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Gains in women’s economic equality have been stalled for a 


EDUCATION 1 8 decade, and the recession threatens to make it even worse. 


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Education and science are critical to Canada’s global 
competitiveness, and are an investment in our future. 
However, the federal government has cut funding to 
Canada’s Research Granting Councils, hurting students 
and the research community and damaging the ability of 
Canadian universities to undertake innovative research. 


Tell the government that education and research 
are important to Canada’s future. 


Go to www.nikiashton.ndp.ca/sshrc to sign the on-line petition, 
or contact me. 
10049-81 Ave., Edmonton, T6GE 1W7 
Phone: 780-495-8404 Fax: 780-495-8403 
email: Duncan.L@parl.gc.ca 


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MARSS MARIE 2009 WUIEWEEY °5 


Army of one : 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 7 : 
f ever there was a company whose very business model seems intentional- 
I: designed to infuriate and alienate as many people as possible—while at 
the same time cleverly guaranteeing there 1S practically nothing an individ- 
ual can do in response—tt is Ticketmaster. Or, if you prefer, Ticketbastard. 

For years it's been de rigeur to bash Ticketmaster, and more recently its Ticket- 
sNow subsidiary, for everything from its absurd “convenience” charges to its poor 
service, exclusive rights to practically every major venue in North America and goug- 
ing of fans. First Pearl Jam and later bands like the String Cheese Incident tried to take 
on the entertainment behemoth, only to discover that the power of monopoly capital- 
ism is strong enough to win out over devoted fans and moral indignity. 

Despite years of frustration and numerous failed attempts to reign the com- 
pany in, it finally seems as though the tide has turned on Ticketmaster. Recent 
high-profile debacles involving fans being diverted to the TicketsNow resale 
site, where tickets were available for many times their face value despite seats 
still being available, have so blatantiy crossed the line that governments 
across North America seem to have finally decided enough is enough. 

Last month Ticketmaster reached.a settlement in a lawsuit brought by the 
State of New Jersey over sales of tickets to favourite son Bruce Springsteen. In 
Ontario the company faces a.class-action lawsuit over allegations its opera- 
tions violate provincial scalping laws. Most recently similar problems involv- 
ing tickets to Leonard Cohen's tour have spurred an investigation by the 
attorney general in Ontario and prompted calls for action by everyone from 
the federal NDP to the Alberta Liberals. 

While some of the motivation behind such calls is no doubt crass populism, it's 
clear that governments, not fans or bands, are the only ones who can reign in Tick- 
etmaster and that it’s time to do so. Self-evident rules to limit surcharges, prevent 
ownership of a subsidiary that profits off of scalping its parent company’s tickets 
and, here’s a thought, laws against selling tickets for higher than face value that are 
actually enforced are good steps to start with. With regulation and government 
intervention in failed markets no longer absurd lefty concepts, it’s time to act. w 


Phissue No 698 / Mar 5 - Mar 11, 2009 / Available at over 1400 locations 


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ae hn ee 


Oe ae “a 


z LETTERS 


PROUD OF THE FEAR HE INSTILLED 


Sarah Hamilton's spin on Joscelyn Gard- 
ner’s exhibit Missionary Position ("Bad 
sex,” Feb 12 - Feb 18, 2009) makes me 
wonder how much time she spent view- 
ing the exhibit. Her review does no jus- 
tice to the artist's intent to restore the 
memories of the women recorded in 
Thistlewood's diaries. Hamilton instead 
focuses on Thistlewood, the man who 
subjected the women to daily abuse, 
including torture and rape. Where does 
contemporary sexual politics come into 
this history of violence save for contem- 
porary sexual violence? Her disconnect- 
ed review attempts to restore some sort 
of humanity within the perpetrator—a 
man who had a voice and hardly 
deserves excusing for/his actions. 
Hamilton’s comparison of the diary to 
shoddy erotica puts the works in the 
same league as rape fantasies and role- 
play. There is a significant difference 
between experiencing non-consensual 
abusive sex than experiencing kinky sex 
with a partner on equal grounds. Post- 
colonial and feminist readings enable us 
to reevaluate history, and today we rec- 
ognize Thistlewood's activities as sexual 
assault. No wonder issues such as rape 
are so seldom spoke of in public life 


today, where victims are afraid to come 
forward out of fear of stigmatization, 
trivialization and public sympathy for the 
assailant. The figurative works portray 
the dichotomy between the dehumaniz- 
ing nature of sexual abuse and torture 
on the body and the restorative nature 
of art to the body and its ability to rec- 
oncile with a painful past. Writing the 
women’s names on the gallery wall 
commemorates each woman whose 
Names appeared in Thistlewood’s diary. 
Inserting “Bad Sex" into the review 
title contributes to the rape myths in our 
contemporary society where sexual 
assault is often written off as a bad sex- 
ual experience. How could enslaved 
women have consented to these acts of 
abuse when they held no legal rights? 
They could not deny Thistlewood’s 
authority as plantation owner and had 
no place in their society to escape to. 
Each diary excerpt is not written out of 
worship as Hamilton suggests. His writ- 
ings read like that of a rapist reliving his 
assertion of power and control. It would 
have been worthwhile for Hamilton to 
focus more on the images themselves— 
the significance of the pubic motifs, the 
braided hair and the style of the*font and 
prints and how these elements related to 
the identity of the women who were ren- 
dered through time as faceless and 
voiceless. The map records where each 
event in his diary took place on his prop- 
erty. He had access to his women at any 
given time. The quotation where he tore 
and branded one of his women who tried 


to escape signifies that he used rape to 
mark these women as his territory. The 
simple execution of the animated paper 
doll piece, “Marking His Territory,” which. 
Hamilton critiques, sums up the signifi- 
cance of Thistlewood's use of rape and 
torture, so it would not go over the head 
of a viewer such as Hamilton. 

CAITLIN RICHARDS 


REBIRTH? 


Although | agree in part with the review 
of From the Inside by Alice Cooper (Old 
Sounds, Feb 19 - Feb 25, 2009) | must 
say that this album did not get good 
reviews from the English music press. 
We were all desperate for a return to 
the good old days of Killer, School's Out 
and Billion Dollar Babies, only to be dis- 
appointed. We all know he was very ill, 
albeit self-inflicted, but it was felt that 
he had gone soft and that there were 
just too many ballads on every album. In 
my opinion, he never really captured 
those earlier tracks until The Eyes of 
Alice Cooper and Dirty Diamonds. 

LEIGH CHANDLER 

Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
whether critical or complimentary. Send 
your opinion by mail ue Weekly, 10303 
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ters@vueweekly.com). Preference is 
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Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for 
length and clarity. 


6 WWwEWEEKUY MARS -~MNRf/2009 


.. WUEPOINT. 


~ 


v 


: Women still earn less at work and do more at home, and the 
_ Fecession will likely make it worse. Happy International Women’s Day 


Mroaching a rift 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 
lor more than 30 years, Canada 
has joined nations around the 

- world in officially marking Inter- 
national Women’s Day (IWD), setting 
aside March 8 of each year to recog- 
nize the struggles, progress and barri- 
ers in the fight for women’s Social, 
political and economic equality. 

But while the two decades following 
the 1977 United Nations resolution calling 

on member countries to recognize IWD 
saw significant gains across Canada in 
many key measures of women’s equality, 
Starting in the mid-1990s the steady 
progress being made in closing the gap 
between women and men stalled—and 
with the country in a deep recession 
which might last years, there are fears 
that decades of advances in women’s 
equality are now at risk. 

Kathleen Lahey is a professor in the 
faculty of law at Queen’s University 
who specializes in taxation and has for 
years analyzed federal budgets for 
gender bias. She says that the mid-’90s 
was a crucial turning point for 
women’s economic gains, and many of 
the changes to public policy that took 
place then will have a major impact on 
how women are able to weather the 
growing economic storm. 

"Just to give you a sense of how well 
things were going in the 1990s, Canada 
was ranked number one in the world in 
terms of the gender development index, 
indicating that men and women were 
benefiting almost equally, the most 
equally of any sort of gender breakdown 
in any country during the second half of 
the 1990s,” Lahey explains. “But the 
radical restructuring of Employment 
Insurance that took place beginning in 
1996 really undercut a lot of that. And 
even though it wasn’t very pro- 
nounced, the fairly light recession that 
took place just after the turn of the mil- 
lennium actually seemed to mark the 
point at which women lost their 
momentum in terms of increasing their 
share of full-time jobs, and more and 
more new jobs for women since then 
have been in the part-time mode. 
Combine that with tax cuts that have 
left women literally with lower after- 
tax incomes overall then they would 
have had before, and with things like 
income splitting and incentives for 
women to focus a lot of their produc- 


= (GENDER GAP 


tive efforts in the unpaid sector, it has- 
n’t taken much. | wouldn’t say the 
income gap is stagnating, it’s now 
going the other way—it’s widening.” 

By 2006, Canada had dropped to 
25th on the OECD measure, and 
national statistics show why. 

According to Statistics Canada data 
for 2005, for full-time, full-year work- 
ers in Canada—the most common 
measure of the gender gap in 
income—women earned just 70.5 per 
cent of what men earned, a number 
which hasn’t improved since 2000. 
When all types of work—including 
part-time and other non-standard 
work—are looked at, women earn just 
64 per cent of men’s salaries. 

Th part this disparity is because most 
employment for women continues to be 
concentrated in a handful of traditional 
sectors, with two-thirds working in 
teaching, nursing or other related 
health care fields, clerical positions or 
sales and service jobs in the retail sec- 
tor. Meanwhile, women still hold just 
seven per cent of jobs in transportation, 
trades and construction, and just a third 
of all manufacturing jobs. 

Women also far outnumber men in 
part-time jobs, with just over a quarter of 
women working less than 30 hours a 
week, compared to just one in 10 men— 
and one in five women say they don’t 
work full-time due to personal or family 
responsibilities, a problem made worse 
by a serious shortage in affordable child 
care spaces across the country. 


IN ALBERTA, the recent years of a red-hot 
economy actually widened the gender 
gap, says Susan Morrissey, the execu- 
tive director of the Edmonton Social 
Planning Council. 

“We looked at the earning gap 
between males and females over the past 
30.years, and the data shows that the gap 
between men’s and women's earings 
for full-time and full-year employment 
seems to grow during economic booms. 
During the boom men are more likely to 
go into occupations like oil and gas 
extraction and construction, where they 
get paid very, very well.” 

Because few women work in these 


‘recession, and 


occupations, income in 
Alberta is more unequal 
than in Canada asa 
whole, with women 
who worked full- 
year, full-time in 
2006 earning 
just 59.3 per 
cent of men’s 
salaries, 
down from 
a peak 
ratio of 
almost 71 
per cent in 
1995. 

€o m= 
bined with 
the high cost 
of living in the 
province, the 
income disparity has 
had significant conse- 
quences for women in boom- 
time Alberta. 

“Woman are still twice as likely 

to live in poverty as men, and that's 
been consistent across the board,” 
Morrissey says. “In 2006, 7.3 per 
cent of families where the major 
income earner was male were 
living below the LICO [low 
income cut-off] and 16.9 per 
cent of families where 
females were 
the major 
income 
earner 
were liv- 
ges 
below 
LICO. 
S re) 
there's still a major 
difference between 
those two.” 

With the 
province now in 


Finance Minister Iris 
Evans predicting 15 000 jobs in 

the province will be shed in 2009, the 
gender gap in income may actually fall 
as the economy sheds high-paying, 
male-dominated jobs in the trades, but 
that’s hardly good economic news for 
women, who will also increasingly feel 
the pinch as the economic downturn 
ripples through the service sector, 


where 
most new 
jobs for women 
have been creat- 
ed in recent years 
What's worse, 
with warnings of a 
“rude awakening” on 
government 
spending 
being 


the April 7 
provincial 
budget, 
women in 
Alberta are likely 
to find themselves 
caught between government cuts 
and the void in services that 
results. 

“When we cut back on government 
spending what we're doing is cutting 
back on services that are generally pro- 
vided by unionized women, and which 
will now have to be provided by volun- 
teer women,” explains Lisa Lambert, a 
PhD student in political science at the 
University of Calgary and the author of 
the popular monthly feminist newsletter 


Iron Board 


Lounge’s 


Daily Special! 


S SCNO 
snack moms and n 
homes to feed 
aging parents and 
grandparents—and 
we know that two- 
thirds of caring 
labour is provided 
by women itis 
disproportionate- 
ly women that 
are doing this 
labour—and 
they’re often 
doing it without 
pay but also on top 
of a'regular work 
day. So it’s the double 
shift that we talk 
about, the double day for 
women of providing 
labour all day and then free 
labour for all the things that don't 
get covered when they should be,” 


IN RESPONSE to the dramatic downtum 


in the economy, on January 27 the 
Harper Conservatives released the 
2009 federal budget, intended to “stim- 
ulate economic growth, restore confi- 
dence and support Canadians and their 
families during a synchronized global 
recession.” 

Bul according to an analysis of the 
budget conducted by Lahey entitled 
“Designed to Leave Women Behind— 
Again,” women will see little direct ben- 
efit from the budget, which she says 
seems “almost designed” to exclude 
women from much stimulus spending 

While $8 billion a year for the next 
two years was dedicated to infrastruc- 
ture spending, Lahey says men will 
disproportionately benefit from the 
jobs created because so few women 
work in trades or manufacturing 

Announced changes to the personal 
exemption amount and shifting of 
income brackets, Lahey says, will also 
make little difference for most women 

“You have to remember that 
women’s incomes are so much lower 
than men’s incomes that 40 per cent of 
women have no tax liability,” Lahey 
explains. "So if you give a woman in 


/ 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 9 


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MARBAMAR-U.2099 WUIEwEExuy 7 


Let’s get this show on the road 


US-China deal on emissions must happen soon 
if world is to reach agreement at Copenhagen 


S | DYER STRAIGHT 


= GWYNNE DYER 
& | guyme@weweekly.com 


For a decade now, the deadlock 
between the United States and China on 
how to deal with global warming has 
crippled the effort to make an effective 
international treaty. It’s why the 1997 
Kyoto accord was such a botched job: 
with the US refusing to sign and China 
under no obligation to control its green- 
house gas emissions, over 40 per cent 
of the world’s total emissions were 
excluded from the treaty. 

The US-Chinese quarrel could have 
the same poisonous effect on the 
attempt to negotiate a replacement 
treaty in Copenhagen by the end of this 
year, so Washington and Beijing need to 
sort out their differences first. This can 
only be settled at the highest level, and 
there isn’t much time left, so what is 
needed is a summit meeting between 
the two countries to make the deal. 

John Holdren, President Obama's 
chief scientific adviser, has been press- 
ing for such action for years. In an inter- 
view last year, he told me, “| run 
research projects in collaboration with 
government organizations, think-tanks, 
universities in China and India on cli- 
mate change and what to do about it. 
And what | can tell you is that the Chi- 
nese and the Indians are not less knowl- 
edgeable and not less worried about 
this problem than we are in the United 
States or Canada or Europe. 

“They are waiting for us to lead, in 
part because we in the industrialized 
world caused most of it up until now. But 
they understand that climate change is 
already harming them. You go and sit pri- 
vately with the political leaders of China 
and they will quote to you the results of 
their own Chinese climate scientists’ 
studies showing that China is being seri- 
ously harmed today by climate change. 


"The Chinese and the Indians in my 
view are going to sign on to a global 
approach to reducing greenhouse gas 
emissions within three to five years of 
the United States making the transition 
from laggard to leader. They're waiting 
for us to do it, but they're going to join.” 

There was no announcement about 
a US-China summit following Secre- 
tary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to 
Beijing on February 21, although 
Obama and President Hu Jintao are 
already scheduled to meet during the 
G20 summit in London in April. How- 
ever, there are many hints and signs 
that a summit is coming up quite soon. 
The most striking one was the publica- 
tion in early February of a report joint- 
ly published by the Asia Society and 
the Pew Center on Global Climate 
Change. ‘The report was produced 
by a committee chaired by Stephen 
Chu, Obama's new energy secretary, 
and John Thornton, tipped as the new 
US ambassador to China. John Hol- 
dren was among the contributors. It 
explicitly calls on President Obama to 
hold a summit with the Chinese lead- 
ership on the climate issue. 

