sat-Mon 2:00 


THE UNKNOWN WOMAN (184, sexual 
Violence) Daily 6:50, 9:10; Sat-Mon 2:30. 


SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM 


WEM, 8882-170 St, 780-444-2400 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violen 
passes Fri-Thu 1:20 4:15 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A. crud 
tent) Fri-Tue, Thu 12:10 2:30 5 
10:10; Wed 5:00 7:50 10:10 


DISASTER MOVIE (14: 
tent) Star and Strollers 
1:00 


rude con- 
reening Wed 


DEATH RACE (144A, gory scenes, 
coarse language, brutal violence) no 
passes Fri 1:30 4:40 7:40 10:25; Sat- 
Thu 1:30 4:40 7:40 10:25 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG 
young children, coarse lai 
Thu 1:40 4:50 7:20 10:00 


it rec. for 
ge) Fri- 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) | 
Fri-Thu 12:30 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Fri-Wed 12:20 4:10 6:30 9:10; 
Thu 12:20 4:10 9:10 


TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
quage, crude content) Fri-Thu 1:00 
4:00 7:15 9:50 


THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAV- 
ELING PANTS 2 (PG) Fri-Thu 3:50 
7:10 9:40 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (18A. sub- 
stance abuse) Fri-Thu 12:50 4:20 7:30 
10:20 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE —> 
DRAGON EMPEROR (PG, frightening 
scenes, violence) Fri-Thu 2:00 4:25 
6:50 9:20 


STEP BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 
guage,nat rec. for children, crude con- 
tent) Fri-Tue, Thu 1:50 4:45 7:55 10:30: 
Wed 1:50 4:10 10:30 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
scenes,not rec. for young children, vio- 
lance) Fri-Thu 1:10 4:30 8:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT: THE IMAX 
EXPERIENCE (PG, nol rec. for young 
children, violence, frightening scenes) 
Fri-Thu 12:00 3:30 7:00 10:15 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Fri-Thu 12:40 3:40 
6:40 9:30 


| __ WESTMOUNT CENTRE 


111 Ave, Groat Bd. 750-455-8726 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violence) Fri- 
Mon 1:15 3:30 7:10 9:30; Tue-Thu + 
7:10 9:30 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Fri-Mon 12:45 
8:10 6:40 9:00; Tue-Thu 6:40 9:00 


DISASTER MOVIE (144. crude con- 
tent) Fri-Mon 1:30 3:40 7:00 9:10; Tue- 
Thu 7:00 9:10 


TROPIC THUNDER (148, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) Fri-Mon 4:00 
3:20 6:50 9:20; Tue-Thu 6:50 9:20 


[WETASKIWIN CINEMAS | 


TBQS52-3922 
THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, coarse an- 


, Not recommended for young 
Shidren) Fii-Mon 1:10, 3:35; Daily 7:09, 
9: 

DISASTER MOVIE (14. crude content} 
Fri-Mon 1:05, 3:25; Daily 7:05, 9-25 


TROPIC THUNDER (144. coarse lan 
guage, crude content) Deiy 7:10, 9:35 
COLLEGE (184, coarse language. 
crude een Fri-Mon 42:55, 3:20: Daily 
6:55, 9:20 


WALL-E (G) Fri-Mon 1:00, 3:30 


FILM CAPSULES 


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 


ping is Irena’s internal struggle amidst the 
chaos, witnessed as much through the 
storytelling as it is through Rappoport's 
subtle yet raw performance. Both realms 
of action and hidden character engage 
the viewer until both come full circle in 
the film's warm though open-ended con- 
clusion. 


NOW PLAYING 


DEATH RACE 

WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY PAUL WS ANDERSON 

STARRING JASON STATHAM, JOAN ALLEN, TYRESE GIBSON 
kik 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 
Marrying together the United States’ 
recessive economy and corporate 
takeovers with our unashamed love affair 
with reality TV, NASCAR and borderline 
attempted murder (aka, Ultimate Fight- 
ing), Death Race is the equivalent of 
great sex with a prostitute: it's nothing to 
be proud of, but it sure is fun. 

A remake produced by corn-ball king 
Roger Corman of a 1975 Roger Corman 
production, Death Race 2000, the film 
modernizes the franchise by playing on 
gadem politics in a very egregious, con- 
spiratorial fashion. Imagine that at the 


Behind 


| DVDETECTIVE 
S| JOSEF BRAUN & BRIAN GIBSON 

Li. | dvietective@vueweekly.com 

. 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef{@vueweekly.com 
There's this moment in Turn the River 
(2007) where this guy who sells phony 
passports waits for a client in a pool hall, 
one of these gloomily slick looking joints 
where the proprietor actually brushes the 
tables, where everyone seems to be on 
the make, and amateurs don't feel too 
welcome. Passport guy's been waiting for 
a while, killing time shooting stick on his 
own, and once his client finally arrives he 
can't keep himself from venting his sheer 
“annoyance at the game, its tedium and 
unforgiving geometries. His client, a pool 
shark, someone so attuned to the game 
she actually sleeps on a pool table, tells 
him the reason he doesn't like pool is 
simple: he sucks. 

This moment struck me because, well, | 
@uck. Okay, | can probably beat my grand- 


DEATH RACE 


end of Obama's or McCain's first term (or 
McCain's replacement after his 2010 
heart attack), the economy in America is 
so depressed and unemployment so ram- 
pant that the prisons overflow with des- 
perate criminals (you don’t have to 
imagine very hard). In order to support 
the prison systems, the US government 
sells them to private companies, namely 
businesses entrepreneur turned warden 
Hennessey (Joan Allen). That sassy, suit- 
ed super-bitch turns the state pen into a 
race track where prisoners and their pit 
crews fight to the death with missile- 
armed vehicles. 

Jensen Ames (Jason Statham) is the 
latest sucker to fall into the death race 
trap. A former race car driver fired from 
his factory job, he’s framed for the mur- 
der of his wife by a masked ninja. Upon 
entering Terminal Island prison, he’s 
served an ultimatum by Hennessey: 
wear the mask of a now-dead champion 
racer (named Frankenstein) and continue 
his legacy for one final match, which, if 
he wins it, will pardon him, or stay 
locked up for life. Jensen need only be 
reminded of his baby to accept. So he 
hops in the drivers seat with his sexy 
assistant—the future of WWE wrestling 
divas—Chase (Natalie Martinez), and 
competes in a three-day race against 
such Death Race superstars as Machine 
Gun Joe (Tyrese Gibson). 

Stupid, chauvinistic and preposterous, 


Death Race is a soul-sucking thrill ride. 
Paul WS Anderson, director of video 
game adaptations Mortal Kombat and 
Resident Evil does what he was built to 
do: he titillates with sex and violence, 
and regresses the audience to barbarians. 
In fact, at the showing | attended, there 
was actually a row of cheering movie- 
goers, championing our hero every time 
he sent limbs flying. It's just that exciting. 
It turns a 21st century Cinemaplex into an 
ancient Roman coliseum. 


THE HOUSE BUNNY 

DIRECTED BY FRED WOLF 

WRITTEN BY KAREN MCCULLAH-LUTZ, KIRSTEN SMITH 
STARRING ANNA FARRIS, COLIN HANKS, EMMA STONE 
wk 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 

Most of the criticism of The House 
Bunny has focused on the fact that Anna 
Farris is a gifted comic actress who has 
been stuck in some bad films (some real- 
ly, really bad films, like the Scary Movie 
franchise and Wa/ting ... /; if only she 
could find someone able to use her tal- 
ents she'd get more recognition. 

These critics are half-right. Farris cer- 
tainly is a gifted comedienne, albeit one 
born about 20 years too late. Her greatest 
strengths, slapstick pratfalls and a full 
commitment to vacant-eyed dimwitte 
take someone with deft timing and an 
assured comedic intelligence, but comedy 
has, for the most part, left that kind of 
clowning behind—which would explain 
why so many of these movies, which | 
would argue do play to those strengths 
(it’s no accident that the sorority Farris’ 
character takes over in Bunny is chris- 
tened ZAZ), feel tired and hacky. She's 
probably this generation's Leslie Nielsen, 
but his movies aren't exactly setting new 
standards for comedy these days either. 

Unfortunately, “tired”—or perhaps 
“hacky"—Is a pretty good description of 
the film itself. In a premise that might be 
offensive if it weren't so over-used, cen- 


the 8-ball 


ma, but basically | stink. Yet | love pool. 
Which means that | steer clear of halls like 
the one in Turn the River, sticking to musty 
dives where the sticks are warped and the 
tables shabby, booze-stained and uneven, 
where the jukebox is always in the way 
when you need to make that decisive shot 
and everyone's too drunk to bother noticing 
how we bend all the rules just to stretch 
our buck as long as possible—that much 
more time to sip beer and listen to the 
happy snap-drawl of those chalk-smeared 
spheres rolling along the spot-lit green 
expanse. How, you might ask, can | enjoy 
something so much when I'm so bad at it? | 
don’t know, blame it on the movies maybe. 

| probably saw The Color of Money 
(1986) on pay-TV a dozen times as a kid. | 
remember my astonishment, even then, 
at how much | actually kinda loved Tom 
Cruise, how perfect he seemed as the 
young hot shot, how elegant and infinite- 
ly more alluring Paul Newman's Fast 
Eddie Felson was, the aging version of 
some other young hot shot from some old 
movie I'd never seen, and how Mary Eliz- 


30 WSWEEKLY AUG 28 SEP 3, 2008 


abeth Mastrantonio, the woman with ten- 
uous allegiances to both men, was the 
most intriguing of the three. But mostly | 
loved the atmosphere of the game as it 
played cinematically. And it’s a good thing 
| dug The Color of Money as much as | did 
back then, since the field of pool movies 
would prove either barren or badly tilled 
in the subsequent 20 years. 


[KNEW ZILCH about Tum the River, but it 
had Rip Torn, a friendly quote from critic 
David Edelstein on the case and a rather 
fetching cover image of Famke Janssen 
confidently handling a cue stick. It's the 
writing/directing debut of Chris Eigerman, 
a seasoned actor, which perhaps explains 
why he wanted to make what is essential- 
ly a character study in the New Hollywood 
vein, a movie about a loner who lives out 
of a truck, apparently owns maybe two 
outfits, has what we call “a past,” and 
does one thing really well: beat the pants 
off of cocky pricks, taking them for all 
they've got in merciless rounds of one 
pocket. Every character study is of course 


terfold-hopeful Shelley (Farris) gets 
kicked out of the Playboy Mansion by a 
scheming fellow playmate, and ends up 
at the most loseriest sorority on campus. 
Naturally, she turns them from nerdy 
social outcasts to social butterfly babes, 
all thanks to a few makeovers and some 
block-rockin’ parties. 

House Bunny tries to save itself from 
the obvious charges of sexism with a sub- 
plot about a smart, sensitive guy who 
won't fall for Shelley's usual sexy tricks, 
and a half-hearted moral about being 
yourself, but the fact everyone's a chesty 
sexpot by the end undercuts that mes- 
sage quite nicely. Essentially, the film 
changes its moral from “if you're sexy, 
people will like you,” to “if you're sexy, 
you can be yourself, and people will still 
like you.” Gentlemen: to progress. 

It's not a complete waste, though: 


THE HOUSE BUNNY 


Farris is a pretty good old-timey joke- 
ster, and she gets some help from 
Emma Stone (Superbad), who, 
between this film and The Rocker (see 
below), is carving out a pretty nice 
niche as a sharp, disaffected young 
woman. Stone won't be her genera- 
tion's next great comic actress or any- 
thing, but her brand of comedy 
certainly feels more of-the-time than 
Farris’ tomfoolery. 


also a study of milieu, and 7um the River 
promises viewers a 92-minute plunge into 
those long-neglected pool halls. 

Kaily (Janssen) is wearying of the hus- 
tling life. We know this because whenever 
some old acquaintance sees her again— 
like Torn’s crusty sage—they always tell 
her how she looks like shit. (I just kept 
thinking, “Dude, that's Famke Janssen. She 
looks goood.”) She’s got a plan to snatch 
her estranged preteen son (Jaymie Dornan, 
a great find, with a goofy, Tobey Maguire 
smile that catches you off guard) from his 
dad and head for Canada, exactly the sort 
of lame-brained plan that these loner anti- 
heroes always seem to make, but hey, peo- 
ple do stupid stuff in real life, too. All she 
needs to do is build up some serious funds 
for those passports ... 

The movie's not bad. It does indeed 
generate a pleasingly distinctive air, lurk- 
ing along the peripheries of the tables, 
echoing those theatrical overhead lights 
in other interestingly stylized scenes, and 
even offering a colourful array of eccen- 
tric supporting characters to back up 


THE ROCKER 
DIRECTED BY PETER CATTANEO 
Prac BY MAYA FORBES, WALLY WOLODARSKY, 


STARRING RAINN WILSON, CHRISTINA APPLEGATE 
wk 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 

A sweet little comedy that’s sweet far 
more often than it’s funny, The Rocker 
would probably benefit greatly from cast- 
ing someone else in its lead role. The 
eponymous hero, one Robert “Fish” Fish- 
man (Rainn Wilson), is an unrestrained 
man-child of the type popularized by Will 
Ferrell and Jack Black, a slightly out-of- 
shape wild man who doesn't let his pro- 
truding gut and lack of sense hold him 
back one bit. Wilson tries to rock as much 
as possible, but he’s really better suited to 
the restrained, nebbish role he plays at his 
day job on The Office: his awkwardness is 
a quiet one, not a screaming, unkempt 
one. As such, the numerous moments of 
physical comedy rarely have much punch, 
falling flat as often as he does. 

Still, Wilson is surrounded by enough tal- 
ented comics—The Rocker is practically 
summer vacation for the UCB/SNL/30 Fock 
crowd—to draw out some occasional laughs, 
and the trio of young actors that make up the 
rest of the band do an admirable job of get- 
ting across their growing pains. Thrust into 
the spotlight when Fish ends up caught on 
YouTube practicing the drums naked, the 
foursome embarks on a tour that sees the 
rock and roll lifestyle—both the sex-and- 
drugs one advocated by Fish and the more 
slowed-down pace each of them takes us>— 
putting strain on real life. 

It's certainly nothing new, but a few 
supporting performance keep it fresh 
enough throughout. Emma Stone, as the 
band's cynical bassist, is particularly good 
with both a sarcastic one-liner and the 
slow-burning relationship with her lead 
singer, while 30 Rock's Jason Sudeikis is 
perfect as the asshole A&R who manages 
the band, equal parts smarmy, over-excit- 
ed and lecherous. w 


Janssen’s genuinely compelling, textured 
lead, like Kaily’s ex, a sad dad nakedly 
jealous of his own son. But the movie's 
awkward, too, and doesn’t quite earn its 
tone, faux-urgency or ending. That this is 
Eigerman’s first feature is fairly obvious 
to anyone with even a passing habit of 
nitpicking—did those same two extras 
just pass by three times in the last 30 
seconds, walking in the same direc- 
tion?—but what matters is that Eigerman 
seems to have decided on what kind of 
movie he wanted to make before he actu- 
ally made it, failing to capitalize on what 
he actually had in the can. To-narrow it 
down, I'd argue that the biggest single 
problem here is actually the music, which 
comes courtesy of Clogs and is perfectly 
interesting in itself, but steals all the 
potential humour—sorry, but sleeping on 
a pool table should be funny, guys—and 
the actual sense of studying this charac- 
ter, rather than just dunking her in a bath 
of generic indie moodiness. Still, she 
looks just right craning her long body over 
those tables. w 


ALM 


LAGWAGON / 38 Eger 


40 THIEVES / 40 
AIRBORNE / 41 [LS a 


E-town band gets down to some Concentrated Living 


EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 

ometimes all the pieces fall into 
Se without difficulty. Some- 

times it all comes together and 
you're off and running with the wind 
at your back. But sometimes—for the 
City Streets, anyway—life is just a 
little more difficult than that. 

The band's touring adventures 
have been well documented over the 
last couple of years, sometimes in 
this very paper, as well as on their 
new album, Concentrated Living. It 
turns out that the album is not 
exactly as new as one might at first 
think—sessions for the record took 
place over a year ago. 

“Well, we recorded it in summer 
last July and August in Vancouver and 
that process went great—we recorded 
it in two weeks and mixed it and had 
it, and then we just were getting the 
money together for artwork and all 
that stuff,” recalls singer/guitarist 
Rick Reid with a shrug. “For various 
reasons it got passed down the line to 


three different artists and somehow at 
the end of the mess we finally finished 
the artwork a couple weeks ago.” 

But even as the band slowly 


the past year, the creative wheels kept 
turning—which is not all that surpris- 
ing for a group of musicians who 
threw an EP of new songs up on the 


Cindy Frey 


because they had some tunes they felt 


FAI, AUG 25 (8 Phi} 


Ltd 

— 

= | THE CITY STREETS 

FS | WITH SECRET RE, PLUS PERFECT, 

o— | WHATS WRONG TOHEL 
THEARTER, $B 


long after their first album had been 
released. So while they worked 
towards getting this latest album out 
Reid kept writing new s 


“We could make another record 
right now,” he admits. "We're 
always working on new songs. The 


creative process is the whole point 
in doing this for us. With this 
record, some of these songs are two 
years old at this point and some- 
times we forget, ‘Oh, we've got to 
play these, ‘cause the record's not 
even out yet,’ but we're already 
playing two or three new songs just 
to keep it interesting for us 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 45 


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REUNION TOUR 
EPT 3 


PAWN SHOP - EDMONTON 


LISTINGS FOR YOU 


THU 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dutf 
Robison 

BACKDRAUGHT PUB Open stage: 
Spm. 

BLUES ON WHYTE Maurice John 
Vaughn 


CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB Open 
stage hosted by Alberta Crude: 6: 
10pm 


DRUID Guitar heroes 


DUSTER'S PUB Thursdays open 
stage; hosted by the Mary Thomas 
Band; 9pm 


EDDIE SHORTS Open stage 
Thursday hosted by Kicks and Thrill 


EMPIRE BALLROOM 


FOUR ROOMS Keristan Vaughan 
8pm 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Toy Singers 
{indie/pop/folk); 8pm: $10 


HULBERT'S Hulbent's house con- 
certs: Tim Chesterton; 8pm; $12 via 
licketSource, $15 {door} 


IVORY CLUB Live Dueling Pianos, no 
cover, 8pm 

JAMMERS PUB Thursday open jam: 
7-lipm 


J AND R BAR AND GRILL Open 
131 ith the Poster Bays 

(pop/rock/blues), 8:30pm-12:30am 

LB'S PUB Open jam with Ken 

Skoreyko; Spm 

LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRILL Open 

Stage Thursdays with Gary Thomas 


NEW CITY Olivier Jarda, Doug 
Hoyer, Michael Rault 8pm (door), 
donation 


NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by 
Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers 


BYRNE'S Mourning Wood 


ROCK PUB AND GRILL Jaz Night 
with Jonny Mac: Spm-tam: no cover 


URBAN LOUNGE Cassidy, quests; 
$5 (door) 
WILD WEST SALOON Aaron 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Thursday 
Nights: Electro Education: dub, trip 
hop. lounge, electro with DU Lazer 
Beam 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 


Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Big Fock 
Thursdays: Dus spin on three levels 


BUDDY'S Wet underwear contest 
with Mia Fellow, midnight. DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


FILTHY MeNASTY'S Punk Rock 
Bingo wath DJ SWAG 


FUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 
FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 


Requests with OU Damian 


GAS PUMP Ladins Nite: Top 
40/dance with DJ Christian 


GINGUR SKY Urban Substance 
Thursdays 


HALO Thursdays Fo Sho: with Allout 
DJs DU Degree, Junior Brown 


JEFFREYS CAFE Alfiv Zappacosta 
(jazz); $25 


KAS BAR Urban Housa: with DJ 
Mark Stevens; 9pm 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays 
funky house/techno with BJ Colin 
Hargreaves, house/breaks with DJ 
Krazy K, hardstyle/techno wit DJ 
Dacha, tech trance/electro with DJ 
Savage Garret: no minors. no cover 


NEW CITY | Love ‘20s Party: with 
Blue Jay, Nazt Nomad: no minors 
8:30pm (door) 

NEW CITY Bingo hosted by Dexter 
Nebula and Anarchy Adam; no 
minors, 10pm; no cover 


ON THE ROCKS Salsaholic 
Thursdays: Dance lessons at Bpm: 


AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


MUSIC 


Salsa DJ to follow 


OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New classic 
frock. R&B, urban and dance with BJ 
Mikee; Spm-2am; no cover 


PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT Hit it 
Thursdays: breaks, electro house spun 
with PI residents 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Meta! Thureday 
with org666 


VELVET UNDERGROUND 1.) 
Degree and DJ Generic 


FRI 
LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dut! 
Robison 


AXIS CAFE Kerri Wolke, Lisa 
Evangelos 


BLUES ON WHYTE Maurice John 
Vauahin 


CARROT Live music Fridays: Tom 
Mead: all ages; 730-3-30pm: $5 
(door) 


CASINO EDMONTON Suite 33 
(pop/rock) 


CLASSICAL 


HERITAGE AMPHITHEATRE 
Edmonton Symphony Orchestra— 
Symphony Under the Sky; Single tick- 
ets: $10-$25 (adult arass\/$12-$33. 
{adult reserved); Festival Pass: $82 
(grass adult)/$120 (reserved adult) 
available at Winspear box office 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Funky 
Friday: Funky breaks, funky house, 
funky tunes with Phife and friends 


BANK ULTRA LOUNGE Connected 
Fridays: 91.7 The Bounce, Nestor 
Delano, Luke Morrison 


BAR-B-BAR 1.) James; no cover 
BAR WILD Bar Wild Fridays 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE friday 
DJs spin Wooftop and Main Floor: 
Eclectic jams with Nevine-indie, soul, 
motown, new wave, electro; 
Underdog: Perverted Fridays: Punk 
and Ska from the ’60s ‘70s and "80s 
with Fathead 


BOOTS Retro Disco: retro dance 


BUDDY'S We made ‘em famous! DJ 
Eddy Toonflash, come eerly to avoid 
lineup. no cover before 10pm 


CHROME LOUNGE Platinum VIP 
Fridays 


THU, SEP 4 (6 PM) / FINNTROLL / STARLITE ROOM, $26.50 


Seen here in their natural habitat, underneath a bridge. 


CASINO YELLOWHEAD Stars 
Tonight (tribute) 


COAST TO COAST PUB AND 
GRILL Open stage Friday Night: host- 
ed by Leona Burkey: 9pm 


DINWOODIE LOUNGE Lagwagon, 


The Sainte Catherines, Tat, 7pm; $24 
at TicketMaster 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE 
Airboume (rock/metal), Sound Fury, 
The Parlor Mob; no minors; 8pm; tick 
els at TicketMaster 


FOUR ROOMS Keristan Vaughan 
Spm; $5 


FRESH START Live music Fridays 
Audrey Ochoa Duo; 6-Spm; $5 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Taking 
Medication (CO release party, alt 
rock/powerpop); Melissa Majeau and 
Darren Maltais (folk); 8pm, $10 


HULBERT'S Lynett McKell; 8pm: 
$10 (door) 


IRISH CLUB Jam session; 8pm; no 
cover 

JEFFREY'S CAFE Gorvie Matthews 
{eountry/blves}: $10 


JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB Every 
Friday: Heathwind (classic pop/rock); 
9pm; no cover 

NEW CITY Rebar: with Barry 

Black. Code Red, Mikey, Squirrelly 8 
Drag/vatiaty show (S10pm); fundrais- 
er for the Youth Emergency Shelter 


ON THE ROCKS Bad Judgement 
with DJ Shawnibis 


PAWN SHOP Carpenter, Greater 
Than Giants. The End Credits; 8pm 
(doors); free (before 9pm) 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Fear of City, 
Surban Syndrome, Cast in Stone 


REXALL PLACE Oasis, Ryan Adams 
and the Cardinals 7pm, $45.50: 
$69.50 at TicketMaster 


TEMPLE 1.6.1. Psydays: Techno Hippy 
Crew, Spm 


URBAN LOUNGE The Afterbeat, 
Beat Union (UK) 


VELVET UNDERGROUND Cockatoo 
and The Turn; $10 (door) 


WILD WEST SALOON Aaron 


Goodvin 


DELUXE BURGER BAR Rare ‘60s 
and '70s progressive rock, disco, and 
electronic Indie with Joel Reboh 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Fock. hip hop. 


house, mash up: no minors 


ESMERALDA'S Exies Freakin Frenzy 
Fridays* Playing the best in country 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DJ 
Damian 


GAS PUMP Top 40/dance with DJ 
Christian 


= 


Mike; Spm:2am; no cover 


RED STAR Movin" on Up Fridays 
indie, rock. funk, soul, hip hop with 
DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson: 


ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 


‘SAPPHIRE RESTAURANT AND 
LOUNGE Deep House: with Friday 
resident DJ Luke Morrison, 


SPORTSWORLD INLINE AND AND 
ROLLER SKATING DISCO Top 40 
request with a mix of retro and disco, 
Tpm-12midnight 


‘STOLU'S Top 40, RAB. house with 
People’s OU 


STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 with DJ 
Tysin 

TEMPLE 7.G,|.Psydays: Every 2nd Fri 
PsyTrance, Beals and the dance-y 
stuff with the Techno Hippy Crew, 
guests 


WUNDERBAR Fridays with the Pony 
Girls, OU Avinder and DJ Toma; no 
cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Foundation Fridays 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dutt 
Robison 


AXIS CAFE Kerri Wolke, Lisa 
Evangelos 


BEAUMONT BLUES FESTIVAL The 
Ride, West of Winnipeg, Slawburn, 
Samantha Schulte, Fist Full of Blues, 
Hip Pocket. Come on in our Kitchen; 
Between Sets: Michael Rault, Bobby 
Cameron: 12pm (gates): $30 (1-day 
Pass)/$50 (2-day pass). free (child 12 
and under) at Town of Beaumont 
Administration Office, BBA/ Sun Life 
Financial Office, Mary Beth's Coffee 
House, Maina’s Donair, all in 
Beaumont 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of 
the Dog: Christina Martin; live 
acoustic music every Saturday after- 
Noon; 4-6pm; no cover 


BLUES ON WHYTE Saturday 
Afternoon Jam; evening: Maurice 
John Vaughn 


CARROT Open mic Saturdays hosted 
by Anna Vandas; 7:30-10pm; free 


CASINO EDMONTON Swite 33 
{pop/rock) 


CASINO YELLOWHEAD Stars 
Tonight (tribute) 


EARLY STAGE SALOON-STONY 
Saturday Live Music 


SAT, AUG 30 (9:30 PM) / GAYE DELORME / HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB, $10 


How'manly jokes about his name do you think this poor guy has 
suffered through? Would you believe more than Bob Saget? 


HALO Mod Club: indie rock, new 
wave, Brit pop, and '6Os soul with DJ 
Give Jay, DJ Travy D: no cover before 
10pm: $5 (after 10pm) 


GINGUR Ladies Room; with Bomb 
Squad, DU OB the Teacher 


SET NIGHTCLUB Spincyclu, DXL and 
DJaded; hosted by Kwame; no 
minars; no caver 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Hypnotiq Friday. 
Breakbeat, house, progressive and 
electro with Groovy Cuvy, DJ Fuuze 


NEW CITY Friday Night Freek Out 
rockandroll/punkroek/abitofaver- 
thing/indy with DJs Jebus and 
Anarchy Adam {from CJSR’s Your 
Weekly AA Meeting): G-Whiz 


OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Rotro to Now. classic 
Tock. R&B, urban and dance with DJ 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Green 
Energy Music Festival featuring 
Benny Benassi, Swedish House 
Mafia, Gianluga Motta: 9pm; no 
minors, tickets at TicketMaster 


FILTHY McNASTY'S Open stage 
Saturdays hosted by The Love Shove 
and guests; Tpmn (door), 2-fpm (show) 


FOUR ROOMS Keristan Vaughary 
Spm $5 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Gaye 
Delorme “the man behind Cheech and 
Chong” (jazz), Chris Segger: 8pm: $20 
(door) 


HULBEAT'S Paul Cresey; 8pm; $10 
{door} 

JAMMERS PUB Saturday open jam, 
3-730pmy country/rock band Spm- 
Zam 


MUSIC WEEKLY 


JEFFREY'S CAFE 


JEXYLL AND HYDE PUB Headwind 
(classic pop/rock); Spm; no cover 


ON THE ROCKS Bad Judgement 
wilh DJ Crazy Dave 


PAWN SHOP Nate's Final Show: 
Thee Johsons, Change Mathodical, 
guests; Som 


RENDEZVOUS PUB In Oath of Hers 
Myan Prophecies, quest 


STARLITE ROOM Oh Snap Presents 
Z-Trip, Degree and quests; tickets at 
TicketMaster, Blackbyrd. Foosh, FSm 
Soular 


‘STRATHERN PUB Open stage 2nd 
Sat of each month: 59pm; followed 
by karaoke 


TAPHOUSE Molson open stage jam 
with The Taphouse Rockers hosted by 
Carmen Cook, 4-Spm 


STARLITE ROOM DJ Z-Trip; 9pm, 
$25 at TicketMaster, Blackbyrd, 
Foosh, FS, Soular 


VELVET UNDERGROUND Politic 
Live, Screwtape Lewis, Dawn In The 
City; $10 (door}; August benefit con: 
cert in support of the Youth 
Emergency Shelter 


CLASSICAL 


HERITAGE AMPHITHEATRE 
Edmonton Symphony Orchestra— 
Symphony Under the Sky, Single tick- 
ets: $10-$25 (adult grass)/$12-$33 
(adult reserved); Festival Pass: $82 
(grass adultl/$120 (reserved adult} 
available at Winspear box office 


HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN 
CHURCH Ensemble de Ja Rue; 8pm: 
$20 (adUlt)/$12 (student/senior/low 
income) at the door, TIX on the 


Square 
DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Saturdays: Top 49 with DJ Soundwave 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Saturday 
Dus on three levels. Main Floor 
Menace Sessions: alt 
rock/electro/trash with Miss 
Mannered 

BUDDY'S Undie night for men only, 
free pool and toumey, DJ Arrowchaser 


DELUXE BURGER BAR Rare '60s and 
‘70s progressive rock, disco, and elec: 
tronic Indie with Joel Reboh 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock hip hop. 
house, mash up: 


ESMERALDA'S Super Parties: Every 
Sat a different theme 


FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays Gone Gold 
Mash-Up: with Harmen B and DJ 
Kwake 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) Top 
tracks, rock, retro with Du Damian 


GINGUR SKY Soulout Saturdays 


HALO For Those Who Know: house 
every Sat with DJ Junior Brown, Luke 
Morrison, Nestor Delano, Ari Rhodes 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizzle Saturday: DJ 
Groovy Cuvy and guests 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 


‘Saturdays real altemative, classics, 
punk with DJ Naz Nomad: no covex 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Saturday 
Sucks: electro, industrial, alt and indy 
rock with OUs Greg Gory and Blue Jay, 
$s 


PLANET INDIGO-JASPER AVENUE 
Suggestive Saturdays; breaks electro 
house with Plresidents 


RED STAR Saturdays indie rock. hip 
hop, and electro with DJ Hot Philly 
afd guests 


RENDEZVOUS Survival metal night 


SPORTSWORLD ROLLERSKATING 
DISCO Sportsworld Inline end Roller 
Skating Disco: Top 40 request with a 
mix of retro and disco, 1-Spm and 
Tpme1Z midnight 


‘STOLU'S ON WHYTE Top 40, R&B, 
house with People’s 0) 


TEMPLE 0h Snap!: Every Saturday 
with Degree and Aliout DJs with, 
weekly quests. Spm, 


WUNDERBAR Featured DJ and loca! 
bands 


Y AFTERHOURS Releaso Saturisy 


me 


ENTER SANDOR 


=> | STEVEN SANDOR 
=> | steven @neweettycon 


Here's something that has ticked me off 
about concerts since long before | started 
writing about music: the bullshit encore. 
That's when the artist saves the two or 
three most popular songs in his reper- 
toire for the finale. 

| have always felt that saving the most 
popular tunes for the encore is total fro- 
mage. The encore is not supposed to be 
automatic—OK, for most acts it is, but at 
least they shouldn't take them for granted. 
The encore is supposed to be a sponta- 
neous reaction to the adulation of the 
fans. They love the show, so you come 
out and give them something special. 
Encores should always feel like a band is 
thanking fans for hooting and clapping 
and enjoying the show so damn much, 
not as a contrived part of the show. 
That's why | cringe when bands leave 
their signature songs for the encores. 
Back in 1992, | had the chance to inter- 
view James singer Tim Booth. At the 
time, the band was having huge success 
with the single, “Sit Down.” Fans at con- 
certs the band played around the world 
would actually sit down (60 000 plopped 
onto the dirt at the Reading Festival) 


fant some more ... bullshit? 


when the band hit the chorus. 

Despite its success, Booth swore at 
the time that the song would never be in 
an encore. 

“We realized it was our fans’ way of 
saying ‘Thank you for the show.’ But we 
still won't play it in the encore. That 
would be a rock ‘n’ roll cliche.” 

Unfortunately, very few touring acts 
follow this philosophy. 

Some of the best shows | have seen 
have featured finales that didn’t follow the 
bullshit encore formula. | recall years ago 
seeing punk legends (at least they're punk 
legends to me, so pipe down) the Dead 
Milkmen come out for an encore, and 
singer Rodney Anonymous simply asked 
the audience “any requests?” Not bad. 


THE FOO FIGHTERS’ 2003 show at the 
Shaw Conference Centre saw the band 
finish with a crazy rock jam. Dave Grohl 
claimed, as Edmonton was the last stop 
on the tour, that the band was going to 
have fun. And it did. In fact, when trad- 
ing CDs and tapes was still fashion- 
able—back in 2000, that is—the band 
had spawned a series of groups who 
traded live recordings of their encores, 
which included covers ranging from the 
Spice Girls to the Angry Samoans. 
“We've only ever done about five 
songs from start to finish,” said Fighter 
Nate Mendel back in a 2000 interview. 


“Most of the others are done in jams.” 

And that’s proof of just how spontaneous 
the Foo Fighters can be in its encores. 

Clutch, those kings of stoner rock, also 
finish up shows with jams—in total ‘70s 
funkified style. 

“We didn’t know when to stop,” Clutch 
lead man Neil Fallon told me after a sweaty 
encore jam at the Dinwoodie Lounge 

And Fishbone, the crazy funk-punks from 
Los Angeles, sent out Angelo Moore alone 
to read beat poetry for an encore for the 
hottest show | have ever attended (temper 
ature wise) at Toronto's Concert Hall back 
at the height of the band's popularity 

Soundgarden, on the Badmotorfinger 
tour, did a ridiculous take of the Beatles’ 
“Hey Jude,” to mock the classic-rock and 
mainstream metal types who had flocked 
to the band when “Jesus Christ Pose” 
crossed over and had pop success. The 
band’s version made it clear they were 
laughing at the song, not praising it 

Yes, those are a few memorable encores 
But | have seen far too many that follow the 
do-it-by-numbers rule. Save some B-sides, 
unreleased material or a few precious cov- 
ers from the encore. Do the hit songs in the 
middle of the show. Or at the start. Let's 

retum the encore to its former glory. w 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chief 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and author 
living in Toronto. 


{door} $5 (door) Phat Kat (Fringe weekend) ROCK PUB AND GRILL Monday 
BLUES ON WHYTE Boogie Patol CLASSICAL OVERTIME BROILER Sunday dele 
EDDIE SHORTS L; Industry Night: Requests with DJ Bo ROSE BOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE The 
Anetta EIU Opel | rR S b Legendary Rose Bow! Monday Jam: 

stage jam; 7pm; no cover HERITAGE AMPHITHEATRE Sundays DJ Gallated | tigsted by Sherry-Lea Wisor/Mike 

| EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE The oes Symphony Cees ; MANS Pet McDonald (atternating). $pm-12am 
Official Backstreet Boys Afterparty yrogaony Oncer Romie ck: Pas 2 ee 
with Girlicious: no minors; Spm: tick- ets: $10-$25 (adult grass\/$12-$33 CLASSICAL 

LIVE USIC ets at TicketMaster (adult reserved); Festival Pass: $82 
(grass adult/$120 (reserved adult) HERITAGE AMPHITHEATRE 


BEAUMONT BLUES FESTIVAL iar ge var ests atin DIS Symphony Under the Sky. Single tick 

Blues Emporium, Mad Dog Blues LOOP LOUNGE Jam hosted by Lenny ets: $10-$25 (adult grass\/$12-$33 

Band, Graham Guest, Shakedown . (adult reserved); Festival Pass: $82 = 6 
Combo, Recollection Blues Band, Pete | ON THE ROCKS King Musiata BACKSTAGE TAP AND GRILL (ors adul/$120 reserva W/ MELODY UNWINDING & 
Turland, Matt Walker; Between sets: OSCARS PUB Open stage Sundays Industry Night: with Atomic Improv available at Winspear box office : 


Jim Hepler - Kat Danser: 12pm. 
(gates); $30 (1-day Pass}/$50 (2-day 
pass); free (child 12 and under) at 


i The Block Aftemoons: Phil, 2-7pm; Main Floor Mondays: live music monthly; no ee 
Town of Beaumont Administration Lao ch Derclics, Got To Give It Up: Funk, Soul, oe BAR WILD Bar Gone Wild Monday 
Oifice, BBAY Sun Life Financial Office, Murder She Wrote Motown, Disco with DJ Red Dawn Service Industry Night: no minors 


‘Mary Beth's Coffee House, Maina’s 
Donair, all in Beaumont 


HULBERT'S Sonawriter’s Stage; 


hosted by Chris Wynters of Captain 
Tractor; 8-11pm. 


REXALL PLACE Backstreet Boys: 
7:30pm; $35.50-$75 at TicketMaster 


available at Winspear box office 


Jameoki and DJ Tim 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sunday 


BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB latest and 
greatest in House, Progressive and 


MON 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sieeman 


BLUES ON WHYTE Boogie Patrol 
IVORY CLUB Open mic Mondays: 


Edmonton Symphony Orchestra— 


DIS 


Spm-2am 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Best in Trip-Hop; Rudy Electro; 10pm-2:30em; ‘Music and comedy; 8pm Floor: Eclectic Nonsense, Confederacy 
Show 2-the Black Dog mini-music COMMUNITY quest DJs inquire at PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY ‘of Dunes, Dad Rock. TJ Hookah and 
fest: Red Ram, The Fat Dave Sound FLOWER SCHOOL kelly@micherti.com Rear Admiral Saunders 


Wave, 40 Thieves, Pale Moon Lights, 
The Wicked Awesomes, Electricity for 
Everybody; 3-10pm; no cover; 2pm 


VENUE 


HALU/LITTLE 
Little Flower Open Stage 
URBAN LOUNGE Close Attention: 


432-461) * AXIS CAI 
9200 * BACKROOM VODKA 


(CLUB § Ladies Industry Sundays. 
With Du Invinceable and guest DJs; 


* ARTERY 9535 Jaspey Ave, 780-758-9856 * ATLA! 
Fe 10349 Jasper Ave, 780-990-0 


HALL Acoustic instrumental old time 
fiddle jam hosted by the Wild Rose 
(Old Tyme Fiddlers Society, 7pm 


BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB Ady Electro 
latest and greatast in House, 


NTIC TRAP AND GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780- 
1031 * BACKDRAUGHT PUB 8307-99 St, 780-430- 
BAR 103244-82 Ave, upstairs, 780-436-4418 * BANK ULTRA LOUNGE 
10765 Jasper Ave, 780-420-9098 * BAR WILD 10552 82 Ave, 780-432.0814 * BEAUMONT BLUES FES- 
5010A-52 Ave, 1.5 km west of 50 Stand 50 Ave, Beaumont * BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE 
1 * BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Aye, 780- 
ert, 780-418-6332 * BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 
7 39-3981 « BOOTS 10242-106 St, 780423- 


INO EDMONTON 


RREN FRANK W/ THE TREVOR ToHIR 


7055 Argyll Rd, 780-463-9467 « CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780-424-9467 * CHRISTO- 
PHER'S PARTY 


it F 14-175 St * CLIFFS PUB 8214-175 St, 780-487-8887 * CLUB 9 10324-82 Ave * 
UJ | D E (Bast To const PUB AND GRILL 5552 Calgary Tr. S, 780-439-8675 * CROWN AND ANCHOR PUB 
15277 Castle Downs Rd, 113 St, 780-472-7696 * DINWOODIE LOUNGE SUB. U OF A * DRUID 11606 
Jasper Ave, 780-454-9928 * DUKES BAR AND GRILL 1265-151 Ave * DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 
780-474-5554 ¢ EDDIE SHORTS 10713-124 St, 780-453-3663 * EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM 
EXPRESSIONZ CAFE Poa ea a toe ATV's Ostia) ive, 700-916 1557 © FLUID 
5-107 Ave, 780-471-9125 * FIDDLER’S ROOST 8906-99 St * of ve, z . 
pee AONE 08 §-980-429-0700 * FOUR ROOMS Edmonton Centre, 102 Ave, 780-426-4767 * FOX 10125-109 St, 780-990-0680 eli 
Riverbend Sq, 439623,» FUNKY BUDBHA (White Ave) 103812 Ave, eo gt Gap is 20 A loser Stony Pam Aa, 780700-010 + 
° lasper Ave, e , 5 
Te SC eae ae 1 BO 299.1902 * HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH 10037-84 Ave © HOOLIGANZ PUB 10704- as at 
Hee e BERTS 7001-115 St. 780-436-1161 » THE IVORY CLUB 2340 Calgary Trail South * JAMMERS PUB 1948-127 Ave. 780-491 6/70 0 3 is 
. ipsa 2 JHTTET GGA Sali uan acacia ae ee 
pe. rat 2 1, 780 1.2786 * LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR 11053-56 Ave, 780- 
Ave, 499-6768 « LB'S PUB 23 Akins Dr. St Aber ayands « LIV WIRE BAR RAND GRILL 1107 Knotwood Rd. East * LOOP LOUNGE 367 St 
METRO 10250-106 St. 780-990-0704 * NEW CITY 10081 Jasper Ave. 780- 
Bivd « O'BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780-414-6766 * ONTHE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave. 780-482-4 7 * OVER- 
DRIVE St, 780-439-9495 * OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 10304-111 St. 780-423-1643 « SOUTH Whitemud 
Crossing, 4211-106 St, 780-485-1717 * PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780-432-0814 * PLANET INDIGO-JASPER AVENUE 1160 nee 
AioeiOP NDIGO-ST-ALBERT 412 Liberton Dr, St. Albert « PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10850-97 Ave. 780-474-5270 6 RED STAR 10538 Jasper 
Ave, 780-428-0825 © f PUB 10108-149 St » ROCK PUB AND GRILL 570 St Albert Tr, St. Albert, 780-458-5571 © ROBEBOWL/ROUGE 
LOUNGE 10111-117 St,780-482-5253 * ROSSDALE COMMUNITY HALL/LITTLE SCHOOL 10135 -96 Ave * SAPPHIRE RESTAURANT AND 
1 "780-437-023 1/710-1625 * SAVOY 10401-82 Ave, 780-438-03 


LOUNGE 73 * SECOND CUP 12326-124 St, 780-451-7574 « SIDELINERS PUB 
11018-127 ues e006 « 73710-104 St « STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St_ 780-428-1099 » STEEPS 


WHERE THEY ARE 


431-1699 =e 


pe RS sae ses* 


TEA LOUNGE-COLLEGE PLAZA 
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AUG 28 --SEP 3, 2008 


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Requiem for the hipster 


& | BACKLASH BLUES 


ROLAND PEMBERTON 
= roland @vueweekly.com 


After reading Douglas Haddow’s recent 
article in Adbusters, “Hipster: The Dead 
End of Western Civilization,” | couldn't help 
but wonder about the subculture | live 
amongst. Other than sounding judgemental 
and out of touch with the subject matter (by 
his definition, he himself is a hipster if he is 
hanging out where they hang out), 
Haddow’s main point holds water: for the 
most part, in a real world sense, hipsters 
do not contribute to the furthering of socie- 
ty and are lacking the political impetus of 
every North American counterculture 
before it. His assertion is that the hipster is 
largely a consumer group, their fashion 
being usurped by major corporations, their 
music taste being remarketed back to them 
with constructed bands and pseudo-indie 
motion pictures 


bedrooms themselves. You want shorts? 
Cut your pants in half. Hipsters are inher- 
ently creative, self-sufficient people. But 
am | talking about hipsters here anyway? If 
a hipster is someone who goes to certain 
places to dance, listens to certain kinds of 
music and wears certain clothes as a 
means of “street cred,” where does their 
belief system come into play? Haddow’s 
article basically states that a hipster is any- 
one who would be offended by being called 
a hipster, but what does that make some- 
one who doesn’t care about labels? 

How do you explain this sub-sub-cul- 
ture of people who identify with the typi- 
cally considered tenets of hipsterdom (vin- 
tage clothes, obscure media, general 
counterculture), but do not use these con- 
cepts as status symbols? Am | a hipster if 
| like Basquiat but keep it to myself? Does 
having grey American Apparel slacks 
make me a victim of conformity if.| merely 
like the color grey? Do we need another 
name for people who do not deal in the 
negative aspects of the hipster? 


time a social movement occurs (be it the 
Beat Generation, the Black Panthers, hip- 
pies, whatever), the concept can’t possibly 
stay honest in the Western world. If the 
original purpose of a social movement is 
to not conform, no group can ever fulfill 
this promise forever, because the more 
popular the movement gets, the more peo- 
ple with less at stake and less reason to 
tead the manual join, therefore lending to 
a more diffused movement. 

The article has a point that is reflected in 
the arcs of all the previously paramount 
social groups: the commercialization and 
appropriation of the “hipster” idea by mass 
media is going to spell the end of it, at least 
in its current form. Haddow’s hipster lives 
and dies on cool and nothing is more uncool 
than hearing your favorite song in a Coke 
commercial. | just don't think it's the end of 
the world, or Western civilization, for that 
matter. Like grunge and punk before it, 
there will always be internal and external 
criticism of a youthful generation, founded 
or unfounded. Hipster is as hipster does: it's 


ironic that someone would care so much 
about people who aren't supposed to care 
about anything, W 


This doesn’t account for the main hipster 
concept: do-it-yourself. When hipsters want 
a certain kind of music, they make it in their 


THE THING THAT anti-hipster journalists 


like Haddow do not account for is that any 


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Hearts and solo 


‘Christina Martin strips her rootsy pop to the bones playing live 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychrista @vueweekly.com 
I istening to Two Hearts, the 
sophomore record released in 
ate spring by Halifax-based 
songwriter Christina Martin, there is 
really only one préssing question: was 
there a happy ending? I 

“Well, he’s thrusting himself in my 
face right now, trying to distract me,” 
she laughs. “So | guess it turned out 
alright—so far.” 

That dangling caveat underscores 
Two Hearts, a confessional, lovelorn 
valentine to emotional endurance, 
textured under the tasteful ears of 
East Coast musician/producer Dale 
Murray and whipped into an achy 
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ingénue vocals. Martin's songwriting 
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mentation that ebbs and swells with 
sonic elements like jangly guitar, 
twangy banjo, supple lap steel, soulful 
organ and even strings and horns. 
“Not all the songs are about the 
same relationship,” Martin adds. “But 
they are all about loss and exit events 
that happened with me or in my fami- 
ly, that type of thing. I wanted the 
album to have a common thread—the 
songs have a similar vibe and emo- 
tion, butnot the same sound. It's easi- 
er for people to enjoy the melancholy 
rollercoaster, ride ups and downs if it 
sounds like it belongs together.” 


HER SONGS also share a similar lyrical 
pitch. Martin is both bare and plain- 


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spoken—like water pouring into a dry 
canyon after heavy rain, she plunges 
down the most straightforward course 
through what she wants to communi- 
cate. There's no fancy wordplay, few 
metaphors or elaborate scenarios, just 
clear-eyed expressions of feeling and 
need. 

“I pretty much stick with a simple 
melody and simple lyrics,” she 
explains. "The strongest songs are 
often really simple. I start with some- 
thing | want to say and go right to, 
‘How can I sum this up?’ Sometimes I 
have hidden messages, but it’s not 
usually a mystery—this is how | feel; 
this is what I want to say. When I 
can't find the right words or if I feel it 


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These barest aspects of her songs 
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Martin points out going it alone cre- 
ates an intimacy with audiences she 
relishes. ‘ 

“| think it’s.a craft to tell a story and 
get people to share something in 
return,” Martin says. “I go off a lot, 
sometimes talk about the song or 
throw out these general topics and 
ask if anyone's been affected by the 
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SEPTEMBER 29 
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3] 


Dropping a Log-wagon 


~ CAROLYN NIKODYM / carolyn@vueweekly.com 
ome say the best way to handle 
Gross on stage is to pic- 
ture your audience naked. Con- 
ducting an interview with someone like 
Joey Cape, singer for Lagwagon and 
Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, can 

conjure up a similar case of nerves. 
“Hold on one sec, I'm going to 
switch phones ... I’m going to go to 
the other ... it’s too hard to explain,” 


Cape says. “One sec. Hello? Um. 
Hello?” 

Then that unmistakable sound: a 
flush. 


“Are you on the toilet?” | ask 

‘I didn’t want to say it, but the cat’s 
out of the bag. You caught me on the 
toilet,” he explains. “It’s really funny, 
because I looked at the clock and I 
said, I've got 30 seconds and I thought 
1 could do it, and when nature calls, 


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what can you do?” 

Now that we're all picturing Cape 
on the throne, now that we've had to 
ask about the toilet, there aren’t any 
questions weirder to have to ask of a 
total stranger. 


WELL, “TOTAL STRANGER” is a bit of a 
misnomer. As the first band signed to 
NOFX singer Fat Mike's Fat wreck 
Chords back in the early 90s, Lagwag- 
on has earned a rightful place in SoCal 
punk history. There is simply no mis- 
taking the band’s honest lyrics and pro- 
duction, nor its raucous stage energy. 
It’s this straight-up characteristic that 


WWW.REVTHEORY.COM + 


Cape senses will see the band through 
the trials much of the music industry 
(read: loss in CD sales) finds itself in. 
“Ultimately, it’s about music. It’s not 
about marketing and blah, blah, blah 
and all this other crap that comes with 
being in a band, and so making records, 
sometimes it just feels like kind of futile 
thing,” Cape says. “I see a day, not too 
long from now when bands are just giv- 
ing music away, you know. I mean 
everybody does it now, but | mean 
everyone. I just don't know how people 
are going to get creative and continue to 
market selling music when it’s so easy 
to get. It doesn’t make a lot of sense. 
“There's two worlds of music 
There's the Disney world, the world of 
artists that just go out there and 
they're lipsyncing, or they’re singing 
over backing tracks that are pre- 
recorded, and then there’s rock bands 


WWW.RIDESAGAINMUSIC.COM 


and punk bands that never really had 
all the frills," he adds. “They're just 
playing the music and | like the fact 
that when my band plays live, we 
sound pretty much exactly the same 
as our record, because we're not real- 
ly doing anything. There's no smoke.” 

Cape, like many other musicians, 
sees the benefit of releasing a few 
songs at a time and completely doing 
away with the album. That said, Lag- 
wagon has just released an EP, J Think 
My Older Brother Used to Listen to Lag- 
wagon, but Cape sees the EP as a bit of 
a compromise, a way to get the music 
out there while still acknowledging that 
many folks are picking and choosing 
the tracks they want to download. 

“T just didn’t feel like making a full- 
length,” he says. “I’m just not really 
sure about the album as an art form, 


anyway. It feels like a little bit like a 
dead art form to me.” 

Music, however, is alive and well. 

“Music to me is the greatest thing 
that ever happened. It’s the one thing 
internationally that everyone in the 
world connects to, and it’s a powerful 
thing and it’s all positive. But how we 
get music to people now had totally 
changed,” he says. “Music is the one 
form of art that seems to appeal to 
everyone from the youngest age. You 
can't hold it in your hand. It’s a 
sound. | think it’s very interesting, 
and I think there's a lot of power in it, 
and I think that can be used. It’s 
amazing the things that politicians 
wield to get through to people, but 
music is not used often enough for 
solidanity and to bring people togeth- 
er. It’s powerful.” v 


A A OS! ES OO 


___ RED RAM 


FS ae ae a ee 


SHREY ROTEL 63.00 


BEECUV ROY SY ER Doe ME pcusre wer 


‘MUSIC 


2 
= 
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Ss 
Ps 
= 
<= 


Making up isn’t 
hard to do 


CAROLYN NIKODYM /carolyn@vueweekly.com 

ave you ever been spent? 
Hes spent? Where your 

friends and family are telling 
to take a break, to kick back, but you 
know you can’t. Not only because 
you're the only one who can land all 
those balls you’re juggling, but also 
betause if you stop, you’re stopping. 
And maybe never getting back up. 

After some 1200 shows in eight 
years, that was exactly where Bon- 
nyvillian Mike Plume found himself. 
Spent and broken hearted. He actually 
began to feel it more than 400 shows 
before that, but it took him a couple 
of years to admit it to himself and the 
band he’d criss-crossed Canada, 
Europe and the US with. 

“It was in April of ‘02, I sat down 
with the guys, and | said, ‘Here's the 
deal, I'm really, really, really tired, and 
I need a break,'” Plume relates. “‘I 
also know we all need to work so that 
we can pay our bills, so if you guys. 
are okay with playing two or three 
shows a month—and granted we 
were coming off years of playing 20 to 
25 shows a month—so if you guys are 
okay with playing two or three shows 
a month to pay everybody's rent, | can 
do that.” 

As it turned out, the band—made 
up of Meck Meyers, Dave Klym and 
Ernie Basiliadis—wanted to strike out 
on their own. And they did, with no 
hard feelings, trying out new sounds 
as the Populars. 

Plume played solo, but very sel- 
dom, in the interv: He dis- 
covered what it was like to live in one 
place for more than 12 hours. 


WED, SEP-3 (6 PM) 


THE MIKE PLUME BAND 


Lad 
— 
en THEPAWN SHOPS 
a. 


“1 went from 200-plus shows a year 
to 10 shows a year, and that was 
enough for me at that point,” Plume 
explains. “When you start to get lost 
in thought when you're playing on 
stage, you start thinking, like what's 
on TV tonight, you know? Like you 
know what? Maybe I'm phoning this 
one in, and I'm not doing anybody 
any favours.” 


IT TURNED OUT, though, that music 
was a tough habit to break, and 
Plume and the band managed to get 
together for a few shows over the last 
six years, including one during 
Ottawa’s celebration of Alberta's cen- 
tennial. 

It wasn’t until this year, however, 
that the guys started talking more 
seriously about the Mike Plume Band. 
The band went down to Nashville, 
where Plume now lives, to rehearse. 
They started talking about touring 
Europe. Not only that but they'd go 
with new music in hand. They record- 
ed an album, due out in the New Year, 
and have set out for a reunion tour of 


"Western Canada. 


In the bio Plume has sent out, he 
writes, “I never thought I'd be at this 
point again. | never thought I cared 
this much about it. 

"| was wrong.” 

And all of the band’s fans say, 
“Here's to well-deserved rest.” W 


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SEPT 1] - UKELELE Fest w/ over 13 artists.. 

SEPT 12 - End Credits w/ Bayoneetes and.. 
Very Very Special Surprise Guests!!! 


LABOUR DAY 
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UPCOMING SUBURBS 


AUG 29 - Rebar Family Reunion *2 

AUG 31 - Long Weekend 80s Basheroo! 

SEPT 4 - Real McKenzies w/ Wednesday 
Night Heroes 

SEPT 5 - Green With Envy Electrofest #3 

SEPT 12 - Capital City Burlesque’s Tribute 

To Elvis Presley © 

SEPT 19 - SICK Industrial Party Vol. Wi 

SEPT 26 - CHIXDIGGIT! w/ Old Wives 

SEPT 28 - Imperative Reaction/SITD 

OCT 3 - Raygun Cowboys CD Release Party 

OCT 10 - The MAHONES w/ Panik Attak 

OCT 17 - SNFU/Mr. Plow/Mad Cowboys 


wg 28 Se 92008 | wsweexmy 39 


Stealing for fun 


” BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekty.com 


hile other band members 
worry about overexposing 
themselves in their home- 


town, local cramp-rockers 40 
Thieves have no such preoccupa- 
tions. Instead, the band can be found 
nearly every weekend honing its 
considerable skills on one stage or 
another, whether the audience num- 
bers in the hundreds or the singles. 
But why? It turns out, the band 
needs the practice 

“We haven't had a solid jam spot in 
about six months because of the state 
of any rehearsal space in the city,” 
laments bassist and vocalist Lee Klip- 
penstein. “We got a house so that we 
could jam in it.” 

The recent move of Klippenstein 
and guitarist Caleb Neumeier into a 
house of their own (drummer Grant 


TAT 


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40 THIEVES 


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Callaghan lives elsewhere) may have 
allowed the band to have a jam space 
of their own for the first time in 
months, but it brought with it some 
new problems. Although noise com- 
plaints were never a big deal when 
they were begging friends to let them 
come over and jam, in their new abode 
the neighbours seem a little sensitive 
“We've probably jammed three 
times in the basement. Two of those 
times we finished at 9:30 or 10 o'clock 
and we've got complaints to our land- 
lord,” Klippenstein says, mentioning 


WITH GUESTS 


; 


that their landlord has been pretty 
cool about the situation. “We've 
sound proofed it a little bit better and 
we're gonna give it another go, but 


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it's even hairy jamming down there 
right now—story of the Thieves!” 

Another reason why the band 
plays so much is because, well, they 
like it. To that end, the band loves to 
go on tour and play in new places. 
Although they all have jobs in order 
to pay the bills, the band is con- 
stantly on weekend trips around the 
province and into BC, where they 
play to have fun without much 
thought of how touring can further 
their career in "the biz.” 

“It's 90 per cent for just shits and 
giggles. It's good exposure I guess to 
get yourself out to other cities, but the 
real reason for’me is just because it’s 
fun as hell,” Klippenstein laughs. “The 


last tour we went on with Sailor's 
Blood from Victoria was pretty enter- 
taining. We woke up on the beach in 
the Okanagan, just shit like that—typi- 
cal tour stuff.” 

Maybe waking up on a beach is 
typical tour stuff, but 40 Thieves is 
also all about extreme situations 
when they hit the road. So much so 
that the band is planning a trip to 
Toronto and back in—seriously— 
December. 

“We're gonna brave the elements 
and the shield—we've built ourselves 
ample drive days through that shit, 
and we're gonna take it slow. We'll 
see how it goes. It’s a risk but we're 
willing to take it." w 


OH SNAP! AND 


ih 
*« * « FS SKATE AND SNOW + ah * 


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Airbourne jet-setting 
across the world 


LEWIS KELLY / lewis @vueweekly.com 
hough Ryan O'Keeffe will 
shortly be paid to play the 
drums in front of thousands of 
appreciative Quebeckers, the Aus- 

tralian’s voice sounds tired. 

O'Keeffe and the other three mem- 
bers of Airbourne are in Montréal to 
continue their nigh-perpetual touring 
in support of their latest record, Run- 
ning Wild. For how long, exactly, has 
the band been on tour? 

"Since forever. Since last year we've 
been flat out,” says O'Keeffe. “We did 
all through December, Christmas, and 
then all through January and then first 
of February we were in the States.” 

Still, O'Keeffe denies that the band 
is bored or tired. 

“No, no, we love touring,” he 
explains. “This is what we really like 
doing.” 

Airbourne's rigorous touring sched- 
ule has seen them mostly bouncing 
between America, the United King- 
dom, and mainland Europe, but it also 
included a visit to Canada four 
months ago. Apparently, the fact that 
you can buy Australian beer here has 
something to do with the band’s 
speedy return. 

"Well, we've drank quite a lot of it 
already,” explains O'Keeffe. “You can 
actually get Australian beer over here. 


You can't get it in America. We don't - 


drink Fosters.” 

The fact that Canada and Australia 
are somewhat similar probably didn't 
hurt matters any. 

“It's not really that much different, 
you know,” says O'Keeffe. “Everyone's 
nice. It does remind me a bit of Aus- 
tralia. Good people, good times, lot of 
hearer 

But apart from all this, the band’s 
record sales in Canada have recently 
taken off in a big way. This obviously 
raises the question of why. 


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“Canadians have always loved their 
rock and roll. The reception we've 
had has been terrific,” ventures O'Ke- 
effe. “It’s good to see Canada rocks.” 

As a four-piece classic rock band 
from Australia, Airbourne is inevitably 
likened to another rockin’ quartet 
from Down Under. It is impossible not 
to hear AC/DC echoed in the 4/4 
drumming, bluesy guitar licks, and 
straightforward, blue collar lyrics of 
Airbourne. Their hair is even the same 
length. The only thing Airbourne is 
missing is a school uniform for its 
front man and lead guitarist, Ryan's 
brother Joel. Still, according to Ryan, 
the band welcomes the comparisons. 

“It’s an honour,” he says. “Every band 
is compared to somebody, and they're 
one of the best in the world, especially 
when it comes to rock and roll. And 
we're a rock and roll band too, so it’s 
great to be compared to one of the best 
rock and roll bands in the world.” 

While Airbourne certainly sounds 
like a blast from the past, O'Keeffe 
sees the classic rock sound of the ‘70s 
and ‘80s as timeless. 

“For us, it never really left,” he says. 
“it’s just the way we see rock and roll 
played. It’s just the way we've always 
wanted to play it. From day one we've 
always played that kind of sound.” 

And though Airbourne is still a fair- 
ly young band—O Keeffe is just 22— 
their drummer doubts that their sound 
will change much over the years. 

“This is the way we've always 
played, ever since we were kids, and 
the way we'll always play,” says O'Ke- 
effe. “It’s the way we see how rock 
and roll should be played.” v 


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KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristina@vueweekly.com 
Randl Lewis Bailer is a philosopher of sorts. 
The singer-songwriter/quitarist of local act 
Screwtape Lewis, for one thing, is inter- 
ested in the relationship between art and 
reality. Bailer experienced a case of “life 
imitating art” when his band had to push 
the release of their fourth record, Finding 
Ways to selfDestruct, back for more than a 
year because the hard drive containing all 
the band’s track mixes did some self- 
destructing of its own 

Bailer, however, chalks everything up to 
“bizarre coincidence.” 

"If we were to make record number 
five, it would be called Finding Ways to be 
Completely Successful or something like 
that—jinx yourself in a positive way,” 
Bailer jokes. 


FOR THE WEEK ENDING AUGUST 28, 2008 


1. Elliott Brood - Mountain Meadows (six shooter) 

2. Ry Cooder —!, Flathead (nonesuch) 

3. Beck —- Modern Guilt (universal) 

4. Amos Garrett - Get Way Back (stony plain) 

5 Alejandro Escovedo - Real Animal (back porch) 

6. The Dutchess And The Duke - Shes The Dutchess, He's The Duke (hardly art) 
7. Ayla Brook - After The Morning After (saved by radio) 

8. Dennis Wilson - Pacific Ocean Blue (epic) 

9. Giant Sand - provisions (yep roc) 

10. Ndidi Onukwulu - The Contradictor (jericho beach) 

11. Martha Wainwright - | Know You're Married. .. (maple) 

12. Agnostic Mountain Gospel Choir— Ten Thousand (shoutin’ abner pim) 
13. Emmylou Harris - All | intended To Be (nonesuch) 

14. The Black Keys — Attack & Release (nonesuch) 

15. Brendan Canning - Something For All Of Us....(arts & crafts) 

16. The DB Buxton Revue - No Refund E-P. (daniel buxton) 


17. The Pack A.D. - Funeral Mixtape (mint) <i 


18. Tim Hus - Bush Pilot Buckaroo (stony plain) 

19. Sigur Ros - With A Buzz In Our Ears We Play Endlessly (x!) 
20. Stereolab - Chemical Chords (4ad) 

21. The Steeldrivers — S/T (rounder) 

22. Buddy Guy - Skin Deep (silvertone) 

23. Watermelon Slim And The Workers — No Paid Holidays (northem blues) 
24. Eliza Gilkynson - Beautiful World (red house) 

25. Jerry Douglas — Glide (koch) 

26. Centro-matic - Dual Hawks (misra) 

27. Bon Iver - For Emma Forever Ago (jagaguwar) 

28. James Hunter - The Hard Way (go) 

29. Man Ray Gun - Misfortune Telling (man ray gun) 

30. Sonny Landreth — From The Reach (landfall) 


DEATH VESSEL 


NOTHING IS PRECIOUS 
ENOUGH FOR US 


This collection of music was written 
and sung by Joel Thibodeau. It is 
unlike anything you've ever heard. 
People will call it many things. Few 
will get it right. This is Death Vessel. 


make sure TO FRIEND US at 
10355 Whyte Ave. Shop online at megatunes.com 434-6342 


In reality, the band has actually experi- 
enced a number of successes. When The 
Opulent Hum was released in 2005, the 
band was chosen as Sonic's Band of the 
Month and its songs even gained airplay 
in Europe. While Bailer celebrates, he still 
reflects on the state of the music industry 
including that of radio. 

“There's not a whole lot out there [on 
the radio] that interests me,” admits 
Bailer, who would rather play various 
mixed CDs in the car than listen to the 
radio. “I feel that there are some trends 
that just Keep lasting. 

“A couple of us were driving the other 
day and the radio was on and | kept say- 
ing, ‘Is this Nickelback?’ and the driver 
would say, ‘Oh, no, this is ... "—whatever 
band. Then the next one would come on 
and | would say, ‘Well, this is Nickelback, 
right?’ and they'd say, “Well ... no. | 
couldn't tell the difference because there 
were at least three bands that sounded to 
me just like Nickelback.” 

Aside from the Hanna rockers, 
Alberta is known for many things-includ- 
ing being the Canadian equivalent of 


www. oasisinet.com 


Texas. Bailer agrees that there is some 
truth to the stereotype. 

“In pockets of Alberta, there is some 
amazing intolerance towards every- 
thing from race to homosexuality and 
they're easily 30 years behind the 
times in their thinking and in their 
acceptance of people that are consid- 
ered different. You don’t want make a 
generalization and say, ‘Well,. all 
Albertans are like that,’ because obvi- 
ously, they're not. | think it’s a small 
number that makes it bad for everyone 
else in the province. Being a musician 
in Alberta all these years, there's no 
doubt that I've seen it up close and per- 
sonal. They have to change. We can't 
embrace that sort of narrow thinking.” 

A week spent in Cuba earlier this sum- 
mer also leads Bailer to reflect on how the 
attitudes of people there varied from 
those living at home. 

“| guess one of the things that really 
struck me there is how little the people 
have as far as things [such as] technology,” 
says Bailer. “You don't see very many peo- 
ple with MP3s or cell phones or laptops.” 


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42 wo WEEKLY AUG 28- SEP 3, 2008 


Bailer confesses to holding an assump- 
tion that scarcity automatically means a 
dog-eat-dog attitude, but he instead dis- 
covered that the opposite occurs in Cuba, 
where people tend to band together 
despite living in poverty. 

"{| was] talking with one of the guides 
and she said, ‘| think it’s in Havana, where 
they have two murders a year-—like, ‘I'm 
embarrassed!’ And you could see it on her 
face. She just sort of grimaces, ‘Ohh ... | 
wouldn't want to go to Canada,” says 


Bailer, referring to Edmonton's 18 homi- 
cides this year to date. 

“Anytime | travel, | feel like | learn a lit- 
tle bit more about my own country and 
how things are and where things are 
going. | think a lot about this disappear- 
ance of communities. When community 
starts to disappear, | think it's a dangerous 
thing. So it makes me wonder as an artist 
or as a musician, how can we use the arts 
to embrace community rather than to 
break it down?” w 


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PREVUE 

THU, SEP.S (8 PM) 

THE REAL MCKENZIES 

WITH WEDNESDAY NIGHT HEROES 

WEW CITY SUBURBS, $15 

BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 
Reputations—positive ones at least— 
are a double edged sword. On the one 
hand, it can be a good thing that peo- 
ple you meet know something about 
you already, or at least know what to 
expect. On the other hand, if you don't 
live up to your reputation, you risk 
being a disappointment. 

Such would seem to be the conun- 
drum of the Real McKenzies. Known 
as a hard-drinking band of Scottish 
punk rockers, the members are 
expected to show up half-soused to 
whatever gig they're playing. And 
once they get there, they're expected 
to get fully-soused. Having been 
around for over 14 years, however, 
the band couldn't be expected to do 
that every night, could it? 

“It’s one of those things that you 


perpetuate by, in the right time and 
the right place, you knock down a half 
a bottle of whiskey and drink a case of 
beer within a half-hour or an hour. The 
reality of it is that if you did that 24 
hours a day you'd be dead before you 
know it,” vocalist Paul McKenzie 
explains. "These sort of depictions 
tend to perpetuate themselves—all 
you need is a little kick and a little fire 
and away you go.” 

That fire hasn't always come in 
handy for McKenzie, however, as on a 
recent tour of Europe the singer paid 
dearly for some of the liquid courage 
that booze had provided him—he took 
a bottle to the face after teasing the 
audience. 

“Normally | see them go to my right 
or my left, but this one came right 
down the centre and got me,” he says. 
“| probably egged them on. We got 
there early and started drinking, and | 
think | might have said the wrong thing 
at the wrong time. These Croatians, 
they're very very passionate. | think | 


SEPTEMBER 8 


was bugging them about losing at soc- 
cer, and they take it 10 times as seri- 
ously as | do. Next time I'll bug ‘em 
about something else, like the war or 
something.” 

Tour stories like that often make 
their way into the albums the Real 
McKenzies record and release, but a 
fair amount of traditional songs and 
stories from Celtic culture do as well. 
Tapping into the the long line of Celtic 
storytellers by resurrecting these tradi- 
tional songs and presenting them to a 
new audience fills McKenzie with a 
Significant amount of pride. 

“If you look at all the legend and 
stories and music involved with the 
Scottish Celts, the Irish Celts and 
the Celts themselves as they came 
across Europe, it’s a well | could 
never empty.” he says. “In my life- 
time if | can take a cup of it and 
record it it would be an unnatural 
feat—there’s just so much of it. To 
take a small fraction of that is an 
honour” w 


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MUSIC 


THE CITY STREETS 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31 
WHILE IT'S REID wno generally 


brings a song to the others, he’s 
quick to point out that it’s usually 
little more than a melody with 
some words and chords, and the 
song only becomes a City Streets 
tune once bassist Matt Leddy and 
drummer Mark Chmilar have had 
their way with it. Of course, just 
like getting the album out, the 
songwriting process doesn’t always 
happen particularly quickly. 
“| usually don’t have much of an 
idea and that’s kind of the fun [of 
putting the songs together],” Reid 
laughs. “Sometimes we're working 
on a song for months and months 
and do, like, eight different ver- 
sions, and sometimes it just comes 
together.” 
- “There'll even be parts where he's 
got the song and we'll try it a bunch 
of different ways, but we might get 
stuck for a week wondering what to 
do with these four bars to make it 
where we want it to be,” adds Leddy. 
“We can be pretty self-critical at 
times, too,” laughs Chmilar. “If some- 
thing’s not sounding right, we'll let 
the other person know.” 
For the City Streets, creation is 
something that is ongoing; there’s no 
one “finished” version of a tune as the 
songs constantly change shape, 
sometimes in obvious ways, some- 
times much more subtly as the band 
works them over on the stage long 
after they've been recorded in one 
version or another. 
“You take certain songs on the road 
and just by testing them or whatever 
there are certain parts that you just 
naturally play louder,” explains Leddy. 
“So the song even changes while 
you're on the road and by the time you 
get back you're ready for a remix.” 
“There are songs off our first record 
now that we play a lot different live 
because they just grow over time,” 
Reid agrees. “It's not like a song is the 
way it is, but we work on it to get to 
the point that we like it and then it 
hopefully evolves.” 
“That was the nice thing about 
Concentrated Living compared to : 
{previous album] These Things Hap- 
pen," Chmilar adds. “These Things e 
Happen, we just started the band and F ra | A t pAS) = Ed: | l t E t C tre 
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AIDS Wolf, Cities of Glass (SKiN 
GRAFT) In avant-garde composer 
John Cage's collection of lectures and 
writings, which he cheekily titled 
Silence, he wrote, “Wherever we are, 
what we hear is mostly noise. When 
we ignore it, it disturbs us. When we 
listen to it, we find it fascinating.” 
Montreal's AIDS Wolf are disturbing 
and fascinating. Their twisted guitars, 
strings scraping and being bent into 
submission, their seemingly random 
drum bashing, and the screeching. Oh 
the screeching. 
The band some- 
times sounds as 
if they are trying 
to chase you 
away, which in a 
way they are 
Noise rock is not 
for the faint of 
heart, and it’s 
certainly not for 
everyone. 
Albums like this 
are seemingly a 
test: are you with 
us or against us? 
The “Us vs 
Them” attitude inherent in a lot of 
noise rock brings up an interesting 
point about how musical subculture, 
and the perception of those subcul- 
tures, influences the tastes of an indi- 
vidual. AIDS Wolf are obviously 
“cool” people; they play in a band that 
erupted during the Montréal indie 
explosion, their members create 
some of the coolest show posters 
around for SeriPop, and they tour the 
world playing what is essentially 
noise for kids-as cool as them 
Someone who wants to feel as if 
they're at the forefront of the avant- 
garde, to feel as if they are privy to 
the secrets of the newest thing, might 
latch onto noise rock or AIDS Wolf. 
But I think that this criticism dis- 
misses the musicality of this record. 
While I'm sure there are some people 


recordsé&cds 


you &mecp 
the walkmer 


who put an AIDS Wolf (or a Wolf Eyes, 
or a Can, or a Locust) record on their 
shelf after listening to it once and con- 
sider themselves full members of 
whatever sub culture they imagined 
they were joining, | don't think you 
can dismiss the ideas inherent in the 
music AIDS Wolf makes just because 
some people are sheep. All genres 
have their sheep. 

Cities of Glass is dense and, at times, 
frustrating—but it’s not as if you can’t 
dance to it. It'll be a complicated little 
dance, to be sure, 
but there’s a 
beat, there's 
some semblance 
of melody, these 
are not songs 
that have no 
structure, there is 
something to 
latch onto— 
something that is 
sometimes a lit- 
tle tenuous and 
fleeting, but it 
gets you going in 
the mind. Cities of 
Glass is not about 
drinking beers on the patio or shaking 
your ass at a club, it’s about thinking 
about what the essence of music is, 
and pushing yourself to open up to a 
new definition. Getting past the 
screeching, the dense guitar sounds 
that seem like they are just feedback 
and scraping, and that seemingly ran- 
dom drumming will provide the dedi- 
cated “listener with a reward. The 
reward of this album is the way it 
changes your thinking, the way it 
makes you realize that music can still 
be dangerous and can still confound 
the-squares. While the original noisy 
thrust of punk rock has been com- 
modified, AIDS Wolf feels like a pure 
barrage that could never be. This is 
alone music, not something for your 
makeout mixtape. —BRYAN BIRTLES / 
bryan@vueweekly.com 


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Alice Cooper, Along Came a Spider 
(SPV) The Coop is at it again—after the 
throwback to garage rock of the origi- 
nal Alice Cooper 
group on his last 
album, this time 
out he’s throwing it 
back to the first 
solo Alice Cooper 
albums, taking a 
twisted _ storyline 
and running with it. Back then he was 
welcoming us to his nightmares and 
taking us on trips into hell; now, the 
record centres around a serial killer 
named Spider. The best moments are 
the ones where Cooper and his band 
sound like they're back in the garage, 
laying down sloppy, raunchy riffs like 
on “I Know Where You Live” or going 
from gentle piano to epic ballad on 
“Salvation.” Unfortunately, there’s a lot 
of sludgy moder metal filling in the 
cracks here. Plus, Cooper's story this 
time out seems more downright mean 
than the darkly humorous approaches 
he’s taken in the past. There is a twist 
at the end that tries to put a new spin 
on the record, but it comes across as a 
gimmick that is too little too late. —EDEN 
MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


The Creepshow, Run For Your Life 
(Stomp) With the body of a rockabilly 
record and a bolted-on head straight 
out of a 1950s horror flick, the 
Creepshow’s Run 
For Your Life is a 
bizarre, shambling 
monster of a 
record. Like The 
Rocky Horror 
Picture Show, it 
might not be very 
smart, but it is a ton of fun, It does get 
a little monotone at times as the band 
has a restricted sonic palette, but this is 
mitigated by the playfully macabre tone 
of the record and its brevity. A strange 
and wonderful mongrel, Run For Your 
Life makes _you want to do anything 
but. —LEWIS KELLY / lewis@vueweekly.com 


CREEL 


The Creepshow will be creepin’ ‘round 
the Starlite Room on Wed, Aug 3. 


DJ Nana, The World Inside My 
Head, Vol 3 (Urbnet) On his first 
track, DJ Nana introduces this record 
to lovers of all 
genres of music. 
What he shows us 
next is that hip 
hop is and can be 
just as diverse as 
rock music. One 
track is. sparse in 
beats. giving off an ethereal sound 
(‘Intro-Welcome to Nanaland”) while 
the next consists of heavy beats that 
would it good video game background 
music (Motorcity Vibin’). Then 
there's a track intro powered by organ 
chords which are held in a minor key 
(‘Eighties Babies, Stay Fly!”) making it 
a solid track to choose for the haunted 
house you plan to make next 
‘Halloween while another track could 
easily be on a K-Os record (“Ichill’ ft/ 
Luke F.O.R.C.E.). While the styles often 
vary to the point of feeling like you're 
in a bumper car and being jerked 
momentarily as you hit other cars, the 
tracks on their own are so fresh and 
innovative that minor imperfections 
like faulty track flow can be forgotten. 
— KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristina @vueweskly.com 


The Free Press, Half Truths & 
fhole Lies (tfp) With lyrics like “All in 
name of God and love,” you would 
think that the Free 
Press is trying to 
mirror U2. Instead, 
it sounds more like 
| the current 
Journey. _ Alex 
Oliveira’s power- 
ful,  high-range 
’ ocals, containing just the right 
amount of rough, make these pop 
songs more than just pop songs. 
They're pop songs that bring in a cer- 
tain ampunt of intensity due to the fact 
that flat vocals are not belting out the 
lyrics. Highlights include the guitar solo 
and bridge of “It’s Killing Me That it’s 
Killing You” and the fast vocal work 
and dissonant piano chords of “Stop 
the War.” Meanwhile, “The Only Way 
Home” sounds like Hawksley Workman 
singing a Beatles song. As the album 
progresses, there are tracks like «The 
Beginning of the End of the World” 
which could have easily been written 
by Sam Roberts. Aside from a couple of 
bland tracks like “Neverland” and “Dirty 
Little Secrets,” pop rock hasn't sound 
this good in a while. —KRISTINA DE GUZMAN 
/ kristina@vueweekly.com 


The Green Hour Band, The Green 
Hour Band (Kingdom Records) | 
suppose if any Canadian city were to 
produce a band that would answer 
Jae-t-fecngsso.n 
Airplane’s dare to 


“feed your head” 

and follow the 

White Rabbit down 

7 the psychedelic 

hole, it'd be 

Vancouver. But 

bathed in the glow of the Aurora 

Borealis and the 21st century, the 

Green Hour Band, despite liberal use of 

idery sitar, has more of a hoser heart 

than a hippie one. There's some Serious 

nostalgia bluesy dirty rock—and wail- 

ing harmonica—undemeath the fuzzy 

jangle of guitars and noodly vintage 

organ, reaching back further into the 

‘60s than psych, back to the roots of the 

British invasion. Then they underpin 

the whole frenzy with bell-clear bass, 

throbbing like a glam rock hangover. 

Green Hour simply dig loud, sweaty, 

far-out music and they play it with 

gusto and without pretension. —MARY 
CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychrista @vueweekly.com 


Various Artists, Saved by Saskatoon 
(Saved By Radio) Of course this 
record is great. I've always had a bit of 
a soft spot for Saskatoon as a city and 
if you've ever 


there you know 
their scene is as 
interesting and 
dynamic as ours, 
but maybe a little 
smaller. I guess the 
same could be said about the city itself. 
_ Anyways, it’s always impossible to 
review a “various artists” type of com- 
pilation, especially when it is site spe- 
cific because then it isn’t based on any 
musical criteria, but on loca- 
tion. All of the songs are different, and 
all are the best Saskatoon has to offer. 
I couldn't imagine the process of 
choosing who would and wouldn't be 
‘on the album, it must have been hard. 
bar BIRTLES / bryan @vueweekly.com 


watched live music_ 


<3 OLD SOUNDS 


EDEN MUNRO 
= eden@meweekly.com 


The Clash, Cut the Crap (Epic) 
Originally released: 1985 For the 
Clash, the three years between the 
release of Combat Rock, the band’s 
fifth album and its fourth and last with 
the lineup of Joe Strummer, Paul 
Simonon, Mick Jones and Topper 
Headon, and Cut the Crap, the final 
Clash album, was a period marked by 
the slow disinte- 
gration of the band 
and Strummer and 
Simonon’‘s 
attempts to keep 
the ship upright. 
Singer/guitarist 
Strummer and 
bassist Simonon 
were the sole 
holdovers at this 
point from the 
band's earlier years 
after the dismissal 
of first drummer 
Headon and then guitarist Jones. 

Replacements for the absent mem- 
bers were brought in—on drums, 
Terry Chimes, who played on the 
band’s debut, was first, followed by 
Pete Howard, and on guitars were 
Nick Sheppard and Vince White—and 
Strummer led the band on, loudly and 
angrily proclaiming that the group was 
as strong as ever. 

It's not impossible to believe that 
there was a chance for the Clash to 
reinvent itself as a second, artistically 
viable entity; prior to the release of 
Cut the Crap, the band set out on a 
bus tour of the UK, which might have 
been an opportunity for the band to 
solidify into a united front. 

In the studio, however, there was 


QUICK SPINS 


ee | WHITEY HOUSTON 
= {juickspins@vueweekly.com 


BRET RYAN 

BRET RYAN 
(UNIVERSAL) 
FUCKING TERRIBLE! 


New low from Disney's latest 
Cartoon character 


ICE CUBE 

RAW FOOTAGE 
(EMI) 

Street cred at zero 


As disc nears end I'm thinkin’ 
Are we there yet? 


THESE Mss 

(BOREALIS) 

Oh wow! How ballsy! 

Old timers sing protest songs 
Demand kids off lawn! 


JET BLACK STARE 
IN THIS LIFE 
(ISLAND) 

These candyasses 


Have two songs; one fast, one slow 
And both made me barf 


little unity as Strummer and manager 
Bernie Rhodes took control of the ses- 
sions, keeping the participation of the 
other band members at a minimum. 
The result is an album that shows 
glimpses of what might have been— 
Strummer's songs are there, but 
they're buried deep beneath layers of 
sounds that ultimately feel pasted 
together. 

The primary percussion sound that's 
heard on Cut the Crap is that of a 
drum machine, and there are guitars 
everywhere which sound planned out, 
thoughtfully 
placed here and 
there within the 
mix rather than fly- 
ing fast and furi- 
ously as they did 
when it was Jones 
who was chopping 
at the strings. 

In light of the 
fractured recording 
sessions that led 
to the album's cre- 
ation, it's funny 
now to listen back 
to Strummer’s defiant claims on “We 
are the Clash,” where he sings, “We 
ain't gonna be treated like trash / We 
got one thing / We are the Clash / 
That's right / We are the Clash / It's 
like a patch / You can strike that 
match.” 

Looking back, it seems obvious now 
that this band was not the Clash, but 
rather some sort of misguided project 
with Strummer and Rhodes fighting 
for control in the wake of the dissolu- 
tion of the original band 

In the years that followed Cut the 
Crap, Strummer came around to 
essentially calling bullshit on himself, 
admitting that it was a dishonest ven- 
ture trying to create a new band out of 
the ashes of the old. w 


RYAN NEILSON 

FOUR WALLS 
(INDEPENDENT) 

Heartfelt rootsy pop F 


Fans of John Mayer will think 
How is this legal? 


ELODIE 0 

STUBBORN 

(MULATIA) 

| love French singers! 
Preeious mangling of English 
Is le boner time 


WOVENHAND 
TEN STONES 
(SOUNDS FAMILYRE) 


Folk with gravitas! 
Something beguiling about 
This guys plaintive wail 


STAIND 
et he OF PROGRESS 
Waaaay huge anthems dude!!!! 


Whyte Ave meathead soundtrack for 
Beating on strangers 


SHWAYZE 
SHWAYZE 
(GEFFEN) 

Laid back yet sexy 


Perfect disc for trying to 
Fuck in a hammock 


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AUG 28 - SEP 3, 2008 


= ASTROLOGY 
a inet rarethn 


ARIES (MAR 21 - APR 19) 

My Aries friend David's acupuncturist 
diagnosed his current condition as an 
“encroachment of phlegm in his triple 
heater.” That's also an apt metaphorical 
description of what's going on in your 
psyche. Your internal engine—the fire in 
your belly—is a bit clogged by a sluggish 
Stream of swampy, snotty feelings. | sug- 
gest you take action to purge this creep- 
ing effluvia. A good way to start would be 
to do what Gestalt dream workers do: 
imagine that the effluvia can speak, and 
ask it to tell you what it wants. 


TAURUS (APR 20- MAY 20) 

Borrowing some words of poet Eliza Acton 
and mixing them with mine, I've prepared a 
love note for you to use as your own. Feel 
free to give these words to the person 
whose destiny needs to be woven more 
closely together with yours. “I love you as a 
glad bird loves the freedom of its wings. | 
love you as | love the first lily of spring 
exploding with clear fragrance in the 
moonlight. | love you as | love the swell 
and hush of a low melody that brings the 
past to life again. | love you as | love the 
tone of a soft-breathing dawn whose soul 
has awaken for me alone.” 


GEMINI (MAY 21 - JUN 20) 

In Greek mythology, the Procrustean bed 
was a torture device. Anyone foolish 
enough to lie down on it would be forcibly 
modified in order to fit its exact dimen- 


sions. A person who was smaller than the 
bed would be painfully stretched and those 
who were too big would have their body 
parts amputated. | beg you not to climb into 
any situation that resembles that bed, 
Gemini. You need an adaptable niche that 
will adjust to your unique needs and tal- 
ents, not a rigid pigeonhole that squeezes 
and bullies you into assuming its shape. 


CANCER (JUN 21 - JUL 22) 

“Dear Rob the Astrologer: | recently dis- 
covered your column, and | like it. But I'm 
wondering if I'm approaching it in the 
right way. Although I’m a Crab, all 12 of 
your horoscopes seem to make sense to 
me and describe how | feel. Is this OK? 
—Curious in Austin.” Dear Curious: You 
Cancerians are very versatile and empa- 
thetic these days. Given how open you 
are to being taught from every angle, you 
have my blessing to glean useful informa- 
tion from the horoscopes for all of the 
signs. This phenomenon will probably run 
its course by Sep 23, and after that you 
may find that only the Cancer horoscope 
really works for you. 


LEO (JUL 23- AUG 22) 

I'm not so interested in predicting the 
future as | am in creating the future. Why 
waste even a minute worrying about how 
things will turn out when you can devote 
your energy to making things turn out the 
way you want? It’s true that in the horo- 
scopes | offer you, | speculate about what 
may be coming. But my purpose in doing so 
is to describe favorable scenarios that you 
can use your willpower to manifest. Right 
now, for instance, | won't prophesy, “You 
may soon be blessed with a valuable new 
Tesource.” Rather, I'll say, “Get out there, 


WUEWEEKLY 


or 


Leo, and acquire a tool or fuel or asset that 
will help you become more practical about 
fulfilling one of your dreams.” 


VIRGO (AUG 23- SEP 22) 

“| have dreamed in my life dreams that 
have stayed with me ever after, and 
changed my ideas,” wrote Emily Bronte in 
Wuthering Heights. “They have gone 
through and through me, like wine through 
water, and altered the colour of my mind.” 
One of your main assignments in the com- 
ing week, Virgo, is to identify a dream that 
can work that kind of magic on you. If there 
is no such dream currently seeded in your 
imagination, find a new one to plant there, 


LIBRA (SEP 23- OCT 22) 

“The apocalypse won't be all that bad,” Bible 
scholar Parker Creaston told the Weekly 
World News. There'll be a “brief period of 
mild to moderate disorder,” after which will 
come an extended period of “worldwide 
peace and harmony.” Similarly, Libra, your 
fear of impending chaos in your personal 
sphere will turn out to be overblown. Yes, 
you may suffer temporary shortages and 
inconveniences, as well as what we might 
call a metaphorical “traffic jam.” But you can 
forget about mountains of fire, seas of blood, 
and hordes of locusts from the bottomless 
pit. They will definitely not be showing up. 


SCORPIO (OCT 23- NOV 21) 

You've reached a phase in your astrological 
cycle when you have special power to 
expand, deepen, and enhance your web of 
allies. My advice? Don't just schmooze and 
party, but rather schmooze and party with 
an evangelical sense of purpose, taking 
advantage of the fact that people are more 
likely than usual to see you as attractive, 


48 wwSweemy 


AUG 28.~ SEP-3, 2008 


be sympathetic to your cause, and lend you 
their support. The connections you forge 
and the synergetic collaborations you ignite 
in the next three weeks could be major fac- 
tors in your success in 2009. 


SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22- DEC 21) 

According to the Guinness World Records 
website, the world record for opera 
singers receiving curtain calls is Luciano 
Pavarotti, who got 165 after his 1988 show 
at the Deutsche Opera in Berlin. If that 
mark is ever broken, it may soon be 
accomplished by a Sagittarian performer. 
That's because you people will be at the 
peak of your potential to garner acknowl- 
edgement, recognition, and rewards in 
your chosen field. Here’s a secret about 
how you can take maximum advantage of 
that potential: imagine that there is a high- 
er, finer level of excellence that's beyond 
what you've understood as excellence up 
until now. Then figure out what you'd have 
to do to rise to that higher, finer level. 


CAPRICORN (DEC 22 - JAN 19) 

Below is an excerpt from a Charles Baude- 
laire poem, as translated by Louis Simp- 
son. “Ask the wind, the wave, the star, the 
bird, the clock, everything that is flying; 
everything that is groaning, everything that 
is rolling, everything that is singing, every- 
thing that is speaking ... ask what time it 
is, and wind, wave, star, bird, clock will 
answer you: ‘It is time to be drunk! So as 
not to be the martyred slaves of time, be 
drunk, be continually drunk! On wine, on 
poetry or on virtue as you wish.” It is a 
perfect time in your astrological cycle to 
draw inspiration from that counsel, Capri- 
com. In addition to wine, poetry and virtue, 
consider trying anything else that might 


work to achieve the desired exaltation, like 
meditation, dancing, sex, dream work or a 
vision quest. 


AQUARIUS (JAN 20 - FEB 18) 

Thanks for the entertainment you've pro- 
vided so far in 2008, Aquarius. Since last 
January, you have sent a nagging demon 
packing and corrected a kink in your 
integrity, You've paid off a load of karmic 
debt left over from the old days and have 
even begun to dissolve an outdated psy- 
chosexual imprint. Before | announce your 
reward for all this good work, though, I'd 
like you to make more progress on tem- 
pering your obsessive side. See what you 
Can do to convert it from a part-time lia- 
bility into a full-time asset. 


PISCES (FEB 19 - MAR 20) 

“The real secret of magic is that the world 
is made of words,” said the sage Terence 
McKenna, “and that if you know the words 
that the world is made of, you can make of 
it whatever you wish.” I'd go even further 
and say that you can actually shape your 
world through your use of language. Do 
you really want to live amidst infertile 
chaos where nothing makes sense and no 
one really loves anyone? Then speak with 
unconscious carelessness, expressing 
yourself lazily. Or would you prefer to live 
in a realm that's rich with meaning and 
beauty and interesting mystery? Then be 
discerning and creative in how you speak, 
primed to name the novel truths that are 
always being born right in front of your 
eyes. Of course you always have the 
power to create heaven or hell through the 
words you choose, Pisces, but right now is 
a potential turning point when you could 
form good new habits. w 


A SF CANADA St. Albert Place, 
P gate © Inaugural Edmonton 
‘Region 3 km Walk for Autism featuring 


ertainment, and an Autism resource Fair 
7, Registration 8:30-10am © Info/teg- 
2.6227 or www.walknow- 


TEP SUPPORT GROUP Braeside 
Church basement, N. door, 6 Bernard 
St, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. Albert 
children of alcoholic and dysfunctional 
Meet every Mon including holidays 
p GRANDMOTHERS RALLY (780-988- 
© To fight HIV and AIDS in Africa, grand- 
fs and others will hang out dirty laundry at 
‘the Gazebo in Old Strathcona Park to bring.atten- 
to broken promises made by the Government 
of Canada * Sept. 6 (10am-2pm) 
CANADIAN NATIVE FRIENDSHIP CENTRE 
11205-101 St (780-479-1999) ¢ Basketball; Mon (5- 
ie * Healing Circle; Mon (6-Spm} © Boxing; 
(on/Thu (7-9pm), Tue (5-7pm) * Volleyball; Tue (6- 
8pm) © aa ircle; Tue (6-8pm) * Beadwork 
Class: ;; Wed (6-8pm) © C.N.EC. Pow-wow; Wed (6- 
im) ® Hip-Hop Class; every Thu {5-7om) © Cree 
lass; Thu (6-8pm) ¢ Elders and Residency; Fri (all 
day) * Safe Using and Harm Reduction; last Fri 
every month (11am-12pm) ® Tobacco Reduction; 
every Fri(1-2pm) Drop-in Night; Fri (6-8pm) 
DECREASE STRESS/IMPROVE HEALTH 12520- 
135 Ave (780-451-9535) © Free meditation course 
and orientation © Sat, Sept. 6(1-3pm); course 
ll Mon, Sept. 8 (7pm); www.willpowerinsti- 
com 


DYNAMICS OF HIV/AIDS HIV Edmonton, 300, 
11456 Jasper Ave, www. hivedmonton.com (780- 
488-5742, ext. 229) ¢ Learn about HIV/AIDS, harm 
reduction, Hepatitis C, viral ye eer cycle, treat- 
ment side effects, local/alobal issues, determinants 
of health and human rights. 2 day free workshop. 
Includes a light lunch * Sept. 4-5; contact Jen at 
IV Edmonton, pre-register by Aug. 29 


TTRUTH, EDMONTON 
S 911 Stanley A. Milner Library 
Theatre, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq * Two speak- 
ers will present lectures and a film will be 
with some of the latest presentations on alternate 
9-11 theories ® Sat, Sept. 6(1-5pm) * $16.50 
_ (ady)/$15 (door) 


FREE YOGA Lululemon Athletica Kingsway securi- 
ty entrance 2 (780-471-1200) ¢ All levels wel- 
come, new vies each week, mats provided * 
Every Sun (6-/pm) 


ee WELLNESS AT THE WILLPOWER, 
12520-135 Ave (780-459-0470/780- 
451-9535) © Free meditation course (decrease 


stress-improve health) * Orientation session: Sat, 
Sept. 6 (1pm) , 
IMAGES ALBERTA CAMERA CLUB 
Pleasantview une 10860-57 Ave (780- 
489-9776/780-452-6224 780-962-6561) ® Featuring 
presentations, speakers, workshops, outings, and 
competitions. All levels of photographers welcome 
* Meet the 2nd and 4th Thu each month; Sept- 
May (8pm); www.imagesab.com 

INTUITIVE YOGA-IN THE ‘Grant Notley 
fay 11603-100 Ave (780-909-9355) * For all ages, 
levels, genders, practice in the ne on 
weath Tamra © Mon- u (6:30-7:15am); 
Wed Grandin Park-LAT (5:45-7:00pm); Sun 
(10:45am-12pm) * $10 donation 

LIVING WITH LOSS Strathcona Place, 


i Presentation on grie led, 
0 ips Bese nevi aot 231, 


Ta 


St (780-425-1060) 
aoe 10502-70 
with 


coachin, 


day featuring demonstrati introducto- 
aia At monet tions ont a free introd 
TOASTMASTERS CLUBS + 
Toastmasters Club: Chamber of Commerce, 600, 
9990 Jasper Ave at Thu (Som) ° 
ronan aa 
a |; 
i (noon-|pm) 


r Club: Londonde 
Public Library www.norators.com; Wed ep 


mn} 
Grant MacEwan melon 5 


the Arts, Rm 437, 10045-156 St (780-459-0642); 
Parkin, BI16 Gateway Boctevard T6tas% O08 
Pauls ulevard (7! : -0808); 


Fe Ki Im, 
Millard Building, 131 Airport Rd (780-498- 
4608/474-1138) Thu (7-8:30am\" 


WOMEN IN BLACK In front of the Old Strathcona 
Farmers’ Market * Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat 
(10-1 1am) every month, stand in silence for a world 
without violence 


QUEER LISTINGS 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-RED DEER Si k 
United Church, Red Deer (403-347-6073) ean 
welcome LGBTO fe and their friends, family, 
and allies meet the 2nd Tue (7pm) every month 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB 117258 Jasper Ave 780- 
488-7736) * Open nightly 9pm-3am, Fri 8pm-3pm * 
Sun: Rotating drag shows with Mz Bianca and Mz 
Vanity Fair in The Stardust Lounge and GoDiva and 
Donnatella NE1 in The GoDonna Show, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy * Mon: Amateur strip con- 
test with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy * Tue: Free pool and tour- 
ney, DJ Arrowchaser * Wed: Hump day with DJ 
Sexxxy Sean * Thu; Wet underwear contest with 
Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ WestCoastBabyDaddy © 
Fri: We made 'em famous! DJ Eddy Toontlash, 
come early to avoid lineup, no caver before 10pm * 
Sat: Undie night for men only, free poo! and tour- 
ney, DJ Arrowchaser 


EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) Unitarian 
Church of Edmonton, 10804-119 St ¢ A group of 
older gay men and their admirers who have com- 
Mon social interests meet the 2nd Sun (2:30pm) of 
most months for a social period, a short meeting 
and a guest speaker, discussion panel or a potluck 
Supper. Special interest groups meet for other 
social activities throughout the month. email 
edmontonpt@yahoo.ca, 

Www. primetimersww.ora/edmonton 


GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION 
www.teamedmonton.ca * Women’s Drop-In 
Recreational Badminton; Oliver School Gym, 10227- 
118 St (780-465-3620); Wed (6-7:30pm) * 
Bootcamp; St. Alphonsus, 11624-81 St; Man (7- 
8pm); bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca * Sy 
ateway Lanes, 100 3414 Gateway Blvd; Sat ( 
7pm); bowling@teamedmonton.ca * Running: Sun, 
ue, Thu; running@teamedmonton.ca © 
Sue NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; Tue (8-Spm), 
Thu (7:30-8:30pm); swimming@teamedmonton.ca 
© Volleyball: 101 Amiskiwacy Academy, Municipal 
Airport Terminal just off Kingsway; Wed recreation- 
al (8-10pm); recvolleyball@teamedmonton.ca; Thu 
Intermediate; volleyball@teamedmonton.ca * 
YOGA (Hatha): Free Lion's Breath Yoga; every Sun 
(2-3:30pm); yoga@teamedmonton.ca 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB Boots, 10242-106 St 
(780-387-3343) © Crossdressers, transsexuals, 
friends and supporters meet 2nd Thu each month 
ita /etpunssyafoomad vera yedmonton il 
sions, 


IMMIGRANT VOICES FROM BRAZIL: 
LITERATURE AND FILM HC L-4 U of A Campus * 
Guest speakers Therezinha Kennedy and Rita 
Espeschit; film screening of Erefié krenak # Part of 
Brazil Week * Sept. 8 (dpm) 


INSIDE/OUT U of A Campus * Campus-based _ 
organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identi- 
fied and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, 
academic, straight allies and support staff © 3rd 
Thu every month (fall/winter terms): Speakers 
Series, Contact Kris (kwells@ualberta.ca) 


LIVING POSITIVE 404, 10408-124 St, www.edm- 
i onete (1-877-975-9448/780-488-5768) © 
Provi ing confidential nee support to penele living 
with HIV Tue (7-9pm): Support group * Daily 
drop-in, peer counselling 
MADELEINE FOUNDATION Faculté St. 
Jean, Rm 3-18 (780-490-7332) Program for HIV- 
AIDS prevention, and harm reduction in 
hol oer ym Fer 
an im every mon! - 
BaVSTO tnembershn] © Prevegistr 
geocities.com/maki nid 
www, ingwaves_edm ° 
Recreational and competitive swimming with 
ers ergeuaed to participate. 
tices * Every Tue, Thu 


9540-111 Ave * A support 
J enda of ehian gev bisex- 


Social 


bard ing 
)) * Trans 2 
¢ Me e Istand a 
with: va every Sun (7pm); 


facilitator: Rob Wells robwells780@hotmail.com © 
HIV Support Group; Meet the 2nd Mon of each 
month (7pm) * Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex 
and Sis Ty 10) Alliance; Support meeting 
the 2nd Tue each month a * Transgender, 
Transsexual, Intersex and Questioning. Education, 
advocacy and support for men, women and youth; 
PFLAG Edmonton: Meet the Ist Wed each month 
(7pm) * Free short-term, solution-focused drop-in 
counseling; gave! (7-10pm) * YouthSpace: 
gogein for LGBTO for youth up to 25; Tue-Sat (3- 
im) 
ROBERTSON-WSESLEY UNITED CHURCH 
10209-123 St (780-482-1587) www.rwuc.org * 
Soul OUTing: an LGBT-focused altemative worship 
* 3rd Sun every month (7pm); worship Sun 
(10:30am); people of all sexual orientations wel- 
come. A LGBT monthly book club and a bi-monthly 
film night. Call for more info or email jraven- 
scroft@rwuc.org 


‘ST. PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH 11526-76 Ave 
(780-436-1555) © People of all sexual orientations 
are welcome ® Every Sun (10am worship) 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave (780-488-6557) * 
Open Daily (noon) * Sat-Tue Karaoke with Tizzy and 
Patrick * Sat-Sun Pool Tournaments 

pi meee a ae 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


BRAZIL WEEK 2008 Various venues on U of A 
campus (780-492-4926) ¢ Commemorating 
Brazilian Independence Day, a week of readings, 
screenings, music, dance, and poetry * 

www. humanities.ualberta.ca/mics/ 


CORN MAZE 26101, SH 627, Pag Grove, 
Www.edmontoncommaze.ca, (780-288-0208) © 
Rexall Edmonton Indy themed maze © Until Oct. 18 
© $9 (12 and up)/$7 ‘en 1)/free for kids under 5 


EDMONTON MULTICULTURAL STARS 
FESTIVAL Giovanni Caboto Park * Featuring live 
music, dancing, free pancake breakfast, mini-soccer 
tournaments, sports activities, arts and crafts, and 
a talent showcase ® Fri, Aug. 29 (4-9pm), Sat, Aug. 
30 (9am-9pm) 

OPEN MINDS WALK AND RUN Hawrelak Park, 
9330 Groat Rd Contact: Kristina De Guzman at 
(780-428-2465) © 2.5k fun walk, 5k trail walk, Sk 
road run, or 10k trail run to raise money for the 
pee suc Society, games for kids and music by 
Souljah Fyah * Sun, Sept. 7 (8:30am check-in; 
10am race/walk) © Register online at 
www.WalkandRun.ca 


QUE CALORI Wellington Community Hall, 13440 
132 St # Salsaddiction Rueda Dance Team, Latin 
dance Party and fundraiser * Sat, Sept. 6 (8pm 
door, oor performance) ¢ $12 (adv at TIX on the 
Square)/$15 (door) 

UNDER THE BIG TOP FESTIVAL Festival Place, 
Sherwood Park (780-449-3378) * A new week-long 
performing arts festival featuring physical theatre, 
puppetry and magic * Until Aug. 31 


KARAOKE 


BLIND PIG 32 St. Anne Street, St. Albert (780- 
418-6332) ¢ Tue, Wed, Fri: Karaoke with Shelly 


BILLY BOB'S SPORTS BAR Continental Inn, 
Stony Plain Rd (780-484-7751) ¢ Wed (8pm-12am); 
wea Sat (9:30pm-1:30am): with Right Said Ed 


CASTLEDOWN’S PUB 16753-100 St(780-457- 
7111) ® Tue (9pm-tam): with Off-Key Entertainment 


CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB 37 Millbourne Rd 
(780-462-6565) * Tue (Spm): with Sonia/Prosound 


CROWN AND ANCHOR 15277 Castledowns Ad 
(780-472-7696) ® Thu (10:30pm) * Wed: Name 
that Tune 2 

DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave * Wed nights: with Gary 
from Mr. Entertainment 

ECCO PUB 9605-66 Ave (780-435-5050) * Sat 
(9pm-1am) 

GAS PUMP 10166-114 St ee © Tue, 
Wed (Spm-1:30am): Gord's Best Live Singing Show 
HAWKEYES TOO 10044-102 St (780-421-9898) « 
Fri, Sat (8pm-midnight); Hot Karaoke Productions 
HOOLIGANZ PUB 10704-124 St (780-452-1168) « 
Fri: Karaoke with Krista, Liquid Entertainment 
INGLEWOOD PUB 12402-118 Ave (780-451-1390) 
* Thu, hosted by Gordon; Fri, Sat: hosted by Jolly 
Greg Giant (9:30pm-2am) 

JASPER PLACE HOTEL 15326 Stony Plain Rd 
(780-489-1906) © Mon (9pm-1am); Karaoke 
KNIGHTS PUB SOUTH 1919-105 St (780-461- 
0587) © Fri, Sat (10pm-2am): Gord's Best Live 
Singing Show 

LAMONT HOTEL 4815-51 St, Lamont (780-895- 
2413) © Last Fri every month (10pm-2am}: with 
ProSound Productions 

LIONSHEAD PUB Coast Terrace Inn, 4440 
Gateway Blvd (780-431-5815) * Sun (8pm): With 
Evolution Entertainment 

10725-104 Ave (429-4940) # Fri (5pm- 

late): with Chris 
MOJO’S Best Western Hotel, Fort Saskatchewan 
(7a Sus 7080) © Fri (9:30pm): with 

jonia/Prosound Productions 
MONA PUB 9606-118 Ave (780-477-7752) 
Thu, Fri, Sat: sound and songs with great hosts 


at iliaaia ie (780-490-1999) « 
7 ' 


NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave (780-489- 
2511) © Sun (3-70m) 


The BS people believe 


&3| QUEERMONTON 


ot | TAMARA GORZALKA 
{am @yueweekly.com 


It's just my luck to get one of the worst 
viruses |'ve ever had right at the tail end 
of summer. I've lost my voice, spent the 
vast majority of last week in bed, had 
countless fever dreams (or more aptly 
fever nightmares), a cough that won't 
quit and a lot of other fun unmention- 
ables. It's the same sort of luck that saw 
a place burn down last Wednesday, the 
day before | was to interview for a job 
there. Yes, the karma gods love me not 

So when it came to writing this 
week's column, | felt less than inspired 
Always being one to get by with a little 
help from my friends, | asked them for 
suggestions of the many bullshit myths 
about queer people that pissed them off, 
with a smattering of my own. You'll see 
no mention of religion here, despite its 
constant connection to assorted claims 
about gay people. |'m neither qualified, 
nor do | have the energy to tackle that 
mountain. 

“Hanging around gay people wil! 
make you gay.” Come on. | could hang 
around with a doctor all day, it won't 
make me any more interested in or able 
to perform surgery tomorrow. 

“Lesbians (especially the butch ones) 
just want to be men.” No, transidenti- 
fied males just want to be men. Or more 
accurately are men, who just happen to 
have been born in the wrong body 
Clothes and overall look have. very little 
to do with emotional gender. To use the 
medical analogy again, | might wear 
scrubs to bed because they're comfy, 
doesn’t mean | dream of being a doctor 

“Lesbians hate men.” | like guys. | 
have lots of male friends, and | always 
have. |’m just not attracted to them. | 
think girls are awesome, but | don't 
always love them either. One of my 
favourite quotes on the issue comes from 
film director Ligy Pullapally who said, 
“My personal belief is that homosexuali- 
ty has little to do with either the actions 
or inactions of the opposite gender.” 

Some of my best friends are men. Are 
lesbians really so simple-minded that 
our emotional relationships are depend- 
ent simply on the possession of a vagi- 
na? | have met far too many vagina 
owners that | really wish to never 
encounter again to restrict myself only 
to them. And we mustn't forget that this 
entire idea hinges upon the concept that 
there are only two genders and that 
those two classes possess a bunch of 
unique attributes that aren't found in the 
other. An idea that I’m not particularly 
fond of myself. 

“If you're gay, you'll never have kids.” 
This is often a concern that parents have 
when their kid comes out, that they'll 
never get to be a grandparent. But in 
this age of adoption, fostering, artificial 
insemination and surrogacy, there's still 
plenty of ways to become. have kids, if 
they so choose. R 

“Gay parents will raise“a gay chil- 
dren.” See all those homos running 
around? The majority of them were 
raised by heterosexuals. If straight peo- 
ple keep raising gay babies, Matt and 

Jim down the street are just as capable 
of raising hetero ones. And if the next 


few generations are a little more open 
to sexual and gender fluidity, is that 
really a bad thing? 

“Lesbians don't care about how they 
look.” What, you think this short-spiky- 
feathered-hair-fitted-vintage-tee-choker- 
studded-belt-bootcut-jeans-with-folded- 
cuffs-faux-leather-wristband-and-camo- 
patterned-Converses look just put itself 
together? The thing Mr Joe Hetero does- 
n't get is that just because it's not 
attractive to him, doesn’t mean a lot of 
work didn’t go into it. It's not for his bene 
efit anyway. And remember, the femme 
girl that you're busy checking out could 
just as easily be one of us. 


"GAY PEOPLE just haven't met the right 
person (of the opposite sex).” | knew—| 
mean really knew—that | was definitely 
gay after | dated some of the best guys in 
the world. They treated me wonderfully 
were kind, caring and overall great 
boyfriends. And | didn’t feel anything 
liked them, sure, but | was utterly bored 
by them and | didn’t know why. As Pulla- 
pally said, it just doesn't have anything to 
do with what the opposite gender lack’ 
but what the same gender has to offer. 

“Lesbians were made that way by a 
traumatic event, like sexual assault.” 
Homosexuality isn't created by one 
event, gay people are born. Sure, some 
gay people are likely to have had abuse 
in their past, but so have a lot of straight 
people. Many gay people, myself includ- 
ed, never had a traumatizing event in 
their childhood 

“l've never met a gay person.” Yes, 
you have. Unless you are an infant or 
have been living in a cave_since your 
birth, I'm sure that you have. | can't 
count the number of times co-workers 
and such have excitedly asked me ques- 
tions about being gay, saying they ve 
“never met a gay person before.” They 
have, they just didn’t know it. The aver- 
age person doesn’t go around constantly 
trying to suss out the orientation of the 
people they interact with, and even if 
they do, chances are they won't see it if 
they're looking for their stereotyped idea 
of what gay and lesbian people are 
Remember, you can't tell a person's gen- 
der or sexual orientation just by looking 
at them. 

“Bisexuals can't make up their minds, 
are fence-sitters, greedy, confused or 
attention-seeking.” Many people, gays 
included, seem to think that bisexuality 
isn’t a real orientation. There's an ida 
too, that once a bisexual chooses to set- 
tle down in a monogamous relationship, 
they cease to be bi. This isn’t anymore 
true than the idea that if | settle down | 
stop being a lesbian because I’m only 
with one woman instead of dating many. 

“In gay and lesbian relationships one 
person is the ‘man’ and one is ‘the 
woman.’” Maybe back in the ‘S0s there 
was a reason for gender roles like these. 
Mom took care of the home and dad 
went to work. But now, think about it, 
what do those distinctions even ie 
They don’t tend to apply much to straight 
relationships anymore and they don't 
have a place in gay ones. A healthy rela- 
tionship is one that shares responsibili- 
ties equally. 

I'm sure | missed 4 few. Shoot me an 


email to tell me your favourites thigh 
forgot. v a 


aug2e-ses200 worsuvccxmy 49 


2 CLASSI 


“AP YOU WANT TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD I 


DATING 


Minute Da Date Fri Sept 12 at The 
Rock Bar & Grill (St. Ages: 21-33, 35-46 & 47- 
56. Register at 780-457-8535 or www.eightminute- 
date.ca 


EDUCATIONAL 


Actors Needed ... 
Must include professional attitude and 
desire to succeed. 


www.vadastudios.com 


HELP WANTED 


Drivers: Local Delivery $17/hr and UP!!! Great 
Benefits, Dental/Vision. 3wks Vac. Performance rais- 
es. Many shifts avail. Class 5. 403-730-2234 


GRAPHIC LAYOUT - experienced, in-house, f/t, 
MAC InDesign, Acrobat, PhotoShop, Illustrator 
Color & b/w book production, some creative. 
Strong layout, image correcting & organized. 
Knowledge of type, fonts, page make-up, 
digital file prep & pre-flight for print. 
English essential. Lone Pine Publishing, 
Edmonton. email: infe@lonepinepublishing.com 


AS part of our expansion programme, Yash Clothing 
>And Textile company is seeking for part time work 
from home Sales/Account representatives, it pays 
more than $3650 2 month plus benefits, depends on 
your devotion to the job and takes only little of your 
time.. Please contact us for more details. 
Requirements—Should be a computer literate. 2-3 
hours access to the internet weekly. Must be over 
20yrs of age. Must be efficient and dedicated. If you 
are interested and need more information, please 
send e-mail to yash.sandpiper02@qraffiti.net 
for more feedback 


Ricky's All Day Grill, South Ed Common 
Seeks Experienced cooks, starting at $12.80/hr 
10004 21 Ave. 

Apply in person 


The Cutting Room is tooking for 
Assistants and Stylists 
Piéase drop off your resume to 
10536 124 Street 


Drivers wanted: $15+/hr, Wed (night). Thu (day), 
-perm/PT. Must have mini-van or truck. Looking for reli- 
able, responsible person. Ph 907-0570 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL, TEACH ENGLISH: 
We train you to teach. 1000's of jobs around the world. 
Next in-class or ONLINE by correspondence. Jobs guar- 
anteed. 7712-104 St. Call for info pack 1-888-270-2941 


HOUSES FOR SALE OR LEASE 


"Low Cost Counselling Available ™ 
Fs The Education Clinic at the } 
nu = University of Albertaisnow 
® accepting referrals for personal, 1 
"couples and family counselling for™ 
nthe 2008-2009 university year. “ 
u There is a one-time $50 if 
administration fee. Counselling is ® 
= provided at NO CHARGE. For ia 
u More information call 780-492- i 


au 3746. i! 


FRAMING 


MOVIE POSTER SHOP 


Affordable picture frame options. Music Posters. 
8126 Gateway Bd 435-0406. 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


MODAL MUSIC INC. 221-3116 
Quality music instruction since 1981. 
Guitarist. Educator. 
Graduate of GMCC musie program 


Enthusiastic, Friendly, highly qualified 
And experienced teacher of piano & oe 
Teaches all musical styles for all ages/skill levels 
Forest Heights area. Call Aaron (BA Honours 
Performing arts, Liverpool Inst. For performing 
Arts, England). Phone 780-504-5786 


Highly qualified music instructor (B.Ed. Music 
Major). Teaches all levels of piano students, 
All musical styles and beginning bass quitar. 
All ages welcome, reasonable rates, flexible schedule 
Call 780-721-3298 


ARTIST TO ARTIST 


ARTIST/NON PROFIT CLASSIFIEDS 


Call To Enter 2009/2010 for The Works Art & 
Design Festival: currently accepting Bua esto to 
take part in the 2009 and 2010 Core Program of 
themed exhibits—theme of sustainability and environ- 
mental consciousness with a core program relating to 
WATER in 2008, HEAT in 2009 and EARTH in 2010, 
The Works Art & Design Festival's 25th anniversary 
year. Submit exhibits for consideration: Environmental 
Site Specific Installation; Curated Group Exhibit; 

Individual-or Two Artist Exhibit, and Communi 
Programs. Proposals should relate to the theme of the 
year applicants are interested in. 2009 and 2010 sub- 

missions are due Aug. 29, 2008. See www.the- 
works.ab.ca for application 


Nature photographer looking for artist using either 
pencil, coal or chalk to draw representations of my 
priotopreps for collaborated show. All inquires wel- 
come. Please contact chris at 780 757 6954, chris- 
gaivgan@hotmail.com 


Steeps—Old Glenora: for open mic—Spoken word 
First Thursday every month. Contact Adam Snider to 
sign up adam,snider@gmail.com 


Photographer seeks interesting, strong, photogenic 
faces. Sitter will be repaid with free photographs. 
Gerry contact@geryyaum.com, www.gerryyaum.com 


MUSICIANS 


Hard rock punk band requires high energy drummer to 
complet pawer trio. Must have good gear. 
No amateurs. Call Pau! 780-233-4269 


Bass player with vocals wanted for three-piece band. 
Westem roots-based music. www.marvmachura.com 
Mary @ 240-1509 


Fun and Inspiring 
Summer Employment 


Public Outreach is hiring its summer staff! We are offering 
great positions for students looking to gain valuable work 
experience in a fun and flexible environment. 


As part of.an Outreach Team, you will engage in 
meaningful dialogue in order to promote sustainable 
funding on behalf of our select group of non profits. Our 
Teams enjoy working outdoors in a dynamic and 
interactive atmosphere, on behalf of causes they feel 
passionately about. With flexible scheduling, excellent 
training, and scholarships this is the ideal summer 
employment opportunity! 


$14 / Hour 


No Commission 


To apply, please send resume with cover letter 
to recruitment@publicoutreach.ca 
or call 780.436.9896 
www.publicoutreach.ca 


Experienced country lead guitarist would like to jam 
with mature country singer who likes traditional 
country music. 780-421-1250 


a 


Phone 426-1996 from 9am-5 


pm Mon-Fri ° 


AUG28 - SEP 3,2008, 


Indie Rock/Alternative band seeks vocalist ages 16- 
19. Wide variety of influences and musical tastes. We 
have a full PA and are in contact with many major 
industry professionals. Contact Matt. 780 99 


King Ring Nancy seeking a hard-hitting drummer, 
very serious and dedicated. Call Kevin 780-642-2608 


Paul and Matt from the Las Vegas Krypt Keepers are 

looking for ui player and drummer for all original 

act, selected covers, and eve some Krypt Keeper 
stuff. 966-6305 & 485-9997 


Hart Bachmier’s Dead Mans Train requires drummer 
and bass player. HARD ROCK. LONG HAIR. Call toll 
free 1-888-845-0811 HN 


Flutist Available; Misty Rose Kno! 
has a B Mus is well trained and experienced in 
playing classical, by ear, solo or in groups 
mistyknol@hotmail.com 780.932.1224 


VOLUNTEER 


Edmonton Multicultural Stars Festival, Aug. 29- 
30. The youth planning committee meets every Fri at 
5:30pm at 208, 10010-1074 Ave for info or to volun- 
teer, call Jennifer, aa for peat Communities, 
8 


Plant a.garden row for Meals on Wheels 
Looking for help with fresh produce during the sum- \ 
mer. Drop off produce 11111-103 Ave, 8am-3pm 
weekdays; www.mealsonwheelsedmonton.org 


Volunteer website for youth 14-24 years old. 
www. youthvolunteerca 


Red Cross's Humanitarian Issues Program: need 
volunteers to help promote humanitarian issues to the 
Edmonton Community. We are hoping to expand our 
youth team (12-24 yrs old). Contact Laura Keegan at 
laura.keegan@redcross.ca 


Participants and volunteers needed for the 28th 
Annual Terry Fox Run 2008, Sun, Sept. 14, 8:30 
(registration), 10am (run) at Hawrelak Park. 
Run/walk/roll 2, 5, or 10 km, www.terryfoxrun.org, 
888.836.9786 for info 


The Edmonton Guerrilla Gardeners Went You! 


Looking for help in the mass planting of sapling trees 


Had Enough? 
Cocaine Anonymous 425-2715 


to setup an appointr 


(780) 416-8621 


S FOUR LINES FOR $20 


Email rob@vueweekly.com  10303-108St. Edmonton 


[( Deadline Tues at Noon * Print legibly on lines at right « Up to 45 Characters per line = Every letter, space or mark counts as one character « Allow one space following punctuation 


along Baseline Road between Edmonton and Sherwood 
ma and She 
www. 


nfo at: http: //edmontongg, } 
aon con ar pe BSTE 


oe 
Hope Mission call for the summer, need water bottles 
to hand out oun downtown's inner city. Drop- 
off at 9908-106 Ave, call 422-2018 


Trout Unlimited's Yellow Fish Road 
Looking for volunteers interested in the environment 
and aquatic ecosystems. Volunteers paint yellow fish 
on storm drains in Edmonton neighborhoods. E: krol- 
heiser@tucanada.org 


a 
Old Strathcona Youth Society: Looking for volun- 
teers (21+) interested in working with high-risk youth, 
drop-in setting. Naomi 496-5947, e-m: osye@telus.net 


Special needs “Learn to Bike” courses at Gold Bar 
Park are looking for volunteer experienced cyclists to 
help with this course. Thu evenings Sept 4-Oct. 16 

John at jbcollier@shaw.ca 


Autism Speaks Canada: Inaugural Edmonton 
Capital Region Walk for Autism Info. and registration: 
888.362.6227 or www.walknowforautism.org/edmon- 

ton Sun, be oe 7, 2008 / Reqistration: 8:30-10am at 
t. Albert Place, Lion's Park 


Bring laughter, smiles and simple delights to child and 
back into your life! Be a Big Brother or Big Sister 
Today! Call 424-8181. Remember you don't have to 
change your life to change theirs! 


Big Brothers Big Sisters and the African Centre need 
volunteers to help at a camp for children and youth 
new to Canada. Focus is to provide children and youth 
5-16 with a summer they will never forget. Runs 
Mon, Wed and Fri, 9-4. 

To volunteer contact Diana at 780-424-8181 ext 227 


Brain Neurobiology Research Program at U of A 
Hospital is seeking healthy and depressed subjects 
(not currently taking antidepressants) for various stud- 
ies. Reimbursement for one provided. Call 780- 
407-3221 (depressed only), 407-3906 {healthy or 
depressed), or 780-407-3775 (female healthy or 
depressed, including pregnant and just 
delivered) for more information 


Volunteer for your local Red Cross. Help us make our 
mission of assisting the most vulnerable in our com- 
munity and around the world possible. Volunteer for 


Want to stop smoking? Nicotine Anonymous 
meetings: 7pm, every Wed, Ebenezer United Church 
Hall, 106 Ave, 163 St. Contact Gwynn 443-3020. 


109 FOXBORO TERRACE | 
SHERWOOD PARK 


* Main floor taundry = 


OPEN HOUSE 
SUNDAY 1-4 PM 


~~ 


i 
g: 
ae 
Ha 


ut 
iit 
rel 


www.comfree.com # 23745 


Print your ad here... 


New Jersey. | am very much 
cat play with females. | always 
play with my own scat, but | 
s wish some female would share 
with me. Can you help me with 
se? 
N WANNABE 


changing the baby this morning 
he started to whimper and fuss. 
fhat’s the matter,” | asked her. 
“Don’t like poop?” 
“No,” she said firmly. “Don’ yike it.” 


Red Cross. To volunteer call 780.423:2680 / E: we- 
edm-dm@redeross.ca 


Rise Up: Radio Free Edmonton on CJSR FM 88 
seeking people with a critical ear who will be at 


rotests, eines, blockades, any sites of struggle _ 
fxtwen eo corporations or governments to sim- 


ply a recorder and send us the footage. 
—E rigeupradi n ] 
for recording equipment and more details 


Tandem Captains—Cycling with the Blind 
Tandem Captains required. Please contact John 
Collier at 433-1270 


Break the Code! Help and adult to read and write. 
Call Jordan Centre for Family Literacy 421-7323 
www.famlit.ca 


io@cjsr.com; Sam Power, 492-2577 ext. 4 


Would you like to Help peop 


Let's be honest; | don’t yike it either. The 
truth is, hardly anybody does yike it, and of 
those, most appear to be men. So every six 
months | get some variant of your question 
and every year or so | answer it. Like this: 
"Chances are you're SOL. Sorry!” 

There are a few women who will 
actively seek out scat play. They are, in 
both the Rick James sense and the 
strictly demographic one, superfreaks. 
If you moved to a major metro area and 
became involved with the S/M commu- 
nity and behaved well and got invited 
to parties you might hear of one, or 
perhaps if you approach very carefully 
and are vewwy vewwy quiet, glimpse 
one in the wild. | can't even promise 
you you'd meet her, and | certainly can- 
not guarantee that anyone you did 
meet would want to do her thing with 
you. This is not the sort of thing people 
just indiscriminately do with anyone 
who comes along. . 


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Exposure: Edmonton's Queer Arts and Culture Festival 

seeks steering committee volunteers. Visit 

wwwexposurefestival.ca 

Oe _ 
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bg ait eeniasorteal fore or call 

Janina 423-1973 


Society are looking for 
ith adult students in the 


As with many other very rare, widely 
despised subspecialties, this is the sort of 
thing you're probably going to have to pay 
for. You could find yourself a strict Ger- 
man-goddess or some such who might 
consent to shit on you on her terms. That 
just might have to be good enough for 
you, and it is certainly going to cost you. 
LOVE ANDREA 


DEAR ANDREA: 

My boyfriend says his old girlfriend used 
to let him pee on her. I'm wondering why, 
and also if it’s really safe. He says it's 
sterile. Is it really? And what's the deal 
with this? | can look it up but ! kind of 
don’t want to see what happens if | look 
up “pee on me“ on Google. 

LOVE, HOT SURE ABOUT THIS 


DEAR SURE: 
Good thinking! Especially if it’s your work 
computer, but either way, googling “piss 


Math Literacy Program. For info Ph 424-5514 


E.C.AW.AR. (EDMONTON COALITION AGAINST 
WAR AND RACISM) Volunteers welcome. 
www.wage-peace.com for info/contacts, Ph 988-2713 


A call for volunteers - Action for Healthy 
Communities: Questions about AHC philosophy & 
programs? 944-4687 Visit: www.ad4he.ca 


Have you been affected by another per- 
son's sexual behaviour? 
$-Anon is a 12-Step fellowship for family 
members and friends of sex addicts. 
Ph 780-988-4411 for meeting locations 
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‘angely appropriate for the bullshit issue 


play” or similar is probably a bad idea 
unless you're quite sure you want to see 
what you'd see. 

| can't answer “why” without knowing 
more ahout what the boyfriend and the ex 
were up to. You can piss on somebody 
with much sneering and attitude and be all 
dominant about it, but two people can also 
just kind of play with pee because it's 
there, with no greater meaning. You can 
splash it around, or aim it, or drink it/make 
somebody else drink it, but there’s no way 
to tell which they were doing without 
more info. On the subject of drinking it, 
though, it really is pretty clean, although | 
hesitate to use the word “sterile” since |'m 
a stickler and anything that's touched the 
outside of somebody's body is going to 
pick up some “body ash” or some dust or 
something, plus there are many reasons 
that a spare blood cell or so might be 
floating around in there; but basically, pee 
is remarkably clean. 


Poo, of course, is remarkably dirty—i 
defines “dirty,” really—and right there 
you have your difference. It's extremely 
unlikely that you're going to catch any- 
thing from pee. Social taboos aside it's 
pretty innocuous. The taboos are there, 
though, so in a way pee is a cheap thrill 
it feels really dirty without being any dirt- 
ier, really, than a glass of drinking water, 
and in many cases it’s cleaner. The big 
thrill/low actual disgustingness quotient 
explains its relative popularity among 
“weird sex" types. It's weird but not that 
weird. 

None of this means, of course, that 
you have to let him pee on you. You're 
going to want to ask what exactly he and 
the ex were up to, what he got out of it, 
and, if possible, what she got out of it. As 
long as he’s willing to drop it if you're not 

into it, though, what the heck. Maybe 
you'll yike it, maybe you won't. 
LOVE, ANDREA 


SERVICES 


SACE-Public Education Program: Sexual 
Assault Centre of Edmonton (www.sace.ab.ca) pro- 
vides crisis intervention, information, counseling, 
public education services. For a customized pres- 
entation T: 423-4102/F: 421-8734/E 
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Canadian Montal Health Association, 
www.cmha-odmonton.ab.ca Education Program 
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to intervene with people who may be at risk for 
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Missing the bus 


fter years of being tart, maligned and avoided at all costs, public tran- 

sit has recently become a hot topic in cities across Canada. Even in 
jonton—the country’s most car-addicted city—high prices at the pump 

are convincing more and more Edmontonians to hop on the ol’ proletariat chariot. 

ETS ridership climbed eight per cent in the first six months of 2008 alone, 
continuing the upward trend of recent years, and in June Edmonton Transit 
proposed spending $267 million on new buses and other equipment to 
improve service to meet the increased demand and further boost transit use. 

The results of a national survey released Sep | by the Federation of Canadian 
Municipalities (FCM) and the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) indicate 
that across the country, drivers are increasingly willing to hang up the keys. 
Almost a quarter of survey respondents said they are driving less because of high 
gas prices, one in five said they're already considering a switch to transit, and 40 
per cent said they will think about switching if gas prices continue to rise. 

FCM and CUTA point out that these sentiments could mean a tipling in transit use 
across the county, with commensurate cost, health and environmental benefits. It is, as 
they call it, “a once-in-a-generation opportunity to move people from cars to transit.” 

The grey cloud to this silver lining, however, is that transit systems across the 
country simply don’t have the capacity to meet such a drastic increase in demand, 
and the groups warn that without long-term commitments of more resources from 
all levels of government—to the tune of $40 billion over the next five years—people’s 
motivation to switch could be lost in the face of crowded buses and long waits. 

Embarrassingly, Canada remains the only OECD country without a long- 
term national transit plan, and the current federal budget's two-year $500 mil- 
lion Public Transit Capital Trust falls far short of the $2 billion in new funding 
that FCM and CUTA say the federal government needs to invest in transit sys- 
tems to keep up with population growth and the shift to transit. 

With a federal election looming, it’s the ideal time to demand from all par- 
ties real commitments to public transit that will get Canadian cities out of the 
car-centric model and on the path to a sustainable transportation future. w 


Issue No 672 / Sep 4 - Sep 10, 2008 / Available at over 1400 locations 


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tes reporting to 
from the Centre o 


2008 Federa| Elect, 


= LETTERS 


WAKE UP AND SMELL THE PARTICLES 


Shawn Van Vliet (“Um, actually ... fact,” 
Letters, Aug 7 - Aug 13, 2008) still 
seems unclear about the word “theory.” 
A theory is not a fact, but rather is “a 
supposition intended to explain [facts}” 
(New Oxford Dictionary). Thus by defini- 
tion a theory is open to question. 

For example, although gravity hasn't 
changed, Newton’s theory of it was 
completely recontextualized by Ein- 
stein’s. Einstein showed that Newton 
was correct (only) within a certain frame 
of reference. Likewise, some are point- 
ing to holes in Darwin's 150-year old 
theory and saying maybe there is more 
to evolution than Darwin accounted for. 
Some of those people are religious 
kooks, others are not. 

One hole, for example, is the parallel 
development of similar species on sepa- 
rate land masses over millions of years. 
This phenomenon is difficult to explain 
as the result of chance mutation. 

Darwin has become the poster boy 


for classical materialism, a paradigm” 


which is (fortunately) being super- 
seded by a quantum-mechanic 
inspired model of an integrated, and 
dare | say, meaningful universe. So 
Shawn, wake up and smell the sub- 
atomic particles! 

MICHAEL CENKNER 


VUEPOINT 


YOU, live 
f the 
lon, 


A DIFFERENT VIEW ON CHILDCARE 


Sadly, Acufia only sees one side of the 
issue ("Childcare costs not the only 
problem,” Aug 14 - Aug 20, 2008) and 
wants us all to subsidize it exclusively. 
Not just care of children, not just non- 
parental care, not just even daycare, but 
only one type of dayeare—the not-for- 
profit. He does not require all parents to 
use it, of course, only to pay for it 
whether they use it or not. 

In the bigger picture view, all children 
are of equal value, all locations where a 
child is taken care of are “childcare” 
locations and the only real fair funding 
is money that goes to where the.child is. 
If we are going to have taxpayers sup- 
port care of children, the money should 
go like family allowance used to, to flow 
“with the child.” That's the most demo- 
cratic, efficient and respectful of 
parental options of sitter, daycare, 
nanny, grandparent or parental care. 

Sécond, the argument that we must 
favour women who “have to work” is 
redundant since taking care of a baby is 
work~He means, of course, that mothers 
nowadays have to earn income, but that 
is a reality we can adjust. If we had 
income splitting, universal birth and 
maternity benefits and universal funding 
per child, we would remove prejudices 
from the current tax system that force 
some women away from their young chil- 
dren. In other words, we can change the 
paradigm and not just give up and say 
the bonding between parent and child is 
an unrealistic goal. It is a vital goal. 


Third, large chain daycare is an 
option, just like large chain restaurants. 
If you don’t like it, don’t patronize it, but 
the state has no business outlawing it. 
If money flowed with the child, parents 
could have contro! over which service 
they sought and could exert pressure to 
make sure the services were good, or 
they'd leave. Sadly a funding for only 
one style of daycare actually reduces 
quality; because it’s a guaranteed 
income for life for the daycare, why 
should they have to make it good?” 

Fourth, the large chain daycare phe- 
nomenon is a bit misleading given that 
the real daycares harmed by banning 
independents are small mom-and-pop 
operations. The friendly, convenient 
neighborhood childcare location with a 
few kids and very loving caregivers is the 
one you are banning in favour of a large, 
government-run, standardized, assembly 
type operation. In terms of what's good 
for kids, we need to ensure that small 
operations are as funded so parents can 
do what they find best for the child. 
BEVERLEY SMITH 


WHAT FRINGE SHOWS? 


| enjoyed reading Bryan Britles’ article 
("The Fringe of what?," Aug 14 - Aug 20, 
2008) because, as a European-based 
performer coming over to the Canadian 
circuit for the first time, | thought it was 
only me who was surprised by the lack 
of—well, “Fringe shows!” 


TED KERR / ted@vueweekly.com 
few weeks ago the world 
_ gathered in Mexico City for the 
17th annual International 
AIDS Conference (IAC), a multidisci- 
plinary gathering of individuals and 
organizations involved in the politics, 
science, healthcare and culture of 
HIV/AIDS. 

Some of the bigger stories emerg- 
ing from the conference were the 
need to further integrate the rights of 
men who have sex with men (MSM) 
into HIV prevention work, the grow- 
ing activism amongst sex workers to 
have their profession legitimized and 
the news that the US Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention has 
under-reported instances of HIV 
infection in the US. 

But the big story for Canadians at the 
IAC was not what was being done 
around the world, but what the Canadi- 
an federal government was and was not 
doing about HIV/AIDS back at home. 

Since Prime Minister Stephen Harp- 
€r’s no-show at the opening ceremo- 
ny of the 2006 International AIDS 
Conference held in Toronto—a histori- 
cally important opportunity for the 
leader of the host country to address 
the world about HIV/AIDS—commu- 
nity leaders and activists have been 
disappointed with the Conservative 
government's lack of understanding 
about what needs to be done in 
response to HIV/AIDS. 

The Conservatives continue to dis- 
appoint, recently announcing funding 
changes that will see less money 
going to AIDS service organizations 
and less money being spent on 
HIV/AIDS altogether. 

‘According to the Canadian AIDS 
Society (CAS), in 2004 the federal gov- 
emment—after intense lobbying from 
groups across the country—pledged 
over five years to double funding to 
the Canadian Strategy on HIV/AIDS. 
At its height the federal government 
was to be spending $84.4 million dol- 
lars on HIV/AIDS, working towards 
the mid-'90s recommendation that 
they should be spending $100 million. 

But rather than hitting the $100- 

“million mark, or even doubling the 
contribution, the Harper government 
has announced that they will be 
reducing and redirecting monies 
spent on HIV/AIDS in Canada by $26 
million over the next five years to 


ev 
ere 


HIV/AIDS 


focus on the internationally focused 
Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative 
(CHV1), as well as to meet a 2004 Lib- 
eral budget cut they say was to come 
into affect now anyway. The redirect- 
ed funds will be going towards micro- 
bicide and vaccine research, 
something that has HIV/AIDS 
activists and frontline workers upset. 


AS ACTIVIST Louise Binder, chair of 
the Canadian Treatment Action Coun- 
cil explained at a CAS press confer- 
ence at the Mexico City conference, “It 
was always agreed by those providing 
the funding and the community with 
which they.consulted that large 
research endeavours, including those 
for vaccines and microbicides, would 
not come from this [community] 
source of money because it would 
immediately swallow up the fund.” 
While some estimates say the fed- 
eral government will now allocate as 
much as $5 million towards the CHVI, 
a collaborative initiative with the Bill 
and Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr 
David Butler-Jones, the chief public 
health officer of Canada has said the 


figure is actually $3 million 

What is agreed, however, is that the 
money will not be going to community 
organizations, something experts agree 
is a mistake. According to a statement 
by CAS at the IAC, “The best way to 
contain the epidemic in the short-term 
is by providing sustained funding to 
community-based AIDS service organi- 
zations, which will enable them to 
effectively continue offering the treat- 
ment, support, education and preven- 
tion programs they already provide.” 

For Binder, who lobbies on behalf of 
people living with HIV, the reduction in 
funding and the redirecting of money is 
proof of the lack of leadership coming 
from Harper's government. 

*This is a matter of national shame,” 
she told delegates at the IAC. “When 
young girls are being infected at ever- 
higher rates, when Aboriginal people 
are so over-represented in new infec- 
tions, when Caribbean and African 
Canadians are being infected at esca- 
lating rates, when HIV infection rates 
among men who have sex with men 
are climbing again ... we need leader- 
ship, not abdication of responsibility.” 


FOR ALBERTANS, the federal cuts mean 
$500 000 less will be spent on HIV pre- 
vention and AIDS awareness in the 


province. With over 4000 cases of peo- 
ple living with HIV in Alberta, and ever 
increasing STI rates that experts look at 
as a sign of increased HIV infections in 
the near future, the loss of money 
means AIDS service organizations will 
be making choices based on financial 
considerations, rather than on the 
needs of clients and the community. 

Jennifer Vanderschaeghe, the exec- 
utive director of the Red Deer-based 
Central Alberta AIDS Network Society, 
is finding herself forced to make diffi- 
cult choices about where to focus 
scarce resources 

“Unless we move buildings—which is 
not an option—then I am going to have 
to cut prevention work because there is 
no way I can reduce the amount of 
frontline work we do,” she says 

As Vanderschaeghe sees it, the 
redirection of money simply doesn’t 
make sense, “The negative impacts of 
cutting community funding will be felt 
long before the positive effects of a 
possible vaccine.” 

HIV Edmonton Executive Director 
Deborah Jakubec agrees 

“Great, work on a vaccine,” she 
Says, “just don’t take away money 
from the community.” 

Jakubee says the cuts mean a loss of 
$13 000 for AIDS work in Edmonton 


Live Better 
Work Union! 


nadian government disappoints on HIV/AIDS 


Talk of Canadians at International AIDS Conference was impact 
cuts and reallocation of HIV funding will have on frontline fights 


next year, which will mean less sup- 
port and prevention work being done 
in the capital city, and an increased 
workload on already busy staff. 

For Daven Seebarran, executive 
director of AIDS Wood Buffalo, the cuts 
from the federal level will have a disas- 
trous effect in Fort McMurray and the 
surrounding areas the agency serves 

Dealing with a record amount of 
drug addiction and homelessness, 
along with a transient population and 
other social conditions that raise the 
risk of HIV transmission, Fort McMur- 
ray is bracing for a difficult year. The 
funding cut will mean 10 000 fewer 
condoms will be distributed in the 
city, and the loss of the agency's peer 
ambassador program that does pre- 
vention, awareness and support out- 
reach with urban poor, rural, sex 
worker and other at-risk populations. 

The cuts, Seebarran says, also rep- 
resent all the work the agency can’t 
even dream of doing, which he says 
could have disastrous implications 

"This will result in greater numbers 
of people being infected as we are 
unable to stem the tide of the epidem- 
ic,” predicts Seebarran. “With the boom 
of Fort McMurray, we need more fund- 
ing to prevent the epidemic from get- 
ting out of control, not less.” v 


iow | 


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YES | 


EDMONTON 461-9086 
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SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


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Issues is a forum for individuals and organizations 
to comment on current events and broader issues 
of importance to the community. Their commentary 
‘is not necessarily the opinion of the organizations 

they represent or of Vue Weakly. 


We’re in for a whale of a time 


Lifting moratoria to create pipeline and tanker ‘energy corridor’ 
for tar sands oil will threaten recovering cetacean populations 


CHRIS GENOVALI / raincoast.org 
The International Union for Conservation of 


- Nature (IUCN) recently released its 2008 list 


of threatened species of cetaceans (whales, 
dolphins and porpoises). While the news 
was reasonably encouraging for the global 
recovery of populations of humpback 
whales, these assessments have far-reach- 
ing impacts on their conservation manage- 
ment. Populations in the Atlantic may now 
be approaching pre-whaling levels, and 
while the situation may also be trending ina 
positive direction on this side of the world's 
oceans, in the North Pacific researchers still 
consider the humpback-whale population 
threatened, and the western North Pacific 
population endangered. 

Until a few decades ago, commercial 
whaling severely depleted many of the 
blue, fin, sei and humpback whale popula- 
tions that inhabited British Columbia’s 
waters. Today, our image of whales has 
changed, and the global moratorium on 
whaling has given these species an oppor- 
tunity to recover. For reasons not fully 
understood, however, populations in the 
North Pacific have yet to rebound to his- 
toric levels of abundance, and indeed, fin, 
sei and blue whales remain endangered. 

Raincoast Conservation is now at sea 
completing five years of systematic marine 
mammal surveys from Vancouver Island to 
the Alaskan border. Aboard our research 
vessel, Achiever, a team of scientists and 
observers work, eat and sleep on rotations 
for one to two months at a time. The team 
records observations of all marine mam- 
mals as Raincoast surveys the waters 
between Dixon Entrance {near the Alaska- 
BC border) and Vancouver Istand. Our pre- 
set tracklines take us back and forth 
across Hecate and Queen Charlotte Straits 
and into inlets along the central and north 
coasts. To date, Raincoast has surveyed 
over 12 000 kilometers at sea. 

In addition to recording sightings of large 
Whales, the results of our surveys provide 
population estimates for harbour and Dall’s 
porpoises, Pacific white-sided dolphins and 
minke whales, among others. At present 
there are no population estimates for any of 
these species in the area. We are working 
in conjunction with our partners at Duke 


NZIE 
FRIDAYS 


University's Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab 
to rectify this data gap. 

Collecting distribution and abundance 
data on marine animals is critical to making 
informed decisions about oil and gas devel- 
opment on the BC coast. The habitat of 
these species and other marine life is under 
threat from coastal oil and gas exploration 
and drilling, as well as a potential increase 
in tanker traffic linked with the proposed 
liquid natural gas and oil pipeline terminals 
intended for the north coast. 


IN FACT, every stage of the BC govern- 
ment's looming “energy corridor’ scheme 
poses a threat to cetacean populations on 
the coast, starting with harmful noise 
impacts generated by seismic activity all 
the way through to the prospective spills, 
underwater noise and ship strikes associ- 
ated with the transport of the recovered 
oil and gas. Specific to the IUCN report, 
the good-news story regarding hump- 
backs could be put in jeopardy if this 
array of hydrocarbon-based projects is 
allowed to proceed. 

Addressing the frenzied election-year- 
driven drumbeat in the United States to 
pursue a similar strategy as is being 
flogged in BC, Thomas Kostigen of the 


WUEWEEKLY SH 4-SE 10,2008 


online business journal MarketWatch 
wrote last month that “Coastal drilling for 
oil is mindless, not only from a supply 
perspective but from an environmental 
perspective. The amount of oil to be 
found off our nation’s coasts would be a 
trickle of what's needed to meet con- 
sumer demand.” 

Coastal oil drilling in the contiguous US is 
a transparent politicized panacea that will 
not make much of a dent in terms of 
demand or pricing in that country. Despite 
this reality, a collective state of election-fed 
delusion has distorted the debate as the 
Republicans attempt to force-feed coastal 
drilling down the Democratic Party's throat. 
The Democrats’ response has been, as one 
pundit put it, to crumble like feta cheese. In 
his article, Kostigen pointed out, “Drilling 
creates hazards, and costs the economy 
dearly. Take a look at the local Alaskan 
economies that suffered because of the 
Valdez spill. Not a pretty picture.” This begs 
the question as to why there is such a push 
to expose the BC coast to these same “haz- 
ards” when lifting the drilling and tanker 
moratoria is so fraught with risk. 

The Statistics Canada website just 
might have the answer: “Canadian oil com- 
panies derive the majority of their revenues 


from exports; in 2005, two-thirds (66 per 
cent) of Canada’s crude oil production 
flowed out of Canada. Since 1995, thirsty 
Americans have received practically all (99 
per cent) of Canadian oil exports.” 

We do not need coastal oil exploration 
to satisfy domestic consumption in Cana- 
da and the tar sands crude from Alberta 
anticipated for shipping to Kitimat will be 
headed straight out of the country (likely 
to rapidly expanding Asian markets) on 
Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCC's) approx- 
imately the size of the Exxon Valdez—or 
larger. The not-so-hidden agenda behind 
all the chatter about rescinding the mora- 
toria in BC has everything to do with 
export markets. For instance, the US has 
five per cent of the world’s population, 
yet their oil usage makes up 25 per cent 
of world oil consumption, and Canada 
ranks as the number-one supplier of oil to 
the US, well above Saudi Arabia, Mexico, 
Nigeria, Venezuela and Iraq. 

Both the current provincial and federal 
governments have indicated their desire 
to lift the coastal moratoria, even if it 
means having to double down on the 
odds of a catastrophic oil spill, not to 
mention significantly contributing to the 
already dangerous level of carbon dioxide 
in the Earth's atmosphere once all those 
foreign consumer countries of Canadian 
oil burn up the product. Parenthetically, in 
a July article by Gwynne Dyer, climate 
scientist James Hansen of NASA stated 
that we have passed what he considers 
the threshold for “maximum permissible 
concentration of carbon dioxide in the 
atmosphere.” 

lt remains to be seen whether federal 
and provincial opposition parties will ulti- 


_mately make like feta cheese as the 


Democrats have in the US, or whether they 
will actually stand up to the ruling parties’ 
oil and gas blitz. The real question, howev- 
er, is whether British Columbians are will- 
ing to gamble with the future of this coast 
and allow their governments to play the 
role of hydrocarbon pusher to oil-addicted 
American and Asian markets. w 


Chris Genovali is executive director of 
Raincoast Conservation. 


11834 Kingsway Ave. 
780.453.7320 
www.ezziesnightclub.com 


| DYER STRAIGHT 


‘| gwynne@vueweekly.com 


Three weeks ago, when the Georgian 
army foolishly invaded South Ossetia and 
the Russian army drove it back out, | 
wrote that we shouldn't worry about a 
new Cold War. An old journalist friend in 
Moscow immediately emailed me saying 
that | was wrong, and I'm beginning to 
think he was right. The preparations for a 
new Cold War, or at least a Very Cool 
War, are coming along quite nicely. 

On Aug 27 Britain's foreign minister, 
David Miliband, flew into Kiev to say that 
"the Georgia crisis has provided a rude 
awakening. The sight of Russian tanks in 
a neighbouring country on the 40th 
anniversary of the crushing of the Prague 
Spring has shown that the temptations of 
power politics remain.” 

By recognizing the independence of 
Abkhazia and South Ossetia, Miliband 
said, Russia has ended “the post-Cold War 
period of grewing geopolitical calm in and 
around Europe.” So Ukraine and Georgia, 
formerly parts of the Soviet Union, would 
be welcome to join NATO, formerly Rus- 
sia’s great enemy. Oh, and one other thinge 
Russia bore “a great responsibility” not to 
start a new Cold War. 

On the same day Mitt Romney, at the 
time a leading candidate for the Republi- 
can vice-presidential nomination, was in 


Denver to make the point that Senator 
Barack Obama, the Democratic presiden- 
tial candidate, lacked the judgement and 
the experience to deal with a crisis like 
the “invasion of Georgia.” He then pro- 
ceeded to speculate that the next move 
of “the Soviets” might be to invade 
Poland. Well, why not? If we're going to 
have the Cold War back, we might as 
well have the Soviet Union back too. 

And so to Russia‘s prime minister, 
Vladimir Putin, who raised the stakes on 
the following day by speculating that the 
United States government had encouraged 
Georgia to attack South Ossetia in order to 
provoke a crisis. "The American side in 
effect armed and trained the Georgian 
army ... the suspicion arises that someone 
in the United States especially created this 
conflict with the aim of making the situa- 
tion more tense and creating a competitive 
advantage for one of the candidates fight- 
ing for the post of US president.” 

White House spokeswoman Dana Peri- 
no dismissed the allegation: “To suggest 
that the United States orchestrated this on 
behalf of a political candidate—it sounds 
not rational.” Unfortunately, it sounds all 
too rational to Putin, who is widely sus- 
pected of having started the second war 
with Chechnya in order to win the Russian 
presidential election in 2000. 

Indeed, it would be a perfectly rational 
(if utterly immoral) strategy if the Bush 


“administration were trying to boost John 


McCain's chances in November. Persuade 
the American public that it faces a great 


TOON GINA 
LESSONS NOW! 
NEW ADDRESS: 1681i- 106 AVE 


FRONT 


he goose and the gander 


threat by starting a new Cold War, so the 
argument goes, and they'll turn to the 
candidate who is old enough to have 
fought in the Vietnamese sideshow dur- 
ing the first Cold War. 

But | don’t believe that the White 
House told Georgian President Mikhail 
Saakashvili to go ahead and grab South 
Ossetia, counting on the Russians to 
counter-attack, smash the Georgian army, 
and scare Americans into voting for John 
McCain. The Bush administration would 
Not have betrayed its favourite Georgian 
so callously. The truth is probably that 
Saakashvili, having been promised NATO 
membership, attacked South Ossetia on 
the false assumption that the United 
States would threaten war with Russia to 
back his play. 


NOW RUSSIA HAS enraged the West fur- 
ther by recognizing the independence of 
South Ossetia and Georgia's other break- 
away territory, Abkhazia. This is no real 
loss for Georgia, which has never con- 
trolled them since it got its own inde- 
pendence when the Soviet Union broke 
up in 1991. The local ethnic groups fought 
off the first Georgian attempts to conquer 
them in 1991-92, and the “ethnic cleans- 
ing” by both sides in those wars ensured 
that the Ossetian and Abkhaz minorities 
would never again accept Georgian rule 
Yet for the past 16 years Moscow did 
not recognize their independence. Russia 
has always insisted on preserving the terri- 
torial integrity of states, because so many 


of its own minorities might be tempted by 
Separatism if it were legal for unhappy eth- 
Nic groups to just leave a country. If South 
Ossetia can secede from Georgia, why 
can't North Ossetia secede from Russia? 

When the major Western countries, hav- 
ing occupied Serbia’s Albanian-majority 
province of Kosovo in 1999 to stop the atroc- 
ities being committed there by the Serbian 
army, finally recognized Kosovo's independ- 
ence last February, Moscow was furious. 
This was a precedent that could unleash 
international chaos. Well, now it has 
accepted that same precedent for South 
Ossetia and Abkhazia—although Hell will 
freeze over before it agrees that the same 
principle might apply to, say, Chechnya 

As the former British ambassador to 
Yugoslavia, Sir Ivor Roberts, said last 
week: “Moscow has acted brutally in 
Georgia. But when the United States and 
Britain backed the independence of Koso- 
vo without UN approval, they paved the 
way for Russia's defence of South Osse- 
tia, and for the current Western humilia- 
tion. What is sauce for the Kosovo goose 
is Sauce for the South Ossetian gander.” 

There is still no good reason to have a 
new Cold War, and | still think it won't 


happen. But as the politicians posture 


and the stupidities accumulate, |'m less 
sure than | was that it won't happen. w 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 
published in 45 countries. His column 
appears each week in ue Weekly 


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Please help us to remember our friend 
and colleague Ross Moroz, who passed 
away Sept 26, 2007, by participating in 
the Rotary Run for Life or by making a 
donation. Money raised at the event will 
go towards suicide prevention programs 
in the Stony Plain area. 


For more information, or to register, 
please go to rotaryrun.ca. 


The Stony Plain 
5th Annual 


Rotary Run 
for Life 


Sept 14, 2008 


Donations to the Rotary Run can be sent to: 


Att'n: Wally Ross 


Please make cheques payable to: 
Rotary Club of Stony Plain - neeners Acooust 


For more information, please contact 
Misha Moroz at mishamoroz@gmail.com 


Fo 


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FRONT 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


LETTERS 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4 


| chatted to a fellow performer about 
this issue and he believes it's the prospect 
of money (potentially quite a large sum for 
a writer/artist), that lures the writers out of 
their bedroom or influences the type of 
show. Has the audience conditioned the 
performers or the other way round? 

Certainly from my point of view—in 
performing a “theatre piece that 
dances"—the lack of any space to warm 
up, the size of the stages (too small), the 
perception that dance doesn't belong in 
theatre, together with the curious press 
reviews (often by the sports reporter), 
doesn't help, but I'm hoping to cover the 
considerable time and cost of mounting 
the show over the long-term. And let's 
face it, it's better to be in Canada in the 
sunshine than Edinburgh in the rain! 

Thank you for pointing out the “ele- 
phant in the room.” 
FERGUS ROUGIER: 


ANOTHER OPINION FROM EDINBURGH 


Having been a regular performer at the 
Edinburgh Fringe can | offer some insight 
into the way things are going there ("The 
Fringe of what?,” Aug 14 - Aug 20, 2008). 
It's not that most shows are comedy 
shows—one man stand-ups—but that the 
philosophy behind the Fringe seems geared 
now to stand-up comedy. The BBC's Best 
of the Fringe is a half-hour feature, on both 
TV and radio, for stand up comedy only! 
The main Fringe venues that once “did” 
theatre now concentrate on stand-up 
because that’s where the revenue is. Most 
punters you talk to believe the Edinburgh 
Fringe Festival is a stand-up festival. 

| wonder whether anyone has filtered 
the shows in Edmonton—how many 
stand-ups, serious drama, dance story- 
telling, etc. Are there any statistics? Is 
there a breakdown? 
PETER MCGARRY 


ELECTION SOLUTION 


To make the choosing of the date of the 
next election (“Politics: down with brown,” 
Aug 28 - Sep 3, 2008) more fair for all the 
federal political parties and for all Canadi- 


ans, Prime Minister Stephen Harper's” 
needs only to ask other federal political 
party leaders to agree to one thing—that 
the date of the next federal election will be 
in October 2009, as the fixed election date 
law Parliament passed last year requires. 

This agreement will end the struggle 
mainly between Harper's Conservatives 
and the Dion Liberals (but also involving 
Layton’s NDP and the Bloc, led by 
Duceppe) over control of the next election 
date—they all want it to occur at the 
time they think will lead to the best 
results for their party. As well, it will give 
all the federal party leaders a more equal 
chance of being in a good, or bad, posi- 
tion when the election is held. 

It will also make the next federal elec- 
tion more fair for voters, as polls show that 
a large majority don't want an election now, 
and knowing the election date well in 
advance will allow people to plan their lives 
so they can participate more in the election. 

In addition, people with children are usu- 
ally very busy with this beginning-of-schoo! 
time period, as are students, and if they 
have moved to a new city for school they 
often don’t have proof they live there (mak- 
ing it more difficult for them to register to 
vote and to participate in the election). 

Holding an election now will also 
mean a proposed Jaw that bans loans to 
election candidates (except by banks and 
other financial institutions) will not be 
passed, and an ongoing court case that 
will make election spending rules more 
clear will not be completed. Without this 
law and clear rules the election will also 
be less fair and democratic. 

So how about it federal party leaders— 
how about doing something all together in 
the public interest, instead of in your 
party's interest? Fix the election date, 
instead of trying to fix the election result. 
DUFF CONACHER, COORDINATOR 
DEMOCRACY WATCH 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
whether eritical or complimentary. Send 
your opinion by mail Nue Weekly, 10303 
- 108 Street, Edmonton AB T5J 117), by 
fax (780.426.2889) or by email (let- 
ters@vueweekly.com). Preference is 
given to feedback about articles in Vue 
Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for 
length and elarity. 


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health@vueweekly.com 


Health Canada’s warming last week about 
Life Choice ephedra containing excessive 
amounts of ephedrine needs some clarifi- 
cation. For starters, ephedrine is readily 
available as a decongestant in its synthet- 
ic form in 60 ma doses (pseudoephedrine, 
found in common cold medications), which 
is double the 30 mg dose we're currently 
being warmed against. 

And while it's true that ephedra of any 
kind, including the synthetic kind, should- 
n't be used carelessly or during pregnan- 
cy, or by those with heart problems, high 
blood pressure, thyroid disease or anxi- 
ety, ephedra has long been successfully 
used for asthma by herbalists whose 
clients prefer it over conventional meds 
for their run-ins with the monster of 
obstructed breathing. 

What can be a problem—and is worthy 
of strong caution—is the punch packed by 
ephedra-containing weight-loss products 
that combine ephedra or Mau Huang, |- 
cartinine, which is an amino acid that 
stimulates fat-burning and elevates blood 
pressure and heart rate, and caffeine- 
heavy herbs such as Kola Nut. 

But Health Canada’s warming last week 
also extended to Life Choice’s kava product 
(which has been illegal to sell in Canada 
since 2002, but may be imported for person- 


al use), Kava is used as a muscle relaxant, 
pain reliever, diuretic, to treat anxiety, 
depression and insomnia, and historically in 
some cultures, ceremonially and for pure 
pleasure. Health Canada’s warning claims 
serious risk of liver toxicity, but herbalists 
tell me kava has been used in Europe in 
Standardized extract form for years, even 
with patients who have pre-existing liver 
problems, without complication. 

Reports of liver damage have been 
linked to a single kava supplier using poi- 
sonous stems and leaves of the plant avoid- 
ed by knowledgeable herbalists. And 
Germany, who led the way with the wam- 
ings and investigations into kava, has lifted 
its ban on kava root. 

The truth is that research has shown 
kava to be safe and effective, often equally 
as effective for severe anxiety as benzodi- 
azepines such as valium—and much safer. 


ALL PHARMACEUTICALS used for the condi- 
tions kava is indicated for come with risk of 
liver damage. They can be addictive and can 
have devastating long-term results, and 
Tylenol is now the leading cause of acute 
liver failure. And self-medication of many of 
these symptoms often includes alcohol, 
which, of course, comes with well-known 
stress on our livers. So to single out an effec- 
tive herbal medicine for liver toxicity seems, 
tome, a tad over-reactive and hypocritical. 
And finally, still in the news daily, is 
Gardasil, perhaps most significantly with 
reservations expressed by the New Eng- 
land Journal of Medicine. “Despite great 


va warning hypocritical 


expectations and promising results of clin- 
ical trials, we still lack sufficient evidence 
of an effective vaccine against cervical 
cancer ... the overall effect of the vaccines 
on cervical cancer remains unknown ... If 
HPV-16 and HPV-18 are effectively sup- 


pressed ... other strains may emerge as . 


significant oncogenic serotypes.” 

And, in addition to the nearly 10 000 
mostly relatively minor {and about 600 
devastating) adverse reactions reported, 
the vaccine has now been linked to acute 
Pancreatitis, a painful debilitating dis- 
Gase that can be fatal, and is character- 
ized by sudden, severe abdominal pain 

For those thinking about cost effective- 
ness, a Harvard study has determined a 
cost of $43 600 for every life saved by the 
vaccine administered to 12-year-old girls, 
and a cost of $120 000 per life saved if 
given to all women up to age 21, anda 
cost higher still if a booster will, as many 
believe it will, be required 

That cervical cancer has quickly 
moved from being a rare and obscure 
cancer confined mostly to the developing 
world to something we feel the need to 
invest heavily in despite extremely effec- 
tive and accessible prevention measures 
is a testimony to the power of the phar- 
ma lobby, which once again, according to 
Gardasil developer Diane Harper and the 
New York Times, worked its panic-creat- 
ing magic on all major opinion leaders, 
women’s groups, medical societies, 
politicians and the public 

What's new? w 


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Sun, music, injuries, dea 


‘Story sharing’ project aims to stem workplace toll 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vuaweekly.com 

I ike many of us, Daryl Richel 
spent a good number of his 
ummer weekends travelling 
Alberta's highways to reach the far- 
flung fields which play host to the 

province's myriad music festivals. 
But while his fellow festival-goers 
were preoccupied with setting up their 
two-person MEC tent, Richel was busily 


erecting an 18-foot-in-diameter circus, 


tent decorated with colourful painted 
images of people at work. And while for 
most the greatest technical challenge of 
a weekend was remembering to plug in 
their cellphones to charge, Richel was 


inside the tent, ensuring a network of _ 


laptops and sound equipment was 
working properly. 

And at the moment you were roast- 
ing in the midday sun listening to 
music, he was likely busy helping peo- 
ple choose from an audio database of 
stories about workplace injuries and 
fatalities, and encouraging them to 
record their own tales of the little slips 
and life-altering events they've experi- 
enced while earning a paycheque. 

It was all part of a pilot project 
called “the Workus,” a new outreach 
program of the non-profit Alberta 
Workers Health Centre aimed at col- 
lecting and sharing stories about the 
thousands of Alberta workers who are 
injured or killed at work every year 

Richel recognizes the choice of 
locales for the project may seem a lit- 
tle odd at first 

“Summer festivals are about having 
a good time and forgetting about life's 
problems and relaxing,” Richel con- 
cedes. “So on the surface you might 
say, ‘Who wants to come into a tent 
to hear about things that have gone 
wrong for people on the job?’ But the 
reason that we're focusing on festi- 
vals is because wherever there’s a 
group of people, there’s a group of 
people who work, and wherever 
there's a group of people that work, 
there's a group of people who've been 
hurt at work. And that’s the audience 
the Workus is trying to focus on.” 

Richel says that the colourful tent 
would typically pique the curiosity of 
about 75 people over the course of a 
festival weekend, with about half tak- 
ing the time to listen on a laptop to 
one or more of the stories. About a 
half-dozen people would usually be 
moved to sit and recount their own 
stories, which were digitally recorded 


+ 


2 LABOUR 


and added to the growing library for 
others to hear later. 

Richel collected more than 50 stories 
over the summer, and the centre plans 
to eventually post them online to make 
them available to a wider audience. But 
Riche] says the face-to-face approach 
of going to where people are will 
remain the primary tool if the Workus 
continues, as planned, next year. 

“| think it’s even more important, 
especially in this day and age when 
there’s so much emphasis on the 
Internet to actually just go out into the 
community and do something inter- 
esting and unique and engaging and 
talk to people one on cne.” 

He says that approach is important 
because for many injured workers 
caught in an often-uncaring system, 
the process of having someone listen 
can be cathartic. 

-“When you tell a story, no matter 
what it is, it's kind of liberating for 
people,” he says. “It'san opportunity 
for people to have their stories heard 
not by a government agency, not. by 
the WCB, not from the Alberta gov- 
ernment, not their doctor, not an 
insurance investigator. It’s just a place 
for them to share their story and tell it 
in a way that they see fit. A couple of 
times people have told their stories 
and then they just kind of sit back and 
they say, ‘Wow, thanks for listening. 
Thanks for the opportunity for my 
story to be heard.” 


THERE |S CERTAINLY no shortage of sto- 


ries to collect about the failings of 
health and safety in Alberta's work- 


places. 

Last year, 154 workplace fatalities 
were officially “accepted” by the Work 
ers’ Compensation Board—a 24 per 
cent increase over 2006 and the high- 
est toll in the province since 1982. In 
addition, 12 farmworkers, who are not 
covered under the province's WCB sys 
tem and not counted in official statis 
tics, were also killed. 

And the news this year-isn’t getting 
any better. Already 88 fatalities had 
been officially recognized in the 
province by the end of July, compared 
to 70 at the same time last year. 

Sobering as those numbers are, 2007 
also saw 62 473 workplace injuries 
serious enough require time off or 
modified duties, costing $220 million in 
compensation payments. To make 
matters worse, a 2007 Employment 
and Immigration report on workplace 
safety points out that some 40 per cent 
of workplace injuries go unreported. 

Richel says one of the aims of the 
Workus project is to put a human 
face—or at least voice—to those num- 
bers, and enable injured workers or 
families who have lost loved ones to 
contribute to helping other workers 
avoid a similar fate. 

“It's an opportunity to give people 
who have been injured on the job a 
platform for their stories to be heard,” 
Richel says. “They know someone 
else will hear a story and they might 
change their behaviour on the job or 
they might look a little bit harder at 
their employer to say, ‘Hey, hang on, 
you know I heard this story and | 
think we should change the way 
we're doing things.’ That’s part of the 
reason it's a story sharing project—it 
creates a community of people who 
want their voices to be heard.” w 


iy SEP 4- SEP 10, 2008 


out the Homestar Runner car- 
Ociated media; my first 
attempt at w this column, for exam- 
ple, had knotted itself into 300 words 
about HAs “joyfully wicked blend of intelli- 
gence and innocence” before | pulled my 
head out of my navel. The fact is, I'm just 
hungry—along with millions of similarly- 
appetited humans—for clean, smart, fun 
comedy with a good heart in a laffosphere 
weighted heavily toward smug irony, 
cringe-comedy and the meaner of spirits. 

Now, if that's what we're hungry for in 
our watchables, how much more must we 
be craving it in our playables? With games 
populated by hard-bitten men of action, 
moody teens of destiny, desperate gunsels 
and steroidal space soldiers, we ought to 
be more than ready for a cast of lovingly 
characterized cartoon freaks and their 
adventures through their surreal world at 
the intersection of pop culture and chil- 
dren's storybooks? How can | not love a 
gem like Strong Bad's Coo! Game for 
Attractive People? 

Fundamentally a more-or-less straight- 
forward graphic adventure, the first Wii- 
Ware episode of SBCG4AP (episode 
subtitle: “Homestar Ruiner”) deals with 
the series’ wrestling-masked antihero 
Strong Bad's attempt to somehow “beat 
the snot out” of nemesis Homestar—an 
attempt which comes to involve figuring 
out how to enter and win the legendary 
Free Country USA Triannual Race to the 
End of the Race. In pursuit of his awe- 
some, stylish goals, SB will have to do 
the standard adventure-game things: 
explore the game world and its charac- 
ters, gathering items and information and 
figuring out how to apply those to the 
obstacles in his path. 

SBCG4AP, though, works better than a 
{ot of graphic adventures—which, honest- 
ly, tend toward frustration and tedium—in 


mnt 


that the conventions (unconventions?) of 
the Homestar Runner universe map per- 
fectly to the conventions of the adventure 
genre. Adventure-game puzzles tend to 
fequire what's kindly called “lateral think- 
ing"—that is to say they make no real- 
world sense. But in a world that already 
makes no real-world sense, a world gov- 
erned by the surreal laws of child’s play, 
the more ridiculous the solution, the more 
Sense it makes. I'd prove my point with 
examples, but, you know ... spoilers, right? 


THE BEST PART OF IT ALL is that, as with 
the HA cartoons, SBCG4AP may be surre- 
al and unpredictable but it's never random 
in that “Hey, check out all the weird shit 
I'm comin’ up with!” way. It’s a short-form 
game—you'll get through it in five hours, 
if you're reasonably thorough—but it’s a 
complete experience, with a full dramatic 
are: a compelling setup, a light first act, a 
deeper second act that deals with the 
consequences of the first, and a satisfy- 
ing denouement. | found myself grinning 
as much at the game's structure as at the 
jokes—it would have been easy for a 
Homestar Runner game to be throwaway 
fan-service, a mere souvenir product. 

Of course, SBCG4AP isn't in any way 
short on fan service. Everywhere you look, 
there's material drawn from nine years of 
Homestar Runner canon, from the 
precincts of Strong Badia to Marzipan's 
organic garden. All the major characters 
are present and fully utilized in the 
progress of the game, and the main adven- 
ture is gilded with all kinds of bonus good- 
ies. So, yeah ... lots of fun for nerds. 

Lots of fun for everyone, really. Even if 
you don't know Bubs from Coach Z, there’s 
so much good-natured fun and joyful weird- 
Ness to this game that it's worth the price of 
admission (like, 10-odd bucks; cheap as 
free!) just to wander around the Homestar 
Runner world. The point of episodic content 
is to keep ‘em coming back for more, and 
Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive Peo- 
ple does that for me just as surely as the 
cartoons (homestarrunner.com) did that first 
time | blew 10 hours compulsively plowing 
through the archives ... w 


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DISH 


Designer beef 


Spring Creek’s eco-friendly take is 
proving popular across Alberta 


SHARMAN HNATIUK / sharman@vueweekly.com 

onsumers are no longer open- 
{ ing their mouths and accepting 

the taste of genetically modi- 
fied foods—but eating healthy and 
environmentally-conscious foods usu- 
ally comes with a high price tag. 
Thankfully a local producer is provid- 
ing a natural beef option that tastes 
good at an acceptable price. 

Spring Creek Ranch is a fourth- 
generation family ranch near Vegre- 
ville with deep agriculture roots in 
Alberta. You could say they have gone 
back to the basics by producing 
Spring Creek Premium Beef that is 
never treated with hormones or 
antibiotics; however, they are also 
embracing advances in modern tech- 
nology that promote efficiency while 
ensuring that agriculture’s resources 
remain renewable. 

In the aftermath of BSE and other 
meat-related issues that have dam- 
aged beef production in our country 
and helped to create a culture of 
concern about the heaith of meat 
consumption, the Kotelko family, 
who runs Spring Creek, has stepped 
forward to create a healthy product 
that consumers can feel confident in 
placing on the dinner table. Spring 


42 


Lt | LOCAL PRODUCERS 


3 | SPRING CREEK RANCH 
SPRINGCREEK.CA 


Creek takes pride in the health 
advantages of their beef by eliminat- 
ing hormones and antibiotics from 
their farming practices. A vegetarian 
diet of the cleanest and highest qual- 
ity grain and forage, enriched with 
vitamin E, fed to cattle in a stress- 
free environment means that cows 
can be cows again and hang out eat- 
ing grain in the pasture. 

What makes Spring Creek unique 
is their commitment to sustainable 
farming practices that will help 
maintain their business and their 
homestead for future generations. 
Highmark Renewables, their very 
own Integrated Manure Utilization 
System, converts the manure accu- 
mulated from Spring Creek Ranch 
cattle into renewable, zero-green- 
house gas energy and odorless 
biofertilizer. They produce enough 
power to supply their needs as well 
as the needs of neighbouring com- 
munities. 

The multimillion-dollar pilot project 
has helped make Spring Creek self- 


sufficient. They are now producing 
more energy than they consume and 
involved in developing similar sys- 
tems in dense agriculture areas. 
Spring Creek is helping to improve the 
image of farming by turning waste 
into something that is useful and by 


creating sustainable and environmen- 
tally friendly agriculture processes. 


THE COSTS of producing a premium, 
high-quality beef that meets their stan- 
dards in addition to their industry-lead- 
ing environmental initiatives can be 


COL MUSTARD'S / 14 


costly, but the market for the Spring 
Creek product is growing. “At first 
glance, consumers are hesitant at the 
price, but after they try it, people 
become repeat customers because they 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 15 


One taste & you'll 


el-Mmolele).q-teb: 


Catch all our del 


WUEWEEKLY SH 4-SE 10,2008 


ous Cantina specials! 


2 NICE LEGS 
JAMES LYLE 


els @vueweely.om 


os 


Two-thousand five is 
reported to be a stellar 
year in Bordeaux. With 
both sides of the 
river producing 
amazing wines, 
the prices have 
skyrocketed and 
availability is scarce. 
When you are able to find 
some of the better Bordeauxs in Canada, 
you'll likely find staggering prices 
attached. This is the case with the 
Chateau Lusseau, which at $80 is definite- 
ly overpriced. But, with most strong vin- 
tages, one has to set aside sticker 
shock and see if the juice will have 
you forget about the price. 
This wine definitely did 
that for me but took a very 
long time to do it. 
Chateau Lusseau is a 
Grand Cru winery 
from Saint Emilion, 
on the right (east- 
erly) bank of the 
Garonne river. 
Interestingly, 
most Bordeaux's are 
blends and the primary 
grape is generally dependant on which 
side of the river the winery and vineyards 
are. The left bank are Cabernet based; 
the right are Merlot. So this being a Mer- 
lot should present more subtle, refined 


> 


structure than it's left 
bank neighbours. 

When | first 
opened this strawber- 
ry-red wine, | found it 

emitted a well rounded 
nose with consistent tan- 
Nins just strong enough to 
hide other odours. But as 
the tannins subsided, which 
did take some time, the nose 
was filled with fruit and hints of 

spice. 

The flavours did take a while to 
develop. As expected, this wine is made 
to cellar and age. It took a few hours in a 
decanter before the wine opened up. It 
had a refined body with welcoming con- 
sistency and fruit. Throughout the evolu- 

tion of the taste, the fruit 

and structure of the 

wine remained pres- 

ent without being 

overwhelming, | caught 

hints of dirt in the back 
portion of the palate. 