Zhou Wenzhong, the Chinese ambas- 
sador to the United States, attended the 
launch of the report at the Brookings 
Institution and spoke in much the same 
terms: “Cooperation between our two 
countries on energy and environmental 
issues will enable China to respond to 
energy and climate change issues more 
efficiently, while at the same time offer- 
ing enormous business opportunities 
and considerable return to American 
investors.” 


IF THE SUMMIT does happen, its main 
job will be to recognize the fact that 
China and the US cannot be expected to 
make equal cuts in their emissions, and 
that China needs help in meeting even a 
less demanding commitment to cuts. For 
a decade American politicians have 
been unwilling to accept that it has to 


WEEKISY MAR 5 - MAR41, 2009 


a 


be a very lopsided deal, and now they 
have to bite the bullet. 

The problem is history. The United 
States, like the other fully industrialized 
countries, has been emitting green- 
house gases for a long time, and is very 
tich as a result. China, like the other 
rapidly industrializing countries, has 
only been producing large emissions for 
a couple of decades, and is still relative- 
ly poor 

The two countries now emit about 
equal amounts of carbon dioxide each 
year, but China has four times as many 
people, so its per capita emissions are 
still only a quarter as big. Over time, the 
United States has put three times as 
much carbon dioxide as China into the 
atmosphere. So the United States, in 
Beijing's view, has a moral obligation to 
make much deeper cuts, much sooner, 
than China. 

China must at least stabilize its emis- 
sions in the relatively near future, too, 
but it must do so in ways that let it keep 
growing its economy. That means it has 
to go on growing its electricity generat- 
ing capacity, but the new power must 
come from renewable sources like wind 
and sun or from nuclear energy. Those 
are all more expensive than dirty coal- 
fired power stations, so China will need 
help with the extra cost. 

A US-China deal must include all that: 
much stronger emission curbs in the US 
than in China in the early stages, techno- 
logical help from the United States and 
large-scale American investment in 
clean Chinese energy sources, and prob- 
ably a carbon-trading deal as well. But if 
it can be done, it will provide the tem- 
plate on which other industrialized and 
industrializing countries can join up to a 
global deal for steep emissions cuts in 
Copenhagen this December. w 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 
published in 45 countries. His column 
appears each week in Vue Weekly. 


FRONT 


To science, 
| could help ... 


WELL, WELL, WELL 


CONNIE HOWARD 
health@vueweekly.com 


HEALTH 


l've been thinking lately that science 
itself needs a bed in the intensive care 
unit. In a climate too often characterized 
by hostility, manipulation, protectionism 
and financial interests, it appears to be 
battle-weary, losing its grasp on its very 
life-blood—the testing and retesting of 
what we think we know. But though the 
challenging of existing theory is the very 
essence of science—the way by which it 
self-corrects and remains valuable— 
some paradigms seem to have become 
sacred and off-limits. 

Not that this is anything new. Dr Abram 
Hoffer, one of the pioneers of nutritional 
and orthomolecular medicine, had pub- 
lished over 150 articles in medical journals 
when his publishing career came to an 
abrupt halt. What halted acceptance and 
publication was his focus on orthomolecu- 
lar, nutritional psychiatry. 

Unwilling to admit defeat, he and his 
colleagues created their own journal in 
1967—the Journal of Schizophrenia, 
which eventually became the Journal of 
Orthomolecular Medicine. But despite 
the high quality research it has reported 
for four decades, and despite the 
astounding success of Dr Abrams clinical 
practice, orthomolecular medicine is still 
marginalized by the orthodoxy, and myths 
about nutritional medicine still abound. 

One of the most common myths used 
to dismiss nutritional medicine is the 
claim that we generally get all the nutri- 
tion we need from food. But most of us 
are, even by very conservative recom- 
mended dietary allowances according to 
a US Department of Agriculture survey 
published a decade ago, deficient in a 
significant number of key nutrients. 

Another tired myth is the one holding 
that nutritional medicine does little more 
than feed the fish—many, many studies 
have shown that supplements increase 
blood levels of the nutrients supplement- 
ed. And yes, excesses are excreted, but 
with high-grade bio-available supple- 
ments much is also absorbed and used. 
Ironically, those fond of the expensive 
urine argument don't consider it a valid 
one when it comes to therapeutic doses 
of any other medicine—therapeutic 
doses of all medicines result in feeding 


| felt that 


of the fish, only in the latter case we're 
feeding them with antibiotics, antihista- 
mines, antidepressants, decongestants, 
pain relievers, anti-cholesterol meds, 
hormones and sedatives. 


STORIES THAT PARALLEL Dr Hoffer's 
marginalization abound, and in fact go 
back a very long way. In 1847, Dr Ignaz 
Semmelweis, also challenging medical 
orthodoxy, dramatically reduced mortali- 
ty in pregnant women by advocating dis- 
infection of hands. For his radical hypoth- 
esis, he was ridiculed and rejected and 
had his clinical privileges at the hospital 
terminated. A few years later, Louis 
Pasteur went on to make scientific histo- 
ry with his theory of infectious disease. 

A society named after the hand-wash- 
ing pioneer and devoted to exposing mali- 
cious and sham peer review—the 
Semmelweis Society Intemational (SS!}— 
awards a Clean Hands Award to honour 
those unfairly maligned by the orthodoxy. 
Last year's award went to Dr Peter 
Duesberg and journalist Celia Farber for 
their science and reporting on AIDS, work 
for which both have suffered serious career 
setbacks and character assassination. 

For shining the spotlight on holes in 
both proofs and treatments of AIDS, both 
have been accused of causing untold 
harm and death among AIDS victims. But 
it is AIDS that kills, not discourse about 
causes or standard of care. And it was 
panic and insufficiently tested early 
treatment—high dose AZT monothera- 
py—that turned out to be highly toxic. 

Some defend the power of orthodoxy 
as legitimate and protective, but I'm con- 
vinced that its power is rarely used to 
protect the public from research of inferi- 
or quality or from dangerous ideas, but 
rather as a way to shut down ideas that 
run counter to more profitable ones. Pick 
a field, any field—from political science 
to the environment to cancer or vaccine 
or drug research—and talk to a few sci- 
entists trying to get funding for research 
that poses a threat to the existing wis- 
dom; you'll see. 

Science at its best continues to look 
for better answers where existing ones 
are inadequate; science at its worst 
defends existing paradigms, no matter 
how inadequate, with desperate and 
vicious defensiveness. But it is relentless 
refusal to set existing paradigms in stone 
that permits science to self-correct, to be 
alive and well enough to serve us. w 


0 ure? 
a 
that 40 per cent a tax cut you're giving 
her nothing. 
ionately, on a statisti- 


“So disproportis 
cal basis, it’s going to go more to men 
than to: women because more men will 
fall in the higher end of that low brack- 
et then the women will; women 
always cluster in the bottom end of 
every income bracket.” 

The same problem is repeated in the 
other shifts in higher, tax brackets, 
delivering the greatest benefits to 
those at the top, who tend dispropor- 
tionately to be men. 

" “I've never seen this kind of pattern 
used for tax cuts before. Not anywhere. 
Not in the US, not in European counties, 
not in Australia,” says Lahey. “It's very 
strange that it would be done in this way 
to put each of those at the top end of the 
low income brackets. And there are rela- 
tively few women there already.” 

Other elements of the stimulus pack- 
age, including home renovation credits 
and home buyers’ tax credits, will simi- 
larly disproportionately go to’men 
because they tend to have higher 
income levels and are in the best posi- 
tion to benefit from such measures, 
which entirely exclude renters and 
those who don't have savings to invest. 

Lahey says that this budget, and 
most that she’s seen since she started 
analyzing them in the 1980s, simply 
ignore the fact that women’s incomes 
and lives are different from men’s, and 
as a result require different types of 
supports to increase their level of eco- 
nomic security. 

One example is that no infrastruc- 
ture spending was dedicated to build 
new child care facilities, which all 
advocates say is critical for women, 
who are still responsible for most child 
rearing duties, to be able to effectively 
access good jobs in the labour market. 

It's also evidenced by the 
announced enhancements to the 
Employment Insurance program, 
which will extend the benefit period for 
EI, but only for workers who already 
qualify for the program, which current- 
ly excludes most women. 

Monica Townson, an economic con- 
sultant and research associate with the 
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives 
who co-authored a 2007 report on the 
gender bias in the EI program, explains 
that when the Unemployment Insurance 
program was changed to the Employ- 
ment Insurance program in 1997, eligi- 
bility criteria went from being based on 
the number of weeks worked to being 

based on number of hours worked. This 

change, which dropped the percentage 
of unemployed workers who qualified 
for El from 70 per cent to just 36 per 
cent by 2004, disproportionately impact- 
ed women because they tend to work 
more part-time and other non-standard 
jobs due to family responsibilities, and 
therefore find it harder to accumulate 
the necessary hours. While 40 per cent 
of men qualified in the year Townson 
looked at the data, just 32 per cent of 
women did. In Alberta, because of the 
complicated formula based on regional 
unemployment levels, fewer than one in 
four women in the province were eligi- 

ble for El in 2004. 

"The important thing to note is that 
women are adversely affected com- 
pared with men under the current situ- 


ation, and that will be particularly seri- 
ous for them in the recession if women 
are losing their jobs and can’t qualify 
for benefits," Townson warns. 


WHAT IT ALL ADDS UP TO isa more 


precarious economic situation for 
women in the recession, meaning they 
will have fewer options available to 
them, for example, in situations where 
they are living with domestic abuse, a 
serious problem at any time in Alber- 
ta—which leads the country in domes- 
tic assault, homicide-suicides and 
stalking—but one-that is often exacer- 
bated by the frustration and stress that 
comes with a recession. 

Jan Reimer, the provincial coordinator 
with the Alberta Council of Women’s 
Shelters, says that while the most recent 
data from shelters in Alberta won't be 
collected until next month, there are 
troubling signs emerging. 

“What we're seeing, particularly 
from the United States, is fairly fright- 
ening,” she warns. “There's tons and 
tons of articles coming across our 
desks now about the escalation of 


domestic violence. 1 recall one article 
where a shelter had indicated they'd 
seen more than a 200 per cent 
increase in demand with this down- 
turn in the economy. So’ we're very 
concerned about how this may play 
out in Alberta in the next little while.” 

Unfortunately, a recession also means 
that shelters have fewer resources avail- 
able to help women in need. 

"Shelters are always stretched, but 
certainly their funding becomes more 
and more compromised when it’s 
harder to fundraise in their own local 
communities,” she says. “As business- 
es and organizations cut back, so does 
{shelters’] access to those much-need- 
ed dollars.” 

Reimer says that a pressing need in 
Alberta at the moment is second- 
stage transitional housing, which 
provides women with longer-term 
support after they leave emergency 
shelters, She says that based on the 
number of emergency beds, the 
province needs an additional 600 sec- 
ond-stage apartments just to meet 
current needs. 


AS WOMEN in Canada face these chal- 
lenges, their capacity to collectively 
engage on such issues has also been 
greatly diminished in recent years, with 
formerly influential women’s organiza- 
tions such as the National Action Com- 
mittee on the Status of Women (NAC) 
now all but defunct. 

“We're at such a difficult time 
for feminism in Canada because 
so many of the voices at the 
national level have been silenced 
because of the lack of funding,” 
Lambert says. “Many feminist 
organizations have been denied 
charitable status because we 
advocate, but a group like the 
Fraser Institute, a so-called think- 
tank that really just promotes 
very, very conservative ideologies 
and produces lots of reports about 
it can get charitable status. 

“And the only other access to money 
that groups would have, which is gov- 
emment funding, has been completely 
cut back by Harper,” Lambert contin- 
ues. “He’s cut the funding to these 


organizations at the very time they're 
desperately needed to speak for 
women who are unable to fund these 
kinds of organizations themselves— 
working women, women who are try- 
ing to do double shifts, who are 
providing caring labour, who are being 
laid off of their work, these are not the 
women who are donating money to 
advocacy organizations; they can’t pos- 
sibly. It’s very, very troubling.” 

Lahey agrees the situation is serious 
but says that more and more women 
are realizing the impact that public pol- 
icy has on their lives and getting 
involved in community workshops on 
things like the budget, involvement 
Lahey says is critical 

“If we get another even one or two 
years of budgets like this we've already 
had for two or three years we're going 
to be very squarely back in the male 
breadwinner model of social and fiscal 
policy in Canada,” she warns. “And 
look how long it took to displace that 
model.to begin with; we're talking 
about rolling back decades of move- 
ment forward and development.” v 


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FRONT 


o future at all 


Why Big Media is bad for Canadian journalism 


= MEDIA LINKS 


STEVE ANDERSON 
steve@temucraticmedia.ca 


Media giant Canwest reported a $33 mil- 
lion loss in the quarter ending November 
30, 2008, and an overwhelming $3.7 bil- 
lion debt. In the past 12 months, Canwest 
has also cut over 1000 jobs, scaling back 
local operations and considering shutting 
down some stations entirely. : 

Collectively Canwest, Torstar, Quebecor, 
and CTVglobemedia have cut over 1300 jobs 
in the past three months, on top of deep 
cuts made last year. With ad revenues 
expected to slump further, there is no end in 
sight. The effects of these dramatic cuts in 
journalism will negatively affect public 
debate and discourse in Canada because, as 
former Toronto Star publisher John Hon- 
derich notes, “The quality of public.debate, 
if not the very quality of life in any communi- 
ty, is a direct function of the quality of media 
that serve it.” 

In his piece entitled “All the news that's 


Sharron 
Proulx-Turner 


fit to fund,” John Honderich does a good 
job of explaining why journalism is impor- 
tant in a democratic society. Honderich also 
offers good ideas on how to revive journal- 
ism, but he fails to discuss why journalism 
is in its current state of crisis. 

What is the cause of the current state of 
journalism in Canada? In a statement made 
on the likely demolition of TV stations 
located in Montréal, Hamilton, Red Deer, 
British Columbia, Kelowna and Victoria, 
Leonard Asper, Canada's largest media 
baron, declared, “As they are currently con- 
figured, these stations are not core to our 
television operations going forward ... we 
believe that our efforts are best focused on 
the areas of greatest return.” 

Asper poignantly reveals that news 
outlets, and the journalists who work for 
them, are increasingly treated as a part of 
a business rather than a unique social 
institution that is essential to a function- 
ing democracy, 

But Big Media executives try to claim 
journalism’s woes are caused by the slump- 
ing economy or the displacement of audi- 
ences to new online media. While these 


are factors, the primary cause is the highly 
concentrated media ownership in Canada 
combined with the deepening bottom-line 
mentality of big media corporations. Media 
ownership is more highly concentrated in 


Canada than almost anywhere else in the _ 


industrialized world. As of 2005, almost all 
private Canadian television stations are 
owned by national media conglomerates 
and, because of increasing cross-owner- 
ship, most of our newspapers are owned 
by the same corporations that own televi- 
sion and radio stations. 

Something to think about is the fact 
that just hours before CTVglobemedia 
annaunaced its intention to take over 
CHUN, they laid off 281 people and can- 
celed news broadcasts across the country. 


IN 2007, the Communications, Energy and 
Paperworkers (CEP) union published a 
study entitled “Voices from the News- 
room,” in which they found that only 9,5 
per cent of journalists indicated that they 
believe the corporate owners of their news 
outlet valued good journalism over profit. 
Not surprisingly, 44 per cent of journalists 


aie) Ann Eriksson 
reads from her latest 


reported a decreased desire to stay in jour- 
nalism. The CEP report clearly illustrates 
the sentiment felt by many journalists: that 
the bottom-line mentality of Big Media 
owners is having an increasingly negative 
impact on their ability to do their jobs. 
Allowing just a few companies to own 
most of our media means journalism is 
likely to be less grounded in local commu- 
nities and thus less relevant to audiences. 
A newspaper is not likely to provide engag- 
ing journalism if it is geared towards effi- 
ciently delivering eyeballs to advertisers 
while investing the least amount of money 
possible in journalism. 

Combine this focus on the bottom line 
with an uncompetitive, concentrated tradi- 
tional media market, along with the ero- 
sion of ad revenue, and you'll find a race to 
the bottom for journalism in Canada. The 
news entity that can most effectively cut 
costs and exploit journalists wins! 

Some might argue that even if a media 
outlet has a social or public service man- 
date, it still has to make money in order 
to produce journalism. Putting aside the 
assumption that media outlets need to be 
run as money making businesses, lets 
debunk another myth about journalism: 
that it is unprofitable. In looking at the 
Canwest job losses, we can place the 
blame squarely on corporate mismanage- 
ment. Where is Canwest's debt from? Not 
unprofitable journalism, but rather acqui- 
sitions and mergers that were entirely 
unnecessary, not to mention profoundly 
unpopular with the public. 