This well-built, clean 
wine held on for what 
seemed like forever. Its fleshy 
body and good fruit continued 
to be a welcome taste for hours. 
Further evidence that with some 


f time and patience, particularly with 


price, a wine lover can be rewarded! 
2005 TINHORN CREEK 
MERLOT 
$20 


Wow, what a nose! When | first opened 
this vibrant cherry red wine, the odours 
exploded! There was vibrant fruit with 
hints of strawberry with a reasonable 
tannin presence that seemed to even out 
the smell. But, nevertheless, this is a 


ier JASPER! AvE 


Pee ennet ann neneonnenenn ees: 


erent experience 


wine that | could sit and smell for days. 
But the larger question was if the taste 
could live up the hype 

For the most part, no. It was a 
decent bottle of wine with a simple 
Structure and adequate fruit at the 
front. | found that behind the initial 
fruit flavours was a hint of spice that 
became bitter. There were decent pak 
overtones throughout, though after 
being open a while, the wine seemed 
to completely give up 

| thought it was a decent bottle of 
wine, but it needs to get better to com- 
pete with similarly priced wines in the 
market. w 


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He killed dinner 


Col Mustard’s is the place to go for 
a sandwich ... for dinner, not so much 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweokly.com 

messed up. Not a usual occurrence, 
[= one that does happen occasion- 

ally. Having found out that Col 
Mustard’s Sandwich Canteen is 
now serving dinner—real dinner from 
a real dinner menu—the plan was to 
stop in and eat, well, dinner. The glitch 
came about over differing opinions as 
to what constitutes dinner. 

If you form part of the rare minority 
that, for some peculiar reason, has an 
aversion to sandwiches, you may not 
be aware that Col Mustard’s has been 
a soup and sandwich emporium in 
our city for the past 12 years. When 
overcome by the need for a really 
great sandwich, it’s definitely the 
place to go. Everything is made from 
scratch and creations range from the 
mundane to the unique and bizarre. 

The premises that saw the loving cre- 
ation and consumption of the first sand- 
wich years ago became too cramped for 
the increasing demand and they moved 
locations just over two years ago. A 
new building with more space also 
meant higher overhead; higher over- 
head led to Jonger hours. Longer hours 
meant opening for dinner, which is pre- 
cisely the reason a friend and! 
descended upon Col Mustard’s on a rel- 
atively balmy Tuesday evening. 

As we maneuvered our tired bodies 
up the steps leading to the ornate 
door, | felt like 1 was about to enter a 
grand old character house. Our feet 
led us into the cheery and inviting 
take-out area, where remnants of old 
converged with splashes of new. Rus- 
tic wooden floors were livened up by 
vivid green, purple and yellow walls. 
An old-fashioned country bench com- 
peted for the pleasure of our company 
with tall, modern bar stools. High ceil- 
ings and big windows with bright 


tor's a Rwarcts 0 


TE-SAT (11 AM-8 PM) 
COL MUSTARD’ 
SANDWICH CANTEEN 


10002 - 124 ST, 780.448.1590 


CANTEEN 


white trim chased away the gloomy 
night and made the room feel open, 
airy and spacious. 

Numerous black chalkboards listing 
the lunch and take-out menu were hung 
behind and to the side of the display 
case/take-out counter/beverage bar. 
Just behind the contemporary black bev- 
erage bar, up a few steps, we got our 
first glimpse of the dining room, teasing 
us with the inviting light wooden chairs, 
checkerboard floors, framed rubber 
duckies and neon pink walls. Eager to 
settle in, my sandwich-obsessed friend 
first had to crane her neck and check 
out all the different sandwich offerings 
so her stomach could start pondering all 
the different possibilities. 

So far, so good. But when I asked 
the friendly girl behind the counter if 
she could seat us, just as my friend 
began debating her sandwich options 
out loud, the plan changed rather 
quickly. You see, sandwiches are only 
available for take-out after 5 pm. 
Before 5 pm, you can sit down, order 
whatever sandwich your heart 
desires, relax in the quirky dining 
room, and enjoy. After 5 pm, you can 
take your sandwich home or eat it at 
the lone little table in the front win- 
dow or at the beverage bar. Seeing as 
my friend needed a sandwich, we 
ordered sandwiches and ate at the 
lone little table in the front window. 
My review never happened. 


ANOTHER NIGHT, another friend and 
another attempt at a dinner review. 
This time it was a Friday night, there 


Excellence 


10012 - 107 Street mins # Edmonton 


Reservations 780-424-0707 - 


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SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


DISH 


was a slight nip in the air, and we 
actually made it up those little steps 
into the dining room. 

Our little two-person party settled 
in amongst a few other two-person 
parties and made the dining room 
seem a wee bit fuller, but not much. 
Sometimes | appreciate a quiet 
restaurant, but the way the tables 
were arranged | felt kind of exposed, 
and a bit on display. It was simple, 
quirky, and casual, but I thought it 
would be more comfortable if it was 
bustling and full of people. 

Although they are licensed for 
beer and wine—and actually had a 
reasonable selection of wines by the 
glass—it felt like a hot chocolate 
($4) and a soda water with lemon 
($3) kind of night. Our eyes tried to 
casually inspect other diners’ choic- 
es and, although we did catch a 
glimpse of a burger, some salmon 
and something green that I thought 
must be a salad, our mission was 
quite unsuccessful. 

That left us with just the dinner menu 
as a guide. There was a wide range of 
intriguing options on it. Soup, salads 
and pizza made up the first part of the 
menu, followed by some small plates 
and then the dinner dinners: lemon and 
garlic chicken breasts, a cioppino pot 
and grilled lamb chops. There were 
even burgers and mac ‘n’ cheese. 

Although I was tempted by the spe- 
cial of the day, an asparagus lasagna 
with spinach, ricotta and mozza, | 
was having a hard time deciding. | felt 
like I should be eating a sandwich, 
and my mind—and stomach—were 
having a hard time getting past that 
little barrier. Even one of the big sal- 
ads couldn't sway me. 

After numerous return trips from 
our very patient waitress, 1 ended up 
ordering the Grilled Flatbread with a 
Trio of Dips ($8). My friend went with 
the Three Cheese Pizza ($10). We each 
debated ordering a small spinach salad 
to add some colour to our dinners, but 
visions of the dessert special, butter 
pecan pie, dashed that thought. 


WE MANAGED to fit in a great deal of 


chatting before our dinners arrived 
When they did, I originally thought we 


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i, round disk that was placed in 
t of my friend was brown, very 
rown, , all Over. Closer inspection 
2 that it was indeed pizza, a 
cheesy pizza, with very brown, 
ery well done cheese. My one nibble 
jas chewy: the overdone cheese was 
chewy, the pita bread crust was 
chewy, the pizza was chewy. 

My flatbread was better, even if 
some of the pieces were a bit too 
grilled. It was nicely arranged 
around three little pots in the middle 
of the plate: one contained a tomato 
jam, one was filled with hummus 
and the third had tzatziki, I'm not 
sure what the spicing in the tomato 
jam was but my friend, who aban- 
doned her pizza in favour of my flat- 
bread, thought it tasted kind of like 
gingerbread. ! thought maybe curry, 
buf neither of us was inspired to 
investigate further. Both the tzatziki 
and the hummus were mild and 
creamy, with the hummus becoming 
the dip of choice. The garlic hit | was 
anticipating never materialized, and, 
although my taste buds missed it, | 
didn’t offend anyone at the breakfast 
table the next moming. 

Although neither of us were full, we 
decided to skip ordering a wedge of 
the tempting butter pecan pie. It just 
felt like time to go. 

[still can’t really say we had dinner 
We had a couple of little items from 
the big dinner menu, with mixed 
results. There's still a huge chunk of 
menu that we didn’t even touch. | do 
know I love Col Mustard’s for lunch. 
I’m just not sure about dinner. v 


ad received the wrong order. The’ 


SPRING CREEK RANCH 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 


are happy with the product,” explains 
Kirstin Kotelko, the family member 
growing the Spring Creek brand. 

Buying the brand is a unique con- 
cept for beef buyers, as most con- 
sumers grab the generic variety each 
grocer supplies. But Spring Creek has 
learned that more and more people 
want to know where their food comes 
from and are demanding higher stan- 
dards. “Once they get over the price 
hurdle, it’s not an issue anymore,” 
says Kotelko. “Consumers are willing 
to pay for a premium product with 
high standards and great taste.” 

Knowing their cattle are never fed 
or administered antibiotics, growth 
hormones or animal byproducts is 
attractive to both consumers at home 
and on the restaurant food scene. 
Spring Creek stands behind a tender 
and flavourful premium beef of excep- 
tional quality, a product that meets 
the standards of some of the top 
restaurants in Edmonton. The chefs at 
Characters, Jack’s Grill, and the Fair- 
mont Hotel MacDonald are all serving 
up Spring Creek beef on their menu, 
as are restaurants in Calgary, Banff, 
Vancouver and Toronto. 

Fresh cuts can be purchased at the 
Riverbend, Oliver Square and St 
Albert Trail Safeway locations in 
Edmonton; Spring Creek is the only 
branded beef that they're selling, but 
the price isn’t a major factor for those 
looking for a prime cut of beef. 

“Some people go with the cheaper 


AAA beef, but we also have a lot of 
customers who only buy the Spring 
Creek cuts,” explained Wayne Fer- 
guson, a butcher at the St Albert 
Trail location. “The price isn’t that 
much higher than our other quality 
cuts, but there are definitely repeat 
customers who only want to buy 
this brand now.” 

All Safeway stores across Canada 
are now selling Spring Creek Gourmet 
beef burgers, lean ground beef and 
spicy beef BBQ sauce, and there are 
plans to expand the product line to 
Sausages in the fall. But one of my 
new favourite places in town, Urban 
Careit Deli, is caring both fresh cuts of 
Spring Creek Premium Beef and using 
the product in their convenient gour- 
met take-away dishes. The Passionate 
Plate also uses Spring Creek beef in 
their studio kitchen and gourmet to 
go dishes 

Thanks to my love of great beef, | 
appreciate the product that Spring 
Creek is providing. When presented 
the choice I always prefer to support 
a local producer, especially one that 
is committed to producing a health- 
conscious product in an environmen 
tally sustainable way. While the price 
tag is higher than the average beef 
commodity on the market, buying 
Spring Creek Premium Beef means 
buying a brand committed to quality. 
Personally, I believe that the taste, 
texture and flavour of a quality cut of 
beef is worth it. And with environ 
mental initiatives like theirs, Spring 
Creek might even get some of you 
environmentally conscious vegetari- 
ans eating meat again. v 


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NSH 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 Aw 


JEREMY DERKSEN / snowzone@vueweekly.com 
ot air ripples above the 
H= Along the road cactus 
plants stretch up as tall as 

men, limbs winding around slack 
barbed wire fence. Driftwood 
cabanas lean against a rocky bluff 
that is slowly eroding into the 
beach. With my pale skin, | am an 
obvious foreigner in a country 
where almost no one speaks my 
language. All I want is a surfboard. 

In mangled Portuguese, I ask 
around for a place to rent from and 
find Pedro Barbudo. Tanned and lean, 
Barbudo is the energetic type whose 
age is impossible to guess, though 
there’s a hint of friendly wrinkles 
around his eyes. 

More importantly, he speaks rea- 
sonably good English. He’s an instruc- 


= (PORTUGAL 


tor at the Guincho Surf School (guin- 
chosurfschool.com), named for the 
beach where I've washed up with my 
gypsy band—my three brothers, my 
brother Andrew's fiancée, and my 
wife and infant son—in tow. Except 
for the roaring ocean, the scene could 
be a spaghetti western. 

We'd come north from Lisbon 
along the Estoril coast, up through 
the wealthy resort town of Cascais 
where oceanfront views command 
high prices. A paved multiuse trail fol- 
lows the road from Cascais to the 
beach. 

The waves at Guincho are among 
the best in Portugal. National and 


international competitions are regu- 
larly held here and further north at 
Ericeira. With clean water and a for- 
giving beach break, Guincho is a 
good place for beginner to interme- 
diate surfers; but more advanced 
surfers need swim only a little fur- 
ther out to catch bigger, more chal- 
lenging swells. 

The last time I'd come to Portu- 
gal, two years ago July, my luck 
had been different. After receiving 
contradicting advice | had headed 
south to the Alentejo, but the 
water there was flat. Then I took a 
long bus trip to Ericeira and got 
stranded in town, miles from the 
surf beach. This time I'm feeling 
lucky. Fall is ideal surf season in 
Portugal and the waves are straight 
ahead. 


wea 
PEDRO APPRAISES ME as t explain 
what | want. He hasn’t met many 
Canadian surfers, if any, and he's 
skeptical. After some discussion 
about our experience, we negotiate a 
flat-fee rental of 20 euro each (about 
$30 CAD) for wetsuits and surf 
boards—no contracts, insurance 
forms or waivers required—and we 
hit the water running. 

The weather is so unseasonably 
warm—hovering around 28°C—I 
quickly shed the wetsuit. For the first 
time ever, I'm surfing in nothing but 
board shorts. 

The afternoon break grows as we 
paddle into it. Soon I'm drinking salt- 
water cocktails and shaking foam out 
of my ears and nose. Finally, after a 
long, arduous swim out, { catch my 
wave. It’s about a metre high, a per- 


te 


Saltwater cocktails on the Estoril coa 


a 


fect break for my skill level. 

1 paddle several strong strokes into 
it, pop and set up on the board. The 
wave pushes me hard and fast toward 
the beach, curling into a frothing 
whitecap as I draw nearer to shore. 
Sun gems dance in the rippling water 
before me. | tip back and let myself 
sink slowly into the cool water. 

The afternoon sun wanes as I gath- 
er the gypsies for our return voyage 
into the land of cork trees and wind- 
mills. Along the beach, young girls 
flirt with their boyfriends in the water. 
Scruffy dogs chase sticks into the 
waves. Further down, workers are 
setting up an outdoor bar and a 
makeshift stage. As we make our way 
back, boards under our arms, miles of 
endless sand burn the last impression 
of summer into our feet. w 


16 OE WEEKLY SEP 4A-SEP 10, 2008 


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES 


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COLIN CATHREA / colin@vueweekly.com 

ust beyond Airport Lake, the Arctic 

stillness was broken by a growing 

cloud of dust on the horizon. The 

mble of 18 wheels on the rough 
gravel road grew louder as the semi 
crept closer. The grey ghost lurched to 
a stop close to where we sat resting 
from a hike in the middle of nowhere 
near the Arctic Circle. 

Like a scene out of a Stephen King 
movie, the cab door opened slowly 
and a grizzled driver emerged, step- 
ping down to the first pavement he'd 
seen in nearly 2000 kilometres on his 
regular route up to Inuvik, North- 
west Territories. He looked over at 
us and the dogs. “Howdy,” he said. 

Noticing spare wheels stacked on 
the trailer’s roof, | asked how many 
flats this trip. “Only a few this time,” 
he smiled. 

1 had studied the roadmap of the 
Dempster Highway and read about its 
beauty and savageness. It’s the only 
highway in Canada that passes 
through the Artic Circle; 700 km of 
atrocious driving. It’s slimy when it’s 
wet and a virtual dust storm when it’s 
dry. The dust is so fine it permeates 
the interior of your vehicle. You don’t 
want to tail anyone for long or your 
air filter will plug off like a cork ina 
bottle of Yukon Jack. 

Travellers advisories suggest bring- 
ing supplies like food and water, tires 
and a flare gun. The highway winds 
its way through several mountain 
ranges, parallels wide rivers and pops 
out on high alpine plateaus. Its beauty 
is hard to explain and even harder to 
capture on camera. 

That's when | thought of the can of 
Soup. You see, goods get this far north 
via several different modes of trans- 
portation, depending on the season. 
When the mighty MacKenzie River is 
open, huge barges are loaded on the 
South side of the massive Great Slave 
Lake at Hay River and navigate the 
water north to Inuvik. In the winter, 
when everything is frozen, an ice 
highway connects Inuvik to Tuktoyak- 
tuk on the Arctic Ocean. 

Prices for commercial goods swing 
with the season. The barges are a rel- 
atively cheaper way to ship goods, so 
prices in late summer and fall are 
lower than in winter. While it may be 
impossible to put a price on beauty 
and remoteness, a can of Campbell's 
Chunky Beef soup I'd found in the 
Srocery store offered some perspec- 
tive. It was $7.98. 


='NORTH 


TWO WHITE SIBERIAN HUSKIES, miko 


and Gus, sat panting beside us as we 
tehydrated after our hot and sweaty 
hike into Airport Lake. It was mid- 
June and we were enjoying a brief 
Teprieve from the usually nasty bugs 
thanks to a late-May snowfall which 
had slowed the spring hatch. There 
was still ice on most of the lakes. 
While flying over the massive Great 
Bear Lake, we saw thousands of 
square miles of it. This delta is one of 
the largest watersheds on the planet, 
second only to the Amazon. 

My hiking companion and | had just 
attended the Inuvik Petroleum Show, 
where we'd listened to the environ- 
mental and geopolitical concerns of 
the local people. We flew up instead of 
driving the Dempster Highway because 
of time constraints, but we planned to 
take time to explore the land and get a 
true sense of the life here 

This year Inuvik celebrates its 50th 
birthday, a year which may change 
this land forever. Drilling for natural 
gas has been going on for quite some 
time, but a proposed pipeline to lucra- 
tive American markets would run 
above ground through native people's 
lands, disrupting traditional hunting 
and fishing grounds. 

This has the Inuit concerned. They 
see themselves as guardians of this 
land and they want a say in its stew- 
ardship. Meeting with several tribal 
elders to get a sense of their con- 
cems, I was struck by their closeness 
to the environment. For generations 
their survival has been linked to the 
land, and a deeply rooted connection 
to the earth remains ingrained in their 
culture. 

In the last decade polar bears have 
been seen far inland, displaying hunt- 
ing habits more like grizzlies and 
blacks, said George Irish, one Inuit 
man I met. As the ice recedes further 
away from shore, he explained, so 
does their food. One of the first 
speakers at the petroleum show sim- 
ply stated that the Eskimo Nation 
does not recognize international bor- 
ders, only the natural borders of the 
north. The shrinking polar ice cap is 
causing massive changes to these 
people's way of life. 

When it comes down to it, commu- 
nity is everything up here. It's literally a 


matter of life and death: you cannot 
survive on your own. In many lands, 
Aboriginal peoples hide their presence, 
but in the cold and dangerous North, 
they advertise their whereabouts with 
Inukshuks. The ancient stone 
metaphors are a guide for travellers, 
pointing the way to people and aid. 


WE'D COME SEEKING INUKSHUKS in the 


symbolic balancing act between plun- 
dering and preserving the land, but 
after several days of northern politics 
my travel companion and | were ready 
to get good and truly lost. Our hosts at 
the Arctic Chalet (arcticchalet.com), 
Olay and Judi Falsnes, helped us with 
pointers and the loan of our two 


guides, huskies Miko and Gus. 

Olay, a former bush pilot who ran 
his own airline, is one of those north- 
em pioneers who has numerous sto 
ries of adventures he's had over his 
decades roaming the land. He's also an 
inventor of sorts, using geothermal 
heating and cooling, revamped trucks 
to haul water and all sorts of other giz- 
mos. Judi is a dog lover extraordinaire, 
with a family of over 25 huskies. 

Miko and Gus were vital guides on 
the trail. They led us along unmarked 
routes by following the scents of pre- 
vious hikers, all the while acting as 
scouts for grizzly bears and other crit- 
ters. We fished for northern pike and 
lake trout as the 24-hour sun stayed 


high in the sky. 

Truly, hiking in the middle of the 
night under a clear blue sky in bright 
sunlight is bizarre. After one long trek 
we hit the local bar around midnight 
We finally emerged to bright sunlight 
at around 3 am, walking right into the 
middle of a road hockey game 

With such drastically different sea- 
sons, it’s hard to forget about their 
impact. Late May snowstorms, 24- 
hour sun and $8 cans of soup may be 
inevitable, a fact of life in the North 
Melting polar ice caps and oil 
pipelines are another matter. With 
Miko and Gus running ahead, | 
focused on the trail in front of me and 
my own connection to the land. v 


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


18 


WUrEv 


Financial Services 


HON WA 


PEREORMANCE FIRST” 


.- SV, 


www.sconacyde com 


20 WWEWEEKLY SP 4-SE 10,2008 


JEREMY DERKSEN / snowzone@vueweekly.com 


erm, table, berm, table, table ... 
Br: I'm flying in mid air, barely 

getting my feet back on my ped- 
als as | crank a hard half-sideways land- 
ing, skidding in the dust. It’s only my first 
run and my fingers are stiffening into 
crab claws around my handlebars, and 
there's a wide, crazy grin frozen on my 
face. So this is Silver Star. 

Wherever I've gone this season, 
there’s been at least one constant: on 
lifts, in bike shops and on web 
forums, riders are talking about Silver 
Star's park (skisilverstar.com). Now | 
know why: fast, flowy lines with pro- 
gressive features building confidence 
and ability as they propel you higher 
into the air and harder into the turns. 
Still, between log jams, teeter-totters 
and drop-downs, it’s enough to push 
experienced riders to the brink. If 
there's a park whose design hints at 
the future of the sport, this is it. 

Despite insane speed, serious air 
time and potential for pain, downhill 
biking hasn't yet galvanized the mass- 
es the way other “extreme” sports like 
snowboarding have. There’s a steady, 
masochistic freeride subculture but the 
sport is still in adolescence, figuring 
out how to reach both the hardcore 


WUEWEEKLY 


YOUR ADVENTURE AWAITS... 


WELL NOT YET! 


LOOK FOR MORE 


ADVENTURES 


OCT 23 -SNOWZONE LIGHT 
NOV 20 - SNOWZONE WEEKLY 
APRIL 23/09 - GREAT OUTDOORS 
JUNE 11/09 - HOT SUMMER GUIDE 


and the Sunday rider at the same time. 

Usually, efforts to cater to one seg- 
ment alienate the other, especially if 
it’s the hardcore old guard who feel 
ignored. But Silver Star has struck a 
rare balance. “Other parks have gone 
after the hardcore rider but that’s a 
small demographic,” says Cam Soren- 
son, Silver Star's bike park director. 
“Yeah, we've got stuff for the hardcore 
rider but for the sport to grow asa 
whole it has to diversify. We want a 
park that’s fun for everybody.” 


THE TRAILS BEAR OUT this philosophy. 
After starting on Rock Star, a blue run 
with berms and moderate tables, | 
upped the ante on Super Star. It kicks 
off with a metre-high drop-down, 
then launches into a series of multiple 
pitches and jumps mixed with some 
roots and rocks for good measure 
before you hit the berms and tables all 
out. With room to ride out or around 
the biggest stunts and enough space 
between features to manage speed, I 
was able to roll smooth and fast. Less 
brake, more crank ... yeehaw! 

“You can make a feature safe but 
still challenging and that's the biggest 
thing we've been working at. That 
comes from having a trail crew who all 


ride,” Sorenson says. He’s had at least 
30 days riding the park this season. 
Sorenson and crew have used 


= (SILVER STAR 


their knowledge to build in pro- 
gression without watering down 
the wilder stunts and terrain. LTG, a 
new trail complementing the black 
diamond Pipe Dream, is a log-rid- 
ing reverie for the intermediate 
rider: three teeter-totters one after 
another leading into an intricate 
section of logwork. Then there's 
World Cup, with its double wall 
rides of high-speed intensity, or the 
Jagged steeps of Double Dog. 

All this translates into a park that 
lets riders progress while keeping 
them on their toes. “It's an active bike 
park, you're never waiting for some- 
thing to happen. You're always turn- 
ing and moving,” Sorenson says. “I 


hate going down a straight jump to a 
straight turn to a straight jump. | like 
moving my bike.” 

With sophisticated park d 
better bikes and younger gener 
taking to the hills in increasing n 
bers, there's a breakthrough br 
ming. As this season nears its cl 
Sorenson's progressive park 
heralds a change in the sport towards 
@ more supportive, sustainable m 
No doubt, it will attract the ho’ 
force before long 

But in the meantime, lift lines are 
still sparse and the trails are \ 
open. Sweating in the 35°C hea 
halfway down World Cup, I had a 
clear view of the future as one rider 
after another launched big air in front 
of a wide panorama of hills under- 
neath a clear blue sky. Less brake 

more crank, get it while you can. v 


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EK SEP 4- SEP 10, 2008 


TRAIL FIX 


ee 

i] 

i—] 

E BOBBI BARBARICH 
bobbi@vueweekly.com 


SUMMER ENDS: WHATEVER 

For the first time in months, | fell asleep 
with a cold nose. | wasn't sweating and 
there was no hum of a futile fan passing 
warm air over my moist skin. Instead, | 
hunkered down under a thin blanket and 
cheered for winter. As | spend the unoffi- 
cial last week of summer surfing in Tofi- 
no, | can't wait until this wet stuff is 
semi-solid fluff. 

With winter bearing down, | start look- 
ing for free ways to get on the hill, so | 
spoke with Louise Charron,VP of public 
relations with the Canadian Ski Patrol 
System (CSPS). At resorts, they're the 
ones you see wearing the blue and yel- 
low jackets with the yellow cross/blue 
maple leaf insignia on the back. They're 
also the ones riding with a free lift pass 
for each shift they patrol and they may be 
getting a free lunch or discounted season 
passes for their families. 


It may seem that in order to be a 
patroller, you have to be a skier—as a 
snowboarder, | had never considered it. 
Charron informed me otherwise. “You 
don’t need to be an expert, but you will 
need to be able to handle a toboggan 
and meet the minimum rating set out by 
the local patrol.” 

Ski and snowboard instruction is often 
available at little or no cost at the local 
level. CSPS will completely train you in 
first aid and CPR, as well as avalanche 
search and rescue techniques if you're in 
a high-risk area. It also offers exchange 
opportunities between patrol organiza- 
tions across the country 

Patro! commitment is flexible. Says 
Charron, “It depends on the local patrol 
Some will ask for a certain amount of 
days, others are fixed to a one day a 
week.” The next recruitment night is Sep 
24. Patrol training starts Oct 7 and lasts 
seven weeks with on snow training 
beginning in December at Rabbit Hill 
(info@cspsedmonton.ca). 


LONG LIVE RABBIT 
Despite the rumours, Rabbit Hills road will 
be open this winter—allowing quick 


access to the largest and arguably best 
terrain park in northern Alberta, Says Rich 
Parrie of Rabbit Hill, “The County of Leduc 
passed a bylaw allowing them to take over 
the road and guarantee access for the next 
two years,” including summer months 

Rumours have been circulating the 
bike park would close after this sea 
son. “Although Rabbit Hill has a strong 
group of core riders, Season pass hold- 
er numbers dropped this year, 
explains Parrie. To reduce financial 
losses incurred during the first two 
years of operation, the hill is revamp 
ing its hours for next spring but has no 
plans to close. "Since the road will 
remain open, we are optimistic that 
trend will reverse next summer.” 

Rabbit Hill is also promoting their new 
winter season passes ($249 before Sep 
30). Pass holders will enjoy’a 25 per cent 
discount at Sunshine, Marmot, Norquay 
and Kicking Horse, and discounts at sev 
eral other resorts. It will also give you 2 
free three-day lesson program or a VIP 
bonus card for freebies and significant 
money savers at the hill. 

So turn off that air conditioning. Dream 
cold, Think snow. w 


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES 


ite 
1 wo words: Canadian 

_ Idol." Ryan Parker leans 

in emphatically, a gen- 
erous eine spreading across his 
face while his eyes twinkle with a 
bit of friendly ribbing towards his 
friend and frequent collaborator, 
Sheldon Elter. “Seriously, if you 
work it all the way back, if Shel- 
don never went on Canadian Idol, 
we probably never would have 
had this.” 

The this to which he’s referring 
is their new sketch comedy show, 
Caution: May Contain Nuts, set 
to air this fall on APTN, and as his 
tack would imply, he’s selling it a 
bit short. Truthfully, the show’s 
roots go all the way back toa 
drunken conversation at a 
Nextfest wrap party, where Parker 
and local improviser/actor Matt 
Alden floated the idea of starting a 
sketch comedy troupe, which 
would eventually come to be 
called Blacklisted. Beer promises 
slowly became actual commit- 
ments, and as the duo drew ina 
host of other locals—Alden‘s 
friend Jeff Halaby, Elter, sound 
wizard Aaron Macri and eventual- 
ly comedy vet Dana Anderson— 
shows started piling up, and 
eventually audiences with them: 
the group got a regular late-night 
slot at the Azimuth, and eventual- 
ly a few sold-out runs at the 
_ Fringe, drawing wider and wider 
audiences with their bombastic, 
frequently irreverent sketches. 

Only then did Elter’'s gig on the 
popular karaoke show come in to 
play. Singing on Idol landed him a 
Spot in the APTN series Hank 
Williams First Nation; ‘onn 
made on that 


i, eventually, 

the reat of up. Enlisting a 
host of other local actors and 
Patel luding Howie 
doin, Minister 

! and Natasha 

Napo! P was solidi- 


fied, a pilot a and saon 
after - ae a full six- 


|| EYES SEE ES Ee Ee 28529 
, aia 


id gets some help from the 
y for their new sketch show 


Fad SAT, SEP 19- SAT, OCT 18 (1230,At) 
UTION: 


MAY CONTAIN NUTS 
FATRNGALARUISEL AE HAD, 
HOMIE MILE, MINISTER FAS 

JAMS AAS WnPOLEAD 
ATH CHANNEL 85) 


has turned out, they admit turning 
stage funny into screen funny was 
quite the learning experience, 
especially from the acting side. 
That said, they credit the group’s 
already-collaborative working 
arrangements—thoroughly aided 
by both their new recruits and the 
TV crew—with helping them land 
on their feet. 

“The best thing about our group 
is that everyone has their different 
style of comedy, so usually any 
sketch that ends up in a show, 
everyone's had their input: noth- 
ing’s really finished when we bring 
it to the group,” says Parker, 
adding that the dynamic stayed for 
the television show. “Once we got 
on set, it was hilarious. We'd con- 
stantly be going, ‘Can we change 
this, can we change this.’” 

“Our poor script supervisor,” 
laughs Elter in agreement. "We never 
let her rest. But that kind of environ- 
ment actually ended up turning out 
great, because eventually everyone 
felt like they could come at us with 
ideas.” 

“Yeah, by the second week in, 
everyone was like, ‘You know 
what would. be funny ...’” contin- 
ues Parker. “With comedy, usually 
the more input the better, and 
everyone was trying to put in their 
two cents, which was awesome, 
really, because then everyone is 
invested, and everyone is enjoying 


themselves.” 


The ability for the show to draw 
people together turns out to be Park- 
er antes favourite part of the 
experience: a point of pride for both 
of them is that the show was created 
entirely in Edmonton, using local 
actors and crew. 

“There's a real sense of pride, 
that we get to throw back to the 
community here,” he says. “It’s a 
chance for us to say, ‘This is 
where we started, and this is 
where we're going to start some- 
thing else,’ and that’s a really cool 
thing to be able to do.” w 


- 


ALBRECHT DURER / 24 


amy@Qyueweekly.com 


This week, my first curated exhibition, 
Edmonton: EXPLORED, opens at the Art 
Gallery of Alberta for a two-month run. 
Besides shameless self-promotion, I'm 
tom as to how | feel about this show and 
my ongoing role within Edmonton's arts 
community. I'm not really angling for 
either positive or negative reactions: 
moreso | feel I'm finally putting my money 
where my mouth is and that | continue to 
be engaged with Edmonton, a city struc- 
ture that can stand in for any other mid- 
sized sprawl city on this continent. 

At the same time, in between days of 
install, I'm heading back to the U of A to 
begin my MA with a directed reading 
course on our flat city of urbanity and 
sprawl. Reading urban theorist and art 
critic Lucy R Lippard’s The Lure of the 
Local: Senses of Place in a Multicentered 
Society, the NY-biased writer ranges from 
the paint of mythologies and Marxism, 
framing the stories and identity of a city 
as being a history perpetuated by the 
privileged to the role artists have played 
in conduiting and documenting the gentri- 
fication of urban spaces. In writing about 
the ongoing decline of American boom 
cities and the general abandonment of a 
city's centre for new development further 
from the centre (to the point of creating 
new cities outside of the abandoned 
core), Lippard notes that the city has 
always been a perpetual shuffle between 
developers and citizens, and that boiled 
down, itis simply about land value versus 


Exploring Edmonton 
PRAIRIE ARTSTERS 


the value of its current tenants—insights 
all aptly applicable to almost every zone 
of Edmonton in the 21st century. 

Commuting through the city core 
everyday, especially coming down from 
the 118 Ave zone 
of revitalization 
through forgotten 
blocks of redlined 
neighborhoods, 
the Edmonton | 
know is a city with 
no pedestrian traf- 
fic, scared off by 
the rumbling of 
Semis and pick- 
ups roaring all- 
too-near, stepping 
around piles of 
plastic garbage 
blown to and from 
unkempt alleyways, and where street- 
level gravel lots and “For Lease” signs 
remain the constant norm. 


EDMONTON: EXPLORED started as an 
image in my head, a living diorama of sev- 
eral outdoor Edmonton Cultural Capital 
projects pulled together into one indoor 
setting. From street art to billboard art, the 
common denominator between artists and 
civically minded individuals Jennifer 
Berkenbosch, Clay Lowe and lan Mulder, 
Ted Kerr, aAron Munson and Mark Temple- 
ton and Monica Pitre lie in their independ- 
ently achieved engagements with this 
citys contemporary identity. From current 
discussions on the merit of graffiti to mak- 
ing visible the faces of Edmonton's immi- 
grant population, across the board there 
comes a consistent engagement with chal- 


LE. 


= 


r— 


lenging the city’s official mythologies, pro- 
ducing work and documents of work that 
actively participate in bringing attention to 
those perspectives easily forgotten once 
they were ghettoized 

A major underly- 
ing theme is navi- 
gating through 
Edmonton on a 
pedesirian level 
which mostly 
testricts the work 
to the city’s inner 
core. Although the 
Majority of work is 
a reinterpretation 
of their original 
presentations, the 
works invite you to 
shed the-conven- 
lence and order of 
vehicular grid systems and engage in the 
act of walking—of physically tracing 
city step by step—as a fundamental fac- 
tor to internalizing your surrounding 
rhythms. Gathered within a space smaller 
than 60 square feet, the inner city is con- 
densed, dissected and made accessible 
to those who do not necessarily inhabit 
those neighbourhoods. The gallery is only 
a presentation of reality documented, and 
the contextualized works are living and 
breathing just blocks away from their sim- 
ulacrums. | know for me, the experience 
of walking through this city is an increas- 
ingly isolating experience, but that just 
means more than ever that | need to 
explore why | remain here. w 


Amy Fung is the author of 
www prairieartsters.com 


0 NEW PORTRAITS OF THE PAST BY 
rm A 


K.c. ADAMS 


” LORI BLONDEAU 
meme DANA CLAXTON 


TERRANCE HOULE 
| MARIA HUPFIELD 
_ KENT MONKMAN 

ADRIAN STIMSON 

JEFF THOMAS 


Dana Claxton, Saby Boy Gotra indion Horse, 2608 
Digital Print.60 x 48° 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA 


; Faeries Square, 100 - 10230 i: Ave | Edmonton AB 
15) 4P6 | 780.422.6223 | wy eryalbert 


eS os @s-- ee WUEWEEKLY 


SP 4-SH 10,2008 © WuEweemy 238 


0TO 


VUEWEEKLY.COM 
TO LINK TO 


TO LI 
EDMONTON'S 


MOST 


COMPREHENSIVE 
LISTINGS OF 


ARTS” 


e jC h ;" 


on 


Looking at the works 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychrista@vueweekly.com 
he extensive introductory text 
panels in The Prints of 
Albrecht Direr: Works of a 

Renaissance Master—historical 
and biographical context for the 
artist and his era—cannot prepare a 
viewer for the first glimpse of the 
initial print by Direr in this show, 
“Samson Rending The Lion.” Even if 
you've seen his pieces reproduced 
in the middlebrow way reserved for 
giants of art history—on calendars 
posters, tote bags, brick-like coffee 
table books, and the like—you can’t 
anticipate the impact of being inch 
es away from a reproduction 
authored by Direr himself. 

Made in 1496, when the artist 
was 25 years old, “Samson” show- 
cases Diirer’s strength as much as it 
does his biblical! heroic subject’s— 
the dense imagery laboriously craft- 
ed ina multiplicity of lines, 
considered and Jaden symbolism, 
his incredible evocation of character 
and situation, the skillful transfor- 
mation of a familiar ages-old story 
into a moment that crystallizes a 
new nuanced meaning for his view- 


me] Diirer endures 


and legacy 


of a printmaking master at AGA 


UNTIL SUN NOV 
THE PRINTS OF 


ALBRECHT DURER 
ORGANIZED BY THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA 
AGA 100-1020 JASPER AVE 


lu 
— 
co 
co 
a 


ers at the height of the Renaissance 
and continues to grip new audi- 
ences over five centuries later. 

In the print, Samson wrestles the 
kind of stylized lion that we might 
broadly recognize from heraldry— 
not a Serengeti cat but one that 
looks almost as mythic as its tor 
menting opponent. He holds open 
the unfortunate creature’s jaws, and 
the animal looks up at him with a 
kind of pleading awe. Samson’s 
eyes, however, are not focused on 
the beast. It doesn’t even look like 
he is particularly concentrating on 
the rending at all—rather, he gazes 
off to the left of the print, well 
beyond its paper borders. His eyes 
are distantly focused, despite being 
anchored by his intent brows, and 
he appears to be heeding some far- 
away call that only he can hear. The 
long, loosely twisting curls of Sam- 


son's famously strength-giving hair 
are mirrored in the mane of the suc- 
cumbing lion, and indeed they 
resemble the mane gracing the 
artist on his self-portrait, and again 
in a later piece that’s also in the 
show, the long curling hair of St 
john The Evangelist, naked and 
gruesomely stuffed in a cauldron 
over a roaring fire to meet his mar- 
tyred fate. (St John’s hair, in turn, is 
echoed by the flames rising beneath 
the pot where he is praying, eyes 
turned piously upward.) 


DURER 1S MORE explicitly present in 
the work by virtue of his initials, a 
characteristically bold printmaking 
signature that he places prominently 
at the centre bottom of the paper, a 
proud brand of creation. The “A” arcs 
over the “D,” his Germanized Christ- 
ian name embracing his familial one 
If he were alive today, Diirer would 
have been a font geek on top of any 
other artistic inclination he might 
have pursued 


He was linked to the cutting-edge” 


technology of his day. In 1439, gold- 
smith Johann Gutenberg invented his 
printing press, and the machine rev- 
olutionized Europe as it diffused 
across the continent, sowing a 
plethora of ideas, some quite radical, 
in its wake. Like the Internet a 
decade ago, it democratized thought 
in a way that had not been thought 
possible. Durer was the son of a 
goldsmith, surrounded by a commu- 
nity of craftsmen who easily adopted 
printing presses, which were some- 
what familiar to this class of artisan- 


merchants, as they employed princi 
ples and techniques already presen; 
in a typical goldsmith activity 
engraving. A precociously talente« 
artist as an adolescent, Durer was in 
the proximity of presses from a 
young age and his later printmaking 
would be featured in several printed 
books, and ripped off enough to spu; 
him on to become an early copyrigh 
activist. 

But there's no need to focus on 
history here—as with any show cir 
culated by the National Gallery 
Albrecht Durer comes lavishly 
wrapped in didactics. Due tc 
Direr’s early fame, extensive writ 
ings and pivotal role in his time and 
place, a lot is known about the man 
and his work, and the NGC has pro 
vided not only broad information 
but each piece is also accompanied 
by a small write-up that points tc 
technique, subject, and symbolism 
plus the occasional bit of intellectu 
al ephemera. 

The real centerpiece is the print 
themselves, and unlike some big 
name shows that have blow: 
through town, there's a lot of meat 
including famous pieces like his 
“Revelations” works. Durer'’s prints 
can completely absorb you, full) 
drawing you into his controlled riot 
of significant marks. His subject 
matter is almost always intense— 
battles between Light and Dark root 
ed in the moralistic folktales and 
Christian and Classical myth, bul 
framed in the new humanism that 
marked the Renaissance and lit th« 
path to the Enlightenment. vw 


Stade’ s 


Seatured  Sidisb. 


12-5PM 


spend the 
work! 


SEPTEMBER 20 & 21, 


Join us for a weekend of art. Take the opportunity to 
weekend meeting these gifted artists and watch them at 


PEARL DER | St Albert 


| Hidden Talent / Spotlight Gallery 
JUNE HARING | 4107, 25 Chisholm Ave. 
| of 
MEMORY ROTH | St. Albert, AB 
| Ph. 780.419 


LAURA WATMOUGH 
The Studio Gallery 


11 Perron St. St. Albert, AB 
Ph. 780.460.5993 


MONK 
PAT WAGENSVELD 
Pygmalion School of Fine Art 


8645 McKenney Ave. St. Albert, AB 
Ph. 780.460.1677 


DIXIE ORRISS 


2nd Floor, 33 Rayborn Cres 
St. Albert, AB 
E. dalinec@shaw.ca 


DORIS CHAREST 


541 30 Range Road 270 
Sturgeon County, AB 
Ph. 780.459.3747 


JUDY SCHAFERS 


4740 - 50 St 
Bon Accord, AB 
Ph. 780.921.3412 


POTTERY 
BY HEATHER 


VEEIILY 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


isaontonn 9 tars Ans Burg fon Rain location, 
Weak © Sept. 10 

(apm) ® aan rete 

= ; |St, wwwcitieballet.com * Open 

[heat a Season launch ® Sat. Sept. 6 (34:30pm) 


[no och ll are 
Ukrainian Giea 11018-97 St (780-966-9285) « 


Mar-Mac ad and 


a Annual Gala and Fundraiser * Sat, 

eee a 10923-101 
er era MZD 0; 
F RTE Islamierecaet 
GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 

AGNES BUGERA GALLERY 12310 Jasper Ave (780- 

487-2854) © ‘Tue-Sat 10am-5pm @ ACQUA ALTA: 

Artworks BC based artist Jane Everett # 

Sept. 13-25 * Opening reception: Sat, Sept. 13 (2-4pm) 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10196-106 St (780-488- 
6611) © ELEMENTAL CONNECTIONS: An Exhibition of 
Sustainable Noe New Sept. 27 © Gallery: 
FLUORESCENCE: New ceramic works by Candice Ring; 

Sept. 6-Get. 18; opening reception: Sat, Sept. 6 (2-4pm) 


ART BEAT 26 St Anne Street, St Albert ee) 


20 ® Open 
resp So 4390» of St Alberts 
Matar Wve (ROAZ2 S223) ©" Open Mon 
A sre Square 
t-adan Spm, Tht Y Sat-Sun 
ia WORKS OFA MASTER: 


(CE 
OF ALBRECHT DUREA: Until Nav, 2 © FACE 
THe NATION: Artworks ie eight Aboriginal artists from 
i MsKiaT(unSant the REAL 
Ful ° 
naan teal aris si Sept 25» 


Sept. 5 (7. ay ale Se Rept 
curator's 
i ak Serre (rap ca Day. Activities, pa 
inet ofa oo online extn THE ROAD: 
Gintcing the Alaska Hic Sat, Sept. 6 (14pm) 
rca (ottbeae eb fect See THen $5(6- 
i : {Syrs and (family-2 adults, 4 chil- 
ren) 


ARTSHAB STUDIO GALLERY 3rd Fi, 10217-106 St 
eee ey 


CANADA PLACE 2nd F!, 9700 Jasper A\ (26- 
ihe ee ah he Frances Alty Arscott 


St * Artist mst 


(12:30-3:30pm); www. thecarrot.ca 
LALBERTA 9103-95 


CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE 
Ava Preece d) *'Mon-Fri 10am-Spm; Sat 10am-Spm 
= Artworks by Louise Rae, Stephen 
ian Annette Ayre, Suzanne Gaultier and Louise 
eae rama’ . Sept. 5-17 © Opening reception: 


pes RED GALLERY 9621 
Ave (780-498-1 = ose Mon Tiam-Spm © 
Summer Salon and Sale * Until October 


COMMON SENSE Payal SR -2685) © 


Spee by appointment. ‘* THE IMPOR- 


itercolt ind 
cacy ein Each bs 
oe a0 

a tee si thd 


2a Surrey 4404 | eal _ 


Ser Eine paar iy Doles Ka cas 


(ie ee a 
Pl ie 
nat Si, 1 1 Londen long 


Be 


by various 


THE SWIMMERS: Vi 
Ort me i Reg 
pn sista rg en Hi 


See a 
Meee 
10831 Universit 


gan-pm Ae pr or the 


ps a instructors for the upcoming fall/winter session; ud 


JOHNSON GALLERY RA ERY OTIS 1817-30 St1780.478- 
B424) Open Tue-Fri $:30am-5:30pm; Sat e30am-4pm * 
Artworks by various artists « Tate 
JOHNSON (780-465- 
B17) pen Mont Sitidanspn= 
Arties 2 Thao ptember 


Wat tun gn rp Sat 180-944-9497) « Mon- 
iu 10am-7pm, Sat 10am-5pm * 

artwor local and international artists, 
ea décor and gift items 


LATITUDE 53 10248-1065 St (780-423-5353 
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm; Sat noon-Spm OCR CTY BIRT 
CITY: Bios show { featuring artworks 


by local artists 
mony 


sdmonton’s et of rock and roll music, curated 


j by Todd Janes © Until Sept. 6 


LOFT GALLERY A. J, Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 
Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park (780-986-3081/467- 
7356) ® Open Thu §-3pm, Sat 10am: 
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 08 SHOW: Artvoaia Willie 
Wong, Dianna Sapara, Janet Kraemer, Sonja Marinoske, 
Tony Goobie, Janice Bonsant-Wilson and Margaret 
Klappstein * Sept-Oct 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St 
(780-407-7152) * Open Mon-Fri 10am-8pm; Sat-Sun 1- 
8pm * FORM UNFOLDING: Artworks by members of the 
Sculptors Aeocation * Until Oct. 26 * Opening recep- 
tion; Sept. 4 (7-9pm) 


MCPAG 5411-51 St, aay Plain (780-963-2777) # Open 
Mon-Sat 10am-4pm; Sun 10am-6:30pm © TIME PAS- 
SAGES: Paintings by Beverly Bunker © Until Sept. 23 


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES-JASPER Jasper Park Lodge, 
Www,mountaingalleries.com (780-852~ See * Open 
daily * Artworks by Diane Way. 


MUNAN GALLERY 10045-101A Ave, Rice-Howard 

BES ra Place, ing 208 206 (780-756-7396/780-429- 
}* INSCENDS: Oil paintings, seulp- 
ned rai, doll houses and tribal masks * Until 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 Ste Anne Street, St 
Albert (780-459-1528) © DINO DEW: Tue-Sat {11am-3pm) 


NAKED CYBER CAFE 10354 Jasper Ave © 
COLLAPSING COLONIES: Featuring works by the Beehive 
pe biowised for the North of Nowhere Expo © 

til Nov. 


NINA HAGGERTY STOLLERY GALLERY 9704-111 Ave 
780-474-7611) * Open Mon, Wed, Fri 9:30am-2:30pm; 
ue, Thu 9:30-4pm, 6:30-8:30pm * CAP: Project Greed 
and other work * Until Sept. 26 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 10183-112 St ree 
we © Open Tue-Sat 1am-5pm © VIOLET OWE! 

Figurative artworks in paint, charcoal, sculpture ot bas 
telief ® Sept. 11-24 © Opening reception: Thu, Sept 11 
{?7-Spm); artist in attendance (11am- 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 2 12304 Jasper Ave. 
probertsongall: sveig (780-455-7479) * Open Tue- 
Sti Mam- -Spm © GRt eee esi artworks by 
Cla Ess James Lahey, Beth Pederson, Alice Teichert 
o 


PORTAL GALLERY 300, 9414-91 St (780-702-7522) « 
LOST AND FOUND: Marcie Rohr, artworks focusing on 
childhood # Until Sept. 12 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 15 Perron St, St. 
Albert (780-460-4310) ¢ Open Tue-Sat {10am-Spm), Thu 
fiGarssaan © GUILDED: Artworks by Susan Casault, 
Joanna Dummond, Audry Hewlett. and others * Sept. 4- 
27 © Opening reception: Sept. 4 (6-Spm) 


PROVINCIAL OF ALBERTA 8555 Roper Rd 
Laer 1750) * Open: Tue-Sat Sam-4:30pm, Wed Sam- 
* LES FRANCE INES EN ALBERTA: COURAGE ET 
AMINATION: The aay of Francophones in 
Alberta; until be DOCU IMENTING ALBERTA: 
Photographs of Alberta landscapes from the Public 
Affairs Bureau; Sept. 17-Dec. 1 


ROWLES AND COMPANY LeMarchand Mansion, 108, 
11823-100 Ave (780-426-4035) © Paintings by Frances 
various artists; glassworks by Prairie Isle Glass Works 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave a 
9100) ¢ Open daily 9-Spm * Government House: 
tours Sat and Sun and statutory hols Mane cae 
427-2281 info * 
BETWEEN SCIENCE AND Fi eee, fee from muse- 
ums and pnvate collections from the world; until 
14© LOST SHIP RECOVERED VOVAGES THE 

IESS OF IRELAND: Artifacts salvaged from the 
wreck of the Empress of Ireland: until Oct. 5 © Fromt 
Terrace: The North Edmonton Sculpture Workshop pres- 
ents Peter Hide at The Ram, Until Oct. 5 


ST ALBERT ARTWALK Art Beat Gallery, The Bookstore 
On Perron, Cargo and James Ltd, Concept Jewel 

Design, Grimson Cuil Gi Gemport, Profiles Public Art 
rae es Gallery, Studio Gallery 


atl easy ton wo Oe condi ° ant 
* Sept 6-23 © = tren “ 


plays ® Sat, Sept. 13 (9am-2pm) 
STUDIO GALLERY 11 Perron St (780-460-5993), 143 
Grandin Park Plaza, 22 Sir Winston Churchill Mest St 
Albert Laeeae e open Tr Thu 12-1 ee Fri 10am- 
oil biti ge ee Or is and mead 
wi mi 
artworks by a variety of artists a ‘ 


SUN LIFE BUILDING Lobby, 10123- 

4035) © Paintings by Bi Y. SS 

TU GALLERY 10718-124 St (780-452-9664) © Furniture 

Cem ih by Ralph Reichenbach Sept. 13-Oct. 11 © 
Opening pe hie 13 (12-4pm) 

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA MUSEUMS GALLERY A 

TELUS Centre, 87 Ave, 111 St (780-492-5934) « 

eA ‘STROKES: Chinese Paintings from the 


Bh ho 2 fepresenting the styles in 
‘om 15th to 20th centuries © Sept 16. an. 24, 


a ee 12308 Jasper Ave (780-488-4892} 
* FALL IN THE CHARLEVOIX: eatin artworks by l 
jai Coté, Guy Roy, André Turenne and others © Sept. 


WORKS GALLERY 700 10225 ~ 100 Ave * Open: Mon- 
fri 12-5pm ¢ DEAD OF NIGHT. Photos by Nick Rudnicki 
Closing reception: Thu, Sept. 4 (7pm) 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St (780-452- 
9100) © Wired to Win:iMAX film. Also playing in IMAX: 
Human Body- Dinosaurs Alive! « BODY WORLDS 1: The 
onere inal Exhibition of Real Human Bodies; feature exhibit 

|AX films: Coral Reef Adventure; Wired to Win; 
Human Body; Dinosaurs Alive!, ee *Dawn of the 
Space Age; Margaret Zeidler Star Theatre: daily 


OF ALBERTA Foyer of Rutherford Library 
(South) * Book display of Hea ee 
Collections * Part of Brazil Week # Sept. 8-1 
Wwww.humanities.valberta.ca/mics/ 


WORLD TRADE CENTRE 9990 Jasper Ave (780-426- 
4035) ® Paintings by Keith Nolan; soapstone and lava 
rock sculptures lark Totan 


LITERARY 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave (780-469-8755) « Story 
Slam: An opportunity for writers to share their work, 
explore their talents and show off © 3rd Wed every 
month * $5 (donation) 


CITY ARTS CENTRE Le Ave (780-932-4409) « 
TALES. Monthly Storytelling Circle: Tell stories or come 
to listen © Sept. 2008-June 2003 (8pm) * Admission: $3, 
first time free 


EDMONTON POETRY FESTIVAL Throughout 
Downtown Edmonton, 780-496-7030, www-.edmontonpo- 
etryfestival.com * Various Venues © Sept. 11-13 


HULBERT'S 7601-115 St (780-436-1161) * The Olive 

Reading Series: Poetry, politics and discussion; an open 

mick low for new poets ¢ 2nd Tue each month 
pm) 


STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY 7 Sir Winston Churchill 
Sq * Edmonton Reads: One City-One Book: launch of 
Ted Bishop's Aiding With Rilke: Reflections on Books and 
Motorcycles; Thu, Sept. 11 


STEEPS—-OLD GLENORA © Spoken word open mic * 
Ist Thu every month © Contact Adam Snider to sign up: 
Adam.snider@gmail.com 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Tory Breezeway 1 * Poetry 
and music recital featuring Clara Munoz {Oswald de 
Andrade), Pedro Munhoz (Carlos Drummond de Andrade), 
Nicolas Mendoza thee Bandeira), followed by Bossa 
Nova and MPS classics with Grupo Anima Dissonante © 
Part of Brazil Week Fri, Sept. 12 (4pm) 


UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909-86 Ave (780-427-8174) © 
The Poets” Haven: Monday Night felts Series Atal 
ed by Stroll of Posts; every Mon night (7pm) * $5 {door} 


LIVE COMEDY 


CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS COFFEE HOUSE 9351- 
118 Ave. www.thecarrot.ca * People in Pants Comedy 
Improy Troupe ® First Thu of each month 


COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Gateway Boulevard (780-469- 
ed Leif Skyving; Sept. 4-6 * Jamie Killstein; Sept. 
11-1 


COMIC STRIP 1646 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St 
(780-483-5999) © Don Friesen; until Sept. 7 * Hit or Miss 
Mondays: 8 © Best of Edmonton: The Best in 
Edmonton's Community; Tue, Sept. 9 * Trent 
McClellan, Matt Alaeddine, Dan Brodnibb and Lars 
Callieou; Wed, Sept. 10 ¢ Donnell Rawlings, Trent 
McClellan and Paul Brown; Sept. 11-14 


LAUGH SHOP Londonderry Mall, www. ee eee 

° neat ied, Sept. 10 « The Wet S} ts (| 
Kang ane John foods); Sept. 11-13 * $10 (Thu)/$20 

(Fnil/$22 (Sai 


UON'S HEAD PUB Radisson Hotel, 4404 Gateway Blvd 
* Comedy Night: Hosted by Lars Callicou featuring pro- 
fessional and amateur comedians * Every Sun (Spm) © 


No cover 
THEATRE 


CSI: EDMONTON “LITTLE MURDER ON THE 
PRAIRIE” Jubilations Dinner Theatre, 8882-170 St, _ 
Phase Ill, West Edmonton Mall (780-484-2424) « Until 
Oct. 26 (Wed-Sat 6:30pm; Sun Spm) 
DIE-NASTY SOAP-A-THON Varscona Theatre, 10329- 
‘83 Ave (780-433-3399) wwwedie-nastyimprov.com * 53 
TET ee rn fea- 
Die- Nes Soe. and international 

* Runs from Fri, se i eons. Sa 

bs at pm) Tickets and 


ee SHOP OF field Dinner Theatre, 
ie oa Ta 08 k and lyrics by 
ah Oe ee tates, inti! Nov. 2 


Norther Light Theatre 
Tw in Soa rete 71-1586) 


Drala Ht wets 
e 
n'tcome * Sept. hei 
ide \V/sen- 
iy What Oe i pre- 


view night is Tas or stents 


OR THE WEEK ENDING SEPTEMBER 4. 2008 


1. Elliott Brood - Mountain Meadows (six shooter) 

2. Ry Cooder — |, Flathead (nonesuch) 

3. Beck - Modem Guilt (universal) 

4. Amos Garrett - Get Way Back (stony plain) 

5 Alejandro Escovedo — Real Animal (back porch) 

6. The Dutchess And The Duke-She's The Dutchess, He's The Duke (haruly arf 
7. Ayla Brook — After The Moming After (saved by radio) 

8. Dennis Wilson - Pacific Ocean Blue (epic) 

9. Giant Sand - provisions (yep roc) 

10. Ndidi Onukwulu - The Contradictor (jericho beach) 

11. Martha Wainwright - | Know You're Married... (maple) 

12. Agnostic Mountain Gospel Choir - Ten Thousand (shoutin’ abner pim) 
13. Emmylou Harris - All | Intended To Be (nonesuch) 

14. The Black Keys - Attack & Release (nonesuch) 

15. Brendan Canning ~ Something For All Of Us...{arts & crafts) 

16. The DB Buxton Revue - No Refund E.P. (daniel buxton) 

17. The Pack A.D. — Funeral Mixtape (mint) 

18. Tim Hus - Bush Pilot Buckaroo (stony plain) 

19. Sigur Ros — With A Buzz In Our Ears We Play Endlessly (xi) 

20. Stereolab - Chemical Chords (4ad) 

21. The Steeldrivers - S/T (rounder) 

22. Buddy Guy — Skin Deep (silvertone) 

23. Watermelon Slim And The Workers - No Paid Holidays (northem blues) 
24. Eliza Gilkynson - Beautiful World (red house) 

25. Jerry Douglas - Glide (koch) 

26. Centro-matic - Dual Hawks (misra) 

27. Bon Iver -— For Emma Forever Ago (jagaguwar) 

28. James Hunter —- The Hard Way (go) 

29. Man Ray Gun — Misfortune Telling (man ray gun) 

30. Sonny Landreth — From The Reach (landfatl) 


LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III 
RECOVERY 


Watching someone grow into maturity / 
is truly fascinating. Recoveryis that / 
type of experience only on a aural 
level. Listening to Loudon cover his 
own songs from years ago is a treat 
for any major fan and a super 
fantastic wayto get re-introduced. Or 
introduced if you haven't listened to him 
before. 


eo 


Whyte Ave. Shep ate at Sones con 434-6342 


SP 4-SEP 10,2008 WUTEWEEKIY 25 


yee ¥ t Por 


PO PPPS > a) 


(FILM 


‘= 


Tee ae eee he ee oe ee ee 


a? « 


ws, 


Mumblehorror 


The Duplass Brothers revel in their realism 
with the sweet, funny, awkward, scary Baghead 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 
en discussing his use of 
symbolism, or rather the lack 
thereof, Ernest Hemingway 
once said of The Old Man and the Sea, “If 
I made them good and true enough they 
would mean many things. The hardest 
thing is to make something really true 
and sometimes truer than true.” 

Though the characters and situa- 
tions certainly lack the steely fortitude 
of your typical Hemingway novel, a 
very similar attitude is at work in the 
work the Duplass Brothers, Jay and 
Mark. In both their feature debut, The 
Puffy Chair, and its horror/comedy fol- 
low-up, Baghead, the writing/direct- 
ing duo employ a minimalist though 
hyper-realistic style, anchored by a 
loose, wide-ranging willingness to 
thrust up life, both beautiful and awk- 
ward, presented without comment—an 
aesthetic that has them closely aligned, 
at least in spirit, with the modern 
mumblecore movement. 

But as Baghead demonstrates, some- 
thing that sets them apart—and 
arguably above—some of their fellow 
neo-realists is a willingness to engage 
the dictates of genre. In many ways a 
typical horror film—four friends, in this 
case struggling LA actors, head out toa 
cabin in the woods to party (and osten- 
sibly work on the script that might final- 
ly get them all work), only to have 
things go awry—it's also a sophisticated 
exploration of the complicated relation- 
ships between its principles, their awk- 
ward pauses, long-simmering feuds and 
always-developing bonds. Enhanced by 
the fact the Duplasses are confident 
enough to let the audience make up its 
own mind about both character and 
mood, each aspect serves to enhance 
the other: the moments of stark honesty 
provide a depth to character that horror 
frequently lacks, while its genre struc- 
ture tightens the loose, improv-y feel 
into sharply compelling moments of 
quietude. It is a film where something 
as simple as activating a motion sensor 
light manages to both reveal a light, 
playful character and lay the ground- 
work for some coming horror tension 
all at once. 

Vue Weekly had a chance to speak 
with Mark Duplass about these 
dichotomies, as well as other chal- 
lenges of cinematic realism, in a con- 
versation that was as detailed and 
refreshingly honest as his films. 


S&S FA SEPS, SUN, SEP 7, TUE, SEP & THU SEP 11 (9 PM) 
SS | SATSEPH MON, SEP & WED, SEP 10 (7 PM) 
S | BAGHEAD 

WRITTEN, DIRECTED BY JAY AND MARK DUPLASS 
STARRING ROSS PARTRIOGE STEVE ZISSIS, 
GRETA GEAWIG, ELISE MULLER 

METRO CINEMA 


keke 


VUE WEEKLY: There are basically two 
really strong ideas playing off each 
other in Baghead: this relationship 
drama about four struggling actors, 
and this sort of comedy/horror film 
about being terrorized by a guy with a 
bag on his head. Which aspect came 
first in the creative process? 

MARK DUPLASS: The concept of a guy 
with a bag on his head, and that being 
potentially scary and potentially funny 
at the same time, that came first, and 
that was really kind of exciting to us. 
It’s kind of a complex thing, but the 
idea that it could be simultaneously 
funny and scary, that was one of the 
impulses that drove us initially 
through this movie. Really one of our 
favourite things to this day about 
watching it in the theatre is watching 
people who are laughing one minute 
and then getting scared the next, 
while the person next to them is still 
laughing; they look at them almost as 
if they've been betrayed. It’s like, 
“We've both experienced this same 
moment, and it scared the shit out of 
me and you're laughing: what’s 
wrong with you? You're a terrible per- 
son.” We really love that duality. 


VW: Why realize that duality in this 
story of struggling actors? 

MD: Well, Jay and I have really found 
the types of movies that we think we're 
good at making, we find that they bor- 
row a lot from our lives and the current 
situations we find ourselves mired in. 
We just kind of think, “We're privileged, 
upper middle class people, what do we 
really have to offer, what can we be an 
authority on?” 

This time around, we had spent a 
year and a half on the festival circuit 
promoting our movie and meeting tons 
of desperate filmmakers and actors who 
are trying desperately to become suc- 
cessful, and kind of knowing that they're 
never going to make it, but going for it 
nonetheless. These people really kind of 
became like modern heroes for us. I 


mean, when we watched Braveheart in 
our teens, we loved the fact this guy was 
going into battle even though he knew 
he was going to lose. And we just start- 
ed seeing that William Wallace to Rocky 
Balboa to the desperate LA actor kind of 
parallel, and it got us really excited: 
there's a lot of heart in that. 


VW: You mentioned that you tend to 
focus on situations that you find your- 
self mired in, which can sometimes be 
a dangerous way to make art. I mean, 
there is that write-what-you-know 
aspect, but the danger is getting too 
navel-gazey, which is a common criti- 
cism of a lot of similar films. Are you 
ever concemed with that? 
MO: You certainly think about that, but 1 
know that, when we first really figured 
it out, if the worst problem we had was 
that only the navel-gazers were gonna 
like this, well—we really didn't care, 
because we were coming from hell, and 
at least we were in a place that works. 
Still, 1 do think we transcend that. | 
mean, we really like genre, and we 
really like good plots for our movies, 
and we really like to saddle them with- 
in traditional story structures. It’s our 
hope that if you're going to be loose 
and improv-y and navel-gaze-y, if you 
give it a nice strong spine, and you 
snap it down into an 80-minute movie 
that's moving along to its climax, it 
won't feel as indulgent. [Iaughs) 


WW: I think one of the other things that 
really sets you guys apart is your will- 
ingness to just let things be: as you 
kind of alluded to with the duality of 
the bag on the head, you often let peo- 
ple take the moments you show how- 
ever they will. Still, genre, and 
especially horror, often demands forc- 
ing people's perspective on something, 
so how do you manage that duality? 

MD: Yeah, it’s that choice between serv- 
ing up a buffet and letting them eat what 
they want versus the hand of the direc- 
tor that's crafting the perfect meal. There 
was a balance, and we weren't com- 
pletely just, “Okay, here it is; art is art, 
accept it as you will.” It was more about 
eliciting a response, as opposed to a cer- 
tain kind of response. We found that, 
with the pacing of the film, it was almost 
like we would create these little lulls so 
a moment could happen: just enough 
quietness to create a good bang, and to 
some people it was hilarious and to 


some people it was scary, but it always 
got something out of them. That was 
how we handled it: it’s time fora 
moment, and that moment can be 
whatever people take it as, but let’s just 
pace ourselves to that moment. 


VW: I think it'd be fair to say you guys 
go for a realist aesthetic ... 

MD: [Jaughs] That’s—yeah, that’s an 
understatement. That’s the god of our 
set, that’s what we're going for: what 
would happen here? Is it realistic? If 
it’s not, let's take a break and figure 
out what would really happen. 


VW: Right, of course. So, given that’s 
what you're going for, how do you 
find you realize it? Putting reality on 
film is often a lot harder than it 
looks—it’s rarely just pointing the 
camera at something going on, as you 
sort of allude to with the film that 
shows at the film fest at the begin- 
ning, but there is definitely a strong 
element of that. So how do you find 
reality in a fictional framework? 

M0: We found that for our taste, natu- 
ralism only works under specific set- 
tings. It’s our belief that with 
naturalism, and if you train your eye 
on the specificity of the minutiae of 


- human interaction, you're going to get 


great details and originality—that’s 
where it’s got to come from. You haye 
characters who have very clear moti- 
vations—almost overly clear, overly 
simplified, soap opera-esque motiva- 
tions, the most simple things you can 
come up with, and the film is inside of 
a genre that's barreling towards a very 
simple question for the end. 

If you strip down the four leads in Bag- 
head, they're almost just caricatures: the 
young girl who just moved to LA, the hot- 
tie guy who can't get the lead role, his 
chubby friend who's jealous and the older 
actress who's about to be put out to pas- 
ture, They're really just generic stereo- 
types, but they had strong motivations 
and the actors knew exactly what the 
characters wanted, so when it came time 


to improvise, we could get all this really 


_ cool interesting tiny specificity and origi- 


nality that was all—tt all came from the 
fact the soup was really solid, so to speak. 


VW: One of the real strengths of the 
film is the depth of character, and the 
little moments that you kind of revel 
in—that scene where Chad [the sweet, 
funny, awkward schlub who ends up 
grounding much of the film’s emo- 
tional depth] is trying to hit on 
Michelle [the young actress], fo: 
instance, is just a painfully revealing 
bit of character. How much of that is 
you and Jay psychoanalyzing that 
character before, and how much is 
just letting the camera roll and hoping 
you catch those revealing moments? 
MD: I think that kind of question really 
gets into the deeper aesthetic of ou: 
filmmaking, and the deeper function o! 
how we work: we don't bring the actors 
to our camera, we bring the camera to 
the actors. They go and do what they 
want todo, and we just follow the most 
inspiring thing in the moment. O! 
course we're keeping an eye towards 
where we're going, and of course we're 
making sure their motivations are clear, 
but we're hiring people who aren't stu- 
pid, and we're hiring actors who know 
to stay within their limits, and we just 
let them go and say those things. 
Inevitably, the dynamics will change @ 
bit from what the script was, but so long 
as it’s within the confines of the story 
and where we're headed, we don't care 
what we get, we just want it to be 
inspired, We think we'll live longer a5 
filmmakers that way, because it's essen 
me pe on other people for inspira- 
And really a lot of it is obeying the 
oe things that are happening a5 
to fighting. the storm and jam- 


~ ming them into’ our preconceived 


notions of what they should be. If you 
just kind of follow them around and help 
guide them where their natural instincts 
are going, it’s easier on everyone, it’s 
less stressful, and in the end, I think, you 
get the most truthful stuff. w 


eee 


26 ww 


EWEEKLY SE 4-SEP 10,2008 


ON THE COVER 


The subtle Soviet 


=| DVDETECTIVE 


S | s0ser onan 
i | dvdetective@vueweekly.com 


arisa Shepitko was born in 
1939 in the Ukrainian city of 
rtemovsk. She attended the 
Moscow Film School and studied 
under the great Alexandr Dovzhenko, 
director of Arsenal (1928) and Earth 
(30), but being an all-too-apt pupil, 
and part of what would prove an icon- 
oclastic generation of Soviet filmmak- 
ers, she would not uphold or even 
reconfigure the traditions of her men- 
tor so much as follow his example as 
an innovator and exacting aesthete. 
She developed an utterly distinctive 
voice, one that would seek poetic 
methods of externalizing internal, indi- 
vidual transformations rather than, in 
accordance with official Soviet ideolo- 
gy, speak for the glory of a people. 
Wings ('66), one of two films in 
Eclipse’s new no-frills Shepitko box, 
begins with an image of pedestrians 
moving in several directions on a vil- 
lage street. This image of public life, at 
first inexplicably strange, seemingly. 
slightly distorted, somehow alienating, 
is revealed as something literally sepa- 
rate from the quiet, tidy world we're 
entering when a figure suddenly enters 


ckua 


igelelfelstciaiela 4 


the frame and moves toward us, the 
camera tracking backwards to show 
that the crowds are on the opposite side 
of a window from him. The figure is a 
bespectacled, anonymous tailor, unim- 
portant to the rest of our story, but his 
duty in this first scene in emblematic: 
he’s measuring Nadezhda Petrukhina 
(Maya Bulgakova) for her power suit. 

A decorated World War Il fighter pilot, 
Nadezhda is being costumed for her new 
role as director of a provincial trade 
school, her severe new threads render- 
ing her androgynous and angular. The 
job is intended as a reward for her hero- 
ism, yet it quickly finds her uncomfort- 
ably trying to fit into the role of an 
authority figure over a generation for 
whom her past means little. The sense of 
falseness associated with her position is 
echoed throughout Wings, with several 
theatrical or illusory scenes in which key 
elements disconnect: a soundless speech 
on a TV; firemen apparently running 
toward but in fact only running through 
a drill, two middle-aged women in an 
empty café reminiscing for their lost 
youth over beer and plates of meat who 
begin to sing and waltz together, until it’s 
revealed that a crowd of men with 
arched brows are observing from just 
outside the café windows, and the 
women embarrassedly separate and 


CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE 


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SEP 4-SEP 10,2008 = \W7UXS WEEE rd 
ag 


Truth under the knife 


Morris questions how we know what we 
know in Standard Operating Procedure 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 


ith its unprecedented 
access to key participants 
in the crimes committed 


against Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib, 
its multitude of images of violence 
and humiliation both real and staged, 
and, maybe most of all. its prodding 
of one hell of an ugly scar on Ameri- 
ca’s visage, Errol Morris’ Standard 
Operating Procedure, first released 
last spring, hasn't proved to be the 
feel good movie of the year. it is, 
however, among the most vital; con- 
frontational, grotesque, divisive, fasci- 
nating, smart, beautifully crafted 
and—here's the catch—more genera- 
tive of questions than answers. 
Elegiacally scored by Danny Elfman 
and vividly shot by Robert Chappell 
and frequent Scorsese collaborator 
Robert Richardson, SOP alternates 
between the wide view and the 
uncomfortably intimate, between the 
familiar evidence and the unseen, 
sometimes contradictory details, 
between the state and the individual, 
with all roads leading back to a hand- 
ful of hours a few years ago during 
which some largely un-remembered 


Ss FRU SEPS SUN, SEP 7, TUE SEP & THU, SEP 11 (7 PA) 
| SALSEP6, MOM SEP B & WED, SEP 10 (9 PM) 


STANDARD OPERATING 
PROCEDURE 


DIRECTED BY ERROL MORRIS 
Jototok 


men were at the mercy of a handful of 
US officers taking the objectification 
of the ostensible enemy to a diaboli- 
cally juvenile extreme. | can’t quite 
believe it, but I actually went to see 
Morris‘ “non-fiction horror film” twice 
in a single week when it had its Cana- 
dian premiere at Hot Docs. Yet I still 
feel there is much to learn from it. 

The case file opens with letters sent 
home to a spouse, speaking fearfully 
about the escalation of aberrant 
behaviour at the prison, about the 
poker face required to go along with 
things. These letters are from Sabrina 
Harman, the “thumbs-up” girl, whose 
pixie-smiling poker face graces a 
great many of the most appalling 
images. Soon after we begin to hear 
of a romance from one of Sabrina’s 
colleagues, who talks about how love 
makes you blind, especially when 


THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 11" 


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WEST EDMONTON MALL 


PRESENTED BY: 


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ARE AVAILABLE AT: 


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SUBJECT TO CLASSIFICATION 


you're only 20, a woman in this man’s 
army, and the man you're in love with 
is a charismatic superior. This testi- 
mony comes from Lynndie England, 
that slight, demonic-looking girl hold- 
ing a leash, a hooded, beaten prisoner 
on the other end of it. If she's not one 
of the real culprits, than who is? 

It is expected that political documen- 
taries utilize journalistic sources in build- 
ing their visual narrative, and there is 
some of that here, but SOP is a movie 
about snapshots, hundreds of them, 
taken by numerous cameras, mostly by 
those who would gain the least from 
their existence: the criminals. In SOP no 
single image remains trustworthy—what 
we don’t see often contradicts our 
assumptions about what we do—but 
there is embedded in this project a 
hunch that some sort of truth might be 
found in the collected photos as a whole. 


WHILE MORRIS, who finally won an 
Oscar for The Fog of War a few years 
back, is certainly among the world’s 
most prominent documentary film- 
makers, his characteristic mise en 
scéne—the lovingly aestheticized 
reenactments, the talking heads 


IN THEATRES FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12" 


which seem less interrogated than 
given an open mic, the highly selec- 
tive inclusion and paced delivery of 
context—continues to be debated for 
its moral scrutiny. It is of course these 
very aspects of Morris’ work, both the 
approach and the debates it incites, 
that make it so deeply engaging. Film- 
makers like Werner Herzog may push 
journalistic/objectivist norms even 
farther, but it's Morris who applies 
these techniques not to marginal fig- 
ures but subjects as volatile as Ameri- 
can war crimes and the death penalty. 

David Edelstein's very good review of 
SOP for New York ends with these ques- 
tions: “Special Agent Brent Pack, who 
analyzed the photos and sent many of 
Morris's subjects to military prison, 
says, ‘A picture is worth a thousand 
words,’ Okay, maybe. But which words? 
Whose words?” To which | could only 
reply, “Exactly!” Though it’s considered 
over and over throughout SOP, Morris’ 
core thesis about the relationship 
between accountability and evidence is 
in an odd way overshadowed by the 
monstrous events investigated here. 
Hardly used as a tool for deception, 
Morris’ particular approach very much 


DVDETECTIVE 


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 


smooth out their clothing. So much of 
this place Nadezhda inhabits seems to 
exist as simulation, 

Nadezhda will frequently be seen 
attempting, with barely contained des- 
peration, to strike a tone of merriment 
amongst her colleagues, family and 
townsfolk, but one of the only scenes 
in which she seems to truly feel herself 
is one where she’s essentially alone. 
She stands in the street as it begins to 
rain and the other villagers all run for 
shelter. She gazes toward the newly 
vacant horizon and her point-of-view 
seems to lift off, taking her into the 
dampened sky and into an episode of 
helpless nostalgia for the days when 
she flew fighter planes and was so in 
love with a fellow pilot whose death 
she witnessed from her own cockpit 
It’s a beautiful, heartbreaking scene, 
emotionally matched only by the film’s 
finale, where an act of panicked escape 
becomes something transcendent. 


THESE THEMES of transcendence and 
flight are inherent in the very title of the 
other film in Eclipse’s Shepitko box, The 
Ascent ('76), set in 1942 Belarus, where 
starved and weary Soviet partisans are 
on the run from Nazi invaders, in a land- 
scape so seized by winter that only the 
barren, inky, crooked foliage breaks up 
the grey-whiteness that's seemingly 
melded earth and sky. The film follows 
two of the partisans eventually captured 
by the Nazis, Sotnikov (Boris Plotnikov) 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


FILM 


emphasizes the slipperiness of images 
the fathomless layers of subjectivity anc 
spin inherit in any act of photographic 
or cinematographic documentation-— 
not to mention the ways in which such 
images are thereafter delivered, re 
framed and viewed by an audience 
Morris, who was once a private 
investigator, has made the process o/ 
investigation itself a dominant theme 
in his work, and his recent essays fo; 
The New York Times on what truths 
can be gleaned from the extant pho 
tographs from the Crimean War has 
placed him in a small group of major 
intellectuals, Susan Sontag amony 
them, who've made the dissection o/ 
photographs crucial to their body o1 
ideas, In this sense he is a sort of poe! 
of doubt, drawn toward subjects thai 
might otherwise seem easy to glos 
over. With Abu Ghraib he has perhaps 
found his ultimate subject, a catastru 
phe made more labyrinthine instead 
of less so for the proliferation of data 
surrounding it, and the best sort o! 
proof that oyr age of seemingly infi 
nite images and all-seeing technolog\ 
is not to be mistaken for one o 
greater knowledge or certainty. v 


and Rybak (Vladimir Gostyukhin), sent 
out to forage for food. Sotnikov, wh: 
already seems the physically weaker 0! 
the pair, is badly injured, yet as thei 
plight worsens and they, along wit! 
three other locals, are set to be execu! 
ed, Sotnikov unearths some inner 
resolve, devises a plan to become a sor! 
of martyr, and little by little seems ‘ 
glow, becoming increasingly beatific as 
he nears his own death. 

The Ascent is a very grim film thal 
doesn’t flatter human nature, but it 
inspiring in its lyricism, strange devel 
opment of tension and paradoxical 
equation of escape with surrende: 
Music is seldom used, but when it is it 
makes for eloquent, nearly dream-like 
passages. The almost hallucinatory— 
not to mention Christian mystical- 
tone that envelops the story 4s 
Sotnikov’s face takes on a more icon 
ic light, aligns it to the contemporary 
work of Tarkovsky, films like Andrci 
Rublev ('69) and Solaris ('72), as does 
the use of Tarkovsky regular Anatol! 
Solonitsyn, appearing here in the very 
enigmatic role of a Russian interroga 
tor working for the Nazis. 

Shepitko would doubtlessly havé 
gone on to further establish herself @5 
among the greatest filmmakers of th 
late Soviet era and beyond, but, sadly, 
The Ascent would be her last film. Sh« 
was killed in 1979 along with four ©! 
her collaborators while scouting loca- 
tions for her next project, Farewell (0 
Matyora. The film was later complete’ 
by Elem Klimov, her husband, th« 
director of another masterful war film. 
Come and See ('85). vw 


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OPENING THIS WEEK 


FLY METO THE MOON 

DIRECTED BY BEM STASSEN 

WRITTEN BY DOMONIC PARIS 

STARRING CHRISTOPHER LIYOD, KELLY AIPA 
KKKK 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweokly.com 

In 1896, the Lumiére brothers screened 
their one-minute short, “L’Arrivée d'un train 
a La Ciotat,” literally about a steam train 
arriving at a station, and the audience was 
So Startled by the vividness of an oncoming 
train that many of them jumped out of their 
seats. If that same audience sat through 
Fly Me t6 the Moon, they would probably 
have heart complications. In fact, Fly Me to 
the Moon contains 3-D technology so 
impressive that even the 21st century audi- 
ence | screened it with couldn't help but 
reach out and try to touch the objects 
before their eyes. 

Compared to most animated films, the 
$27 million price tag is a discount. Saving 
money by voicing the main characters with 
child actors unknown to anyone but their 
elementary pals, the Belgian production was 
able to make this look more expensive than 
the rest, that is, as soon as you strap on the 
stylish Ray-Ban-style “Real D” glasses. 

Playing on the historic Apollo 11 mission 


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SHADOW OF A DOUBT 


to the moon, Fly Me to the Moon tells of the 
first flies to ever land on the moon. Nat, 10 
and Scooter, a nerdy trio of pre-pubescent 
male flies, are tired of the world buzzing by 
them. While the cute female flies are busy 
with the jocks, they find themselves listen- 
ing to the same story told by Nat's grandpa 
(voiced by Christopher Lloyd) about how he 
rode the shoulder of Amelia Earhart across 
the Atlantic. Inspired, they decide to sneak 
into Buzz Aldrin’s mask and take a free trip 
to the moon, leaving their families hysteri- 
cal. But of course, the Cold War has trickled 
into the fly community as well. Unwilling to 
let American flies reach the lunar surface 
first, Poopehev the Communist fly sends his 
informants in America to sabotage Apollo 
11 from NASAs mission control. Tinkering 
with the tubes and gears that keep a rocket 
safely in space, Nat and the gang have to 
save the mission. 

Seeing the other side of the coin works 
brilliantly because, although everyone (except 
for moon-landing denialists) knows that we 
landed on the moon in 1969, hardly anyone 
knows that it was attributed to flies. Or per- 
haps the visuals are so flipping amazing that it 
can-convince the audience of anything while 
they try to keep their minds from blowing. 

Fly Me to the Moon takes a while to set 
up its story, which is all the better because 
it takes a while to actually follow the story 
instead of just the graphics. | honestly can’t 
tell you what happened in the first 10 min- 
utes, but | can tell you a rocket flew at my 
face, | was propelled through a lawn and a 
firefly almost landed on me. 

That said, there are some visual and 
mechanical flaws: the movements are 
much slower than they would be in most 
animations, probably because when 
things do move at a normal or fast pace, 
the effect is dizzying. The exchanges of 
dialogue are also awkwardly paced, for 
which | have no excuse, and although the 
insects are unique and their details 


introduction to 


Starts Sept 8th 


Starts Sept 13th 


Ala ation a a 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


SCREEWRITING 


BABYLON AD 


charming, the humans look like clon: 
But the errors are forgivable and the thyij) 
unforgettable in comparison. 


SHADOW OF A DOUBT 

OIRECTED BY ALFRED HITCHCOCK 

WRITTEN BY THORNTON WILDER AND SALLY BENSON 
STARRING TERESA WRIGHT, JOSEPH COTTEN 

MON, SEP 8(8 PM); ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 
tottok 


JONATHAN BUSCH / jonathan@vueweekly.com 

The inherent contradictions of the Ame, 
ican family, and the characteristic bon 
that helps it withstand under pressure 
of criticism, are portrayed in Alfrey 
Hitchcock's diabolical but rather offbes 
1943 thriller Shadow of a Doubt, » 
of the director's three non-war narra 
tives made during the Second Wo;\\) 
War. Its central plotline, about a you 
woman who discovers a grim secre 
about the charming uncle who visits th: 
home of her small town family, even 
makes problematic the works of some of 
the film’s own creative participant 
notably co-screenwriters Thorniu: 
Wilder (Our Town) and Sally Benson 
(who wrote the original story for chirpy 
1944 musical Meet Me In St Louis) 

Teresa Wright (The Little Foxes) star 
as Charlie, an 18-year-old free spirit di 
parate and dissatisfied about the repete 
titious lifestyle of her California home life 
in Santa Rosa. Her mother (Patricia 
Collinge, in a performance directed b 
Hitchcock to loosely resemble his ow 
mother, who died in the same period oi 
the film’s shoot) is more than content 
keeping up the static household, and dis 
approves of Charlie’s wish to bother he 
namesake Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotte: 
to drop them a line and shake her out o 
boredom. However, an almost cosmic 
telegram arrives, informing the family 
that Uncle Charlie is already on his wa) 
to come stay, sending his niece into a 
Freudian frenzy of admiration for her 
handsome relative. 

But the attention that Charlie pays | 
her uncle slowly leads her to mayi« 
more information that her youthful 
bosom can handle, especially wher 
two suspicious detectives posing as 4 
magazine writer and photographe' 
worm their way into the house to 
investigate the family. It’s hard for 
Charlie to turn a blind eye, and after 
she suspects Uncle Charlie's connec- 
tion to a nation-wide murder case, she 
fears not only for the sanctity of her 


: REGISTER TODAY! 


FILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY-ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


ined the film to be 


| one at home. 
Charlie's moth- 


hysteria brought on 
onnection with her 
‘brother. 

‘unique to Hitchcock's 
aver, occurs between the 
s as they heave the weight of 
secrecy back and forth onto each other in 
a familial struggle that is undeniably sexu- 
al. As Ken Mogg writes in The Alfred 
Hitchcock Story, “Young Charlie's state of 
mind in early part of the film resembles 
what the philosopher Kierkegaard called 
dread, a state of innocence or dreaming 
that awakens a thirst for the prodigious 
and the mysterious.” 


Shadow of a Doubt is playing as part of 
the Edmonton Film Society's “The Game is 
Intrique” fall program. For more details on 
the program and a complete schedule of 
films, you can visit wivw.royalalbertamu- 
seum.¢a/events/movies/movies.htm 


MATHIEU KASSOWITZ 
(aN AST ERIC BESWARD, JOSEPH SIMAS 
STARRING VIM DISESE, MELANIE THIERRY, MICHELLE YEOH 
ik 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 

Director Mathieu Kassovitz has publicly 
divorced himself from from Babylon AD. He 
accused Twentieth Century Fox of re-cutting 
the movie to “pure violence and stupidity.” 
Now, while Vin Diesel trots the country pro- 
mating it, Kassovitz can apparently be found 
relaxing in the-Caribbean, getting as far 
away from the fiasco he promised. 

So how bad is Babylon AD? Well, it’s 
certainly no worse than Kassovitz’ last 
schlock, Gothika—which, by the way, he 
never disavowed. There's plenty wrong 
with the movie, but most obviously, the 
plot is bare and the story very complex. A 
90-minute movie based on a 719-page 
novel by French author Maurice G Dantec, 
it appears to be missing joints that con- 
nect a gun-blazing action flick to a post- 
apocalyptic commentary on the state of 
biological science, religion and terrorism. 