Quebecor, one of the country’s largest 
media conglomerates, recently locked out 
workers of its most profitable newspaper, 


the Journal de Montréal. The Journals . 


union estimates Quebecor drew in $50 
million in profits from the Journal de 
Montréal in 2008. We might ask why lock 
out workers in a profitable business? 
While Quebecor may be profitable, in 
Canada’s uncompetitive traditional media 
market, it can be more profitable if it 
breaks, or at least weakens, worker com- 
pensation and benefits. When a media 
company is focused on achieving utmost 
profitability, it may be inclined to continu- 
ally push for more and more output by 
fewer and fewer journalists, thereby cre- 
ating a downward spiral for journalism. 
The problem with journalism in Canada 


isn’t so much the economic slowdown or 
new media—these factors simply exacer- 
bate a trend that was already underway. 
The real culprit is the propensity of big 
media to treat news operations as just 
another business. 


THE CRTC had a good opportunity to decen- 
tralize and diversify Canadian media own- 
ership in their 2007 “Diversity of Voices” 
hearing, but while they established impor- 
tant cross-ownership rules, they did so only 
after allowing several mergers to go 
through. The new rules seemed carefully 
crafted to avoid any forced divestment of 
Canadian media companies. To make mat- 
ters worse, the response to the current 
state of journalism, and the wider econom- 
ic turmoil, seem to further deepen the 
trends that have helped produce the crisis 
in the first place. Besides recent (seeming- 
ly) successful efforts by big media to lobby 
the CRTC to soften its regulatory orienta- 
tion, the Canadian Press agency is looking 
to move from an industry co-operative 
funded by its members to a business aimed 
at turning a profit for its new investors— 
the exact opposite of what journalism in 
Canada needs right now. 

Despite the layoffs, weak morale and 
Big Media debt, journalism in Canada Is 
far from its grave. Now that we have prop- 
erly diagnosed what has deflated journal- 
ism, we can come up with the antidote; to 
develop and experiment with new forms 
and mechanisms of financing journalism. 
With the decline of big-business-financed 
journalism, this is the perfect time for us 
to re-imagine what journalism in the 21st 
century should look like. 

In my next column, | will lay out vari- 
ous schemes for a rejuvenated 21st cen- 
tury public services journalism in Canada. 
There's no shortage of.experiments 
underway, and you may in fact be reading 
this column in one of those experiments 
right now. wv 


Steve Anderson is the national coordina- 
tor for the Campaign for Democratic 
Media. He is a contributing author of 
Censored 2008 and Battleground: The 
Media: Media Links is a monthly syndi- 
cated column on media issues supported 
by CommonGround, The Tyee, Rabble.ca, 
Vancovuer Observer and Vue Weekly. 


Ted Blodgett 


Edmonton's Poet 
Laureate launches The 
Invisible Room and 
Poems for a Small Park. 


novel, In the Hands of 
Anubis; a wonderfully 
playful exploration of 
human relationships 
and the guides we 
meet in life. 


& Anna Marie 
Sewell 


read from their most 
recent collections. 


Fri., March 6 
7:30 pm 


Poetry Nights at Aadvreys! 


Fri., March 20 


Thurs., Mar. 19 7:30 pm 


7:30 pm 


(780) 423-3487 
10702 Jasper Ave. 
www.audreys.ca 


Drop by and fill up on books from our Cooking sections— 
roll Met mAlhAmoliMmUniMiutelcel smc i 


save 25% on ald the Globe amd Matt bestsellers everyda 


10 = wasEWEEKIy MARS-MAR 11,2009 


FRONT 


— 


joughtful note from an old friend? An 
lusing photograph of days gone by ... or 


ro en a non-amusing snapshot of a group of 
falta 


gers posing in front of a ski lift or 
some shit? Not today; not anymore. Now, 
all my What's Happening Window fills up 
with Is notifications that one or another of 
my procrastinating acquaintances has 
topped my score in Bejeweled Blitz, neces- 
‘sitating another run into the world of high- 
speed gem-matching in order to maintain 
‘myhonour ; 
___ Eye of the tiger! Thrill of the fight! I've 
never been much for falling-icon puzzle 
games, a genre with a pedigree reaching 


back from Bejeweled through Columns and 
Dr Mario to Tetris and beyond to rickety 
plastic rumpus-room Connect Four duels, 
but something about Bejeweled Blitz has 
got me firmly by the nuts. A lot of this has 
to do with sheer intensity; a round of Blitz 
plays out in exactly one minute, and scoring 
high requires that every instant of this time 
be occupied with constant combos. Any 
hesitation, even one second spent dithering 
around looking for a match, and you may as 
well hang it up. The interplay of neurotrans- 
mitters at work here, the swirl of stress hor- 
mones and payoff serotonin, has profound 
effects on body and mind; half an hour with 
Blitz on a laptop tenses up muscles worse 
then 10 hours of typing, and even after your 
wrist is screaming and your spine threatens 
to lock up into an agonizing perma-hunch 
you're under the terrible compulsion for just 
one more round. 

Disclosure: I'm personally acquainted 
with Jason Kapalka, one of the original cre- 


All things reconsidered 


& /IN THE BOX 


SS | OAVEYOUNG AND Th PLAYER 


— imbhebox @vueweeky com 


Due to the unfortunate timing of Vue's 
printing deadlines, we submitted this 
weeks column on Tuesday evening—or 
Trade Deadline Eve. Trade day goings- 
on will dominate Oiler and hockey talk 
all week, and we missed it. So here's a 
list of Probable (could happen), Possible 
(likely but optimistic; armchair GM 
wishful thinking) and Not Bloody Likely 
trade scenarios. By the time you read 
this the deals will be done. Maybe we 
stumbled on one! 


THE PROBABLE (BASED ON PREVAILING 
RUMOURS) Erik Cole for any left winger 
who can shoot a puck and gives a shit: Hey, 
| like Cole, but he can’t play the left side. 
Dustin Penner and Robert Nilsson can play, 
and Ethan Moreau and Liam Reddox want 
to play, but none of these guys seems able 
to fill that top line role. 1B 


THE POSSIBLE A huge package deal for 
Jason Spezza. Why not? It's been talked 
about all year, and while Horcs does work 
well with Ales Hemsky he should be, by 
definition, a second line centre in this 
ie, And a sniper at center would help 
uous hole on the left side. 18 - 


: POSSI BLE Il | really want to see the team 

oquire a gritty veteran centre and capable 
r this musical-chairs playoff run and 
possible playoffs. In this order: lan Laperriere 
fe aa slayer), Marty Reasoner (again!) or 
Rob epee (all UFAs; all potentially 

ignable). | also would be right chuffed to see 
F armaticees Senators Yard Sale and 
h for Antoine Vermette, Filip Kuba or Chris 
ler. DY : 


teats e 
“LIKELY Earlier this season | 
lie would be the one to 


is contract, while Mathieu 


yeah. Any chance the Oil have of making 
the post-season this year rests squarely 
on number 35's ornery shoulders. He ain't 
going nowhere. 1B 


ALSO NBL | also mused aloud recently 
about the outside chance of trading 
Captain Moreau at the deadline to a 
contending team needing leadership 
and grit for the playoffs (Souray could 
easily take the leadership reins). More- 
au’s ugly eye injury last week likely 
quells that likelihood. Moreau would 
add certainly add depth to any team 
but until the eye is healed, he can’t 
provide depth perception. DY 


COLD, HARD REALITY Truth is, | don’t 
really expect anything earth-shaking to 
happen this year. The current Oiler lineup 
is made up of either untouchables or 
untradeables. Hemsky? Sheldon Souray? 


Sam Gagner? These guys are the future ~ 


of the team. Penner? Nilsson? Seriously. 
How many puckbags do the Oilers need? 
No, barring new GM Steve Tambellini 
going completely nuts on (last) Wednes- 
day, this is the team that will be here 
down the stretch. TB 


MORE REALITY A deal or two will be 
made but | don't anticipate anything 
dramatic like previous seasons (think 
the Smytty trade or Rollie and Sergei 
Samsonov deals). If any players come 
to Edmonton, | expect spare parts will 
arrive—if anything. If a big acquisi- 
tion does arrive, however, something 
good (Andrew Cogliano, badly needed 
draft picks, Tom Gilbert) would have 
to leave. DY 


THIS WEEK'S OILER DEFINITION 

Relief: 1) Freedom, especially from pain. 
2) What Oiler prospect J-F Jacques likely 
felt Tuesday night during the Nashville 
game. Jacques scored his first NHL 
goal—check that, his first NHL point—in 
the game. It was Jacques’ first time on 
the scorecard in 54 games scattered over 
the past four seasons. w 


ators of Bejeweled and a founder of PopCap 
Games, the casual-gameplay juggernaut 
built on its success. From talking with him, 
\'m given to understand that the crack-like 
qualities of the Bejeweled experience were 
No accident, but rather the result of the kind 
of nefarious mind-control alchemy normally 
attributed in science-fiction thrillers to shad- 
Owy organizations bent on world domination. 
Rather than start development from the 
benign, almost joyful, question “What kind 
of game might people like?” they instead 
asked themselves “What makes people stop 
playing?” Everything from the colour of the 
gems to the speed at which they fall and the 
subliminal frequencies of the sound effects 
was thoroughly tested in a secret under- 
ground facility, on a captive panel of shang- 
haied stay-at-home moms and desk jockeys, 
in order to eliminate any and all escape 
routes. Bejeweled is nothing less than a 
neuro-psycholagical prison, a sparkling, jin- 
gling concentration camp. 

Still, some hardy or resourceful few 
were managing to make it over the wire; 
Blitz represents a beefing-up of security, 
using the most addictive techniques made 


possible by social-networking technology. 
The competition aspect and its all-fixating 
leaderboard is just the beginning, a logical 
extension of the high-score table on the 
old Galaga cabinet at the neighbourhood 
pizza parlour: "FUK and ASS think they're 
better than you! Click here to prove them 
wrong!” There is also a collaborative 
angle, tied to avarice. Your network's score 
is pooled and represented in the Blitz win- 
dow by a thermometer-style gauge; as 
your total score climbs, you become eligi- 
ble to win (that is, eligible to enter a draw 
to win) increasingly exciting and fabulous 
prizes. Whether or not you really care 
about getting a chance at scoring a 
Bejeweled DS cartridge or a PopCap stick- 
er or whatever is immaterial: the ther- 
mometer is there, and it’s just one more 
hook into the gamespace, one more essen- 
tially trivial “because it’s there” motivator 
that keeps you on the page with the “I'm 
Glad | Lost My Job!” scam-ads. 
Essentially trivial. There's the thing that 
can save you, when you realize you've 
been clicking combos for three hours and 
let yourself do that terrible math: that's 


188 goddamn rounds, maybe 170 if you 
take into account the two seconds or so 
between TIME UP and PLAY AGAIN. If 
you're-lucky, the realization (the guilt, the 
horror) of exactly what you've been doing 
with that time—performing elementary 
pattern-recognition tasks of the kind they 
administer to research apes, without even 
the certainty of a reward banana—is 
powerfully shaming enough to knock a 
hole in the wall and let you escape to 
freedom 
But still ... the damage has been done 
You're programmed. You walk around 
your world seeing everything through a 
gem-grid filter, even to the point where 
you're looking at the face of a Joved one 
and a part of you can’t stop wanting to 
shift their features around in order to 
make a combo—but do you shift the nose 
up to score a row with the eyes, or shift 
an eye over to score a column with the 
nose and mouth? And then the notifica- 
tion pops up, and you click, and some 
cousin’s husband has beat you out of the 
top three ... but not by much. The next 
thing:you know ... ONE MINUTE! GO! w 


YEAH, SURE, LEr's 
GO FOR A COUPLE 
OF BEERS LATER! 


MAR5-MARH2009 W/USWIEEKLUY 
US PT RAM - 2 A 


We go in style 


Upscale Hundred Bar + Kitchen the 
perfect choice for pre-Citadel meal 


GORDON MORASH / gordon@vueweekly.com 


cluster of restaurants sits 
ready for the pickin’ at Rice 
Howard Way. A mini-United 


Nations that would seem closer to A 
Taste of Edmonton or Heritage Days if 
only the weather were better. Let's 
see: we have Czech, Lebanese, two 
Greeks, French, Italian, Russian, a 
martini bar, an English pub, and when 
food-on-the-hoof beats sit-down any 
day of the week, there's always a Fat 
Franks weenie wagon. 

But at the corner of the block, stuck 
on the main floor of the McLeod 
Building, we have something of a 
non-ethnic entry, a restaurant risen 
phoenix-like out of the ashes of a 
football player’s short-lived sports 
bar. This is Hundred Bar + Kitchen, 
the newest member of the Century 
Hospitality conglomerate that also 
owns the Century Grill, De Lux Burger 
Bar and Lux Steakhouse + Bar 

Hundred is one fancy, schmantzy 
high-ceilinged place, dressed in black 
wood, stone and burgundy leather 
banquettes,.tall stools and some 
hidey-holes for those who wish not to 
be seen. Wrapped chandeliers hang 
from the ceiling, and it is a lively 
place, with black-uniformed bodies 
surfacing from hither and yon, as if 
hidden passages admit them and then 
secrete them away. 


Wipiom avec 


MON -WEO (11. AM=12AM), THU/ FAL (1AM -2 
AM), SAT (5 PM - 2AM), SUN (5 PM - 12.AM) 


HUNDRED BAR + KITCHEN 
{0009-1014 ST, 120.425.0100 


BISTRO 


The dress code is smart casual, but 
that still doesn’t prevent the back- 
visored baseball cap boys from get- 
ting a table ... or even from honouring 
a suggestion that they remove their 
hats at the table. Otherwise, it’s a per- 
fect place for a pre-Citadel drink, a 
nosh of tapas and a reasonable meal, 
with upper-end prices 

The menu is a quite playful take on 
the tapas approach, in which small 
and varied servings will eventually 
make up for a bigger whole. This is 
not a thematic approach to food, 
where one course builds to a fever 
pitch of nirvana by the time the end of 
the night rolls around. Rather, this is 
what you might find on Grey Cup Day, 
far better cooked, prepared and plated 
than in your own low-ceilinged rum- 
pus room. It’s even comfort food! 


THERE WERE TWO of us on a Sunday 


evening, and we were led to our 


reserved high table, next to a pair of 


young ladies whose conversation was 
far too easy for us to avoid, About a 
half-hour into the visit, the lights were 
romantically dropped, rendering a 


Comiortigad you [oy2: 
Ede 273) getter. 


reading of the menu and later viewing 
of our food a bit problematic. Still, 
hunger soldiers on. On the appetizers 
front, we request a bow! of freshly 
chopped, freshly fried potato chips 
($8)—not French fries—with a five- 
cheese sauce that will readily knock 
your conventional Philly cream 
cheese dip off the edge of the world. 
Fine. The sea-salted chips arrive 
warm, in plentiful quantities, but 
some are done just right, the rest too 
dark and thus bitter in flavour. We try 


the thick Stella Artois onion rings 
with homemade ranch dressing ($7), 
which have the mouthfeel and vision 
of well-crafted tempura batter. Alas, 
the flavour of the fine Belgian beer 
does not make much of an appear- 
ance. The cheeseburger perogies, 
however, are quite an eye opener, 
with six to a plate, browned texture 
on the outside, dotted with sour 
cream and topped with caramelized 
onions and bacon. There is something 
ethereal to this most basic of peasant 


MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2008 


DISH 


fare that raises it above any other per- 
ogy you might have tried. The lean 
beef has something to do with it, as 
well as the assertive flavour of the 
cheddar cheese. Still, it’s that tooth- 
some crunch that tells you you're in 
the right neighbourhood. 


| WISH | COULD say the same for the 
foie gras French toast ($19). This has 
the makings of a stellar opening gam- 
bit for any evening—seared goose 
liver atop a thick slice of toasted 


ULTIMATE MAC & CHEESE 


Pa 


‘raisin brioche dressed with Saska- 


toon berry syrup and compote, From 
the components alone, this is a rich 
dish, but the overall effect is sweet- 
néss. Foie gras is fat, yes, but you 
should be able to taste it, and not 
just what would constitute French 
toast on a Sunday morning. The 
scattering of saskatoons makes an 
effort to add some edge, but it’s just 
not enough. 