Hollywood's favourite forgotten holo- 
gram Vin Diesel retums as Toorop, an exiled 
American soldier b think) from Special 
Forces (I) cked 


BREAKFAST ON PLUTO (14A, coarse 
Wad 620, tree 


CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 


130 Ave 50 St. 780-472-9779 


SPACE CHIMPS (G) 

Daily 1205, 3:05, 5:05, 7:10 
HELLBOY I: THE GOLDEN ARMY 
(14A) 

Fri-Sat 1:40, 4:25, len 9:55, 12:20; 
Sun-Thu 1:40, 20, 9:55 
HANCOCK (PG, crude content, violence, 
coarse language) 

Fri-Sat 1:50, 4:35, 7:15, 9:35, 11:60; 
Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:35, 7:15, 9:35 
WANTED (18A, gory scenes, brutal vio- 
lence) 

Fri-Sat 1:35, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45, 12:10; 
Sun-Thu 1:35, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45 


THE LOVE GURU (14A, crude content) 
Daily 1:55, 7:30 

THE HAPPENING (144, gory scenes) 
Fri-Sat 9:25, 11:30; Sun-Thu 9:25 


THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG, violence, 


frightening scenes) 
Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:40, 7:25, 10:05, 12:20; 
Sun-Thu 1:45, 4:40, 7:25, 10:05 


YOU DON'T MESS WITH THE 
ZOHAN (144. sexual content) 

uae 4:45, 10:00, 12:15; Sun-Thu 4:45, 
10: 


scenes) 
oe 710, 3:15, ae 


PRINCE CASPIAN (PG, violence) 
Fri-Sat 1:15, 4:40, 7:35, 10:45; Sun-Thu 
1:15, 4:40, 7:35 


Daily 1:35 
CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 
14231 137th Avenue, 780-732-2206 
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:20, 7:45, 10:25 
BABYLON ALD. (14, violence) 
Daily 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 
COLLEGE (184, crude content, coarse 


Daily 4:30, 9:45 


TRAITOR (14A, violence) 

Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 1:00, 4:00, 6:40, 9:10; 
Tue 4:00, 6:40, 9:10; Star and Strollers 
Screening: Tus 1:00 


~ DEATH RACE (14A. gory scenes, 


coarse language, brutal violence) 
Daily 2:00, 5:15, 8:00, 10:40 


‘THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recor 
mended for young-chikiren, coarse lan- 


;Wed-Thu 4:10, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20; 
Strofiers 


Tue 4:10, 6:50, 9:20; Star and 
ee ae 


2 (144, coarse language) 
Baws. 3 |, 7:10, 9:30 


Rae ae Eee Bane Po) 


‘Scenes, violence} Daily 1:50, 7:05 


STEP BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, not recommended for children, 


crude content) 
Fri-Wed 12:20, 2:50, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10; 
Thu 12:20, 2:50, 10:10 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 


Sale for young chil- 
dren, violence) 
Daily 12:10, 3:30, 7:00, 10:15 


MAMMA MIA! [PG) 
Daily 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9,00 


JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PS, not recommended for 
FER Daly. 

Dally 1:40, 4:15, 7:15, 9:40 


WALL-E (G) 
Daily 12:05 


CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 
1525-99 St, 780-496-8585 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violence) 
Daily 2:00, 5:00, 7:45, 10:20 


COLLEGE (18, crude content, coarse 


tanguage) 
Daily 5:20, 10:30 


TRAITOR (144, violence) 

Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 1:20, 4:15, 7:00, 9:50; 
Tue 4:15, 7:00, 9:50; Star and Strollers 
Screening; Tus 1:00 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, crude content) 
Daily 2:16, 8:00 


MAMMA MIA! SING-A-LONG (STC) 
Fr-Mon,Wed-Thu 1:00, 3:40, .6:30, 9:10; 
Tue 3:40, 6:30, 9:10; Star and Strollers 
Screening: Tue 1:00 


DEATH RACE (174A, gory scenes,coarse 
Janguage, brutal violence) 

Daily 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10:15 

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children,coarse lan- 


guage) 
Daily 12:50, 3:20, 6:40, 9:15 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Fri-Sat, Mon-Thu 1:10, 3:50; Sun 1:10 


MIRRORS (18A, gory scenes) 
Daily 9:45 


FLY ME TO THE MOON 3-D (G) 
REALD Daily 12:20, 2:40, 4:50, 7:10 


TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
guage,crude content) 
Daily 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 10:10 


THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVEL- 
ING PANTS 2 (PG) 
Dally 3:15, 6:30, 9:20 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, substance 
abuse) 

Fri-Tue, Thu 2:10, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30; Wed 
2:10, 10:30 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE DRAG- 
ON EMPEROR [PG, frightening 

scenes, violence) 

Fri-Sat,Mon-Thu 6:50, 9:30; Sun 9:30 


STEP BROTHERS (144A, coarse lan- 
guage, not recommended for children, 
‘crude content) 

Daily 1:15, 4:00, 7:15, 9:45 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PS, frightening 
‘scenes, not recommended for young chil- 
dren, violence) 

Daily 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10:0 

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PG, not recommended for 
young chikiren) 

Daily 1:40, 4:10, 7:20; REALD Daily 9:40 


WALL-E (G) 
Daily 12:45 


WWE: UNFORGIVEN (Classification not 
available) 
Sun 6:00 


CINEPLEX WEST MALL 8 


LAKH PARDES! HOIYEY (PUNJABI 
W/E.S.T.) (PG, coarse language, vio- 
fence) ‘ 

Daily 9:20 

SPACE CHIMPS 
Fri 4:30, 6:40; Sat: 
Mon-Thu 6:40 
WANTED (18A, gory scenes, brutal vio- 
Fri 4:35, 7:15, 9:45; Sat-Sun 1:40, 4:35, 
7:15, 9:45; Mon-Thu 7:15, 9:45. 

THE LOVE GURU (144, crude content) 
ase 7:00; Sat-Sun 2:20, 4:25, 7:00; 
Mon-Thu 7:00 
THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG, violence, 


Fn-Sun 4:20, 9:10; Mon-Thu 9:10 


YOU DON'T MESS WITH THE 
ZOHAN (144A, saxual content) 
Fii,Mon-Thu 6:45; Sat-Sun 1:20, 6:45 


1:10, 4:30, 6:40; 


KUNG FU 
Seo oon stan 2 210, 4:50, 
7:10, 9:30; Mon-Thu 7:10, 8:30 


SEX AND THE CITY (164) 


tanguage) 
* Dally 9:50 


Daily 9:00 


INDIANA JONES AND THE KING- 
DOM OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

Fri 4:10, 6:50, 9:40; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:10, 
6:50, 9:40; Mon-Thu 6:50, 9:40 


THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: 
PRINCE CASPIAN 


(PG, violence) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 6:20, 9:15; Sat-Sun 2:00, 
6:20, 9:15 


IRON MAN (PG, not recommended for 
young children, violence) 

Fn 4:40, 7:20, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:50, 4:40, 
7:20, 9:50, Mon-Thu 7:20, 9:50 


CITY CENTRE 9 
19200-102 Ave, 760-421-7020 


BANGKOK DANGEROUS (164) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Daily 12:50, 4:50, 
7:00, 9:55 

COLLEGE (184A, crude content, 
coarse language! 

Dolby Stereo Bigtal Daily 9:40 
BABYLON A.D. (144, violence) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Daily 12:10, 3:00, 
6:30, 9:20 

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (18A, substance 
abuse} 

Dolby Stereo Digital Daily 1:00, 4:00, 
6:40, 9:15 

TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

OTS Digital Deity 12:30, 3:40, 710, 9:45 
THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young childreni, coarse lan- 


guage) 
DTS Digital Daily 12:40, 4:10, 7:20, 9:30 


HAMLET 2 (14A, coarse language) 
DTS Digital Daily 1:10, 4:15, 7:30 

THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 
frightening scenes, not recommended for 
young children) 

DTS Digital Daily 12:00, 3:30, 8:00 
TRAITOR (144, violence) 

DTS Digital Daily 12:15, 3:20, 7:25, 9:50 
DEATH RACE (14A. gory scenes, 
coarse , brutal violence) 

DTS Digital Fri-Wed 12:20, 3:10, 6:50, 
9:10; Thu 12:20, 3:10, 9:10 


CLAREVIEW 10 
4211-199 Ave, 780-472-7600 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 
frightening scenes, not recommended for 
young children) 

Fri-Sun 12,50, 8:00; Mon-Thu 8:00 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (18A substance 


abuse) 
ey 2:10, 4:45, 7:05; Mon-Thu 4:45, 
205 


TROPIC ThuNDER (144A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Fri-Sun 1:10, 3:50, 6:45, 9:20; Mon-Thu 
3:50, 6:45, 9:20 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, coarse lan- 


guage) 

Fri-Sun 1:20, 4:20, 6:40, 9:25; Mon-Thu 
4:20, 6:40, 9:25 

DEATH RACE (144, gory scenes, 
coarse language, brutal violence) 
Fri-Sun 1:25, 4:40, 7:00, 9:35; Mon-Thu 
4:40, 7:00, 9:35 


HAMLET 2 (144, coarse language) 
Daily 4:30 

BABYLON A.D. (144, violence) 
Fri-Sun 1:50, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30; Mon-Thu 
4:50, 7:10, 9:30 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude content} 
Fri-Sun 1:00, 4:25, 7:30, 9:40; Mon-Thu 
4:25, 7:30, $40 

COLLEGE (184, crude content,coarse 

} 


TRAITOR (144, violence) 
Fri-Sun 1:30, 4:00, 6:50, 9:10; Mon-Thu 
4:00, 6:50, 9:10 


FLY ME TO THE MOON 3-D (G) 
Fri-Sun 2:00, 4:30, 6:30, 9:00; Mon-Thu 
4:30, 6: 00. 


GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 
2020 Sherwood Drive, 780-416-0150 


BANGKOK DANGEROUS (18/) 
Fri 4:20, 7:00, 10:20; Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:20, 
7:00, 10:20; Mon-Thu 7:00, 10:20 


BABYLON A.D. (144, violence) 

Fri 4:40, 7:30, 10:00, Sat-Sun 12:10, 
4:A0, 7:30, 10:00; Mon-Thu 7:30, 10:00 
aoe content, 
Fri-Sun 3:45, 9:40; Mon-Thu 9:40 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude content) 
Fri 3:40, 7:40, 10:30; Sat-Sun 12:20, 
8:40, 7:40, 10:30; Mon-Thu 7:40, 10:30 


Tal iene ae then 


coarse language, brutal violence) 
Fri 4:30, 7:20, 10:10; taoreun 1-30, 4:30, 
7:20, 10:10; Mon-Thu 7:20, 10:10 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, coarse tan- 


guage) 

nf 4:15, 7:10, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:00, 4:15, 
710, 9:50; Mon-Thu 7:10, 9:50 

STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Fri-Sun 4:00, 7:05, 9:30; Mon-Thu 7:05, 
9:30 

TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Fri 4:10, 7:15, 9:45; Sat-Sun 4:10, 4:10, 
7:15, 9:45; Mon-Thu 7:15, 9:45 

STEP BROTHERS (144, coarse lan- 
guage, not recommended for children, 
crude content) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 6:45; Sat-Sun 12:50, 6:45, 
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
SCENES, not recommendad for young chil- 
dren, violence) 

Fr'3;30, 6:50, 10:10; Sat-Sun 12:00, 
3:30, 6:50, 10:10; Mon-Thu 6:50, 10:10 
MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Fri 3:50, 6:40, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:50, 
6:40, 9:20; Mon-Thu 6:40, 9:20 

THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVEL- 
ING PANTS 2 (PG) 

Sat-Sun 12:40 


8712-109 St. 780-433-0725 
VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA (144) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:00 


GRANDIN THEATRE 


Grandin Mail, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. 
Albert, 780-458-9822 


Date of issue: Thu. September 4 only 
TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 


guage, crude content) Thu, Sept. 4 
1:10, 3:15, 5:35, 7:35, 9:35 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, sub- 
stancs abuse) Thu, Sept. 4 5:20, 9:30 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) Thu, Sept. 4 1:05 
3:20, 7:25 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, crude con- 
tent) Thu, Sept. 4 1:15, 3:10, 5:00, 
7:00, 8:55 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom 
mended for young chikiren, coerse lan- 
guage) Thu, Sept. 4 12:40, 2:25, 4:10. 
6:00, 7:50, 9:40 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS 
(PG) Thu, Sept. 4 7:00, 3:00, 6:45 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
Thu, Sept. 4 4:50, 8:45 


DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 
$60145 Ave, Camrose, 780-608-2144 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 
Daily 7:05, 9:20; Sat-Sun 2:05 


BANKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Dally 7:00, 9:10; Sat-Sun 2:00 


DISASTER MOVIE (148. crude content) 
Daily 7:10, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:10 


T2Q-352-3922 
ue HOUSE BUNNY (PS, coarse lan- 


wage, not recommended for young chil- 
Shen} Daly 7:00, 9:30; Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:35 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A. crude content) 
Daily 7:05, 9:25; Sat-Sun 1:05, 3:25 
BANKOK DANGEROUS (154) 

‘Daily 7:10, 9:35; Sat-Sun 12:55, 3:20 


COLLEGE (184. coarse language, crude 
content) Daily 6:55, 9:20 


"WALL-E (G) Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:30 


9828-101A Avo, Citadel Theatre. 
425-9212 
STANDARD OPERATING 
PROCEDURE (STO) Fi, Sun, Tue, Thu 
7:00; Sat , Mon, Wed 9:00 


BAGHEAD (14°. coarse language, nudi- 
ty) Fri, Sun, Thu 9:00; Sat, Mon, Wed 
7:00 


PARKLAND CINEMA 7 


120 Century Crossing. Spruce Grove, T80- 
972-2392. Serving Spruce Grove. Stony 
Plain: Parkiand County 

BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daily 6:50, 9:10; Sat, Sun, Tos 1:00, 
8:10; Movies for Mommies: Tus 7:00 
DISASTER MOVIE (14A. crude content) 
Daiy 9:00 
TROPIC THUNDER (144, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) Z 
Daify 7:05, 9:20; Sst, Sun, Tue 12:50, 
3:00 i 


BABYLON AD (744, violence) 
Daily 7:10, 9:25; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:15, 320 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence 
frightening scenes, not recommended for 


SEP 4-SEP 10,2008 =U 


’ 


young chikcren) / 
Daily 8:00; Sat, Suni, Tue 12:45, 3:30 
MAMMA MIA! PS) | 
Daily 6:45; Sat, Sun, Tus 1 

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG 
guage, not recommended for yy 
dren) 

Day 7:00, 9:15; Sat, Sun, 
DEATH RACE 
Cars 
Daily 


Tue 1 


10337-82 Aye. 750-433-0778 


EDGE OF HEAVEN 
9:15; Sat-Su 


THE UNKNOWN WOMAN (164 
violence) Daily 


eS EM | 


WEM, 8852-170 St, 760-444-2: 00 


BANGKOK BANEEHOUS. BA 
Daily 1:30, 4:15, 8 


BABYLON AD (144 
Fri-Tue, The 1; 1 
4:10, 8:00, 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, 
Daily 12:30, 3:50, 7:50 
DEATH RACE (144 br 2 
coarse lanquage. 
Daily 1:30, 4:40, 7 
THE HOUSE BUNNY (P 
mended for young children 
guage) 

Daily ]:40, 4:50, 7-20, 10:00 
STAR WARS: THE CLONE 


Fri-Sat, Mon-Thu 12:20, 6:3 


TROPIC THUNDER (144 


THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVEL- 
ING PANTS 2 (PG 
Fri-Sat, Mon-Th 
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (1 
stance ab 
Fri-Wed 1 
12:50, 3:4! 
THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE DRAG- 
ON EMPEROR (PG, frightening 

scenss, violence) 

Daily 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20 

STEP BROTHERS (144, coarse lan 
guage, not recommended for chidren. 
crude content) 

Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 1:50, 4:45, 7:55. 
10:30; Tue 12:40, 3:00, 10:30 

THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence 
fnghtening 
young chi 
Daily 1:10, 4:30, 6:10 

THE DARK KNIGHT: THE IMAX 
EXPERIENCE (PG, violence 
scenes, not recommended for 


4:20, 7:30, 10:20; Thu 
10:20 


dren) 

Daily 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:15 
MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Daily 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:30 


WWE: UNFORGIVEN (csssiication not 
available) 
Sun 6:00 


| ___ WESTMOUNT CENTRE | 
111. Ave, Groat Ad, 780-455-8728 


BABYLON AD. (144. violence) 

OTS Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 7: “10, 9:20; Sat- 
Sun 1:30, 3:30, 7:10, 9:20 

MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 650, 
9:10; Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:10, 6:50, 9:10 
DISASTER MOVIE (144, cruce content) 
OTS Digital Daily 9:30 


TROPIC THUNDER (14. coarse len 


DISASTER MOVIE (144, crude content) 
Daily 7:05, 9:25; Sat-Sun 1:05, 3:25 


BANKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daly 7:10, 9:35; Sat-Sun 12:55, 3:20 


COLLEGE (184. coarse language, crude 
content) Daily 6:55, 9:20 


WALL-E (G) Sat-Sun 1:00, $30 


FILM CAPSULES 


covenant to somewhere in America (I think: 
there's a lot of talk of Canada as a destina- 
— tion, but it never pans out). 

If the original script is indeed loyal to 
the book, that means plots of American 
fascism, animal cloning, cyborgs, drug 
experiments and DNA mutation were all 
cut. What is salvaged is highly exaggerat- 
ed action sequences in which Ski-doos 
defeat fighter jets and nuns gain sudden 
martial arts abilities. | think | get why 
Kassovitz described it as “a bad episode 
of 24,” but | don't get why he can’t man up 
to the fact that he directed those “bad” 
» scenarios, regardless of what he intended 
they be book-ended with. 

But there are also awesome visuals and 
striking photography, assets of the French 
director which caught the attention of Hol- 
lywood years ago. There are elements of 
his created world that | would call brilliant, 
if | didn’t know how obviously derivative 
they are of A Handmaid's Tale, Children of 
Men and Blade Runner. So although it 
would be interesting to see a director's cut 
of Babylon AD, | doubt an elongated cut will 
going to inject Diese! with nuance or pre- 
vent the action from being so cartoonish. 


= COLLEGE 
DIRECTED BY DEB HAGAN 
WRITTEN BY DAN CALLAHAN, ADAM ELLISON 
STARRING DRAKE BELL KEVIN COVAIS 
* 


JONATHA BUSCH / jonathan @vueweekly.com 

Popular audiences love to laugh, and it’s a 
test of their human spirit if they can do so 
even when something is as simple and 


generic as College, an empty-headed com- 
edy about a trio of high school kids enjoying 
a debaucherous weekend, sampling the 
lifestyle of university kids. The biggest issue 
it raises is how it managed to sneak past an 
express ticket to the shelves at Blockbuster 
and get a wider release. 

With hopes of an informative weekend 
touring Fieldmont University, Kevin (former 
Nickelodeon sweetie-pie Drake Bell) and 
Morris (Kevin Covais, one-time American 
(do! contestant) quickly become tempted 


by word-of-mouth tales of adventure that 


such a visit might land them some tail and 
free booze rather than a measly scholar- 
ship. The sex-obsessed fat guy—! mean, 
their friend Carter (Andrew Caldwell) 
insists that, despite his lack of ambition, 
he should tag along to add to the excite- 
ment, being a loud pervert and all. Their 
arrival immediately proves itself difficult, 
having to relocate their crash pad from the 
dorm room of a smelly porn addict to a 
white-populated frat house who agree to 
let up a corner in the cellar as a means to 
gain more cred with the school. It turns 
out these frat boys are assholes, including 
alpha male leader Teague (Nick Zano), and 
they send the youthful trio out of a num- 
ber of embarrassing escapades, from mis- 
guided party directions to being 
duct-taped naked to an on-campus statue. 

If you smell revenge, you might be 
right, or perhaps just smelling all the 
doodie references made in College, as 
the boys try to get even, despite 
repeated failures. It only gets them in 
further trouble, getting them ridiculed 
and trampled on by even the smallest 
party guests (hint—Verne Troyer as 
himself). But then the boys each learn a 
valuable lesson before it ends, some 


thing about friendship and the glory of 
revenge, and they meet some pretty 
girls. Let's move on, shall we? 

Bell, with his suave youthful conser- 
vatism, might be playing his cards right as 
the central character, considering | spent 
more enerry comparing him to George Pep- 
pard or Montgornery Clift than feeling out 
for any critical issues this poor Superbad 
mock-up could raise. Even a visit to a gay 
frat house, featuring a glow-in-the-dark 
boner tag, wasn’t enough to get me sin- 
cerely laughing or offended, which may be 
a sign that | need to start jogging again. 


DISASTER MOVIE 

WAITTEN AND DIRECTED BY JASON FRIEDBERG, 
AARON SELIZER 

STARRING MATT LANTER, VANESSA MINNILLO, 6 THANG 
e 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 
Now I'm not saying that Disaster Movie 
is the worst movie ever made; I'm just say- 
ing that it's the worst I've ever seen. Really. 
And I've seen thousands of movies. Litter- 
ally thousands. Good, bad, forgettable, 
unforgettable, unique, trite, on-the-nose or 
off-the-cuff. But never have | sat through 
something so unbelievably unfunny, 
unthoughtful, uninspired and unworthy, For 
lack of a better adjective, it's just lazy. 

Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer 
do this at the end of every summer, but 
never has the cash-grab been such an 
atrocity to the pockets of our beloved 
teens. The 90-minute movie spends so 
little time on plot (five minutes are 
spent spoofing just one joke from 
Superbad) that | don’t even have a log- 
line to offer. 

And most incredibly, it’s so stupid that 


Edmonton Columbian Choirs 


(holon 


Come sing with ue! This i9 our 42d season. 
Great choral and vocal training ata reasonable price! 


Young Columbians (ages 5-11) 


it can't even stick to its subject: disaster 
movies. At least Scary Movie, and even 
Date Movie, had a focused target. But 
the makers of Disaster Mowe didn't even 
bother to watch one disaster flick—not 
Earthquake, not Deep Impact, not even 
Airplane!. Had they, they'd know there's 
plenty to parody: alpha males feuding for 
leadership, love blossoming from fear, 
amends made between friends in the 
face of death. None of these are even 
attempted to be parodied. 

Realizing this early, | started tallying 
things. (The margin of error is three per 
cent, accounting for the time | spent seek- 
ing solace in a Yogen Friiz cup.) The num- 
ber of queer jokes is nine, body hair jokes, 
three, pedophile jokes, four, midget jokes, 
two, body functions or excretions jokes, 
10. The number of times | laughed is zero. 

| also counted the movies and shows it 
spoofs: 25. Of them, not one is a disaster 


DISASTER MOVIE 


flick. The most targeted is Juno. Yes, they 
have the nerve to mock Juno for being 
“overly written,” when this feels like | 
was scripted during a conference call. |i 
also features lookalikes so awful they 
require introduction as the tired celebrit 
they're impersonating. Amy Winehouse 
has been done. Dr Phil, done. Jessic: 
Simpson, Justin Timberlake, Flava Flay- 
done, done and done. If you can believe 
it, they are still parodying Michael Jac! 
son and his monkey. Still. Michael Jac! 
son. Bubbles and little boys. In 2008 
Even Leno stopped scraping that pot 

The last time | reviewed a Fried- 
berg-Seltzer movie for Vue it was Epi 
Movie, which sucked slightly less. |r 
it, | wrote, “l hope that their next ven 
ture is Parody Movie.” Well, here it is 
A parody of the indignant disaster that 
has become of this franchise. Maybe 
that's where the title originated. v 


Q 


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WHITE LIGHTNING / 39 


PO’ GIRL / 42 


Ukelele changes world—seriously 


CAROLYN NIKODYM / carolyn@vueweekly.com 


en Burning Hell's front- 
man Mathias Kom decided 
to pick up a $30 ukulele 


about a decade agu, he couldn't have 
known where this Mae id would 
take him. 

“1 can be convinced to buy just about 
anything for $30, so | bought it and | 
just didn’t stop playing it for days,” Kom 
tells. “I played and played and played. I 
still play guitar as well, but ever since, 

_ the ukulele has taken over.” 

It might even be safe to say that the 
ukulele has changed his life. Not only 
has it afforded him the opportunity to 
lead his variable band across conti- 
nents with a brand of music that is as 
disarming as it is witty, but it has also 
given him a chance to see a side of 
Israel that most of us can’t get to by 
headlines. 

If you were to say the phrase 

“ukuleles for peace,” chances are 
you'd elicit some giggles. But what if 
you were to discover that the phrase 
is the name of an actual organization, 
one that puts ukuleles and kazoos 
into the hands of Israeli children? 


THU, SEP11 (8 PM) 


5 
= BUR 
ES | WiTHTHE BEARTHURS, DOUG HOVER 
Ex | ALENAMANERA 

WeW CTY BY DONATION 


“That's one of the strengths of it, is 
that it sounds kind of goofy at first and 
it intrigues people. And it is silly, there 


is a silly element to it,” Kom says. “The. 


ukulele is a silly thing, especially when 
you get 30 of them in the hands of a 
bunch of 10-year-olds. It gets pretty 
silly, and that’s the magic of it, because 
it’s not really about the music, the pro- 
fessionalism of the music or anything 
like that. Although the kids do try very, 
very hard to play well and sing well, 
it's just about how much fun they have 
together and play.” 


UKULELES FOR PEACE, started by Paul 
Moore, forms orchestras of Arab and 
Jewish children, outfitting them with 
fun instruments to perform concerts. 


” After Kom discovered the organization, 


he was eventually asked to visit Israel 
to help record an album with the kids. 


“1 think that because it’s chil- 
dren, people go into it maybe with 
the expectation that they’re just 
going to see a cute show and see 
adorable kids playing the ukulele, 
but they come away from it with a 
totally different thing,” Kom says. 
“And as Clichéd as it is, it’s really 
one of those moments when you 


say, these kids actually, not just in. 


the future are they going to make a 
difference, but now. They have the 
power, they have the capability as 
ten-year-olds to make something 
happen, which is unbelievable. 
Totally inspiring.” 

It's an inspiration that has pulled 
Kom in. The Peterborough native has 
just finished a documentary about the 
project and is in the midst of planning 
a summer camp. It’s also the muse for 
the Edmonton show, where Burning 
Hell shares a bill with local ukulele 
faves the Be Arthurs and Doug Hoyer, 
as well as Alena Manera. 

No, when Kom bought that ukulele, 
he couldn't have known that he'd be 
playing the city’s first-ever ukulele 
festival. Ww 


Our Mustc at Convocation HALL sexe 
CELEBRATES 15 YEARS 0 


F ECLECTIC 


September 14, 2:00 pm 
Chamber Winds 


Conductor Angela Schroeder 

Flute Shelley Younge, Lindsay Elford 
Clarinet Jeff Campbell, Amber Campbell 
Oboe Beth Levia, Alyssa Miller, oboe 
Bassoon Diane Persson, Matt Howatt 
Horn 


Bird Serenade, Gounod Petite Symphonie 
Francaix Sept Danses, Bernard Divertissement 


Tickets available at the door or in advance through Tix yn the Square 
780.420.1757 and the Gre <a 80.428.2356. yerformances ar 

Gafitecat ion Hall at the University 

and our many other events, see wn 


4-0PM 


HAPPY HOUR 
DRINK PRICES 
207PM 
emer Go 
WAFER VHIN 
MINS 


Allene Hackleman, Olwyn Supeene 


ormation on these 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


WUEWEERLY 3 


10551- 32 Avenue {Upstairs 
780-432-5053 


END EVERY NIGHT AT THE 
FAWN SELOrF ! 


NO COVER AFTER 1AM 


BACKDRAUGHT PUB Open stage 
Spm 


BLUES ON WHYTE TOBY 
CENTURY CASINO Harlequin: 7pm 


CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB Open 
stage hosted by Alberta Crude; 6- 
10pm 


DRUID Guitar heroes 

DUSTER'S PUB Thursdays open 
stage: hosted by the Mary Thomas 
Band: Spm 


EDDIE SHORTS Open stage 
Thursday hosted by Kicks and Thrill 


FOUR ROOMS Peter Belec 


HULBEAT'S Hulbert’'s house can, 
Certs; Steve Palmer, Spm; $12 
{ticketSource)/$15 {door} 

IVORY CLUB Live Dueling Pianos, no 
cover; Spm 

JAMMERS PUB Thursday open jam 
7-1ipm 

J AND R BAR AND GRILL Open 
Stage with the Poster Boys 
{pop/rock/blues), 8:30pm-12:30am 
JSUUIANS-CHATEAU LOUIS 
Graham Laurence (jazz piano); 8om 
LB'S PUB Open jam with Ken 
Skoreyko; 9pm 

LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRILL Open 
Stage Thursdays with Gary Thomas 
NEW CITY The Real McKenzies 
Wednesday Night Heroes: Bpm {door}: 
NO minors, tickwis at Megatunes 
Blackbyrd, NewCity 


NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by 
Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers 


O'BYRNE'S Dave Simpson 


RIVER CREE CASINO Andrew Dico 
Clay; 8pm 

ROCK PUB AND GRILL Jazz Night 
with Jonny Mac: Spm-lam; no cover 
‘STARLITE ROOM Finntroll! 
Warbringar and guests: 8pm 
URBAN LOUNGE Darren Frank and 
his band, quests; $5 {door) 


DJS 


VODKA BAR Thursday 
Nights: Electro Education: dub, trip 
hop, lounge. electro with DJ Lazer 
Beam 
BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 
Entertainment 
BLACK DOG FAEEHOUSE Big Rock 
Thursdays: DJs spin on three lavels 
BUDDY'S Wet underwear contest 
with Mia Fellow, midnight, DU 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


FILTHY MeNASTY'S Punk Rock 
Bingo with OJ SWAG 


FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Requests with OJ Damian 


GAS PUMP Ladies Nite: Top 
40/dence with DJ Christian 


GINGUR SKY Urban Substance 
Thursdays 

BALD Thursdays Fo Sho: with Allout 
Dus DJ Degree, Junior Brown 


KAS BAR Urban House: with DU 
Mark Stevens: 9pm 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays: 
funky house/techno with DJ Colin 
Hargreaves, house/breaks with OJ 
Krazy K. hardstyle/techno with DJ 
Decha, tech tranea/electro with DJ 
Savage Garret; no minors; no cover 
WEW CITY | Love “80s Party: with 
Blue Jay, Nazz Nomad: no minors: 
8:30pm (door) 

NEW CITY Bingo hosted by Dexter 
Nebula and Anarchy Adam; no 
minors; 10pm; no cover 

ON THE ROCKS Saisahoti 
Thursdays: Dance lessons at 8pm, 
Salsa DJ to follow 

OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New: classic 


rock, R&B, urban and dance with DJ 
Mikee; Spm-2am; no cover 

PLANET INDIGO-ST, ALBERT Hit It 
Thursdays: breaks, electro house spun 
with Pl residents 

RENDEZVOUS PUB Meta! Thurrday 
with org666 


PREVUE / FR SEP 5 (@PM) / WHITEY HOUSTON / NEW CITY 


Terrorists 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Whitey Houston, The Mitts 


O'BYRNE'S Chris Wynters 
ON THE ROCKS Love Junk 


REXALL PLACE Simple Plan with 
Faber Drive, Metro Station, All 
American Rejects, 6:30pm (door), 


VELVET UNDERGROUND DJ 
Degree and DJ Generic 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


AUCE HOTEL-CAMROSE 
Slowbur, 9:30pm-1:30am 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 
Apoustiholics 

AMIS CAFE Michael Amirault 
BLUE CHAIR CAFE The Jimbos 
donations 

BLUES ON WHYTE TOBY 


CARROT Live music Fridays: Jeremy 
Doody; all ages; 7:30-9:30pm,; $5 
{door} 

CASINO EDMONTON Siocpers 
(blues) 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Sem 
Cockrel! (blues) 


COAST TO COAST PUB AND 
GRILL Open stage Friday Night host 
ed by Leona Burkey; Spm 

FOUR ROOMS Peter Be 

FRESH START Live music Fridays 
Prairie Cats Trio; 6-9pm; $5 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Po’ Girl; 99m 


(show); tickets at TicketMaster 


IRISH CLUB Jam session; 8pm: no 


cover 


7:30pm (show); $29.50-$39.50 at 
TicketMaster 


‘STANLEY A MILNER LIBRARY 
THEATRE Eight: Colours and 
Reflection: Edmonton Creative 
Musicians’ Colfective Explorations 
Concert Series {improvised new 


Delano, Luke Morrison 
BAR-B-BAR DJ James: no cover 
BAR WILD Bar Wild Fridays 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Friday 
‘Ds spin Wooftop and Main Floor: 
Eslectic jams with Nevine-indie, soul 
motown, New wave, electro; 
Underdog: Perverted Fridays. Punk 
‘and Ska from the ‘60s 70s and “BOs 
with Fathead 

BOOTS Retro Disco: retro dance 
BUDDY'S We made ‘em famous! DJ 
Eddy Toonflash, come early to avold 
lineup, no cover before 10pm 
CHROME LOUNGE Platinum VIP 
Fridays 

DELUXE BURGER BAR Rare ‘60s 
and "70s progressive rock, disco, and 
electronic Indie with Joel Reboh 
EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock, hip hop, 
house, mash up; no minors 
ESMERALDA’S Exies Freakin Frenzy 
Fridays: Playing the best in country 
FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DU 
Damian 

GAS PUMP Top 40/dance with DJ 
Christian 

HALO Mod Cluty: indie rock, naw 
Wave, Brit pop, and ‘60s soul with DJ 
Blue Jay, DJ Travy D; no cover before 
10pm; $5 (after 10pm) 

GINGUR Ladies Room: with Bomb 
Squad, DJ OB tha Teacher 

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Hypnotiq Friday: 
Breakbeat. house, progressive and 
electro with Groovy Cuvy, DJ Fuuze 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE, $30 


hot even gonna lie. 
— 


PREVUE / TUE, SEP 9 (7 PM) / BLOC PARTY / 


Foals cancelled, but man am | pumped to see these guys. I'm 


instrumental musich: $15 {adult}/$10 
{student/senior) at TIX on the Square. 
door, www freojazz.ca 


TEMPLE 1.6. Psydays: Techno Hippy 
Crew; Zeitlos Presents; Audi Paul 
Orlesko and Zemrock: Spm 


TOUCH OF CLASS—CHATEAU 
LOUIS Barry Paety (pop/rock); 8:30pm 


PREVUE / FAL SEP 6 (9PM) / WEST OF WINNIPEG 
STARLITE ROOM, $10 J 
The band West of Winnipeg will be playing in Edmonton, con- 
veniently located 1351 km west of Winnipeg 


JEFFREY'S CAFE June Mann 
Quartet (70s pop and jazz classics) 
$i0 

JEXYLL AND HYDE PUB Evory 
Friday: Headwind (classic pop/rock) 
Spm; no cover 
JUUIANS—CHATEAU LOUIS 
Graham Laurence (jazz piano): 8pm 
WEW CITY Green with Envy Party 
Brohans, Sandy O'Brien, Plan 8, Nudi, 
Nolano; no minors 


URBAN LOUNGE Crush; $5 (door) 
VELVET UNDERGROUND 


September Stone, No Heat Tomorrow, 
Desousa; $10 {door} 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Funky 
Friday: Funky breaks, funky house, 
funky tunes with Phife and friends 
BANK ULTRA LOUNGE Connected 
Fridays: 91.7 The Bounce, Nestor 


NEW CITY Friday Night Freek Out 
rockandroll/punkrock/abitofever 
thing/indy with Us Jebus and 
Anarchy Adam (from CJSR's Your 
Weekly AA Meeting); G-Whiz 
OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New: classic 
rock, A&B, urban and dance with DJ 
Mikee; Spm-2am; no cover 

RED STAR Movin’ on Up Fridays: 
indie, rock. funk, soul, hip hop with 
OJ Gatto, OJ Mega Wattson 
ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 


SAPPHIRE RESTAURANT AND 
LOUNGE Deep House: with Friday 
resident DJ Luke Morrison 


‘SPORTSWORLD INLINE AND AND 
ROLLER SKATING DISCO Top 40 
fequest with a mix of retro and disco: 
Tpm-12midnight 


STOLU'S Top 40, R&B, house with 
People's DJ 
STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 with DJ 


Tysin 


TEMPLE T.G.|.Psydays: Every 2nd Fri 
PsyTrance, Beats and the dance-y 
stuff with the Techno Hippy Crew. 
quests 


WUNDERBAR Fridays with the Pony 
Girls, DU Avinder and DJ Toma; no 
cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Foundation Fridays 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


ALICE 
Slowtum: 9:30pm-1:30am 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GiLt 
Acoustiholics 

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE |); ,, 
the Dog: Wafer Thin Mints; live 
rs Hate a 
rie urday afte 
BLUE CHAM EAE i sn 
rio 


BLUES ON WHYTE Ssturday 
Afternoon Jam; Evening TORY 


rset cl mic Saturdays; 7:90 
10pm; free 


CASINO EDMONTON Sieo, eper 
(blues) 


Sam 


CASINO 
Cockrell (blues) 


EARLY STAGE SALOON-STONY 
Saturday Live Music 

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Open stage 
Saturdays hosted by The Love Sho 
‘and guests; 1pm (door), 2-6pm (show) 
FOUR ROOMS Peter Beloc 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Miko Fh), 
and Kaley Bird (folk/indie}: 8pm 


SAMMERS PUB Saturday open jam 
7.30pm; country/rock band Spr 


2am 
SEFFREY'S CAFE Thom Benner 
(jazz $10 


JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB Headwir: 
{classic pop/rock); 9pm; no cover 
SET NIGHTCLUB Rey Theory, fi 
Again, Starewall: 7pm; $10 at 
TicketMaster, Jet Nightclub, 
Unionevents.com 


JUUIANS—CHATEAU LOUIS Potro 
Polujin classical guitar; 8pm 
MEAD HALL Live Slaughter 
Wisdon, Necrobiosis, The Lucifer 
Project: 8pm; $13 

NAKED CYBER CAFE ON JASPER 
David Axis, John Armstrong, 
Edmonton Paul; Spm; $5 


ON THE ROCKS Love Junk 


PAWN SHOP This is a Standolt 
Passenger Action, quests; 9pm 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Realcamino 
Shapt Innenwyne, Bloated Pig: no 
minors; 8pm (door), 9:30pm (show), $8 
STARLITE ROOM Oh Snap Pr 
ZThip, Degree and quests; tic 
TicketMaster, Blackbyrd, Foosh, FSm 
Soular 


‘STRATHERN PUB Open stage 2nd 
Sat of each month; &-9pm; followed 
by karaoke 

TAPHOUSE White Lightning (CD 
release party), Element of Sound; 8pm 
(door); $5 


TOUCH OF CLASS—CHATEAU 
LOUIS Barry Pasty (pop/rock!) 8:30prn 


URBAN LOUNGE Crust, $5 (doo') 


VELVET UNDERGROUND Damants 
with The Nicky Tams ; 9pm; $10 


(door) 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Saturdays: Top 40 with DJ Soundwave 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Saturday 
‘DUs on three levels. Main Floor 
Menace Sessions: alt 


rock/electro/trash with Miss 
Mannered 


BUDDY'S Undie night for men only, 
free pool and toumey, DJ Arrowchaser 


DELUXE BURGER BAR Rare ‘60s ar! 
70s progressive rock, disco, end elec 


ent: 


tronic Indie with Joel Reboh 
EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock hip hop. 
house, mash up 
ESMERALDA'S Super Parties: Evory 
Sata different theme 

FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays Gone Gol! 


Mash-Up: with Harmen 8 and DJ 
Kwake 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) Top 
tracks, rock, retro with DJ Damian 


GINGUR SKY Soulout Saturdays 
HALD For Those Who Know: house 
every Sat with Du Junior Brown, Luke 
Morrison, Nestor Delano, Ari Rhodes 
LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizzle Saturday: 0 
Groovy Cuvy and guests 

NEW CITY UIKWID LOUNGE 
Saturdays real alternative, classics 
punk with DJ Nazz Nomad, no cover 
(NEW CITY SUBURBS Saturdoy 
Sucks: electro, industrial, alt and indy 
tock with Dus Greg Gory and Blue Jv, 
s 


Suggestive Saturdays: breaks electro 


MEEKLY 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


MUSIC 


BLUES 


ast time Z-Trip made the trek to Edmon- 
son's Starlite Room, the atmosphere of 
the show was a little bit different. Bright- 
ly lit and with a rowdier crowd, he still 
did a great job of entertaining his audi- 
ence by mashing up old favourites, using 
~ uintables and MIDI controllers to blast 
| Nirvana's “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and 
_ AC DC's “Thunderstruck” for the wildly 
moshing faithful. This go-around, the 
focus was more about appealing to pres- 
ent tastes, while retaining the old-school 
sorateh aesthetic that makes Z-Trip so 
sffective to begin with. 

Arguably the original mashup Dd, Z- 
jrip’s success relies on the audience's 
nusical acumen, their age and, more 
ecently, the musical climate. Some songs 
jave been so played out they wouldn't 
work in his set anymore, but certain pop- 


ular songs are highly visible/recognizable, 
yet still relevant to his mix. At one point, 
he asked the audience if they remem- 
bered a song, asking where “the old- 
school heads” were at. The acapella he 
dropped was Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s “Shimmy 
Shimmy Ya.” As much as everyone react- 
ed to this song, it was a weird thought 
that a song from 1995 can be considered 
retro with this generation of new ravers, 
some of which were born in the ‘90s. His 
awareness of this is interesting to me. 


AFTER PERFECTLY MATCHING those 
vocals with Danger Mouse's instrumental 
for “Dirty Harry” by Gorillaz, | stopped 
dancing and had to think of Z-Trip’s direc- 
tion, why he’s such an original in today's 
field of Dus. While most DJs are franti- 
cally searching for the Hot New Track, try- 
ing to be ahead of the other guy's Internet 
connection, Z-Trip sticks to what he 
knows and merely keeps abreast of what 
new classics are worth incorporating into 
his world. He’s clearly taken a shine to 
Justice, cutting it up over top of “Gene- 


’s Excellent Adventure 


sis” and playing two versions of 
“D.A.N.C.E" in a row to an adoring crowd. 

| interviewed Z-Trip for his last show 
in Edmonton and his approach back then 
was all about melding old-fashioned dig- 
ging in the crates with relevancy in a 
new digital world. “Everyone needs to 
adapt to what's going on around you. 
{But} if you adapt too much, you become 
what's going on around you,” he said. Z- 
Trip has created a faint balance between 
the familiar and the unexpected with his 
original style of presentation. The feel of 
the show this past Saturday had a spe- 
cial energy, not because of what was 
played, but how smooth and effortless it 
was presented. 

Z-Trip is a DJ with complete control 
and no fear, something that isn't always 
obvious when watching a great turntab- 
list do their thing. | never entertained the 
thought that he could make a mistake, 
misread the crowd or go in any one direc- 
tion for too long. For the first time ina 
while, | felt safe and didn’t feel the need 
to criticize his decisions. w 


Presidents Stringbeans Quartet: }}am-2pm. ae sae (a ee eee oo? Reni DOA. Wednesday Night 
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TV is the future of music ... again 


ENTER SANDOR 


STEVEN SANDOR 
= | steven@vweweekly.com 


Last year, | lamented the lack of Western 
Canadian musicians that were making the 
trek to the Canadian Music Café at the 
Toronto International Film Festival. The 
Café is a place where music supervi- 
sors—the people who pick out pop songs 
to use to complete scenes in movies, TV 
shows and even commercials—scout out 
fresh new Canadian acts. 

This year, though, Shuyler Jansen, the 
man behind Hobotron and a key member 
of Edmonton alt-country faves Old Reli- 
able, is coming to Toronto to try his luck 
in front of the movie and TV people 
Jansen, who relocated his home base to 
Saskatoon three years ago, will play 
music from his new solo album, Today's 
Remains, at the Café. As well, Jansen 
has some new material which will be on 
an upcoming as-of-yet untitled album that 
saw him collaborate with members of the 
New Pornographers. But he will have to 
be quick. Each act gets just 25 minutes on 


stage. That's timed, too. No chance for 
encores and such. Just get the best mate- 
fal out there. : 

“I'd like to make a soundtrack,” says 
Jansen, “but I'm not a traditional sound- 
track writer.” 

So, he's hoping to link up with a film- 
maker who would be willing to take a 
chance and use his music. As well, 
Jansen’s manager and the person who 
handles the licensing of his music will be 
in the crowd, meeting with as many of 
the music supervisors as they can. 

“Still, I'm not the kind of person who 
can do a hard sell on stage,” says 
Jansen, “| don't quite know what it will 
be like. Will there be a lot of people talk- 
ing? | guess the thing with these sort of 
things is that you can't take them too 
seriously. You just play and try to have 
some fun.” 

The track record shows that, indeed, 
some people are listening, not just talking 
to other movie folks. Past successes 
include Canadian songwriter Molly John- 
son—a music supervisor was so 
impressed with her set, that a call was 
made to place a song of hers in the Ben 
Kingsley film You Kill Me before Johnson 


actually left the stage. And Lily Fros; 
the strength of a 2007 performanc e | ; 

got songs into MTV's The Hills, True ¢., 

fessions of a Hollywood Starlet any p., 
son Arms. 

Since most music-video stations a), 
too busy airing reality-TV schlock to ac, 
ally make time to play music videos, qi 
ting a song on a movie oF TV program ca, 
be more effective for modern artists th; 
getting in front of the camera themselves 
That's especially true when it comes t, 
music advertising. Seriously, how many 9; 
you have seen the Telus commercis| 
wondered “Who does that song?” an 
went to find out more about Justi: 
Calvin Harris or Le Tigre. Or, you can't «ji 
count the spikes in downloads after ¢| 
likes of Gorillaz, Cansei Sur Sexy or Fe 
have had music placed in Apple ads 

But Jansen isn’t so sure a mainstream 
producer will go for him. 

“That's the thing about movies—e\ 
the biggest movies seem to have so muc! 
bad music involved.” w 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-c/ 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and auth 
living in Toronto. 


SAT, AUG 30 / THEJOHNSONS / 
PAWN SHOP After many years, thov- 


sands of miles and umpteen shows, 


local skate-punks the Johnsons have 


thrown: in the towel after singer/gui- ji] 


tarist Nathan Burge decided to leave 
the outfit. Playing old crowd pleasers 
and current numbers, the Johnsons 
spilled gallons of sweat and more than 
a few beers for the music they love and 
this city will surely miss. w 


See more photos and read Phi! 
Duperron’s full review at vueweekly.com 


TUE 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLUES ON WHYTE Jordan Dunning 
Band 

DRUID (JASPER AVENUE) Open 
Stage with Chris Wynters 
EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Bloc 
Party with Foals; 7pm (door), $30 at 
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U of ASU info desks 


O'BYANE'S Celtic Jam with 
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ROCK PUB AND GRILL Ammars 


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MUSIC GP A-SP 10,2008 WUEWwenmy 37 


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ARYAN GIRTLES / bryan@vueweek!y.com 
‘ iySpace page of 
White Lighting, fresh faces 
to Edmonton's thriving 
music scene, the band openly sug- 
gests that its name resembles that of 
an “0s butt-rock band.” Self-efface- 
ment seems to be a theme amongst 
pands these days, but referring to 
yourselves aS butt rockers has got to 
take the cake. 

pormed a little less than a year 
ago, White Lightning may have a 
humorous Side to them, but they're 
anything but a joke. The band, 
composed of singer/guitarist Steve 
Bosch, drummer Enoch Rottier and 
bassist fimmy Rushton, has been 
gigging around their hometown of 
st Albert and nearby neighbour 
Edmonton, and are set to release 
their first EP, entitled Hold On, this 
weekend at the Tap House. But 
what about that reference to “butt 
rock"? 

“We had a few different names 
we were thinking about and that 
one just stuck with everyone. We 
thought it was pretty epic, but still a 
little bit funny,” explained Bosch 
over the telephone. “I'd say butt 
rock is a bit of classic rock with a 
mix of craziness that makes you 
just wanna rock your pants off." 

If in fact that’s what butt rock 


is, then White Lightning is not 
only named like a butt rock 
band, they also play butt rock. 
Melding bluesy '70s funk with a 
Led Zeppelin classic rock vibe, 
their EP has the kind of sounds 
that just might make you want to 
take your pants off. 

“The sound we’re going for is 
bluesy, rocky, funky and, of course, 
ballsy,” laughs Bosch. “It’s just a mix 
of music that we all love that we've 
learned to all love throughout our 
lives.” 


BOSCH DIDNT SET OUT to start such a 


JOIN THE 


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MUSIC 


here be Lightning! 


SAT, SEP 6 (0 PM) 


ku 
=—> 
= | WHITE LIGHTNING 

coe | WITH ELEMENT OF SOUND 

2. | TAPHOUSE (0020 MCKENNEY AVE, ST ALBERT), $8 
become White Lightning numbers at 
various coffee shops around St Albert 
with no band at all. 

“Initially it was me who had the 
songs written, I was doing an 
acoustic thing for awhile doing cof- 
fee shops with some of my songs, 
and then I just tried to put a band 
together,” he says, before explain- 
ing how he found his bandmates. “I 
found Enoch and I knew he was a 
sick drummer because everyone | 
know either plays with him or 
wants to play with him, so I started 
playing with him and then we found 


classic rocking band; originally he 
played many of the songs that would 


Jimmy and he could shred the bass, 
So we all got together.” 

The band plans to begin the 
process of recording a full length 
follow-up to their EP sometime 
this winter—using recording time 
White Lightning won through a St 
Albert battle of the bands—but 
until then, they wanted to get 
some of their music on disc so that 
they could share it with family 
friends and fans 

“We punched out seven songs 
and we're pretty pumped on them 
enthuses Bosch, mentioning that he 
even recorded the final song—an 
acoustic track entitled “Comfort”— 
by himself in his bedroom. “We just 
wanted to share the music a bit 
have something to show of it to 
us moving forward.” v 


UPTOWN 


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ALL SHOWS-ADMISSION BY DONATION!!! 

AUG 28 - Olivier Jarda/Doug Hoyer/Michael Rault 
AUG 29 - Sex Party w/ Rad Attack 
AUG 31 - Let's Dance w/ The Intensives 
SEPT 5 - Whitey Houston w/ Guests TBA 

EPT 8 - @n The Brink w/ Balls Out Face First 
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SEPT 12 - Capital City Burlesque’s Tribute 

To Elvis Presley 

SEPT 19 - SICK Industrial Party Vol. VI 

SEPT 26 - CHIXDIGGIT! w/ Old Wives 

SEPT 28 - imperative Reaction/SITD 

OCT 3 - Raygun Cowboys CD Release Party 

OCT 10 - The MAHONES w/ Panik Attak 

OCT 17 - SNFU/Mr. Plow/Mad Cowboys 


The Po’ stands for 


‘positive’ 


hen you talk to Po’ Girl's 
Allison Russell, you get the 
sense that all is right with 


the world. You get the sense that for 
every one of life’s cons, she could 
come back with two of life’s pros. 

This probably isn't all that surpris- 
ing when you listen to the trio's lush 
and honest folk, but you might think 
that the band’s full-on tour schedule 
would lead to a kind of weariness. 

“Of course you get homesick, and 
you don't get to see loved ones and 
friends and family as much as you'd 
like,” Russell says from Vancouver. 
“But at the same time, you don’t take 
them for granted.” 

“We sort of see it as, we're kind of 
paying dues right now. We're all from 
the the school of building an audience 
through live touring,” she adds. “Those 
are the bands and writers that we're 
kind of most influenced by, people like 
Fred Eaglesmith, who has been doing it 
all himself all these years and carving 
out an amazing niche for himself and 
people like Lucinda Williams and 
Emmylou Harris. We kind of look up to 
them and see the way they've conduct 
ed their careers and it seems pretty 
smart to us. And we love travelling.” 

it isn’t just travelling itself, but also 
the way the band—rounded out by 
Awna Teixeira and Benny Sidelinger— 
gets to seé places. 

“Being able to travel in that way is 
such a privilege, because you're not 
treated like a tourist. You're kind of 
taken in and embraced in a very special 
way," Russell says. “I can't imagine, 
we're so spoiled in a way, now, to go 
somewhere as a tourist is very difficult 


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for us. Where are our new best friends 

And family? That are going to show us 
places to go and the most amazing 
things about this particular city?” 


THE PO’ GIRL family is set to grow 
when the band joins Fred Eagle- 
smith’s Roots on the Rails tour, a 
week-long gig aboard a steam train 
riding through New Mexico, at the 
end of the month with Corb Lund and 
Washboard Hank. 

As Russell tells it, sharing the stage 
with Eaglesmith is a long time com 
ing, too. While Po’ Girl and Eagl« 
smith have played some of the same 
festivals, the band missed a date with 
Eaglesmith several years ago. 

“We were supposed to open for him, 
years ago, on the first Po’ Girl tour 
back in 2003, at the West End Cultural 
Centre in Winnipeg, but we broke 
down several times on the way,” she 
explains. “We just couldn't get there in 
time because our transmission had to 
be replaced in our van. We thought we 
could get the bus and go do the show, 
but the bus wasn’t going to get us there 
in time, so it was devastating.” 

The band may even have advance 
copies of its new album by that time 
Recorded in Austin over the summer, 
Po’ Girl spends downtime on the road 
putting together the albums finishing 
touches, which Russell says will be 
officially out sometime between late 
fall and early spring. ¥ 


4? DEWEEKIY SEP 4- SEP 10,2008 


MUSIC 


—$—<—$—$$—$—————— 


eeting members of local 
ock quartet Septem- 
A Stone is a slightly 
ae, tak and Their 
songs are , dark and seri- 
jusic for fans of eyelin- 
er and dyed-black hair. But 
the Stoners themselves are 
jovial and soft-spoken in 
person: The lead guitarist, 
jason Cullen, owns a small 
white kitten who playfullly 
pites my fingers while ! 
talk to the band in 
cullen’s apartment. 

“ve been around the 
music scene for a long time," he 
says. “I pretty much bleed it. Like the 
rest of the guys do. Music is in our 
blood.” 

«Music and poker,” quips drum- 
mer Kevin Wozney. With shoulder- 
jength hair, a Van Dyke goatee and 
the voice of a longtime smoker, he 
looks every bit the self-taught, sea- 
soned local musician. 

The rest of the band are no less 
experienced. But with no formal 
music training and an aversion to 
sheel music, September Stone 
relies on its intuition and ear to 
get through gigs. This can make 
their sound somewhat mutable. 

“Anyone who's seen us, they never 
know what they're going to get,” says 
Cullen. 


! 


” GAT OEDT GTH 


“The song 
remains the same,” adds 
bassist Frey Banman, “but every 
show is essentially different.” Covers 
of songs by bands like Tool and Sil- 
verchair are suddenly stitched on the 
end of a September Stone original or 
spontaneous riffs catalyze a session 
of rockin’ out. 

“We do that kind of stuff all the 
time,” confirms Wozney. 

There are some things the band 
does not do all the time—like touring, 
for example. 

“Even though we've been around 
for a while we didn’t branch out in 
Edmonton to any of the bars or any- 
thing,” says Wozney. “We used to go 


oe 


give 
the HMV Qift card 


to this one open jam all the time— 
Garry Thomas's famous open jams. | 
haven't even been across 


the country yet. I 
can’t 
wait to 

branch 
out a lit- 
tle.” 
But a 
cross-coun- 
try tour might 
have to wait 
for a while 

Everyone in the 

band has a full- 
time day job 

“As everyone 
knows, we're 
working and bills 
= come first and fore- 

L/ most,” says Cullen. “I 

wish I could make a 


FRI SEP 5 (9 PM) 


thed 
—_— 
be | SEPTEMBER STONE 
coe | WITH NO HEATTOMORRDW, DESOUSA DRIVE 
1. | VELVET UNDERGROUND, $10 
living playing in a band. It’s my goal.” 

Conspicuously absent from the 
room is the enigmatic D Errol, Sep- 
tember Stone’s front man and princi- 
ple lyricist. According to Wozney, 
Errol is a world-class talent 

"If it ever took off, [Errol] is the 
guy that would take it there. God, 
that guy, he's like nobody I’ve seen 
on stage,” he says. "When | first 
met him, when I got in a band with 
him, it was like, ‘Wow, finally, 
somebody | can jam with who's got 
serious talent.’” 

Errol’s zeal for on-stage acrobatics 
might be unmatched in Edmonton 
Wozney recalls a gig when it took an 


ee ee 


unexpected tum 


“fErrol} stepped out onto a bin, and 
he didn’t realize it 
"cause he steppe 


Wozney recounts 
and when he went 
pushed off to come b 
and it just kept going 
‘wham!’” 

If Errol ever manages to hit 
show, the rest of S e 
will be with him 

“1 would love to 
time and have ti 
Cullen earnestly 

“We 


At press time, \ 
Jason Cullen i [ 
September Stone. The 
ue as a three piece 


MUSIC 


SKLY SEP 4- SE 10,2008 


Stickin’ it to science 


nvAN GIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 
ike Moby and Feist, TV on the 
Radio's music has been fea- 
on television so much that 
you've probably heard them, even if 
you didn't know that you had. Their 
breakout hit “Wolf Like Me” from 
2006's Return to Cookie Mountain 
became the perfect fit any time some 
sort of urgent thing had to get done 
on television, or anytime there was a 
particulatly rocking party. 

But TVOTR doesn't really rock out 
like your typical band. Instead of getting 
together to jam out some riffs or some- 
thing, the band creates lush sound- 
scapes by building their songs layer 
upon layer until they‘re done. That tech- 
nique worked for their last album, and if 
early reports are true it is certainly work- 
ing for their newest disc Dear Science. 
But as bassist Gerard Smith explains, 
once the album is done, the trick is 
bringing those layers into a live setting. 

“Translating it live has always been a 
challenge for this band because of the 
way things have been recorded,” he 
says. “You have one set of criteria in the 
studio and another live, so it’s not an 
easy feat, especially if you don’t have 
some crazy million dollar tour budget. 
You just try and do the best you can.” 


LIKE THEIR PREVIOUS RECORD, the band 


had the luxury of taking their time 


- 


: 


while recording because they did it in 
founding member Dave Sitek’s Brook- 
lyn studio. While Smith explains that 
being able to return to the same studio 
as well as having the freedom to 
record at any time the band pleased 
was some comfort, he finds that he is 
still somewhat uncomfortable in a stu- 
dio environment in general 

"It's a strange way to work—most 
people get to work out of their home 
on a laptop, or when we were 
younger we worked off a four track,” 
he says. “You go into a studio and 
there's all this equipment and it’s like, 
‘What the hell is that?’ and it's a weird 
place to get familiar with. It'sa 
strange venue.” 


Hatha lyengar Ashtanga 
451-8131 12039-127 St. 


www.edmontonyogastudio.com 


Yoga Seminar 


with Francois Raoult 
Oct. 4-5, 2008 Cost: $250. 
3 hours asanas a.m. and 2.5 hours pranayama p.m. 


] Francois Raoult is dedicated to teaching 
yoga with awareness, integrity and com- 
passion. He first felt the call at age 19, 
on a pilgrimage to sacred sites of India. 
A graduate of the Ecole Nationale de 
Yoga in Paris, he started teaching in 
‘ 1975 and a year later began intensive 
www.openskyyoga.com ‘raining with Sri B.K.S. lyengar. Today a 
certified lyengar instructor, Frangois also has studied meditation 
with Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, Ayurveda with Dr. Robert 
Svoboda, and anatomy with Thomas Myers. In addition to con- 
ducting an annual yoga retreat in France, Frangois teaches regu- 
larly throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. 


One session will be on feet and ankles in asanas 
(pronation / supination. etc) 
One session on abdominal tone and release. 
Inversions - as he is quite a fan of sirsasana. 
Afternoons will include pranayama and some chanting. 


A similar kind of trepidation comes 
through on the new album. While the 
title of the new disc might seem like it 
relates positive feelings towards the 


PLUS SPEC 


ALL THAT 
REMAINS 


WED, SEP-10 (8 PM) 


TV ON THE RADIO 


WITH MILES BENJAMIN ANTHONY ROBINSON 


lu 
=> 
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STARLITE ROOM, $25 


a. 


scientific community, Dear Science 
actually refers to some of the more 
troubling aspects of the irreversible 
decisions scientists make. 

"Dave [founding member Sitek] had 
written this letter after reading about 
this group of scientists that had want- 
ed to blow a piece off of this meteor— 
he just thought it was the most 
outrageous thing that man would want 
to interfere with a celestial occur- 
rence,” explains Smith of the title. “It's 
a little outrageous that you're going to 
blow off a piece of this projectile that’s 
on its own course and not really inter- 


GIs 


36CRAZY! 


fering with anybody and not knowing 
the results of blowing off a piece of it 
You have to really wonder about what 
it is that justifies making that decision 
And even though the disc drops 
over a week after TV on the Radio 
makes its first appearance in Edmon 
ton, the band will be playing plenty of 
the new material when they get here 
“I’m pretty sure—that’s what I’ve 
been working on,” says Smith. “T'll be 
playing it but maybe they'll be playing 
the older stuff. I'll be playing the newer 
stuff because I've invested so much of 
my hand-eye coordination into it, or 
what's left of my hand-eye coordina- 
tion—man, getting old is a pain in the 
rumpus. Its been the focus of our m 
recent rehearsals, so I’m sure at 
part, if not half, of our set will in 
quite a bit of our new material.” v 


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ZIMMER’S HOLE 


DOA certainly not, uh, DOA 


CAROLYN WIKODYM / 
OA’s kazillionth album North- 
em Avenger has been 30 years 
in the making. Its lightning- 
fast guitar and ragged lyrics right- 
eously display a band that continues 
its life unapologetically. 

It couldn’t have been easy, but 
somehow DOA—made up of Joey 
“Shithead” Keithley, Randy “Rampage” 
Archibald and James Hayden—has 
avoided becoming what Keithley calls 
a “nostalgia act.” You could find the 
reasons in the album's 12th track, 
"Still a Punk.” 

Keithley’s brand of punk rock has- 
n't lost its nuts. After all, the world is 
still full of lyrical fodder. 

“That song kind of sums up that 30- 
year period, in the sense of why we 
got into punk in the first place and 
why we're still in it,” he says. “The 
funny thing is, when I started playing, 


I thought the world was a screwed up 
place. I just didn’t realize how 
screwed up it was. It's a lot more 
complicated than I conceived back 
when I was 20 years old.” 

He also isn’t the kind of guy who 
would ever be content to rest on his 
laurels. It would be pretty easy to be 
content with being considered one of 
the founders of hardcore, but he’s the 
kind of guy who wants to keep mov- 
ing forward. 

“When people say, ‘Oh Joe, weren't 
the old days the greatest?’ I think, 
yeah, some of it was, some of it was- 
n't,” he says. “But that was then and 
this is now, let's live with the present.” 


IN THE PRESENT, of course, punk rock 
has taken some different and, one 
could easily argue, watered-down 
forms, Keithley doesn’t seem to be too 
bothered by the mainstream success 


is | MON SEP (7 PM) 

=| DOA 

coe | WITH AANCIO 

2 | SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE, $24 -$79 


of of pop punk, however. Rather, h. 
has expressed his surprise about hoy, 
long it took. 

"Some of the current punk rock j 
pretty prefab,” he says. “Not all of it 
There's still some good stuff out ther< 
but every music becomes a gen; 
after awhile, if it survives, and thi: 
one has and gotten bigger. It’s perfec: 
for sticking it to your parents, cops 0; 
teachers, your boss. So it just too} 
them a long time to catch up to it 

“The funny thing is that you never 
used to be able to get punk at th 
mall, but now you can get your hai 
changed and buy punk rock clo 
and buy the music,” he adds. “And 


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when you had coloured hair 20, 30 
years age, there was a good chance of 
getting beaten up. So it’s a lot differ- 
ent, right. 1 prefer that people don't 
get beaten up, so I guess it’s improved 
in that way.” 

Nonetheless, the Vancouver band 
has remained a beacon in the genre 
for hardcore fans, a reminder that talk 
minus action equals zero. Not that 
xeithley thinks every band needs to 
purvey political lyrics—it would be 
boring if that were the case—but he 


Wi/tatS U LD 


seems quite comfortable in the role. 
“Is just the perfect thing for me,” he 
explains. “I got politicized when I was 
16. There was a Greenpeace protest 
against nuclear arms testing off of 
Alaska, the Aleutian Islands and I got 
into that and I had listened to a lot of 
folk music, like Woody Guthrie and Bob 
Dylan, when | was a kid. And when 
punk rock came around, it was just 
natural. I heard it when | was about 19 
or 20 and I went, like, oh, yeah, this is 
what rock music is supposed to be." w 


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= NEW SOUNDS 


Rodney DeCroo, Mockingbird 
Bible (Northern Electric) it’s been 
an interesting trajectory that Rodney 
DeCroo has been on since he picked 
up an old acoustic guitar and began 
writing songs a few years ago. For 
many songwniters, experience turns 
into structure—it just feels safe when 
there's a particular approach to fall 
back on, or a nice sheen on top as a 
way of pulling punches 

Not so for DeCroo, though. He went 
from a ragged first album to dropping 
War Tom Man, a 
live album full of 
new songs that 
were even more 
jagged than those 
on his debut, and 
on to Trucker’s 
Memorial, an 
acoustic record 
with Rae Spoon 

DeCroo's latest 
solo effort is 
Mockingbird Bible, a 
continuation of 
both the stripped 
down approach of 
Truckers Memorial and the tom and 
frayed spirit of War Tom Man. Here 
there is not so much a hurricane like 
DeCroo conjured up on his live record, 
but something more like a dark river 
beneath which a deadly undertow hides 

“Sacred Ground" opens the album 
with the percussive attack of an acoustic 
guitar that sounds as though it’s holding 
the fort for all it’s worth, while producer 
Jon Wood adds just the right touches to 
keep things spinning and slightly off bal- 
ance—a guitar weaving in here, another 
one ducking out over there, a low 
melody rumbling out of a piano. 

It's an effective introduction, stand 
ing just off the beaten path and beck- 
oning listeners on into the grey areas 
beyond the comfort zone. The next 
song, “Mockingbird,” is where the 
lights really go out, DeCroo’s voice 
dusted in a spooky tremolo over top of 


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simmering, arpeggiated chords and a 
swirling, rising soundscape that is 
constantly slipping out of grasp 

From there the album pushes and 
pulls at its limits, from the apocalyptic 
organ hits over the steady march of 
‘Long White Road” to the creaking of 
the room on the album closing “The 
Captain’s Tower Song.” Around every 
bend and behind every door there lies 
some compelling musical idea that 
keeps the songs alive and shifting. 

Mockingbird Bible finds DeCroo 
treading on dan- 
gerous territory 
lyrically as well, 
flirting with disas- 
ter as he peers 
into the darkness 
He's earned the 
right after his pre- 
vious records to 
step back some, 
maybe turn on a 
light and breath 
easy for a while, 


but he doesn't, 
instead wonder- 
ing if it’s rain 


falling or gasoline, at the same time 
striking a match to learn the truth. 

And truth is central to the record as 
DeCroo opens up and sings with an 
honesty that is admirable and terrify- 
ing in lyrics like those in the gentle 
“Memories of Snow and Dust,” where 
he wonders, “That sorrow comes 
down hard and fast / Is it the only 
thing that lasts?” 

The songwriter makes the effort to 
lay himself bare, and that’s not always 
an easy thing to listen to. But amongst 
all the heartbreakers and soul stirrers 
here, there are some brief and welcome 
respites—'Lies Are Just Lies” is difficult 
in its words, but the music lulls one into 
a sense of hope that is either real or 
false depending upon how the lyrics 
are taken—and it’s in these respites 
that the hope for survival resides. —EDEN 
MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


104430 - 124 street 
780.732.1132 
www.listenrecords.net 


calypsoul 70 co 


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Skybombers, Take Me to Town 
(Albert Productions) As soon as th 
first track off of thc 
Melbourne band’s 
debut be gin ( 
| play, it feels tike \-, 
| backin a 
when punk ang 
’ alternative rock 
Was one of the 
more exciting genres to listen to, Th, 
band does first appear to have str k 
gold with its slower tunes. “If You Wan 
to Be the One” and “My Morning's Gone” 
are very reminiscent of alt-rock song 
from the mid- to late-1990s. Then 
song like “Eleanor’s Lullaby’, an ode 
the band's influences, comes along and 
reveals why simply rhyming word 
("Eleanor Rigby 1 know / She lives up 07 
Abbey Road / She doesn’t know Sgt 
Pepper, don’t think he met her / But ii 
they do I'll let you know’) without taking 
thythm into account is cringeworthy 
—KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristina @vueweek!y.com 


time 


Eas 


Lonely Drifter Karen, Grass |; 
Singing (Semprini Records) If you can 
imagine Julie Christy channeling Edith 
Piaf in a Rodger 

and Hart musical 
while playing an 
impishly romantic 
runaway debu- 
tante-turned-globe- 
j trotting hobo, you 
# may begin to grasp 
the utterly darling genius of Lonely 
Drifter Karen's disarming debut 
Launching with a playful penny arcade 
whiz-trill-bang, Grass is Singing confi- 
dently sashays through its own uniquely 
nostalgic blend of melodic cabaret pop 
folk, and jazz, laced with flourishes ot 
traditional world music compressing 
eras and locations with sincerity and 
delight. Given the pan-European nature 
of LDK’s players (Austrian Tanja Frinter 
lending her silky vocals, guitar and writ- 
ing, Spaniard Mare Melia Sobrevias on 
piano, ukulele and accordion, and Italian 
Giorgio Menossi on percussion), perhaps 
the gypsy-ish roaming is to be expected 
but this lovely little oddball album sur 
prises nonetheless —MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / 


matychrista @vueweekly.com 
Hawksley Workman, Los 
Manilicious (isadora/Universal) 


Workman does well in just about 
everything he does, but when his 
fighter side comes out he's simply 
smokin’. Released 
in Europe back in 
May, it’s hard to 
believe that this is 
the same creative 
genius behind the 
sober melodies of 
Between the 
Beautifuls (which 
actually recorded after Los 
Manlicious). There are carry-overs—or 
correctly speaking, borrowed tracks— 
but rest assured, they are not lazy 
copy-and-paste schemes. In addition, 
there is an abundance of tunes that 
mirror the successful formulas of 
dance-worthy hits from (Last Night) we 
Were the Delicious Wolves (think 
‘Jealous of Your Cigarette”) as well as 
tunes that toy with other styles 
Workman's musical ideas rarely stand 
still—but that’s what makes listening 
to him such an exciting ride. —KRISTINA 
DE GUZMAN / kristina@vueweekly.com 


was 


TIL 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


MUSIC 


‘That Was, The Week That 
(arts & Crafts) The solemn burst 
of drums is followed by glossy dark rip- 
ples of low guitar. 
Other instruments 
fall in, fattening the 
sound and «= pro- 
| pelling its menace 
to a kind of edgy 
urgency, opening 
F the self-titled debut 
of The Week That Was. The band and its 
umpteen members hail from the heavi- 
\y industrialized northeastern parts of 
pritain, and the changeable Channel 
weather and the machinery of several 
eras of progress have left their imprint 
on the aural landscape of their intense 
offering, a dense concept art-rock 
album stuffed with literary lyrics, 
unusual syncopation, highly stylized 
instrumentation, and the suggestion of 
apocalypse. Hang in past the harrowing 
first few songs, and the darkness breaks 
for some wrenchingly beautiful music 
it's All Gone Quiet”; "Come Home”) 
ind a listening experience that’s nearly 
inematic. Actually, if you enjoyed Terry 
Gilliam’s Brazil, this could be its sonic 
counterpart. —MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE  / 
nerychrista @vwewoekly.com 


Mother Mother, Oh My Heart (Last 
Gang) The second full-length release by 
Vancouver based Mother Mother seems 
designed to push 
the band into the 
mainstream. It’s 
safer than their pre- 
vious release, 
2007's Touch Up, 
with much less of 
- the bratty in your 
ce attitude that permeated the last one 
ind made you wonder how their brand 
of shiny poppy folk could have gotten so 
subversive. It still features the amazing 
vocal interplay between Ryan 
Guldemond, his sister Molly and Debra- 
jean Creelman, the guitar work is 
absolutely mesmerizing, and the addi- 
tion of extra instruments like synth and 
cello have filled out the sound admirably. 
Oh My Heart is good, but I think it’s miss- 
ing that dangerous element that made 
the band so exciting in the first place. 
—BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 


The Curse of Company, Leo 
Magnets Joins A Gang ... (Arts & 
Crafts) Enigmatically titled, Leo 
Magnets Joins A Gang ... is a night 
album, one for 
the private brood- 
ing moments that 
a decade and a 
half ago would 
have likely been 
soundtracked by 
Mazzy Star. The 
equally generously named Australian 
quintet, The Curse of Company, 
weaves a beautiful rootsy shoegaze 
psych-pop with a lush velvety feel 
and a slightly doomy, anxious vibe. 
Seesawing male and female vocals 
and a noir-ish whimsy fatten up the 
Originality of the offering, which 
unspools like a foggy dream of a car- 
Nivalesque underworld. A glimpse at 
their weird and wonderful website, 
‘comagnets.com, is a worthwhile 
“version and a hint of what you're in 
‘or if you throw down with Leo 
Magnets, | —MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / 
narychrista@vueweekly.com 


OLD SOUNDS 


EDEN MUNAD 
=} | eden@veweekly.com 


= 
7) 
= 


Marcus Hook Roll Band, Tales of 
Old Grand-daddy (Capitol) 
Originally released: 1973 AC/DC is a 
band that has always worked from a 
relatively small palette of rock ‘n’ roll 
sounds, showing an impressive focus 
in sound right out of the gate. It's as 
though the Malcolm and Angus Young, 
the brothers at the core of the group, 
knew exactly the sound that they were 
after when they put 
AC/DC together. 
And maybe they did, 
if their first record- 
ing, with the 
Marcus Hook Roll 
Band in 1973, is any 
indication. ~ 

The Marcus Hook 
Roll Band was a stu- 
dio project helmed 
by an older Young 
brother, George, and 
his production part- 
ner Harry Vanda 

The resulting record, Tales of Old 
Grand-daddy, demonstrates that the 
biggest influence on Malcolm and 
Angus was the songwriting of Vanda 
and George Young. 

The approach to the songs is imme- 
diately familiar, even though there is 
far more of a heart of soul to this 
recording than what lay in the future of 
the younger Young brothers 

On “Shot in the Head,” the hard left 
and right guitars are there, similar in 
approach but not quite the same as 
chords join and individual notes are 
picked out by one guitar around the 
other. Even the song itself is familiar— 
it seems obvious that Angus and 


QUICK SPINS 


WHITEY HOUSTON 
quickspins@vueweekly.com 


MATTHEW SWEET 
SUNSHINE LIES 
(SHOUT) 

Pop rock underdog 

He's got jingle AND jangle 
He's just tons-o-fun! 


THE MIDWAY STATE 
HOLES 
(REMEDY) 


Ivory ticklers 
They might tickle your fancy 
If you're 10 and gay 


THE VERVE 
FORTH 
(PARLOPHONE) 


Ashcroft lessons learned: 
Solo disc = FART! And 
Don’t sample the Stones 


Speedo and the gents 
Recorded one trillion songs 
All but one are good 


Gia 40 (en)-<hdy 


Maras Hook Roll Band 


MERCURY REV 
_ SNOWFLAKE MIDNIGHT 
(YEPROE) 


Malcolm snatched one of the song's 
chord riffs for use in their own “Rock 
and Roll Singer.” 

There are glimpses of the future 
found throughout the record, mixing an 
economical style of songwriting that 
the Youngs would keep with a soulful, 
eclectic approach that they would 
abandon when they took the wheel of 
their own group. The best moments 
here, though, are those in which the 
Marcus Hook Roll Band sounds like 
something unto itself, rather than a 
studio-built lark that Angus and 
Malcolm used as a training ground. 

A highlight of the 
fecord is “The 
People and the 
Power,” a devastat- 
ing soul number 
with a refrain of 
“The People don’t 
have the power to 
change things any- 
more.” Even better 
is “Silver Shoes and 
Strawberry Wine,” 
a cryptic tune that 
burns slowly and 
seems tailormade for a trip of some 
sort—teal, metaphorical, chemically 
induced 

Beyond these songs, much of what 
is here comes across as uncomfortably 
structured, but it's still an interesting 
listen as the starting point for AC/DC. 

When the smoke has cleared, in the 
big scheme of things and despite a few 
detours through a landscape more soul- 
ful than heavy, it turns out that if you've 
heard the Marcus Hook Roll Band then 
you've heard every AC/DC album—or at 
least the sounds that the younger Young 
brothers would appropriate for their 
awn purposes, adding a little volume 
and turning them into that characteristic 
AC/OC sound along the way. v 


DRAGONFORCE 

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(ROADRUNNER) 
Technically perfect 

A triumphant display of 
Over practicing! 


Must suck to have made 
A career for someone else 
With your own pop smarts 


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A LITTLE TRADITION 
(WNT) 

Fine Winnipeg lads 


Take everything old and cool 
spin pure modern gold 


URIAH HEAP 

WAKE THE SLEEPER 
(SANCTUARY) 

New disc! Just like old! 

Like nothing has changed over 
The last 90 years 


THE ACACIA STRAIN 
CONTINENT 
(PROSTHETIC) 


Heavy and quite loud 
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of Kirstie Alley 


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Sleepercar a 
family affair 


KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristina @vueweokly.com 
here was a guy in my writing 
class last year who stated 
that he was from New York 

but that the reason he didn’t have 
an accent was because he was 
from “upstate New York.” Similarly, 
listening to Jim Ward, the vocal- 
ist/guitarist of both El Paso’s 
Sleepercar and Sparta and former 
guitarist/back-up vocalist of At the 
Drive-in, reveals that west Texans 
do not carry accents as well 

‘The biggest [stereotype about 
Texas] is that we're all cowboys and 
wear cowboy hats and that we bring 
horses to school and stuff like that 
It's honestly not true,” says Ward. 

Hmm ... sounds like the very same 
misconceptions that outsiders have of 
dear old Alberta 

Interestingly enough, an inquiry 
regarding the maple leaf on 
Ward's guitar when his band 
opened up for City and Colour at 
the Jubilee Auditorium a few 
months ago reveals that the musi- 
cian has a connection with the 
province. It begins with a trip 
taken by his mother-in-law who is 
originally from, Windsor 

“My wife's mother is Canadian so 
theoretically, my kids would be a 
quarter Canadian,” Ward concludes, 
half-jokingly. “My mother-in-law was 
On vacation in Mexico and ended up 
moving to El Paso. My wife was born 
in El Paso but now, all of her family 
lives in Calgary.” 


WARD, HOWEVER, is Texas born and 


raised. Unsurprising considering that 
the title of Sleepercar’s alt-country 


Urban , 


ounge 


SLOAN FR 
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MEMBER OF VUE WEEKLY'S SRS? Rea 


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MUSIC 


Maes TES SEPT (8PM) 
— 

SLEEPERCA 
co | WITH TEAM BUTLOING 
| STARLTEADOM, S15 


debut, released earlier in April t} 
year, is West Texas. The band’s na, 
itself pays respects to the king 
lifestyle Ward’s grandparents eq |), 
ing in that part of the state 

“(The name Sleepercar] come 
from the part of a train wh, 
workers sort of lived when th 
wete building a bridge or som 
thing like that,” Ward explains 
great-grandfather built tro, 
bridges in west Texas and southe 1 
New Mexico so my grand{ 
grew up on sleeper cars which 2 
basically like mobile homes on 
railroad tracks. The wives an, 
[children} would live in there whi! 
the men were working." 

It's evident how important fami! 
is to Ward. His father, Jeff, why 
appears on the band’s record pl 
bass, significantly influenced war: 
musical tastes. Growing up, Ward 
often listened to bands prevalent in 
the '60s and ‘70s, such as the Bea 
les and Led Zeppelin. 

“My dad played guitar while | 
was growing up. When he kind 
went back to playing bass, | hap 
pened to be starting this band and 
so he just kind of came along fo: 
the ride,” says Ward. “And it’s bee 
really fun. My relationship with my 
dad is really good. Some guys built 
cars with their dad or went fishing 
or whatever but I played musi 
with mine.” w 


ATT = 


WEEKLY 


Fetes Meiiaten Recto. eae St % 


| - ae (pn tem 


Nn sl Creston, 
te tO 
oe ioene TD ane —< 1 


matashiling.ca 1157) with Tibetan tradition 
Lama Ani Hine. jinners welcome, instruction 
ble; free; Wed 7pm) 


Augustana Campus Dish ae le 
. 
ae eco ps 
TAOIST TAI CH SOCIETY Butler Par, 1 

Pan 7804-4253) Te ottiaiee ete 


Wee and a free introductory class 
Sac Sop 81pm) ig 
THOUGHTFUL TUESDAY Steeps College Pl 
11116-82 Ave hes owing mnt Hed 
Showy a te aaa inter Sten * ldiers; Te 
im 
soe ison poi 


Toastmasters ae Public 
‘www.norators.com, Wed (7-8: * Power 
may eee 768 eet = 
ian 


OF ALBERTA Riverdale Community 
Hall, 9731-100 Ave, www.vola.ca * Vegan/vegetarian 
potluck, pM cc a dish axe pei ees 
Spoon, al ils . mem- 
bery/$5 (non-member ee 12 and under) 


CRICK ... LENNON AND 

Pair ying Co 
ic lecture am, in author 

broadcaster, com) ne 


in the arts and sci- 
ences * Tue, ee ae esos ) Free event 


WOMEN IN BLACK (n front of the Old Strathcona 
Farmers’ Market * Silent vigil the Ist and 3rd Sat (10- 
11am) every month, stand in silence for a world with- 


out violence 
QUEER LISTINGS 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-RED DEER Su yk 
United Church, Red Deer (403-347-6073) © A im wel- 
come LGBTO people and their friends, family, and 

allies meet the 2nd Tue (7pm) every month 


BUDDYS NITE mae ee 1 Ave Ue as 
Be ° Be nightly Spm- pe Sun: 
Rotati shows rad ri tienes and Mi Vanity 
Fair in 3. dust Lounge and GoDiva and 

Donnatella NE1 in The GoDonna Show, DJ 

WestCoa: jaddy ¢ Mon: ; Amateur strip cont 

with Mia Fellow, a ee DJ WestCoastBa =a 
* Tue: Free pool and tot DJ Arrowchaser * Wed: 
Hump day with DJ Si ar ere Ti: Wet under- 


EXOXY 
t with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy * Fri: We made “em famous! 
DJ Dea Totash, come early to avoid lineup, no 
before 10pm * Sat: Undie night for men only, 
‘ Foapodl end tumey; DJ Arrowchaser 


EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) Unitarian 

Church of Edmonton, 10804-119 St * A group of older 
gay men and their pate who have common social 
interests meet the 2nd Sun (2:30pm) of most months —_ 
for a social period, @ short meeting and a quest speak- 
er, discussion ea of a potluck ses Special inter- 


est meet for other social throughout 
the email edm hoo.ca, www.prime- 
ples ee 
ane ere www.teamed- 
= e oheste rop-In Recreational 
Hyer Sen in ae 118 St (780-465- 
)* AS 
ieee Mon pice 100 3414 ‘eatnay 
ney ahi ee eres 
ae 
ol, 1782 MS Tue best we Banh Ths 
any Mana 
ae tere ea reenatrrt 
vol feat cae YOGA 
ie Sere Yoga: every Sun (2-3:30pm); 


Ger esau +106 St (780- 
neat ed Th Oh th 
ge aroups yahoo com/ grou =o hd 


oo 
a 


PFLAG Pride Centre, 9540-111 Ave * A support group 
pay, isa trans- 
the ist Wed each 


fiat gs pi olpers ae 
www) (ce eee ai (780-488-3234) ® 


Open Tue-Fri felonies q is iaamas 
DoRetE Meet 
every Thu (7pm) * is te a ial Up: An bab book 


meet ety at action * Youth 
Understanding ¥ Youth: Youth up to.25 years, support 
ane social cal wom meet a a3 ion 5 
haw.ca © Womons} meeting 1st Sun 
He month (10:30am-12:30pm) * Trans p 
Faucet ft Group: a the Ist and 3rd Sun 
Vana wnt Bide mnt itor 
le: un cilitator, 
Rob Wells robwells 7Te@notvall Ee 
: Meet the 2nd Mon of each month ome 
is ee reed Intersex and ee 
ig aul ing the 2nd Tue each 
wt 17 aor ransgender, Transsexual, Intersex 
and ral as Education, advocacy and support for 
men, women and youth; PFLAG Edmonton: Meet the 
1st Wed each month oh en . ree Sat Aa solution- 
focused drop-in counsel {aaa m) * 
stSpace: drop-in for L bra ane teal a to 25; Tue- 


ROBERTSON-WSESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10203- 
ante 1587) www.nwuc.org * Soul OUTing 
-focused altemative worship * 3rd Sun oN 
(7pm); worship Sun rea people of a ae 
ioe orientations welcome. A LGBT monthly book club 


and @ bi-monthly film night. tall for more info or email 
jravenscroft@rwuc.org 
ST. PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH 11526-76 Ave (780- 


436-1555) ¢ People of all sexual orientations are wel- 
come © Sun (10am worship) 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave (780-498-6557) * Open 
Daily (noon) © ae Tue Karaoke with Tizzy and Patrick 
Sat-Sun Pool Tournaments 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


BRAZIL WEEK 2008 Various venues on U of A cam- 
hs (780-492-4926) * Commemorating eed 
Independence Day, a week of readings, screen 
music, dance, ant ‘poetry * www.humanities, ete 
ta.ca/mics/ 


CORNFEST Marketplace at Callingwood, 69 Ave, 178 
+ © Fundraiser for the Firefighters Bum Treatment 
Society, Edmonton Chapter * Sat, Sept. 6 (12-5pm) 


CORN MAZE 26101, SH 527, Spruce Grove, 
wwwedmontoncommaze.ca, (780-288-0208) © Rexall 
Edmonton Indy themed maze * Until Oct. 18 © $9(12 


and up)/S$7 (5-11)/free for kids under 5 


OPEN MINDS WALK AND RUN Hawrelak Park, 
9330 Groat Rd Contact: Kristina De Guzman at (780- 
428-2465) © 2.5k fun walk, 5k trail walk, Sk road run, 
or 10k trai! run to raise money for the Schizophrenia 
Society, games for kids and music by poole ° 
Sun, Sept. 7 (8:30am check-in; 10am race, 

Register online at www.WalkandRun.ca 


PECHA KUCHA 2 Westbury Theatre, Trans Alta Arts 
Barns, 1030-84 Ave, www.edmontonnextaen.com * A 
night for young desi jet to meet, network, and dis- 

their projects. Featuring designers presentations 
on aie B pane and architecture, DJ Pr Pop spins 
tunes in the lobby ® Sept. 11 (6:30pm) * $5 (door) 
QUE CALORI Wellington Socinta Hall, 13440 192 
St © Salsaddiction Rueda Dance Team, iD cas. 


and fundraiser * Sat. Si 
pete © $12 (adv at Thon Bar tho ou 15 


(doar) 
KARAOKE 


BLIND PIG 32 St. Anne Street, St. Albert (780-418- 
6332) © Tue, Wed, Fri: Karaoke with Shelly 


a BOB'S SPORTS BAR Continental Inn. ed 
Plain Re (780-484-7751) * Wed (8pm-12am); Thu, Fri 
Sat (9:30pm-1:30am): with Right Said Ed 


CASTLEDOWN'S PUB 15753-100 St (780-457-7111) 
® Tue (Spm-1am): with Off-Key Entertainment 
CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB 37 Millboume Rd 
(780-462-6565) * Tue (9pm); with Sonia/Prosound 


CROWN AND ANCHOR 15277 Castledowns Rd (780- 
472-7696) * Thu {1030pm) * Wed: Name that Tune 


DRUID 11606 J: Ave * Wed nights: with Gary 
from Mr. Entertainment 


Le PUB 9605-86 Ave (780-435-5050) © Sat (pm- 


GAS PUMP 10166-114 St (780-488-4841) * Tue, 
Wed (9pm-1:30am): Gord's Best Live Singing Show 
HAWKEYES TOO 10044-102 St (21-9898) © Fri, 
Sat (8pm-midnight}: Hot Karaoke Productions 
HOOLIGANZ PUB 10704-124 St (780-452-1168) * 
Fri: Karaoke with Krista, Liquid Entertainment 


Trane co 12402- nee an oat ae 
Thustvest by Gordon: Gordon; Fri, Sat: hosted by Jolly Greg 


Giant (9:30pm-2am| 
Pe eiceena ee Stony Plain Rd (780- 
489-1906) * Mon (9pm-1am): Kara pe 
KNIGHTS PUB SOUTH 1919-105 St tite ae 
® Fri, Sat (10pm-2am}: Gord's Best Live Singing Show 
ON THE ROCKS 11740 Jasper Ave (780-482-4767) * 
Mon nl with Wil Clark and Mr. Entertainment * 
Wed een N Name "hat fine © Thu (Spm): Salsa 


Cuban salsa 
wicabe 1715-108 Ave pocarEsresl * Longest 
running Karaoke bar, 7 days a week 
ROSIE'S 10604-101 


Tee wun (7pm): with 
Ruth # yo eer Sire et 
ae ae ie 


Schulman and Speedos 


65 | QUEERMONTON 


3 | TED KERR 
| tedcovneventyeen 


It was while reading writer and activist 
Sarah Schulman’s 1998 book, Stage 
Struck: Theatre, AIDS and the Marketing 
of Gay America, in anticipation of her 
upcoming lecture that kicks off the 
Inside OUT lecture series, that | began to 
see how we as a society still suffer from 
homophobia and heterosexism. 

Schulman’s book starts off retelling 
her experience of trying to receive 
acknowledgement that her book People 
in Trouble, published in 1990, was used 
without permission (along with Puccini’s 
La Bohéme) by Jonathan Larson to write 
the hit Broadway musical Aent that 
debuted in 1996 {along the way remov- 
ing anything interesting and progressive 
from Schulman’s original book). 

Stage Struck quickly becomes a 
steady, page-turning text that illumi- 
nates the inquiring mind on the confines 
of being queer in modern society. 
Through the recounting of her own expe- 
rience, Schulman illustrates how Ameri- 
can and Americanized popular culture 
reappropriates the experience of the 
minority, deconstructs it to a shallow 
shell only to fill it up with white, hetero- 
sexist, middle-class filler aimed at paci- 
fying the masses and assuaging the guilt 
and ignorance of the majority. Along the 
way, due to tokenism and the politics of 
Oppression, we as minorities applaud 
and support it. Reading her book gave 
me concrete reasons to dislike Rent 
beyond the pit in my stomach that told 
me that it was crap. For me, Schulman's 
most powerful statement in the book 
that illuminates the predicament we find 
ourselves in is, “It is very seductive for 
gay people to confuse the presence of 
limited gay images in advertising with 
some kind of social equity.” 

In a chapter entitled “The Creation 
of a Fake Public Homosexuality” Schul- 
man shares with the reader the param- 
eters that regulate how and who fram 
the LGBT community gets represented 
in modern popular culture: 1) Gay and 
lesbian celebrities are allowed to 
emerge as along as they become 
famous while they are in the closet 
and then they come out. 2) Gay con- 
tent is permissible if it focuses on 
romance. 3) Mild homoerotism in het- 
erosexual paradigms is permissible. 4) 
Homophobia is unmentionable. 5) Gay 
people are rarely allowed to be the 
heroes unless they are tragic heroes 
rescued by straight people. 

Nothing illustrates Schulman’s 
assertions more than the tale of 
Matthew Mitcham and his quest of 
Olympic gold. | first heard about 

"Mitcham on Perez Hilton. There was a 
picture of a handsome man ina Speedo 
and for once this summer it wasn't 
Michael Phelps—it was Mitcham, and 


the story was about how in the quest ” 


to receive a grant so his boyfriend 
could cheer him on in Beijing, where he 
would be competing for gold, he ended 
up coming out of the closet to the Sya- 
ney Morning Herald. \n doing so he 
became the first openly gay Australian 
to represent the country at the 
Olympics. 


SE 4 


-SEP 10.2008 = WUWEWEEKLY 


WHEN HIS PERFORMANCE seemed less 
than stellar at the beginning of the 
Olympics, the gay media attributed it to 
the pressure of coming out. NBC sports, 
the official American network of the 
Olympics, attributed it only to personal 
problems. Maybe it could be arqued that 
NBC not mentioning his sexuality was 4 
sign of success, of queer integration. 
Perhaps in the minds of the sportscast- 
ers being gay was so accepted that it 
could go without mention. Or maybe gay 
was still perceived as off-putting by 
sportscasters and producers so they did- 
n't mention it because they didn’t want 
people at home to switch the channel 
Their failure to not talk about his sexu- 
al orientation came to a head when 
Mitcham came from behind to win 
Olympic gold in the men’s 10-metre plat- 
form dive, achieving the highest scores 
ever in the sport. And still the sportscast- 
ers didn't mention that he was gay. By 
not celebrating the historic feat of being 
an out gay Olympic winner, NBC missed 
the chance to tell a story of diversity and 
adversity—a human story that hopefully 
anybody could relate to. Instead they 
feinforced ignorance and sold the lie of a 
“normal” boy making good 

Within hours of Mitcham’s win and 
NBC's silence, posts and stories began 
appearing all over the web. Qutsports 
wrote, “If he had had cancer, if his parents 
had been killed in a car crash when he 
was two, or if he had just proposed to his 
girlfriend, they would have mentioned it” 

The day after Mitcham’s win, NBC 
Olympics President Gary Zenkel issued 
in an apology, “We regret that we 
missed the opportunity to tell Matthew 
Mitcham’s story. We apologize for this 
unintentional omission.” 

One of the most upsetting things about 
NBC's failure to fully celebrate Mitcham 
is that they are the network that has 
brought us Will and Grace, made us suf- 
fer through Queer Eye for the Straight 
Guy and they're responsible for countless 
gay and gayish characters from Kenneth 
on 30 Rock to Pat on Saturday Night Live. 
One has to ask NBC: are gays only good 
for laughs? To drive up ad dollars? To use 
as publicity stunts disguised as progres- 
sive programming choices? 

Through Mitcham’s story we can clear- 
ly see that the parameters that Schulman 
writes about in her book are still in effect: 
1} Mitcham came out before he was well 
known. 2) His story is about competition, 
not love. 3) He competed in an all-male, 
nearly-nude group activity, thus blowing 
any heterosexual paradigm out of the 
water. 4) Because of him we are mention- 
ing homophobia. 5) He won the medal, 
making him the hero. 

Mitcham and his story do not follow 
the rules, so at this point in our American- 
ized existence his tale does not get told to 
the masses. Schulman refused to let her 
story go unheard, so she told it herself, 
and along the way she has helped us rec- 
ognize our own stories, making room for 
true heroes to emerge. w 


Sarah Schulman will be giving a free 
public lecture entitled, United in Anger 
A History of the AIDS Coalition to 
Unleash Power at the Telus Centre on 
the U of A campus on Tue, Sep 16 (7 
pm). Visit www.ismss.ualberta.ca for 
details. 


| (ii ASTROLOGY 
ARIES (MAR 21 - APR 18) 


“Like an ox-cart driver in monsoon season 
or the skipper of a grounded ship, one 
must sometimes go forward by going 
back,” wrote novelist John Barth in The 
Friday Book. Consider using that 
approach, Aries. Retreat may be the 
strongest move you can make right now; 
surrender could turn out to be a master- 
stroke. But in order to get the most out of 
this strategy, you've got to keep your ego 
from injecting its agendas into situations. 
Don't act out of shame or pride; don’t 
humble yourself excessively or be burning 
for revenge. Be objective, neutral, poised 


TAURUS (APR 20~MAY 20) 

One of my favourite memories is gazing into 
my Taurus daughter's face just moments 
after her complicated birth. She had been 
through a heroic ordeal that scared the hell 
out of me, and yet she looked calm, beatif- 
ic, and amused. “She's part-Buddha and 
part-elf,” | thought to myself as | held her in 
my arms. | saw elegant compassion blend- 
ed with wise playfulness, two states | had 
never before witnessed in the same person. 
This unexpected marvel imprinted me 
deeply, and has informed my work ever 
since. Do you have a comparable memory, 
Taurus? A time when a key to your destiny 
was revealed to you? A tuming point when 
you got a gift that has fuelled your quest for 
years? This is not only a good time to revisit 
that breakthrough; it's also a ripe moment 
tovask life for another one. 


GEMINI (MAY 21 - JUN 20) 

The governor of Minnesota has a wife who 
loves to go fishing. Tim Pawlenty told radio 
station WCCO that his wife Mary is smit- 
ten with the sport. She is genuinely driven 
to cast her bait into the lake in quest of the 
catch. “Now, if | could only get her to have 
sex with me,” the governor added, sug- 
gesting that her passion for intimate union 
with him was not as pressing as her urge 
to fish. While | personally lean toward the 
position that eros is one of life's best gifts, 
| don't judge Mary harshly for her prefer- 
ence. Many people find that the most sat- 
isfying and useful way to express their 
libido is through some non-sexual activity. 
You may want to consider that possibility, 
at least in the coming days. It's the subli- 
mation phase of your astrological cycle. 


CANCER (JUN 21 - JUL 22) 

Normally, you're not the most direct person 
in the world. Nor are you the most concise. 
You sometimes display tendencies to side- 
Step the main issues and take the long way 
home to the truth. Why, then, have you 
apparently turned into a sleek paragon of 
precise communication? To what do we 
owe your crisp new efficiency, your knack 
for cutting through the crap, and your com- 
mitment to saying exactly what you mean? 
Maybe it has to do with the alignment of 
the planets. Or maybe you really, really 
don't want to be misunderstood 


LEO (JUL 23- AUG 22) 

Resilience is a quality that allows you to 
rise above setbacks and find resources in 
unexpected places. It’s a willful instinct to 
seek the higher ground and.a bigger 
vision. It's intensely practical, because it 
shushes the nagging voices in your head 


that make negative interpretations of 
your experience, thereby allowing you to 
act courageously in your own best inter- 
ests. This is Resilience Week for you, Leo. 
Call on your dormant reserves. 


VIRGO (AUG 23 - SEP 22) 

Pregnant giraffes give birth standing up. 
Babies arrive in their new environment with 
a jolt, hitting the ground after plummeting six 
feet. Although they were fairly safe before, 
upon leaving the womb they are in danger of 
being preyed upon by animals like leopards 
and hyenas, which wouldn't dare attack their 
giant mothers. I'm thinking there's a resem- 
blance between the newborn giraffes and a 
New project you're working on, Virgo. Its ini- 
tial splash into the world may be a bit rocky 
and fraught with dicey challenges. But I'm 
here to say that if you're a vigilant caretaker 
in the early going, it will grow to maturity. 


LIBRA (SEP 23 - OCT 22) 

My friend Joan was experiencing a cascade 
of annoying physical symptoms—mediocre 
digestion, mild headaches, chronic conges- 
tion in her ear, itchy skin. None was terrible, 
but together they were a big distraction. 
After two trips to her regular acupuncturist, 
there was little improvement. The acupunc- 
turist decided it was time for more drastic 
measures: He was going to try a dramatic 
treatment that was akin to pushing a reset 
button on a machine. Success! Joan was 
freed from the nagging ailments and experi- 
enced a thorough rejuvenation. | suggest 
you seek out the equivalent treatment, 
Libra: push the reset button. 


SCORPIO (OCT 23-NOV 21) 
“The reality of love is mutilated when it is 
removed from all its unreality.”. So said the 


EK 


SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


French philosopher Gaston Bachelard in 
his book The Poetics of Reverie. He meant 
that realism alone is not enough for human 
beings to live on, especially in our most 
intimate relationships. We need fantasy to 
augment the merely factual perspective. 
We require poetic truths to keep the 
rational approach honest. Without the play 
of the imagination, in fact, our understand- 
ing of the world is impoverished and dis- 
torted, In this spirit, Scorpio, | invite you to 
be extra daydreamy and imaginative about 
love in the coming days. Feed your soul 
and the souls of those you love with expe- 
riences that arouse mystery and wonder. 


SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22 - DEC 21) 

A teacher you will ultimately feel a strong 
need to learn from has recently become 
known to you, or will soon become known. 
A series of lessons you will benefit from 
studying throughout 2009 is already reveal- 
ing its contours. | suggest you do some 
meditation and free-writing about these 
developments. Making your intuitions more 
conscious will prime your deep psyche for 
the work ahead, helping it to attract the 
experiences you'll require to prepare for 
your future educational assignments. 


CAPRICORN (DEC 22 - JAN 19) 

“The whole history of civilization is 
strewn with creeds and institutions which 
were invaluable at first, and deadly after- 
wards.” So said British essayist Walter 
Bagehot. | would add the following corol- 
lary: the fortunes of many individuals 
have declined because of belief systems 
and structures that were invigorating ear- 
lier in their lives but that gradually 
became paralyzing or parasitical. Has that 
ever been true about you, Capricorn? 


More importantly, might it become trye it 
the future? Please take inventory of you 
reliance on theories and attitudes and 
methods that made good senso v,,.. 
upon a time but that are now bo, anitn 
irrelevant or even counterprodu: tive 


AQUARIUS (JAN 20-FEB 18) 

“What did you do this summer?" | askeg my 
Aquarian readers. “| didn't build a single 
sandcastle,” wrote Emma from Baltimos; 
“| didn't fall in love. | didn’t celebrate th, 
full moon. | didn’t run through a meadow 
didn’t taste honeysuckle. But on the oth: 
hand, | worked hard on the book I'm writing 
| dramatically improved my diet. | kept my 
house clean and well-organized. | watch 
less TV." If I'm analyzing the omens corre 
ly, many of you Aquarians were like Emr 
in the past months: more successfu! 
accomplishing practical goals than at ha 
ing free-form fun. | don’t think that’s a prob 
lem, though. You can't do everything, righ’ 
But these next few weeks before the equi 
nox will be a good time to correct ih; 
imbalance. | suggest you go in quesi of 
what has been missing. 


PISCES (FEB 19 - MAR 20) 

You will have a knack for seeing what h: 
been invisible and for describing what 1 
one else can say. You'll have a talent {o 
perceiving the open secrets that everyone 
else has refused to notice and for speat 
ing about truths that everyone has avoid 
ed articulating. I'm not sure what you’ v: 
done to attain these wizardly abilities 
but the cause isn't really important, is it 
Get out there and use your superpower 
to generate breakthroughs that will for 
Stall and maybe even cancel sluggish 
breakdowns in the group processes. w 


ung 


Sep}? a The 
neat 


time... Please contact us for more details. 
Requirements—Should be a computer literate. 2-3 
hours access to the internet weekly. Must be over 
‘20yrs of age. Must be efficient and dedicated. If you 
ere i and a more inormaten, please 
e-mail to yash,sandp) iti. net 
for more feedback 


The Cutting Room is looking for 
Assistants and Stylists 
Please drop off your resume to 
J 10536 124 Street 


DRINK COFFEE, TALK ON THE PHONE 


MAKE MONEY! 


Lonking for the perfect jal with goed people, 
great pay, flexible hours, all while sapperting 
the arts? Then call Bev at 780-408-8111 


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y SUG SeanUON io 
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FALL POSITIONS 


Bussersa(llanagers. 


Dovey, (Garorre nyxe A" OSS 10) sf 


bar stars. 


Drivers wanted: $15+/hr, Wed (night). Thu (day), 
perm/PT. Must have mini-van or truck. Look for reli- 
able, responsible person. Ph 907-0571 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL TEACH ENGLISH: 
We train you to teach: 1000's of jobs around the world, 
Next in-class or ONLINE by correspondence. Jobs quar- 
anteed. 7712-104 St. Call for info pack 1-888-270-2941. 


HOUSES FOR SALE OR LEASE 


decor, Gas fireplace, 
Combres # 23185 ° 


FRAMING 


MOVIE DOSTER SHOP 


Affordable picture frame options Music Posters. 
8126 Gateway Bhd. ISB. 


NOTICES 


Private ecclesiastical notice: Jat it be known to all 
concerned men and women that a successful ecclesi- 
astical lawful private agreement/contract/con- 
venant/elaim, through default judgment has been 
entered into between the private woman Alison 
Redford, acting as the de facto attorney General for 
the province of Alberta; "the private men” Robert 
Nicholson, acting as the de facto Minister of justice 
and attomey general of Canada; Chris Bentley, acting 
as the de facto Attorney general for the province of 
Ontario and the private sovereign man created by 
God, Paul-Joseph: of the Ricci family. The full text of 
the agreement may be viewed at http://www.allcre- 
atorsgifis.org or call Paul-Joseph at 866-444-8645 
ext. 241 for a copy 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


MODAL MUSIC INC. 221-3116 
Quality music instruction since 1981 
Guitarist. Educator. 
Graduate of GMCC music program 


Enthusiastic, Friendly, highly qualified 
And experienced teacher of piano & guitar. 
Teaches all musical styles for all ages/skill levels 
Forest Heights area. Call Aaron (BA Honours 
Performing Arts, Sepa) Inst. For Performing 
Arts, England). Phone 780-564-5786 


Highly qualified music instructor (B.Ed. Music 
Major). Teaches all levels of piano students, 
All musical styles and beginning bass guitar. 
Ail ages welcome, reasonable rates, flexible schedule 
Call 780-721-3298 


ARTIST TO ARTIST 
FREE*FREE*FREE*FREE*FREE 


FREE*FREE*FREE*FREE*FREE 
ARTIST/NON PROFIT CLASSIFEDS 

Need a volunteer? Forming an acting troupe? Want 
someone to jam with? Place up to 20 words FREE. Ads 
more than 20 words are subject to regular price or cruel 
editing. Free ads will run for four weeks, if you want to 

renew of cancel please phone Glenys at 780-426- 
1996/fax 426-2889/e-m glenys@vueweekly.com or drop 

it off. Deadline is noon the Tue before publication. 

Placement will depend upon available space 


AUDITION NOTICE for CITIE BALLET: SEASON AUDI- 
TIONS 2008-09 on Fri, Sept. 5, 4:30-6pm at the Marr- 
Mac Dance and Theatre Arts, 8627-109 St Male & 
Female dancers, Classical & Contemporary, 
Intermediate to pre-professional level; Min age 16. 13 
780-472-7774 of E: nevab8@telus.net to register, 
wwwecitieballet.com 


1S SS ee 
The ASA and EPL invite you to the free Art Talk with 
Jeff de Boer on Thu, Sept. 25, 7pm at the Stanley A. 

Milner Theatre (downstairs), 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq 


Steeps—Old Glenora: for open mic—Spoken word 
First Thursday every month, Contact Adam Snider to 
sign up adam.snider@qmail.com 


Photographer seeks interesting, strong, photogenic 
faces. Sitter will be repaid with free photographs. 
Gerry contact@gemyyaum.com, www.geryyaum.com 


MUSICIANS 


Drummer needed: Serious inquiries only. Experience 


and creativity an asset. Quality gear required. Must 
be willing to commit. Call Sean 780-990-0888 or e- 
mail Amazaria@gmail.com 


Hard rock punk band requires high energy drummer to 


complete power trio. Must have good gear. 
No amateurs. Call Paul 780-233-4269 


Bass player with vocals wanted for three-piece band 


Wester roots-based music. www.marvmachura.com 
Mary @ 240-1509 


Experienced country lead quitarist would like to jam 
with mature country singer who likes traditional 
country music. 780-421-1250 


Indie Rock/Alternative band seeks vocalist ages 16- 
19. Wide variety of influences and musical tastes. We 
have a full PA and are in contact with many major 
industry professionals. Contact Matt. 780-604-4199 


King Ring Nancy seeking pro hard-hitting drummer, 
very serious and dedicated. Call Kevin 780-642-2608 


Paul and Matt from the Las Vegas Krypt Keepers are 

looking for quitar player and drummer for all original 

act, selected covers, and covering some Krypt Keeper 
stuff. 966-6305 & 485-9997 


Hart Bachmier’s Dead Mans Train requires drummer 
and bass player. HARD ROCK. LONG HAIR. Call toll 
free 1-888-845-0811 


Flutist Available; Misty Rose Knol 
has a B,Mus is well trained and experienced in 
playing classical, by ear, solo or in groups 
mistyknol@hotmail.com 780.932.1224 


VOLUNTEER 


Had Enough? 
Cocaine Anonymous 425-2715 


1424 sq, ft 


_ — 


to set up an appointment 


(780) 416-8621 


www.coit 


Volunteer website for youth 14-24 years old 
we youthvolunteer.ca 


Old Strathcona Youth Society: Looking for valun- 
teers (21+) interested in working with high-risk youth 
drop-in setting. Naomi 496-5947, e-m: csyc@telus.net 


Bring laughter, smiles and simple delights to child and 


back into your life! Be a Big Brother or Big Sister 
Todayl Call 424-8181. Remember you don’t have 
change your life to change theirs! 


VOLUNTEER 


Special needs "Learn to Bike” courses at Gold Bar 


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‘ SEP 4 - SEP 10, 2008 


WUEWEEKLY 


— 
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SS /AUTSEX.COLUMIN. Sy'eratmrssus os 
’ K on eBay. Do you know if Synova is going to 
5 ANDREA NEMERSON come out of their reorganization and start 
alisex@altsexcoluma.com making the sponge again? 
LOVE, SPONGELOVER 

DEAR ANDREA: DEAR LOVER: 
What the heck is going on with the Today There's something about the Sponge 
contraceptive sponge? (beyond the spermicide itself) that just 
My wife and | have always used con- - makes people go all gooey. This is the sec- 
doms, but when we saw the sponges afew ond time that Sponge lovers have loved 
months back, we figured, “Lets try em.” and lest and I'm afraid! do not know when, 
Oh... my... God. Going bareback after — if ever, your beloved will retum. Back in the 
years of condom use was absolutely amaz- ‘90s, Seinfeld Elaine coined the term 
ing for both of us. We also discovered what “sponge-worthy” when she discovered the 
my wife is calling my “special trick,” which _ first shortage and had to start gauging 
involves sliding the condom-less head of my whether or not a boyfriend rated a pre- 
cock aver her clit. It worked for her OK with —_ cious, hoarded sponge. That model was 
a condom on, but without a condom is _ pulled from the market for-safety and man- 
described by her as “exquisite.” ufacturing problems, and didn’t come back 


So naw, Synova, the company that was 
making the sponge, has declared bank- 


VOLUNTEER 


Special needs “Lear to Bike" courses at Gold Bar 


Park are looking for volunteer experienced cyclists to 
help with this course. Thu evenings amtil 16. 
John at jbeollier@shaw.ca 


Autism Speaks Canada: |navaural Edmonton 
Capita! Region Walk for Autism Info. and registration: 
888.362.6227 or: wwew.walknowforautism.org/edmon- 

ton Sun, = 7, 2008 / Registration: 8:30-10am at 
1. Albert Place, Lion's Park 


until last year, along with a big media blitz 
that attracted hordes of new fans. And yes, 


Participants and volunteers needed for the 28th 
Annual Terry Fox Run 2008, Sun, Sept. 14, 8:30 
{registration}, 10am {run) at Hawrelak Park. 
Run/walk/roll 2, 5, or 10 km, www.terryfoxrun.org, 
888.836.9786 for info 


Plant a garden row for Meals on Wheels 
Looking for help with fresh produce during the sum- 
mer. Drop off produce 11111-103 Ave, 8am-3pm 
weekdays; www.mealsonwheelsedmonton.org 


The Edmonton Guerrilla Gardeners Want You! 
Looking for help in the mass planting of sapling tees 
along Baseline Road between Edmonton and Sherwood 
Park. info ato hitty: ffedimontonarbtogspatcom: 
WwW facebook.com/group.php?gid=10775038726 


Hope Mission call for the summer, need water bottles 
to hand out throughout downtown's inner city. Drop- 
off at 9908-106 Ave, call 422-2018 


Trout Untimited’s Yellow Fish Road Program 
Looking for volunteers interested in the environment 
and aquatic ecosystems. Volunteers paint yellow fish 
on storm drains in Edmonton neighborhoods. E: krol- 

heiser@tucanada.org 


Red Cross's Humanitarian Issues need 
volunteers to help promote humanitarian issues to the 
Edmonton Community. We are hoping to expand our 
youth team (12-24 yrs old), Contact Laura Keegan at 
laura.keegan@redcross.ca 


Brain Neurobiology Research Program at U of A 
Hospital is seeking healthy and depressed subjects 
{not currently taking Antidepressants) for various stud- 
ies. Reimbursement for expenses provided. Call 780- 
407-3221 (depressed only), 407-3906 (healthy or 
depressed), or 780-407-3775 (female healthy or 
depressed, including pregnant and just 
delivered) for more information 


Volunteer for your local Red Cross. Help us make our 
mission of assisting the most vulnerable in our com- 
munity and around the world possible. Volunteer for 
Red Cross. To volunteer cal! 780.423.2680 / E: wz 
edm-dm@redeross.ca 


Rise Up: Radio Free Edmonton on CJSR FM 88 
seeking people with a cntical ear who will be at 
protests, picket-lines, blockades, any sites of struggle 
between people, corporations or governments to.sim- 
ply bring a recorder and send us the han 
E riseupradio@ejsr.com, Sam Power, 492-2577 ext 4 
for recording equipment and more details 


Tandem Captains-Cycling with the Blind 
Tandem Captains required. Please contéet John 
Collier a¢-433-1270 


* Beek the Code! Help and adult to read ant verite. 


Call Jordan Centre for Family Literacy 421-7523 
www.famlitca 


Want to stop smoking? Nicotine 
Anonymous meetings: 7pm, every Wed 
Ebenezer United Church Hall, 106 Ave, 

163 St. Contact Gwynn 780-443-3020 


—— 


| Had Enough? | 
Cocaine Anonymous 425-2715 


Here Today, gone tomorrow 


Synova, the new owner, has declared bank- 
ruptcy. The manufacturing rights have 
passed to yet anther company but | don’t 
think they're saying when, if ever, they will 
begin exercising them. 

So what is the big deal? The Sponge is 
nothing but a ... sponge, filled to the brim 
with Nonoxynol-9, the soapy, controversial 
spermicide which has been around forever. 
The big advantages are ease of application 
(pop it in) and forgettability (you don’t have 
to pop in another one for a day or so). 
Nonoxynol-9, though, can be some nasty 
stuff. A number of studies have demonstrat- 
ed that it causes enough irritation to let in 
pathogens, including HIV, and it tastes horni- 
ble. Plus, | will forever bear a grudge 
against it since it caused a boyfriend to 
develop a huge bright red clown-mouth—a 
scarlet letter “O"—around his normal 
mouth just in time for Passover at my moth- 
er’s house. But | do understand your dismay 


Senior's Birthday Entertainment 
Senior recreation/activity centre needs volunteer 
entertainers for monthly afternoon parties. 
Weekday message Karen 780-468-1985 seesa.ca 


Volunteers Needed to work with new immigrants in a 
vanety of tasks and with some great fun events and 
outings! Many exciting shifts available! Call Judy 
424-3545, ext 249 


Volunteers Needed! to assist new immigrants on first 
time shopping trip for essentials. 2-3 hrs. occas. 
weekdays. Call Judy 424-3545. ext 249 


Volunteers Needed! to help adult immigrants leam 
English. Shifts day/ eve., days/wknds, 3-4hrs/wk. No 
exp. req,, various locations. Judy 424-3545. ext 249 


Volunteers Needed to help new immigrants to Canada 
leam about Canadian customs and culture. Tue and 
Thu June-Aug. Ph Judy 424-3545. ext 249 


The Networkc Volunteer today to be a 
Distress Line Listener. Apply on line at: www.thesup- 
portnetwork.com or call 780-732-6648 


Meals on Wheels, volunteer kitchen help and drivers 
needed, weekdays 10am-1pm. Call 429-2020, 


Volunteer for ElderCare. Help with daily activities for 
seniors. Call 780-434-4747 Ext. 4 


Canadian Mental Health Association—Edmonton 
Region Board Recruitment. For info visit www.cmha- 
edmonton.ab.ca, click on-Volunteer. Contact Abigail 
Parrish-Craig at grammaabby@shaw.ca 


SEX TRADE WORKERS 


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www. freewebs.com/asiantouch 

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Christie's Outcal! Massage 
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780-964-7361 


HOT DIRTY TALK from Hot Dirty Girls 
Only $1.50/min with NO CONNECTION FEE 
Call now 866-875-6597 we're waiting 


ADULT 


SteamWorks Gay & 8i Mens Bathhouse. 24/7 
11745 Jasper Ave, 780-451-5554 
Www.steamworksedmonton com 


Flat Rate Escorts 
Don't Pay More Then 
Quoted. $300/400 he. 

(780) 932-4739 lic#64748946 

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CLASSIFIEDS 


at the loss of a beloved contraceptive. 
There are other forms of spermicide, film 


or pellets or whatever, ble oda 
held. 


well without a diaphragm-y thing to 


them in place. In fact, even with sucha — 


device they work exactly as i 
beloved Sponge did, which was very. , 
indeed in women who have had children anc 
sort of OK in women who haven't. The 
Sponge was never a great form of birth con- 
trol; it just allowed for great sex. Is your wife 
absolutely sure she wouldn't just like a nice 
NuvaRing or an 1UD? | know it’s not fair—t'd 
like to be able to recommend some sort of 
device to insert into you—but it's got to be 
better than condoms and etemal sorrow. 
LOVE, ANDREA 


DEAR ANDREA: > Wien. 
I'm on the pill and monogamous so not lim- 
ited to water-based lubricants. Recently, 
we got the idea to.try vitamin E oil—it 
smells and tastes pretty good, it lasts 
longer than Astroglide; and it’ edible, 
hence safe. Well ... a short while after we 
happily started lubing with E | got a urmary 
tract infection and have since read numer- 


SERVICES 


Don’t know where to start? The Youth Emergency 
Shelter Society has an exciting new day 
program-—the STAR Project for youth 15-30 who are 
not eligible for El and are willing ta work towards 

employment: Runs Sept. 22-Feb. 6. Receive tivin 
jallawance and up to $500 in bonuses throughout the 

project. Applications at the Youth Emergency 
Shelter Society, or call 468-7186 Ext 227 
info. Deadline: Sept. 5, 2008 


if more 


SACE-Public Education Program: Sexual 
Assault Gentre of Edmonton (www.sace.ab.ca} 
provides crisis intervention, information, counsel- 
ing, public education services. For a customized 


fe 


gene 


based h 
aoe 


want to wi 


Want to get a job & hold it? Hope to have a career? 


sits! Calgary 403-313-3311 - 
Nighigg. Other cities 1-877-834-4044 . 


= ae, ° 
Edmonton } Mobile pay, text “SCORE” to 96669 ; 


+. 

. 100's of 
“a HOT 
3: 

3 

e 

e 

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es 


lb alter a 


DEAR E: 

You're right that it could be a coincidence 
but I'm betting Not. | don't know what the 
carrier oil is in that stuff but whatever it i 
your vagina probably doesn't know how», 
get rid of it. | also completely agree th:; 


‘water-based lubes are essentially unsar 


factory, ut luckily one does not have i> 
teach for weird, random substances off \)\- 
supplement shelf. What you want is a nic: 
silicone Jube, of which there are many. You 
can get them flavoured if that's your scene 
but most are ta: Pree, non-ir 
tating, non-drying, and so slippery they are 
actually kind of dangerous and you really 
watch where you prop the bottle 
between applications. You will Jove them, 
and you will thank me. 

LOVE, ANDREA 


___ presentation T: 423-4102/F: 421-8734/E 
info@sace.ab.ca; www.sace.ab.ca/24 Hour Crisi 


| 
Naat te i | 
} 


Canadian Mental Health Association, 
www.cmhe-edmonton.ab.ca Education Progie | 
is pleased to offer workshops to give you the ski | 

to intervene with le who may be at risk {c 
___ suicide. the links to ASIST 
5 or call 414-6300 


Have you been affected by another person's sexual | 
behaviour? S-Anon is a 12-Step fellowship for far 
ly members and friends of sex addicts. Ph 780-960. | 
4417 for meeting locations and info, or visit 
www.sanon.org | 


M ~ 


e 
e 


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1-900-561-5555 sesisonin yp 


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UEPOINT 


say 


sts 
~ SSUES / 10 
DYER STRAIGHT / 1 


May day for democracy 


@ 2008 federal election which has stumbled embarrassingly out of the blocks in 

Jeger days—with cheap and disingenuous attack ads,-an “error’ somehow 

ing in a pooping puffin and a Liberal candidate predictably fulfilling the elec- 

tion equivalent of Godwin’s Law by being the first to invoke Hitler's name—it was 

the decision to exclude Green Leader Elizabeth May from the televised leaders’ 
debates that has rightfully attracted the most outrage across the country. 

The network consortium—made up of the CBC, Radio-Canada, CTV, Global 
and TVA—which unilaterally sets the shifting rules for which parties it deems 
worthy to participate in the English and French debates announced Sep 8 that 
the Greens would once again be shut out, explaining that “three parties 
opposed its inclusion.” 

It was confirmed that both the Conservatives and NDP had threatened to boycott 
the debates if May was allowed to participate. While both Harper and Layton initially 
attempted to at once defend their stance and, in a game of hot-potato, shift blame 
for the decision back to the consortium, their stance was seen as a blatantly hypo- 
ctitical and overtly political move intended only to benefit their respective parties. 

It's hard to know just what part of the debacle to be outraged by first: the fact 
that a private consortium of broadcasters gets to decide who is allowed to par- 
ticipate in a debate intended to inform Canadian voters, the fact that a couple of 
political parties were almost able to exercise a veto over the legitimate partici- 
pation of another party or that the consortium didn’t just call Harper and Lay- 
ton’s bluff and tell them to enjoy their non-participation. 

It was clear from everything from polls to common sense to public outcry 
that May should be allowed to participate in the debates. The Sep 10 reversal 
from both Layton and Harper, who now say they won't boycott the debate if 
May is allowed in, puts the ball back in the consortium’s court, and poke likely 
to finally clear the way for May to participate. 

It would seem as though there are moves so insulting by even the pathetical- 
ly low standards of democratic notions held by Canadians that they can be 
roused from their slumber and actually impact their political leaders. This elec- 
tion just got a whole lot better. w 


Issue No 673 / Sep 11 - Sep 17, 2008 / Available at over 1400 locations 


WUEWEEKLY 


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6 WWEWEEKIY se 11-se 17,2008 


= LETTERS 


NOW WHO'S EMBARRASSED? 


It wasn't so long ago that we understood 
why Americans, embarrassed by a gov- 
ernment that did not represent them, 
were moving up here in droves. Now we 
are getting a chance to realize how they 
actually feel (“Blinded by the right,” Aug 
21 - Aug 27, 2008). 

| feel both embarrassed and betrayed 
by a government that adopts only the 
failed policies of our neighbour, even 
after that neighbour is looking for ways 
to rescind them. Even though | did not 
vote for this government, | still expected, 
based on past experience, that any Cana- 
dian party would still conduct itself 
morally. | was wrong. 

Clement's obvious incompetence is 
criminal. | could accept his dismissal of 
harm reduction if he seemed to know 
what he was talking about. However, he 
prefers to talk rather than to learn. Van- 
couver's Insite and other such facilities 
no more encourage drug use than medics 
encourage battlefield injuries. We might 
not like drug abuse or war but we still 
should have the compassion to tend to 
the wounds. Clement would rather have 
us withhold assistance. 

It is clear that neither the World 
Health Organization, the Canadian Med- 
ical Association or scientific research 


VUEPOINT 


carry any weight with the health minis- 


” ter, and sadly enough it is part of a pat- 


tern with these Conservatives (and | say 
these because | am sure there are plen- 
ty of Conservative-supporting people 
who are as dumbfounded by their 
actions as | am). This government has 
an agenda, and that agenda does not 
represent the people. Every poll has 
shown overwhelming support for harm 
reduction in Canada, every bit of 
research regarding Insite has recom- 
mended expansion, and none of it 
seems to register. Just for the record, 
the Liberals (though a little more 
responsive to evidence) were equally 
misguided in the drug wars, but at least 
they had the sense to keep their mouths 
shut in public. 

PAUL BERGEN 


NEVER MIND THE FACTS 


Tony Clement is a vile monster who cam- 
paigns on the backs of sick and dying 
people inorder to pander to the Tories’ 
mean-spirited, myopic, punishment- 
happy voter base (“Blinded by the right,” 
Aug 21 - Aug 27, 2008). 

Never mind that junk food kills many 
times more Canadians than all illegal 
drugs combined, and that alcohol and 
tobacco kill in similar numbers. 

Ignore the fact that it is the prohibi- 
tionist mindset of punishment-happy 
sickos like Harper and Clement that 
caused this mess in the first place. 

Forget that there are only enough 
treatment beds for a tiny fraction of the 


people afflicted. 

Forget that the laws around drugs in 
Canada are arbitrary, hypocritical, coun- 
terproductive and serve only to subsidize 
gangsters, lawyers, cops and jailers 

Never mind that—no matter what 
Clement says—harm reduction is 4 
proven success, and that the US-style 
drug laws offered by the Tories are fail- 
ing everywhere it has been used. 

Never mind that it costs far more lives 
and money to approach the problem with 
"zero-tolerance" than with some com- 
passion and pragmatism. 

It is monstrous people like Harper and 
Clement that are keeping this country 
from moving forward with a sensible and 
affordable drug policy. They are the prob- 
lem, not the solution. 

AUSSELL BARTH 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
whether critical or complimentary. Send 
your opinion by mail Nue Weekly, 10303 
- 108 Street, Edmonton AB T5J 117), ) 
fax (780.426.2889) or by emai! 
(letters@vueweekly.com). Preference 's 
given to feedback about articles in Vue 
Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for 
length and clarity. 


CORRECTION 


Last week's article “Canadian govern- 
ment disappoints on HIV/AIDS,” stated 
that federal cuts would mean $500 000 
less for HIV/AIDS programs in Alberta. 
The figure should have read $50 000. 
We apologizes for the error. 


ace 

i en 

classical guitar coming from up the 

— mingle with the conversa- 
ms, mostly in Spanish, of the small 
huddled together in the lobby. 

The walls of the cavernous main 
hall are draped in red banners and 
lined with faded photographs, yellow- 
ing newspapers and boldly coloured 
posters—many bearing the visage of a 
bespectacled, moustachioed man, 
others eerie rows of small black and 
white photos of young men and 
women. A series of speeches have 
just concluded, and in the basement a 
documentary is about to begin. 

For Viad Gomez, this Sunday after- 
noon is a familiar scene, one that 
brings back a flood of his earliest 
childhood memories of growing up in 
Edmonton. 


2 


= 
: 
5 


THU SEPT 
DE SEPTIEMBRE: 


CHILE'S SEPTEMBER 11 
FEATURING: VOCES DEL EXILIO PRESENTATION BY 
LITEY BAEZA, THE UNMARKED GRAVEART EXHIBIT 
AY GABRIELA ROSENDE, SCREENING OF THE FILM 
EL-11 BY SERGIO OLWARES, MUSIC BY THE 
PEOPLE'S POETS. 

STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY THEATRE 

(7SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL SQ) 

ADMISSION BY DONATION 


“That's what | remember being a 
part of—even at five, six years old— 
going to all of these things with my 
family and my Dad,” Gomez, now 34, 
recalls. “The different organizations 
he'd work with, the marches. That's 
what the ‘80s was, a lot of education.” 

One event in particular, from the 
mid-‘80s, comes to his mind, when a 
young woman who had survived 
being set on fire for her participation 
in a pro-democracy demonstration 
visited the city to share her story. 

“I just remember when she walked 
in, there was a room full of people, 
and people just started weeping.” 

Such intense recollections are 
familiar to many in the hall, members 
of Edmonton’s Chilean community 
who came to the city as exiles and 
refugees over three decades ago in 

years: 


the following the September 11, 
1973 it Lied which ended the 


1g Nationalization of 
key role and the aggressive 


a —— EEE 


imple- 
mentation 
of social pro- 
grams to benefit 
the country’s impov- 
erished majority—drew 
the ire of both conserva- 
tive.elements of Chilean 
society and the Nixon admin- 
istration, which for years was 
active in the destabalization of 
Allende’s government and gave 
support to the military coup. 

In the years that followed, Pinochet 
implemented a severe program of 
neoliberal economic policies, and the 
dictatorship was responsible for the 
systematic violation of civil liberties 
and human rights, including the ban- 
ning of political parties and widespread 
torture, assassinations and “disappear- 
ances” of political opponents. A report 
released in 1991, the year after Chile 
finally returned to a civilian govern- 
ment, estimates that 2300 Chileans 
were killed and some 30 000 tortured 
during Pinochet's 17-year reign 


LIKE GOMEZ, sandra azocar’s youth in 
Edmonton was dominated by the 
tragic events of her homeland. 

“We grew up around political meet- 
ings, we grew up around cultural 
events, we grew up around these 
types of events,” Azocar says. “We 
didn’t have a childhood per se; every- 
thing we did was so we could support 
the cause in Chile, all our activities 
were always around that theme. We 
never had camping trips or anything 
like that. And it’s not a bad thing, 
we're not bitter about that, because it 
made us who we are today. 

“But this is why we call ourselves a 
lost generation,” she continues, 
“because we really had no time to 
grow up. We were kids one day and 
then we were exiles the next day and 
that’s it—there was no in-between." 

While their stories are unique— 


_ Azocar was a young schoolgirl on 


that Tuesday morning and she can 
still recall bombs falling on a govern- 
ment-run radio station just blocks 
from her family’s home in Santiago, 
while Gomez was born after the 
coup—they, and the families of many 
of their contemporaries, shared a sim- 
ilar path to Edmonton. 

Their fathers were among the tens 


of thousands 
of students, workers, 
trade unionists and Allende 
supporters detained by the 
military in the days and weeks 
following the coup, which saw 
the Moneda, the presidential 
palace, bombed by the air force in an 
attack that also resulted in Allende’s 
death. An estimated 40 000 Chileans 
were rounded up in the days following 
the coup and held in Santiago's 
national soccer stadium. 

Azocar's father never returned 
from work on September 11, and she 
didn’t see him until a year later, when 
her family was able to visit him in 
Chacavuco, a concentration camp for 
political prisoners in northern Chile. 
Gomez's father—a member of the 
Communist Party—was also detained 

In 1974, both men were among the 
thousands exiled to neighbouring 
Argentina, and were joined later in 
the refugee camp outside of Buenos 
Aires by their wives and children. 
Both families spent a year in Argenti- 
na before being granted visas to come 
to Canada as refugees. 

In the years following the coup, 
thousands of Chileans fleeing the 
political persecution of the Pinochet 
regime arrived in Edmonton, settling 
in neighbourhoods like Millwoods, 
Castledowns, Clareview and Beverly. 

In the 1970s, there were few govern- 
ment or settlement agency programs 
for refugees, and many Chileans found 
the support they needed in the city’s 
progressive community—the labour 
movement, the NDP and other socialist 
and solidarity groups. 

Despite the roots that did grow in 
the community, most of those who 
came to Edmonton thought they would 
only be in Canada for a short time. 
Litzy Baeza, a 34-year-old whose fami- 
ly came to the city in 1975, conducted a 
series of interviews with Chilean 
refugees as part of the research for her 
Master's thesis on the experience of 


FRONT 


Chilean 
exiles in 
Edmonton. She 
Says the notion of 
imminent return 
informed how the city’s 
Chilean community evolved 

in those early years. 

“In the beginning everyone had 
their luggage packed. Everyone had the 
idea that they were just going to be 
here for a while and they were going to 
go back and continue with their strug- 
gles,” Baeza explains. “So they never 
thought future-wise, they just did things 
for the moment and tried to build this 
community for the time being. That's 
how this ethnic community evolved— 
because they were very strongly trying 
to keep a national identity, trying to 
keep this culture of exile with them, 
always thinking that they would go 
back to Chile. Once they realized that 
they were here for the long haul, peo- 
ple started to then assimilate into 
Canadian culture.” 


WITH THE THOUGHT of immediate 


return fading as the dictatorship tight- 
ened its grip on power in Chile, the 
vibrant cultural and political commu- 
nity Gomez and Azocar recall so. 
vividly evolved in Edmonton. 

Education about human rights vio- 
lations in Chile and solidarity efforts 
with those fighting the Pinochet 
regime continued throughout the ‘80s. 
As the community became more 
established, they began to provide 
support for new waves of political 
refugees coming to Canada from 
countries like El Salvador and 
Guatemala, which were facing dicta- 
torships similar to the one in Chile 
Chilean exiles also increasingly 
became involved in the same move- 
ments for social justice and human 
rights they had struggled for in Chile, 
becoming a key part of the labour 
movement and political left in 
Edmonton, all the while involving 
their children in their activities. 

“One thing | learned is that it wasn't 
just about Chile,” explains Gomez. “It 
was about the labour struggle here, and 
it was also about solidarity with 


F/ 11 


As part of the Once de Septiembre 
commemoration, local filmmaker Ser- 
gio Olivares—who was born in Chile 


less than two months after the coup | 


and exiled with his family to Cana- 


da—uwill be premiering his documen- | 


tary short, £ 17, which tells the story 
of the coup and the experience of the 
Chilean diaspora through the voices of 
the Edmonton exile community 

“My motivation was to help docu- 
ment the experience of the exiles here 
in Canada,” Olivares explains. “WV 
feality [as a child] was one wh 


was surrounded by amazing individu- 
als that fought everyday for the strug- | 


gles of human rights not only in Chile, 
but around the world. What they gave 
me was 2 moral compass with the 


ideology to respect humanity, to | 


respect human rights and not just 
fespect it but fight for it. My responsi- 
bility is to develop programming that 
helps teach the stories of those peo- 
ple.” 

Olivares began collecting footage 
for the film when he was 15, through 


his participation in the public access | 
program Nosotros, which has been on | 


the air in Edmonton since 1981, and 
currently runs on Shaw cable. 
“Nosotros was 2 community pro- 
gram that came out because we need- 
ed to explain to the Latin American 
community and also Canadian commu- 
nity what happened to us,” explains 
Medardo Azocar, a former millwright 


who fled Chile with his family {includ- | 


ing daughter Sandra), and who has 
worked on Nosotros since its incep- 
tion. “The program was to denounce a 
dictatorship, human rights violations 
and other things. And that’s work that 
was needed.” 

Azocar is pleased that Olivares’ 
involvement in the show has !ed to 
the documentary, and that he and oth- 
ers of his generation are using art and 
music to carry the memory of the coup 
and the exile community forward. : 

“I'm so proud of him. That's 100 per 
cent important because that history, 
we can't forget it. That history what 
happened to us, our children, our 


Nicaragua and El Salvador. I leamed that grandchildren—they have to remember 
it wasn’t just about my country and what what happened to their parents and to 
happened there, it was all connected. ” their grandparents. They centinue 
going on, in culture, language and they 
remember what happened to us.” w 
CONTINUES ON PAGE 14 : 
SP 11-SP 17,2008 WuEwenay 7 


This American rage 


Pioneering activist and author Sarah Schulman 
brings lessons from the AIDS crisis to Edmonton 


TED KERR / ted@vueweekly.com 
ooking at the thick raspberry- 
hued building standing erect 
gainst the popsicle pink sky, 
one gets the sense that you are looking 
at it from across the street through 
teary, blurred eyes while waiting for a 
friend who is never going to arrive. Or 
maybe you're seeing it drunk while rid- 
ing your bike just before you turn a 
comer. The human figures at the base 
of the building are just smudges of 
color, shadows. The lights burning in 
the windows look like personal heav- 
ens floating above desks and beds, or 
the beginnings of small fires. You are 
afraid to look away from the image, 
afraid that when you look back it will 
be gone. And you are right. It will be 

gone. It is gone 

The image—taken by photographer 
Nan Goldin—is the cover of author, 
intellectual and activist Sarah Schul- 
man's novel Rat Bohemia, which was 
“named by the Publishing Triangle as 
one of the 100 best gay and lesbian 
novels of all time. Both the photo and 
the novel are portraits of New York 
City’s Lower East Side during a time 
that no longer exists, and of a place 
that can never be recreated. The 


Microsoft 


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photo and the book are documents of 
loss, about AIDS and ultimately about 
the failures of the 20th century that 
continue to plague us today. 

They are about the beginning of 
AIDS, of how America and later the 
world first reacted, and how the world 
has changed since then. They are, 
especially Schulman’s novel, creative 
works that allow readers to under- 
stand the real links that exist between 
AIDS and gentrification, globalization, 
sexism, racism, classism and, as 
Schulman describes during a phone 
interview, “the hierarchy of how peo- 


web hosting 


www.alentus.com 
780.429.9903 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008. 


ple are treated.” For Schulman, the 
photograph, which she describes as 
“gorgeous,” is of a culture obliterated 
by AIDS and a reminder that, along 
with people like Goldin, she outlived 
the time to tell the story. 

It's a story Schulman will be sharing 
with Edmontonians when she visits the 
U of A next week as part of the Institute 
of Sexual Minority Studies and Services’ 
InsideOUT Speakers’ Series to deliver a 
free public lecture on the early days of 
AIDS and the history of the AIDS Coali- 
tion to Unleash Power (ACT UP). 


SCHULMAN HAS BEEN involved from 
the beginning. _ 

“When I was in my early 20s,” recalls 
Schulman, “I was the city hall reporter 
in New York just when the AIDS crisis 
was starting, when they were closing 
down the bathhouses, before people 
knew what was going on.” 

It was women like Schulman who, in 
the early days of AIDS, were part of a 
movement that saw friends taking care 
of and advocating for dying and sick 
friends because those whose job it was 
were to afraid to deal with AIDS. 

At the same time, Schulman also 
helped herself, other survivors and those 


FRONT 


who 
came after by docu- 
menting the time. Her first-hand 
experience provided her with the human 
connection and knowledge to become 
the most eloquent and effective voice of 
the crisis. Her novel People in Trouble not 
only provided the uncredited backbone 
of the Broadway musical Rent, but was 
also the first piece of American literature 
to include a character living with HIV. 
Though her work with ACT UP, her 
role as a founding member of both the 
Lesbian Avengers and MIX NYC—the 
New York Queer Experimental Festi- 
val—and through her dozen published 
works, Schulman has made a career out 
of working towards liberty and justice 
for all, notions she recognizes as classic 
American ideals in a country that has 
yet to fully recognize her contributions. 
In addition to her speech, Schul- 
man will be showing clips from a film 
she is making with MIX NYC co- 
founder and long-time collaborator 
Jim Hubbard. The film, largely based 
on her and Hubbard’s ACT UP Oral 
History Project—which has been in 
the works since 2001—is an extensive 
collection of interviews with those 
involved from the beginning with ACT 
UP, which in the face of government 
inaction and a media that was too 
afraid to report the facts, harnessed 
the power of the media and intro- 
duced design, art and commerce as 


vital aspects of political interventions. - 


Watching the clips online (actupo- 
ralhistory.org), one is hard pressed 
not to see ACT UP as the mother of 
modern activism. Interviews with 


such movement lumi- 

naries as Jean Carlomusto, Douglas 
Crimp and the hilarious Maria 
Maggenti document how ACT up 
brought activism into the post-mod 
em world. 

By deconstructing notions of spec- 
tators and active participants through 
activist spectacles that were at once 
emotionally intense, clever, media- 
grabbing and shaming, ACT UP was 
able to indirectly (though I am 
inclined to say directly) save millions 
of lives and improve the quality of life 
of millions more through their advo 
cacy for faster drug trial times, price 
reduction on medication and the 
inclusion of women in the definition 
of those living with AIDS. 

In the history of the AIDS struggle 
says Schulman, she hopes today’s 
activists can find inspiration to help 
them create new and more effective 
movements. She suggests that the 
departure point is seeing what the com 
munity needs, and from there “enjoying 
the beauty of simultaneity, allowing for 
critical mass, setting winnable goals 
ensuring communication, having rea 
sonable proposals, producing direc! 
actions and allowing environments 
where people can act freely.” 

In addition to her lecture, Schul 
man will also be doing a public read- 
ing of her new novel, The Child, which 
explores teen sexuality, age of con- 
sent and human complexity. v 


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ARYAM SAUNDERS / bryansaunders@vuewoekly.com 


en talk first emerged 
about building a series of 
nuclear power plants in 


Alberta, a local blogger in favour of 
the plan made a harsh remark that 
also bore some truth. Even if one of 
the power plants had a meltdown, he 
said, the worst that could happen 
would be that Edmonton would be 
flattened to the ground by a nuclear 
explosion, and the city would be 
reduced to nothing more than a giant 
parking lot. In other words, he joked, 
it would look exactly as it does now. 

Jokes aside, if new research from 
the Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
(WPI) in Massachusetts pans out, 
there might just be a silver lining to 
Edmonton's embarrassing asphalt 
surplus. According to Dr Rajib Mallick, 
an associate professor of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering at WPI 
who does research on the thermal 
properties of pavement, Albertans 
might be able to avoid building any 
more power plants because they've 
been standing right on top of a clean 
way of generating energy all along. 

The solar energy absorbed by 
streets and parking lots, Mallick says, 
could not only prove to be a sustain- 
able source of energy but could also 
reduce the heat island effect that is 
often encountered in larger cities. 

“We'd been scratching our heads 
and thinking about how to reduce the 
urban heat island effect,” Mallick 
explains. “In the meantime, a compa- 
ny called Novotech approached us 
and they said, ‘Well, is it possible to 
look at the capture of solar energy 
from pavements?’” 

The heat island effect, for the unini- 
tiated, occurs when large areas cov- 
ered in asphalt and concrete absorb 
heat from the sun’s rays and then 
slowly release it back into the air 
throughout the day. As the experts 
from the Heat Island Group explain on 
their website, due to this phenome- 
non, urban areas often experience 
weather two to four degrees warmer 
than the surrounding countryside. 

Due to this increase in temperature, 
heat-driven chemical reactions that 
take place in the atmosphere occur 
more readily, and noxious gases like 
nitrogen dioxide are produced as a 
result, The negative effect on air qual- 
ity in and around urban areas is con- 


Alberta’s 
electrical workers 


2 ENERGY 


siderable, and affected regions often 
See the incidence of respiratory illness 
increase as well. 

At the same time, air-conditioning 
costs and electricity demands also go 
up, which puts a strain not only on 
the power grid but on the environ- 
ment as well. 

It's not just southem cities reeling 
from the effects anymore either. 
Slowly but surely, more northerly 
cities are starting to see the impacts 
as well. Even officials in Edmonton 
are starting to get worried about it, 
with local city planners recommend- 
ing that the city take steps to reduce 
the heat-island effect in the down- 
town core. 

However, municipalities are strug- 
gling to find effective ways of coping 
with the problem. In some cities, offi- 
cials are painting roads and rooftops 
white or experimenting with other 
ways of making these surfaces more 
reflective. Other cities have resorted 
to planting thousands of trees in an 
attempt to shade the ground. 


MALLICK’S TEAM, however, has taken 


the completely opposite approach: 
they've actually been busy designing 
a pavement that absorbs as much 
solar energy as possible. The best 
pavement that they've come up with 
so far is made largely with the highly 
conductive rock quartzite. Applying a 
super absorbent coat of paint to the 
surface of the road helps too 

The next step, once the heat is cap- 
tured in this special asphalt, involves 
transferring this heat from the pave- 
ment to a series of fluid-filled pipes 
that Mallick refers to as the heat- 
exchanger system. From there, the 
energy can be moved elsewhere and 
put to good use. 

As Mallick points out, depending 
on how one decides to set up the 
heat-exchanger system, the energy 
absorbed by the blacktop can be used 
for all sorts of things such as generat- 
ing electricity or heating and steriliz- 
ing water. It could even be used to 
melt snow and ice in the winter. 

"There has actually been research 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 14 


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ISSUES 


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iyik 


pg RT A and organizations 
‘to comment on Issues 
quite eae ENT Thoit Common 
Is not necessarily the opinion of the organizations 
Topresent or of Vue Weetiy 


Whose energy independence? 


Tar sands are key to energy security plans in the US election, 
but federal parties ignore Canada’s dependence on foreign oil 


RICARDO ACUNA / walberta.ca/parkland 

One of the ways in which the current US 
presidential election differs from the current 
Canadian federal election is that oil prices, 
energy independence and energy security 
are all critical campaign issues for the US. 

Americans are upset about high prices 
at the pump, and they are clearly con- 
cerned about being so dependent on 
“volatile” countries in the Middle East and 
Venezuela for more than a quarter of their 
petroleum needs. 

Both the Republicans and the Democ- 
rats have responded by making energy 
security and independence a key plank in 
their respective platforms, and senators 
Obama and McCain have gone out of their 
way to ensure they are addressing these 
issues in every speech. 

The key issue they are addressing Is the 
fact that the US currently imports more than 
12 million barrels of oil per day, which repre- 
sents almost 60 per cent of its annual con- 
sumption of oil. With a full-out war being 
waged in Iraq, another one possibly on the 
way in Iran and an unabashedly unfriendly 
government in Venezuela, Americans are 
rightly concerned about the security of their 
supply. Add to that the reality that terrorist 
attacks against oil company facilities 
throughout the Middle East and Africa have 
been on the rise, and you can gain an appre- 
ciation for their level of concern. 

It is to that end that John McCain is 
promising that “in a world of hostile and 
unstable suppliers of oil, this nation will 
achieve strategic independence by 2025.” 
Not to be outdone, Barack Obama Is 
promising to “eliminate” the US's need 


for Middle Eastern and Venezuelan oil 
“within 10 years.” 

Combined, the Persian Gulf and 
Venezuela account for just over 26 per cent 
of US oil imports. Both candidates are vow- 
ing to eliminate the need for these imports 
through some combination of conservation 
measures and the promotion of “alterna- 
tive fuels.” Obama includes a windfall prof- 
its tax in his plan, and McCain wants to 
end the current moratorium on drilling in 


.the Outer Continental Shelf. 


Contrary to popular 
belief, Canada 
imports substantial 
amounts of oil . 
every year—about 
40 per cent of all 
the oil we consume 
in Canada is 
imported. 


Although their specific plans differ sub- 
stantively, there can be no doubt that it is 
incredibly smart and strategic for them to 
be addressing these questions in such a 
high-profile way during this election. 

These same issues, however, will 
receive no airtime or profile whatsoever 
during Canada’s current federal election. 
Why would they? 


CONTRARY TO POPULAR BELIEF Canada 
imports substantial amounts of oil every 
yeat—about 40 per cent of all the oil we 
consume in Canada is imported. Breaking 
those numbers down regionally shows that 
Eastern Canada is dependent on imports 
for 90 per cent of its oil needs. 

Of the almost 850 000 barrels that 
Canada imports each day, almost half 
comes from OPEC countries, including 
Algeria, Iraq and Saudi Arabia. |In other 
words, we are almost twice as depend- 
ent on volatile countries for our imports 
as the United States. Despite that fact, 
not one of Canada’s federal parties even 
mentions energy security on their web- 
sites or in their platforms. 

lf we as Canadians can understand 
why the US would want to eliminate 
the need for the 26 per cent of their 


imports that come from the Middle - 


East and Venezuela, why are we sit 
ting back and doing nothing about the 
fact that more than 45 per cent of ou; 
imports come from similarly volatile 
countries? 

ls it because of Alberta's tar sands 
which are estimated to hold the world’s 
second largest reserve of oil after Saudi 
Arabia? 

The sad reality is that 75 per cent of tar 
sands oil is exported directly to the United 
States, meaning it is completely useless to 
most Canadians. That proportion will rise 
even further thanks to the five ney, 
pipelines being planned and developed to 
carry even more tar sands product to the 
United States. 

Given that virtually all of the 
pipelines leaving Alberta flow south of 
the border, it's absurd to think that 
somehow the tar sands provide energy 
security and independence for Canada 
In fact the opposite Is true. 

The United States National Energy 
Policy acknowledges explicitly that 
Alberta's tar sands are a cornerstone of 
US energy security. Both Obama’s and 
McCain’s energy security plans would 
fail miserably if they were not able to 
rely on growing and secure supplies 
from Alberta. 

In other words, Alberta's tar sands are 
the key element in all of the US's explicitly 
articulated energy security and independ- 
ence plans, yet they contribute nothing at 
all to Canada’s own energy security. And 
given the resounding silence coming from 
Ottawa and the federal parties on this 
issue, it’s clear that this situation will not 
change any time soon. 

The bottom line is that if OPEC 
stopped exporting oil tomorrow, we in 
Canada would lose over 45 per cent of 
our oi! imports and the United States 
would lose 26 per cent of theirs. Yet 
their political leaders are elaborating a 
plan to address this problem with our 
oil, and we are not. 

As Canadians, it’s incumbent upon us 
to demand that our political leaders pay 
at least as much attention to our energy 
security as the Americans are to their 
own. It is also critical that we demand 
an energy policy which ensures that 
Canadian oil is used to guarantee Cana- 
da’s energy independence before it gets 
sent south to secure that of the Ameri- 
cans. Ignoring the problem will not 
make it go away, it will make it 
worse—especially given the continued 
growth in our oil exports. The federal 
election has just started. Now is the 
time to make this an issue. v 


Ricardo Acuna is executive. director of the 
Parkland Institute, a non-partisan public 
policy research institute housed at the Uni- 
versity of Alberta. 


WIEEKINY «SE 11 - SE 17,2008 


iplomatic crossroads of 
k, with Condoleezza 
irst visit by a US Secre- 
in 55 years (to discuss a 
volving payments to Ameri- 
Nis of terrorist attacks allegedly 
d ), radical Bolivian pres- 
Morales showing up (to beg for 
- mane’ cheap oil), and Italy's Prime 
t ter Silvio Berlusconi arriving to 
promise Libya $5 billion in compensation 
for the brutalities of Italian colonial rule. 
But the US Congress wasn't impressed. 
On Sep 8 the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee postponed hearings on the 
confirmation of Gene Cretz as the first US 
ambassador to Libya since 1972. What 
bothered the senators was Libya's delay 
in paying 4 promised $1.8 billion in com- 
pensation to the families of 180 Ameri- 
cans who died when Pan Am Flight 103 
was brought down by a terrorist bomb 
over Lockerbie in 1988, and of the Ameri- 
can soldiers who were targeted in a 1986 
attack on the West Berlin nightclub La 
Belle (one killed, scores injured). 

Western intelligence services blamed 
both those attacks on Libya’s leader, 
Colonel Moammar Gadhafi, and US air- 
craft bombed Libya after the 1986 attack, 
killing some 30 Libyans including Gad- 


hafi's adopted daughter. Yet the evidence 
for Libyan involvement is distinctly shaky, 
and Libya never officially admitted its 


* responsibility. Instead, it finally signed a 


“humanitarian” deal that gives the Ameri- 
can families $1.8 billion, but also includes 
an unstated amount for the Libyan victims 
of the American air attacks. 

How very curious. The details of the 
deal have been deliberately left vague, 
and nobody will say where the money for 
the Libyan victims of US air strikes is 
coming from. If it is coming from the US 
government, that would be an interesting 
precedent. But everybody knows what is 
teally at play here. 

~The United States worries about the 
security of its oil supplies and Libya pro- 
duces ail, so Washington has been seek- 
ing @ way to end its quarrel with Colonel 
Gadhafi for a long time. Gadhafi wanted 
that too, because the UN sanctions 
imposed at Washington's request were 
hurting his regime. But since neither gov- 
ernment ever apologizes, it took a while. 

Gadhafi's key move was to dismantle 
his fantasy “nuclear weapons pro- 
gramme”—he never really had more than 
bits and pieces—in 2003. This let Presi- 
dent George W Bush claim that his “war 
on terror” was scaring the bad guys into 
behaving better, so the mood music 
improved immediately. Even before that, 
Libya sent a couple of low-level intelli- 
gence agents to face an international 
court over the Lockerbie bombing (one 
was acquitted, one was convicted, and 


ive compensation 


the Libyan regime was scarcely men- 
tioned). 

The final compensation deal was 
Signed last month. Condoleezza Rice was 
in Libya last week partly to show that 
Gadhafi was no longer in the dog- 
house—and partly to ask where the 
money was. That is bothering the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, too, but 
they shouldn't worry. Libyan banks take 
more than a month to transfer even thou- 
sands of dollars abroad, let alone billions. 


THE HISTORY behing Silvio Berlusconi's 
deal with Gadhafi is much clearer, and so 
are the motives behind it. Italy conquered 
Libya, formerly part of the Ottoman 
empire, in 1911, and ruled it until 1943. 
Tens of thousands of Libyans who resis- 
ted were killed, many more had their land 
confiscated and given to Italian settlers, 
and the country was run for Italy's bene- 
fit, not that of its own people Italy 
Owes—but why is it paying now, half a 
century later? 

The answer is partly oil—a quarter of 
Italy's oil and a third of its gas come from 
Libya—but also illegal immigrants. Italy is 
the destination for a growing stream of eco- 
nomic migrants from Africa who use Libya 
as a jumping-off place for their trip across 
the Mediterranean, and Berlusconi needs 
Gadhafi's cooperation to stem the flaw. So 
Libya gets $5 billion of Italian money to 
compensate for all the wrongs of the colo- 
Nial era (and Italy's compensation will come 
later, in apparently unrelated deals). 


“It is my duty ... to express to you in 
the name of the Italian people our regret 
and apologies for the deep wounds that 
we have caused you,” Berlusconi said in 
Benghazi, bowing symbolically before the 
son of the hero of the Libyan resistance, 
Omar Mukhtar. It's a generous apology, 
too: $200 million a year on infrastructure 


“projects for 25 years, and if Berlusconi's 


cronies in the Italian construction busi- 
ness get the contracts, what's the harm in 
that? But we will probably not see him 
making a similar apology in Mogadishu or 
Addis Ababa any time soon. 

Libya got off lightly. Ethiopia, Somalia 
and Eritrea, Italy's other African colonies, 
suffered far more from its rule, and are 
owed far more in compensation. But they 
have no oil, they are not close to Italy, 
and they are not going to get it. 

If you calculate the amount owed by 
other former colonial powers at the same 
per capita rate as Italy did for Libya— 
around $1000 per head of the ex-colony’s 
current population—then France owes 
Algeria $30 billion, the United States 
owes the Philippines $75 billion, and 
Great Britain owes India $1.1 trillion. But 
the victims’ heirs shouldn't spend their 
money until they actually have it in their 
hands, and they shouldn't hold their 
breaths while waiting. w 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 
published in 45 countries. His column 
appears each week in Vue Weekly. 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 
FRONT 


d looking unusually 
of weeks at the cabin 
r last year—the ones 
to an eastern approach 
depleted Qj and sexual 
e away again, on the road 
@, experiencing the Rockies in a 
don't-bother-knockin’ van. 
ur desire for intimacy, for skin-on-skin, 
breath-on-breath closeness, is hard-wired 
into us, built in for our survival and persist- 
ent at every stage of life. Its effects, of 
course, go far beyond procreation, affecting 
everything from our art to our health. 

But though desire and sexuality are 
hard-wired and persistent, no pun intend- 
ed, they're often fraught with all kinds of 
difficulty, sometimes becoming more a 
matter of wanting to want than actually 
wanting. Sex is, as David Schnarch, author 
of The Passionate Marriage, says, the cru- 
cible of our lives, that place where our lives 
and relationships and selves are heated, 
distilled, intensified and tested—all of 
which demands a certain level of well- 
being, courage and resilience. 

But, despite the obstacles, it's a fire 
worth keeping stoked throughout life. 
Because engaging often and enthusiasti- 
cally, besides adding a lot of fun to our 


lives, is just simply good for us. It’s one of 
life’s little (or not so little) pleasures that 
won't leave us hung-over or feeling fat or 
worried about the state of our arteries or 
livers, and those of us unafraid of pursuing 
healthy pleasures and minimizing the 
unpleasant tend to live better and longer 
than those more driven and duty-bound. 

And in a sweet little positive feedback 
cycle, the well-known benefits of a robust 
sex life—effects that include enhanced 
immune function, reduced risk of heart attack 
and stroke, oxytocin-induced pain relief and 
feel-good endorphins—also include 
increased testosterone production, which in 
addition to keeping our bones and muscles 
strong, keeps us going back for more. 

But sex, besides returning good health, 
also requires good health as a prerequi- 
site—good cardiovascular health and 
healthy energy levels for the physical act, 
and good psychological, emotional and 
relational health for positive expression of 
sexuality with a long-term partner. 

There is of course the reality that sus- 
taining anything over time, let alone some- 
thing as complicated as sexual passion 
with a long-term partner, comes with 
obstacles. But with sexual activity clearly 
linked to significant and measurable physi- 
ological and emotional bonuses we have 
every reason to fight flagging interest. 


FLAGGING INTEREST can be a symptom of 
everything from exhaustion, depression, 
boredom, anxiety and resentment to hor- 


mone imbalance and less-than-prime cardio- 
vascular health—some of which are easy 
enough to rectify, others not. It's not like we 
can easily and without repercussion leave 
toxic or exhausting partners or places of 
work, it's not like it's easy to balance kids 
and work and pleasure, it's not like antide- 
pressants and other meds don’t come with 
the potential to further dampen desire, it's 
not like we don’t feel a little spent by the 
time the family has grown and we can 
retire, and it’s not like Viagra is any kind of 
solution to problems of desire or limping 
relational or emotional health. 

But address the obstacles we must, if 
we want to reap the benefits. Addressing 
our relational limps, staying physically 
active, getting enough rest, minimizing 
things that fuel depression, getting enough 
dietary cholesterol (essential for hormone 
production) and other nutrient-dense food 
for prime hormone and energy levels, sup- 
plementing and rebalancing those (bio- 
identically, of course) when they drop too 
low with time or illness or prolonged 
stress—whatever it is we need to make us 
feel sexy and energized and desirable and 
interested—are all worth the investment. 

The shamelessly hedonistic in ways others 
may resent or condemn actually have it kind 
of right. Not to minimize the risks of careless 
hedonism (they're real, and can be devastat- 
ing), but pleasure is a worthwhile pursuit at 
every Stage of life, and sexual pleasure, no 
matter the obstacles, is perhaps the most 
persistent, rewarding and potent of all. w 


The 20th Annual 
AGI DION T-V ED) LECTURE 


What Federalism 


Means in Québec 
ee ee ee Ce 
oe Guy Laforest 
_ Professor of Political Science 
~ Laval University 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2008 
5:00 P.M. 

231/237 LAW CENTRE 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 
RSVP by Sept. 19:to: 
ccs@law.ualberta.ca or (780) 492-5681 


Free and open to the public 
Reception to follow 


( CENTRE for CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES 
Centre d’études constitutionnelles 


the McDonald Lecture is organized by the Centre for Constitutional 


Studies in memory of Justice David C. McDonald. The Centre carries on its 
activities chanks to the financial support of the Alberta Law Foundation. 


EDMONTON YOGA STUDIO 


Hatha lyengar Ashtanga 


451-8131 12039-127 St. 


www.edmontonyogastudio.com 


FALL CLASS SCHEDULE 


STARTING SEPTEMBER 15 
DAY 
“ Yoga with Props 
7:30-9pm 


Yoga Seminar 
with Frangois Raoult 
Oct. 4-5, 2008 Cost: $250. 
3 hours asanas a.m. and 2.5 hours pranayama p.m. 


PLU 


a 
Anita Strachan BSc RAc * 


Registered Acupuncturist & 4 
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Edmonton, AB 
(780) 451 - 8131 


Francois Raoult is dedicated to teaching 
yoga with awareness, integrity and com- 
passion. He first felt the call at age 19, 
on a pilgrimage to sacred sites of India. 
A graduate of the Ecole Nationale de 
Yoga in Paris, he started teaching in 
1975 and a year later began intensive 
training with Sri B.K.S. lyengar. Today a 
certified lyengar instructor, Frangois also has studied meditation 
with Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, Ayurveda with Dr. Robert 
Svoboda, and anatomy with Thomas Myers. In addition to 
conducting an annual yoga retreat in France, Francois teaches 
regularly throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. 


website: 


email: 
pointsplusacupuncture@shew.ca www edmontonyogestudio.com 


Points Plus: Acupuncture and 
wholistic healing is available at 
the Edmonton Yoga Studio. 


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Where’s the romance? 


{INFINITE LIVES 


= DARREN ZENKO 

CS | infinitelives@vweweekly, 

Toss the topic of “sex in videogames” 
around in your head for a while, and it's 
tough to avoid the conclusion that, man, it's 
@ pretty terrible landscape. Jokey adoles- 
cent tittering, crude girl-getting, pneumatic 
cheesecake, testosteroidal beefcake, all 
refracted through a lens of violence and 
Stridently heterosexual! power fantasy. 
Bleah; “mature” content, right? 

Romance, though ... almost from the 
beginning, games have been stuffed start- 
screen to credit-crawl with tried-and-true 
storybook shit. Paragons of chastity 
(princesses or girlfriends) kidnapped by inhu- 
man monsters and hidden away behind 
wave after wave of henchbeings, to be freed 
only after many screens’ worth of righteous 


HEY, BOB WANNA TRY 
some CKACK? 


[AECL 


YEAH, I MEAN, IT's 
CooL, I GUESS mn 


V7 


_ 


= 
S| 
: E | 


Stabbing, punching and shooting. What nerd 
of a certain age can ever forget the gripping 
opening sequence of 1987's Double Dragon 
in which girlfriend Marian gets gut-punched 
by thugs ... and in which we got our first, pre- 
cious glimpse of digitized panties as the lead 
thug threw her over his shoulder, sack-o- 
potatoes-style? Classic! 

Sappy storybook (especially in Japan- 
ese role-playing games) and dumb pulp fic- 
tion: dames in jeopardy, unrequited 
affection, yearning glances, desperate 
deathbed declarations of love as the uni- 
verse gets sucked into some vortex or 
whatever ... this is human relationships in 
videogames. That is, if the love object is 
lucky enough to be actually alive; many's 
the wife or girlfriend who's had to give up 
the ghost in order to provide motivation to 
our hard-bitten heroes. Just once, I'd like 
to see a videogame character in a stable, 
mature relationship with a living, non- 
abducted, non-demonically-possessed sig- 


SOMEWHAT MORE 
AWAKENING THAN 
COFFEE... 


nificant other; is it possible that game 
designers might take a break from ripping 
off Aliens long enough to rip off Hart to 
Hart, instead? 


NOW, THAT'S JUST the narrative side of 
things, the storylines that are supposed to 
tum the repetitive drudgery of gaming into 
“interactive cinema.” It's even worse when 
games try to translate the subtleties of 
human hearts and hormones into playable 
mechanics. Our friends the Japanese, 
those intrepid erotonauts of the Far East, 
have long been innovators in this, pioneer- 
ing the “dating sim” genre, many elements 
of which have found their miserable way 
into the mainstream. Available in a range 
of spiciness levels, from PG to XXX to NO 
NO NO NO, dating sims involve (usually) a 
guy trying to (usually) score with (usually) 
girls. They're all about managing time and 
budget, saying the right (or so very, very 
wrong) thing at the right time, and general- 
ly wearing down your target's defenses 
until victory is yours and you claim your 
sexy prize. 

To be fair, some of these games are 


DON'T QUITE see 
WHAT THE 8G DEAL 
IS ALL ABOUT... 


LEMME GIVE 
IT ANOTHER 


pretty sophisticated, and some might even 
make useful primers for the socially inept. 
But when this mechanism gets grafted 
onto another game, whether its a happy E- 
fated farming game (Harvest Moon) or a 
gangland fantasia (Grand Theft Auto), it’s 
always boiled down to something exactly 
like video-game combat: choose the right 
weapons and attacks and hammer your 
Opponent until a certain number is high 
enough and a certain other number is low 
enough, and ... A WINNER IS YOU. This is 
the “puttin’ in the hours” model of success 
with the ladies as popularized by ‘80s teen 
movies, a model more likely to produce 
restraining orders than romance. 

And as for attempts to bring the “physi- 
cal act of love” into the bleep-blorp realm, 
well ... at their most sophisticated (ie, not 
counting the X-rated “shoot vaguely semen- 
like missiles at vaguely womanlike blobs” 
and “dodge arrows in order to rape the Indi- 
an maiden” games of yester-century), main- 
stream games that have dared to include (or 
almost-but-not quite include, in the case of 
Grand Theft Auto's infamous “hot coffee” 
content) explicit or semi-explicit sex present 


ENERGY 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 


in Holland for using this [kind of 
system] to heat and then to store 
water at a relatively warm tempera- 
ture in an aquifer, and then to bring it 
back up in the winter time to melt 
your snow,” Mallick points out. 

Trent Bancarz, a spokesperson for 
Alberta Transportation, says he’s 
intrigued by the idea, but he’s not 
entirely convinced that it’s ready to be 
implemented just yet 

“As a concept it sounds interest- 
ing,” Bancarz says. "However, it 
sounds like something that’s very 
much in its infancy. It’s certainly not 
something we would be doing any- 
time soon, though, I suppose as the 
technology gets more developed, who 
knows, it may someday become prac- 
tical to do it here.” 

Mallick however, is much more 
optimistic, saying that he expects that 
it will be less than a year before he 


it as nothing more or less than a game of 
Simon: do what ere when you're 
told to do it, or you're fired. This is actually 
relatively accurate, but twiddling the 
thumbsticks so Kratos can get his rocks of 
with some slave gitls and collect a couple 
Power Orbs (or whatever) before heading 
out to fight some medusas has as much to 
do with real sexas ... 

.. as playing Halo has to do with being 
ina real gun battle, | guess. Huh. What am 
| saying, that videogames ought to start 
portraying real people in real relationship 
situations, that when they include or allude 
to sex they ought to make sure the game- 
play accurately simulates all the wonderful 
complexity of human psychology and physi- 
ology? How could that really work ... and 
how could it be fun? Honestly, if there are 
going to be videogame experiences approx- 
imating real-world sex, they're not going *o 
come through interfaces and algorithms, 
but through real people on the other side of 
the screen. That's right; I'm talking abou 
cyber-sex in multiplayer games, and 
sweet Jesus, I've never been so glad to be 
out of space. w 


implements his designs somewhere on 
a much larger scale, outside of his la! 
Actually, he's already been approach: 
by several interested parties. 

On the other hand, Mallick is quick 
to admit that his invention can't 5 
used everywhere. Airport runways 
and busy highways that carry heavy, 
fast moving traffic should probably be 
avoided for now, for safety reasons 
Other stretches of pavement, howev- 
er, are likely fair game. 

“The best application for this kind 
of system, as we see it now, is imag- 
ine a big hotel, or a big office or a 
Wal-Mart, which has a huge parking 
lot,” Mallick says. “If you can actually 
get that heat out of that parking lot, it 
can help you cut down your energy 
costs for that building. 

“Does this means we have to do 
asphalt farming, as in set up asphali 
parking lots in places that there aren't 
any right now?" he asks, rhetorically 
"No, absolutely not. But if you have a 
parking lot, and you have to live with 
it, well then use it!” w 


COMMEMORATION 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 


AS THE COMMUNITY commemorates 
the 35th anniversary of the coup that 
brought them to Edmonton, people 
like Gomez and Azocar—the children 
of those who lived through the coup 
and built a life in exile—feel a respon- 
sibility to continue the work of their 
parents and to keep the memory of 
what happened in 1973 alive. 

This commitment to remembering is 
the impetus behind the Once de Sep- 
tiembre commemoration being organ- 
ized on September 11 by the now-adult 
children of those who fled Chile and 
struggled to put roots down in Canada. 

“For us, being sons and daugh- 
ters of Chilean exiles, we lived that 
process, even though we might 
have not been born in Chile, or 
came to Canada at a very young 
age, we still grew up with the exile 
concept of being away from the 


one 


homeland,” says Azocar, who will 
act as the MC of the event. “So for 
us to have the torch passed on to 
us is a very important thing in 
terms of keeping the Chilean com- 
munity alive here and keeping us 
with an identity of who we are and 
where we came from.” 

“It's a duty,” agrees Gomez, who 
will perform as one-third of the 
political hip-hop trio the People’s 
Poets. “Because | think I grew a lot 
from the experience and it’s shaped 
my life. It’s part of our identity and 
there’s a lot of richness in the history 
and the culture ... and I'd love to 
pass it on to the next generation. 

“A lot of people sacrificed, and so 
for us it’s really important to remem- 
ber that sacrifice and keep it present 
and pass it on and continue that 
struggle, obviously in a different 
way—we're a different generation liv- 
ing in a different context—but we 
have to keep the memory alive, in any 
way possible." w 


é 
* 
2 


Na 


JAM HOSTYM / jan@vueweekly.com 
getting ready to go out for din- 
[staan ese up, dress- 
ing down—all the way to nothing. 
Think of the freedom: no agonizing over 
the perfect dress/pants/shirt/shoes, no 
colour-coordinating challenges, no wor- 
tying about whether your chosen outfit is 
too dressy or too casual. You simply dine 
in all your naked glory, outfitted only in 
whatever attributes Mother Nature has 

bestowed upon you. 

Don't get too excited. This isn’t hap- 
pening in Edmonton—not that | know 
of anyway. Yet. But a not-so-quick 
flight to New York would put you in the 
midst of all the action. Clothing Option- 
aj Dinners are held monthly at some of 
that city’s more liberal eating establish 
ments and appear to be taking off—lit- 
erally. The idea isn’t meant to shock or 
titillate; it’s simply to allow people to 
express themselves in the way they feel 
most comfortable—and in this case, 
that would be without clothes. They 
actually feel best dining naked 

If you're the oh-so-comfortable- 
in-your-own-skin sort, dining “au 
naturale” may actually appeal, and 
might even excite you. So | decided 
to do a little impromptu, slightly dis- 
organized and extremely unscientific 
survey of a few restaurants around 
our fine city. No long list of ques- 
tions, no formal poll, just a quick 
conversation on their thoughts 
regarding the naked dining phenom- 
enon and whether they would open 
their doors for such a function. 

This innocent little question turned 
Out to be not quite so innocent. After a 
few “you're kiddings”, some “no com- 
ments” and even the loud click of an 
abrupt hang-up, a few gracious people 
were kind enough to share their 
thoughts on this apparently bizarre topic. 


ONE OF THE FIRST people T talked to was 
Joe Rustom at Parkallen Restaurant. 
They serve their pita bread wrapped in 
little individual packages so that some- 
one else's hand doesn't accidentally 
brush against your pita when they're 

theirs from the basket; he’s 
very much into keeping things clean 
and sanitary and | thought he may have 
Pei interesting insights on this whole 

ude dining concept. 


And he did. When | asked if he 
would ever consider hosting such a 
, his immediate response, other 

than laughter, was “No, no, no, no, no.” 
He thought it would expose them to 
just too many liabilities of a personal 
Nature—spilling hot liquids on bare 


SEXUAL CUISINE / 16 Fm 


ed dinner 


What are the chances of dining 
in the buff at Edmonton restaurants? 


/NUDE DINING 


skin and other exposed body parts, cut- 
ting their feet on broken glass (does 
nude always mean no shoes?) and a 
host of other issues. He said he’s 
learned that if something can go 
wrong, it will go wrong and he’s 
always afraid of the “what ifs.” 

But he thought it was a great idea 
overall and one he wouldn't mind par- 
ticipating in—although he admitted his 
wife might have a different thought or 
two on the matter. And when | asked if 
he'd host such an event if the partici- 
pants signed a waiver, he said he'd be 
all for it. Without all the liability issues, 
he figured it would be a blast to hold a 
little nude dining soiree at Parkallen— 
and he thought they could fill up all 70 
seats in a snap. 

Other restaurants had a slightly dif- 
ferent reaction. 

Penny Buckner from Café Mosaics 
was taken somewhat off-guard by the 
question, her first thought being a loud 
and clear "Ewwwww.” She found the 
idea funny and somewhat disgusting, 
but certainly not appealing in the least. 
There was not even a smidgen of 
uncertainty in her voice when she stat- 
ed that there would be no way that her 
restaurant would entertain nude diners. 

Peter Pepin over at Block 1912 was 
slightly stronger in vocalizing his disap- 
proval. He just didn’t see why anyone 
would even want to dine out without 
any clothes on whatsoever—“Why 
would they want to do that? Why?’—and 
was unwavering in his declaration that 
they just would never do that. It simply 
goes against everything they believe in. 
He did find the thought of people actually 


having to undress for dinner instead of 
dressing up quite funny though 


I THOUGHT 1 best check with one of Cap- 
ital Health's Environmental Health Offi- 
cers and see if there were any real 
health concerns that might arise from 
nude dining or any that might prohibit 
it. After a few too many phone calls (I 
think they thought it was a joke), Nel- 
son Fok was kind enough to share his 
professional opinion with me. And the 
good news is that there are no strict 
health concerns with dining in the 
buff—other than the chairs that all the 
naked behinds would be perched on 
New York diners solved that little dilem- 
ma by bringing their own cushions to sit 
on, which is a very comforting thought 

He did say diners may be more apt 
to find hairs in their food simply 
because more hair would be exposed. 
It doesn't represent a health concern 
(hair doesn't stay in food long enough 
for bacterial growth) but it may curdle a 
few stomachs. And then there's always 
the issue of spilling hot liquids—clothes 
do provide a bit more of a barrier 

We did have a little conversation 
about an Edmonton restaurant that 
offered a nude buffet, but it's not quite 
what you're thinking. Customers were 
treated to the opportunity of eating 
food off of a naked female’s body. 
There was a twist, though: food needs 
to be served on a sanitary surface 
something the human body is definitely 
not. This all-important dilemma was 
solved by wrapping the body (or bod- 
ies) in Saran Wrap. 