Aim for an entrée? There are a 
series of flatbreads—aka thin-crust 
pizzas—in varieties of Earth (grilled 
peaches, cambozola, caramelized 
onions, tahini crust, $14), Surf 
(sautéed prawns, olives, artichoke 
hearts, spinach and basil pesto with 
crumbled goat cheese, $15), or Turf 
(Italian sausage, pancetta, roasted 
red peppers, spinach, mozzarella, 
and sun-dried tomato pesto, $16)). 
The latter is sturdy in flavour, colour- 
ful in presentation, and the keeper of 
the bunch because of its distinctive 
meat and vegetable options. 

And just because it’s a cold Sun- 
day, let's finish off with a true entrée, 
an order of beef short ribs ($30). 
These are slow-braised, exactly as 
expected, yet on some of the plate 
the meat is cold, and in the centre, 
just right. It’s a bit stringy and not as 
well-flavoured or tender as a long 
braise in wine, stock and pan juices 


should be. In fact, a nice swirl of pan 
juices on the plate and over the meat 
would help immensely. it’s supposed 
to be brushed with a barbeque 
sauce, but that flavour is MIA. The 
caramelized shallot mashed potatoes 
would be a nice touch, if only the 
shallots had a bit more presence, 
and the selection of correctly cooked 
single piecés of carrot, zucchini, 
asparagus, sweet pea pod gently 
pressed into the top of the mash is 
certainly pictorial. 

Dessert is a trio of red velvet cup- 
cakes with creamcheese frosting ($9) 
that proves to be the surprise of the 
évening. These are dense, and far 
less sweet than you might expect. 
The flavour is intense when you 
remove the overabundance of sugar 
and taste the remaining chocolate 
cake flavours for what they are. You 
should be able to see the red tones of 
this Southern delectable, but not 
even dessert will kickstart electricity! 

One thing to note is that Hundred 
has a very good wine list and deals 
on Sunday that allow you to order 
any bottle that is available by the 
glass for half price. So, a very fine 
Liberty School cabernet from Califor- 
niathat runs $13.50 per glass is 
yours for half the $54 carriage on 
Sunday, roughly the same price as 
the liquor store. w 


DISH 
WEEKLY 


ton’s annual Downtown Dining Week. 
Six years ago when | moved downtown 
it was a wasteland—you couldn't even 
jet a sandwich after’ pm. And now look 

ous the amount of food 

of the night and 


ethiopi 


from every corner of the earth. In fact, 
this year 23 restaurants will be partici- 
pating in Downtown Dining Week, the 
largest number to date. Special menus at 
fixed prices will be offered all over the 
downtown core, at too many restaurants 


+ to list here, but if you check out edmon- 


tondowntown.com, a full list of the par- 
ticipating restaurants, as well'as links to 
their special menus, is available. w 


an restaurant 


Se sone me ices 
rian and Vegan Cho 
as - Every Day! 


=e i the awaNOrne: 
age starian Vibrations Buffet 
The Last Tu’ 


lege 


esday of Each Month! 


_ 


$ I | J) ee 
I'd be happy just to 


watch you age 


<2 NICE LEGS 


JAMES LYLE 
= nicelegs@®vueweekly.com 


2004 LECONFIELD COONAWARRA 
CABERNET SAUVIGNON, $20 


2003 RICHARD HAMILTON HUT BLOCK 
CABERNET SAUVIGNON, $15 


It's a tough time in Australia right, now. 
Droughts and wild fires are having a hor- 
rific effect on both agriculture and the 
environment. Though horrible to hear, it 
will be interesting to see the effects of 
these environmental impacts on the 
wine of 2009. |'m reviewing two wines 
from the southern continent this week, 
but both are from several years ago. 
First, | give the Leconfield Coonawar- 
ra Cabernet Sauvignon a try. When | 
searched out information on the winery's 
website, | found information on the 2006 
vintage. | can only assume the informa- 
tion provided is similar to the 2004 vin- 
tage. It says the wine was aged for 20 
months in 100 per cent new oak, but an 
interesting mixture of American and 
French oak. It also states that this is the 
Leconfield wine most suitable for aging. 
When | first opened this deep; inky 
wine, | found it had a nice even nose 


with hints of flowers. The odours were 
thick and full, giving me the impression 
that this wine would be a substantial 
one. The wine offered even flavours of 
smoke and leather, but was slightly let 
down by an overly light structure. In 
Spite of its lightness, the juice offered a 
pleasant consistency with light tannins 
to just support the flavours without get- 
ting in the way 

The wine lacked much quantifiable 
fruit and never seemed to come into its 
own. | found this to be a good bottle of 
wine but | question the wineries com- 
ments of its ability to age. 

Next, | gave the Richard Hamilton Hut 
Block Cabernet Sauvignon a try. This 
wine showed as a thin watery juice, 
slightly crimson coloured and offering a 
very earthy nose with hints of spice and 
cloves. 

With the first sip, | was welcomed by 
a light tart wine with the vast majority 
of its presence at the front of the palate. 
| did note hints of orange. The wine 
seemed underdeveloped and simplistic 
particularly as it flowed to the back of 
the palate. It does offer a-nice clean fin- 
ish but, in my opinion, too much so. 

This wine lacks the fruit of a new 
world wine and the structure of an old 
world wine. | think the Hut Block is in 
search of its identity. | will wait until it 
finds one. w 


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DISH 


MARS-MAR 11,2009 = WL 


We're all in this together 


Sabzy Café is truly a family affair 


SHARON YEO / sharon@vueweekly.com 
ver since Sabzy Café opened 
E: doors on January 1, grateful 
patrons have been pouring in. 
“franians have been here for over 35 
years, and they've always been com- 
plaining, ‘Where are the Persian 
restaurants?’” Ali Sabetghadam 
recalls. “People would drive to Van- 
couver, Calgary or Los Angeles for a 
Persian restaurant.” 
Ali, 19, and his family, which 
includes his brother Hossein, 22, sis- 


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ter Nafysseh, 26, and parents Ahmad 
and Aghdas Golchi, decided to fill the 
city’s void of Persian cuisine. The tim- 
ing couldn't have been better, as the 
Sabetghadams had just celebrated 
their 15th year in Canada, and were 


eager for an opportunity that would 


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allow them to work together. 

“A family is already a success if 
you're together,” states Hossein. 
“Instead of building something your- 
self, if you build up something that is 
already so strong, your chances of 
succeeding are way better.” 

Starting a restaurant seemed to be 
a good fit, as Aghdas passed along 
her knowledge of food to all of her 
children at a young age. 

“From childhood, our mom has 
taught us how to eat fresh and how to 


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mix vegetables so that they all comple- 
ment one another,” shares Nafysseh. 
“She taught us the nutritional values of 
it all, too, so we all grew up with an 
understanding of nutrition.” 

Hossein provided a slightly different 
take: “I was pretty confident that Per- 
sian food is a seller. There was no 
question about it.” 

Defining Persian food Starts with 
the name of the café: “sabzy” trans- 
lates from Farsi to mean a blend of 
seasonal herbs. “If you go to Iran and 
order a salad,” explains Ali, “they 
bring you sabzy.” Basil, mint, cilantro 
and parsley are integrated into many 
of their dishes, and can be eaten as a 
side. The restaurant also serves tradi- 
tional beef and lamb kabobs, using 
halal meat ground in-house, and 
between Thursdays and Sundays, pro- 
vide Persian specialties such as fesen- 
jan stew, made with pomegranate 
molasses and walnuts. 

Sabzy Café also caters to vegetari- 
ans and vegans, which not only 
makes business sense, but also falls 
in line with the flavours inherent in 
Persian cuisine. Nafysseh, the’ family’s 
only vegetarian, reveals, “A vegetari- 
an diet is really easy when it comes to 
Persian food because it’s just as tasty 
without meat. For example, there’s a 
lot of legumes in our stews, so it bal- 
ances out.” 


THE FAMILY worked hard over the past 
four months to ensure the restaurant 
would be ready in January. Nafysseh, 
Hossein and Ali quit their jobs to 
focus on the family business, and 
each found an area that meshed with 


PARKALLEN 
RESTAURANT 


their personal interests. Nafysseh, 
having completed a certificate in inte- 
rior design a few years ago, shaped 
the restaurant, down to the colours 
on the walls (the deep purple, light 
green, and rich yellow “represents the 
colours of vegetables and fruits,” says 
Aghdas). Hossein, with a business 
background, took on marketing and 
website development. Ali, eager to 
help his father, has been assisting 
with the time- and labour-intensive 
kabob preparation. Ahmad and Agh- 
das have maintained their day jobs in 
teaching and human resources, 
respectively, and act “as our backup in 
the restaurant,” claims Ali. 

The close-knit family decided to 
focus on attracting a different clien- 
tele than most of the area’s establish- 
ments. 

“Whyte Ave has a lot of places that you 
can pick up alcohol,” explains Ali. “We're 
trying to stay as far away from that as 
possible. We're family-oriented ourselves 
and we want to draw in families.” 

Sabzy has seen their fair share of 
mothers with children and seniors in 
their first month, and also, by offering 
free wireless internet, hope to draw in 
tech-savvy youth. “We really want 
young people to come here because 
this is a very safe place,” says Aghdas. 

While the Sabetghadams admit that - 
it is too early to know if their endeav- 
our will be a success, they're not tak- 
ing the time they have together for 
granted. But with their focus on well- 
prepared and fresh fare served in a 
welcoming atmosphere, there is no 
doubt Sabzy Café fills more than a 
Persian niche on Whyte Avenue. v 


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MARS | MAR 1f 2009 


DISH 


_ Swept away 


Culina Highlands more than meets lofty expectations 


ee 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 
Pdon't know what would be 
worse—the lofty expectations that 
come with being one of the previ- 
ous Owners of Bacon, a much-loved 
but now defunct cozy little Edmonton 
eatery, or the perhaps even higher 
expectations that surface when you 
attach the legendary ‘Culina” to your 
name. Culina Highlands, now happi- 
ly ensconced in Bacon's former 
stomping grounds, has certainly set 
the bar high for itself. 

Culina Highlands had a reputation 
long before anyone had an inkling of 
what was transpiring behind the rus- 
tic brick facade, and I was more than 


. happy to make the long trek across 


town to sit in that cozy little room 
once again. 

It was late, it was cold, and it was a 
Tuesday, but I phoned ahead anyways 
to make sure they had room for my 
husband and I—tiny rooms can only 
accommodate so many hungry bod- 
ies. On this particular night it proved 
to be an overly cautious measure— 
only one lonely table of two, just 
nursing the final sips of their coffee, 
greeted us when we pulled open the 
front door. But I’m guessing this night 
was a rare exception. 

Heavenly warmth, gently glowing 
candles and simple sophistication sur- 
rounded us. Blacks, whites and dark 
browns dominated the room, but 
bright splashes of colour, courtesy of 
bold prints by local artist lan Craig, 
added bursts of interest. The room 
was interesting, cozy and elegant (in 
an off-beat way), but still oh-so-com- 
fortable. Maybe it was because there 


were only the two of us, but the - 


atmosphere seemed so laid back and 
engaging that I almost felt like kicking 
off my shoes. 

We spent some time chatting with 
our waiter about the intriguing prints, 


ese / Vietmanese 
Restaurant & Bar 


Japan 


Come in & try the best Sushi in town 
' plus traditional Vietnamese food 


8109-101 STREET 2 EAT-IN & TAKE OUT 


(one block off Whyte Ave) 


THE- SAT (11AM-2PM) & (SPM TO 10PM) 


CULINA HIGHLANDS 


Lu 
= 
cee | F09- 12AVENUE, 700.477.2422 


and then consulted the wine list. Our 
waiter warned us that they might not 
have everything listed, as they were in 
the process of revamping their selec- 
tions, but the two red wines by the glass 
we settled on—a Luigi Bosca syrah and 
a Clos de los Siele malbec ($9 each), 
both from Argentina—were both avail- 
able and exceedingly drinkable. 

Two little glasses and a wine bottle 
filled with water were carefully 
deposited on our table-and, feeling 


oj cyla}c 


GIGEGAGY 


og SENS) 


: 
: 


re 


G 


I 


settled, we were ready to contemplate 
the eclectic menu. I couldn't decide 
whether to have the borscht with sour 
cream and then the quinoa salad with 
fried chickpeas, or the wild spring 
salmon with spicy dill-beet salsa and 
sour cream. But then again, how 
could I go without nachyncka or but- 
termilk biscuits? 

In the end, I decided to try one of 
their vegetarian options, the portobel- 
lo mushroom baked with brown rice 
and served with spiced root vegeta- 
bles and fresh greens ($20). My hus- 
band, never one to turn down a 
traditional Ukrainian meal, still ago- 
nized before ordering the kalyna plat- 
ter ($20). 


rhe te 


ser RREE 


Gueat Ualian Dining since 1991 
8715 -109 ST, 439-8466 


fiorecantina.com 


We sipped our wine and reveled in 
the room: its muted lighting, its glori- 
ous solitude, its peaceful vibe. And we 
noticed some of the many unique lit- 
tle touches—like the big chalkboard 
with a map of the world drawn on it, 
highlighting the origins of some of 
their beers; the whimsical white paper 
bags that elevated the battery-operat- 
ed candles from routine to Striking; 
and the “gratitude”. section of the 
menu, a thank-you to their suppliers 


WHEN OUR DINNERS ARRIVED, they 


proved to be just as comforting as the 
room itself. My portobello mushroom 
fiesta, with organic greens scattered 
over top and to the side, was creamy 
and soft and crispy and warm, all at 
the same time. I'm not sure what the 
hearty sauce the portobello was nes- 
tled in was, or which spices accented 
the sweet roasted carrots, | just know 
they all worked together to create an 
extremely satisfying experience 

My husband's kalyna platter was 
most definitely a platter. A mound of 
lazy cabbage rolls was topped with 
two long slices of grilled kubassa and 
flanked by four plump perogies. 
Bacon gremolata was scattered over 
the perogies, as were a few rounds of 
green onions, and pickled beets 
crowned the whole affair. No crunch 
in this but again, creamy and soft and 
warm and oh-so-soothing 

We both demolished our din- 
ners and, wanting (but not need- 
ing) more, we eagerly ordered 
dessert. Dried apricot and walnut 
perogies almost found their way 
to our table, but the chocolate 
poppyseed cake won out. This 
particular dessert is not made in- 
house, although some are. Linda, 
Queen of Tarts, did the honours 
because, as our waiter informed 
us, she is simply the best. And if 
this particular dark, rich, dense, 
crunchy creation is any indica- 
tion, she certainly is. 

Culina Highlands isn’t just a restau- 
rant, it’s an attitude. An exceptional, 
passionate, comfortable attitude with 
an amazing eye for detail. It also hap- 
pens to be utterly delicious. So take 
your expectations, but phone first. w 


Sotra 


AUTHENTIC 
TURKISH 
COSINE 


Open Tuesday to 
Sunday for 
dinner at 5 pm 


Please phone for 
Reservations 


10345-106 St - 423-3044 
CE OSES 


Edmonton’s 
best food 


website! 


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vueweckly.com 


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£4.99 Breakjast 


Gam until I lam 


Brunch served until Som 


DISH 


MARS. WAR 1% 2009 \7WULEIE 


15 


WUEWEEKLY 


Far away in another place 


Heli-skiing offers the experience of 
having the mountains to yourself 


JEREMY DERKSEN / snowzone@vueweekly.com 
rouching under chopper 
( blades, a hurricane of rotor 
wash sparkles before my eyes 
A raging sea of snow spreads out 
from the eye of the storm. Three sepa- 
rate levels of noise assault the ears— 
first, the threshing sound of blades 
hacking air, then the motor's deep 
guttural rumble and, finally, the upper 
register whine of the chassis. Then 


INCREDIBLE 
2009 SAK L 
PACKAGE 


= (POWDER 


the seven-seater 407 Bell lifts, almost 
unexpectedly, leaving a palpable vac- 
uum in its wake. 

In the silent moment that follows, I 
marvel at the corrugated expanse of 
peaks, pine and powder. In all 1500 


1402 Bow Valley Trail 
Canmore, Alberta T1W 1N5 
www.canmoreinn.com 


16 WweWEEKLY MARS-MART1, 2009 


square kilometres of the Robson 
Helimagic (robsonhelimagic.com) 
leasehold, my fellow skiers and I are 
the sole occupants. Due southeast, Mt 
Robson’s summit slices the sky like a 
rough grade boxcutter, glinting 
against thin blue air. 

My G3s are piled amongst the rest of 
the arsenal, poles and skis strapped 
together with a small Velcro cinch. Still 
overwhelmed, | stumble through deep 


S 


¢9 Gg” 


PER PERSON, PER NIGHT (PLUS TAXES) 
BASED ON 2 ADULTS 


snowy drifts, pick them up and step in. 
As the bindings click, the chopper mist 
finally clears from my head. I turn to 
my friend Joe with a huge grin and 
wide eyes. He’s busy snapping photos 
like an overzealous tourist. 

Lead guide JC Trespannier picks up 
on the excitement. With the comic 
timing of a weathered backcountry 
expert, he says, “OK, sorry guys, we're 
done for the day.” The irony—that 
we’ve only just begun—breaks the 
mystique, snapping us into action. 

With a few short instructions on 
safe travel, we're let loose on our first 
of nine untracked powder lines 
spread over three separate moun- 
tains, adding up to 5000 vertical 
metres on a bluebird day in the Sel- 
wyn Mountains. 


THAT MORNING at the vatemount Best 
Western, I was on my way to check 
out when a stranger greeted me. 
“Going skiing?” asked the man as he 
eyed my boots. He had a short bristle 
of white hair and spectacles, looking 
wizened and fatherly. Not the type I 
would immediately peg as a back- 
country aficionado. 

But this is Valemount, and only two 
types of people visit in winter: alpin- 
ists and sledders. Then there’s the 
mixed breed—sled-assist skiers. This 
guy was the latter and he clearly 
knew his stuff. “If you get the chance, 
check out Dixon Glacier,” he said as 
we parted. 

The moment was pure Valemount. 
Inside tips exchanged between con- 
noisseurs. Fitting for a town that just 
launched a rebranding strategy, start- 
ing with a new slogan: “Let the moun- 
tains move you.” 

People here move among the 
mountains quietly, unaffected and at 


i 


ease. There's none of the hustle and 
bustle of “the show” and yet some of 
the best scores in the world lay just 
minutes from the town’s back door. 

In its 19th year of operation, Rob- 
son Helimagic attracts visitors from 
far and wide, says manager Christine 
Dolbec. The operation draws a large 
percentage of its clientele from 
Europe and the US, but since taking 
over as manager in July 2008 one of 
Dolbec's primary aims has been to 
boost local visits. 

“We get skiers from all over the 
world,” she explains, “but there are a 
lot of people fin Western Canada] who . 
don’t know what's in their own back- 
yard.” 

One way she’s trying to build a 
local following is by fashioning the 
company into a boutique-style opera- 
tion. Day skiing—a rare commodity in 
the industry—starts at $599, three-day 
packages from $2899 and five days 
from $4799. 

Based on a “smaller is better” phi- 
losophy, the operation limits its 
maximum group size to eight skiers 
per guide and two groups per 
machine. The emphasis is on shorter 
shuttle times and greater individual- 
ized guiding attention. On our trip, 
we are six (not counting the pilot)— 
four guests, two guides ... and plenty 
of wide open space. 

Michel Clair and Jean Pierre Blein 
hail from Lyons, France. For over 20 
years, Clair has been flying overseas 
to interior BC to go heli-skiing, usu- 
ally for a week or two at a time. At 
61, he’s amassed over three million 
feet of heli-skiing vertical with some 
of the bigger outfits in BC. He only 
found Robson Heli a few years ago 
but he’s hooked. 

“Since I discovered Robson,” he 


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and fitness room 


SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY (OFFER ENDS MAY 14, 2009) 


WATERSLIDE ° HOT TUBS 


Local 1.403.609.4656 
Toll Free 1.888.678.4656 


SNOW ZONE 


Says, “I've quit ‘the firm.’” 

Clair explains that bigger compa- 
nies he’s visited often run three 
groups to a helicopter, with 11 skiers 
per group. By comparison the pace is 
considerably more hectic, with 
guides rushing skiers in and out of 
helicopters, he says. He prefers Rob- 
son's approach—still efficient, but 
less stressful. 


LIKE YACHTING OR POLO, heli-skiing is 
a sport in a class of its own. Com- 
monly considered the domain of the 
wealthy, lucky or very talented, the 
average week long heli-skiing vaca- 
tion generally runs upwards of $6000 
per person in high season. Unlike all- 
inclusive beach resort debauchery, 
tips and booze aren't included and 
additional surcharges may apply. 
Many strong skiers and boarders 


who fall somewhere between the 
intermediate to advanced class never 
even consider it because they 
assume, incorrectly, that they won't 
meet the requisite skill level. Those 
who do have the skill and know it 
are often deterred by price, leaving 
only a very few elite. 

-It may cost exponentially more 
than a lift pass, true. But it’s worth it. 
At Robson Helimagic, a day of heli- 
skiing surpasses all previous resort 
experience. It starts with unlimited 
access to 1500 square kilometres of 
terrain spread over several alpine 
ranges. That's only slightly smaller 
than the entire state of Rhode Island. 

The terrain itself encompasses 
alpine saddles, ridges, valleys and 
glades. Rollers, pillows, sweepers and 
the odd boulder serve up nature's per- 


~ fect terrain park. Lower down, tight 


tree lines force discipline—but only 
within limits—and soft snow enables 
speed and contro] at the same time. 

Between epic lines, the short heli 
tides are a living IMAX experience, 
Sweeping through mountain valleys, 
cresting alpine meadows and buzzing 
Mere metres from etched rocky peaks. 

In the wide alpine bowls, we space 
Ourselves out. We progress one at a 
time, cutting pristine lines across a 
blank canvas. There’s no jarring, no 
skidding, no rocks scraping under- 
neath as we float over 50 centimetres 
of soft snow on a solid, settled base. 
Run after run. 

At noon, with a bright sun over- 
head, we stop for a modest but hearty 
catered lunch. Clair, the heli veteran, 
sinks his skis in the snow tails down 
and lays his poles across the bindings 
to build a makeshift chair. Trespan- 
niers heads down below the ridge to 
dig a snow pit while tail guide Ron 
McAllister doles out hefty mountain 
sandwiches, hot juice, apples and 
cookies. A simple repast on a plateau 
looking out on mountain ranges and 
blue sky bending into optical infinity. 


SNOW SUBLIMATES from the tails of 
our skis, so light it passes between 
solid and gaseous states as it sprays 
up behind us, resettling again in our 
wake. Tomorrow, or maybe the next 
day, there will be no marks left to 
indicate our passage. Typical snowfall 
in the region averages 4.5 - 7 metres 
annually. 

A temperature check reveals it to 
be -10 C, but the sun is so warm it 
seems as though we enjoy a perfect 
equilibrium. The term for this phe- 
nomenon, according to McAllister, is 
“apricity’; the warmth of the sun on a 
winter's day. . 

The sun lingers obligingly, but 
slowly the shadows creep out. Down 
low in the trees, the air is cooler. 
Sweeping tight arcs around thick fir 
trees, I come around a thicket to see 
several bare, skinny grey branches 
sticking up from the snow. As I eke 
between two branches and launch 
into the air, it dawns on me that I've 
just skied over a massive, downed 
tree. A grandfather of a tree. | punch 
the final pillows as the slope peters 
out, wishing it wouldn’t end. 

Six sets of skis go back into the box 
of the helicopter. The six of us pile in, 
ending the day with the same grins. 
The blades start spinning, the 
machine begins to levitate. At first 
just a few inches above ground, then 
a few feet. Weightless. Tsunami snow 
washes away our traces. 

In a sparkle of rotor wash, we're 
airborne. v 


= FALL LINES 


La 


Kicking Horse Mountain Resort is rolling 
out the welcome mat for ladies looking to 
improve their tele and downhill skiing. The 
first event is called Wild Women Wednes- 
days where you'll be hosted 9 am - 12 pm 
by local freeheel instructor Paula Stein- 
heber. A fun day of tips and techniques is 
planned at a cost of $89 per person... 

lf that seems a little tame for you 


sa wi) 
> ay 


then you better sign up for the resort's 
Real Aggressive Women's Camp, 
March 13 - 15. RAW Camp is a three- 
day event that will take you to your 
potential and beyond in a supportive 
atmosphere coached by Big Mountain 
Centre female coaches and guides. 
Included are demo skis, Eagles Eye 
lunches and a dinner finale back up 
under the stars in the warm confines 
of the Eagles Eye restaurant. 

Terrain management, line selection, 
avalanche awareness and advanced-to- 
expert ski techniques are on the agenda. 


It's not cheap with the weekend totalling 


$540 per person but the resort is betting 
that you'll have the experience of a life- 
time. If you're interested you better hurry 
because these spots tend to book up in a 
hurry. The RAW Camps are designed to 
be a regular event so check their web for 
future events. 

Finally, the last of the girls-only events 


_at KHMR this spring is the Rossignol Girls 


Day Out two-day ski extravaganza. Includ- 
ing lift tickets this event is only $270 and 
it includes demo skis, big mountain 
coaching, lunches and an opportunity to 
ski alongside professional big mountain 
skiers. w 


-SNOW ZONE 


et, Snowboards - Sk#tebpares 


Be a ae 


SMS EONS REPORT 


} Local 


} Rabbit Hil — 60cm hase, 2em of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Snow Valley — 60cm base, 2cm of new snow. All lifts and runs now open. 
‘ Sum Ridge — fiflcm base, 2om of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Edmonton Ski Cab — Open. 


Alberta 


Canada Olympic Park— 70cm base, no new snow. All lifts and 8 runs open. 
Castle Mountain — 97-152cm base, no new snow. All lifts and 50 runs open. 
Lake Louise — 155-18 1em hase, 15cm new snow. 9 lifts and 125 runs open. 
Marmot Basin — 109cm base, no new snow. & lifts and 76 runs open. 

Mt. Nommuay — 85cm hase, 350m of new snow. All lifts and 26 runs open. 
Nakiska — 21-94cm base, 55cm of new snow. 5 lifts and all runs open. 

Sunshine Village — 158em hase, 40cm of new snow. 12'lifts and 103 nuns open. 
Tawatinew — 50cm base. All lifts and runs open. 


B.C. 


|] Apax — 174cm base, 11cm of new snow. 3 lifts and 68 runs open. 

: ) Big White — 172cm hase, 22cm of new snow. 15 lifts and 117 runs open. 

) | Femie — 191-201cm base, 18cm of new snow. All lifts and 110 runs open. 
Kicking Horss — 148cm base, 39cm of new snow. 

Kimberley — 97cm base, no naw snow. 5 lifts and 77 runs open. 

Mt Washington — 16Gcm hase, 31cm of new snow. 3 lifts and 45 runs open. 
Panorama — 50-S0cm hase, 3cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Pownler King — 139-320cm base, 39om of new snow. 

Red Mountain — 165cm base, 13cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

/) Revelstoke — 101-223em base, 3em of new snow. 5 lifts and §2 runs open. 
) Silver Star — 140-180cm base, 12cm of new snow. 11 lifts and all runs open. 
} Sun Peaks — 131-167cm base, 30cm of new snow. 10 lifts and 122 runs open. 
|} Whistler’ Blackcomb — 185cm hase, 63cm of new snow. 

1} White Water — 196cm base, 21cm of new snow. 


VULS.A. 


49 North — 140-21 fem base, 10cm of new snow. 4 lifts and 70 runs open. 
© Big Sky — 130-193cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
| Ciystel Mountain — 17cm base. 7 lifts and 45 runs open. 

Great Divide — 99cm base. 7 lifts and 80 runs open. 
| Lookout Pass — 172-259cm basa, 7cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
} Mt Spokane — 109-191cm base, Som of new snow. All its and runs open. 
| Schweitzer Mt. — 190-266cm. 8 lifts and all runs open, 
7 Silver Mt. Resort —122-218em base. 
} Sun Valley — 86-147cm hase. All lifts and runs open. 


Get up to date conditions, easy to search @ vueweekly.com 


sort 


2 


€ 


All conditions accurate as of Mar 4, 2009. 


1 Snowboards - Skateboards 


5. 
al sy 2~Standardizes 
motgraycte2D get 


Safety 


ss 24) 
> “a ol | 


do —— dob | 
Be Retraining” 


MARIA KOTOVYCH / maria@vueweekly.com 
Je= at the white circles dotting the 


ground below. They resemble back- 
yard swimming pools, only ones 
you can’t swim in. I'm in an airplane, 
cruising 3500 feet above the refineries. 
And now, it’s my tum to try flying. 

| I'm about to do the typical first les- 
son that a beginner flight student 
would complete. Kyla Ewasiuk, the 
chief flight instructor at the Edmonton 
Flying Club, leads me, through several 
exercises: attitudes and movement, 
straight and level, left and right. In 
other words, she’s teaching me how to 
keep the plane at an even altitude, how 
to adjust the nose up and down and 

how-to tum the plane left and right. 
We're flying a Cessna-172, a standard 
training plane. Over the radio to the air 
traffic controller, Ewasiuk uses the 
: ; call sign, “Québec Charlie Lima.” 
When students first start flying a 
plane, Ewasiuk explains, they are 


ee 


her is suitable for flying. Stu- 
n become more independent 
ince. 

a plane is difficult, Ewasiuk 
g that it’s one of the last 
s learn before flying solo. 
Ewasiuk’s control, our 

ot a bump. 

onton Flying Club has a 
of flight instruction. The 
es out of the Edmonton 
Airport, which was called 


a's first licensed airport in 1926. 


chford Field when it became - 


= FLIGHT 
SCHOOL 


The club, originally called the Edmon- 
ton and Northern Alberta Aero Club, 
was founded a year later. Wilfrid 
“Wop” May, Canada’s aviation ace in 


the First World War, was the club’s - 


first president. 

Ewasiuk got her first licence in 
1995. And yes, she admits that she 
was once afraid of heights. An Air 
Cadet when she earned her licence, 
she completed it through a scholar- 
ship program. Eight years after finish- 
ing the cadet program, she returned 
as an officer and started instructing. 


“| realized how much I liked teach- 


ing. I thought, I like flying, I like teach- 
ing. Let’s teach flying!’” enthuses 
Ewasiuk, “It was one of those lightbulb 
moments where I thought, ‘I know 
what I want to do with my life!’” 
Ewasiuk has been a flight instructor 
for three years. During this time, she 


chas heard two primary reasons guid- 


ing people's decisions to lear to fly. 
The most popular, she says, is that 
people want to do it for a career. 

“You can always tell a pilot, 
because they just can’t shake it,” she 
observes. “They want to do it; it’s a 
passion for most people who pursue 
aviation.” 

The desire to fly as a hobby is the 
other reason that brings students to 
flight school. 


"|These are] people who already 
have a career and they've established 
themselves in their lives. They still 
can't let it go, and ‘It’s time,’ they say, 
and they come in. They've wanted to 
do it forever, so they come-and get 
their licence.” 


INHER EXPERIENCE, anyone who comes 
in, whether to pursue a career or a 
hobby, has caught the “flying bug.” The 
person wants to learn, and just can’t 
forget about it. In fact, Ewasiuk recalls 
a 76-year-old student who started fly- 
ing lessons at another club: “He said, 
‘T've put this off for too long!” 

The flying bug also hits the young 
ones—Ewasiuk regularly meets 13- 
year-olds who come in asking, “Am I 
old enough yet?” 

At 17, students can obtain a Private 
Pilot Licence, which will license them 
to fly. To attain it, students needs to 
complete 40 hours of Ground School, 
which is the in-class component, and 
at least 45 hours of flight time, which 
includes dual training with the 
instructor, along with solo training. 

A student's first solo flight is an 
important event, says Ewasiuk. 

“About halfway through, we send 
them solo. It’s a big day—they get a T- 
shirt, they get their picture taken and 
we celebrate because they went by 
themselves.” 

People earn a Private Pilot Licence 
to be able to fly, but students who 
wish to work as a pilot in Canada 
must obtain a Commercial Pilot 
Licence. To ear this licence, students 
must complete 80 hours of in-class 


EDUGAAOR 


beckons for those with ‘the bug’ j 


| or a hobby, the thrill of taking flight draws students back to the wild blue yonder 


instruction and log-at least 200 hours 
of flight time. Ewasiuk also lists some 
other requirements, such as cross- 
country and instrument requirements. 
The minimum age for holding this 
moré comprehensive licence is 18. 