So if you have this unrelenting desire 
to eat dinner minus all the usual con- 
strictions, your best bet just may be to 
give Joe over at Parkallen Restaurant a 
call. Or hop a plane to New York. v 


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Just because the sex is quick doesn’t mean the food has to be 


MS O'GENEST / msogenest@vueweekly.com 


/ eet me just after noon,” I 
whispered, my voice 
husky with desire as I 


pressed the hotel keycard into her 
hand. A flush crept up her throat as 
she glanced at the card and gave a 
scarcely perceptible nod. I watched 
her move under the tight, businesslike 
skirt as she strode away. My cell 
phone buzzed on my hip—the girl 

friend—and | ignored it. 

| had been flirting with the Viet- 
namese mother of two for a couple of 
months. Her husband was out of town 
a lot, and she admitted to both loneli- 
ness and a penchant for Pinot Noir. | 
made a quick call to the Italian Centre 
on the southside (5028 - 104A St) and 
asked them to assemble a goodie bas- 
ket for two. They asked a couple of 
questions about my order, then told 
me it would be ready on time. 

With difficulty, I put the conquest out 
of my mind until | left work. I intention- 
ally passed her desk to find her desper- 
ately focused on a spreadsheet and 
blushing furiously. She refused to meet 
my smouldering gaze and I grinned 
broadly on my way out the door. 

I dropped $50 at the Italian Centre 
and picked up a $30 bottle of the Lake 
Breeze Seven Poplars Pinot Noir on my 
way to the hotel. I slipped into the near- 
ly vacant parking lot and took an eleva- 
tor from the lobby to my room. She was 
already waiting for me and watched 
nervously as | poured her a drink. 

I could tell that she was expecting 
something quick. She was baffled by 
the meal I laid out, but started to relax 
as she rolled the salty kalamata olives 
on her tongue, which blended with the 
silky black currant flavours of the 
Pinot. Wayward pearls of mild, creamy 
bocconcini cheese rolled across the 
sheets. We chatted quietly about work, 
kids and holiday plans as we ate 

Occasionally, | reached over to feed 
her a particularly succulent morsel. | 
daubed at her mouth with the napkin, 
lingering over her full lips. She moved 
to kiss my fingers and I intercepted 
her lips with my own. A passionate 90 
minutes later, I had a spring in my 
step for the rest of the afternoon. 


ANY SEXUAL ESCAPADE can be a 


seduction, and a true seduction com- 
bines all of the senses. A woman 
must be engaged by sight, sound, 
taste, touch and smell: | find that 
sharing some exquisite dishes right 


SEXUAL 
CUISINE 


beforehand sets the tone for a glut- 
tonous bout of lovemaking. 

In fact, even on those rare occasions 
when my tastes run to the sordid and 
only a professional can satisfy my 
desires, | include some appetizers before 
{ savour the main course. | find that car- 
rying a half-dozen nata from Popular 
Bakery (9307 - 118 Ave) under one arm 
and a six-pack of cold Hoegaarden 
under the other helps any price negotia- 
tion. Each tiny, traditional Portuguese 
tart boasts luscious custard and a 
sweetly caramelized crust that inspires 
extra effort in those that I approach. 

Sadly, not every seduction can be 
planned so perfectly. There are times 
when I’m rushed—or taking advan- 
tage of an opportunity—and I’m 
caught without those succulent tidbits 
that tantalize the palate and deliver 
the most passionate of experiences 
Since I have yet to find a room service 
that measures up, I keep Dial and 
Dine (780.944.9933) on speed dial. 

While networking at a function at 
the Westin, | hit it off with a stun- 
ning blonde presenter from Mon- 
tréal. | rescued her from a crowd of 


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IN RESTAURANT WLU UMN Rel amerrilcler isskeNs) BANNAN a37N7 


portly men dressed in unflattering 
suits and we dashed upstairs to her 
suite. In the elevator, we were 
unable to keep our hands off each 
other and we fell into her bed with- 
out even bothering to check if the 
door was closed. A half hour later, | 
made a quick phone call, and after 
a more leisurely session, there was 
a soft knock at the door. Wearing 
her robe, I accepted the bags from 
the grinning delivery guy and gave 
him a sly wink along with a hefty 
tip on the $65 bill. 

Mikado’s Combination Plate of 
sushi and maki has yet to disappoint 
me, and it can stand up to some deliv- 
ery delays. The Rainbow Roll is 
always impressive, and both were 
perfectly paired with the sake I had 
requested. Sushi always tastes better 
when you're naked with someone you 
met recently and likely won't see 
again. Don’t ask me why. Refreshed, 
we spent a few more hours together 
before she turned her cellphone back 
on to discover that the organizers had 
been looking for her all afternoon 

The key to a successful seduction is 
preparation. If you are prepared, you 
are confident and charismatic. Uncer- 
tainty and doubt will kill your game 
faster than a rich, well-dressed cock- 
blocker. Take some advice from some- 
one who has been there and deliver an 
unexpected pre- (or post-) sex treat 
and get ready for the fireworks. v 


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SVWVEEK SEP. 11.~'SEP 17; 2008 


“BISH 


called Sex in a 
Really. Someone 
an oh-so-inventive- 
nent to bestow such 
ous moniker on it. 
2 judge? The title cer- 
trick—it’s a combina- 
- simplicity with utterly 


ago, back in the days when I 
‘disregard for the substances 
twas burdening my system with, I 
would have actually been crazy 
enough to eat such a concoction (had 
it actually even remotely appealed to 
me). But it didn’t. Not even when my 
closest, dearest friend raved endlessly 
about how absolutely amazing it was. 
And it still doesn’t appeal. At all. Just 
a quick look at the ingredient list 
sends shivers up my spine. Cool Whip 
and jell-o Instant Pudding—what 
could be so great about that? 

Well, it was time to find out. I did a 
quick internet search and found mul- 
tiple variations of the recipe, all with 
their own individual quirks. | nar- 
rowed it down to the one | thought 
would be the least offensive (cherry 
pie filling in anything is not a good 
thing) and had to go shopping—my 
cupboards were shockingly lacking in 
the highly processed, food-like prod- 
uct department. 

At the grocery store I grabbed my lit- 
tle hand basket and went in search of 

*the ingredients. Graham wafer crumbs 
and cream cheese (things | actually use 
on a semi-regular basis) were easy 
enough to find, but the Jell-o Instant 
Pudding required a bit more thought—it 
didn’t fit any of the categories so nicely 
identified on the signs above the aisles. 
But my biggest challenge proved to be 
the Cool Whip. Where would it be if not 
in the refrigerated dairy section, and 
what food group is it anyway? 
Stumped, I flagged down a wandering 
employee who directed me to the oh- 
So-obvious freezer section. There | 
yanked open the big glass door and 
grabbed a large plastic tub of the stuff. 
I knew! shouldn't have but | just 
couldn't resist inspecting the ingredient 
list and, much to my dismay, it was 
even worse than I had anticipated: 
water, corn syrup, hydrogenated 
ul im kernel oils, tock 


é guilty sex 


an comes with strings attached 


FO 


1/2 cups butter, melted 
1 cup pecans; chopped 
11/2 cups graham wafer crumbs 
8 oz cream cheese 


= /AT HOME 


I hauled my assorted groceries home 
and tackled the base layer first, essen- 
tially a graham wafer crust kicked up a 
notch by the addition of ground pecans. 
It was quick and simple to put togeth- 
er—melt the butter, stir it together with 
the pecans and graham wafer crumbs, 
pack it into a 13 x 9 inch pan and bake 
it for about 13 minutes at 350°. 

At this point one of my daughters 
strolled through the kitchen and asked 
what I was making. 

“A gourmet dessert,” 
confidently. 

After noticing the Jell-O packs on the 
counter, she came back with her wise 
and wordly response: “EWwww—how 
could a gourmet dessert be made with 
cheap pudding?" Especially sharp con- 
sidering most kids her age would hap- 
pily devour sugar in any form at every 
opportunity. 

Deflated but not defeated, | perse- 
vered. After all, with a name like “Sex 
in a Pan,” it had to be good, didn’t it? 

The next step was a bit more com- 
plicated than the first one, but only 
because I had to dig out.my mixer and 
plug it in. Beat the cream cheese, add 
the icing sugar and then stir in the Cool 
Whip—except | didn’t have Cool Whip. 

That meant I had to do a little bit of 
extra work—I actually had to whip the 
cream | bought instead of simply plop- 
ping in a mound of Cool Whip. So I 


1 announced 


-dumped the cream in a bow! and 


turned on my mixer. | did have to add a 
bit of vanilla and a couple of spoonfuls 
of icing sugar but, other than that, it 
was quick and painless. 


1 tub Coo! Whip; divided, thawed 
1 pkg chocolate instant pudding 
1 pkg vanilla instant pudding 
Scups milk 

Grated chocolate 

1 cup icing sugar 


So once | had whipped cream, I fold- 
ed about half of it into the cream 
cheese mixture (the recipe said to fold 
in half of the Cool Whip). Then I spread 
that over the graham wafer crust and 
made the pudding. 

All that involved was dumping 1 1/2 
cups of milk into a bowl, adding the 
pudding mix and then beating it fora 
minute or two. So I made the vanilla (a 
rather gummy, foreboding entity), 
spread that over the cream cheese mix- 
ture and then made the chocolate pud- 
ding. 1 didn’t even bother washing the 
bowl or beaters betweer puddings— 
bonus. Then I spread the chocolate 
pudding over the vanilla and slathered 
the rest of the whipped cream over that. 

The final step was to sprinkle it with 
grated chocolate. My oh-so-lovely 
Callebaut stash stayed neatly tucked 
away in my cupboard for a more wor- 
thy occasion, but | did grate a lovely 
dark chocolate Lindt bar. After liberally 
scattering that over the top, | tucked the 
whole thing away in the fridge for the 
flavours to meld and mingle together. 

Time for the taste test. It came out of 
the pan as a rather wiggly, wobbly 
mass. And it smelled sweet—very, very 
sweet. And it tasted sweet—very, very 
Sweet. And kind of artificial, thanks to 
the Jell-o pudding. It was actually okay 
though, and even my skeptical daugh- 
ter deemed it “pretty good"—but defi- 
nitely not gourmet. 

| forced my husband to lug the rest of 
the pan to work with him’so I could get 
some impartial, unbiased opinions 
(unfortunately, | couldn't seem to move 
past the Jell-o). Too sweet, nice and 
light, yummy and not too sweet, and 
tiramisu-ish were some of the com- 
ments. But sex ina pan? Not so much. 


JAC 


WARM UP 


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wee PER Bi PACK 


In recent months, a number of my friends 
have raved about a certain beer they've 
just discovered. | respect my friends, and 
so perk up my ears when they tell me 
about something they like. 

The beer they're going on about is 
Tankhouse Ale from Toronto microbrew- 
ery Mill Street. | know Mill Street to be a 
brewery with growing popularity and with 
@ penchant for winning awards. They are 
one of a handful of small Ontario brew- 
eries who are beginning to aggressively 
market and distribute their beers across 
the country, breaking out of the regional 
rut. The Tankhouse Ale is their flagship 
brand. | remember trying it a-couple years 
ago, and at the time | liked it but it didn’t 
jump out at me terribly much. 

| decided to give it another try with a 
more focused mind to the quality of the 
beer. | came away more impressed than 
the first time. 

Tankhouse Ale is a pale ale, the hoppy 


* yet balanced traditional British style. That, 


in and of itself is not remarkable: most 
mieros offer their version of a pale ale. 


IT POURS a deep reddish copper with a 
decent off-white head that dissipates 
quickly, leaving only a thin layer on the 
beer. It has a rounded and floral hop 
aroma, mixed with some crystal and 
caramel malt sweetness. | also detected 
some esters in the smell, almost Belgian 
in quality. There is also a distinct whiskey 
note to nose. 

Up front in the taste toffee and caramel 
sweetness dominates. After the initial 
sweet, bitterness moves in quickly, as well 
as a grassy and rounded hop flavour. The 


bittemess never fully takes over-—the beer 
keeps a toffee malt character throughout 
The finish is balanced, but leaning toward 
a lingering piney bitterness. 

Tankhouse presents a very smooth 
beer, which both mutes the hop bitterness 
and softens the malt. Overall itis a drink- 
able, pleasant and accessible pale ale. |i 
is not quite as hoppy or complex as other 
| have sampled, but it’s clearly well made 
By keeping the beer smooth and bal- 
anced, they both increase the drinkability 
of the beer and expand their potential 
market for it among beer shoppers. 

The lesson for me is that it pays to have 
friends who appreciate beer. Especially 
beer that is craft brewed in Canada. w 


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FOOD NEWS! 


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SEP,14-- SEP 17, 2008, 


It's been 365 days since we published our last sex survey. This year we've asked 
you for all sorts of new strange and twisted information about your sex lives, and 
for the most part you've let us in on all your kinky details—in some cases kinkier 
then we'd ever expected. We asked you about whether you would sleep with your 
best friend. We asked about your thoughts on people dry humping on Whyte 
Avenue. We asked about your sexual addictions. Wow, did we get some crazy 
information about your fellow Edmontonians. 


So enjoy reading the results of our survey and the photos from our Sex in the 
City shoot. Please note that some of the percentages exceed or are less than 
100%. We've rounded some numbers in the interests of making it more easily read- 
able. And just a note: some of the photos and answers were so racy that we decid- 
ed not to print them in the interests of decency. But don’t worry, you can go to vue- 
weekly.com—where decency be damned—to see them. 


How old are you? 


What gender to you most identify yourself as being? 


Female Straight MS — ‘Male Straight 
Female Gay MG Male Gay 
Female Bi MB Male Bi 


Male - Female Male 61% 
Under 18 2% 3% Female 39% 
18 - 24 30% 50% 
25-29 : 18% 26% © 
30 - 36 21% 12% . a : 
ae = 62 What is your sexual orientation? 
46 -70 13% 1% Homosexual 7% 
4 2% 0% Heterosexual 79% 2 55 
Bisexual 14% co . 
cS FB 
20 SWVEEKUY SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 SEX IN THE CITY 


so amazing in bed, I'd 


1% 0% 
23% 43% 
3% = ~—-0% 


than single? Perhaps. 


LADIES MEN 
Never been happier! And | mean it this time. 
its still the beginning of the relationship so 


fo women. 

Have two children, hard to leave ... but | want 
to leave. , 

Love the guy but am not getting enough sex! 
We have a connection that is very hard to find. 
We never fight! = 

How thrilled can you still be after 15 years? 
He's my soul mate, I'm his future baby mama. 

! love them very much, but their lack of 
prior sexual experience can be frustrating. 


in the last 12 months, you are? 


eT eee 
ae 
Me ~ 2. 


ny am FS FG 
; ei 13% 14% 
1% 57% 
. 10% 14% 

18% 0% - 
9% 0% 
5% 15% 

4m Oh 


43% 


6% 


FB 


23% 
40% 
14% 
9% 
0% 
6% 


9% 


MSs 


27% 


29% 
13% 
2% 
2% 
26% 


3% 


MS 
13% 
55% 

8% 

9% 

4% 


5% 


6% 


MG 
23% 
18% 
18% 

0% 

0% 
27% 


14% 


he hasn't worn out yet. It’s a fucked-up situation. 
After 12 years, sex does get a bit stale. She turns me on and is experimental. 
Trust in men is gone, and I'm not attracted —_I'm ring shopping. 


MG 


27% 


27% 


14% 


5% 


9% 


5% 


14% 


"MB 


30% 
25% 
5% 
0% 
5% 
35% 


0% 


nost everyone in a relationship is happy. Only straight and gay males seem to be hanging on by a thread. 
how these two groups are also two of the least likely to be single! Better to be attached in an unhap- 


It woulda been “can’t wait to dump their ass”... 
except | dumped their ass. 


Four beautiful loving intelligent children. 
She's awesome. We communicate well, so 
everything works in the bedroom and else- 
where. 

Attracted to someone else but love my spouse. 
Obviously after a few years the initial 
thrill is gone, but she can still give me 
goosebumps or stomach butterflies 
when she tries. 

Whose relationship couldn't be better?! 


Here's something interesting about monogamy—it seems that monogamy is good for both / 
the sexes, while non-monogamy may favour women over men. Forty-one per cent of women ; 
who described their relationships as being “strictly monogamous” described themselves as 
being “thrilled” with their relationship, compared to 44% of men. But when it came to non- 
monogamy, the numbers were incredibly at odds. Contrary to popular belief—that would 
be the one that claims women are biologically inclined towards monogamy while men 
aren't—fully 100% of women who described their relationships as “absolutely non-monog- 
amous’ were thrilled with their relationships while only 29% of men in the same boat said 


that they too were thrilled 


love in the last year. Too bad, but based on percentages they 
(for you girls! There also seems to be lots of people on the mar- 


bn ee a Se re | 
me Ss MEN LADIES . 
Oh buddy ! am single | wouldn't say sleeping around ... just exploring 
Girls will fuck me, but not date me the options 
30% Straight sex in the missionary position. Still fucking single. Went on one date. Never 
Ahh, the fuckin’ divorce called back. I'm pretty sure that is the defini- 
30% Attached and unfulfilled sexually, therefore look- tian of single. 
ing to move to sleeping around and loving it. | have a short attention span when it comes to 
{ sleep with people then | hate them men and a high sex drive so they were out 
15% My boyfriend of nearly four years faster than a new set of pumps 
cheats on me and leaves me for this _ Left my live-in boy friend of five years but we 
5% other boy, just like That. | hope the are still seeing each other. 
asshole rots in hell. | love humping. 
After being partnered for many years, | am _ Happily married to the same man for 12 years. 
0% now doing what | should have been doing in Attached and sleeping around! — 
my 20s, Now that 50 is behind me, I have the —_ Married, thinking about separation ... . 
15% wisdom and the resources to have much Still married {seven years) and polyamorous. Briefly 
MORE fun now ! had a long distance girlfriend this year as well. 
~ Ina well-oiled open relationship. My primary 
5% relationship is plenty “pe but aie em 
allowed to go out and have more fun wit 
others, as fin as it isn’t inconveniencing GET ALL THE PHOTOS, SURVEY RESULTS AND 
the other partner. 
We broke up two weeks before | found out! _EHIND-THE-SCENES PICS AT VUEWEEKLY.COM 
was Now we're working it out. Lots 
has changed, for the better. 


y were single and still putting themselves out there. We 


SEX INTHE CITY 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


wuewemay 1 


What inventive items have you masturbated with? 


LADIES 


Electric toothbrush hairbrush handle 
Seriously a pen wrapped in bubble wrap with a 
condom over it. 

Lets see, there was a banana, a cucumber. | used 
an ice cube once to see how that felt, since I'd 
fead about doing it somewhere. The obvious fin- 
gers, and toys. The strangest was this vibrating 
nail file | had. | was too young to-go the sex store 
for a vibrator, and was NOT going to ask my par- 
ents to get me one! : 

If it vibrates, I've tried it 

Usually just my rabbit vibrator-—| would give up my 
microwave and oven to keep that thing. It's great! 

A squeegee handle 

I quess I'm not inventive. 

A can of ice cold Coca-Cola on my nipples 
inventive items?? Porn, my partner masturbating in 
front of me, erotic stories, dirty talk/phone sex, just 
cuz |'m horny and need a quickie 

Silicone penis, vibrator, fingers, on web cam, 
while watching porn etc etc. 

Dripping faucet in a tub 

Hot water bottle, hair brush handle 

Hair brush 

Shower head, vibrator, myself. 

Fukarama. This little vibrator that fits on your finger. | 
don't use a dildo—{ want to make sure | still crave the 
real thing. 

Grapes, peaches, fruit really 

A deodorant stick (with the lid on!!) 


Electric toothbrush, back massager, water 
faucet wand thingy in shower 

Vibrator, cucumber, vibrating eggs, water, etc 
Kitchen utensils, wine bottle, other phallic 


In the last month, how many times 


have you had sex? 


FS FG 
0 22% 28% 
1-4 19% 29% 
5-10 18% 14% 
11-20 22% 29% 
21 - 30 9% 0% 
30+ 9% 0% 


FB MS MG MB 
29% 18% 23% 25% 
11% 31% 18% 20% 
20% 23% 27% 10% 

9% 15% 14% 31% 
17% - 8% 9% 4% 
14% 4% 9% 10% 


Wow, bisexual girls are getting it a lot. They are at least twice as likely as any other group to be 
getting it on a daily basis. Those poor gay girls must be sad. Why won't anyone sleep with them? 


In the last month, how many times 


have you masturbated? 


FS FG FB MS MG MB 
0 16% 0% 9% 5% 0% 4% 
1-4 36% 29% 29% 15% 13% 11% 
5-10 74% 43% 29% 23% 14% 15% 
11-20 12% 14% 9% 28% 21% 36% 
21-30 B% 0% 17% 17% 14% 9% 
30+ 4% 14% 14% 13% 32% 25% 

22 SVVEENY SEP 11- SEP 17,2008 


shaped bottles ... 

It's big and pink ... you fill in the blanks. 

Lizard pen with a fuzzy top, chair. 

Banana. Cucumber. Tube of sunscreen. Flower vase 


My mom's 1960s back massager. That thing has 
POWER! 

Turkey baster and a ketchup bottle 

Cell Phone 

A mirror and flashlight 

Hands, dildos, toothbrush, shower head, brush 
markers, hair brush handles, candles 

Arm of chair, shower head, cell phone 

Dildo, those vagina butterflies 

Fruit, vegetables, pens, candles—vhatever's handy 
and appropriately shaped! 

Empty perfume bottle 

Chair legs. 

Barhie dolls 

Bouncy balls, whisks 

Carrot, pen, hair brush handle 

Porn, erotic stories, and a great thing called 
imagination. 


MEN 


Sofa cushions. 

Never felt the need to be inventive beyond fiqu; 
ing out how to clean up the damn mess after ... 
Mattresses 

TOILET PAPER ROLL 

Um ... a sock? 

Banana 

Just the usual lubes and creams, an ex-girlfriend’s 
underwear when | was a lot younger. 

Vibrator 


shly sexed individuals 


ith, masturbation rate 
$ inthe pa 


en higher 


SEX IN THE CITY 


Shop Owner - Warren Currie 


Sy ‘Edmonton 780-413-4554 www. TheEasyRider.com 


a 
a oh J ' 


ae TM SP 11-SP 17.208 =\WwEwEey 23 


Do you have any secrets you've kept from your lover that, were 


they to find out, would get your ass dumped? 


LADIES 


If | had the chance to hook up with a cer- 
tain ex-lover | would take it in a heart- 
beat. 

| have a wandering eye which some- 
times leads to other things. I've 
cheated on many of my boyfriends. 
He told me he loved me se much that 
there was nothing | could do to make him 
stop loving me, but | still don’t tell him 
about certain things, like that dude that ! 
slept beside. 

Well, I'm worried about the anorgas- 
mia. Also | don't feel comfortable 
talking about John’s suicide as a 
partner that you lose that way has a 
huge stigma attached to it, same 
goes for the abuse and the rape. 
They all draw different reactions. 

| dig chicks a little more than | let on ... 


that's all. Oh and sometimes | think about’ 


him doing guys. | don’t think he'd dump 
me because of that. He'd probably just 
never have his friends over here again. 
That | had internet sex with my ex- 
boyfriend once and have emailed 
with him with for three years. 

He wouldn't like some of them, but he 
wouldn't dump me. 

Sex with someone | shouldn't have 
Yes! Now that we're over | guess you 
should know | was cheating on you with 
my ex! : 

| cheated quite a few times when 
we were dating with men and 
women. 

A guy paid me $100 once for a blow job. 
No lover at the moment but most 
guys have issues with how many 
times I've cheated and been the 
“other woman” in my past as well as 


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that over the years I've been diag- 
nosed and treated for 2 different 
STD's 

FUCK YEAH! 


MEN 


Having a wife of course 

fam a horrible flirt at work. It's 
shametul really. My ego needs to be 
stroked on a continuous basis. 

Not getting dumped but I've done more 
with my best friend that’s a girl before 
we started going out than she knows 
about. 

Me stepping out, she was a virgin 
when we got married and has never 
even seen another man’s privates. 
No, hiding things isn’t worth it if you 
want the relationship to last. 

The aforementioned sordid love 


affair with her best friend. Well, not 
really a love affair so much as ran- 
dom sex. 

Sometimes | think about my ex-girlfriend 
when | masturbate. 

I've had sex with two other girls 
since we've been together. 

Nope ... she knows about all my partners 
in the past five years. | am an open book, 
and expect the same from my partners. 
They have all known about any of 
my one time stands, and | of theirs. 
have been pretty lucky finding hon- 
est partners. We're all over 50, we 
all have a past, and it would be ludi- 
crous to think otherwise. Hell, some 
of us even remember the ‘60s, lol. 
No, I'm pretty open about my sexual past, 
although this has made for some tense 
moments. Probably should not have dis- 
closed everything. 


1 could tell this one that 1 am the 
yorkshire ripper and she would sti/| 
want me. The poor thing, | prefer 
when they try to hold the stick, so to 
speak. However, the quiet ones can 
be much more fun in the sack. 

Not really. | made out with another gir! 
once, but | don’t think I'd get dumped for 
that. | was drunk, honest! 

Indeed, | do. If | tell you them, you'l! 
probably dump me too. 

My wife would be extremely irate were 
she were to discover | have a lover. 
Giving head 

Too much online porn/flirting 

Sucking cock 

Internet + home alone time = neglected 
chores. 

I cheated on her 

Sure, that | step out and that | am bisexu 
al. She would freak. 


What is your approach to your 


relationship? 


FS 
Strictly monogamous 85% 


Absolutely non-monogamous 0% 


Secretly non-monogamous 6% 


Only non-monogamous under 
certain circumstances 


10% 


FG FB MS MG MB 


50% 33% 63% 56% 55% 
0% 8% 3% 18% 0% 
0% 19% 17% 7% 9 
50% 46% 18% 18% 36% 


In this question, we excluded everyone who told us they were not in a relation 
ship. Is it just us, or are straight males sleezes? Those poor, innocent straight 
girls. Straight girls, look at your boyfriend. There is a one in six chance he’s 
fucking around on you. Sorry, it’s not our fault you hooked up with him. 


“LADIES 


| can't even imagine anything but 
strictly monogamous. 

More his choice than mine. 

| host kink parties and while there's 
no intercourse there's a lot of other 
things happening ... and we're dis- 
cussing swinging with another cou- 
ple we know. 

1 am completely loyal to the per- 
son I'm with, but could be 
described as a serial- 
monogamist. Kind of sounds like 
a serial killer, but no killing 
involved. 

We have discussed threesomes etc 
in the future, for now we are com- 
pletely monogamous. 

We're married. If my husband 
cheated on me, I'd kick his ass. 
If | cheated on him, I'd kick my 
own ass. 


MEN 


Monogamy is unhealthy and unrealistic 
Talk of threesomes have sizzled 
up my sex life, whether we'd 
actually go through with it is 
another story, at least until the 
insecurities evaporate. . 

| only cheat when she deserves !t._ 
We used to swing a fair bit until 
we had a bad experience with 4 
second female. Hopefully it'll fire 
back up again. 

One at a time please, it's so much 
better that way. : 
She's allowed to have sex with 
other men or with another man 
and me at the same time. We 
haven't actually done it yet 


ough. 
Every now and then | need a differ- 
ent thrill. | love my parnter but ... 
sometimes get restless. 


SK” SEP '11 - SEP 17, 2008 


SEX IN THE CITY 


last year? 
FS FG 
0 9% 0% 
1 54% 57% 
2-4 27% 43% 
5-10 9% 0% 
10+ 1% 0% 


Well, it seems that there are no gay girl virgins in Edmonton, despite the fact 
that they have told us they are not getting laid much. But the gay guys are 
making up for them, and everyone else for that matter. Fifty per cent of gay 
guys have had more than five partners in the last year, They seem to change 
partners more often than their underwear. 


LADIES 


Three were relationships that | was 
in... The fourth was a one night 
ying .. With an CA ae 
e were unemployed, ai 
couldn't afford condoms for the 
amount of sex we'd to 
have (plus my boyfriend likes the 
Kimono brand which are slighty 
pi expensive 3 the house- 
old names and only come in 
packs of three that we can find) 
So we didn't have sex as regular- 
y= we both would have liked. 
0 we stuck fo oral sex. 
In the past year | have 
three mel n which 


ous relationship 
us‘one partner. 


How many partners have you had in the 


_ on what I've been missing out on. 


I travel, I have fun, | laugh and 
: ae ee 
en 


__| l remember the names of all the people 
I’ve slept with. 3 


FS Fe FB 


MS MG MB 
Yes 712% 85% 61% 66% 50% 74% 
No 28% 15% 39% 34% 50% 26% 


Do you need to speak with someone? 
The Back Porch provides information 
on all your options, including abortion, 
Parenting and adoption. We 
confidential and non-judg 


| adjusted the numbers to leave out all the people who said they were virgins 
Wow, you've got the best chance of being remembered if you have Slept with a 
gay girl and the least if you've slept with a gay guy. Everyone else is fairly con- 
sistent. Basically, if you have slept with someone other than a gay girl, you have 
about one in four odds of being forgotten. Still, you'd better perform to ensure 
you arent some drunken story that begins, “There was this guy.” ... 


work with support agencies 
Alberta. 


GET A 
BEHIN 


LINE PHOTOS, SURVEY RESULTS AND 
ES PICS AT VUEWEEKLY.COM 


L 
D-THE-SCEN 


FB MSs MG MB 1 
11% 8% 9% 10% : Ni hh 
17% 49% 23% 21% aakcwe 
49% 32% 18% 49% | 
9% 6% 27% 15% 13TH 
14% 5% 23% 5% ik & 


Es 


RTHDAY 


In the swing lifestyle, it's easy to 
have 10+ in one weekend with clubs 
or house parties. LOVE IT! 

I've stopped sleeping with 
skeezy assholes which means 
I'm not getting laid. 

It's too easy to get laid while travelling 


MEN 


| have had exactly 22 sexual partners 
in my life, 12 of which have been in 
the last year. 'm 18 and I'ma 
manslut. 

My wife and the other girl, 
(together), andanescort _ 
After becoming single last moni 
I've been doing a little catch up 


Don’t keep track, many more than 10, 
mostly meaning less lust. 

and lover. 
One night stands. 


igage with my world and the 
men | meet. This is the funda- 
mental wiring and the science of 
all men, gay or straight. 


SEP'11'- SEP 17,2008 =§ UTE WEBKLY 


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Key «= SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


events@mothersmusic.com ‘ 


26 


Do you have any sexual addictions that you'd like to reveal? 


Pain ... and spanking 


to watch a couple have sex without 
them knowing | was peeking in. 
Love to masturbate with water pressure. 


tening to women or thinking what | 
would like to do to them. So no it’s alla 


Jove head. But doesn't every girl? It's my favourite way to get off by myself. part of my stratagy to stay sane-ish 
ff like it.a little rougher. For ae sex is like a ate in thet ite {think that my largest hidden sexual 
ike to hold my partner's head and more | have it the more | want it and ites isto porn itself. 
hair while he goes down on me. the more I'm willing to risk to get it bpaysher it doesn't even matter 
Touching their hair gets me off. I really have been like an addict at what Kind of porn it is, | just always 
No—well, I like to bite. times and have had to make myself seem to want more of it. | easily 


Being tied up. In life | tend to domminate 
everyone else so once in a while its nice 
to be the one being dominated. 
Making my partner cum 

Sex itself. My poor partner can't keep up 
with me. i 

| am addicted to orgasms. They're super. 
Lesbian erotica 

| kinda like having my neck grabbed, so 
as not to really be choking me, but just to 
{eave a hint of a threat that it could hap- 
pen. Because sexual desire is so rooted 
in anticipation, it's so much nicer to just 
suggest that which is hot rather than to 
come out for example, and just choke a 
bitch. 


like to be dominated in that !like to Probably online porn, but who doesn't? Fa Dine Novelanmant 

be tied up or taken by surprise while _ | masturbate to gay pornography 4% P G nlOge vey PIOPMent 

doing regular things like washing while | have a flaccid dick and | aun Fi) f HUT UU 

dishes or coming through the door at ~—_ scream at my dick to get hard and 

the end of the day. It makes me feel sob because it doesn’t turn me on. 

like he’s been thinking about me Dear God, why can’t! just he gay? 

before he got home and had to have | love to see women in physical pain 0 
me right there. when I'm fucking them. 0 
| always hope my partner will venture to Not going into the BDSM side but I 


my ass—t had a partner when | was 18 
who licked it and put his fingers in it then 
fucked it and HOLY SHIT it was awe- 
some. 

Watching girl on girl porn. It's hot! 
Masturbating in public is hot. 

How about just sex as an addiction? 
Eating her out. She eats lots of fruit and 
tastes like honeydew melon most of the 
time. Yum! 

| straddle the edge of the bathtub, 
put a pillow down and grind down 
on it until | come. It gets me every- 
time, and | do it about four times a 
week. Since | was about 14. | am 27 
now. 

Playing with my clit 

! haven’ done it yet, but | would love 


stop “cold turkey” for periods of a 
time to gain some control over my 
libido and clear my head 


MEN 


| know this is a {ittle boring, but | like 
watching lesbian porn. 

| don’t know... | had this one girl 
that loved getting it up the ass, and I 
Sorta miss her, but only for that 
Masturbation. Eleven times in one day is 
the most. | could even have sex multiple 
times in a day and I'd still feel like having 
@ wank at some point later. 

! masturbate at least four times a 
day even on days when i get laid. 


like her being more dominant. 

| think about sex all the time ... if | was a 
girl I'd be a lesbian nympho! 

Yes. Internet porn and a need to fuck 
women other than my wife 

Uhh, yeah, sex. It's awesome 
youporn.com 

Pom. Especially finding and collecting pic- 
tures | find on the Internet on my computer 
| think I'm starting to kick the habit though 
I love a partner touching me down 
under while going down on me. 
Lesbian porn — 

| masturbate a lot. And am basically 
always in the mood. She is not. 

| love mutual masturbation. Nothing gets 
me off faster and with more pleasure 
than masturbating next to my partfer as 


What is the longest you've 


gone without sex? 


she gets herself off 

Yes | love watching women get naked, 
as long as they stroke my cock or 
allow me to jerk it on their chest 
Heels, around my ears. Too hot 


NSA sex is really hot. Get in, get it 


done, leave. 


Sometimes | wank too much but that is 
So | can enjoy a fast few five or six pints 
watching football with my pals, not lis- 


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accumulated over 200 gigs of porn at 
this point, yet never watch any of it. 
Truthfully, most of it bores me to 
death. Yet | find myself logging on to 
porn trading websites daily, down- 
loading more content that | will 
never find the time to watch. 

Anal sex and outdoor pee games 

I'm crazy about lactating breasts 
Sucking cock 

I masturbate a lot, and love seeing 
my ass packed with a dildo while 
crossdressed. 

Well, | find it far less fun to hi 
out smoking pot—is that a 0 
merely a pleasant accompaniment? 


FS - FG FB MS MG. MB j-~ J 
0-2 months 23% 43% © 37% 30% © 27% «A STARTING AT 
3-6 months 78% 0% 23% 19% 27% 31% 
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More than 2years 15% © 14% © 3% © 21% ©=— «9% «19% 
| ama virgin "5% 0% 6% 3% 9% 5% 
inating 


Again, | have to shed a few teats for gay girls. Only bisexual guys seem to 
wait as long as gay girls to get some action. Gay guys seem to never go more 


than a year. A year sure is a long time. 


SEX IN THE CITY SEP 11-SHP 17,2008 \wweweexmy 2] 


How do you feel when you pinrax but your eed does not? 


PO a te eet 


ae ? are 

aa . 
enjoyed th ; aa ‘ 
Totally bummed. They > 18% 14% 
must il it pe 28 a = 


Who gives a shit? vt oe aie 


We also had an “other” option but, for the purposes of math, we left it out of the table. Check out their thoughts below. 
But to the point, gay girls have committed themselves to taking care of business. Their partners must cum or else! Straight 
guys seem OK with their partners not reaching nirvana as long as they get their bits worked. 


ALL 


Mind you, | tend to climax much more then they do. By 
the end of the session, I'm not happy unless they've cli- 
maxed at least once however. 

Wouldn't know. Probably guilty though. 

Well ... | don’t think that I'VE ever climaxed! But my part- 
ner always does! 

To me it means that it's simply time to even the 
score—hoth people should climax. 

| fee! like | haven't done a satisfactory job 

Usually the other way around for me. Dude does but 
! don't. Inside | feel either pissed or used and think 
they are selfish. 1 cum copiously and most men (and 
women) seem fo enjoy the waterworks and 
although most cum as well, they aren't too con- 
cemed if they dont. 


Stay | AT A BELLSTAR RESORT” 


It's really important to make sure that your partner enjoys 
herself and has an orgasm if possible. That's why cun- 
nilingus and other types of non-intercourse activity should 
be talked about in highschool health class—it's very 
important! 

How in hell does anyone know for sure if one’s 
partner is having a climax or faking it? 

By the time | come, she’s generally come several times. 

1 try my damnedest, so if they didn't come, it's prob- 
ably not my fault and I'm okay with it. 

| feel great | just came, they'll get their's and most of the 
time it's not about me | don't own It. 
great when I get off, 1000000x better when we both do! 
For some people, it simply doesn't happen every time. 
Physical over-sensitivity, mental hang-ups, whatever. 
Usually try to get my partner off first. | feel better 
about cumming once | have satisfied my partner. 


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Has religion, faith or tradition ever 
gotten in the way of sexual fun? 


. 


FS FG." FB MS MG MB 
29% 23% 20% 32% 35% 
77% 80% 68% 


Yes 17% 


No 83% 73% 65% 


Damn tradition. When two or more people want to get naked, why does faith 
get in the way? The straight folk seem to be the least impeded by religion. | 
wonder if that has to do with our society and its fear of homosexuality. Or do 
gay Edmontonians just have really uptight families? 


Are you a moaner or a screamer? 


a 
eae 


FS FG fa iS MG MB 
Moaner 86% 100% 63% 8 z ee 
Screamer 14% 0% 37% ah ae 10% 
is a ss lod. 


In retrospect, this seems like a rather dull question. | should have asked what 
you scream out and how loud the moans are. But | did find it interesting that 
there is not a single screaming gay girl in all of Edmonton but that the bi girls 
are howling like crazy! Listen up, you might hear a bi girl now if you are quiet 
enough! 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


In the last year, have you experimented with someone outside your sexual orientation? 


e 
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Please do not remind me 


Sure have, it is worth a try 


2% 15% 2% ~—oO% 


11% 14% 4% 19% 


/ always find it interesting on these questions that the bisexual people provide 
answers other than “! am bisexual.” How can someone who is bisexual experiment 
outside his or her sexual orientation? Perhaps I'm opening up Pandora's box asking 
that question. Nevertheless, the questions seem to always single out straight guys 
Why are you so afraid of other penises? They are natural ... you have one! Straight 
girls seem to be game. At least that’s is promising for the straight guys! 


STRAIGHT GIRLS 


Seems like it could be fun, as long as 
| didn’t run into them at the grocery 
store the next day. 

At the end of the day, I'm hetero 
and find I'm not really, complete- 
ly satisfied without full penile 
penetration. But I sure do enjoy- 
ing playing with girls! 

| am way too monogamous to try, but 
| always wonder. 

Used to make out with girls but 
who hasn'‘t these days? Lesbian 
is in. 

! wouldn't call myself bi, but, hey, if 
they turn you on, why not? However, 
it ended with a relationship and she 
drove me up the wall, so next time it 
will be a one-night stand only. 

! didn’t put bi-sexual at the top 
because | would never date a 
woman, but | fuck them. 

In the words of Katy Parry, | kissed a 
girl, and | liked it. 

1 was curious. | did, and it was a 
blast. Looking forward to explor- 
ing other female bodies more. 
And yes this is pre-Katy Perry 
‘Kissed a Girl’ crap 

| kissed a girl who was gay but aside 
from the excitement of kissing a girl 
and her soft lips, | wouldn't take it 
any further. Just not into it. 

I'm so straight. Have tried, but it's 
just not for me. | like cocks and 
muscles and Adam's apples and 
facial whiskers. 


“Nope. | don’t have a problem with 


experimenting, but its not for me. 


GAY GIRLS 


Gay Girls were tight lipped, and said 
nothing on this subject. 


STRAIGHT GUYS 


We rubbed shoulders on the side- 
walk—it was invigorating. 

! don’t oppose the idea complete- 
ly, maybe some day I'll meet the 
right boy. 

| can appreciate a good looking man 


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but It doesnt do anything for me sex- 
ually. 

Give me a pretty transvestite and 
a dozen berry flavoured wine 
coolers and anything could hap- 
pen! 

Man and woman, just the way God 
intended. Oh and sometimes man 
and women. 

Kissed a dude, figured | should 
try it, wasn't for me. 

| say straight because | don’t think | 
could be emotionally involved with a 
guy, but it can be a lot of fun once in 
a while. 

/ tried sex with other guys in 
college many years ago. It was 
okay, but not astounding. That 
spark that drives my heterosex 
just wasn't there. 


GAY GUYS 


When | was younger | tried the 
‘straight’ route but found it wasn't 
me—since coming out | haven't 
given heterosexual relations a 
thought. 

Unless you classify making out 
as experimenting, I've heen 


exclusively gay 
Ew, boobies ... va-jay-jay ..N0 
thanks ... 'm dreaming of sunshine, 


lollipops and rainbows to get that 
image out of my head now... thanks 
a lot We. 
I've been approached by 
quite a few girls which is 
quite flattering but I’m not 
turned on at all. 
| am a gay as can be, occasionally, 
after many years, | will meet a 
women that | think, “Maybe | 
should.” Then along comes a MAN 
and | come to my senses and, poof, 
the thought’s gone! 
I had sex with a heavier girl 
which does not generally do it 
for me. | did, however, enjoy it— 
she was quite fantastic and 
knew what she was doing. 
ae are great for friends, but not for 
un! 


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SEP11~SEP'17,2008 


In the last year, have you had sex with someone you should not have? 


LADIES 


Definitely. With my good friend's 
boyfriend. 

| had sex with someone who had 
the same astrological sign as me, 
to see what it would be like. | 
also made out with someone who 
had a lip ring to see what that 
was like. 

With a married man who only told me 
he was married after we were fin- 
ished. 

Yes—someone who was totally 
in love with me and a virgin and I 
just wanted to get laid. Oops. 

A gay guy. And |'m a straight girl. 
Whoops. 

Yes, he turned out to be a flake 
and was just using me for sex. 
Yes, a couple of times. Not with 
strangers, thankfully, but with too 
much alcohol in the body | had really 
bad sex {in my opinion, not his) and | 


felt like shit the next day about 
myself. 
Yep, a random coke-head on New 
Year's. 
Yes, two of my good friends (at the 


same time) when all three of us were 
in relationships and friends with each 
other boy/girlfriends. 

Yes, because | was only doing it 
so they could get hack at their 


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irlfriend. 
ly best friend's boyfriend while she 
ie drunk and passed out in the same 
ed 


Yes. Had an affair with a then- 
engaged coworker, and contin- 
ued it after they got married. His 
wife found out, was cool with it, 
and now we all play together. 

My best friend's boyfriend. Bitch 
deserved it. 

Oh yes! Exes are very dangerous 
«. they know all your “melt me” 
tricks! 


MEN 


Well she was gross looking ... so | 
guess | shouldnt have 

Yes. A girl at a party, it really hurt 
my girlfriend's feelings as she 
didn’t want me to do it. Luckily 
we worked through it. 

In the last year | have slept with the 
majority of my sisters friends. This 
has caused lot of turmoil and drama... 
do | feel bad about it? No. 

Her husband tried to shoot my 
balls off. 

The girl that was living with us 
because she was a ‘starfish"—she 
would just lay there and take it, and 
apparently she was known for doing 
that. 

Yes, prostitutes, co-workers, ex- 
girlfriend married woman, dude 
Yes | rode my old roommate's bird 
while he slept. He would have done 


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the same if the bollocks had half a 
chance. She is a basket case—|'m 
pretty sure she sucked off my other 
mate too, he denied it, the lying bas- 
tard, She was ping about marrying 
him one minute and hopping off my 
knob the next. Weird bitch. 

A woman | met on the Internet. 
She was much less attractive 
than she initially claimed, not a 
problem, really, but then she kind 
of stalked me online after | told 
her it was a one-time thing. | also 
allowed the mother of my son's 
best friend to seduce me (well, | 
did not resist much). We have to 
see each other all the time and it’s 
a real temptation to keep it up, 
but it feels like | am betraying my 
son. 

Close Friend, Jess than 18 year old 
(I'm 24) 

Some woman's husband 

Yes, he didn’t tell me he had a wife 
and kids until after we had sex. 

Yup. But at the time, it seemed all 
well and good and it wasn't until we 
got to know him better that he turned 
out to be more than a little crazy. 
Ones | regret: that lesbian; threesome 
with a girl and her boyfriend that got 
really awkward; a college freshman 
who didn’t tell me she was a virgin ‘til 
after and got scary possessive; 
rebound girl who broke my fucking 
heart. Ones | ought to regret, but 
don't: friend’s ex. That same friend's 
sister. (I'm kind of a cad.) 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


SEX IN THE CITY 


Do you ever think of someone else 


when you're doing it? 


We asked for details. You said: 


ALL 


Previous partners or make 
out buddies whom | never did 
the deed with. 

The male stars from the 
Peruvian telenovela Latin 
Lover. 

A guy | met at a party way 
back. For some reason, | 
thought he was the guy | was 
going to marry. We only cud- 
dled, but | still think about 
him a lot. Even in times when 
| shouldn't. 

Care failure, that girl that 
only wears rope at 


FS FG 

3% 0% 14% 

71% 14% 17% 
60% 57% 43% 
30% 29% 26% 
NewCity. 

Her sisters. 

Once in awhile | think 
about the writing staff 
and Vue Weekly and 
wonder if they would 
approve of my style and 


technique. | imagine you 
sitting bedside with your 
laptop tip-tapping away 
at a breakneck pace stop- 
ping ever so often to gri- 
mace at an unflattering 
angle. Maybe there is 
three of you. One could 
cup my supple ass a little 


MS MG MB 

4% 5% 0% 
14% 14% 30% 
54% 50% 60% 
28% 32% 10% 


and a couple others could 
tweak my nipples a bit. 
My lover doesn’t mind 
though. She doesn’t read. 
She's fantasizing about 
the sweaty coke-snorting 
lead singer from the 
Barenaked Ladies. 

My wife when with others ... 
and my sister-in-law when 
with my wife. Lol. 

No, really, never. Am I 
weird for that? 

Mother Teresa or anyone hot- 
ter than my ex-wife. 

Her husband. 


If you seek a new partner/fuck buddy, 


is anyone off limits? 


To begin, remember this is a question you could click all that applied. After we launched the survey, 
we realized that we did not have enough options on this question. Member of the family is too gen- 
eral. | mean, really, having sex with one’s sister is repulsive, but doesn't everyone have some hot 
third cousin you'd like to see naked at a family reunion? Funny, though, even without clarification, 


Straight guys were by far the most likely to put out the fuck me flag at Thanksgiving. Guys, in gen- 
eral, are far more likely to hit on anyone in their lives. Sluts! 


S io whee 
FS FG MB MS MG ~ MB e = “i iy a | 

Members of my family 95% 100% 97% 86% 95% 90% 4 a ; 1 

Members of my ex's family 72% 86% 43% 47% 50% 36% ny > = -> “4 : 

My friends 29% 29% 11% 21% 14% ~ 5% as 

My friends’ partners _ T% 71% SI BH ABH 28K ot w 

My friends’ exes 50% 29% 31% 238% 9% 5% 

Anyone with a partner 63% 72% 40% 36% 41% 14% 

No one is of limits 3 4% 0% 0% 8% 0% 4% 


ould look ir 


Free for 
the masses 


vomen, straight men are 


Every 
Thursday 


. What would you try if you 
_ -had an opportunity? 


bs FS 
Tantric sex 73% 
Group sex (3 or more) 47% 
Fetish play 53% 
Anal 37% 
Internet / Phone sex 32% 
Sex with prostitute ~ 5% 
Sex with transvestite 5% 


FG MB MS MG MB 
71% 66% 58% 59% 71% 
1% 71% 72% 87% 91% 
14% 66% 14% 18% 69% 
57% 69% 47% 59% 75% 
14% 46% 58% 68% 84% 
43% 43% 33% 54% 46% 
14% 11% 30% 5% 44% 
0% 14% 9% 14% 50% 


Remember, people could click on all that applied. Seriously, how can 
30% of bisexuals say they do not want to try outside their preferred 
gender!?! Boggles the mind! Straight ladies seem the least interested 
in experimenting while gay guys look like they'll try just about anything. 


I\ surprised at th 
would do it! So | deeic 


Qut of all the me 


Out of women whe 
beefed up against pro 


willing to ha 
ion, but the real surpr 


vouldn't mind try! 


how that desire translated into people's 


vith a pro, about 10 


who wouldn't be willing to go the prostitute route 


nith a prostitut 


» also thought that law 
n that number jumped to 16% amongst women 


hould be 


a BS 2 SE A OE ae TOS SA ae SE RD I RD ne TT 


Have you tried anything freaky in the last year? 


LADIES 


Whipping cream. It was sticky and | 
worried too much about it getting on 
the sheets 

Anal sex 

Lots of spanking, bondage type 
things. 

Not particularly, | like to keep 
my fantasies fantasies because 
whenever J fulfill a fantasy, I no 
longer fantasize in the same 
way. At that point, I'm remem- 
bering which can also be a turn 
on, but remembering an 
escapade doesn’t mean it had to 
be a fantasy first. 

Bondage 

What do you consider freaky? 
I've been spanked, tied up (lots 
of rope bondage), suspended, 
whipped, tried Violet Wand and 
electric play, slept in rubber 
sheets and a latex catsuit, tried 
breath play, and lots and lots of 
choking, and the experience was 
one that | wish not to repeat. 
Yeah, getting smacked around during 
sex. What fun! 


| stuck my finger in someone's butt 
Sex in a public place. 

| guess many people would find 
the sex club (swing clubs) freaky. 
We tried the swing there—it's 
fun! Sometimes they have theme 
nights where you can dress up in 
costumes (school-girl, shortest 
skirt, ete.) 

Um, | masturbated in public, at 
work—a lot. 

Nothing much, just made a peanut 
butter and jam sandwich with my 
ass. (Which by the way is extremely 
hard.) é 

Is gettin tied to the bed freaky? 
Made a Blacklight porno in my 
boyfriend's garage. We're sexy art 
maniacs! 

My best friend showed me her toy 
box. 

Sex at the resort we honeymooned in 
behind the amphitheatre while the 
show was going on and there were 
hundreds of people walking around. 
Sex with a close female friend. 
Sex outside, in a car 

Sex in the West Edmonton Mall 
parking lot, in the well-lit area 


MEN 


A hooker in a Middle Eastern brothel. 
Her little kids were in the kitchen 
prepping lunch. In the living room, 
waiting with me, were two national 
soldiers. And the pimp was her hus- 
band. 

Had sex with a married woman 
while her hubby and my girl- 
friend watched. It was fun. 

Light bondage, handcuffs, bondage 
tape, lots of new toys and dressing 
up. 

1 dont know what ! consider 


freaky... | passed out in the mid- - 


dle of a blowjob hand cuffed to 
my bed ... | was really drunk and 
falling asleep—it made the girl 
really mad. She left me hand- 
cuffed all night through. The next 
morning | had a really bad neck 
ache and bruises on my wrists. 

| watched a solar eclipse while sit- 
ting in the outhouse with the door 
open. 

Nothing that | would call freaky 
but might entertain someone; had 
sex with an escort—cute girl but 


ing with us (all together) 

Anal, it was great for both me and my 
lover. 

Threesome with a couple 10 
years older than me. He loved to 
watch me giving it to her while 
she gave him oral... it was fun 
and | look forward to trying it 
again! 

Sex in public. Fucking a girl in the 
ass. Fucked a virgin. 

Pee play 

Sex on that grassy patch beside 
Shaw Conference Centre. Full on 69 
with her dripping into my mouth 
Unfortunately, no. Well, does 
anal count? 

After hearing the couple across the 
alley going at it loudly, we got it on 
against the open window and tried to 
match them. 

Her in bondage (leash and hand- 
cuffs) 

Loads! My girlfriend used a butt plug 
on me 

No. Although | let a lovely Swiss 
girl stick her finger half way up 
my hole last year. It was not as 
had as it sounds either. | was 


fetish play, and bringing pretty mun- 
dane toys into the bedroom (vibe). !'m 
not sure what “freaky” even is these 
days! | don’t consider sex while on 
your period freaky, but I'm sure that 
some do. I'm not really interested in 
the more extreme fetishes like water- 
sports, scat, fisting, leather, heavy 
BDSM. 


My lover penetrated my ass with 
a strap-on dildo while | humped 
her best friend. Then my lover 
and | dominated her friend and 
made her our sex slave for the 
weekend (consensual, of 
course). | really enjoyed her 
tonguing my ass while my lover 
sucked my cock. 

Yup ... sex in a dirty video booth 
not fign 

Piercing genitals ... S&M... 

Other than continued threeways 
with another man and my gir!- 
friend, continued pegging at my 
girl’s hands, sex on a swing, 'f 
the kitchen, in my office, in front 
of my living-room mirror-wall, on 
a picnic table in a Saskatchewan 
rest stop, and against the wall oi 
a gun-tower on the Plains of 


Bondage, light S&M too! the sex was horrible and really shocked—she didn’t strike me as 

Had sex all over the office. Bondage expensive. Was sleeping with the naughty type. Abraham, no. 
A little sex in public... Exploring the bad side of life. my wife and the girl that was liv- _ Not really. Light anal play, more nylon © Bloodletting 
4 vUEWEBay SEX IN THE CITY 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


Sneak Away 


Hide and watch 
Head back to your room to work 
off some steam 


Damn it, it's a public hot tub 
and | need a soak! 


Call the hotel, have them and 
the tub cleaned 


Ask if three’s company 


don’t notice you. You ... 


FS FG FB 
32% 58% 18% 
23% 0% 30% 

6% 37% 11% 
23% 2% 11% 
9% 3% 3% 
B% 0% 27% 


MS MG MB 
24% 45% 0% 
23% 20% 28% 
12% 0% 1% 
15% 15% 20% 

3% 6% 10% 
22% 15% 38% 


We did have people answer other but we‘ve adjusted the numbers to exclude them. The percentages are interesting 
Overall, guys seem more likely to take an adventurous route while girls bail. Gay girls are committed, though—to either 


walk away or work their junk! 


WUEWEEKLY 
is still FREE 
every Thursday! 


Sex can be messy! Yours is so messy, you need: 


Tissues 

Hand towel 

Large bath towel 

New sheets 
Decontamination crew ¢ 


We asked for specifics. You said: 


ALL 

|'m a gusher and my man knows just 
how to hit it, haha! 
Sai Je it. 

| was with one guy and he hit me 
right in the right spot and | total- 
ly gushed. It happened with him 
quite often but not since with 


FS AG 
27% 29% 
37% 43% 
23% 29% 
12% 0% 
1% 0% 
other guys. 
1 come big... | do believe gush- 
ing is the word that has been 


used. ; 
Sometimes a shower is necessary 


MB 
36% 
27% 
18% 
12% 

7% 


after. KY, juices, sweat (his and mine) 


| cover the bed with a water- 


proof cover PLUS a couple of 


Ms MG MB 
23% 11% 11% 
33% 33% 26% 
28% 33% 47% 
13% 10% 16% 

3% 10% 0% 


thick blankets to absorb all the 
moisture. And still end up with 
uddles, ; 
here’s nothing fun about sleeping in 
the wet spot. 


“That time of the month” doesn't 
mean that you can't have sex ... 


RY MENS BATH HOUSE 


SEX IN THE CITY 


SEP 11-SEP 17/2008 =\W7UTS WEEKLY 


** 12274 1nSPERAUE, 
EDMONTON y * 
01482-7196 


35 


What keeps you from having sex more often? 


am a virgin 


Sex more often? | am good with what | get 


Work too much 
Too Tired 


Single and not meeting people 


Too busy with friends 


Unwilling Partner 


Too busy with family 


Sexual dysfunction 
STD/STI 


This is yet another question where you could answer all that applied. Though 
it seems people answered fewer categories. In addition, there were several 
that could theoretically overlap. One interesting note is the amount of bisexua! 
women with glow-in-the-dark privates. We hope it's the kind that clears up 


FS FG MB MS MG MB 
5% 0% 6% 2% 5% 5% 
21% 43% 23% 24% 45% 19% 
32% 12% 26% 35% 23% 31% 
41% 43% 29% 30% 27% 36% 
21% 25% 23% 20% 32% 40% 
11% 14% 26% 10% 5% 30% 
11% 15% 11% 21% 5% 14% 
10% 13% 6% 13% 9% 5% 
5% 14% 0% 5% 0% 11% 
3% 0% 9% 1% 0% 0% 


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ALL 


Two childen under two years old, 
need | say more? 

Stupid neighbours in my apart- 
ment building who have SUCH a 
problem when my boyfriend and 
| have sex, that they need to 
leave notes and bang on the 
walls. 

My sex life is fucking fabulous 
Catholic guilt? 

I'm ready to pounce as long as I’m 
not tired. Boyo needs to have a few 


sex (n.) 


more stars aligned, but it's worth it. 
My mother-in-law lives with us 
now so that has put a huge 
damper on our whole relation- 
ship (for the worse) including 
amount and frequency of sex. 

| just don't care to have sex 
with women who believe 
they're entitled to throw me 
out of my own house, steal my 
children and claw away most of 
my future income. 

Both my lovers live in other 
towns. 


sex is like math: you add the 
bed, subtract the clothes, 
divide the legs and hope you 


don't multiply... 


EDMONTON, WE'VE 
GOT YOU COVERED! 


What we offer: 


Sexual Health Education 
Sexual Orientation Support 


een 


OPTIONS 


SEXUAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION 


#50-9912 106 St. (780)423-3737 
options@optionssexualhealth.ca 


For confidential help, email 
optionssexualhealth@hotmail.com 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


(SEX IN THE CITY 


ARTDRIVE 


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SEPTEMBER 20 & 21, 12-5PM 


Join us for a weekend of art. Take the Opportunity to spend the ~ i 
weekend meeting these gifted artists and watch them at work! j 


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Have you ever employed a marital Teateanl’ Siisbs 
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Wow, in almost every group, it is about 50%. Although there was some confusion over the ques- | E. dalinec@shaw.ca 
tion—and to be perfecty clear here, a “marital aid” is a sex to y guys. 
| 541 30 Range Road 270 
JUDY SCHAFERS | sturgeon County, AB 


| Ph. 780.459.37. 
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Whips, vibrator, things to tie me up with. together, costumes, lingerie. , 

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toys, then hell yes! And would recom- then yes BY HEATHER | Bon Accord. AB 

mend it to everyone! I think its great i'm getting a stripper pole | Ph. 780.921.3412 

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SEP 11-SEP 17,2008 = WR 


How often do you have erotic dreams? 


FS FG) =sMB 
Never 6% 14% ) 3% 
Occasionally 83% 57 wk? 
Very often 10% 29% - 7% 
Nightly % : ee 


Hmm, we think the guys are lying. Come on, admit it. It is very often. We asked 


for.déiails of a dream remembered. Here are some interesting ones. 


ALL 


It involved a guy | went to school 
with. We had fooled around once 
before but it didn’t go all the way. 
One night | dreamt that we were ina 
Wal-Mart of all places and we were 
kind of in a corner when he started 
kissing my neck and stuff. We start- 


There are many great reasons to 
pledge an individual or team in the 


Alberta Throwdown on 
September 21, 2008, at 


Edmonion City Hall. 


For 


HIV 


EDMONTON 


Visit 


, your support 
means we can continue to work 
toward ending the discrimination, 
stigma and transmission of HIV/AIDS 
while caring for the people in our 
community infected with the virus. 


ed making out-and he put his hands 
down my jeans and the next thing 
you know | was riding him like crazy 
in the bike aisle... ; 

Cab driver! My (young, white) 
husband is getting fresh in the 
hack of the cab when suddenly 
he and the (old, asian) driver 
switch places, and I love it. 


Last week | had a dream about my 
husband and another guy tag teaming 
me: | was riding my husband's dick 
like the wind while this random guy 
was fucking my ass good and hard. | 
came so hard in my dream that | actu- 


You wart Wo gwe hack to your 
community SAND whip Calgaryin the 
AlbertatThrowdown | 


WALK FOR LIFE 


The Walk will do us good, 
SSS ae a 
today to pledge your favourite walker or 

team or to make a donation. All money raised stays right here in Edmonton. 


OTABANK AIDS WALK FOR LFE PROCEEDS SUPPORT DIRECT SERVICES FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH AND AFFECTED SY HIVIAIDS 18 YOUR COMMUNITY. 2008 )MAGE BY ACCLAIMED CANADKAN HIV-POSITIVE ASTIST MORGAN MkCOMWELL 


LOCAL SPONSORS 


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rem seas 


ally blacked out for a second. 

! was fucking Liev Schreiber in a 
hotel room and couldn't remember 
his name so | kept calling him 
Cotton Weary (his character's 
name in the Scream movies.) 


My best friend (a girl) had a penis 
and we were about to have sex. My 
other best friend (a guy) and | ended 
up trying to have sex but it didn’t 
really work. | guess we both forgot 
he was gay for just one night, una 
noche, etc. 

A couple of months ago | ACTU- 
ALLY orgasmed in my sleep. It 
woke me up. | was dreaming 
about an ex-boyfriend ... oops. 

| was having an affair with a local TV 
personality. 

That big black guy with the 
African accent from Oz was 
going to rape me and then he 
just laughed and shook my hand 
and asked me where | went to 
grade school. 

| was having sex with a much 
younger friend of the family. 

Its usually the same dream every 
time. It involves my childhood best 
friend's older sister. We are fuck- 
ing on the washing machine and 
her mother catches us but we 
don't stop and she just watches us. 


& WERE CLEARING OUT 


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SEP-14 = SEP 47, 2008 - 


SEX'IN THE CITY 


ing FS FG MB MS MG Mp 
2% 29% 29% 35% 32% 21% 


n Stepping out 17% O% 31% 19% 27% 39% 


a monogamous partner 55% 0% 26% 38% 27% 31% Here's one scary thing about the guys who said they never used condoms—65% of them are 
: in Non-monogamous relationships, or aren't ina relationship at all. That's fucked up guys 


“too tight,” “suck all tha 


We don’t consider ourselves arbiters of morality around here or anything— mean, have 
9 Ly 
ut” or “are too restrictive” 1% 0% 0% 8% 14% 9% 


you looked at the issue you're holding in your hands?—but really, if you're going to have sex 
with a bunch of different people, you should at least be safe about it. If not for your sake then 
ae. for everybody else's. Next year we'll probably ask some in depth questions about STIs and 
‘penis, nor does my 3% 1% 14% 1% 0% 0% we'll hopefully get to the bottom of what's going on out there 


Oh, and a few more things: out of the guys that don't use condoms, 55% of them can’t 
remember the names of all the people they've slept with, 25% of them would consider hav- 
; 3 ; : ing sex with a member of their own family, and 15% are “secretly non-monogamous.” 
Wow, roughly 10% of guys are still taking their lives into their hands. | guess the ads and infomer- a y s 


cials just don’t convince you. Tsk tsk. —_ — _-. es = — | 


a : / Rd. 
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SEX IN THE.CITY» SPRAU-SEPI7, 2008. \uiswcsay 39 


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=I ~ SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


Shrvat! 
heey, adhe! f 


FS FG 
Amazing 25% 29% 
No complaints yet 65% 57% 
My enthusiasm makes up for talent 6% 14% 
They keep falling asleep! 0% 0% 
| am a virgin 4% 0% 


FB MS MG 
17% 22% 18% 
1% 60% 64% 

6% 15% 14% 

3% 1% 0% 

3% 22% 5% 


ALL : don't really know. 


Was told | give amazing head. 
am willit 


My wonderful husband 
=> 


hat is the best time for sex? 


FS sFG 
7% 14% 
k 8% 0% 


a. 
vane 


MB MS MG 
3% 11% 5% 
12% 5% 5% 


N% 6% 14% 
eae hid - 16% 


\ 


MB 


16% 


64% 


10% 


5% 


5% 


| e asked you to tell us more. We found it interesting how many people have high opinions of 
their abilities. Too bad we are unable to ask their partners to find out the truth. You said: 


Been told by 80% of my lovers that I'm 

: the best they've ever had. 

vexperiment, | include I'm Latino thats all i have to say. Haha 

foreplay and ! am willing to consider my Most girls tell me I'm fantastic ... a cou- 

jartner’s feelings, and needs. ple others, I'm hoping it was just poor 

Is me I'm a great chemistry. 

over but | thnk that’s him just being polite. | am always suspicious that my significant other 
i been told I've been their best has had better. | fuck well, but | don’t fuck long. 

w job. ‘ é I'm fit, have stamina and enthusiasm, 
cont know think am doing well, but and care about the people | fuck. 


Really, if you preter mornings and your partner 
‘Of course not, you're going to climb on! That said, 
100 ee or goodnight hump. Only bisexual girls want 


SEX IN THE CITY 


Here's one thing about people who consider themselves amazing lovers: many of them must 
be referring to how well they please themselves, not their partners. Out of all the men who 
considered themselves amazing lovers, 10% of them answered that they didn’t “give a shit” 
whether their partner climaxed or not. And in terms of straight men who didn't give.a shit, 
more than 50% thought that they were amazing lovers. 


And for women, the number that didn’t give a shit whether their partner climaxed or not 
while still thinking they were amazing lovers was similar to men’s at 11%. I don’t see how the 
two things can go together quite frankly, how you could roll off your partner thinking that you 
are just the bee's knees while they're looking at you wondering whether they should kick you 
out, start wanking, or both. 


And a fair number of straight men seem to be either naive or delusional about their per- 
formance in the bedroom. Nearly 10% of straight men who answered that they were amazing 
lovers told us that there had never been an instance where their partner didn't climax. Are you 
kidding ine Yo 't any.of you see When Hany Met Sally? 


ated Sil alll 


SP 11-SEP.17,2008 © Wueweexy 41 


nas 


Sree 


aL! 


AIDS KFORLIFE y 


WHY WALK? 


FOUR GOOD REASONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 
2008 SCOTIABANK AIDS WALK FOR LIFE; ALBERTA THROWDOWN 


IT’S GOOD FOR YOU. Doing the Walk in one hour will use up 300 to 400 

calories and the fresh air is great for your skin, lungs and mood. Plus, you're 
surrounded by positive energy. Hundreds of passionate, fun-loving walkers and 
many more devoted, energetic volunteers create an atmosphere that can recharge 
the batteries of even the most bummed out among us. 


HIV EDMONTON RELIES ON THE WALK FOR LIFE, Providing outreach, support 


services and community education to the Greater Edmonton region costs 
money. The Walk for Life is HIV Edmonton's primary fundraiser. Without it, we 
wouldn't be able to engage in activities such as: 


- providing drop-ins, talking circles and other events for people either living with 
HIV or at risk; 


companying clients to medical appointments; 
providing nutritional supplements, vitamins and other necessary supplies; 
delivering workshops to adults and youth across our city; and 
+ helping HAART House provide HIV medication. 


JOINING THE WALK IS POSITIVELY SEXY! A sex-positive approach to HIV/AIDS 
education and prevention is one of the keys to eradicating this virus. 
When 500 Edmontonians walk through the city’s core to raise funds for HIV/AIDS 
support, outreach and services, we send a positive message about sex and 
sexuality to the world. 


THE WALK CHANGES LIVES. Here’s what some of our clients have to say about 
the Walk for Life and HIV Edmonton: 


Jam a heterosexual male who played around with drugs, and it 
only takes one dirty needle to catch the virus. My partner was 
pregnant at the time. During this time, 1 lived in arural area, where 
there was no public understanding. At one point in our town, we 
were considered “that AIDS couple.” We had no real friends after we 
disclosed to a couple people who we thought were our friends 


Lam now living in Edmonton and i tell practically no one about my 
HIV-on account of stigma and discrimination. | don't believe that 
disclosure of my identity will make it any easier for me. Oné place 
that has helped me in the city is HIV Edménton, with the food bank 
vouchers, Ross Armstrong Program and support 


Steve 


Register for the Walk for Life today 

by calling 780-488-5742 or visiting www.edmontonaidswalk.com 
If you cannot walk with us, you can still help. Volunteer, make a donation, pledge your favourite 
walker or team or become a corporate sponsor. We can stop HIV/AIDS, but we cannot do it without you! 


Atthe time |found out Iwas HIV ositi 
pregnant. I mention this 

an pe dget the 
probably not; because of the medications, the baby 


The percentage of babies born in our prairie province | wi 
the virus from their HIV-positive mothers is very low and this - 
percentage is caused by accidents during pregnancy. These AIDS 
Walks are very important, They help with research on transmission 
and on medication for women who are, and who are not, pregnant. 


Geraldine 


The needle exchanges have saved us fromgetting HIV and hep C. Being 
able to get clean needles has been a blessing, especially the Streetwork 
vans that come around and pick up the old sharps and bring new 

ones, HIV Edmonton helped us to survive on the street with food bank 
vouchers, the needle exchange, the drop-in and the support: We also 
get condoms from HIV Edmonton and hand them out to our friends. 


Rick and Page 


~ 


Sometimes I get upset with God and wonder, “Why? Why him? Why us?” 


I like coming to HIV Edmonton. I like the drop-in, plus I feel safe here. 
In particular, | like the Ross Armstrong Program. At Christmas, that 
staff and board give gifts and turkey buns. It is good to know that 
people care. 


Samantha Bobi 


No one deserves this! | got infected with HIV beeause of one foolish 
night, but I did not deserve it | am horrified to hear young gay 

men are still getting infected. i wish I could explain haw awful this 
disease is. Sure, we are not dying as fast, but it still is not fun to be 
sick. 1 wish could scream at the top of my lungs, “Play safel” HIV 
Edmonton helps do the screaming for me. 


Jeff Keller, Board Chair, HIV Edmonton 


42+ 


SEP 11 - SEP17, 2008 - 


VMEWEEKIY 


this danger by telling thern what not to do. “Don't 
jour is bad; it can hurt you.”“You can’t do that, 


negativity? When we use negative language, telling people 
t and must not do, we take the joy out of a fun, healthy, 
it it another way, talking negatively about sex is a real 


wrote on this subject: “While attention to the risks is important, 
‘problematic because it can undermine our sexual health 
Accenting only the negative aspects of sexuality can reinforce 
uate gender stereotypes and leave youth without positive 


with sex are a part of life. We want to be able to communicate 
lle, especially young people, and give ther the information they 
neeideeapebdact: themselves. Using negative messaging and a ‘no-don't-can't-bad’ 
approach to sex results in the brain refusing to listen, blocking communication 
and preventing our well- -intentioned messages from being heard. 


Ae oe safe, healthy sex, we must encourage healthy attitudes 
: education. That's why, when we talk about sex at HIV 
the spotlight on being sex positive. 


the positive, fun and healthy areas of sex and sexuality rather than 
i ng on risks and consequences; 


st, research-based, information about sex, sexuality and 


at there are many forms of sexuality and sexual behaviour; 
tal and non-inclusive language; and 
rma ition, then allowing them to make their own choices and 


be sexually healthy—for life. The world has changed 
about sex and the way we experience sexuality. For 
n over the age of 65 may have had one sex partner their 
or divorced, many are unsure of how to protect their 
[a safe, oat cana of the facts for their well- 


a sexy way of dealing with the risks associated 
Ne acmotwedge the fac that sexis pretty darn 
t omake it better, stay safe and enjoy this 


Title 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


¢?* 


they are into all ut grope fests. 


Rule of thumb: if seeing your parents 
doing it at all is awkward, then doing 
in public yourself is awkward. 

Ina way | would rather see a 
person with a hand up a shirt 
then | would see two people 
playing tonsil hockey. 
Depends on what “in public” means. 
If you're sitting at a table with some- 
one not involved in the action, it 


everyone ‘ 
‘feel free to show the world that 
you're with that person and you care 


** 


Wow, | aallati 45% of people figure that once you are at it, you 
may as well be tonsils deep. Gay girls seem to be split on this subject. They 
are either entirely offended, demanding displays of affection be very tame, or 


about them, but i don’t need to see 
your foreplay ... unless I'm invited. 
Well .,. on the one hand (no pun 
intended) I've felt like yelling 
“get a room” when I see people 
feeling each other up in public, 
but on the other hand (every pun 
intended) good for them for not 
giving a shit about what people 
think. 

| think that fucking in public, if our 
private bits can be seen, is too far. 
if we're in a bar that we're com- 
fortable in, we'll do a little 
fondling and heavier kissing. If 
guys cheer us on, we just might 
go under our skirts and shirts. 
We're the sexiest couple alive, why 
would we deny the world from see- 
ing how hot we are? 

| believe a measure of public 
decency should be observed. 


wasn't in the water and it 
worked a lot better due to his 
balancing act. He tried pleasur- 
ing me.(he calls it ‘polishing the 
pearl’ after seeing some douche 
on Penn & Teller’s Bullshit!) but 
it wasn't working (not only phys- 
ically, but it was his fantasy, not 
mine). 

Bondage, blindfolds, cockrings 
group fetish play 

Web cam 

Answering an online poll about my 


_ sexuality and been perfectly frank 


about it. 
My partner really wants to have 
anal sex but i really don’t like it. 


_ Butt fingering “ 
The whole swing-thing is still a 


bit of an experiment—finding out 
what each of our comfort levels 
are. 


Fisting 
- Anal eating 


Yelling “I love you!” after some- 
one who is half a block away is 
fine; sticking my tongue down 
his throat is definitely not fine. 
Depends on the situation: who I'm 
with and where. Obviously fucked up 
at a bar it’s not a big deal if you're 
groping and secret groping in public 
can be fun if it’s sneaky. But if you're 
with your partner's family or at a 
funeral or something then obviously 
hormones need to be kept in better 
control. 


MEN 


The way you touch your grandmother 
is how your grandmother should see 
you touching others. 

People are too uptight (North 
Americans much more so ... but 
in general about sex), but at the 


same time some exhibitionists 
push boundaries past comforta- 
bility for even liberal-minded 
people. | think people need to 
regulate themselves depending 
on the situation. 

ts all good, even if you go under the 
hood. Appropriate? No. Fun? Fuck 
yeah! 

Standing in front of me she'll 
reach back under my coat into 
my pants and give it a squeeze. 
In the mall or at a bus stop is the 
est. I'm always massaging her 
ass too. It's perfect. The parking 
lot blowjob was nice too. 

Public lovin’ is better than public 
fighting. 

! find anything beyond a light 
kiss on the cheek/peck on the 
lips to be a little unnecessary in 
public. 


t what point do you feel a public display of affection has reached its level of appropriateness? 


Full out pounding in public is a bit 
much. 

It is almost always 13-or 14-year- 
olds doing this in public, which 
is not attractive to me. | once 
enjoyed watching a young adult 
couple almost fuck each other at 
a bus stop. 

PDAs are always of interest, as gay 
men, we still feel we are NOT 
allowed the PDA time that is 
embraced by the str8 community. The 
younger generation is pushing the 
envelope and | am proud anytime | 
see a Same gender couple holding 
hands in public. In this province tie 
reality exists it’s not always a PDA 
issue, it's a safety issue. 

| feel like “hands in the shirt” 
and “hands in the pants” could 
have been two separate 
answers. 


Describe the latest thing you’ve experimented with. 


Garden grown cucumbers, baby 
Taking it in both holes at the 
same time 

Making our own pornography 
Really rough sex, being 
restrained and forced to perform 
sex acts. Quite exhillerating! 
The concept of lovers; friends with 
benefits. 


MEN 


Chronic Masturbation. 

My friend suggested | shave my 
ass—tried to imagine how the 
hell | would accomplish that 
with one wall mirror 

Anal toy. Suprisingly fun. 

Drugs 

| tried boobsex for the first time last 
week that was kinda wierd, although 
chin jabs where quite funny. | also 
ate out my partner when she was 
upside down with ice in my mouth. 
That was kind of wild. 


Anal with a vibrator while 
stoned (I'm a straight male) 

A six foot high tractor tire. 

A beer bottle. | DPed and double 
analed her without the help of 
another guy. I'm pretty talented. 
Cock rings 

Salvia divinorum 

Anal with my wife ... she didn’t mind 
it, but it wasn’t her favorite—I didn't 
feally enjoy it either 

Well fitting condoms—durex 
sensi-thin with a nominal width 
of 56mm 

Fisting 

Infantism 

Semi-polygamy 

Having anal sex with my girl- 
friend while she used a vibrating 
buttplug on me. Most intense 
feeling ever! 

Nipple clamps and hard bondage 
Toys, cross dressing 

Wife's electric toothbrush 


Cum on face or other body parts 
talking dirty with my parnter 
about them fucking someone 
else. 

Erotic literature—so much better 
than pornography. I'd prefer to imag- 
ine my partner in the story, rather 
than see someone | don’t know. 
Naked sailing ... pass the sunscreen 
please, yes ALL over! 

Poppers, piss play 

Going outside of my usual standards 
of what | find attractive in men. | 
hooked up with a guy much smaller 
than myself and it was kinda fun. 
That said, it still wasn't as exciting 
as the usual fun | have with other 
husky dudes. 

| built a dildo machine. Needs 
some work, but we both find it 
fun. 

Meet with other crossdresser for 
mutual fun 

Girl-on-guy strap-on fucking 


SEX IN THE CITY 


SEP.1] - SEP 17,2008 WUE WEEN 


A 


4 


Have you ever had to choose between 
love and great sex in a relationship? 


FS FG 
Yes 23% 29% 
No 77% 711% 


Fairly consistent results. We asked for stories of your love/sex grudge match. 


Here are the dirty details: 


ALL 


It's never gotten to the point of love 
unless there is great sex! 

I've slept with people that I've 
downright hated. It only lasts so 
long though. Then you need to 
move on. Some of the best sex is 
with people you hate though. 

| usually don’t stick around long 
enough to fall in love if the sex isn’t 
good. 

Great sex - | knew he was in 
love with someone else and 
could never love me like 
that...and | knew that though I 
did love him it wasn't “true” love 
(1 couldn't see myself marrying 
him). But our sex was fucking 
amazing. So we stayed together 
longer than we should have cuz 
the nookie was so good. | still 
miss that penis, and those cute 
egg-balls. 

Had an affair for the great sex, 
stayed with the boyfriend because 
the love was better and the sex can 


be improved over time. 

You cannot have love without 
random sex. Theres gotta be that 
“| would fuck you anywhere~ 
mentality. It wasn’t there so, 
after awhile, neither was I. 

Great sex. The love was loveless, it 
turned out. That was a bitch years 
ago though. 

Would not he in a relationship 
that didnt involve great sex. Or is 
it that | have great sex with any- 
one | love? Maybe a bit of both. 
Love. My wife was very inexperi- 
enced when we married. | loved her 
and felt she would make a great 
partner and that we would make 
amazing children together. She has 
gotten better and better over the 
years. 

The person I loved didn’t like sex 
very much. | went along as far as 
1 could, then ended up cheating, 
and we broke up shortly there- 
after. Not a lot of regrets, in the 
end. 


Guys, what do you do to delay the inevitable? 


Take a break, and quickly think about my 
favourite dog that died 

For me it’s the opposite—/ some- 
times take too long 

Think about baseball—it's very boring. 
Uh... |don't? 

Don't have the problem, apparently it is 
uncommon for males to stay hard after 
the “inevitable.” | manage to stand tall 
until it “inevitably” happens a second 
time, and then still, | stand tall for a 
while after. 

Cock ring, knowing what positions 
work 

Get my partner to get on top, there’s less 
sensation soi last a lot longer and its her 
favourite position to climax in so every- 
ones a winner. Going from sex to oral 
also delays the inevitable. 

Actually, | find myself having to 
accelerate the inevitable 

| dunno man, apologize after? 
Depending on what we're doing, 
focus on her 

Sometimes | want to cum right away, 
sometimes it takes a while. Anything 
I've tried to do in the past didn’t do any 
good neither of us want to fuck for hours 
anyways 

Switch positions. Pull out and cool 
off for a moment 

Take it like one of Beethoven's slower 
pieces ... make it slow and deep and 
save the pounding for the climax ... aver- 
age time about 14 minutes .. then 
repeat. 

Sometimes it doesn’t ever cum. 
Actually now that you ask it cums 
less then half the time | bang a 
woman. Maybe they're loose? But if 
1 have to slow down so to speak | 
just pull out and get her to go down 
on me because most women don't 
know how to do that properly to 
make me blow. 

Switch to giving oral for a bit while 
thinking of the fattest guy wearing a 
speedo ... ewwww! 

Think about plain cornflakes 

Please her, and try to get her in: the 
shower for it 

Pull out for a minute 

Change positions, change pace. As | get 


EDMONTON DATE NIGHT 


SPEED DATING. 


D 
N 


edmonton date night 


424-3253 


WWW. EDMONTONDATENIGHT.COM 


older I've learned fighting the good feel- 
ing is 4 crappy waste of time. | enjoy it 
as much as | can, as long as | can. Get 
her off with some dy-no-mite oral first 
and no delay is necessary—you're just 
evening the score! 

! slow down the pace, | concentrate 
on her more than me, and focus on 
calming down, while keeping her 
hot other ways 

Think of Whyte ave, keeps the mind off 
fulfillment. 

Slow it down! Or break to change 
positions, anything that doesn't 
make it obvious. 

| try to stop banging away for a while 
and maybe offer some oral attention 
Sometimes I'll bend a couple fingers 
to a point where i could almost 
break them and just focus on the 
pain. Yeah i know, that sounds 
kinda weird. 

If it's inevitable, how can one delay it? 
Just because you have an orgasm 
does not mean the night is over or 
for that matter you can't go for round 
two. 

What do you mean by inevitable? The 
melting of the polar ice caps? The sec- 
ond coming of Christ? 

! usually play music in my head. Or 
I'll wear a cock ring. Or both. 

| think of fat chicks, but | do them too 

| think of burning trees 

Usually have to take a break, and move 
south on my girlfriend. 

! sometimes tell her when to stop, or 
! will stop. Or 1 think of my Grandma 
The Fibonacci Sequence 

Have more of a problem cumming 
than not cumming. If | am not ready 
1 will usually stop momentarily or 
switch to giving oral to get my part- 
ner closer or off. 

change up the positions or start oral on 
them immediately! 

1 dont have that problem usually. 
Delay it? No let them have it. You can 
always ride them again in the middle of 
the night—nothing: like it being woken 
up by a drunken randy bitch raping ya, 
yes please. 

Slow down, change pace, or 


4h wwuev 


VEEKISY SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


SEX IN THE CITY 


change position. Put on a con, 
Thinking about un-sexy things ; 
usually a good way to kill the ej, 
boner, which is not the des;,,. 
effect. wa 
| haven't figured that one out, thin) 
dogs, or my mom 

Switch to some oral and some j,, 
Make her explode a couple times fi. A 
Quadratic equations 

| count, | think about anything other s), 
my current situation, and | pray to Ne 
that he gives me the strength to kee, 
truckin’ 

Back off, use a dildo in place y; 
penis for a while. 

Think about someone I'm not attiscr. 
to ... only for a few minutes 
Jerk it a few hours before or 4, 
slow to get over the hump. : 
Tighten the PC muscles, think 
work 

All about disassociation, Involve 
your mind in something else, by: 
then, you can lose some of the inti 
macy of the moment. 

Don't clench your butt-cheeks. When { 
inevitable happens the cheeks tigi 
keep the cheeks relaxed and you 
surprised how much longer you can 
out. 

1 don’t delay the inevitable. When it 
happens, it happens, and then you 
rest a bit and do it again! 

Spend time pleasuring the other persor 
Delay? Why? It takes at least an 
hour to get there, and five minutes 
later | want more. (Slut!) 

Pauses, slowing down, switching the 
position. 

Think about work or withdraw early 
have a mini orgasm (no ejac) and 
then good to go 

| usually have the opposite problem 
actually. 

Pull out, shift gears and do some- 
thing else for a while 

Nothing. | think there’s something \ 
with me. | can go for 12 hours 
cumming. Blowjobs and Handjobs |iave 
NEVER done it for me—EVER. The oniy 
thing that makes me cum is abo 
hour of hard sex. 


Tasi¢ 
the forbiden 
Fruil| 


WHEN: SUNDAY The 
WHERBAMOUINGPEAR CENTRE 


al TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT THE J 
A Shapes nt a SB Oe ViOaame (-O2WATION va 
U SOG 14971 FIAT. “Imag Y Ne ame 
2 ONLINE WWW.WINSPEARCENTRE.COM Wi LYN TS 
= TS 


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) 7 | INS modern rock VVEEKLY promi me rliiy STUDI \ | 5 ASSOCIATION prupents _speciaues 


Sep t= SEP17, 208 


What are your thoughts on prostitutioy 


ea Fat +te eg kre= * 
a 
bar G2 a = 
FS FG FB OMS MG oy 
it should be legalized > a 


completely 17% 43% = 29% 22% 27% = 365, 


It should be legalized 
but only inred light dis- 55% 29% 54% 58% 32% 5», 
tricts or brothels 


The laws we have 
should be more strictly 5% 14% 3% 9% 18% 0 
enforced 


We need tougher laws 2 
seainstit 13% 14% 9% 95% 5% 5%, 


The laws we have, and 
their level of enforce- 10% 0% 6% 7% 18% 0% 
ment, are adequate 


It seems everyone is okay with the oldest profession but, with the exception 
of gay girls, everyone believes it should be regulated. We are curious as to 
why the gay guys have come out so strongly against if? 


What should society do about incest 
between consenting adults? 


FS FG FB MS MG MB 
It should be legalized 8% 43% 11% 18% 14% 30% 


The laws we have should 5%, 
be more strictly enforced ee eae sh 


We need tougher laws = 


The laws. we have, and Pie te ; 
their level of enforce- 51% 42% 52% 57% 59% 4% 


ment, are adequate 3 a ; 


Rie ond 2 ys 
t ft 
Wow, this is a significantly touchier issue than prostitution, t that we didn! 
expect it to be. 6 ae Re 
~ 


*- 
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e 


“Ss = 
2) Se 


Ree 


48 \WUEWVEEKLY SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 SEX IN THE CITY 


“ 


ust trap you and 
and feeling 

ay cou Te Ld ner 
lover's arms. Theres noth- 
ing held in a pair of strong, 


on strong shoul- 


laugh, smile. Can you tell I'm a 
in?? 

arms. Manly hair ! 
lepends on the person. Brain first, 
t different physical attributes, 
ppending. Could be their eyes, their 
lemearior, their hands, the shape of 
eir lips. 
leck and hip. 
His erect cock!! 
That is hard because | am not 
with him right now so he 
n't sexy at all to me right now. 
hen | was happy with him, his 
st turned me on. His penis is 
e too. 
He's arms ... they have freckles ... 
igh 


Ig 2 

lis mischievious eyes 
Peeeeeenis. 

hows! 


3s—for guys. Legs—tfor girls 
Hip bones 
His tattoos or his BUM! 


t part of your partner’s anatomy do 
ider the sexiest? 