And pilot training isn’t cheap, cost- 
ing approximately $25 000, but that 
amount will vary because students 
learn at their own pace, with some 
needing more hours than others. 

“It's a comparable cost to three 
years of university, It’s roughly about 
the same from start to finish. That 
Way, you Save a year!” she quips 


MADISON DAHL, 22, has been pursu- 
ing flight training steadily since 
November. With a father who is a 
pilot, she has been surrounded with 
flight her entire life. 

"I've always loved being in the air, 
and eventually I just decided that I 
wanted to learn. I decided that I want- 
ed to fly,” she explains 

Dah! doesn't have her Private Pilot 
Licence yet, but she says she might try 
to get her Commercial Pilot Licence 
eventually. For now, she’s enjoying 
learning to fly and feels excited about 
the process. Although she finds 
Ground School the most challenging, 
her favourite part of flight training is 
being in the plane. 

"| learn by doing things, so when 
I'm up in the air, and we're actually 
going through manouevres, | learn 
that way,” she explains, the flying bug 
in her seeping out as she speaks. 

Ground School classes have about 
40 students, and Dahl is one of just 


two female students in her class 

While aviation still tends to be a 
male-dominated profession, Ewasiuk 
observes emphatically that “it's get- 
ting better,” stressing that there are 
many women pilots out there 

“For me, being a female chief flight 
instructor is not actually that uncom- 
mon,” Ewasiuk continues. “I know that 
I'm not the first, but there is definitely a 
majority of males in our classrooms 

“The other day, I was flying, and 
there was myself, another lady flying 
a medevac and then a female con- 
troller, and I was like, ‘All-girl day! It’s 
all girls on the radio!” she recalls 
laughing 

Despite the overwhelming gender 
imbalance, Dahl hasn't encountered 
anyone who is surprised that a 
woman would want to be a pilot. 

"You're all students. Everyone's at 
the same level,” she says of her class- 
mates. “[It} doesn’t matter what age 
you are, what sex you are—everyone’s 
just very excited to be learning.” 

Edmonton Flying Club member Bill 
Dimmer, 59, got his licence in 1988, 
and says he's is no stranger to the fly- 
ing bug. 

“I'd been complaining about wanting 
to leam to fly for years, and finally my 
wife just got tired of hearing me 
mouthing off, so she bought me Ground 
Schoo! for Christmas one year. So that 
was allit took.” he says of his start. 

While Dahl'is considering a career 
in aviation, Dimmer is a professional 
musician, playing trumpet with the 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 31 


MAR NAR JI. 2m VUEWEEKLY 19 


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20 wwEWweEEKLY Mais) WAR 41, 2009 


facts that I've 


eye te 
<3 


~ 
<.4> 


rn all the 
earned? 


Alberta schools rely on standardized testing to 
measure learning, but some experts say it’s not 


helping students 


XANTHE COUTURE / xanthe@vueweekly.com 
ow can you tell whether a student is 
Hesse According to Alberta Educa- 
tion, the answer is straightforward: 
learning can be judged by “tests, examinations 
or other methods for determining the ability, 
achievement or development of individuals.” 

As a result, standardized testing is common- 
place in Alberta’s K-12 schools. In the final year 
of high school, all students in the province must 
write the diploma examinations, which are 
worth half of a student's final grade—a much 
higher weighting than in other provinces. 
Provincial Achievement Tests (PAT) are a stan- 
dard part of school for Alberta students in 
Grades 3, 6 and 9, as are the newly devised 
Grade Level of Achievement Reporting (GLA), 
which reports the grade level of students’ math 
and language arts abilities. 

Although the government says that it uses the 
data gathered by PATs and GLAs to analyze and 
evaluate students all over the province and to 
help inform both students and parents of their 
progress, the use of standardized testing contin- 
ues to be a point of contention between the 
government and public education analysts and 
policy-makers, both here in Alberta and on an 
international scale. 

Dr Pasi Sahlberg, the lead education specialist 
at the European Training Foundation (ETF) and an 
expert in educational policy, believes that the 
reliance on standardized testing to judge the suc- 
cess of schools in educating students has led to 
the development of market-driven education 
environments in public schools. 

Sahlberg explains that market-driven schools 
proceed from the assumption that public educa- 
tion can be improved through competition, 
which includes tests to judge student perform- 
ance. These tests are then used as the main 
indicator to assess how well schools and teach- 
ers are educating students. 

“The assumption that is made by policy-mak- 
ers is that if we can increase competition 
between schools for resources, students and 
teachers, schools will be better off,” Sahlberg 
explains. “There is a belief that this type of com- 
petitive thinking is beneficial to education sys- 
tems, but in education it’s not so simple.” 

In the market-driven school, Sahlberg 
explains, “Parents are seen as consumers, just-as 
clients are seen as in a business. They are given 
the information so that they can decide which 
school to send their children to.” 

Sahlberg says that the reliance of standard- 
ized testing to judge the success of student per- 
formance started in England in the 1980s and 
quickly spread to North America, Australia and 
other developed nations. Sahlberg’s home coun- 
try of Finland, on the other hand, was not swept 
up in trying out the new approach. 

“Scandinavian countries were not convinced 
that through competition education would be 
improved. Instead an idea of equality is pervasive— 
that every child needs to be provided with equal 
opportunity through good education,” he explains. 

This perspective means schools in his country 
look different than those in countries that 


| STANDARDIZED 
TESTING 


embraced standardized testing. 

“For example, schools in England have only 
two or three core subjects in the curriculum, 
whereas in Finnish schools there is more of a 
broad focus that includes the social arts, based 
on the belief that the success of individuals is 
not solely achieved through the instruction of 
only math and sciences. The whole education 
system in Finland, from kindergarten to Grade 
12, has no high-stakes external testing system,” 
he explains, 


SAHLBERG ARGUES that the more limited focus 
that predominates in most developed countries 
means the curriculum of instruction has become 
narrower. 

“Learning has been focused in areas which 
are not necessarily the most important as stan- 
dardized tests have become the way to define 
the success and failure of students,” he says. 

This, Sahlberg argues, can actually Nave a 
detrimental effect on students’ learning. 

“When students become afraid that they will 
not successfully pass the standardized tests that 
are administered, then we are in nefarious terri- 
tory. They are afraid to work towards finding 
their own talents.” 

However, Sahlberg is quick to note that no 
education system anywhere is perfect. 

“I am not saying that everything is perfect in 
Finland,” he admits, “but Finnish schools are 
performing very well on an international scale 
according to the OECD Programme for Interna- 
tional Student Assessment (PISA).” 

The PISA study assesses student from all 
OECD countries based not only on learning 
achievements, but also by looking at equality 
and other measures, such as students’ 
approaches to learning and their attitude 
towards school. Finland consistently ranks high 
on the measure, matching the top-performing 
math and science countries of China, Japan and 
Korea. 

Sahlberg says that he hopes through his 
research to help create a sustainable learning 
society where students are able to explore other 
avenues of learning beyond worrying about 
their test scores in core subjects. 

“The main message I am trying to communi- 
cate is there are other ways to organize the cur- 
riculum through schools,” he says. “We can put 
learning first through alternative ways of 
assessing students. I-believe, like many others, 
that we need people to be creative rather than 
have only a mastery of basic skills, and that 
everything else will follow. Students need the 
attitude and skills to be innovative.” ; 


DR DAVID BERLINER, an educational psychologist 


and regents professor of education at Arizona 


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22 wwEWweEKLY MARS ide 1; 2009 EDUCATION 


| was riding down the road one day ... 


Motorcycle Rider Safety Training program guarantees Safety and success on two wheels 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 
[f you were going to fly an airplane, 
what are the chances you'd just 
jump in and fly, without having 
any training whatsoever? The answer, 
of course, is zero. It’s a no-brainer. So 
why do 80 per cent of motorcyclists 
on the road today choose to forgo 
safety training before hitting the high- 
way? It’s a question that puzzles 
James McCarthy, program coordinator 
and head instructor of NAIT’s 
Motorcycle Rider Safety Training. 
McCarthy thinks a lot of people 
view motorcycles as recreational 
vehicles, similar to ATVs, and just 
assume it couldn't be all that tough to 


learn to drive them—or drive them - 


safely. But there’s a big difference. For 
one, ATVs don’t have gears and 
motorcycles do. For another, ATVs are 
much more stable—the advantage of 
having four wheels compared to two. 

"There are a lot of dynamics with 
motorcycles that aren’t immediately 
apparent,” McCarthy says. 

His advice? Take NAIT’s Motorcycle 
Rider Safety Training program. Every- 
body. Everybody who wants to ride a 
motorcycle, that is. That includes both 
people who have never ridden before 
but want to learn and experienced 
riders who haven't yet had any sort of 
professional safety training. 

“After about the first 10 minutes, 
they will learn five or six things about 
motorcycles they didn’t know, regard- 
less of their expertise,” he says— 
things like where the proper riding 
position is and the correct way to 
park a motorcycle. 

The program started in 2004 after 
NAIT’s president, Dr Sam Shaw, took 
a motorcycle safety course through 
‘the Alberta Safety Council. He was 
impressed, but thought it could be 
better. So he approached McCarthy 
and Gary Stroich, two of the instruc- 
tors who taught there, and planted the 
seed of.developing a program for 
NAIT which was much more hands- 
on, with the opportunity to get a Class 
6 license at the end of it. 

So now, from April through Octo- 
ber, courses run twice a week, every 
week and are held over two days. 
Fourteen of the 16 course hours are 
actually spent on the motorcycle and 
the other two are devoted to eval- 
uating skills and preparing 
for the Class 6 license 
exam. The emphasis 
is very much on 
hands-on expe- 
rience. As 
McCarthy 


= MOTORCYCLES 


explains, “It's like playing a piano. You 
can sit and talk about it for five hours 
but what are you going to learn?” 

Actually doing it, he says, is the 
only real way to learn. 

In 2004 they expected to teach 
about 300 students, but ended up with 
exactly 620. Now they handle over 
1000 students a year. There are 20 
students per class, with one instructor 
for every three students. Such a low 
student/instructor ratio has all the 
obvious benefits, but it also means 
there are a wide variety of instructors 
available. If a student is having trou- 
ble understanding one instructor, 
there’s bound to be another one on 
the track who has a slightly different 
way of teaching, one that may be bet- 
ter suited to that particular student. 
McCarthy says that all the instructors 
have a different way of conveying 
things, soit works to everyone's 
advantage. 

McCarthy is also proud of the 
fact that all the instructors 
they hire are “true experts.” 
Once they make it through 
the rigorous hiring process, 
they still have to go through 
an equally rigorous training 
process, meaning they're not 
your average weekend warriors 
who only meet the minimum 
requirements. Once 
hired, they have to »». 


ihe 
teach a minimum of a 


10 courses a season 
and are required to 
constantly update 
their skills. 
They also 
guarantee 
success. If a 
student 
doesn't 
feel com- 
fortable 


enough to take the Class 6 license 
exam, or takes it and’fails, NAIT will 
give them free training until they are 
Successful—an offer that can even be 
carried over into the next year of les- 
sons. And even if a student has 
passed, they are always welcome to 
come back and ask any questions 
they might have at any time during 
the same calendar year. 


SO WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? According 


to NAIT’s website, the program will 


“guide you through motorcycle basics * 


such as balance and control, down- 
shifting and up-shifting, hand and 
electric signals, counter steering 
(push steering), acceleration and 
deceleration, both in straight lines 
and in curves, straight line braking, 
braking in curves, emergency 
manoeuvres in curves and straight 
lines, collision avoidance, emergency 
braking and acceleration.” Essentially 
everything you need to know in order 
to safely operate a motorcycle. 

The program is held at NAIT’s main 
campus—in a parking lot. During the 
months the program runs it is called a 
“large training area.” And during the 
winter, when motorcycles every- 
where hibernate, it turns back 
into a much sought-after parking 
lot. Quite a large parking lot, 
actually. Large 
enough 


that students typically drive about 75 
kilometres over the two-day course 

NAIT supplies the motorcycles and 
students are expected to come pre- 
pared with all the rest of the gear: a 
DOT or Snell approved helmet, 
gloves, a riding jacket, appropriate 
footwear and protective eyewear. 

The program always runs—rain or 
shine—and McCarthy and the rest of 
the instructors actually prefer to teach 
in the tain. Says McCarthy: “students 
are amazed at how much traction is 
available when they do operate the 
controls smoothly.” And because trac- 
tion is an issue in’the rain, students 
tend to be much smoother with the 
controls. It's like driving a car—if it’s 
snowy and icy, you apply the gas 
slowly and gently. 

The bikes NAIT supplies are of all 
types: cruisers, dual purpose, sport 
and off-road, and students ride all of 
the bikes. “We want them to be com- 
fortable on any type of motorcycle, 
anytime,” McCarthy explains. 

McCarthy thinks that past students 
are the program’s best 
form of advertising 
and he has reams of 
emails to prove it. 
Carla Yorke 
signed “ 


up for the course when her husband 
bought a new Harley FXLT for himself 
and offered her his old 1988 Harley 
FXR. She was used to bikes having 
spent years riding on the back of 
them, but had never driven one her- 
self. Motivated by the thought of driv- 
ing her own Harley, she nervously 
signed up for the course last summer 
and hasn't looked back since 
As she describes it, “I have a hard 
time remembering what it was like to 
be scared on a bike, even though I 
was terrified.” She also said that the 
safety training was one of the best 
investments she has ever made and 
described the instructors as “encour- 
aging, patient and so helpful.” 
McCarthy stresses that driving a 
motorcycle is much different than 
Operating a car, braking and steer 
ing in particular. There are vital 
skills that need to be learned and 
practiced until they become second 
nature. That way, when faced with 
potentially dangerous situations 
these skills are used without even 
thinking about them 
As passionate as McCarthy 
is about the quality of NAIT’s 
course, he emphasizes that 
all new riders should take 
motorcycle safety training 
») regardless of where they 
take it from. He would, of 
course, recommend 
NAIT, but failing 
that, just take a 
course 
\ The Thurs- 
| day/Friday cours- 
m es are $525 plus 
GST and the Sat- 
urday/Sunday 
A ones are $549 
plus GST. And 
they’re fun 
Professional 
} valuable 
’ informative 
and fun. It’s not 
a military training 
camp and you 
don’t get yelled at 
After all, according 
to McCarthy, rid- 
ing a motorcycle 
should be fun 
not work. w 


For more information on 
NAIT’s Motorcycle Safety 
Training Program, visit 
nait.ca/motorcyecles. To register 
or to check on course dates, call 
780.378.5000. For further 
| inquiries, contact James 
McCarthy at 780.378.5385 or via 
email at jamesmc@nait.ca. 


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EDUCATION 


24 \wWEWEEKY MARS -MAR-41, 2009 


Access me 


Student Legal Services helps those for 
whom the justice system is inaccessible 


BRYAN BIATLES / bryan @vueweekly.com 

Ithough they are no longer 
Avi out of a retrofitted 

school bus purchased for $50 
and painted with psychedelic colours, 
the original goal of Student Legal 
Services of Edmonton hasn't 
changed. 

Since its modest beginnings in a 
small office on Boyle Street with a vol- 
unteer staff of 14—and with a sojourn 
on the psychedelic bus—Student Legal 
Services has grown to encompass two 
offices, one downtown and one on the 
University of Alberta campus, and 280 
volunteers—more than half of all the 
students in the U of A’s law school. But 
even while it has grown over the years, 
Student Legal Services’ ultimate goal of 
helping underprivileged citizens in the 
city of Edmonton gain access to legal 
information and have a voice in the 
justice system has stayed the same. 

As Tim Smythe, executive coordi- 
nator of Student Legal Services’ Crim- 
inal Project explains, the act of 
helping someone out of a jam is far 
more rewarding than the practical 
experience each student gains by par- 
ticipating in the program. 

“We get a lot of volunteers—people 
really enjoy doing it and there's a lot of 
need out there. This is the most we've 
ever had—it’s steadily gone up as the 
number of students has gone up,” he 
says from behind his desk at Emily 
Murphy House, the on-campus office 
of Student Legal Services, which is 
named after the famous Albertan legal 
crusader, the first female magistrate in 
the British Empire. “The feeling that 
you get from helping someone who 
doesn't have anyone-else to help them 
is really rewarding.” 

Student Legal Services of Edmon- 
ton concentrates their resources in 
four main areas. The Criminal Project 
defends people accused of summary 
offences, which have little chance of 


jail time, or works with the accused 
and the Crown prosecutor to get a 
better deal for their client, a reduced 
fine or alternative measures—a pro- 
gram by which an individual convict- 
ed of an offence completes 
community service or makes some 
other kind of restitution in exchange 
for having no criminal record. 

The Pro Bono Students of Canada 
is a nationwide project that Student 
Legal Services participates in, through 
which students provide legal services 
to non-profit community groups or 
assist local lawyers in providing pro 
bono services. 

“Not-for-profit organizations 
around the city don’t necessarily have 
the resources to retain legal counsel 
for certain things,” explains Smythe of 
the work Pro Bono Students of Cana- 
da does. “We'll get a group of about 
four students—usually two upper-year 
students and two first-year students— 
and they'll do things like review docu- 
ments for them. It’s just little things 
that they would pay a lawyer for, we 
do all the legwork.” 

The Civil and Family Law Project 
provides assistance on issues such as 
landlord and tenant disputes, Work- 
ers’ Compensation Board hearings 
and appeals, debt or collection agency 
problems, small claims and student 
appeals. Though the project does do 
some work in family law, it concen- 
trates mainly on civil law because of 
the restrictions placed on student vol- 
unteers in the justice system. 


Pt, 

een a little bit of a touchy 
he past with SLS doing fami- 
it not a lot of lawyers will 


ues and there really isn’t a 
le who do family law in the 
family law office at Legal 
orked and there's a lot of 
le in the lower income areas of 
nton that really need help with 
plains Smythe. “We're trying our 
0 fill a couple of holes.” 
final area that Student Legal 
rvice of Edmonton concentrates on 
he egal Education and Reform 
‘Encompassing various out- 
to at-risk citizens in Edmon- 
m, student volunteers provide 
information at places like iHuman, the 
_ Bissell Centre, Hope Mission and, 
through the Prostitutes at Risk pro- 
gram, at various locations throughout 
the city where sex trade workers con- 
gregate. Though the education and 
reform project constitutes one of the 
smaller divisions of Student Legal 
Services, in some ways it is the very 
backbone of the organization. 

“This organization was founded as 
a legal activist organization,” explains 
Josh Lam, executive coordinator of 
the Legal Education and Reform Pro- 
ject. “It wasn’t necessarily about 
going to court for people; it was most- 
ly about helping underprivileged peo- 
ple—especially in areas where the law 
has discriminated against them, has 
Justleftthem out. _ 

“In the past we really focused on 
prostitution law because they were 
punishing prostitutes more than they 
were punishing johns. That’s one of 


the 
e) 


Aid certificates for fami-- 


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the things we really changed dramati- 
cally. Since then we've focused on 
things like mental health courts, 
Sometimes we get into immigration 
law, aboriginal rights, but mostly we 
try and deal with homeless rights. 
One of the topics that’s come up 
recently is the anti-panhandling 
bylaw. One of the things I’ve been 
working on with a lot of the people in 
the office is to try and persuade the 
city that panhandling is a microcosm 
of a bigger problem.” 


MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC who require 
the assistance of Student Legal Ser- 
vices of Edmonton will most likely 
come into contact with the Criminal 
Project. If an individual is charged 
with an offence, they can come to 
either the downtown office or the one 
on campus to discuss that offence and 
a student volunteer will open a file for 
them. Then, if the offence is of the 
kind that Student Legal Services can 
handle, and the client fits the income 
guidelines of the organization (which 
aren't published but which match 
those of Legal Aid) then the matter 
will proceed from there. 

“Generally the cases are things like 
impaired {driving charges}, we do a lot 
of theft under $5000, simple assault, 
we handle cases that aren't punishable 
by imprisonment or any other serious 
punishment,” explains first-year law 
student and volunteer Scott Matheson. 
“Legal Aid handles serious offences, 
but Legal Aid doesn’t have the 
resources to handle things like 
shoplifting or getting in a small fight.” 

As Matheson explains, without Stu- 


dent Legal Services, many individuals 
charged with offences could see their 
legal troubles increase exponentially. 

“At least with the people I've 
helped, it’s been clear that if they did- 
n’t get help from Student Legal Ser- 
vices they would have to walk into 
court self-represented, or maybe they 
would just skip their court date and 
the matter would get more severe,” he 
Says. “I think a lot of people feel that if 
they don’t have someone there with 
them they just shouldn't go, so Stu- 
dent Legal Services aims to help those 
kinds of people, people who would be 
getting a much worse deal.” 

There is a safety net for student 
volunteers in that every case that Stu- 
dent Legal Services takes on is 
reviewed and helped along by an 
advising lawyer from ‘one of the city's 
law firms. Students get to tap into the 
experience that these lawyers have 
accumulated over the years as they 
attempt to help clients, and the advis- 
ing lawyers help law students navi- 
gate the treacherous path of the legal 
system. In the case of the Criminal 
Project, the advising law firm is Daw- 
son, Stevens, Duckett and Shaigec. 

“Every time we open up a file, any 
decisions that are made-with that file 
are made by the person who has the 
charge—we’ll go in and we'll talk to 
the advising lawyer, go over the dis- 
closure—the police report—with 
them, they'll let us know if there's any 
try-able issues in the case, what some 
of the best avenues are for the princi- 
pal to explore, we'll get the principal 
to come in, we explain to them what 
the advising lawyer told us and they 


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direct us what they want us to do,” 
explains Smythe. “If they want us to 
go to trial then we take it to trial for 
them, if they're just looking to resolve 
the matter then we enter into negotia- 
tions with the Crown prosecutor's 
office and try to get them as low a 
fine or sentence as possible.” 


NOT EVERYTHING goes according to 


plan, however, as Matheson found 
Out the first time he defended a client 
in court. 

“I was in court in the first week in 
October, after starting law school in 
September. | came into court and { had 
never been before, and Docket Court is 
a very strange and funny place if you've 
never been. | had just learned from my 
day leader about all of the formality 
about bowing and how to address the 
judge and everything, and I was very 
nervous,” he explains, “I realized that 1 
had forgotten to bow as I was leaving 
the podium, so I turned around really 
fast to bow and I headbutted [my client] 
in the face, And there's lawyers there 
and articling students, the Crown, the 
clerk and the judge, the bailiff—it was 
quite the scene.” 

Apart from some sort of headbut- 
ting mishap, however, most volun- 
teers find their experience with 
Student Legal Services to be benefi- 
cial, not only because they have the 
Opportunity to use the skills they're 
learning to help their fellow citizens, 
but because volunteering also pro- 
vides them with much-needed experi- 
ence that will benefit them when they 
begin their careers 

“You get a lot of practical experi- 


ence that if you didn’t have then as 
soon as you go into your article and 
get thrust into court you wouldn't 
know what you were doing,” explains 
Smythe, “It's really useful for students 
in terms of the practical experience 
because so much stuff that we do in 
law school is so theoretical and this 
is stuff that you're actually going to 
use, tools that you gather along the 
Way that'll really make you attractive 
to firms and help develop you as a 
young lawyer.” 

Being attractive to law firms may 
be one thing, but all involved agree 
that the largest benefit of Student 
Legal Services is the same as it ever 
was—helping people who have no 
one else to go to bat for them 

“There’s not many other experi- 
ences in law schocl where you get the 
Social aspect and providing a service,” 
says Lam. “I know a lot of people 
come to law school to get a job that 
Pays but I think a lot of people spend 
an extra amount of time [working at 
Student Legal Services]|—even maybe 
Sacrificing some of their schoo! 
work—because you feel good after 
you get a file put away.” 

Smythe wholeheartedly agrees. 

‘The feeling that you get from help- 
ing someone who doesn't have any- 
one else to help them is really 
rewarding.” w 


Student Legal Services of Edmonton is 
located at 11011 - 88 Ave and also has an 
Office at #203, 9924 - 106 Stin downtown 
Edmonton. Student Legal Services can be 
contacted at 780.492.2226 or through its 
website at slsedmonton.com 


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EDUCATION MARS -MAR 11,2009 WUTEWE 25 


At least you won't die wondering 


U of A delves deep into the many aspects of shuffling off this mortal coil 


KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristine @vueweekty.com 

f is class never fails to enter- 
tain!" says Sarah’ Smelquist, 
after another lecture of her 

sociology course on death and dying 

at the University of Alberta comes to a 


Alberta Uaise of Provinctsl Employees 


close. 

Hard as it may be to believe, the 
study of death and dying—or thanatol- 
ogy—isn’t as morbid as some may 
think. ‘ 

One class can consist of discussions 


surrounding everything from jewelry 
and tattoos made out of cremated 
ashes to the amount of time it takes to 


. cremate bodies. Instructor Karen Mar- 


tin once brought up a comment made 
by a visitor to a funeral about how the 


makeup on the deceased woman made 
her look better than she did when she 
was alive. (Martin subsequently 
remarked that she hoped no one ever 
says the same thing about her.) 

The humour that surrounds death is 


With well over 63,000 members, AUPE is Alberta's Largest Union. 
AUPE represents more than 7,500 support staff members at 14 Alberta post-secondary institutions and 3 school districts. 


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MAR 5 MARY 1, 2009 


EDUCATION 


=|DEATH & 
DYING © 


a paradox that sociology professor Dr 
Herbert Northcott had trouble shaking 
when he first introduced the course to 
the U of A over 15 years ago. 

“You know, we're all gonna die and 
yet, there’s lots of jokes about death. | 
was quite surprised when | first started 
teaching death and dying [at] how 
often we were laughing, sometimes 
crying, but often we were laughing,” 
says Northcott. “I also teach an aging 
class and even though there’s ageist 
humour, the discussion of aging isn’t 
much fun, But we have a lot of fun in 
the. dying and death class. Humour is 
one way of managing things that are 
uncomfortable, and maybe that’s why 
there's so much death humour.” 

While the topic of death can be a 
funny matter, it also spawns other 
reactions. Smelquist notes one of either 
two extremes when she tells other peo- 
ple that she is studying death and 
dying. 

“They're either not surprised 
because I’m the weird kid or they're 
completely disgusted,” he says. 

Thanatology emerged in the late 
1950s and early 1960s in the United 
States. Northcott, who is responsible 
for bringing the sociology of death and 
dying to the U of A, had no problems 
convincing the department of sociology 
that this was a course that should be 
taught. However, he agrees that death 


learn about a topic that 
th ordinary. However, 
de to study death and 
the career paths they 
r foresee themselves 


work in a pharmacy, and I work a 
ith seniors and whatnot so | 
ed that this class was going to be 
ly about seniors,” Chaudhary 
s. “But it’s fabout) death in gener- 
al hich | wasn’t really geared for. 


_ death and dying should only be studied 
in terms of illness and old age are mis- 


_ "If you locate [death and dying} with 
gerontology, you're missing out on the 
fact that it’s not just elderly people who 
die, and if you locate it in health and ill- 
ness, you're missing out on all kinds of 
death and all the rituals that surround it.” 

Martin, who has been teaching the 
sociology of death and dying since 
2002, receives just as many varied 
reactions in regards to her profession 
” as the students. 

“| was just on the bus last night on 
the way home and talked to a bus driv- 
er. He asked me what | taught. | told 
him I was teaching at the university, 
and he said he really could have used 
this course when he was working in a 
palliative care program as a nursing 

_assistant,” Martin recalls. “He didn’t 
know such courses existed. 

“Other people think it’s creepy and 
wonder how on earth there’s enough 
to make up a course and why anybody 
‘would take it,” she continues. “I have a 
friend who's a former mathematician 
and he said, ‘There can’t possibly be a 
textbook for this.’ I gave him the text- 
book because he didn’t believe there 
was enough to say, and he was con- 
vinced after he looked at the textbook 
that there was something of value 
there.” 

As a former psychiatric nurse, Martin 
is very observant of students’ reactions 
to a topic that is more likely to strike a 
personal chord with them. At the 
beginning of the semester, she warned 
that students might become uncom- 
fortable as the course progresses. ~ 

To avoid this, she sets up the course 
so that the first half has students talk- 


ing about death from a distance, as _ 


facts and statistics, and as a cultural 
and historical object. Students learn 
that depending on the historical period, 
the culture and the dominant discipline 
of the time, attitudes, emotions and 
practises differ. In turn, they change the 
experiences of dying, death and grief. 

“L would say just the stuff from other 
cultures is interesting,” says student 
Shanna Babij, noting that in compari- 
Son, western culture seems to be lack- 
ing in terms of how it deals with death. 

She isn’t lying, either. One film that 
We got to see in class took us to vari- 
Ous parts of the world. In Kashi, India, 
death is a part of life where cremations 
take place 24 hours a day; in Ghana, 

\shantis are famous for their elab- 

erals and death art. Watching 

m took me back to the time my 
my dad and I to visit my 


ve at the Our Lady of 

a few Halloweens ago 

w prayers. It felt bizarre to 
time, but when I found out 
icans hold all-night vigils for 


deceased loved ones on the Day of the 
Dead, I no longer felt that what my 
mom had done was so strange. 


ASA SOCIOLOGY COURSE, much of the 
discussion in the death and dying class 
is based on how society frames and 
manages death. 

“I think that’s pretty important 
because it’s one of those things that 
goes on but people don’t even pay 
attention to,” Martin observes. “They 
don’t realize that society is shaping 
how we think and feel about death, 
how we grieve and I’m trying to get 
that across that it just isn’t you here. It’s 
you attached to a society or culture.” 

Some may argue, for instance, that 
we don't currently live in a death-deny- 
ing society because we see and hear 
about death constantly in the news or 
on television. Martin, however, would 
beg to differ. 

“You get programs like CSI [where] 
the first thing that happens is the per- 
son we don’t know very well at all or 
don’t care about is killed,” says Martin. 
“I'm trying to say that death has con- 
Sequences: social consequences and 
personal consequences. We’re sur- 
rounded by [death] but our responses 
are blunted.” 

As the term progresses, the distance 
narrows and things become more per- 
sonal. Sensitive topics such as suicide 
and euthanasia are brought up, and 
activities are done that may involve 
students watching a film on how 
euthanasia is handled in the Nether- 
lands and then, being split into groups 
and being assigned a position to 
defend regardless of personal beliefs. 

“Usually what that does, then, is that 
people are free to say anything because 
nobody really know at that point what 
their beliefs are,” says Martin. “So I 
introduce confusion and grey instead of 
just black and white and try to encour- 
age students to think. What we're really 
debating is laws. What I hope the stu- 
dents will get out of it isn’t just beliefs 
about these kinds of things that are 
important, it’s also about what's imbed- 
ded in law and that changes through- 
out history.” 

After studying beliefs and attitudes 
towards death, things get down to the 
nitty-gritty: the dying part. 

“Dying is an experience. It’s not just 
a biological process and that's my 
emphasis,” says Martin, “It's a social 
process and we have social categories 
for kinds of deaths, how people die, 
how medicine treats them and all those 
kinds of things. So when | look at it 
from all angles—kind of like a Rubik’s 
Cube—at some points, it's really 
uncomfortable. 

“Some students think [death is] 
never going to come up and | try right 
from the beginning of the course-to 
Say, ‘It’s going to come up no matter 
whether you want it to or not. At some 
point, with this class, you're going to 
Start to realize that everyone around 
you is mortal, including yourself.” 


IF TALKING about death doesn't bring it 


closer to home, a trip to the medical 
examiner's office might. 

This optional field trip, according to 
Martin, is a way of dispelling the kinds 
of myths propagated by television pro- 
grams such as CS/ where mysterious 
deaths are solved neatly and with cer- 
tainty. It’s a chance for students to see 
how such deaths are managed in reality. 


“Sometimes, we've gone [to the med- 
ical examiner's office] and—particularly 
in the winter—somebody’s been in a 
Suite six weeks dead. They bring [the 
body] into the medical examiner's office 
because they have to find out why they 
died,” tells Martin. “No matter what they 
do, they can’t cover up the smell of the 
body that has badly decayed. The smell 
of that makes death more real. 

“When he says goodbye to people, 
(Denis Caulfield, medical examiner 
investigator] says, ‘I hope I never see 
you in here again, especially flat.” 

A second optional field trip, this 
time to a funeral home, provides stu- 
dents with insight into the jobs of peo- 
ple who work in the funeral industry. 
Students are taken on a tour as if they 
were family members coming in to 
make arrangements for a deceased 
loved one. They are given a chance to 
see the body preparation room as well 
as learn how physical space is 
changed to accommodate different 
cultures and religions. 