MEN 


Eyes, followed by Butt, and if they 
have sexy piercings those come in 
third, but make first and second that 
much better 
Breasts 
Her steaming eyes, 
Tie between just below hip 
bones and her beautiful ass 
Legs, stomach, lips 
Eyes, and hips 
Breasts and nippples 
My partner has the most amazing 
eyes. In the context of sex when 
she is enjoying herself they glaze 
over in pure pleasure, but still are 
connected with me emotionally. 
Smile, ass, intelligence 

face ...4 love coming on it... so 


No partner, but generally I'm an ass 
man 

Ass & back 

Shoulder/neck area. 

What “part* I'm the Christopher 
Columbus of body parts; every- 
where 

Breasts, chest, stomach, ass. In that 
order. 

Most of my partners have amaz- 
ing breasts and legs. 

Everything, | love her ass 

The crest of her pubic bone and 
her lower back and bum. Umm, 
and neck. 


What do you like to do after sex? 


LADIES 


Have a smoke, and* cuddle, my 
boyfriend loves to cuddle so there's 
lots of it 

Lay there and cool off, have a 
glass of water, cuddle, get him 
to make me cum again, cool off 
Some more and then pass out. 
sometimes we'll wander to the 
kitchen for a post-sex snack 
and on the very rare occasions 
we'll go for a walk or a drive to 
Denny's down the road. 

Go to the washroom. Cuddle and talk 
for a couple minutes, and then go 
back for round two 

Clean up 

| often get very very tired after cli- 
maxing and often take a nap or go to 
sleep, or do it again! 

Sleep. Snuggle. Stretch. Have 
mac and cheese. 

Pee 

Sit for a while and bathe in feel- 
ing like a kitten for a few min- 
utes. Then | like to get on with 
the day 

Cuddle, read love poems, fondle him 
Cuddle, which | know is cliche. 
Make banana boats over an open 
fire. 

Get on with my busy day. 
Spelunking 

Either sleep or take a shower. 
it's like going to the gym for an 
hour, it can work up a sweat and 
make you tired 

Talk about the state of the world, 
movies, life, sex ... etc 

Pee. In the toilet. Its a good 
cleanse. Then go make a wish 


on thé wet spot. 

Take a quick nap, smoke a Joint and 
do it again. 

Depends on the kind of sex, 
non? 

Cuddle for a few minutes (5-10 max) 
then sleep 

Relax in the glow of orgasmic 
bliss 

Try to get them to have sex again 


MEN 


Talk, massage (non-sexual), sleep .. 
Smoke cigarettes as we lie in 
each other's filth 
Smoke/talk/read/listento 
music/sleep/COOK—ok, | found my 
winner. 

Find some water to rehydrate 
wipe off my parts, walk around 
naked for a bit feeling like the 
king of the world then go back 
for more 

I'm usually pretty keyed up: some- 
times I'll wait for her to go to sleep, 
then jerk off to a favourite website 
Talk, then sleep. Go for a walk 
Pillow talk. Watch TV in bed. Have 
more 

Meditate, Have intense conver- 
sations, listen to music, bask in 
the afterglow, and fuck 

Relax, cuddle, then get on with the 
day 

Admire my handiwork as the 
months go by 

Sleep. And then take notes. | like to 
revisit the event like a tennis player 
watching game tape of his backhand 
to see how he can improve his 


stroke 

Have more sex. | can come two 
or three times with one hard on. 
Video games because she's so sore 
all over she can’t move to make me 
something to eat 

Eat her pussy out to cool down, 
then lay there and hold each 
other and mayhe fuck again. 
Raid the fridge. nothing like a PB+J 
after sex 

Eat chocolate and smoke ciga- 
rettes. Double-double too 
Depends on what time we have sex. 
| don’t mind passing out and cud- 
dling after sex, but | like it on my 
terms, too much doesn’t work for 
Me. sometimes it's nice to fuck, then 
chill for a bit have a smoke and a 
beer then fuck again. It all depe 
on who Im fucking. If it’s a fuck the 
whatever, if its someone im interest- 
€d in then chillin’, cuddling and a 
playing around after is good 

Have a drink to relax even more 
Cuddle up and wateh ty, talk, discuss 
the plans for the rest of the day 
relax, or ... start again 

Snuggle. Shower. Drink. 

Talk, drink, fuck again 

Cuddling. | love it almost as 
much as sex. Plus, good cud- 
dling sometimes leads to more 
sex 

Cuddle, go for a slurpee 

If it’s at night, sleep or read. If it’s 
earlier in the day then get back 
to work (1 work at home) 

Round 2 

Puff a joint ... makes the overall 
Satisfaction soooo relaxing 


~ 

=< — 
ca 
4 


= 


i Pa 
: | 


Photography: Francis Tetrault 
Location stylist: Renee Poirier M. 


Models: 
Alex 
Lisa 

Maxwell : 
Zsa Zsa 


Location: 29 Armstrong & 


Survey tabulated by: James Lyle 
Written by: James Lyle 


SEXIN THE CITY 


Girls, uninterrupted 


Mo & Jess Kill Susie kicks off NLT’s season of the strong female 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 
T= damsels will be in abundant 
supply this year at Northern 
Light Theatre—scattered 
across four plays, 13 of the 15 roles 
available are reserved for those 
boasting a pair of X chromosomes— 
but not the distressed type, who sigh 
and wait for their man to swoop in 
for the big rescue. Starting with Mo 
& Jess Kill Susie, Artistic Director 
Trevor Schmidt has crafted a season 
of theatre that has women tackling 
just as much centre-stage grit as their 
male counterparts usually do, a step 
away from the theatre roles Schmidt 
usually sees women stuck in. 
“There's always like 18 soldiers, 
and one nurse,” he laughs. “I think 
there’s always an abundance of 
male roles {in theatre], and women 
are often relegated to the girlfriend 
or the wife. And often, if you do find 
a show with two women or three 
women in it like this, I'm disappoint- 
ed that they always seem to be fight- 
ing Over a man.” 
A man isn’t the problem, or even 
a flesh and biood role, in Mo & Jess 
Kill Susie. The titular pair of femme 
fatales have their captive police- 
woman tied up in the bathroom of 
an abandoned building, waiting for a 
phone call to order her either dead 
or set free. But the call doesn’t 
come. Panic starts to creep in 
around them, and Mo & Jess takes a 


THU, SEP 11 - SUN, SEP 21 (8 PM) 


MO & JESS KILL SUSIE 
DVRECTEO BY TREVOR SCHMIDT 

WRITTEN BY GARY HENDERSOM 
STARRING AMANDA BERGEN, AY MARYS, 
LORA BAOVOLD 

THIRD SPACE (1154-19), $15-$20 


PREVUE 


violent turn. 

Though it may be out of the ordi- 
nary as far as female roles are con- 
cerned, according to Schmidt, the 
three actresses were almost a little too 
eager (o get raucous with each other. 

“What's kind of scary to me is 
how much [the actresses] enjoy the 
violence part of it,” he says. “It's 
really interesting: the play really 
explores ‘are women violent?’ and 
what drives women to violent action 
... and these chicks really like kick- 
ing each other in the face, and 
punching each other, and gun 
butting to the head and stuff like 
that. They're really into the stage- 
fighting; they don't get to do that 
very often.” 


MO & JESS is the second play in 
recent memory that Schmidt's 
plucked from New Zealand (the other 
was Cherish, last year's NLT season- 
closing heart-twister). It stood out 
from a few other scripts Schmidt 
received, based on a few guidelines 
he'd given to a playwright agent he'd 


5D \usSwwEenay . Se 14 ~ SEP 17,2008 


been in contact with: a smail cast 
with a predominance of women. 

However, like with Cherish, a few 
script alterations were necessary. In 
part, Mo & Jess examines the issues 
of the Maori people of New Zealand, 
an Aboriginal group most Canadians 
aren't particularly aware of. 

“It’s written for two Maori women 
and a white woman,” Schmidt 
explains. “We don’t get that Maori 
experience here, we don’t under- 
stand it. However, [the play] seems 
to really translate well to the [Cana- 
dian] Native experience.” 

Some small edits were made after 
an email conversation with the play- 
wright, and Mo & Jess was set for 
Canadian audiences. The switches 
Schmidt asked for were mostly cul- 
tural clarifiers but most of the play 
was left as is. The issues explored in 
the script weren’t what drew 
Schmidt in. 

“| could've done the play with three 
white women,” he says. “It’s still a 
good play. I never pick a play because 
the issue is right. I pick a play because 
I like the characters, and I like that 
story that happens to them. 

“That was something that I was 
really pleased about with this play,” 
he continues. "It explores poverty, 
and social class, race, and violence 
among women, but there’s no man. 
They aren't trying to be the girl- 
friend, the wife or the mother.” w 


Insomniac improv 


After 16 years, 53 straight hours 


of improvising becomes second nature 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 

ifty-three straight hours is a 
Presets amount of time to be 

awake for. To be performing 
improv for that amount of time is 
more ridiculous, but it's almost sec- 
ond nature to the core members of 
Die-Nasty now, set to perform their 
16th annual ode to insomnia and 
improy, the Die-Nasty Soap-A- 
Thon. 

In fact, it’s such a natural occur- 
rence that, for some company mem- 
bers, this won't even be the first 
several-day-spanning performance 
of the year. London had its very first 
improv-a-thon during the winter, 
lasting 50 hours and starring a num- 
ber of Die-Nasty members. The 
Edmonton company was, after all, 
the inspiration: the overseas copy- 
catting came about after renowned 
UK performer Kim Campbell sent 
some of his friends to attend and 
perform in last year's Soap-A-Thon. 
They raved back to Campbell, who 
then cooked up his own 50-hour 
extravaganza. 

“We never used the word ‘soap 
opera’ [over there]; it just means 
shit," says Dana Andersen, core Die- 
Nasty member and the director/ring- 
leader who guides the whole 
weekend's scenes. “We called it an 
improv-a-thon, but basically it was 
Die-Nasty.” 

Although Campbell's since passed 
away, there are future UK improv-a- 
thons on the horizon. But at the 
moment, Andersen's more con- 
cerned about his own approaching 
53-hour show. He missed most of 
last year’s Soap-A-Thon due to a 
death in the family, but he doesn’t 
seem worried about getting back 
into the sleepless groove; he’s done 
it plenty before, so he knows what to 
expect when the hours of conscious- 
ness start adding up. 

“The first couple of times is like 


FR SEP12-SUN SEP 4 
STY 


SOAP-A-THON 

DIRECTED BY OANA ANDERSEN 

STARRING FFE HASLAN, DAI i 
WARK MEER, BELA CORNISH Wh 
VARSCOMA THEATRE (1029-3) 10-0 


IMPROV 


taking some sort of weird drug: you 
didn’t Know what sleep deprivation 
is going to do,” Andersen explains 
“But now I know how it affects me 
and I know when I'm getting para 
noid or getting kind of cranky. You 
can see it coming from a long ways 
off, and do some things to make il 


easier for yourself.” 
THIS YEAR'S ioose plot—some kindof 
guidance for the madness—places 


the cast in Hawaii. - 

“We always try to find an excuse 
why we'd be up for 53 hours, lie 
explains. “So this year, we thought 
just a tropical Hawaiian vacation 4 
family going to Hawaii, just spending 
53 hours going through adventure 
and mayhem.” 

That setting is the only predcie™ 
mined performance point: the rest is 
up to Andersen (who directs, pic\'"8 
which actors begin what scenes). (N° 
actors onstage and the cataly''< 
effects of a sleepless weekend spe"! 
on stage. Some will sleep i 
won't. Either way, Andersen '00' 
forward to seeing how the hou! 
whittle away at the cast’s psyches 

“I've seen people go through what 
I call the stargate: it's when they 7 
ready to crash, and then they )¥°" 
lose all inhibition, and start spe?" 
in tongues, and then suddenly, 't al 
becomes clear to them, and he 
relax," he says. “Some peop!« "9" 
no problems. So it’s interes!" 
watch. I quite enjoy the proc** 
watching people go throug! 
weird sleep deprivation.” ¥ 


some 


ng Wo 


this 


lesque t eegetin! the city, no 
Rout »ed by the fact that their 
small ni e most people 
from ever a show. End- 
lessly associate: with their more 
explicit s—if they have even 
that much in common—the tongue- 
in-cheek humour and positive body 
image side of the troupes get ignored 
ore obvious: boobs—even 
burlesque typically 
provi F 


“actually had a’ "great uncle whose 
dying wish: 
daughter not get involved with the 
troupe; he dbestit care that she’s a 
smoker, but she can’t be a dancer,” 
says Meyer, who expresses frustration 
that most of the criticism comes from 
those who've never seen it. As she 


points out, sa am open mind 


= * 


o 


i ee 
NEW CTY SUBURAS (1087 JASPER AVE S10 


SH SEP 13M) 
BACK TO SCHOOL BUR- 
LESQUE 


PRESENTED BY LASCIVIDUS BURLESQUE 
UNION HALL (240-99 51), $10 


and a sense of humour is likely to 
become a fan from their first show. 
“We've never actually had trouble 
finding people who wanted to be in 


_the show. | think it's something fun 


and different for most people, and 
once they see it they understand that.” 


THAT'S CERTAINLY been the case for 
the girls at Capital City Burlesque. 
Grown from humble roots that includ- 
ed a lot of dancing in between rock 
bands, the group—lead by also-Wet 
Secrets Donna Ball and Kim Rackel— 
now boasts 10 dancers and puts on 
several raucous, well-attended shows 
a year, including their latest, Viva Las 
Vegas: A Titillating Tribute to Elvis. 
Though both say that they rarely 
run into the kind of troubles Meyer 
outlines—and again, usually only 
from those who have no idea what 


the troupe does—they do admit it . 


took some time and patience to get 
to that point. 

“Now that we've got a broader 
crowd, and that people know what 


«panel of ey 
members. Though 
en cae ight is chock full of 
g stories, Susan Hagan, the 
who started the Edmonton 
ory Slam almost three years ago, is 
cularly excited for this event, 
pits the best against the best. 
“They'te all fabulous writers,” says 
. “Is anyone’s game. The cali- 
eer going to be amazing.” 


er taal ists are a diverse group, 


we're up to, it’s calmed down,” says 
Ball, “but there was a time where it 
was like, an angry girlfriend telling 
her boyfriend, ‘You're not allowed to 
clap‘ and giving us sour looks.” 

“Really what did it for us was shows 
at the Roost, I think. Gay people totally 
love us. The gay are there for the 
synchronized leg kicks, and the gay 
women are there for the boobs," Rackel 
says with a trademark down-to-earth 
humour. “[Doing those shows] really let 
us expand and try other things, 
because they were really into it” 

Of course, the troupe has also made 
its own way: Ball and Rackel have 
travelled extensively to burlesque fes- 
tivals around North America, picking 
up tricks of the trade as they go along. 
It’s left them with very clear ideas 
about what works for burlesque and 
what doesn't, as well as an idea of 
their place in the broader culture. 

Even with more experience, though, 
Ball and Rackel say that essentially 
what it comes down to is enjoying 
themselves. That attitude helped them 
get through times when being a bur- 
lesque troupe wasn't quite so easy, and 
it has definitely made their recent suc- 
cess all the more enjoyable. 

“Honestly, this is basically the most 
expensive hobby I've ever had,” says 
Ball. “Sequins are our drug habit. If 
you could powder-ify rhinestones, I'd 
be snorting them. But it’s really just 
something we entirely enjoy doing.” 

“What were we calling it before?” 
adds Rackel. “I think it was, ‘feathers 
wrapped in boobs covered in glitter,’ 
or something like that. But yeah, 
that’s basically what it is to us." w 


include a poet (Rempel), a former 
minister now in his 80s (Wishart), 
and a relative newcomer to the Story 
Slam scene (Rudko), though all have 
proven themselves adept at the for- 
mat, which combines aspects of 
both writing—all stories, typically 
700 to 800 words, are written 
beforehand—and performing. And 
while that combination always 
proves potent, Hagan says that hav- 
ing a match for the finalists increas- 
es the intensity of the competition, 
and challenges the writers. 

“We're trying to fire people up, and 
it seems to be working,” she says. 
“When you end a season, there’s a 
new beginning. We're looking to take 
it to the next level.” 


AS PER USUAL, the performers are 


relying on the audience for more 


ARTS 


Rare breeds 


A platypus is the perfect metaphor 
for Edmonton’s misunderstood poets 


SAM VARTENIUK / varteniuk@vueweekly.com 
he website for the third annual 
Edmonton Poetry Festival 
features questions some of the 
attending poets have sent in. One of 
the more colourful participants asks, 
“| like to read my poetry whilst hold- 
ing a live platypus. I have a license 
for him and everything, I just need to 
make sure it’s OK to bring Percy to 
the festival.” 

{t doesn’t get much better than 
seeing live, local, experimental poets 
share their work as they wield an 
egg-laying, venomous, duck-billed, 
beaver-tailed, otter-footed mammal. 
And you can do precisely that from 
Sep 11 to 13 at various venues on or 
about Jasper Avenue. 

“We all learn about language from 
the time we're in our highchairs,” 
Says Alice Major, Edmonton's first 
Poet Laureate (now Emeritus) and 
the festival’s kingpin. “How it moves, 
sounds, refers to the world. It’s about 
participation, dialogue.” 

The festival is scaled down some- 
what from last year, when Edmon- 
ton Cultural Capital funding allowed 
the Stroll of Poets Society to pro- 
gram a full week of events, but 
Major is still happy for what she 
calls a “renewal of local energy." 
Participation ranges from the young, 
hip-hop faction to middle-aged 
poets who are only now coming out 
of the poetry closet. And while 
attendees will get to see plenty of 
local poets, they'll still be treated to 
a few established Canadian artists 
like Toronto's Christian Bok and 
Vancouver's Brendan McLeod 


than just moral support: prize 
money is collected from the sug- 
gested entrance donation of $5, 
which audience members pay 
when they attend the event. Get- 
ting the audience to support the 
slammers has rarely been a prob- 
lem, though: Hagan says that more 
than $400 was collected in June, 
and she fully expects the pot to 
double for the upcoming competi- 
tion, given the stakes. 

However, even with more at 
stake, Hagan expects the Grand 
Slam Off to retain its spirited-but- 
friendly aura. Though the Slam does 
pit contestants head to head, Hagan 
explains that the monthly challenge 
has become much more of a com- 
munity than a competition, with 
both audience members and story- 
tellers frequently returning. 


» SEP-11 = SEP 17, 2008 


THU, SEP 11-SAT, SEP 13 


MONTON 
POETRY FESTIVAL 
VARIOUS VENUES VARIOUS TIMES 
MSI EOMONTONPDETRYFESTVALCOM 
FOR FULL DETAILS 


THE STROLL OF POETS has worked hard 


to make poetry more accessible to a 
generation with an attention span 
measured in seconds. The Killer Blinks, 
which will kick off this year’s festival, 
features rapid-fire poetry: 60-plus poets, 
30 seconds at the microphone each, al! 
done to the beat of a live drummer. It 
may sound easy, but brevity and econo- 
my aren't easy things to master. 
“Poetry has a bad rap for being 
tired, old, confusing and making you 
feel stupid,” explains Major. “When I 
was Poet Laureate we'd do readings 


PREVUE 


_ for groups of Rotarians, business 


associations, city council. Afterwards 
many of them would say, ‘Thank 
heavens it wasn’t bad."” 

Major hopes to continue that kind 
of audience-broadening with the fes- 
tival. After all, we've all written a 
poem at some point in our lives, 
some intensely personal verse 
penned at 4 am, rich with simile, 
alliteration and pathetic fallacy 
We've all stumbled across those 
poems years later in some deep, dark 
recess of our lives and winced at our 
furtive fumbling toward eloquence. 
But now is our chance to see a few 
brave souls with the courage to read 
that stuff out loud 

And potentially to-see the world’s 
only egg-laying mammal. v 


“It’s this really fun, inspiring event 
that invites people to come out and 
share their stories. We have gotten so 
many different, creative people out. 
We see familiar faces each time, but it 
also reaches out beyond the circle 
every month,” she says. “It has its 
own energy, and everybody makes 
sure it keeps going.” - 

Hagan admits that she’s felt that 
kind of vibe ever since starting the 
Slam back in February of 2006, 
inspired by a similar event she 
used to attend when she lived in 
Vancouver. ~ 

“From the moment we started it, it 
was magic. It’s a free space, a place 
where you can take off your mask, 
and it got people coming back and 


* excited,” she explains. “You don't 


have to a persona to be init. It's a 
community, not a club." w 


wueweexy 51 


- Vérité du cinéma 


< | HOPSCOTCH 
CO | hopscotch @vueweekt.com 


Walker Percy's The Moviegoer, first 
published in 1961 and set in New 
Orleans, begins with protagonist Binx 
Bolling visiting his aunt. She gives him 
some bad news, and his internal 
response to this is conveyed to us, unen- 
cumbered by what would seem to be 
required exposition, through his first-per- 
son narration: 

“She squeezed me tighter than ever. 
“Scotty is dead. Now it's up to you. It's 
going to be difficult for you but | know 
you're going to act like a soldier.’ This 
was true. | could easily act like a soldier. 
Was that all | had to do? 

“It reminds me of a movie | saw last 
month out by Lake Pontchartrain ... ” 

No information about who Scotty even 
is gets in the way of this, and the descrip- 
tion of the experience of going to the 
movie near Lake Pontchartrain is much 
longer and more evocative—more impor- 
tant—than Binx’s grave meeting with the 
family member to which he’s closest. The 
unnamed movie is about an amnesiac 
who loses his whole life as it once was, 
but then starts a new one which actually 
seems pretty good. But Binx is just as 
interested in recalling his conversation 
with the proprietor of the cinema after- 
wards, because Binx, avid moviegoer that 
he is, cannot even enter a theatre until he 
knows something about the theatre itself 
or the people who operate it. His experi- 
ence of the movies is obsessively holistic, 
not a plunge into the fictive world on 
screen but a sought-after sense of aware- 
ness that can only be summoned up by 
taking in both the movie and his place 
within it as viewer: 

“ __. it'was here in Tivoli that | first dis- 
covered place and time, tasted it like okra 
It was during a rerelease of Red River a 
couple of years ago that | became aware 
of the first faint stirrings of curiosity about 
the particular seat | sat in, the lady in the 


ticket booth ... As Montgomery Clift was 
whipping John Wayne in a fist fight, an 
absurd scene, | made a mark on my seat 
arm with my thumbnail. Where, | won- 
dered, will this particular piece of wood be 
20 years from now, 543 years from now?” 

There's another fascinating moment 
where Binx describes going to a screen- 
ing of Panic in the Streets, which was 
filmed on location in New Orleans, and 
recognizing the very street outside the 
theatre on screen. This experience grants 
Binx's home place a sense of “certifica- 
tion.” By seeing a movie which shows his 
neighbourhood, it becomes possible “to 
live, for a time at least, as @ person who 
is Somewhere and not Anywhere.” 


I'D ARST HEARD of The Moviegoer while 
reading The Ongoing Moment, Geoff 
Dyer's wonderfully associative book about 
photography published just a few years 
ago. Dyer proposes that Binx sees the 
world, specifically its objects, as though 
through William Eggleston's camera, cit- 
ing a moment in The Moviegoer where 
Binx is getting dressed one morning and 
is arrested by a sudden awareness of the 
objects he’s placing in his pockets. As a 
Southemer approaching his 30th birthday, 
a man whose sole talent, by his own 
admittance, is making money—or as he 
puts it, “selling mutual funds to widows 
and dagos"—a man who even when 
speaking to the reader in this private, 
interior voice, describes himself, rather 
hilariously, as someone deeply pleased by 
acts of perfect conformity, Binx’s sole 
access to his soul's true yearnings arise 
only from such moments as the ones in 
the theatre in Tivoli or when he fills his 
pockets with items, moments during 
which some hidden light is cast upon the 
mundane, filling it with some glowing 
presence. These moments, he tells us, 
remind him of something he calls “the 
search,” something that first struck him 
when he was injured years ago some- 
where in “the Orient,” something which 
“anyone would undertake if he were not 
sunk in the everydayness of his own life.” 
An everydayness Binx, in his schizo- 


vay 


Fal 


Pry ‘ | 


phrenic manner, is carefully cultivating. 

This tension between perfecting con- 
formity and feeling the grip of “the 
search” reminded me not of a movie but 
of another book ... about movies. James 
Harvey's Movie Love in the Fifties, a 
somewhat loghorrretic but in many ways 
deeply satisfying study of precisely what 
the title implies, draws us into the psy- 
chology of the postwar American dream 
life, where the props of reality took on 
more cinematic qualities. He describes 
military training in the "50s this way: 

“ ... the traditional sort of ‘war games’ 
they put us through in basic training, with 
gas masks and bayonets and live ammo 
going off just above our heads, felt like 
some historical re-enactment, as unreal 
as playing cowboys and Indians again... ” 

Harvey zeroes in on the strange dia- 
logue between the faux-optimism of post- 
war ideology and the movies, American 
movies, the ostensible propagandic vehi- 
cles of this ideology. 

Binx, presumably, given this un-articulat- 
ed experience in “the Orient,” has actually 
been a soldier, yet it's revealing that he 
reassures us that for his aunt he can “act 
like 2 soldier.” Did the movies teach him 
how? | finally got around to reading The 
Moviegoer this past week because | 
thought it would be a good thing to read 
while in the thick of the Toronto Intemation- 
al Film Festival. It's interesting, then, to find 
Percy's book, so exacting in its invoking of 
sense of place—far ahead of the academic 
study of the phenomena—is very much 
about the way that movies are not just 
escapism, nor, obviously, just a source of 
knowledge and understanding of self and 
the world, but are somehow both at once 
There are moments in the novel when Binx 
makes it sound like he goes to the movies 
to idle away the hours between work, dat- 
ing his secretaries or socializing pleasantly 
with his family. Yet it seems that the movies 
in their subliminal way are cumulatively 
conspiring against such pacification—they 
are thrusting him back into “the search.” 
And for this reason, The Moviegoer may 
just be required reading for all of us addict- 
ed to the hovering rectangle of light. w 


Ly 


NEW PORTRAITS OF THE PAST BY 
CONTEMPORARY ABORIGINAL ARTISTS 


K.c. ADAMS 


; LORI BLONDEAU 


ty 
4 
i} 


52 =U WEEKLY SP 11 - SP 17,2008 


DANA CLAXTON 
TERRANCE HOULE 
MARIA HUPFIELD 
KENT MONKMAN 
ADRIAN STIMSON 
JEFF THOMAS 


Dana Claxton, Baby Boy Gotta indion Horse, 2008. 
Digital Print. 60 x 48° 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA 
Enterprise Square, 100 - 10230 Jasper Ave | Edmonton AB 
115) 4P6 | 780.422.6223 | www.artgalleryalberta.com 


fens eee ce Qe WU EWEEKLY 


ARTS 


You Pecha 


Rapid-fire lectures take aim at youth 


DAVID BERRY / david@vuewoekly,com 
i ou can hope to improve 
around it, | think, but you're 
never going to get rid of it; 
it’s just too catchy.” For someone so 
resigned to the inevitable, civil engi- 
neer Christian Nelson sounds quite 
upbeat. He certainly seems the type 
who holds a make-lemonade attitude, 
at least if the title of his upcoming lec- 
ture at the second Pecha Kucha 
night of talks is any indication. His 
subject: reclaiming the word “Dead- 
monton.” "With something like that, 
the better way to do it is to attack it 
and make it your own.” 

Specifically, Nelson thinks we 
should take back one of our city’s 
most notoriously insulting pseudo- 
nyms by holding a festival, ideally 
centred around Halloween—he was 
unaware of the already-titled horror 
film fest, but would be happy to 
incorporate it—that turns Deadmon- 
ton into a mark of pride 

Nelson's idea cuts to the quick of 
what an event like Pecha Kucha—and, 
by extension, the night's organizing 
body, the City Council-sponsored 
NextGen initiative—is all about. Not 
making the best of a bad situation, 
exactly, but rather figuring out how to 
make Edmonton an attractive place 
for young people, often by giving them 
a different perspective on a place they 
thought they knew. 


PECHA KUCHA—which roughly trans- 
lates to “chit chat” in Japanese—is an 
event that brings together a vareity of 
presenters from around the communi- 
ty, who each have less than seven min- 
utes to present an idea. Ranging from 
Nelson's reclamation to video game 
controller design to public art, the aim 
is to stimulate discussion about the 
things that members of the community 
already hold dear to their heart. 
Thursday's event will be only the 


Christophe Jivraj 


Kt | THU SEPT 

= | PECHA KUCHA 2 

2 | pneseare a orca 

CL | TRANSALTAARTS BARNS (10330 - 64); 


second version of the mini-lec;,,, 
night in Edmonton, but it alreay 
a strong base to build on: de 
admissions from organizers tha 
had no idea what the reactior 
be, more than 300 people attendeq 
first iteration. 

"That was really affirming, becays, 
we're always saying, ‘Of course })). 
are a million great things going on in 
Edmonton ... right?” laughs Elicjs 
Elliott, a member of the NextGen 
committee and one of the eve, 
organizers. “So it was nice to see {hat 
that was actually true.” 

As a recent arrival from Toronto 
Elliot has experienced first-hand j\\: 
NextGen’s work has increased {h 
sense of community around Edmon 
ton’s younger generation. Still, she re: 
ognizes that, So far, they've really only 
managed to speak to a narrow der 
graphic: “Young, educated profession 
als who are wealthy, usually married 
and home owners,” as she puts it 

As such, she hopes that the se: 
ond Pecha Kucha—which, by iis very 
nature, is a broad undertaking wit 
lot of different things to say—will 
appeal not only to more people, but 
a wider range of them, as well 

“In terms of making an impac 
the community, | think we're doing 
really well in preaching to the chc 
but in terms of an entire comn 
in terms of our mandate, | don’t think 
we're there,” Elliot says frankly. “We're 
addressing that, and we're looking 
forward to trying different things, but 
we haven't realized our full potential 
yet by any means, and I hope an event 
like [Pecha Kucha] can help us reach 
more people each time.” 


nit 


THE SWIMMERS 


September 12 
Te} (0) 01-1 am i a4) 0) 3] 


Opening Friday, 
September 12 
7-10pm 


Artist Talk Saturday 


September 13, 1pm 


3rd Floor Gallery 


Harcourt House Arts Centre 


780.426.4180 


10215 - 112 Street 
Edmonton, AB, Canada 
harcourthouse — www.harcourthouse.ab.ca 


WEEKLY 


MPET DANCESPORT TEAM 
(iesiniant 1018-97 St (780-966-9285) + 
the Annwal Gata and Fundraiser © Sat, 
Sept 8 
The Landing Pad, 201, 10923-101 
mee aver ibernredance,com * MZ0 
iouse/Season Launch * Sept. 13 (1-3pm) « Free 


GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


GALLERY 12310 Jasper Ave (780- 

Tue-Sat 1fam-Spm * ACQUA ALTA 
Kel , BC based artist Jane Everett 
® (pening reception: Sat, Sept. 13 (2~4pm) 
ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10186-106 St (780-488- 
6611) ® ELEMENTAL CONNECTIONS: An Exhibition of 
Sustainable Craft; until Sept. 27 7 
AUDAESEENCE: New ceramic works by Candice Ring; 
Until Oot. ¥ 


BEAT 26 St Anne Street, St Albert (780-459-3679) 
we by Randy Hyashi * Until Sept. 20 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA Enterprise Square. 100, 
10230 Jasper Ave (780-422-6223) * Open Mon-Fri 
{0,Qamebpm; Thu 10:30am-8pm (4-8pm free); Sat-Sun 
\iom-Spm. © WORKS OF A RENAISSANCE MASTER: 
THE PRINTS OF ALBRECHT DURER: Until Noy. 2 * FACE 
THE NATION: Artworks by eight Aboriginal artists from 
across Canada whose works address issues of history, 
fepresentation and identity, until Sept. 21 * AEAL 
Abstract ots by loca artists; until Sept. 21 * 
CDMONTON: IED: Curated by Amy Fung; until 
Nov. 2.* Free (members); $10 (adult}/$7 |senior/stu- 
dent}, $5 (6-12yrs)/free (Syrs and under)/$20 (family—2 
adults, 4 children! 


Artworks 
Sept. 13+ 


ARTSHAB STUDIO GALLERY 3rd Fi, 10217-1065 St 
(720-439-9532/780-423-2966) © open Thu 58pm, or by 
appointment * New work by ArtsHab Artists 


CANADA PLACE 2nd FI, 9700 Jasper Ave (780-426- 
4035) © Paintings by Bruce Allen, Frances Alty Arscott, 
Barb Brooks, Joseph Drapell, and others 


CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS COFFEEHOUSE 9351 
118 Ave (780-495-3499/780-474-9961) * Artist Trading 
Cards at The Carrot © Every 2nd Sat of the month 
(12:30-3:30pm); wwew.thecarrot.ca 


CENTRE D'ARTS VISUELS DE ALBERTA 9103-95 
Ave (780-481-3427) © Mon-Fri 10am-6pm; Sat 10am- 
5pm * TRANSCENDENCE Artworks by Louise Rae, 
Stephen ical Annette Ayre, Suzenne Gaultier and 
Louise Madeleine Cormier, until Sept. 17 ¢ Artworkrs by 
Jeannine Chalifoux, Thérase Bourassa, Urmilla Zdenka 
Oas and Caroline Dion: opening: Sept. 19 

CHRISTL RED GALLERY 9621 Whyte 
Ave (780-498-1984) * Open Man-Fri 11am-5pm ¢ 
Summer Salon and Sale * Until October 


COMMON SENSE 10546-115 St (780-482-2685) » 
Open by appointment, or dail eee © THE IMPOR- 
TANCE OF WHAT WE CARE 2g UT; Watercolours and 
gouaches by Franklin Einspruch © Until Sept. 28 


CROOKED POT GALLERY 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain 
(780-963-9573) * Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm * BOTTOMS 
UP ON SUMMER: Drink ware by award winning potters 
* Through September 


DELTA SOUTH HOTEL Lobby, 4404 Gateway Blvd (780- 
426-4035) ¢ Atworts HG DeJager, Kath " 
Sherman, Elaine Berglund and Audrey Pfannmuller 


sole rn etd 
f 8 . - 
tion: Sat, Sept: 20 (eapal be gel 


ELECTRUM DESIGN STUDIO AND GALLERY 12419 
Stony Plain Rd (780-482-1402) « fest Tue by appoint- 
ment; Wed-Fri 11am-5:30pm; Sat'11am-4pm; closed 
Jong weekends * COLLECTION 2008: New works by 
various artists 


FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY Room 1-1, Fine Arts 
Building, 112 St, 89 Ave (780-492-2081) © Open Tue- 
Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 2-5pm * DESIGNING THI 

CENTENARY AND AGAVE: A Portfolio of prints to com- 
memarate 100 years © Until Sept. 27 © Opening recep- 
tion: Sept. 11 {7-10pm) 


FRINGE GALLERY Paint Spot basement, 10618 Whyte 
Ave (780-432-0240) * John, Mark, Peter and Paul 
Freeman * Through September 


GALLERY AT MILNER-STANLEY A. MILNER 
UBRARY Main Fi, Sir Winston Churchill Sq (780-496- 
7030} * Open Mon-Fri Sam-Spm, Sat 9ai ; Sun 1 
Spm © RIDE OF THE CENTURY. Edmonton Transit 100 
‘years, historic photographs and artifacts ® Until Sept. 30 


GALLERY 1$ 4930 Ross St, Red Deer (403-341-4541) « 
ENCHANTED 8Y THE SEASONS: Jewellery designs by 
Elizabeth Ferchuk * Until Sept. 27 


HARCOURT HOUSE 10215-112 St (780-426-4180) « 
Open Mon-Fri 10am-5Spm; Sat 12-4pm * Main Space: 
THE SWIMMERS: Video installation by Francophone 
artist Christophe Jivraj; Sept. 12-Oct 11 © Frost 
Room Gallery: (CAVAL Black and white paintings of 
crows by Shantael Sleight * Opening receptions: Fri, 
Sept_ 12 (7-10pm), artists in attendance © Artist talks: 
Sat, Sept. 13 (1pm) 


JEFF ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place Senior 
Centre, 10831 University Ave (780-433-5807) * Open 
Mon-Fri Sam-4pm # INSTRUCTORS SHOWTIME 
Artworks by the instructors for the upcoming fall/win- 
ter session; until Sept. 25 


JOHNSON GALLERY (NORTH) 1117-80 St (780-479- 
8424) Open Tue-Fri 9:30am-5:30pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm © 
Artworks by various artists * Through September 


JOHNSON GALLERY (SOUTH) 7711-85 St (780-465- 
6171) * Open Mon-Fri Sam-Spm; Sat 10am-5pm * 
Artworks by various artists * Through September 


KAMENA 5716 Calgary Tr S (780-944-9497) © Mon- 
Wed, Fri Tareoiy Thu 10am-7pm, Sat 10am-Spm * 
Featuring artworks by local and international artists 
home décor and gift items 


LATITUDE 53 10248-106 St (780-423-5353) * Open 
Tue-Fri enya Sat noon-5pm * Main ¢ The 
two Gullivers: Flutura and Besnik Haxhillan; Sept. 19- 
Oct. 18; opening fepestion Fri, Sept. 19 (8pm) * Active 
Citizens Television (ACTY): first series of youth-pro 
duced environmental videos and launch of their interac- 
tive website www.getACTV.ca; and DJs and musical 
entertainment; Fri, Sept. 12 (6-11pm) 


LOFT GALLERY A. J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 
Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park (780-998-3091/457 
7356) * Open Thu 5-Spm, Sat 10am-4pm * 
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 08 SHOW: Artwarks by Willie 
Wong, Dianna Sapara, Janet Kraemec Sonja Mannoske, 
Tony Goobie, Janice Bonsant-Wilson and Margaret 
Klappstein * Sept-Oct 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St 
(780-407-7152) * Open Mon-Fri 10am-8pm,; Sat-Sun 1 
Bpm © FORM UNFOLDING: Arworks by members of the 
Sculptor’s Association * Until Oct. 25 


MGPAG 5411-51 St, Stony Plain (780-963-2777) * Open 
Mon-Sat 1Qam-4pm; Sun 10am-5:30pm # TIME PAS: 
SAGES: Paintings by Beverly Bunker * Until Sept. 23 


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES-JASPER a Park Lodge 
Wwww.mountaingalleries.com (780-852-5378) « Open 
daily * Artworks by Diane Way 


IMUNAN GALLERY 10048-1014 Ave, Rice-Howard 
Way/Scotia Place, Ring 206 (780-755-7396/780-429-3498) 
© ART THAT TRANSCENDS: Oil paintings, sculptures, 
multimedia, doll houses and tribal masks * Until Oct. 15 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 Ste Anne Street, St 
Albert (780-459-1528) DINO DEN: Tue-Sat (11am-3pm} 


NAKED CYBER CAFE 10354 Jasper Ave * COLLAPSING 
COLONIES: Featuring works by the Beate Collective, 
Featured for the North of Nowhere Expo * Until Nav. 1 
NINA HAGGERTY STOLLERY GALLERY 9704-111 A\ 
(780-474-7611) * Open Mon, Wed, Fri 9:30am-2. 20pm: 
‘Tue. Thu 9:30-4pm, 6:30-8:30pm * CAP: Project Greed 
and other work ® Until Sept. 26 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 10193-112 St (780- 
452-0285) © Open Tue-Sat 1iam-Spm © VIOLET OWEN. 
eee ‘artworks in paint, charcoal, sculpture and bas 
relief * Sept 11-24 * Opening reception: Thu, Sept. 11 
{7-Spm); artist in attendance {i1am-5pm) 

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 2 12304 Jasper Ave, 
www. probertsongallery.com (780-455-7479) * Open 
Tue-Sat Us * GROUP SHOW: |ncluding art- 


works by Clay Ellis, James Lahey, Beth Pederson, Alice 
Teichert and others 


PORTAL GALLERY 300, 9414-91 St (780-702-7522) « 
LOST AND FOUND: Marcie Rohr, anwarks focusing on 
childhood © Until Sept. 12 7 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 15 Perron St, St 
Albert (780-460-4310) * Open Tue-Sat (10am-5pm), Thu 
{10am-8pm) * GUILDED: Artworks by Susan Casault, 
Joanna Dummond, Audry Hewlett, and others * Until 
Sept. 27 « ArVentures: Play with Clay: Sat, Sept. 20 (1- 
4pm) for children 6-12 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA 8555 Roper Ad 
(780-427-1750) ¢ Open: Tue-Sat Sam-4:30pm, Wed 
Sam-Spm ¢ OOCUMENTING ALBERTA: Photographs of 
Alberta landscapes from the Public Affairs Bureau * 
Sept. 17-Dec. 1 


ROWLES AND COMPANY LeMarchand Mansion, 1 
11523-100 Ave (780-426-4035) ® Paintings by Frances 
various artists; glassworks by Prairie Isle Glass Works 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 1 2845-102 Ave (780-453. 
9100) * Open daily 9-5pm © House: 
Public tours Sat and Sun and statutory hols {ist 
4:30pm); ph 427-2281 info * exhibition 
DRAGONS: BETWEEN SCIENCE AND FICTION: Artifacts 
from museums and private collections from around the 
world: until Sept. 14 * LOST SHIP RECOVERED 
VOYAGES. THE EMPRESS OF IRELAND: Artifacts sal 
vagjed from the wreck of the Empress af Ireland; until 
Oct. 5 * Front Terrace: The North Edmonton Sculpture 
Workshop presents Pater Hide at The Ram, Until Oct. 5 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St (780-488-3619) * Open 
Tue-Sat 10am-5pm * EARTHBOUND: Abstract paintings 
by Arlene Wasylynchuk # Until Sept 23 


SNAP GALLERY 10309-97 St (780-423-1492) * Open 
Tue-Sat 12-5pm * LOVE THOSE CLOTHES YOU WEAR 
2008: Fundraiser, silent auction: Sat, Sept. 13 (7-1 1pm) 


UGHT GALLERY 107, 25 Chisholm Ave, St 
Albert (780-419-2055) # ARTISTS IN ACTION: Members 
of the new St. Albert Artists Colony creating artwork 
on location that will be added to the exhibit in the 
gallery; until Sept. 15 © St Albert Artists Colony: ist 
annual fall open studio; Sept. 20-21 (12-4pm) 


SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY 35-5 Ave. Spruce 
Grove (780-962-0664) * OPEN ART COMPETITION: 
opening reception: Sept. 12 ® Seniors Art Show; Sept 
20; opening reception: Sept. 27 


STEE PS URBAN TEAHOUSE 2411 Stony Plain Rd * 
PAINTINGS OF DOG; By Father Douglass * Through Sept 


STRATHCONA COMMUNITY LEAGUE 101 39-87 Ave 
(780-986-1067) * Edmonton Weavers’ Guild open house 
featuring weaving and spinning demonstrations and dis- 
plays * Sat, Sept. 13 (Sam-2pm) 


STUDIO GALLERY 11 Perron St (780-460-5993); 143 
Grandin Park Plaza, 22 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St 
Albert (780-460-5990) pat Thu 12-8pm, Fri 10am- 
6pm, Sat 1Gam-5pm * COLOUR, WET PAINT: Featuring 
oi! paintings, watercolours, drawings and mixed media 
artworks by a variety of artists 


SUN AND MOON VISIONARIES GALLERY AND 
STUDIO 12225-107 Ave « Open Tue-Fri 10am-Spm, Sat 
noon-5pm * NANABOZHO=THE TRICKSTER RABBIT. 
Jason Carter's Senes of stone carvings and paintings * 
Opening reception: Sept 12 (7pm) 


SUN LIFE BUILDING Lobby, 10123-99 St (780-426. 
4035) © Paintings by Bi Y. Cheng 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St (780-452- 
9100) ¢ Wired to Win: MAX film. Also playing in IMAX 


ARTS 


Human Body- Dinosaurs Alive! ¢ BODY WORLDS 1: The 
Original Exhibition of Real Human Bodies: {eature exhib- 
it * IMAX films: Coral Reef Adventure; Wired to Win: 
Human Body; Dinosaurs Alive!, daily * Dawn of the 
Space Age; Margaret Zeidler Star Theatre; daily 


TU GALLERY 1718-124 St (780-452-9664) © Furniture 
design works by Ralph Reichenbach * Sept. 13-Oct. 11 
* Opening reception: Sept. 13 (12-4pm) 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA MUSEUMS GALLERY A 
TELUS Centre, 87 Ave, 111 St (780-492-5834) © BRILLIANT 
STROKES: Chinese Paintings from the Mactaggart Art 
Collection representing the styles in China from 15th to 
20th centuries * Sept 18Jan. 24, 2009 

WAAA GALLERY 3rd Fl, Harcourt House, 10215-112 St 
(780-421-1731) ® Mon-Fri 10am-4pm; Sat 12-4pm « 
TRANSFORMED TEXTILES: Works fy members of the 
Hand Weavers, Spinners and Dyers of Alberta * Sept. 11- 
Oct. 11 © Opening reception: Thu, Sept. 11 (7-9:30pm) 
WEST END GALLERY 12308 Jasper Ave (780-488-4892) 
* FALL IN THE CHARLEVOIX: Featuring artworks by Bruno 
Coté, Guy Ray, André Turenne and others * Sept. 13-30 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Foyer of Rutherford Library 
{South} © Book display of Portuquese-Lanquaae 
Collections * Part of Brazil Week © Until Sept. 11 * 
Www. humanities.ualbarta.ca/mics/ 


WORLD TRADE CENTRE 9990 Jasper Ave (780-425- 


4035) * Paintings by Keith Nolan; soapstone and lava 
rock sculptures by Mark Totan 


LITERARY 


ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave * Revenge of the Killer 
Blinks, 30 second snapshot poems hosted by Anna 
Marie Sewell featuring rapid-fire poetry; Thu, Sept. 11 
{6:30pm door, 7pm show) * Insomnicidal Kleptomania 
Poetry Sound hosted by Trisia Eddy; Fri, Sept. 12 (6:30pm 
door) * The Leviticously Deutronomous Finale: featuring 
the Raving Poets Band, hosted by Michael Gravel; Sat. 
Sept. 13(8-10pm) * Part of the Poetry Festival 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave (780-469-8755) © 


Story Slam: the Grand Slam Off for 2008 © Sept. 17 (and 
evary third Wed of the month) 


CITY ARTS CENTRE 10943-84 Ave (780-932-4409) » 
TALES. Monthly Storytelling Circle: Tell stories or 
come to listen * Sept. 2008-June 2009 (8pm) « 
Admission; $3, first time free 


ENTERPRISE SQUARE Main Floor Atrium, 10230 
Jasper Ave * Book launch of Ai! True Things, author 
signing, website demonstrations, live jazz by the 


University of Alberta Saxophone Quartet * 
(7pm) 
HULBERT'S 7601-115 St (780-495-1161) * The Olive 


Poetry Reading Series: Featuring Mary Pinkoski; open 
mic to follow * Tue, Sept. 16 (7pm) 


JASPER PLACE LIBRARY 9010-156 St * Ted Bishop, 
author reading and presentation * Wed, Sept. 17 * Free 


JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB 1209-100 Ave * The 
Hoedown Smackdown Poetry Sweatshop: 90 minutes of 
writing, booze, and riding crops hosted by Jadon Rempel 
# Sat, Sept. 13 (4:30-Gpm) © Part of the Poetry Festival 


STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq 
* Edmonton Reads: One City-One Book featuring Riding 
with Rilke: Reflections on Motorcycles and Books by Ted 
Bishop; Thu, Sept. 11 (11am) ¢ Edmonton Reads 
Adventure Ink: ed Bishop, presentation and talk based on 
Riding with Rilke: Reflections on Motorcycles and Books, 
Thu, Sept. 18 (7pm); free nay Milner Library 
Theatre: Book launch of the collection of essays in The 
Story That Brot re: To Alberta From Everywhere 
edited by Linda ri, Sept. 19 (7:30pm) 


STEEPS—OLD GLENORA © Spoken word open mic * 
1st Thu every month * Contact Adam Snider to sign up: 
Adam.snider@gmail.com 

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Tory Breezeway | * Poetry 


and music recital featuring Clara Munoz (Oswald de 


ue, Sept. 16 


Andrade), Pedro Munhoz (Carlos Drummond de 

Andrade}, Nicolas Mendoza (Manuel Bandeira), followed 
by Bossa Nova and MPB class 
Dissonante © Part of Brazil Wi 
UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909 
The Poets’ Haven: Monday 
ed by Stroll of Poets; every Mon ni 


LIVE COMEDY 
CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS COFFEE HOUSE 


118 Ave. ww 
Improv Troupe © Fi 
COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Gat Bou! 780 
46 ie Killstein; Si if 


© Tim Pulr 


6 Bourbon S 


t Thu of 


COMIC STRIP | 


THEATRE 


ALIEN CREATURE: A VISITATION FROM 
GWENDOLYN MACEWEN Aint 


om) exc 
until mid 


PRAIRIE” Jubilat 
Phase Ill, West & 


DIE-NASTY SOAP-A-THON \ 
83 Ave (780-43 sw die: 
non-ste 


turing the 


women wait in the 
building for a life-or-death pn 
Sept. 11-21 (8prr 
pening night/$20 
ior); Pay-What-You-Can Wedne 
preview night is free for stu 


PRIDE AND PREJUDICE Cit 
9828-101A Ave (780-425-18: 
Tom Wood, based on the 
20-Oct. 12 (7:30pm, 1:30pm 
able at the Citadel box office 
THEATRESPORTS D 
(780-448-0695) w idfiretheatre. 
Theatre's wee e improv show * ep 
runs every Fri (11pm) until the end of July 2009 


WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF Timms Centre 
for the Arts, Main Stage, 87 Ave, 112 St, U of A 
wwwstudiotheatre.ca * Studio *B 
Albee, directed by Rob Moffat 
27 (7:30pm, 12:30pm matinee: 
TIX on the Square 


dult)/$1 
night 


cona Theatre, 1f 


available at 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


pm 


¢ 


is 


io~ 


$ 


FILM 


Light Reading 


Coen Brothers’ latest skims the surface 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 

ook-ended with zooms in and 
B= of Washington from outer 

space and scenes in windowless 
rooms and hallways somewhere deep 
within CIA headquarters full of essen- 
tially hapless, incoherent, bumbling gov- 
emment employees casually making life 
and death decisions, Burn After Read- 
ing isn’t exactly what you might call 
satire. The ostentatious placement of 
the nest of American intelligence in 
what’s made to feel here like the centre 
of the universe might give us reason to 
panic if writer/directors Joel and Ethan 
Coen were very interested in learning 
something about how the CIA works, or 
even had anything to say about it, how- 
ever broadly critical. But this isn’t that 
sort of movie, which may be all for the 
best. What we get instead is the Coens 
at their most disposable and slaphappy, 
a characteristic jumble of wacky charac- 
ters, reversals and milieus as you'd likely 
find in any feature film. 

Like so much of what we encounter 
in. Burn After Reading, Linda Litzke 
(Frances McDormand) feels like a crea- 
ture of urban myth, the embodiment of 
a tabloid headline: “LONELY SUBUR- 
BAN TRAINER SELLS GOV'T SECRETS 
TO FUND NEW BODY, FACE.” The 
lynchpin of this gleefully labyrinthine 
narrative, Linda’s failed attempts to 
cover her multi-tiered cosmetic surgery 
by credit card overdraft alone, promises 
to be redeemed when her co-worker 
Chad Feldheimer (Brad Pitt) takes it 
upon himself to blackmail a recently 


Skin flick 


DVDETECTIVE 


wv 
=< 
= JOSEF BRAUN & BRIAN GIBSON 

Li | dudetectiveweweekly.com 

JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 

A curious thing about Jacques Nolot’s 
Before | Forget (Avant que j‘oublie} the 
title implies urgency, yet the film, now on 
DVD from Strand Releasing, is anything 
but. The writer/director/actor’s presence 
throughout seems to be perpetually fixed 
upon a point of pause, of consideration, 
we suppose, a Cigarette burning away 
between his fingers like some substitute 


OPENS FRI SEP 12 


BURN AFTER READING 
WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY JOEL AND ETHAR EDEN 
STARRING FRANCES MCDORMAND, 

GEORGE CLOONEY, JOHN MALKOVICH, BRAD PIT 


rik 


COMEDY 


fired CIA Balkans expert named Ozzie 
Cox John Malkovich) after a disc con- 
taining what's either Cox’s memoirs or 
financial data or both is accidentally 
left behind in Hardbodies, the gym 
where Linda and Chad work and work 
out, a locale doubtlessly named in hon- 
our of the 1984 "sexy comedy.” 

There's actually some sexy comedy, 
or at least sex-related comedy, to be 
found in Burn After Reading as well, 
what with the twitchy, ever-smiling US 
Marshall and semi-discreet pussy- 
hound Harry Pfarrer (George Clooney) 
banging both Cox’s humourless doctor 
wife (Tilda Swinton) and, eventually, 
Linda. Though he’s shooting his load 
left and nght, he proudly declares more 
than once in the film that he’s never 
had to fire his weapon even once in 
over 20 years of service, an ominous 
detail made more ominous by other lit- 
tle details fussed over by the Coens, 
like the painting of a rifle hanging from 
the bathroom wall beside Harry as he 
fusses over his beard in the mirror. We 
are, naturally, just waiting for that gun 
to go off, and when it does things 
quickly turnm—as they often do in Coen 
Brothers movie—from silly and per- 
plexing to morbid and perverse. 


hourglass to mark time, his largely immo- 
bile face betraying no inner call to action. 
He says at one point that he wants noth- 
ing, which doesn’t entirely ring true, but 
the calming of desire, or at least its com- 
plication by age, illness and the small 
rewards of reflection, certainly appears to 
have marked this character in some irre- 
versible way. Right up until the final 
moments, even when he’s radically altered 
his appearance, his capacity to linger is 
tremendous. 

But then exactly what sort of task is it 
that Nolot’s Pierre—another variation on 
the other Pierres Nolot has portrayed in 
his previous three films, Manége (1986), 


YOU COULD SAY that Clooney's gotten a bit 
of a raw deal with the Coens, starring in O 
Brother Where Art Thou?, Intolerable Cruel- 
fy and now this, not a one of them being 
amongst the finest films in the brothers’ 
prolific body of work. But Clooney's 
uncanny knack for stylized comedy isn’t 
often used elsewhere, and hey, at least 
Burn After Reading is better than The 
Ladykillers. And as shallow as Harry is, at 
least he gives Clooney some diverting 
business to attend to—not a claim you 
could make about Ozzie, who only lets 
Malkovich, looking eerily rubbery and 


@ gray, blow a major gasket in scene after 


scene, or Chad, a character that’s largely 
about synthetic mock-necks and frosted 


Hinterland (‘98) and Porn Theatre 
(2002)—needs to perform in advance of 
memory's erosion? With his emotions 
rarely manifesting in any flamboyant or 
dramatic manner, what do we really know 
of the inner life of this guy? 

We know he’s around 60, and his 
health is so-so. He takes pills that he 
says interfere with his ability to 
orgasm, and an early scene follows him 
as he wakes in the dead of night to be 
sick. We learn later that he’s been HIV- 
positive for more than 20 years. He 
makes a habit of hiring young men for 
sex. In his very particular deadpan, he 
tells a cop through his building’s inter- 


54 = \wWEWEEKLY SEP 11- SP 17,2008 


FILM 


tips and probably not very well cast— 
though Pitt, for all his limitations, looks 
like he’s having fun. McDormand, for her 
part, seems to always come closest to 
striking the best balance between emo- 
tional realism and utter mania. Z 
But perhaps the bigger concer here 
is whether or not the Coens were even 
sure they were making a comedy. You 
could argue that several of the Coens’ 
movies are genre hybrids—though not 
as many as you'd think—but the prob- 
lem isn’t whether or not we can identi- 
fy the genre but whether or not we feel 
as though we should bother investing 
any feelings in the characters. For all 
the hi-jinx, the air of paranoia and 
intrigue peppered throughout the 


com system that his lover has left him 
and that he’s very sad. He bears an 
exceedingly French moustache that he 
says he wouldn't dare shave off, a sign 
of vanity, or at least a stubbornness 
about his image, that can be gauged 
against the sobering effects of time on 
his body, which we see naked—naked 
in a way that bodies rarely are in 
movies—for prolonged periods, espe- 
cially the pronounced paunch he cloaks 
with baggy suits. He visits a few 
friends, other gay men of a certain age, 
with similarly lonely lives, and he visits 
a shrink, speaking frankly tovall of them. 
He keeps his dead father’s barbershop 


film—and soaking Carter Burwell 
deliberately boilerplate score—com- 
pels us to try and generate some deep- 
er interest in Linda, Chad, Ozzie and 
Harry, or at least their high-stak: 
plights, as does the numerous subplots 
of romance and longing, such as that 
between Linda and her lovestruck boss 
(Richard Jenkins). But whatever em: 
tions are built up in the film’s first tw 
thirds make the abrupt, goof-oli 
ending feel that much more like a slap 
in face for even caring. My advic: 
would be not to bother caring, but still 
see the movie. It’s pretty slight, adds 
up to yery little, but nonetheless fea- 
tures enough inspired non-sequiters !o 
entertain. v 


in a corner of his Paris apartment. He 
spends a great deal of time at his desk, 
trying to write, but distracted by the 
past. An old lover of his is dying, and 
he’s to inherit money. 


WE FREQUENTLY WITNESS Pierre in 
moments of monetary transaction. Well, 
we witness Pierre paying others to be more 
precise: the young hustlers, the shrink. the 
cashier at the grocery we see him visit !n @ 
striking sequence that cuts between his 
grocery shopping with the auctioning off of 
his old lover's valuable art collection. He 


*QNTINDES ON PAGE 58 


earlier movie, this serial 1 killer thriller 
and macho buddy cop caper 
bristles with conflicted ambitions 
toward making something that’s both 
smart and base, a genre work for the 
sleaze-hungry and the beard-strokers 


alike. It’s a tough gambit, especially 
t a director of Spike Lee's 


and style to help pull 
it off, but I'm actually impressed how 
relatively well it works, even if it all 
inevitably evaporates under the heat 
of its own sketchy conceit. 

From the start we're encouraged to 
see verge-of-retirement hard-ass 
homicide detectives Cowan (Robert De 
Niro) and Fisk {Al Pacino) as platonic 
lovers of unyielding fidelity. They liter- 
ally shoot their loads side by side at the 
firing range, cheer each other on dur- 
ing cop baseball games, sing each 
other's praises to anyone who'll listen, 
even parrot each other's deflective 
one-liners when separately grilled by 
the NYPD shrink. When, early on, the 
corny looking faux-CCTV video 


footage of Cowan confessing to going 
on an extended vigilante killing spree 
begins its piecemeal interjections into 
the drama proper, we know that these 
old pals will follow each other to the 
precipice of destruction. It’s only a 
question of whether one will follow the 
other right over the edge. 

The economy of characters in 
Gewirtz's script is itself a source of 
dynamicism, keeping his leads sur- 
rounded by numerous closely watching 
potential adversaries nearly all of the 
time: the younger detectives Riley (Don- 
nie Wahlberg) and Perez (John 
Leguizamo), who begin to suspect that 
the “poetry killer’ of various local scum- 
bags must be a cop, the amiable but 
ster Lieutenant Hingus (Brain Dennehy, 
a highly welcome face, and one that’s 
aged into an uncannily resemblance to 
Milan Kundera), who has a good poker 
face but seems all too aware he’s got a 
loose cannon on his hands, and crime 
scene investigator Karen (Carla Gugino, 
a highly welcome everything), a girl who 
likes her/sex extremely rough and is cur- 
rently being obliged by Cowan, their 
proximity giving her access to his pri- 
vate life if not quite his inner life. 


OPENS FAL SEP 12 


RIGHTEOUS KILL 
DIRECTED BY JON AVNET 

WAITEN BY RUSSELL GEWIRTZ 
STARRING ROBERT DENI, AL PACINO, 
CARLA GUGINO 


wk 


THRILLER 


DIRECTOR JON AVNET, whose long 
resume includes jobs as, um, diverse as 
Fried Green Tomatoes and 88 Minutes, 
gets down to the grunt work from the 
get-go, keeping the camera whizzing 
around and the cuts a-flying like Tony 
Scott on auto-pilot. He’s hardly the 
most sensitive filmmaker, but he keeps 


things moving—whether they want to 
move or not. With this fidgety style, he 
can’t quite perform the subtle slight-of- 
hand Gewirtz's script is crying out for, 
though to be fair I'm not sure anyone 
could. The big reversal is telegraphed 
pretty far in advance, and once you 
catch on to what's really happening in 
Righteous Kill you may or may not want 
to bother sticking with it—the movie 
slowly becomes about the clever rever- 
Sal itself instead of the meatier themes 
of loyalty and justice it lays claims to. 
More disappointing for me is the 
neglect of the Karen character. The 
most interesting thing in The Score 
was Robert De Niro’s girlfriend, 
played by the sorrowfully underused 


Sad sack sexuality 


21st century film men are coming 
face to face with sexual mortality 


BRAIN GIBSON / brian@vueweekly.com 

ex in the movies has revolved 
Serine men and their lustful 

gaze for a long time. That look 
of lust has popped up in both complex, 
disturbing ways—the eye spying on a 
naked Vivien Leigh before spiralling 
us, suddenly accomplices, into the 
drain of murder—and simply exploita- 
Uve ways. In the "90s, with titles 
alone—Basic Instinct, Indecent 
Proposal—Hollywood was promising 
some cheap titillation for the cool, 
hard male stare. A pseudo-noir about a 
supposed bisexual? A rich guy looking 
‘o help a down-on-their-luck couple? 
The plots were really just fumbling 
foreplay for sharing out Sharon Stone 
(who, some accounts have it, was 
arassed by director Verhoeven into 
uncrossing her legs in that infamous 
scene), or displaying Demi-nude 
Moore. And then, just as the Internet 
‘vas realizing its porn potential, along 
came Striptease, its title assuring any 
oglers of Moore's first dip into the skin- 
"Y, Soon to be archived on countless 
nude-scene databases. 

Now, in this decade—the naughty 

noughts, exemplified by the Age of Apa- 


SEXUALITY 
ON FILM 


tow—there’s been a strange kind of 
infantile regression. It's as if the film- 
makers weaned on those database clips 
of movie nudity are obsessed with that 
confused, not-quite-teenager male stare 
they had in the ‘90s. It’s all there in the 
titles, too. The Forty-Year-Old-Virgin is 
about a guy too spluttering and uptight 
to just get laid already—no surprise 
when he's surrounded by porno tapes 
as if they're just toys for boys. And, 
voice still cracking, the maturity level in 
Superbad screeches into its natural pre- 
pube pitch when one of the teens freaks 
out at some menstrual blood—he may 
as well scream, “What? Their yazoos 
are for something other than my ding- 
dong?” (Yeah, like birth, as Apatow 
shows in his freak-out-at-pregnancy 
film Knocked Up.) 

But there have been some half-dra- 
mas, half-comedies that show a gen- 
uinely poignant, frail male sexuality 


borne of an adolescent-awkward, 
adult-pathetic and generally unsure 
groping for actual human connection. 
Credit the Coen Brothers and Alexan- 
der Payne for casting a cock-eyed 
look at middle-aged lust, getting us to 
laugh, a little uncomfortably, at a kind 
of sexistentialism through nudity: 
Hamlet meets The Full Monty. 


LIKE THE DOG that didn’t bark in the 


nighttime in the Sherlock Holmes story, 
the interesting thing about sex in the 
Coen canon is that it’s not really there 
There's no action between sheets 
because snappy conversation replaces 
foreplay and the tangled plot of life 
unravels after sex: stealing a baby in 
Raising Anzona because HI's “seed could 
find no purchase” in Ed or a pregnant 
police chief just doing her job in Fargo. 
The Big Lebowski offers the best 
example of a mid-lifer overwhelmed 
and befuddled by sex. “The Dude” (eff 
Bridges) is neither viciously cool nor 
puerile about the unfettered female 
form. He’s just vaguely interested, 
then gets bowled over by neo-femi- 
nist, iber-avant garde artist Maude 
(Julianne Moore), whose single moth- 
erhood is assured when she sleeps 
with an even more semi-conscious 
than normal Dude as he recovers 
from a drugged-out night at a porn 
mogul’s mansion watching topless 
girls bounce on trampolines. Sex, in 
most Coen films, comes out as a kind 
of odd, exotic, childish preoccupation. 
For satirist Payne, the frailties of the 
flesh expose our human foibles. In Elec- 
tion, teacher Jim McAllister (Matthew 


FILM 


Broderick) lets himself go through sex 
as a mechanical, baby-producing exer- 
cise with his wife. Turning to porn in 
the basement and then an affair with 
the toothy Midwestern wife of a friend, 
Jim hits a new low when we see him 
crouched down in the bathtub of a 
seedy motel room, selectively cleaning 
himself off after a quickie. 

This desperate, pleading lust is suc 
ceeded by About Schmidt, with Schmidt's 
bewildered, trapped look when a naked 
Roberta (Kathy Bates) gets into the hot 
tub with him. The scene's mostly at the 
expense of Schmidt (played by Jack 
Nicholson, a supposed Hollywood bad- 
boy bachelor), who finally realizes that 
his sexual horizons have narrowed as 
he's overwhelmed by this woman's laid- 
back, robust sexuality. 

But in Sideways, boastful Jack 
(Thomas Haden Church) is given the 
biggest blow of any Payne-ful, past-the- 
prime protagonist. His moment of con- 
quest is really a sad come-down—we 
walk in on him only to see his sorry butt 
all a-quiver, mid-intercourse. And then 
there's the naked, gut-roofed groin of a 
large man, pressed up against the win- 
dow of Miles’ car in fury after he’s 
snuck into his house to retrieve cuck- 
olding Jack’s wallet for him. 

So here it is, petered out, after all 
the cool hero's voyeurism and the ado- 
lescent fuss. It was a long time com- 
ing, but at last the movies expose the 
red-blooded North American male 
becoming tragicomically aware of the 
wrinkles, flab and’ basic farce of the 
flesh, the flush of his desire paling into 
a trembling, white-cheeked joke. v 


Angela Bassett. Likewise, the most 
interesting thing in Righteous Kill is 
easily De Niro’s relationship with Gug- 
ino, an enormously delicate negotia- 
tion of trust, sex and maybe, just 
maybe, love, or something like it 
Gugino brings tremendous texture, 
sass and dignity to a character that, 
far from being a conventional love 
interest, could have been difficult or 
impossible for the audience to identify 
with, This being De Niro’s movie, it’s 
just as important that her character 
has the potential to tell us a lot about 
Cowan. It’s a shame then that her 


Karen gets more or less brushed aside 
as the film hurtles toward its big 
sloppy, scenery-chewing climax. v 


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CHAD VANGAALEN 


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A local artists heart hooked up to an 
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FILM 
: 


CAPSULES 


OPENING THIS WEEK 


GONZO: THE LIFE 
OF DR HUNTER SHOWS 
DIRECTED BY ALEX GIBNEY 


NARRATED BY JOHMNY DEPP 
kik , 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweckly.com 
It would clearly be unwise to expect a 
gonzo approach to a 
documentary about 
the daddy of gonzo 
journalism. Applying 
such flights of ram- 
bling conjecture, 
digression, lamenta- 
tion and outright 
hallucination as 
were the bench- 
marks of Hunter S 
Thompson's distinc- 
tive prose to most 
non-fiction movies 
of any kind would 
be inadvisable— 
unless perhaps they ey 
were supplied by Thompson himself. 
Alas, Thompson's been dead these three 
years, and his best work was a good 
three decades behind him in any case. 
But you still have to wonder if the good 
doctor, a counterculture hero, a lefty with 
right-wing tastes who once represented 
the very best spirit of Rolling Stone, a con- 
tainer of more drugs than Keith Richards, 
and author of such iconoclastic works of 
oddly eloquent political commentary as 
Hell's Angels, Fear and Loathing in Las 
Vegas and Fear and Loathing on the Cam- 
paign Trail, doesn’t deserve a portrait more 
provocative, or at least more questioning in 
spirit, than the one delivered by Alex Gib- 
ney, director of Taxi to the Dark Side and 
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room. 
Gibney's Gonzo; The Life and Work of 
Dr Hunter S Thompson may have no lack 
of great anecdotes and archival material to 
feed upon, not to mention a head-spinning 
array of new interviews with ex-wives and 
ex-US presidents, but the liveliness of the 
subject matter and commentary it inspires 
can’t quite make up for what's basically a 
safe, conventional delivery. 


“He was my friend. He never paid his 
rent, broke up my marriage, and taught my 
children to smoke pot.” Now, if that's not a 
tribute .... It comes from Thomson's neigh- 
bour and landlord, and it does, for the 
record, come with a nostalgic smile. Those 
who knew and loved Thompson tend to 
feel conflicted about the style of both 
Thompson's life and his death, which came 
from the barrel of one of the author's many 
guns one night in his kitchen in 2005, 
while his family 
relaxed in the next 
room. He always 
said he'd do it that 
way, and no one 
seemed too 
shocked, but it 
made you question 
the relationship 
between bravado 
and cowardice, an 
intersection lorded 
over by Hemingway. 
“We need his voice 
now more and than 
ever,” is something 
said several times 
in Gonzo, yet not as many times as admit- 
tances that the guy was on auto-pilot for 
ages, isolated, paranoid, all-too akin to his 
caricature in the 
Doonesbury comics, 
and getting drunk 
with the likes of Pat 
Buchanan. As 
Rolling Stone editor 
Jann Wenner puts 
it, in the end Thomp- 
son was “hostage to 
his own persona.” 

Gonzo focuses, 
naturally, on the 
good years, the ‘60s 
and ‘70s, when, like 
everybody, Thomp- 
son went off his 
rocker and yet actu- 
ally had some hope. He was handsome, 
daring, gainfully employed and listened 
to. He even advocated presidential candi- 
dates, invented drugs for their opponents 
to be addicted to and ran for Sheriff of 
Pitkin County, Colorado. He legitimized 
fringe sensibilities in political discourse. 


4 BANGKOK DANGEROUS 


SAVAGE GRACE 


But Gibney frames it all like a greates; 
hits package, replete with predictab|. 
hokey-jokey use of period pop Songs anc 
insertions of deeply mannered readings 
of Thompson's work by Johnny Depp, who 
for all his warm intentions just does not 
get the ribald tone at all. 


SAVAGE GRACE 

QVRECTED BY TOM KALIN 

WRITTEN BY HOWARD A RODMAN 

STARRING JULIANNE MOORE EDDIE REDMAYWE 
bos 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 

This long-awaited second feature from 
director Tom Kalin, who made such ar 
impression way back in 1992 with the 
Leopold-and-Loeb retelling Swoon, con 

fortably nestles up against its predeces 

sor with regards to categorization: it's a 
true crime movie, involving sex, horrific 
murder and characters with deeply pre 

tentious ambitions, and it's as queer a 

any movie can hope to be, with its pe: 
sonage mixing in all sorts of combina 
tions untraditional, kinky or downriaht 
deviant. . 

Besides. apparently being exactinaly 
tailored to the thematic interests of pro- 
lific producer Christine Vachon {an instru 
mental force behind 
Swoon, Boys Doni 
Cry, | Shot Ano, 
Warhol, Party Mon 
ster, The Notoriou 
Bettie Page and 
Infamous), it's th 
sort of material that 
also seems to draw 
in some of our 
finest actresses o! 
4 certain age, espe- 
Cially those who 
continually crave 
adventure and 
edge. Given that 
Joan Crawford is 
long gone, | can’t think of a better choice 
for the star role of Savage Grace than 
Julianne Moore—yet at the same time 
think it might just be the worst, or at 
least the least enjoyable, performance 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 58 


DVDETECTIVE 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 


lives modestly, yet there is a-special 
emphasis in this rigorously observational, 
unobtrusive movie on the funds he 
expends. The diminishing savings, the 
diminishing desires, the body in quiet, 
gradual decline: as things fall apart, Before 
| Forget makes no effort to wring the situa- 
tion for high emotions of any kind, yet it 
presents a visually rich, meditative, narra- 
tively loose but strangely cohesive experi- 
ence. It’s about the tasks that fill up a 
person’s days, and the weight that some of 
the simplest tasks assume when we take a 


moment to stop and really see them. 

So eventually, those mysterious 
things, the ones that Pierre is trying to 
do’something with before they're forgot- 
ten, feel like the accumulation of ordi- 
nary—or, well, ordinary for some of us 
anyway—things that define a life as 
much as the prized memories of out- 
standing events. All of it falls under the 
scrutiny of Pierre's pen. And it's as 
though the real testimony winds up 
being not the things Pierre writes but 
those that Nolot allows us to see unfold. 
There is an awful lot of talk about the 
past here, but the way the past is recon- 
sidered is very much a present tense 


drama. Nolot is living it for us onscreen 
doing as little as possible, which is to 
say_exactly what is needed-and nothing 
more. It’s a full, generous performance 
because:it's so un-forced, and because 
the camera is likewise so steady and 
unwavering. Many great filmmakers over 
the years have used the real, unbroken 
passage of time in interesting ways thal 
usually heighten our corporeal exper! 
ence of movie-watching, but Nolots use 
of it here is to shed fight on the corpo" 
al experience his own body is undertak- 
ing, a body that has so much memory 
written right there on its surface for us 
to see. w 


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FILM CAPSULES 


I've ever seen Moore give. But then, 
are we even supposed to enjoy this 
movie? Even on the sombre enjoyment of 
more closely understanding some bleak, 
troubling aspect of human nature? 

Narrated by the real Tony Baekeland, 
Savage Grace dramatizes the story of his 
life leading up to his notorious arrest in 
1972 at the age of 25. It says a lot about 
Baekeland’s life that the real star of his 
Story is actually his mom, Barbara 
(Moore), heiress to the Bakelite fortune, 
an uncultured, desperately unhappy soci- 
ety woman who, after being abandoned 
by her understandably demoralized hus- 
band (Stephen Dillane) for her son’s girl- 
friend, focuses all of her overbearing 
energies on her only child, who she con- 
stantly needles, travels all over Europe 


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with, lives with and, as it turns out, has 
sex with. Tony himself (played by the suit- 
ably stunned-looking Eddie Redmayne) is 
rather a wisp of a boy next to her, nerv- 
ous, uncertain, largely unloved and inter- 
nalizing more rage than most of us will 
ever know. 

For those of us who aren't survivors of 
incest but always suspected it made for a 
pretty miserable home life, Savage 
Grace—the antithesis of Murmur of the 
Heart in more ways than one—certainly 
confirms that and some. But | suppose 
what's truly terrifying in this utterly 
tawdry tale is not the aberrant sex itself 
but the suffocating mothering of which 
the sex is but one manifestation, and 
hardly the most toxic. Savage Grace is 
really a sort of horror movie about the sti- 
fling effects of family and affluence, one 
beautifully photographed in exquisite 
locales and filled with beautiful people, 
where the monster just keeps coming 
back to embarrass herself and everybody 
else with her incredibly awkward 
attempts to seem sophisticated before 
throwing yet another shrill hissy fit. 

| didn't actually know Baekeland’s 
Story before seeing Savage Grace, which 
is just as well—at least there were some 
surprises. But these surprises, like Kalin’s 
craftsmanship, itself a bit overdone and 
noodlely, didn’t make Baekeland’s story 
any more enlightening: just grotesque, 
sad, jarring, intermittently fascinating and 
ultimately kind of pointless 


THE WOMEN 

WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY DIANE ENGLISH 

BASED OWA PLAY BY CLARE BOOTHE LUCE 

STARRING MEG AYAN, ANNETTE BENING DEBRA MESSING 
* 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychrista@vueweekly.com 
“No thinking!” chides one of the pussy 
posse that surrounds Mary (Meg Ryan), 
the angelic do-it-all at the centre of The 
Women. “What do you fe-e-e-el?” 
Actually, | feel grouchy, and it’s not due 
to hormonal fluctuations, but the stagger- 
ing deficiency of intelligence masquerad- 
ing as breezy charm in this remake of the 


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seminal (no irony intended) and sma, 
1939 film of Clare Boothe Luce’s screy. 
ball drama, 

They had big stilettos to fill. The origi 
nal was such a product of its time it's dif 
cult to conceive how the premise—the 
devastating discovery of a “perfect” hus 
band’s affair, and what to do about it, with 
options provided by Mary’s myriad femal 
advisors—could be transplanted to a radi- 
cally different era. In 1939, gender and 
class conventions were still rigid and the 
stakes of risking divorce much higher thai 
today, yet a malleability of power betweer 
the sexes had taken root, offering new 
possibilities. Even the Hollywood studio 
system colluded to add bite to George 
Cukor's version, with actresses playing 
with their equally manufactured stardom 
“personalities” on top of their characters 
doubling the tension between the artifice: 
of femininity and its actualities. The origi 
nal The Women is lauded as an early femi 
nist film—and it was daring to focus 
narrative on female friendships and inner 
lives (even if they revolve around men)— 
but it's as notable for being post-modern 
before such a thing existed, and it was 
close to a masterpiece. 

So why mess with a cultural touch 
stone? Writer/director Diane English 
answer is contained in that line, he: 
empty-headed manifesto for 2008's 
Women: all feeling; no thought. This | 
filmic karaoke—English doesn't want tc 
add anything, she just wants to hear |! 
in her own voice. We get the 1939 pilot 
with superficial upgrades—a minor 
character's a lezzie, the girls have glam 
orous careers and Mary exclaims in 
response to a suggestion she use her 
feminine wiles, “This isn't some ‘30s 
movie!” Hardy har har. 

But while 1939's Women was tart and 
forward-looking, 2008's is retrograde 
Women are portrayed as witless, needy. 
petty, food-obsessed, vacuous and med- 
dlesome—basically Cathy comics with 
money, thrown against the cosmopolitan 
background of rich-bitch New York 
Mary's idea of “hitting bottom” is to leave 
her Connecticut mansion (with two nosy 


2: REGISTER ‘TODAY! 


S revealed (expect 


flick” is too kind. 
n: it pretends to 
it'll kick you in the 


Out two sequels, 
their own 199! 


man set-up before, with its tired, noir 
loner figure: "the work is steady—| 
shouldn't complain,” 

And Joe (Nicolas Cage) doesn’t. He 
doesn’t think or feel much, actually 
(making his dark decision at the end a 
bit puzzling). Pretty much all he does 
is kill for hire. He lists his four rutes— 
including “know when to get out’— 
but then breaks them all on his last 
job in Bangkok. Why? Who knows, 
other than to spin the movie into fea- 
iure-length. If Cage's listless perform- 
ance is any indication—gone from 
Raising Arizona to razing Thailand, he 
seems as long in the tusk as the ele- 
phant that pops up here as national 
symbol and obvious motif—the actor, 
too, is just trying to get in and get out, 
making a quick hit for the cash. 

Joe takes a liking to Kong (Shahkrit 
Yamnarm), the thief he’s hired as a go- 
between (though the Thai man’s deferen- 
tial apology to his tich white “boss” is 
excruciating to watch), and starts mentor- 
ing him. He even falls in love with Fon, a 
deaf-mute woman (Charlie Yeung). Their 
relationship lets the film signal, even 
more blinding-obviously, any emotion. 
Cage shows the only acting he may still 
be good at with his comic pantomime of 
Thai food being hot, but then has to say, 
‘It’s hot!” and the music tinkles in every 
time he locks eyes with Fon. 

The brothers do make the best of 
their homeland location. The gritty, 
blue-black look, and cuts among clubs, 
crowded eity streets and a river market 
‘ap into the pulse of Thailand, and 
there's a deft touch when Joe escapes 
the police by grabbing a camera and 
pretending to photograph the panicking 
crowd, sniper turning snapper. But the 
Pacing is usually clumsy and transi- 


tions ar 


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‘$004 ConnauahtDr slasnsr, 720-852-4749 
BURN AFTER READING (14A, violence) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00 : 
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (1 
Dally 7:00, 9:00 ts 


THE ROCKER (PG, coarse language) 
Fri-Sat 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:20, 11:40; 
Sun-Thu 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:20 

‘SPACE CHIMPS (G) 

Daily 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7-20 

HELLBOY i: THE GOLDEN ARMY 
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HANCOCK Mas crude content, violence, 


coarse 
Fii-Sat 1:50, 4:45, 7:25, 9:35, 11:45; 
Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:45, 7:25, 9:35 

ae (1BA, gory scenes, brutal vio- 
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Sun-Thu 1:35, 05, 9:45 

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Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:35, 7:00, 9:30, 11:50; 
Sun-Thu 1:45, 4:35, 7:00, 9:30 


THE LOVE GURU (14A, crude content) 
aoe 4:50, 10:05, 11:55; Sun-Thu 4:50, 
10:05 


THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG, violence, 
SCONES) 


bay 208 7:30 


You DON'T MESS WITH THE ZOHAN 
114A, sexual content) 

Fri-Sat 10:00, 12:15; Sun-Thu 10:00 
KUNG FU PANDA (PG) 

Fri-Sat 1:55, 4:30, 7:15, 9:25, 11:25; 
Sun-Thu 1:55, 4:30, 7:15, 9:25 


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OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL (PG, vio- 
lence, frightening scenes) 

Daily 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50 

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: 
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Fri-Sat 1:10, 4:40, 7:35, 10:45; Sun-Thu 
1:10, 4:40, 7:35 

IRON MAN [PG, not recommended for 
young children, violence) 

Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:15, 6:55, 9:50, 12:15; 
Sun-Thu 1:25, 4:15, 6:55, 9:50 


DR. SEUSS' HORTON HEARS A WHO! 
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Daily 1:35 
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asia ite (14A, coarse 
language, violence) 
Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 


7:30, 10:00; Tue 5:00, 7:30, 10:00; Star 
and Strollers Screening: Tue 1:00 


RIGHTEOUS KILL (14A, violence, 
coarse language) 

Daity 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 9:50 

THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Fr-Mon, Wed-Thu 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 9:45; 
‘Tue 4:00, 7:05, 9:45; Star and Strollers 
‘Screening: Tue 1:00 


BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daily 2:10, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25 


BABYLON A.D. (14A, violence) 
Daily 7:55, 10:10 


TRAITOR (14A, violence) 

Daily 12:40, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20 

DEATH RACE (14A, Soy eae coarse 
Daily 2:00, 5:20, 8:00, 10:30 

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
come for young children, coarse lan- 
Baily 1:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 


‘STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Daily 12:30, 3:00, 5:30 


| | TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 


guage,crude content) 
Daily 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20 
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184. substance 


| Baty 220, 4;50, 7:45, 10:20. 


BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 


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MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Dally 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:00 

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PG, not recommended for young 


children) 
RealD Daily 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:30 


CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 
1525-99 St. 780-496-8585 

BURN AFTER READING (14. coarse 
language, violence) 
Fri-Mon, Th 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 
7:45, 10:15; Tue 3:00, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; 
Star and Strollers Screening: Tue 1:00 
RIGHTEOUS KILL (144, 
Violence, coarse language) 
Dally 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:45 
THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 
Fri-Man, Wed-Thu 1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; 
Tue 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; Star and Strollers 
‘Screening: Tue 1:00 
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (13/) 
Daily 2:00, 5:00, 7:30, 10:15 
MERA PIND (PUNJABI W/E.S.T., G) 
Dally 12:40, 4:30, 8:30 


DEATH NOTE (714A) 
Mon 9:60 


BABYLON AD. (14/4, violence) 
Daily 9:40 

TRAITOR (14, violence) 

Fri-Sun, Tue-Thu 1:10, 4:00, 7:15, 9:50; 
Mon 1:10, 4:00, 6:30 

MAMMA MIA! SING-A-LONG (PG) 
Daily 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10 

DEATH RACE (144, gory scenes,coarse 
language, brutal violence) 

Dally 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20 

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children,coarse lan- 


guage) 

Daily 12:50, 3:20, 6:40, 9:00 

FLY ME TO THE MOON 3-D (G) 
RealD Daily 12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:10 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Daily 1:30, 4:15, 7:20, 10:10 

THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVEL- 
ING PANTS 2 (PG) 

Daily 3:50, 6:30, 9:15 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, substance 


abuse) 
Dally 2:10, 5:10, 8:00, 10:30 


THE MUMMY: TOMB OF THE DRAG- 
ON EMPEROR [PG, frightening 
scenes, violence) 

Daily 12:45 

STEP BROTHERS (14A, coarse lan- 
Quane, not recommended for children, 
crude content) 

Daily 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:30 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 


Daily 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00 
JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PG, not recommended for young 
chikiren) 

Daily 1:15, 3:45, 7:00; RealD Daily 9:20 
WALL-E (G) 

Daily 12:20 


CITY CENTRE 9 


19200-102 Ave, 780-421-7020 
THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
Dolby Stereo Digital Fri-Wed 12:15, 3:40, 
6:40, 9:85; Thu 12:15, 6:40,9:35 - | 
RIGHTEOUS KILL (14A, violence, 
language) 


coarse 
Stereo Fri-Wed 1:00, 3:50, 


6:50, 9:40; Thu 1:00, 6:50, 9:40 


BURN AFTER READING (144. coarse 


language, violence) 
Digital Presentation Fri-Wed 12:10, 3:00, 
6:55, 9:30; Thu 12:10, 6:55, 9:30 


Doty Stereo Digtal Fi-Wed 12:45, 2:15, 
7:15, 9:50; Thu 12:45, 7:15,9:50 


OPUS ARTE-CINDERELLA (Ballet, 

Classification not available) 

Sat 1:00 

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (184, substance 
Stereo Fri, Sun-Tue 12:50, 


3:25, 6:30, 9:25} Sat 6:30, 9:25; Wed 
12:50, 3:25, 9:25; Thu 12:50, 6:30, 9:25 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
Stereo Digital 12:30, 3:20, 

7:10, 9:45; Thu 12:30, 7:10,9:45. 
HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recorn- 

TE intone Genin cee ar 
Digital Fri-Wed 12:40, 4:10, 7:20, 

9:30; Thu 12:40, 7:20, 9:30 

‘THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 


Digital Fri-Sun, Tus 12:25, 3:10, 
6:35, 9:10; Mon'12:25, 3:10, 6:35; Wed 
6:35, 9:10; Thu 12:25, 6:35, 9:10 


DEATH RACE (144, gory scenes, coarse 
fanguage, brutal violence) 

DTS Digital Daily 9:20 

DEATH NOTE (14A) 

Mon 9:00 


4211-139 Ave. 780-472-7600 
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence, 
Tightening scenes, not recommended for 
young children) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:30, 8:00; Sat-Sun 12:50, 
4:30, 8:00 


PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (18, substance 


abuse) y 
Daily 9:25 


TROPIC ThuNDER (144, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:45, 9:10; Sat-Sun 
1:10, 3:50, 6:45, 9:10 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, coarse lan- 
guage) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:10, 6:40, 9:00; Sat-Sun 
1:20, 4:10, 6:40, 9:00 


DEATH RACE (14A, gory scenes, coarse 
language, brutal violence) 

Fri,Mon-Thu 4:45, 7:05, 9135; Sat 1:25, 
4:45, 7.05, 9:35; Sun 1:25, 7:05, 9:35 


BABYLON A.D. (14, violence) 
Fn, Mon-Thu 4:25, 7:20; Sat-Sun 1:45, 
4:25, 7:20 


BANGKOK DANGEROUS (154) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:20, 7:30, 9:45; Sat-Sun 
1:40, 4:20, 7:30, 9:45 


FLY ME TO THE MOON 3-D (G) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:30, 6:30, 8:50; Sat-Sun 
2:00, 4:30, 6:30, 8:50 


BURN AFTER READING (14/, coarse 
language, violence) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:50, 7:10, 9:40; Sat-Sun 
1:50, 4:50, 7:10, 9:40 

THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:00, 6:50, 9:20; Sat-Sun 
1:00, 4:00, 6:50, 9:20 


RIGHTEOUS KILL (14, violence, 
coarse language) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:40, 7:00, 9:30; Sat-Sun 
1:30, 4:40, 7:00, 9:30 


GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 
2020 Sherwood Drive, 780-416-0150 


BURN AFTER READING (144. coarse 
language, violence) 

Fri 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:20, 
7:00, 9:30; Mon-Thu 7:00, 9:30 
RIGHTEOUS KILL (144, violence, 
coarse language} 

Fri 4:40, 7:30, 10:10; Sat-Sun 12:10, 
4:40, 7:30, 10:10; Mon-Thu 7:30, 10:10 
THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Fy 3:40, 6:50, 9:40; Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:40, 
6:50, 9:40; Mon-Thu 6:50, 9:40 
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) 

Fri 4:50, 7:40, 10:20; Sat-Sun 12:50, 
4:50, 7:40, 10:20; Mon-Thu 7:40, 10:20 


DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude content) 

Dally 9:10 

DEATH RACE (14A. gory scenes, coarse 
violence) 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, coarse lan- 


guage) 
Fri 4:15, 7:10, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:00, 4:15, 
7:10, 9:50; Mon-Thu 7:10, 9:50 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Fri 4:00, 6:30; Sat-Sun 12:40, 4:00, 6:30; 
Mon-Thu 6:30. 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Fri 4:10, 7:15, 9:45; Sat-Sun 1:10, 4:10, 
7:15, 9:45; Mon-Thu 7:15, 9:45 | 


THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, frightening 
scenes, not recommended for young chil- 


dren, violence) 
Fri 3:30, 6:45, 10:00; Sat-Sun 12:00, 
3:30, 6:45, 10:00; Mon-Thu 8:00 


MAMMA MIAL 
Fri 3:50, 6:40, oo, Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:50, 
6:40, 9:20; Mon-Thu 6:40, 9:20 


GARNEAU 
(8712-109 St, 780-432-0728 


VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA (144) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:00 


GRANDIN THEATRE 


Grandin Mall, Sic Winston Churchill Ave, St. 
Albert. 780-458-9822 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
Quage, crude content) 

Dally 12:50, 7:00, 9:00 

BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) . 
Dally 1:10, 5:05, 7:05, 9:10 

THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Soe Daily 12:35, 2:40, 4:45, 6:55, 


RIGHTEOUS KILL (144, violence, 
coarse language) 

No passes Daily 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 
9:20 

BURN AFTER READING (14, coarse 
language, violence) 

No passes Dally 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 
9:15 

DISASTER MOVIE (14A, crude content) 
Daily 5:00 


STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS (PG) 
Daily 2:55 


DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 
TROPIC THUNDER (14A. coarse lan 
guage, crude content) 

Daily 7:05, 9:05; Sat-Sun 2:05 

BANKOK DANGEROUS (184) 

Daily 7:00, 9:00 

BURN AFTER READING (14A, coarse 
language, violence) 

Daily 7:15, 9:15; Sat-Sun 2:15 
JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PG, not recommended for young 
children) 

Sat-Sun 2:00 


7B0-352-3922 
BURN AFTER READING (144, cocrss 
language, violence) 
Daily 7:00, 9:30; 
Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:35 


RIGHTEOUS KILL (144 violence, 
coarse language) 

Daily 7:05, 9:25; 

Sat-Sun 1:05, 3:25 

BANKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daily 7:10, 9:35; 

Sat-Sun 12:55, 3:20 

MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Daily 6:55, 9:20; 

Sat Sun 1:00, 3:30 

WALL-E (G) 

Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:30 


METRO CINEMA 


9828-101A Ave, Citadel Theatre, 
TO-AMS-2212 


EDMONTON TONIGHT (STC) 
Fri 8:30 


ACRE LOSS: AARON MUNSON AND 
MARK TEMPLETON (STC) 
Sat 8:00 


GONZO: THE LIFE AND WORK OF DR 
HUNTER S THOMPSON (STC) 

Fri, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed 7:00; Sun, Mon, 
Tue, Wed 9:15 


FAVA FRESHWORKS: SEAN DYKINK 
W/ TEAM AMERICA: WORLD POLICE 


(STC) 
Thu 7:00 


PARKLAND CINEMA 7 


72-2882. Serving Spruce Grove, Stony 
Plain: Parkland County 


RIGHTEOUS Se (ah violence, 
Coarse language) 
Daily 7:10, 9:30; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:15, 3:30 


BURN AFTER READING (14A, coarse 
language, violence) 

Daily 7:00, 9:15; Sat, Sun , Tue 1:05, 
3:15 

THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Dally 6:50, 9:20; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:00, 


3:20; Movies For Mommies: Tue, Sept. 
16, 1:00 


JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE 
EARTH (PG, not recommended for young 
children) 

‘Sat, Sun, Tue 12:50, 3:00 


BANGKOK DANGEROUS (184) 
Daily 7:15, 9:25 


TROPIC THUNDER (14A, coarse lan- 
guage, crude content) 

Daily 6:55, 9:10; Sat, Sun, Tus 12:45, 
3:10 


MAMMA MIA! (PG) 
Daily 6:45; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:10, 3:25 


THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, « 
guage, not recommended fo 
dren) 
Daily 7:05, 9:05; Sat, Sun, Ti 
3:05 


DEATH RACE (14A. brutal 
Coarse language, gory scen 
Daily 9:00 


a 


10337-82 Ave, 780-433-0723 


EDGE OF HEAVEN (144) Daily 6:45 
9:15; Sat-Sun 2:00 


SAVAGE GRACE (184, disturt: 
tent) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:30 


SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM 


WEM, 8852-170 St. 780-444-2400 
BURN AFTER READING (144 
language, violenca) 
Fri-Tue, Thu 1:00, 4 
4:00, 7:30, 10:05; 
Screening: Wed 1:00 


RIGHTEOUS KILL (14A, 
coarse lang! 


0, 


Daily 1:30, 4:15, 7:45, 10:15 
THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young chikiran) 


Fri-Tue, Thu 12:50, 4:20, 7: 
Wed 4:20, 7:15, 10:10; Star 
Sereening: Wed 1:00 
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (734) =) 
Dally 12:40, 3:40, 7:2¢ 
BABYLON AD (14A 
Fri-Wed re 
1:30, 4:15, 
DEATH RACE (14A, brutal vi 
coarse language, gory 
Daily 12:15 7 
THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG, not reco 


mended for young chidren, o 


<0 


y 12:40, 3:40, 6:30, 9:30 


TROPIC THUNDER (144. coarse len. 
guage, crude content) 

Daily 12:35, 3:35, 6:40, 9:50 
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (188. s 
abuse) 

Daily 12:50, 4:20, 7:15, 10:10 


STEP BROTHERS (144, coarse lan- 
quage, not recommended for chikirer 
crude content) 

Fri-Tus, Thu 1:00, 4:00, 8:50, 9:40; Wed 
1:00, 4:00, 9:50 

THE DARK KNIGHT (PG, violence fright- 
€ning Scenes, not recommended for - 
young children) 

Daily 1:10, 4:30, 8:00 

THE DARK KNIGHT: THE IMAX EXPE- 
RIENCE (PG, violence frightening scenes, 
not recommended for young children) 
Daily 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:15 

MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

Daily 12:35, 3:35, 6:45, 9:25 


WESTMOUNT CENTRE 
111 Ave. Groat Rd. 760-455-5726 
THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 
Dolby Stereo Digital 
Fri, Mon-Thu 6:40, 9:15; 
Sat-Sun 12:50, 3:20, 6:40, 9:15 


BURN AFTER READING (144. coarse 


Fri, Mon-Thu 7:10, 9:35; 

Sat-Sun 1:20, 3:40, 7:10, 9:35 
MAMMA MIA! (PG) 

DTS Digital 

Fri, Mon-Thu 6:50, 9:05; 

Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:10, 6:50, 9:05 
EMMA SMITH: MY STORY (PG) 
St Dolby Disital > 
Fri, Mon-Thu 6:40, 9:00; 7:00, 3:25; 
Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:30, 7:00, 9:25 


WETASKIWIN CINEMAS 
TROS52-3922 
BURN AFTER READING (144. coarse 


*); 


Daily 7:10, 9:35; 
Sat-Sun 12:55, 3:20 


THE WOMEN (PG, not recommended for 
young children) 

Daily 6:55, 9:20; 

Sat Sun 1:00, 3:30 


WALL-E (G) 
Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:30 


‘OP y:-SP 17,2008 wereweenmy 69 


OFF LEASH PARK 


open at 2pm daily 
10425 Whyte Ave 


BEIJK FLOR 


a 


DOORS 


ROFUND 


5:30 PM ROCK 


6:00 PM 


ALL AGES WELCOME 


MM 


Another cheap town 


NQ Arbuckle gets it together and heads west 


EDEN MUNRO / eden@yueweakly.com 
he last time that Neville Quin- 
lan, the singing guitar slinger 
for NQ Arbuckle, was out in 
Alberta—a couple of years ago now, 
touring on his band’s 2005 album The 
Last Supper in a Cheap Town—he 
admitted that the group was already 
halfway through the recording of its 
next album. At the time, the quartet 
was working new songs into shape 
on the road, and as soon as the play- 
ers had a grasp on them they slipped 
into the studio to record them one at 
a time, with hopes of pulling together 
a complete record, But the resulting 
recordings aren't to be found on X O 
K, NQ Arbuckle’s latest 

“We ended up doing a bunch of 
songs that didn’t make it on this 
record because we were doing it in 
that weird way, and then really what 
happened was we suddenly realized 
that a year had passed and we hadn't 
got our shit together, so we said, ‘OK, 
fuck it, we're going in these weeks’ 
and then really started recording it in 
earnest,” Quinlan laughs, adding that 
even the songs that the band tried to 
record during those one-shot sessions 
went through some changes along 
the way. “So, ‘My Baby’ has gone 
through three different versions, and 
then ‘Huntsville Affair’ has gone 
through a bunch of different versions 
So it’s little things like that where we 
just ended up being like, ‘OK, enough 
dicking around.’” 

It’s not unheard of for a band to 
record songs more than once before 
finding a version that is deemed wor- 
thy of the finished record, but those 
“different” versions are quite often lit- 
tle more than the same song played 
the same way—maybe the band feels 


WED, SEP 17 (8 Pld) 


Lot 

=> 

= | NO ARBUCKLE 

cece | WIM ELLIOTT BROOD, THE PALE MOON LIGHTS 
| PAWN SHOP S20 


that one version is a better take than 
the other, but the differences are not 
always apparent to listeners. For 
Quinlan, though, there can be a 
lengthy road between the first version 
of a song and the one that ultimately 
makes the album 

“Yeah, like with ‘Huntsville Affair,’ 
{the album version is] drastically differ- 
ent,” he says, “A lot of the times I 
haven't a clue what any of the songs 
mean until you sort of sit with them a lit- 
tle bit and then all of a sudden you real- 
ize that it’s not as angry as you thought 
it Was or it’s not as happy as you 
thought it was, and then you kind of 
slow it down or speed it up accordingly. 
Arrangements are always on the go.” 


THOSE ARRANGEMENTS start out with 


Quinlan putting fingers to strings and 
lyrics to chords, but listen to the way 
the band members play off of each 
other, working together to dress the 
songs up or strip them bare as need- 
ed, and it becomes obvious that, 
despite the NQ in the name, this is no 
solo act: NQ Arbuckle is a band where 
every player is necessary in the fight 
to keep the music alive. 

"| just write the words and the 
chords to [the songs],” Quinlan agrees. 
“I sort of walk into our space and start 
playing, and then the guitar player's 
gonna write the riff, the drummer's 
gonna come up with a tempo that’s 
suitable, the bass player's gonna come 
up with arrangement stuff—I can’t 
claim to just be going in and Svengali- 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


MUSIC 


MOVING MUSIC / 69 (ia 
BAD RELIGION / 71 (ie 


ing everything. I don’t have the musi 
cal chops for that. It’s very much 
group effort, and really, all songs ar 
written by the whole gang.” 

For Quinlan, the writing process i 
made considerably easier by the {ac' 
that the band is made up of four buddi 
from Toronto. He explains that he star 
ed playing with the Kesper brothers 
drummer Mark and guitars! 
Peter—because they were in his 
favourite band until that group broke up 
so he joined up with them, and bassis! 
John Dinsmore is also an old friend 

(Incidentally, there's a Wikip¢ 
page for NQ Arbuckle that says thai 
Dinsmore was a professional bullligh' 
er before he joined the band. Quinlar 
says that he doesn’t think that’s tru: 
though. Still, it’s an impressive rumour 
to have kicking around.) 

The friends-jamming-on-the-bac! 
porch approach carries over into th 
recording process as well, where th: 
quartet—along with the occasional 
guest or two—put the songs down live 
Of course, Quinlan says with a chuckle 
that tracking things live is only part!) 
due to the band being able to do it 

“We're not clever enough to be able 
to do it otherwise,” he says. “I'd like to 
try and do stuff where you're overdub 
bing stuff and tightening things up anc 
cleaning it up, but fuck, I'll never do it 
We're too impatient. You know when 
you hear about bands and they doa 
song in a week or in a month of recor 
ing? I think, ‘My God, how can they po>” 
sibly spend all that time doing it? D0"! 
they know what it sounds like?’ And y°' 
I'd love to do something where €v« 
thing is sort of done at a different time 

“That'd be kind of fun to do, bul " 
never ends up actually working the! 
way.” v 


+ / bryan @vueweekly.com 
on g that the band is from 
sunny Florida, it’s hard to believe 
ow often Against Me! gets up 
5 Edmonton. Since gaining significant 
gnition for its first full-length album 
Axl Rose, released in 2002, 
band has been on the road almost 
onstantly and, unlike most other 
nds, is happy to go far and wide to 
the fans instead of sticking to a 
mailer, more profitable circuit. 

“| think that for all of us the full real- 
sation of being in a band, the actual 
ling of, ‘Yeah, this is it, this is what 
re investing our effort in,’ is the live 
ow, and you can only play in the 
me town so many times before you 
ave to take that show on the road,” 
plains drummer Warren Oakes 
ile taking a break from moving into 
new house. “It’s what scratches that 
Playing shows is what does it for 
s so you gotta keep making the 
punds looking for somewhere new.” 

The band further distances itself 
om most other touring acts in that 

ere is nary a complaint from Oakes 
bout the pressures of the road. The 
Members of Against Me! consider 
lhemselves lucky to be in a position 
here people who have never even 
et the band like the music. 

‘To even have one person on some 
emote part of the planet love the 
Music you made and is coming out to 


FAL, SEP 12 (7 Phi) 


AGAINST ME! 
WITH JAPANTHER, SAINT AMA CARTEL 
EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE, $25 (AL AGES) 


— 
co 
a 


see you perform it and try to share 
that experience with you, that’s 
enough to perk your spirits right up on 
the worst day,” he says. “Halfway 
across the planet somebody knows 
the words to every song and knows 
every drum fill by heart—you don’t 
wanna let that person down.” 


THOUGH AGAINST ME! took heat from 
some punks for allegedly ‘selling out’ 
when the band moved from indie Fat 
Wreck Chords to major label Sire for its 
most recent album New Wave, the band 
has always claimed to have done so in 


Come 


acoustic 


o*H-O-P 
9934-82 Avenue 


IVIUSIC 


TEL 780 433 3545 


S°H-O-P 


Avenue 


acoustic 


DRUMI 


EL 780 988 1169 


yainst Me! looks to the good times 


order to have the opportunity to work 
with producer Butch Vig, a longtime 
favourite of the members. For Oakes, 
working with the legendary producer— 
who is also an accomplished drummer— 
was everything it was cracked up to be. 
Working with Vig and drum tech Mike 
Fasano, much care was taken in achiev- 
ing the best possible sounds—something 
Oakes had never done before. 

“Sitting in the room with Mike and 
Butch just listening through the demos, 
and they'd go, ‘OK, I can really imagine 
a vintage kind of ‘70s floor tom for this, 
or | think we should go with the bell 
brass snare to get that good clang.” he 
recounts. “Going and breaking down 
song by song which drums should be 
used— I've never done anything but set 
up my drumset and play all the songs!” 

The band will work with Vig again 
next spring when the time comes to 
record a new album—and Oakes let slip 
that an EP may be released before 
year’s end—but one can’t help but won- 
der just how much the political band 
will have to write about if the American 
election proves to be the country-saving 
event it's supposed to be. 

“There’s no shortage of things to 
complain about,” laughs Oakes. "if 
everything really does turn up rosy then 
we'Te just gonna have to write songs 
about the good times. Against Me! will 
turn into a good times party band. I 
think we're up for that. | would be.” w 


ELLIOTT BROOD 


% with NQ ARBUCKLE » 
The Pawn Shop & Wed Sep 17 


Doors @ 8pm Tix $20 


10551- 32 Avenue {Upstairs!} 
730-432-5053 


END EVERY NIGHT AT THE 
AWN SEXZOrF! 


Carneéa 


beyond the fall 


ite fallen: & jar 
doors at 8 ichok oa 9 


$10.00 AFTER 10:00PM) | 
BOORS SPM ee 


RESURGENCE 


Fes ay fr TRE 


ORIGIN 


DE LAST PELONY 


> 


DOORS HT GPM 10949 B2AVE OPSTHIRS WOW. PAMOSHOPLIVE.CO 


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tickets at TicketMaster, Alexis 

s on Wyle, Shadified 
iat (WEM) 


FOUR ROOMS Chvistine Schmolke 


8pm 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 0 

8pn 

HULBEAT'S Hulber’s house con- 
certs: Ariane Lemire: Bpm: $12 at 


TickatSource/$1 


IVORY CLUB Live Dueling Pianos, no 
cover, Spm 


JAMMERS PUB Thursday open jam: 
7-11pm 


J AND R BAR AND GRILL Open 
stage with the Poster Boys 
(pop/rock/blves), 8:30pm-1220am 


JET MIGHTCLUB Domenica with 
guests Hollywood Assassyn 


JUUIANS—CHATEAU LOUIS 
Graham Lawrence (jazz piano); 8pm 


LB’S PUB Dpen jam with Ken 
Skoreyko; Spm 


LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRILL Open 
Stage Thursdays with Gary Thomas 


WEW CITY Utulele Fest: The Burning 
Hell,The Be Arthurs, Doug Hoyer. Jill 
Pollock, Alena Manera, Aaron Parker, 
Liam Trimble, Agape Raygun 
Experiment, Switchblade Death 
Derby, Calvin McElroy, Belacade 

8pm; no minors, admission donation 
to Ukuleles for Peace 


NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by 
Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers 


O'BYRNE'S Soul Beat Revival 


ROCK PUB AND GRILL § Minute 
Date; Bom, no cover 


ROSE BOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE Tor 
Holliston and Dave Lang; Spm; $8 
(door) 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA-FRONT 
OF ARTS BUIDING Maracatu 
Mulanga (Afro-Brazilian deumming) 
Claudia Guimaraes AND 
Miscigenagdo Dance Group; 4pm Rain 
location: Foyer of Acts Building: 4pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Sadiy. I'm Bradley. 
The Suments, The Mange 


WILD WEST SALOON Colleen fac 


CLASSICAL 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Gals 
Fundraising Concert: Gala and 
Recepbon: Edmonton Symphony 
Orchestra, Rente Fleming (soprano), 
William Eddins (conductor); $250 
{Dress Circle and Orchestra 
Loges}/$200 [Terrace )/$150 
(Orchestra/$75 (Upper Circlel/$S0 
{Gallery and Choir Loft) 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Thursday 
Nights: Electro Education: dub, trip 
hop. lounge, eleetro with DU Lazer 
Beam 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 
Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Big Rock 


5 (door) 


Thursdays: Dus spin on three levels 


BUDDY'S Wer underwear contest 
‘with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


FILTHY MoNASTY'S Punk Rock 
Bingo with OJ SWAG. 


FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Requests with OQ! Demian 


GAS PUMP (Ladies Nite: Top 
40/dance with DJ Christian 


GINGUR SKY Urban Substance 
Thursdays 


WALD Thursdays fo Sho: with Allout 
Ds DJ Degree, Junior Brown 


KAS BAR Urban House: with D) 
Mark Stevens; 9pm 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays 
funky house/tachno with O.) Colin 
Hargreaves, house/breaks with OJ 
Krazy K. hardstyle/techno with DJ 
Dechs, tech trance/electra with QU 
Savage Garret no minors; no cover 


MEW CITY | Love ‘80s Party: with 


n Nomad no minors 


NEW CITY Bingo hosted hy Dexter 


Nebula and Anarchy Adam; no 
minors: 10pm, no cove 

ON THE ROCKS 

Thursdays; Dance lessons at Bpm 
Salsa DJ to follow 

OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 


ROOM SOUTH Retro to New: classi 
rock, R&B, urban and dance with DJ 
Mikee; Spm-2am) no cover 


PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT Hit It 
breaks, electro hause spun 
esidents 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Meta! Thurrday 
with org686 


SUEDE LOUNGE Smooth Soulful 
House with DJ Nic-E every Thursday 


VELVET UNDERGROUND 1) 
Degree and 0 Generic 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL The 
Derina Harvey Band 

BELL AND COURT PUB The 
Hardline Blues Bard: $20pm- 1 Dam: 
no cover 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE Songwriters in 
the round: Singin’ Their Songs with 
Rab Heath, Jay Willis and Bob Jahnig: 
8pm, $15 (advi/$20 (door) 


BLUES OM WHYTE Mo Bad As 
CARROT Live music Fridays: Kjterstin 
and Garret; all ages; 7:30-9:30—m; $5 
(door) 


CASINO EDMONTON Sam Cockrell 

{blues) 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD formic Kerr 

{pop/rock} 

COAST TO COAST PUB AND 

GRILL Open stage Friday Night host 

ed by Leona Burkey; Spm 

DV8 TAVERN Live music every Fri 
Spm: $S 

EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE 
Against Me (tock/pop). Japanther, 
Saint Alvia Cartel; 7pm (door); all 
ages; $25 at TicketMaster, 
Jnionevents.com, Megstunes. 
Blackbyrd 

FESTIVAL PLACE Souljah Fyah, 
7.30pm 


FOUR ROOMS Christina Schmolko, 
Spm: $5 

FRESH START | ive music Fridays 
Moving Stairs: 6-Spm; $5 


GIBBONS HOTEL-GIBBONS 
Stowbum (ltwes: $30pm-1:30am 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB HAVEN 
SOCIAL CLUB Wyckham Portoous 
singer, songwriter and storyteller) 
with Nick Perrault (folkl: Bom; $18 
(doorl/$15 {adv at TIX on the Square) 
HULBEAT'S (iso Nicole Grace; Bprn, 
$10 (door) 

IRISH CLUB Jom se 
cover 

JEFFREY'S CAFE Rollanda Lee (jazz 
classics); $10 

JEXYLL AND HYDE PUB Evory 
Friday: Headwind (classic pop/rock 


ny Bom: no 


Spm; no cover 


Lous 
Graham Lawrence {jazz piano) 8pm 


KINGSWAY LEGION Dwayne 
Cannan {blues, "502/60s roots, orige 
nals) 6:30-10-30¢en 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE End 
Credits, Bayoneetes, special surprise 
guest 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Capita! City 
Burlesque, Viva Las Vegas {Elivis tib- 
ute) 


NORWOOD LEGION Uptown Folk 
Qub: Mike Sedava and the Nuked 
Blues Review (Dave “Crawdad™ 
Cantera and Tom Rosthkoy), Greg 
Martin and the MOEs {Bill Sylvester 
and Mike Bombalkl, 7:20pm (door). 
Spm (musiek, $15 (doorl/$12 [adv at 
Myhers Music, Southside Sound) 


O'BYRNE'S McKeevers Crossing 
ON THE ROCKS Exit 303 


PAWN SHOP 01 Angels (Farewell 
forever Show), All Squares Filled. 
guests: free before 10pm 


SUR WINSTON CHURCHILL 
SQUARE Shout Out Out Out Our, The 
Whitsundays, The Trevor Tehir Band; 
all ages; 7-1pm 

STARUTE ROOM Michas! Bernard 
Fitzgerald Smoked Folk; no minors 
$10 (door) 

TEMPLE T.G.| Psydays: Techno Hippy 
Crew: Spm 

TOUCH OF CLASS—CHATEAU 
LOUIS Todd Reynolds (pop/rock); 
8:30pm 

URBAN LOUNGE Creature 


(Montreal). w/ Miss Understood: $5 
{door} 


VELVET UNDERGROUND Light 
Travels, The Ordinaries and The Bird 
Sang Song: no minors; 8pm (door) 
$10 (door) 


WILD WEST SALOON Colleen Rae 


X-WRECKS Patsy-Amico and Bran 
Gregg Trio with Moses Gregg on bass 
(roots); Bom 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Funky 
Friday: Funky breaks, funky house, 
funky tunes with Phife and friends 


BANK ULTRA LOUNGE Connected 
Fridays: 91.7 The Bounce, Nestor 
Delano, Luke Morrison 


BAR-8-BAR 0. James, no cover 
BAR WILD Bar Wild Fridays 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Friday 
Dus spin Woottop and Main Floor 
Eclectic jams with Nevine—indie, soul, 
motown, new wave, electro: 
Underdoo: Perverted Fridays: Punk 
and Ska from the “60s “70s and “80s 
with Fathead 


BOOTS Revo Disco: retro dance 


BUDDY'S We made ‘em famous! DJ 
Eddy Toonflash, come early to avoid 
finaup, no cover before 10pm 


CHROME LOUNGE Platinum VIP 
Fridays 

DELUXE BURGER BAR flare ‘60s 
and ‘70s progressive rock, disco, and 
electronic Indie with Joel Reboh 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock. hip hop. 
house, mash up. no minors 


ESMERALDA’S Exzies Freakin Frenzy 
Fridays: Playing the bast in country 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DU 
Damian 


GAS PUMP Top 40/dance with DJ 
Christian 


HALD Mod Club indie rock, new 
wave, Brit pop, and "60s soul with DJ 
Blue Jay, OJ Travy 0: no cover before 
10pm: $5 (atter 10pm) 


GINGUR Ladies Room: with Bomb 
Squad, 0. OB the Teacher 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Hypnotiq Friday: 
Breakbeat, house, progressive and 
electro with Groovy Cuvy, DJ Fuuze 


NEW CITY Friday Night Freek Out 
rockandrol}/punkrock/abitafever- 
thing/indy with DJs Jebus and 
Anarchy Adam (fom CJSA’s Your 
Weekty AA Meeting); G:Whiz 


OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New: classic 
rock, R&B, urban and dance with OJ 
Mikes: Spm-2am, no cover 


RED STAR Movin’ on Up Fridays: 
indie, rock. funk, soul, hip hop with 
DU Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson 


ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 


‘SAPPHIRE RESTAURANT AND 
LOUNGE Deep House: with Friday 
resident OJ Luke Morrison; 14:30pm. 


‘SPORTSWORLD INLINE AND AND 
ROLLER SKATING DISCO Top 40 
Request with a mix of Retro and 
Dison, 7-10:309m; weaw-sports- 
worldca 


STOLEFS Top 40. R&B house with 
People’s DJ 

STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 with DU 
Tyain 

TEMPLE 1.G.| Psydays: Every 2nd Fri 
Paylrance, Beats and the dance-y 


stuff with the Techno Hippy Crew, 
quests 


WUNDERBAR Fridays with the Pony 
Girls, DJ Avinder and DJ Toma; no 
cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Foundation Fridays 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL The 
Derina Harvey Band 


BELL AND COURT PUB Thc 
Hardline Blues Band; 9:30pm-1:30am, 
No cover 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of 
the Dog: live acoustic music every 
Saturday afternoon; 4-6pm, no cover 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rion Fault: $10 


BLUES OM WHYTE Saturday 
Aftemoon Jam; evening: Mo Bad Ass 


CARROT Open mic Saturdays, 7:30- 
10pm; free 


CASINO EDMONTON Sam Cockrell 
(blues) 


CASINO YELLOWHEAD Ronnie Kerr 
(pop/rock) 

COAST TO COAST PUB AND 
GRILL Funkafeelya. 3:30pm, $5 

DV6 TAVERN Live music every Sat 
Spm: $5. 

EARLY STAGE SALOOM-STONY 
Saturday Live Music 


EDDIE SHORTS Future Echos and 
Guests (rock ‘n’ roll) 


Hanson (rockpop): 8pm (door); The 
Walk Around the World all ages 
event; $32.50 at TicketMaster 


FILTHY MCNASTY'S Open stage 
Saturdays hosted by The Love Shove 
and quests, 1pm (door), 26m (show) 


FOUR ROOMS Christina Schmolke, 
Spm; $5 


GIBBONS HOTEL-GIBBONS 
Slowbum (blues), $:30pm-1-30am 


HERITAGE 
AMPHITHEATRE-HAWRELAK 
PARK Big Rock Celtic Festival Celtic 
Fusion Illusion (29 piece Celtic rock 
band), Captain Tractor, St James 
Gate, MeQuaig, Wajjo African 
Drummers, 20m (gate), 3-9:30pm 
{music); $30 (adv) at 
TickotMaster/$A0 (gate), $75 (adv. 
family of 4), fre (child under 12) 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Wyckhiam 
Porteous (singer, songwriter and sto- 
fyteller), Dirty Larry, Spmi $18 
(doorl/$15 (adv at TIX on the Square} 


HULBERT'S Marleigh and Mueller; 
8pm; $10 

JAMIMMERS PUB Saturday open jam, 
3-7.30pm; country/rock band Spm- 
2am 

SEFFREY'S CAFE Diana Stabel (jaz. 
pop); $10 

JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB Headwind 
{classic pop/rockk 9pm; no cover 
JEKYLL AND HYDE RESTAURANT 
Exicatera (folk/popt: Spm; $10 (door) 


Graham Lawrence {jazz plang); 8pm 


KINGSWAY LEGION Dwayne 
Cannan (blues, "508/ BOs roots, origi- 
natst; 6:30-10:30pm 


ON THE ROCKS Gut 303 


PAWN SHOP Sic Transit Presents 
Carnes, Beyond the Fall, Latafallen, 
Jar; 8pm 


REXALL PLACE Elton John; 7pm 
(door), Bpm (show) $79-$149 at 
TickatMastor 


ROCK PUB AND GRILL Molsen 
Canadian Freeway Jam; 4pm-2:30 


SEP, I< SEP.17, 2008: 


MUSIC, 


MUSIC WEEKLY 


‘am; No cover 


ST. ALBERT FARMER'S Many; 
Slow Burn: 1Dam-3pm 


Double (CD relea 
1S. Spen; no mmr 
Sound Connecti, 
Southside Sound, Megat 


STRATHERN PUB 0 
Sat of each month, 5-9prr 
by karaoke 


TOUCH OF CLASS-cuAy 
LOUIS Todd Reynolds (pre 
8:30pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Miss (jn 
$5 (door) 


VELVET UNDERGROUND 
Qutlaw Band, Bob Wayne an 
Dutlaw Camiss: rio minos 
{doorl; $10 {door) 


WILD WEST SALOON ( 


DIS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Saturdays. Top 40 with 0. 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUS< 
OUs on three levels, Main 
Menace Si ns: alt 
fock/electro/trash with MV 
Mannered 


BUBOY'S Uncie night for m 


free pool and tourney, DJ Arr 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Fock | 
house, mash up 


ESMERALDA'S Super P 


Sata different ther 


FLUID LOUNGE Saturday 
Mash-Up: with Harmen B 

Kwake: 

FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE Ave) 
tracks, rock. retro with DJ ¢ 


GINGUR SKY Soulout Satu 


HALO For Those Who Kr 
every Sat with DJ Junior Brc 
Morrison, Nestor Delano, An f 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Size 
Groovy Cuvy and guest 
NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 


‘Saturdays real alternative, c 
punk with DJ Nazz Nomad 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 

Sucks: electro, industria’ 

fock with DJs Greg Gory 

% 

PLANET INDIGO-JASPER AVENUE 
Suggestive Saturdays: bre 

house with Pl residents 


RED STAR Saturdays indie ' 
hop, and electro with DJ 

and guests 

RENDEZVOUS Survival 
SPORTSWORLD ROLLERSKATING 
DISCO Sportsworld Inliv: 
Skating Disco: Top 40 Req 
‘mix of retro and disco; | 
7-10;30pm; www sports-Wv0 
STOLLI'S ON WHYTE Jop 4 
house with People’s DJ 
‘SUEDE LOUNGE The Fin 
Underground House with Dv N' 
every Saturday 

TEMPLE 0h Shop!) Every 
with Degree and Allout Qs w 
Weekly guests; Spm 


WUNDERBAR Featured 0. 
bands 


ARTERY Wendy McNeil! 
BLUE CHAIR CAFE E110! 2: 
donations 

BLUES ON WHYTE Wire 
AC/DC tribute 

EDDIE SHORTS Live 1°" 
stage jam: 7pm. no cove 
HULBERT'S Song 

7pm; no cover, feature & 
KUDOS Fon WOOD FURNITUS: 
ETD Terry McDade (come 9° 
harp); 14pm 

LOOP LOUNGE Jom hos" 


the years I've been a journalist, | 
ye done a lot of the dirtiest work we 
» to do in our business. | have done 
, share of chasing ambulances and fire 


pening in the area. And, by interest- 
| mean bloody, 

have done “pick-ups,” the journal- 
’s term for going to the family of 
eone who has just died tragically 
d trying te get quotes about the vic- 


a pea. These are the times you feel like 
lowlife reporter in the trench coat that's 
cliché fram se many cop movies. 

But, this past week, while | wasn’t doing 


The event? The after party for the Davis 
iggenheim documentary /t Might Get 
id. The film places three legendary gui- 
rists, Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page, U2's 
e Edge and Jack White of the White 


Winds, Angela Schroeder [conductor), 
Shelley Younge, Lindsay Elford, 
(Mlutes), Jett Campbell, Amber 


a dirty job 


Stripes together on a stage to talk about 
their instrument of choice, their influences 
and about the rock world in general. 

Media covering the Toronto Internation- 
al Film Festival who also got invites to the 
party at the SoHo Metropolitan Hotel—a 
party which all three rock superstars were 
guaranteed to attend—had to wait just 
outside the red-carpet ropes in hopes to 
get quotes and pictures. Deals are made 


ist asks the first question.” 

So, you sit in the rain and wait. Soon, a 
black Mercedes drives up to the ropes. 
Photographers run towards it. The win- 
dows roll down, and there are three young 
adults in the car, laughing uncontrollably. 


the VIP area, where he can hang with the 
other begutiful people, including Michael J 
Fox, producer Bob Rock, NBA star Steve 
Nash, Blue Jays outfielder Vernon Wells 


Page will arrive soon. 


IN THE MEANTIME, someone no one in the 


media recognizes is brought on the carpet, 
pumping flesh like a politician. This is some 


quest DJs inquire at cover 
kelly@michetti com 


BLUES ON WHYTE Slow Bum; Ipm- 


up-and-comer looking for media, his publi- 
Cist trying to get us to stop the Page watch 
in order to get this guy into the press. 

Then, Page arrives, grey mullet just 

perfect, and he walks the carpet, waving 

at the autagraph seekers. But he doesn’t 
stop. No quotes. 

The only member of the film entourage 
who stops to address the carpet media is 
Guggenheim. 


s, spending many hours hunched —_ with photographers and other journalists: “We want to show a kid playing guitar 
te) ‘police scanner, trying to pick up “if Page stops here, can| get this one ques- _in his basement that he can be the next 
is 10 see if anything interesting was _tion in?” “Please make sure the TV journal- Jimmy Page.” 


And he leaves. Over an hour outside the 
ropes, and | have 19 words in my notebook. 
| walk back towards the party entrance- 
way, looking to lick my wounds with a 
tequila or Jack Daniel's. The party is set up 
like this: the hangers-on can all get in and 


-and a photo. : Fooled you all. Great stunt. suck back free liquor, while the VIPs have a 
hese things, while necessary to our Then the stars do arrive. White skips the special room roped off in the centre. All the 
ness, Make a reporter feel aboutas big red carpet and makes a beeline right for partygoers can peer in and see White, 


Page and company chatting away, but we 
are all kept safely outside. 

But | can’t get back in right away. No 
one is being readmitted to the party until 


gangsters in Goodfellas. w 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chief 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and author 
living in Toronto, 


{door}; all proceeds to the HIV net 
work 


Campbell (clarinets), Beth Levia, Matt 
Uattray loboes), Diane Persson, Matt 
Howat (bassoons), Allene 
Hackleman, Olwyn Supeene (hams), 
2pm, Pre concert introduction at 
1:15pm by Dr Angela Schroeder; tick- 
ets available at the door, TIX on the 


‘Square, the Gramophone 


CLUB $ Ladies Industry Sundays: 
‘With DJ Invinceable and guest Dus, 
Phat Kat (Fringe weekend) 
OVERTIME BROILER Sunday 
Industry Night: Requests with OJ Bo 


WUNDERBAR Sundays DJ Galiates 
and XS, quests; no cover 


tam 

IWORY CLUB Open mic Mondays: 
music and comedy, Bom 

PAWH SHOP Cryptopsy, Origin, The 
Last Felony, Skepsis (metal): 8pm 


PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY 
HALL Acoustic instrumental old time 


CLASSICAL 


CITY HALL-CITY ROOM Edmonton 
Choral Fair 2008: Edmonton 
Metropolitan Chorus, Alberta Choral 
Federation, Pro Caro Canada; featur- 
ing adult choirs; 7:30-9:30pm; free 


> SLOAN 


W/ WILL CURRIE & 


ything as sordid as chasing the dead,! and Canadian pop star Bryan Adams. the red carpet is cleared. Then, word THE npc: 
a retum of that slimy-reporter feel. And So far, the media are standing out‘in the comes that the Edge is already in the hotel; ; »: ‘ 2 
came from working a red carpet. rain and getting nothing. Word comes that he came through the kitchen, just like the 


~~ | _ fiddle jam hasted by the Wild lose DS 
0 Polujin {classical guitar: Spm DJS OBS Tite Hedierx Society: 7pm SS OEE THE HOT BUSINESS 
CHURCHILL BACKSTAGE GRILL ROCK PUB AND GRILL Monday BAR WILD Bar Gone Wild Mondays 
le ee pel 4 Industry Naw Acne ine Rock Band Night: 6pm; no cover Service Industry Night: no minors; W/ TH E SET (VICTORIA) 
Sures. Rotin Hunter | Jameoki and 0 Tim ROSE BOWLROUGE LOUNGE The | "2" & ea 
So ii aoe 25pm BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sin‘ay Luigendary Rose Bowl Monday Jam: | BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Msin 
CENTRE Dave Stewant Aftemeons: Phil, 2-7pm. Main Floor: hosted by Sherry-Lee Wisar/Mike Floor: Eclectic Nonsenso, Confederacy 
Got To Gav kt Up: Funk, Soul : McDonald (alternating): Spm-12am of Ounces, Oad Rock. TJ Hookah and 
CLASSICAL Motown, Disco wi ( Rear Admiral Saunders 
isco with DV Red Dawn STARLITE ROOM The Blush a 5 
BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB — Connection, On The Brink, Violet BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB fudy Electro 
OCATION HALL Music at SAGA Teas emetic BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sleemsn Archer, White Chocolate and Krystle fatest and greatest in House, 
frocation Hall Series. Chamber Trip-Hop; Rudy Electro: 10pm-2:20ame Mondays: live music monthly: no Dos Santos; na minors, 7pm; $10 Progressive and Trip-Hop, 12am- 


2:20am; interested guast DJs inquire 


VENUE 


WHERE THEY ARE 


* ARTERY 9535 Ja: Are 780-758-9856 ¢ ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 7704 Benda Trail South, 

“Axis CAFE 1 Ave, 780-990-0031 * BACKDRAUG! iB 

10324A-82 Ave, uj 
ULTRA LOUNGE 167s 10765 en er Ave, 780-420-9098 * BAR 

BELL AND COURT PUB 20010A Main Bivd, Broadmore, Sherwood Park « BILLY BOB’S LOUNGE 

Continental Inn, 16625 Stony Plain Rd, 780-484-7751 * BLACK DOG 

IB 32 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, 780-418-6332 * BLUE CHAIR 


ch ee) e 10349 Jas; 


by ea * BLI 


9624-76 Ave, 780-989-2861 * BLUES ON WHYTE 

10242-106 St, 780-423-5014 « BUDDY’S 117258 Jasper Ave, 780-488-6636 * C. 
Ave INO EDMONTON ieee Argyll Rd, 780-463-9467 * CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464- 

PARTY PUB 2021 Millbourne Rd, West, 780-462-6565 * 
IE ae ey ia Ave, Vcore tal * CLIFF'S PUB 8214-175 St* CLUB 9 10324-82 Ave * 


153 St, 780-424-9467 * CHRISTOPH 
CHROM! 


07-99 St, 
stairs, 780-436-4418 »* BANK 
10552 82 Ave, 780-432-0814 » 


FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 


10329-82 Ave, 780-439-3981 « BOOTS: 
LEVA 11053- 


COASTTO 
Arts Buildi ney 780 492 3611* CROWN 
St, 760-4 ae an 


PLACE | 
10511-82 Ave, Seo aie ise? 7 Flu LOUNGE | 
189 St, 7: 


1107 Knotwood 


780-413-4578 « NAKED CYB! 
106 Se 750.900 780.3800704 = ° NEW CITY 10081 aes a 2 Be UNREAL L-GTES © ONT 
780-439-9485 IME DOW! 


U; 730-432-0814 
1-82 A\ tairs, 
PLEASANTVI EW COMMUNITY 
R 10538 780-428-0825 * RENDEZVOUS PUB 10108-149 St * RITCH! ITED 
D GRILL Si0 St A St Albert Tr, St Albert, 780-458-5571 *« ROSEBOWL/I 

LITTLE 10135 -96 Ave * ST. ALBERT FARMER'S 

NGE 10416-82 Ave, B0097-0231/710- 1625 * SECOND CUP 12336-124 St, 780-451-7574 « 
ROOM 10030-102 St, 780-428-1099 « STEEPC TER 

IOUSE PUB 11012 Jas) 


DIAMONDS 8120 

Seas ee 
ut ossing. 

11607 Jasper Ava * PLANET INDIGO-ST. 


HA 


IB AND GRILL 5552 Calgary Tr. S, 780-439-8675 » CONVOCATION HALL 
An ANCHOR PUB 15277 Castle Downs Rd, 113 

* DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780-454-9928 * DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780- 

oya.s554 * DV8 TAVERN 8307-99 St. www.DVSTAVERN.. TAY. * EDDIE SHORTS 10713-124 St. 

CENTRE WEM Phase Il!, 780-489-SHOW * EMPIRE BALLROOM WV! 

Sherwood Park, 780-449-3378, 780-464-2852 * FIDDLER'S ROOST 8906-99 St * FILTHY 

105-109 St, 780-429-0700 » FOUR ROO! 


md 780-433-5382 © 
Albert, 78 1122 
* LOOP LOUNGE 367 St Albert Rd, St rt, 780-460- 10-1122 « MEAD CeSpen (ee 


SCHOOL 1 


PUB 6104-104 St, 
780-485-1717 * PAWN SHOP 1055 
812 Liberton Dr, St. Albert * 


D ees * STARLITE 


M Phase 2, upper level, WEM, 780- 


3-96: FUNKY BUDDHA 1028 f 2 ni CBOs eee. 
START Riverbend Sq, 780-433-9623 » FUN 1 vB, ° 
hr PUMP ao St. 780-488-4841 « GINGUR SKY 15505-118 Ave, 780-913-4312/780-953-3606 * HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 780-423-HALO * 


ROUGE LOUNGE 10111- 


HALL 10940-1664 St 


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Fe) 

= ROLAND PEMBERTON 
roland @yueweekly.com 


Last Sunday, | took in the 25th anniver- 
sary of the MTV Video Music Awards and 
saw it as an extremely detailed, two- 
hour-long Powerpoint presentation. The 
subject? The music industry's 2008 - 09 
marketing plan: how to make new money 
with old ideas. | was bombarded with 
imagery in the classic MTV fashion, but 
there seemed to be a new reason for all 
this colour and flash. Specifically, the rea- 
son is the re-up. They need their product 
back on the streets and they need a new 
customer base willing to cop it. 

The stage setup this year seemed 
remarkably stripped down from years 
past, where spectacle was once equal to 
musicality. It seemed that even MTV real- 
ized this: capable but relatively unknown 
host Russell Brand was forced to basival- 
ly regurgitate the night's events in a man- 
ner that emphasized how much “fun” the 
show was and how “anything could hap- 
pen.” There were no rock stars climbing 
angular fixtures, no torch passing via 
makeout and no “Wu-Tang is for the chil- 
dren” sloganeering. Slash almost slipped 


on a rotating staircase, though. Some- 
thing can happen, but only if the company 
knows about it, and if the company 
knows about, it can only be so interest- 
ing. Cookie, | think you're tame. 

It seems obvious that the industry is in 
panic mode, especially when they think 
the old tricks are gonna work (because 
they do). Until last night, | had managed 
to successfully never hear a Jonas Broth- 
ers song. Their saccharine love-me-do is 
promoted expertly in the Beatles/Mon- 
kees model: they play their own instru- 
ments, and, more important than their 
dreamy looks and shared bromance, they 
represent “Your Daughter's First Rebel- 
lion,” a scene depicted live on MTV's Hol- 
lywood sound stage with a thousand girls 
madly rushing the stage when the Jonas’s 
“rock out portion” reared its toothless 
head. But don’t worry, dudes: they've got 
something for you too 


I'VE ALSO BEEN purposely avoiding Katy 
Perry's near-immediate ascension to 
worldwide fame. | hadn't even heard her 
song by accident, in a supermarket, at a 
bar or whatever. | just didn’t want to be a 
part of this ballgame, because | kmew I'd 
never stop playing if they got me in the 
rotation. The VMAs had one cool per- 
formance angle where DJ AM and Travis 


Barker would drum and scratch ANd incor 
porate live vocalists. Katy Perry ¢ 5 
cover of Madonna's “Like A Virgin,” ain, 
with her hit song “! Kissed A Gir!” 
wearing a Karen 0 costume (MJ 
and a unitard with Warholian pe 
banana applique on the front) and | wa 
mesmerized. “They” (label, MTV ang A 
company working as Cerberus) poked i 
boner switch from all angles, appeaiin 
to sensuality triggers such as electroclas 
circa 2001, Karen 0, Madonna and th; 
mere thought of girls making out. Thi 
suppose, explains its status as a numb 
one hit. | immediately downloaded « 
Kissed A Girl” and have since unironi all 
considered playing it in public 

Nowadays, the MTV VMAs are only tp 
gentially about music, the same way \\j 
the station isn’t necessarily about p| ing 
music videos. So as the music goes awa 
more and more, this pointless event with, 
bored-looking crowd of celebrities and pri 
grammed fans is somehow becoming les 
and less entertaining. The only thing the 
do still have a hold on is how to use o, 
emotions against us and for them. Tl 
image ts the Trojan horse that tricks yg 
into buying the product, wanting to suppor 
the person behind the image, whether 
not they are even connected. It's a goo 
game but it can't work forever. w 


THU, SEP 4 / THE REAL MICKENZIES / NEW CITY 


See more photos and read Phil Duperrons 
review at vueweekly.com. 


at kelly@michetti.com; karaoke with 
Tizy, amateur strip contest; Spm- 
12am 


FILTHY McNASTY'S Metal 
Mondays: with DJ SWAG 


FLUID LOUNGE Mondays Mixer 


MEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 

Muneh on Metal Mondays: ‘80s 
metal with DJ Sammi Keer; no 

minors; no cover 


BLUES ON WHYTE Siow Bum; 
Spmm-1am 


DRUID (JASPER AVENUE) Open 
stage with Chris Wynters 


OBYANES Caltic Jam with 
Shannon Johnson and friends 


REXALL PLACE Noi) Diamond, Live 
Concart Tour of a Lifetime; $54.74- 
$119.74 at TicketMaster 


ROCK PUB AND GRILL Ammar's 
Open Stage every Tues night with 
Mark Ammar and Noel (Big Cat) 
Mackenzie featuring Backswing 


Porch; :30pm-tam: no cover 


SECOND CUP Open mic every Tue 
7-pm 

SIDELINERS PUB Tu2sday All Star 
Jom with Aljcia Tait and Rickey 
Sidecar; Bp 


TAPHOUSE Moison Open Stage 
Jamn: with Simon Bennett; Bpm-mid: 
hight 


CLASSICAL 


CITY HALL-CITY ROOM Exmonton 
Choral Fair 2008: Edmonton 
Motropolitan Chorus, Alberta Choral 
Federation, Pro Coro Canada, 7:30- 


SAPPHIRE RESTAURANT AND 
LOUNGE Tapas Tuesday. popular 
house beats with BJ Kevin Wong 


AND ROLLER SKATING DISCO 
Retro Night, 7-10:30pm: www sports 
work) oa 


WED 


LIVE MUSIC 


9:30pm; free 
DJS 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Nisin 
Floor; CJSR's Eddie Lunchpail 
Woottop: Dub at The Dog with DJ 
Degree 

BUDDY'S Free pool and tourney, DU 
Asrowctiaser, Som 

ESMERALDA'S Retro every Tue no 
cover with student ID 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Latin and Salsa music, dance lessons 
10pm 


GINGUR SKY Bashment Tuesdays 


RED STAR Tuesdays: Experimental 
Indie Rock, Hip Hop, Electro with DY 
Hot Phitty 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main 
Floor: Glitter Guich Wednesdays: live 
music once a month 


BLUES ON WHYTE Slow Burn; 
Span 

EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Bad 
Religion. The Bronx (rockk 7pm 
{door}; all ages; $29.50 at 
TicketMaster Blackbyrd, Megatunes, 
FS (WEM), Unionevents com 
FESTIVAL PLACE Angie Nusssy, 
Tpmt $20 at TicketMaster 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Open Mic 
every Wed: 7pm 

HOOLIGANZ PUB Open stoge 
Wednesdays hosted by Rock ‘n’ Roll 
Kenny 


SEP 11. = SEP 17, 2008 


MUSIC 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Open mic 
O'BYRNE'S Marco Claveria 


PAWN SHOP Elliott Brood, NO 
Arbuckle Pale Moon Lights; 8pm; $15 
at TicketMaster, Blackbyrd, 
Megatunes, Listen 
PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY 
HALL Acoustic Biuegrass jam pre- 
sented by the Northem Bivegrass 
Circle Music Society every 
Wednesday evening 

ROCK PUB AND GRILL Acoustic 
unplugged jem, $pm-tam; no cower 
‘STEEPS TEA LOUNGE Open mic 
{acoustic} every Wed 


VELVET UNDERGROUND Wyid 
Styie Wednosday: Live hiphop, every 
Wed: $5 

WILD WEST SALOON Tera Lee 


CLASSICAL 


CITY HALL-CITY ROOM Ednonton 
Choral Fair 2008: Edmonton 
Metropolitan Chorus, Alberta Choral 
Federation, Pro Coro Canada; featur- 
ing youth and children's choirs, 7:30- 
9:30pm: free. 


DJS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR Deep 
Wednesdays: Soulful Deep House 
with Nic-é and Smoov 


Nights: with DJ Harley 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE No" 
Floor: RetroActwe A A 

‘BOs and “90s, Post Fun 
Garage, Brit, Mod, Rock a 
with LL Gool Joe 
BUDDY'S Humo day with DJ Send 
Sean 

FLUID LOUNGE Wednesday "0 
This 

FOX Wind-up Wednesd 
hiphop, reggae. old skool. 
with InVinceable, Touch It, weet’ 
guest Ws 

LEGENDS PUB Hip hop/R&E wi" 
DJ Spincycle 

AJ/DJ Wednesday, no minors, 
cover 

IKI DIAMOND'S Punk 2nd 
mmatal every Wednesday 

RED STAR Guest DJs every 
Wednesday 
STARLUTE ROOM Wild Sty 
Wednesdays: Hip-Hop: 9 


aos 


House, prugeessiv= 
with Rudy Electro, DY Ty" 
‘Age and weekly quests“? 
wow beatparty.ret 

WUNDERBAR Wednesda" 


new DJ; po cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Y Not Wednesil 


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SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 MUSIC 


band merchandise 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / maryehrista@vueweekly.com 


usical artists have hada 
visual identity since the 
dawn of rock, and they've 


lent their lustre to fans ever since, 
through T-shirts, record bags, posters, 
badges, underpants, comics and even 
jewelry. The DIY music era encom- 
passed merch, with artists commis- 
sioning or making stuff for audiences 
themselves. In the absence of tradi- 
tional industry money-making, merch 
became an important source of funds, 
and a visual secret handshake. 

Why bother with merch? With ram- 
pant digital song-swapping, it’s wise 
to offer something else people can 
buy to support you. Merch helps build 
a band presence and identity in your 
community and beyond, and stellar 
merch can snag the attention of 
tastemakers and bring your music to 
new ears. The most simple pro-merch 
argument: it’s a way to further con- 
nect with people who like your music. 

What should we sell? Go handmade 
or reproduce something professional- 
ly—your options are determined by 
how crafty you are, how polished you 
want it (be deliberately imperfect if it 
fits your aesthetic), what you can 
afford and what you want to offer. Be 
creative and brainstorm everything 
you can think of, and look at other 
bands’ stuff for ideas. T-shirts and 
hoodies are perennial favourites. Use 
4 quality brand that has a good fit and 
1S comfortable (American Apparel is 
Popular). Or hunt down second-hand 
clothing and screen overtop, like vin- 
‘age denim jackets. Get an assortment 
of sizes. Invest in a stamp of your 
logo (stampexpress.com) and stamp 
weird little second-hand knickknacks. 
Silkscreen or embroider tube socks, 
aprons, arm or leg-warmers. 
Research the local reproduction and 
printing services and price out what 
they offer—stickers and matchbooks 
with your website on them are good 
and relatively cheap giveaways. A 


Musician’s Survival Guide Part II: 


= SURVIVAL 


pin-making machine is available 
online for about $100 (eBay) and is a 
good investment 


BUT WE'RE NOT ARTISTS! Haunt local 


galleries and student art and design 
shows and approach artists you 
admire—a great cultural scene Is 
interdisciplinary. Teach yourself how 
to knit or check out SNAP's Open Stu- 
dio sessions for inexpensive access to 
printmaking equipment and knowl- 
edge from their technicians. 

How do we run the table? Old suit- 
cases become instant display cases 
when they open—pin merchandise to 
the inside. Little containers keep stuff 
like stickers or badges tidy and acces- 
sible. Keep merch organized by style 
and size and have a price list tacked 
up, or price things individually on 
masking tape. Keep a little kit that has 
twist ties, clothes and safety pins, 
tacks, masking tape and markers in it 
so you can adapt your table to any 
venue. Use a little ledger book to keep 
track of what you sell. (List everything 
in advance so it’s a matter of adding a 
checkmark.) Keep a float with change 
and put a notebook and pen out to 
collect peoples’ email addresses. 
While you play, let the audience know 
you'll be at the merch table after your 
set and invite them to come say hi. 
Staff the able with your most gregari- 
Ous members or your street team— 
and don’t always stick your romantic 
partner with table duty. Make 
arrangements with the other bands to 
babysit each other’s stuff during your 
respective sets. 

Random best merch: low’s hand- 
Stitched pillowcases, Sunparlor Play- 
er’s homemade mustards and 
preserves, Locust’s belt buckles and 
coke mirrors, The Neins’ wristbands, 
KISS coffins. v 


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EDMONTONEVENTCENTRE.CA 


Lovers and dreamers 


Wendy McNeill returns with 
A Dreamer’s Guide To Hardcore Living 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychrista@vueweekly.com 


weden agrees with Wendy 
Sion The landscape differs 

from that of her Canadian prairie 
roots, but her new and old stomping 
grounds share a majestic drama in 
their natural elements, slightly austere 
but forceful. The sky is the showpiece 
of both, a domed screen for shifting 
light driven by the day-to-day whims of 
intractable northerly seasons, an 
atmospheric mood ring 

These are hospitable surroundings 
for dreamers, climatic mutability 
drawing out fanciful notions and ram- 
bling thoughts—long grey winters 
nurturing interiority and intimacy 
short velvety summers giving way to 
delight and celebration 

But the world demands something 
tougher of dreamers than self-preser- 
vation. To complete the circuit of cre- 
ation, there has to be an engagement 
with the world, the day-to-day effort 
of living. McNeill delivers this philoso- 
phy in the title of her new album, A 
Dreamer’s Guide To Hardcore Living 

“I knew the theme of the record for 
a while, and I Knew what to call it,” 
she ventures. “I wanted the feeling of 
being a dreamer, to say that dreaming 
was important, but I also wanted to 
add this hardcore element with the 
content of the tunes.” 

The songwniter’s not adding punk riffs 
to her distinctive accordion-driven 
gems. Dreamer’s Guide bends in a fuller, 
more Euro-orchestral pop direction than 
her previous album, 2006's The Wonder 


SUN, SEPT 14 (8 PM) 


= | WENDY MCNEILL 
ec | THEARTERY $10 
i= 


Show, but it encompasses the rich vein 
of dark, glossy cabaret-folk she’s been 
striking since 2004’s Such A Common 
Bird. Instead, McNeill’s reaching for an 
emotional quality to lend her musical 
tales. "There's a Margaret Fuller quote | 
was working with while I was writing 
and making this: ‘Only the dreamer shall 
understand realities, though in truth his 
dreaming must not be out of proportion 
to his waking,” she sighs. “You know, 
it’s like, ‘Be open-minded but not so 
open your brains fall out’!” McNeill 
emits a honey-sweetened chuckle. 


THE WONDER SHOW was a transition 


album. McNeill, long one of those peri- 
patetic Edmontonians, leaving and 
returning like a comet with an erratic 
orbit, had departed for a life in Sweden 
with her new love. The record's full of 
biography—the songs are a parade of 
strong female characters drawn from 
history or her own experience—and she 
accompanied them with her unique 
palette of attic instrument sounds and 
her expressive voice. There were guests 
on tracks, but Wonder was largely a 
one-woman affair, in which McNeill 
“tried on” several feminine personas. 

“I think my operative phrase was 
‘wonder.’” She mugs a wide-eyed doe 
voice: “‘Where am I? Golly, what is all 


this?’ Everything was new; I wa 
barded with new people and plac« 
was reading biographies, trying | 
understand places ! was going t« 
history of some of those places.” 

Dreamer’s is the product of a differen! 
practice. “It was a well-thought-out cre 
ation, ” McNeill offers. “The musici 
and producer were really hands-on. It 
was a very natural, uninhibited and fun 
experience. We rehearsed the shit out o! 
the songs, but we'd do them differently 
every time, recording in this barn | 
Sweden live to tape. The producer was 
this mad scientist, in the best of w: 
He’s totally into analogue, so they’ 
‘natural’ songs, but with a weird film! 
sensibility and no shortage of plings an’ 
plongs. It wasn't about perfection—i the 
mood was there, that was the take.” 

The album resembles a collection 0! 
fables, magic realism in song. Anima! 
and humans struggle against and 
defense of their natures as they tans 
between longing for freedom and th 
constant labour and reward of lovin 
another being, between self-deceit an 
reckoning. McNeill’s deft language *» 
enhanced by a musical landscape '" ¢ 
weaves a host of orchestral textures 2!" 
layers of her vocals together, exqu' itely 
aching and beautifully realized 

Dreamer’s will have a second !!! 
Edmonton: “Our show here has tw° 
and-a-half sets. CBC's recording, 
we're doing the whole album. \\ 
recreate it beginning to end, wit! ¢ 
short break for a video show a"° 
some more songs.” ¥ 


EIEKIY ~—SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


MUSIC 


Vho's driving the bus? 


-town musicians celebrate the transit system 


FMUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 
‘onsider the nature of music for 
a moment: there’s almost 
| always some sort of movement 
urrounding it, metaphorically or just 
Bplain physically. There’s the touring 
Mthat takes musicians from town to 
| own, but then there’s also the move- 
ent of the audience—dancing, mosh- 
g, gentle nodding of the head—and 
© onstage movement of the perform- 
ers—often very similar to what is going 
bn off stage. And of course there’s also 
he movement of the songs them- 
Belves, aS One note proceeds to the 
ext and words and music unfold to 
ll a story or convey a feeling or sim- 
ply lead listeners further into the mys- 
ery of what it’s all about. 
Given all that, a musical compo- 
ent to a celebration of 100 years of 
dmonton’s public transportation sys- 
em—titied Moving Music—seems 
holly appropriate. And so Fri, Sep 12 
and Sun, Sep 14 will see Sir Winston 
hurchill Square taken over by musi- 
jans and music fans of many stripes. 
Among those who will be taking the 
Stage for the event is local songwriter 
evor Tchir, a man who has done 
is fair share of travelling over the 
years, having spent time living in 
Ottawa before moving back to 
dmonton and setting out from here 
‘o play music across the countryside 

Tchir has undertaken a number of 
rips since moving back to the city— 

ong them a cross-Canada solo tour 

at saw him travelling by Greyhound 
bus, along with a second trip out East 
and another over to Europe—but he’s 
also spent a good part of time putting 
Ogether his fourth album, crossing 

© country in spirit on the recording. 

‘This is my first one recorded in 
\lberta,” Tehir says about the upcom- 
Ng album. “It’s fun because I've got- 
€n to include some new Albertan 

usician friends on the record and 
8¢! to work with some people who I'd 


kind of hoped I'd get to work with 


hen | moved back here—like Shan- 
‘on Johnson does some violin on it 
a d Lane Amdt does some guitar and 
Panjo and bass.” 


MOVING MUSIC 

FAL SEP 12(7 PM) 

WITHTHE TREVOR TCH BAND, THE WHITUN- 
DAYS SHOUT OUT OUT OUT 


SUN SEP 14(12 PM) 

WITH LE FUZZ AYLA BROOK, MANRAYGUN, BEM 
SURES, ROBIN HUNTER & SIX FOOT BULLIES 
SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL SO, FREE (ALL AGES) 


Tchir also had former Edmontonian 
Bramwell Park in to do a little singing 
and banjo picking the day before Park 
left town on the way back to his own 
home in St Catharines, Ontario. But 
the player on the album with the 
biggest presence is Tchir's brother 
Stephen, who now makes his home in 
Montréal where he’s studying music. 

“Steve is on almost all of it, and 
he’s really matured as a singer and a 
guitarist so it’s really changed [the 
Trevor Tchir Band’s sound],” Tchir 
remarks. “I mean, before this record | 
only had electric guitar on one song 
on anything ever, but there's a lot 
more electric guitar. He sings a lot of 
backup vocals, mandolin and guitar.” 

Tchir also made a trip to Ottawa for 
a weekend of recording organ and 
backup vocals with Peter Webb and 
Pierre Chrétien, both of whom worked 
with him on earlier recordings, nicely 
tying together this new Edmonton- 
recorded album with the work he did 
while in Ottawa 


SO IT SEEMS that there's much travel— 
by bus, plane or car—behind the scenes 
as well when it comes to creating 
music. Tchir also suggests that music is 
a way of sound tracking experiences, 
and even encouraging memories. 

“| found that on the Greyhound tour 
my favourite thing was to meet other 
musicians in the different Canadian 
cities and do CD exchanges or buy a 
local record, and that became the 
soundtrack,” he explains. “The fun 
thing is collecting that music from 
other musicians on your travels and 
then bringing it back home and shar- 
ing it with friends that love music. 
That’s what's really fun.” w 


HANSON 


THE WALK 


AROUND THE WORLD |. 
TOUR | 


“AN ICONIC 
AMERICAN SOUND.” 
BILLBOARD 


“THE FINEST STRAIGHT-UP 
ROCK BAND IN AMERICA.” 
-THE VILLAGE VOICE 


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Lai makes connections 


. 

BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 

‘oseph Lai is not your typical image 

of a composer. He is not the solitary 

tortured artiste holed up in some 
cramped apartment plucking out 
melodies for nobody, He is a collabora- 
tor, someone who enjoys working close- 
ly with other musicians who he is proud 
to call his friends, and someone who 
enjoys the work of composing so much 
that he is willing to spend long hours at 
his piano both by himself and with oth- 
ers so that it comes out perfect. Further- 
more, he’s not afraid to put the work into 
making his compositions come alive— 
Lai takes a DIY approach to booking his 
performances and to his publicity. 

And sometimes it is because he 
works collaboratively that his pieces 
even exist. His newest piece, Sonata 


for Flute and Piano Op 7—which will 


enjoy its second performance ever 
this weekend—came about through a 
meeting with the flautist he will be 
performing with, Elizabeth Faulkner 

“| met Liz two or three years ago— 
the Da Camera singers performed a 
work of mine called The Sound of the 
Trees. Sound of the Trees is for mixed 
chorus, flute, oboe and piano and Liz 
had been hired to perform the flute 
part,” he explains. “The flute part is 
quite difficult and Liz performed it 
brilliantly. 1 was so impressed with 
her artistry and her playing that | 
talked to her about doing a brand new 


work specifically with her in mind.” 
P y 


FROM THERE, Lai set about actually 
creating the work, and as he did he 
and Faulkner collaborated in order to 
find the best way for Lai’s piano and 
Faulkner’s flute to interact 

“| certainly have set ideas in mind 
compositionally, but I'm a firm believer 
in the adage that you can always learn 
from your performers. For instance, 
there were certain things | did in the 


SONATA FOR FLUTE AND 
PIANDOPT 
BY JOSEPH 6 LAI 


PERFORMED BY LAVAND ELIZABETH FA xe 
Se ale (10037 - fay 


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flute sonata where once in a wi 
would say, ‘Well, Joe, it mighi 
better this way,’” he says. “Fo 
[working collaboratively) j 
healthy and productive, because 
get the ideal from the performe: 
always a learning process." 

In addition to growing his circl: 
friends and colleagues, Lai v. 
like to see appreciation of c| 
music grow in the city of Edm 
There are so many types of n 
available to audiences these da 
explains, and classical music 


~ exactly doing itself any fay 


being as arcane as it has becom 
“Classical music, | think it’s-still viab) 
but composers have to get their head® 
out of their asses. They can't write in 
cesible music. | think there's a pl 
it, but if you want to connect 
audience there has to be a healt! 
dle ground,” he says. “i don’t thin 
have to make a concession ar 
untrue to yourself, but the music 
guage should be something not \« 
cult so that people can understan« 


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70  wooSweEKLy . SP 41 ~ SP 17,2008 MUSIC 


Bad Religion follows its own map 


CAROLYN MIKODYM / carolyw@vueweekly.com 
ne of the best things about 
One older is that you stop 
worrying about the opinions 
of others. 

Bad Religion has a strong tradi- 
tion of not caring—Epitaph Records, 
after all, was formed back in the ‘80s 
for the sole purpose of selling the 
band’s records. At the time, no label 
wanted to purvey the gospel of the 
SoCal punks. Nonetheless, the band— 
made up of Greg Graffin, Brett Gure 
witz, Jay Bentley, Greg Hetson, Brian 
Baker and Brooks Wackerman—did 
go through a bad patch during the late 
‘90s, where nol caring became more 
of a curse than a blessing. Brett Gure- 
witz (aka Mr Brett), one of the band's 
two songwriters, left, and Bad Reli- 
gion seemed to run out of steam with 
each Successive release 

We were sort of at the end of a 
fairly bad cycle,” bassist Bentley 

plains. “We put out a couple of 
bad records on a major label. We 
were just doing exactly what we 
were talking about earlier—kind of 
flogging it and not feeling too good 
about what we were doing, and our 
drummer had quit and then our label 
didn’t sign us back on and we 
thought, “Well this is kind of it.’ 

“At that time,” he adds, “Brett Gure- 
witz called and he said, ‘You know 
what? You guys need to make a really 
good record’ and we said, ‘Well, that’s 


08 


release 
“god and the Devil” 


really easy to say,’ and ane thing led to 
another. The next thing you know, he’s 
in the band writing everything's 
fine, and we just have a renewed int 

Sity, so everything kind of worked out.” 


LONGTIME FANS or the 28-year-old 


band can probably agree with Bentley 
that Bad Religion’s last three albums, 
back at Epitaph and with Mr Brett, 
have burst with purpose and intensity. 
Many called 2002's The Proc 
a retum to the band’s punk r 

There was some disappointment, 
however, when 2007’s New Maps of 
Hell didn’t turn out to be a double 
album, as Gurewitz said it would be 
during an interview for the DVD Live 


with guests 


INiretetneleifettie 


— 


& 


{ 
JKEDPSIS 
\ 


at the Palladium. Although word on 
the Internet is that it was Bentley who 
nixed the idea, he is quick to explain 
how the decision really went down 


WED, SEP 17 (7 PM) 


BAD RELIGION 
WITHTHE BROWX 
EDMONTON VENT CENTRE, $2850 (AL AGES 


=) 
— 
co 
cc 
a. 


“I've read that, that | was the one 
that said no to that. | like that!” Bent- 
ley laughs. “So 1’ll take full credit for 
it, but no it wasn't quite that. | think 
what happened was we'd made Live 
at the Palladium, and in part of the 
interview section with all the guys in 
the band, Brett had said we e 
going to make a double album. And 
even that day that he said it, he said, 
‘I don't'know why | said that.’ And v 
all laughed about it, and we 
whatever, leave it in. Who cares?” 

It wasn't that the band was 
aver to the idea of a double 
album, it was just the time required 
to write enough material, what with 


aid, 


its two key songwriters, Gur 


and Graffin, busy \ 


th Epitaph a 


teaching, respectiyv 


New Maps of 
by fans and crit 
of “still relevan 
in the affirmative 

“We'll kn 
else. Ourr 


and quite difi 


had point 
€ irrelevant to 
nd we 


thing to strive for.” 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


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= NEW SOUNDS 


Metallica, Death Magnetic 
(Warner) The beating of a heart—a 
sound effect that has been stale for at 
least a couple of decades already— 
opens up Metallica's Death Magnetic, 
the album that optimists would love to 
hail as the band’s return to form, hav- 
ing jettisoned Bob Rock as producer in 
favour of Rick Rubin, the man often 
credited with powers of ressurection 
when it comes to the old guard of the 
music industry. 

No, this is not the album where 
Metallica returns to 
its former self— 
that’s quite simply 
an impossible task, 
considering that 
three of the band 
members are more 
than two decades 
older than they 
were during the 
band's nse to the 
top of the thrash 
heap during the 
days of old, while 
the fourth member 
was off doing his 
own thing in other groups long before 
he hooked up with Metallica. 

That's not necessarily a bad thing 
though. There's something disconcert- 
ing about a bunch of guys in their 40s 
trying to recapture their youth, and, 
thankfully, that’s not what happens on 
Death Magnetic, even if the aggression 
found here does recall the band’s ear- 
lier days 

Once the band gets past that ini- 
tial beating heart, the music steps 
up, occasionally stumbling, but 
more often than not writhing like a 
beast that’s been woken from a 
long slumber 

The opener, “That Was Just Your 
Life,” is a good indication of what's 
happening on this album, with guitars 
starting and stopping, slowing and 
then rushing ahead at full charge, 
Hetfield’s voice pulled back in the mix 


ist= 


recordsa&cds 


soft airplane coir soon 


rather than being thnust up front as it 
was during the more radio-friendly 
production of the Rock years. That’s 
the way it should be, too; this is brutal 
music, meant to be uncomfortable and 
angry, and Hetfield’s growl is more of 
a hammer-like tool than a delicate 
instrument—part of the music’s thun- 
der rather than the bringer of the all- 
too-important sing-a-long chorus. 

Hetfield’s lyrics are still a bit clunky 
when you read them on the page, but 
they've always been more about the 
idea and the deliv- 
ery than poetics, 
anyway, so there’s 
little point in dis- 
secting them apart, 
from the music 
and wondering if 
he could have 
done better. 

One significant 
improvement here, 
though, is the role 
of guitarist Kirk 
Hammett. Last 
time out, on St 
Anger, Hammett 
was shut out in the guitar solo depart- 
ment, but that’s not the case on Death 
Magnetic, where he lays waste to song 
after song with furious and elastic flur- 
nies of notes, conjuring up melodies out 
of the pounding rhythms. 

While there’s some repetition in the 
characteristics of the riffing, the band 
keeps the sound varied and interesting 
throughout the record, covering slow- 
er, ballad-like—or at least as ballad- 
like as Metallica should ever get— 
material on “The Day That Never 
Comes,” and, well, just plain killer riff- 
ing on “The Judas Kiss.” 

The effort on this album is clear, 
and Metallica, if not quite back in top 
form, is at least putting some serious 
effort into working out problems in its 
music instead of on the movie screen 
with a sleazy therapist in tow. —EDEN 
MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


10443a - 124 street 
780.732.1132 
www .listenrecords.net 


the new year rico 


top 10 sellers 


01. supreme genius of king khan 
02. jondon zoo the bug 

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04. s/t connor oberst 

05. s/t women 


MUSIC 


06. stand ins okkervil river 

07. kornpakt total 9 v/a 

08. kelo line plus merzbow/richard pinhas 
09. carried to dust calexico 


10. soft airplane chad van gaalen 


The Awkward Stage, Slimmj,,, 
Mirrors, Flattering Lights (min; 
Records) It’s not hard to understan, 
why st 
Nelken, the dri 
ing force be} 
Vancouye, 
B| Awkward © stax 
has a bit of histo, 
with Ne 
Pornographer 
Newman. Like Newman, Nelken is 
pop polymath, equally comfortable ;, 
matter what kind of catchy, melog 
skin he pulls on. Slimming Mirrors 
him doing anthemic pop-rock (“Anip, 
Eyes"), delicate cabaret pop ("ty 
Love on Three With Feeling") and ey, 
sparse little delicacies ("The Sun : 
Down on Girlsville"). Nelken’s 1! 
great strength is his ability to draw « 
the emotions of life’s regrets, bi 
little, serving as the thematic th; 
that ties his pop gallivanting togethe, 
—DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly,com 


SEE 


Damien Jurado, Caught in 
Trees (Secretly Canadian) Cui) 
the Trees is a very apt name { 
Damien 
latest, his thi 
*release I 
Secretly Canadian, 
one of the mo 
reliable labels {or 
folk and pop. On 
the one h 


Jurad 


while getting mired in someih 
more grounded, a theme that ru 
through many of Jurado’s slow, eu 
acoustic songs—"Paper Kite,” bein 
good example as well as a hauntingly 
delicate song. On the other, it could 
also be read as being lost in the forest 
which also readily applies to Jurad 
while his music is certainly pleasa 
enough, Jurado rarely does anything to 
seperate himself from any other nun 
ber of quiet, acoustically inclined 
singer/songwriters. —DAVID BERRY 
david@vueweekly.com 


Kimya Dawson and Friends, 
Alphabutt (K Records) Holy c1a)! 
For the first time ever, I'd really, 1 
like to hang ou 
with some 
I've always been 
of the mind thal 
kids are si 
i nosed monsiers 
used to getting 
What they wali 
and screaming when they don't, and 
they are also very poor conversatio! 
alists. Oh, and I should also m 
that most children I've met can't © 
read, which is really kind of lame. © 
on her new sorta-childrens’ reco'’ 
Alphabutt, Kimya Dawson makes the" 
seem like awesome little humo! 
machines. The whole disc is a gia"! 
amazing fart joke, and the cover cv" n 
includes a picture of a rabbit, a cat 2!” 
a dog farting out the alphabet. Ev 
song is pretty much the most hilar jous 
thing I've ever heard, so you can Ima 
ine that a four-year-old pio | is 
obsessed with farts—and | think ™ e 
are—will just plotz when they he 
this. When this album came into the 
office, the entire editorial staf! ga" 
ered ‘round to hear about how Gis 
gorilla fart, while H is for huge 8° 
fart. —BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.co” 


orill 


stuff like that, it’s like that idea you had 
when you took mushrooms that was the 
most brilliant thing in the world, but it’s 
not like you wrote it down, did you? 
That's what Dave Marsh does on his 
debut solo record. After spending two 
decades in Halifax's music scene, Marsh 
has reached back into his life and dis- 
tilled the essence of the “I'm young, I'm 
pored, I'm a little insecure, let's fall in 
love" feeling that permeated my adoles- 
ceneé, and continues to reach its cruel 
fingers into my early adulthood. Thanks 
Dave, but fuck your feelings. — BRYAN BIR- 
TLS / bryan@vueweakly.com 


Rafter, Sweaty Magic (Asthmatic 
Kitty Records) Not to stretch the sex 
issue metaphor into the music reviews 
or anything, but 
Rafter’s Sweaty 
Magic provides a 
musical play by 
play to your late- 
night (or mid- 
morning) 
escapades. 
“Noise” gets the party started with 
some mid-tempo thumping, before 
moving into the all-out piston-driving 
assault of "Magic." Staving off the very 
real possibility of premature ejacula- 
tion, “Juicy” slows it down so you can 
catch your breath and regain your 
form, before “Sassy” introduces some 
syncopation so that you can drive your 
partner wild with your irregular rhyth- 
mic pacing, and differentiated strokes. 
After that, “Sweat” provides you with a 
soundtrack for some slow stroking to 
finish it all up right. A moment of jeal- 
ousy creeps into the magical moment 
in the form of the sixth song “Salt,” 
before the warm afterglow of “Heat” 
envelopes your body in party time 
horn lines to help you roll over and 
snooze. Or hit repeat on your CD play- 
er and get it on again. —BAYAN BIRTLES / 
bryan@yueweokly.com 


Young Rival, . Young’ Rival 
(independent) For a band from 
Hamilton, it's amazing how British 
Young Rival sounds—it’s like an amal- 

gam of a lot of 


British trends form 
the last 50 years or 
so. Alternating 
between the 
sounds of 
shoegaze, britpop, 


the rollicking 
cacophony of bands like the Libertines 
and with a jangly hint of the Beatles 
deep within, the band is indebted to the 
island that has invaded our shores one 
time for real, and all those other times 
with its music. It works to a great 
degree—but it’s just kind of the same 
old same old, y’knowwhatimsayin? It'd 
be great for some ambient music when 
you want to relax, and I’m sure their 
live show is an interesting place to take 
a date, but I'm underwhelmed. —BRYAN 
BIRTLES / bryan @vueweakly.com 


= |OLD SOUNDS 


EDEN MUNRO 
=} | eden@weweekly.com 


Izzy Stradlin& the Ju Ju Hounds 
(Geffen) Originally released: 1992 | 
just finished reading a book in Continu- 
um’s 33 1/3 series: Eric Weisbard’s 
examination of the two volumes of Guns 
N’ Roses’ Use Your Iilusion albums. It's 
an interesting take, as he devours past 
interviews with the band members and 
delves into the impact of the records, 
recalling the music 
by memory rather 
than actualy listen- 
ing to them. (He 
does get around to 
that in the end, and 
summarizes his 
thoughts on each 
song nicely.) 
Something that 
jumps out in the 
book, though, is 
Weisbard’s dislike 


deep-in-the-mix acoustic strumming and 
embelished by the slide quitar of Georgia 
Satellites guitarist Rick Richards. 

The song is “Somebody Knockin’,” 
and it plays like Stradlin was letting out 
all of his pent up frustration at the jug- 
gernaught business venture that GNR 
had become by that point. There's relief 
in the looseness of the music—it 
sounds very much like a gang of like- 
minded musicians banging out a few 
tunes down at the pub on Friday night, 
getting their ya-yas out with their best 
covers of the Rolling Stones 

While the 
Stones influence is 
heavy throughout 
the record— 
Stones’ cohorts 
lan McLagan and 
Nicky Hopkins add 
keys to the mix, 
while Stones’ gui- 
tarist Ronnie 
Wood even makes 
@ guest appear- 
ance on a cover of 


of the songs written 
by Izzy Stradlin, the group's original gui- 
tar player and the first of the band to 
walk away of his own choice, right 
before the /I/usion records exploded 
GNR up to the upper echelons of popu- 
larity, and prior to the band’s impressive 
fall from grace afterwards. 

Weisbard is of the opinion that 
Stradlin's GNR songs were generally 
the least interesting to be brought to 
the table—more classic rock clichés 
than innovative rock ‘n’ roll. So, with 
that thought fresh in my mind, | dug 
out Stradlin’s first post-GNRA album, 
1992's Izzy Stradlin & the Ju Ju 
Hounds, and gave it a listen. 

The record opens with a guitar riff 
that climbs upwards before widening out 
into a steady rhythm, boosted by some 


QUICK SPINS 


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ex | WHITEY HOUSTON 

=H | quickspins@vueweekly.com 


PEOPLE UNDER THE STAIRS 
FUN DMC 


GOLD OUST MEDIA 

Well holy shitballs! 
This is a lethal dose of 
Pure uncut party 


SCARS ON BROADWAY 
SCARS ON BROADWAY 
INTERSCOPE 


These guys must have the 
System of a Down Syndrome 
Uh ... yeah, | went there 


THE DONKEYS 

LIVING ON THE OTHER SIDE 
DEAD OCEANS 

Sounds like some Lou Reed 
Through the Levon Helms filter 
With some Neil on top 


DONAVON FRANKENREITER 
PASS IT AROUND 
LOST HIGHWAY 


Mustachioed man 
Easy like Sunday morning 
At the-old folks home 


his own “Take a 
Look at the Guy”—there are also 
detours into punk and reggae (the 
cover of Toots & the Maytals’ “Pres- 
sure Drop”) and acoustic gospel 
(“Come On Now Inside”), and at 40 
minutes, the record doesn't overstay 
its welcome. 

Overall, it's a relaxed affair, carrying 
on with no regard for the stadium-rock 
of Stradlin’s other band, and the man’s 
songs are served well by the ragged 
playing of Richards, which avoids the 
grandiose stylings that Slash added to 
his songs in GNR. 

Stradlin disbanded the Ju Ju 
Hounds while working on a second 
album, going on to release records 
with no fanfare or touring, but this 
stands as his strongest record. w 


LAIKA & THE COSMONAUTS 
COSMOPOLIS 

YEP ROC 

Nordic surf rockers 


Make epic, awesome return! 
They're not Finnish'd yet 


GROWING 

ALL THE WAY 

SOCIAL REGISTRY 

Ah! Burbling synth noise! 


So right up my alley | 
Feel violated 


THERION 

LIVE GOTHIC 

NUCLEAR BLAST 

When they are not off 


Slaying dragons, drinkin’ mead 
They rock the church, yo! 


THE STOLEN MINKS 
HIGH KICKS 
NEW ROMANCE FOR KIDS 


What an awesome band! 
Sloppy and delicious like 
Sex with Dan Carlyle! 


OM AVE 
An Ha RECORDINGS 2007- 
WEATHERMAKER 
Standard live album 


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Head for the hills 


Surefire Machine looks to the slopes ahead 


CAROLYN NIKODYM / carolyn @vaeweekly.com 
or Toronto-based Surefire 
Piscine there is only one kind 
of music. There are only pum- 
meling drums, furious guitars and spit- 
ting vocals. There is only rock ‘n’ roll. 

“There's always the raw rock ‘n’ 
roll that comes back. That's where | 
feel we are at—a big rock ‘n’ roll 
resurgence, with bands like Priestess, 
and stuff like that,” guitarist Zeke 
says. “I love it. I like to check my 
problems at the door when I go to a 
rock show, you know. I don’t go to lis- 
ten to somebody whine. | like to hear 
the songs about driving cars and 
women, and drinking and having a 
good time. That's what we do.” 

It probably comes as no surprise, 
then, that it was watching old footage 
of Jimi Hendrix that caught a young 
Zeke's attention. But it wasn’t until 
moving to Golden, BC in 2000 and 
starting a band, with the guys who 
eventually went on to form Disaster 
Man, that he realized he might actual- 
ly have a future in music 

Together with vocalist and guitarist 
Rail Road Wilson, the pair formed Tar- 
Bender, doing the ski-town circuit 
before heading out to Toronto to find 
a rhythm section and the big times. 

- “That was the decision, you know?” 
Zeke says. “If we're going to do this, 
let’s do it properly. Let’s not just be 
stuck here—not necessarily stuck, 
because we love Golden and stuff. It’s 
just, where are we going to go if we're 
pursuing music? What are we going 
to do out of Golden really effectively?" 

After spending most of his life in the 
Rockies~-Zeke was bom and raised in 
Banff-—Toronto was a bit of shocker. 


THU, SEP 16 (6 PM) 


SUREFIRE MACHINE 


= 
—_— 
cs THETAPHOUSE, ST ALBERT, $8 
oe. 


“It was definitely different, but i! 
an amazing place because there's s: 
emuch to do and the food's great,” h« 
explains, “But I lived outside of Toron 
to for most of my time there. I wa 
actually living in a barn, just north 
Toronto in Caledon, that’s where we 
were living. So a good redneck lik 
me, I fit in. The city was definitely 
eye-opener, but the playing there ha 
been great.” 


ZEKE AND WILSON joined forces wit! 
bassist Bones Bowman and drumme: 
Jonny Fantastic, both formerly 0! 
Banned from Caledon, and Surefir: 
Machine revved to life. Most recent! 
the band has been blasting down th 

country’s highways with a stack o/ 
new CDs—a self-titled debut—holding 
down the gas pedal. 

They need something to help them 
drive, after all. When the band return 
to Toronto in the fail, it will have trav 
elled from coast to coast twice in four 
or five months. And Zeke wants to 
make sure he’s ready to do some winter 
touring in the Rockies and Kootenays 

“I! love doing the ski-hill tours 
That's what we used to do, so !l 
would be good to get back out here. ! 
love ski towns, man. Everywhere you 
go, you know somebody,” he says 
gotta get some skiing in too, man. |! 
been two years off, just two years tha! 
I've dedicated just full time to this.’ 

There is only rock ‘n’ roll. ¥ 


SEP 11 - SEP 17, 2008 


MUSIC 


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