What the trip to the funeral home 
doés is add to the discussion of 


bereavement, which Martin defines as 
being in a position of having lost a per- 
son that one considers important 

While Martin encourages students to 
stop looking at death from a distance, 
she admits that part of the challenge of 
teaching the course is encountering 
students where death is far from being 
a distant event. 

“Sometimes, people may come to 
the class in anticipation of being able to 
talk about their experiences in a way 
that makes other students uncomfort- 
able. I've had that happen a couple of 
times, and I had to get [those students] 
to understand that, “You know, this isn’t 
a confessional, therapeutic kind of 
course,” Martin recalls, adding that 
what she encourages students to do is 
speak in generalities and share some 
experiences and ideas that will add to a 
topic being studied from a sociological 
rather than a personal perspective 

Ultimately, the topic of death and 
dying is many things. It can be amus- 
ing, emotional, sometimes, downright 
uncomfortable. But there’s rarely a dull 
moment. v 


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MARS <MAR1,209° WUEWwEE 27 


I’d like to hear my options, so | can weigh them 


Laid-off workers have options for re-training, and the government might even pick up the tab 


BRYAN SAUNDERS / bryansaunders@vueweekly.com 

ccording to the most recent 
A= labour force statistics 

released in February, unem- 
ployment rates are on their way up in 
Alberta. However, despite layoffs in 
some industries, there are still provin- 
cial labour shortages in others. For 
recently laid-off workers, this means 
that a little bit of retraining or certi- 
fication in a new trade could quite 
literally be their “ticket” to finding 
work again. 

This is according to Charles Stra- 
chey, a regional communications 
manager with Alberta Employment 
and Immigration. As he puts it, while 
there has been a slowdown of late in 
the province, there are definitely still 
jobs out there. 

*There is still a lot of opportunity in 
Alberta right now. In Edmonton, for 
instance, the unemployment rate is 
under four per cent still, and five per 
cent is considered a balanced labour 
market,” he explains. 

Edmonton's unemployment rate 
was 3.8 per cent in the month of 
January, an increase of 0.2 per cent 
from the same time last year. For 
the entire province of Alberta, 
unemployment rates hit 4.4 per 
cent in January, an increase of 1.2 
per cent when compared to January 


Quality of Edu 
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= WORKER 
RETRAINING 


2008. Simply put, there’s still a 
labour shortage in this province— 
you just have to know where to 
look for it. 

“I don’t know if I can give you a 
complete list, but what I can tell 
you is that there are some indus- 
tries that are hot right now, like 
health care and the trades, still— 
heavy duty mechanics and that sort 
of thing are still in high demand. 
So, let's say you've been laid-off 
and you liked working with your 
hands and you wanted to continue 
to do that, then a heavy duty 
mechanic might be a good choice 
to you,” Strachey says. 

For a more complete list of in- 
‘demand careers, and of companies 
that are hiring right now, Strachey 
advises job seekers to head down to 
one of the province's Labour Market 
Information Centres, There, they'll 
be able to get not only career 
advice, but they can also find out if 
they're eligible to have their career 


~ 


280 wwEwEEKLy MAR &- MAR 11, 2009 


retraining paid-for in full or in part 
by the government. 

“There's a lot of little different 
pots of money available: there's a 
pot of money if you qualify for 
employment insurance, there's a pot 
of money if you don’t qualify for 
employment insurance. What it real- 
ly comes down to is that it is com- 


~ pletely based on that worker’s 


situation: whether they were laid- 
off—and there’s extra money for 
retraining in certain industries,” he 
points out. “In forestry, for instance, 
there's the Community Development 
Trust Fund that the federal govern- 
ment announced almost a year ago, 
and that’s a billion dollars over three 
years. And our share of that, this 
year, for Employment and Immigra- 
tion, I think is five million dollars.” 


FORESTRY IS ONE of the areas that has 
been hit hard by the high Canadian 
dollar and the shrinking US economy, 
but many call centres in Alberta have 
also been forced to close up shop. But 
it doesn’t have to end badly. When GE 
Money Canada had to close their 
Edmonton call centre this February 
and let go of 250 employees, Alberta 
Employment and Immigration staff 
were on-site, helping find new jobs 

for the laid-off employees and mak- 


EDUCATION 


Bob Prodor 


Sure that the transition from one 
job to another was a smooth one. 

_ "They contacted us very soon after 
we had to make this very unfortunate 
announcement about closing the 
site,” Says Supriya James, a human 
jources leader for GE Money Cana- 
. “And the support that they gave us 
‘was a very strong complement to the 

_ outplacement program that we had 

___ offered to the employees,” 
, explains that on top of set- 
arr up a job fair with 20 different 
employers, and helping the soon-to- 
be-laid-off employees find new jobs, 
Alberta Employment and immigration 
officials also talked with the employ- 
ees about the kinds of courses they 
would néed to take if they wanted to 
get a particular job—like a health care 
aide or a licensed practical nurse— 
and about the tuition assistance that 
was available to them in many of 
these cases. 

"This was something that was 
not previously known to our 
employees, and was definitely very 
useful for them,” she continues, 
adding that she would not hesitate 
to recommend the program to 
other employers who are looking 
at the unfortunate situation of hav- 
ing to lay off employees and 
adding that she is currently looking 
to see if something similar can be 
set up in other provinces where 
other GE call centres are also fac- 
ing the prospect of lay-offs. 

Hugh MacDonald, the Liberal MLA 
for Edmonton Gold Bar and the Liber- 
al critic for employment and immigra- 
tion as well as for advanced 
education and technology, agrees 
with Strachey when he says that this 
is the ideal time for out-of-work 
workers to consider retraining. 

“We've got to start planning for 
the economic pickup,” MacDonald 
affirms. He adds that there have 
been a few problems with the 
retraining program that were out- 
lined in the latest Auditor General’s 
report, in which Canadian College 
Institute International and CDI Col- 
lege are alleged to have charged the 
government for training that they 
never actually provided. But putting 


think Ahead 


problems like this aside, MacDonald 
Says that retraining recently unem- 
ployed workers is a great idea. 

“If 1 have two trade qualifications in 
my pocket, I'm going to be a lot more 
successful in my job hunt than if | 
have just one. And that’s What I think 
we should do in this downturn: we 
should make sure that if workers are 
interested we'll give them a chance to 
significantly improve their job 
prospects by giving them additional 
training in other trade skills,” Mac- 
Donald says. 


STRACHEY POINTS OUT that you 
don’t even have to necessarily be a 
laid-off worker to take advantage 
of some of the training programs 
that Alberta Employment and 
Immigration offers. For example, 
the government also offers “con- 
struction bootcamps” as well as 
four-week “trade exposure” courses 
for people who just want to find out 
if the trades are, in fact, for them. 
In these courses, students are 
exposed to a number of different 
trades at once, and are able to 
determine which they might be 
interested in. 

There is also a trade course 
designed especially for women, called 
Women Building Futures, and another 
specifically for Aboriginal Albertans, 
called Trade Winds to Success. 

“We also have bridging programs 
for immigrants,” Strachey adds. “So, 
someone who is fairly new to Cana- 
da and who was maybe a physician 
in their old country but isn’t pre- 
pared to go through the training 
that's required to become a physi- 
cian in Canada ... what we can do is 
connect them to another health care 
career where they can use some of 
their training and get into that 
career fairly quickly, like a pharma- 
cist or a licensed practical nurse or 
something like that. 

“We also have part-time training 
grants for people who want to contin- 
ue working, up to $5000 a year, we'll 
pay tuition for training, for people 
who want to take training part time. 
There’s a lot of great retraining 
options,” he emphasizes. 


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_ Should think about hiring mature 


And while more mature workers 
may think that retraining at such a 
late point in their lives is a silly 
idea, Strachey argues that it’s not. 
Their experience, he Says, is very 


Join Us at STUDIO 58 


valuable, and, in fact, there’s going —— 


to be an urgent need for them in 
the near future if current projec- 
tions are correct. 

“We're still projecting a labour 
shortage of around 90 000 work- 
ers over the next decade—as the 
baby boomers retire and that sort 
of thing—and so what we have 
been trying to do is let mature 
workers know that we still do 
need them and that their skills are 
still valuable. We've been talking 
to them and talking to employers 
‘and re-emphasizing with employ- 
ers that these mature workers 
have skills and experience that are 
extremely valuable and that they 


workers.” v 


For more information on career 
opportunities and retraining options in 


Alberta, call the Career Information 


Hotline at 1.800.661.3753 or visit one 
of the Edmonton-area Labour Market 
Information Centres, including loca- 
tions at City Centre (10242-1085 St), 
North Edmonton (200, 13415 Fort 
Road), Northgate (2000, Northgate 
Centre, 9499-137 Ave), South Edmon- 
ton (Argyll Centre, 6325 Gateway Blvd) 
or Meadowlark Shopping Centre 
(15710-87 Aye). 

General information on employment 
in Alberta is also available online at 
employment.alberta.ca 


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STANDARDIZED TESTING 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 


State University, offers an American 
perspective on the issue of standard- 
ized testing which shares many of the 
same. concerns raised by Sahlberg. 

Berliner says the use of standard- 
ized testing to make critical assess- 
ments of students and their teachers 
has its place, but not when it’s applied 
to public education as it has been in 
the United States. 

“There are times when high-stakes 
testing is necessary,” he says. “For 
example, | would not want a pilot fly- 
ing a plane unless he has passed all 
his pilot exams. But when high-stakes 


MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2009 


EDUCATION 


testing is applied to kids and can 
mean that they will not graduate and 
that teachers can get fired, this is a 
different situation all together.” 

Berliner adds that relying too heav- 
ily on test data as the indicator of per- 
formance can lead to other problems. 

“When you value an indicator too 
much you can predict that there will 
be corruption in the numbers because 
the people who administer the evalu- 
ation will corrupt the figures,” he 
explains. “This scenario has been 
found to occur in high-stakes testing 
in US public schools. There are docu- 
mented cases of teachers keeping 
some students at home on test days, 
along with other measures, to get the 
best results possible.” 


Berliner is also troubled by the 
structure of the merit pay system for 
teachers in US public schools, where- 
in teachers receive raises based on 
the performance of their students. 
Funding for schools can also be allo- 
cated in the same way. ~ 

“When a teacher can get fired, 
when bonuses are reimbursed to 
teachers whose students receive high 
marks and schools Can get reconsti- 
tuted and you shame professionals 
based on low test scores, how can 
that be healthy?” he asks. “Teachers 
teach all Kinds of kids, whether they 
do well on test scores or not.” 

Berliner argues that a more accu- 
rate way to conduct assessment of 
student and school performance is by 
having an observer physically present 
in the classroom for at least four or 
five days over the course of the school 
year. This individual would generate 
reports for parents, schools and the 
community, and then involve teachers 
in creating a curriculum that works in 
their particular community. 

“We need a system of assessment 
that uses information to grow, rather 
than by taking a snapshot,” he says. 

An over-reliance on standardized 
testing can also raise issues of equal 
access to education. 

“If the students do well, the teacher 
gets a raise; so in order to get raises it 
could imply that teachers will not 
want students in their class who will 
not get good grades,” Berliner points 
out. “Where does that leave special 
needs students, students who have 
English as a second language?” 

As well as leaving some students 
behind and promoting unrealistic tar- 
gets, high-stakes testing is denying 
the talents of students that cannot be 
measured on a bubble sheet. 

“To expect everyone to excel in read- 
ing and math is to deny the arts—or soft 
skills, which schools should also be 
promoting,” Berliner argues. “Society is 
filled with people with talent and 
schools are only rewarding a small 
band of talent. We are all different, vari- 
ability is part of the human condition.” 

Berliner argues that we are living in 
what he describes as a “VUCA"” 
world—one that is volatile, uncertain, 
complex and ambiguous—and that 
education needs to adapt to that reali- 
ty to remain effective and to prepare 
students to participate as active citi- 
zens in contemporary society. 

“When you look back in history, say 
in 1880, everyone knew what they 
were going to be, whether it was a 
farmer or a tradesman. Now you don’t 
have a clue what you are going to be 
20 years from now, and public schools 
in North America are based on the 
assumption that students can succeed 
when they finish school,” he says. 

“We have to develop a curriculum 
for adaptability. It is a VUCA world— 
parents are learning this as they lose 
their jobs,” he continues. “People still 
need facts and knowledge, but after 
basic math and science, what then? If 
you implement market-driven schools, 
are you not losing the concern for the 
children and citizen education? 

“I suggest more project-based 
work, more public presentations to 
prepare students to understand the 
responsibilities of citizenship. We're 
losing the opportunities for schooling 
to deal with citizenship, and I have 
never known a country to do that.” v 


FLIGHT SCHOOL 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19 


Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. For 
him, flying is a hobby, albeit a serious 
one—he is the Zone Commander for 
the Civil Air Search and Rescue Asso- 
ciation Edmonton. 

Dimmer says that flight instruction 
has changed somewhat since his days 
as a student. 

“When I first learned to fly, if you've 
ever seen The Flintstones, you have to 
run along the ground, and the Ptero- 
dactyl ...” he jokes. 

Continuing more seriously, he 
points out that things haven't 
changed very much in the last 20 or 
30 years. The biggest difference that 
he has observed is the introduction of 
certain electronics in the airplane. 
When he first learned to fly, he used a 
map, compass and stopwatch to navwi- 
gate. Now, planes have GPS for navi- 
gation, which can determine a plane's 
exact location within about six 
metres. Dimmer says that GPS makes 
flying long distances easier, and he 
personally has has flown to Tuktoyak- 
tuk and back. 


DAHL SAYS that people are often sur- 
prised when she tells them she’s 
learning to fly. 

“1 don't know if it's anything that 
anyone thought that I would ever go 
into,” she admits, adding that after 
their initial surprise, people show 
interest. They'll ask questions, such as 
where she takes her lessons and what 
flight school is like. 


Fitness from the inside out 


Dimmer, on the other hand, gets a 
different response when he mentions 
that he flies. 

“In my age group, there’s still this 
sort of sense that pilots are daredev- 
ils, It's something that’s like, ‘Oh, a 
pilot! Oh, wow! Boy, you're not afraid 
of anything!” he imitates. “Of course, 
that’s not quite the case at all.” 

When he encounters this reaction, 
Dimmer dispels the misconception by 
explaining how safe flying is. 

“Danger is simply a matter of how 
much risk you create for yourself. If 
it’s a really terrible day, and the visi- 
bility is off and the winds are bluster- 
ing like crazy, then you probably don’t 
want to be up in the sky in a little, tiny 
airplane. If you were at a party all 
night and got home at 4:30 am, and 
you had planned to go flying at 7:00 
am, that’s probably a bad idea,” he 
emphasizes. 

On this point, Ewasiuk Stresses that 
a large part of flight instruction is 
safety training. Indeed, before we 
leave on our flight, she inspects the 
plane to ensure that everything is in 
order, a step that is part of every stu- 
dent's training. 

“One of the things about flying 
that I really like is the idea that you 
have to have a plan in your head. 
You have to have an idea before you 
go where you're going, what you’re 
going to be doing,” Dimmer says. 
“You have to have a plan already—if 
the engine dies halfway down the 
runway, what am I going to do? If the 
engine dies once I’m at 1000 feet, 
what am)! going to do? What options 
do | have if 1 have a problem? All of 


those things—that sort of planning 
process, and visualizing what you're 
going to do ahead of time—is some- 
thing that I enjoy.” 

Both Dimmer and Dahl speak of the 
fun and excitement of flying, and Dahl 
says she would rather fly than drive. 
She adds that even though she’s been 
in the co-pilot’s seat before, she far 
prefers doing the manoeuvres herself. 

“Actually sitting in the pilot’s seat, 
and doing the manoeuvres, learning 
the manoeuvres, doing them and hav- 
ing the plane respond to you—it’s 
great!” she enthuses. 

Her passion for flight is apparent as 
she tells me that she'll be learning to 
do circuits and landings the following 
day. It must be the flying bug—indeed, 
when Dahl first arrived for the inter- 
view, she stood by the window, trans- 
fixed by the activity of the people and 
airplanes outside. 

Having now flown once myself, I 
understand what everyone means 
when they talk about the “flying bug.” 
After we landed and | crawled out of 
the plane, I was trembling slightly from 
the experience. And I was buzzed for 
the rest of the day ... and the day after. 
Since then, I haven’t been able to stop 
thinking or talking about it. 

“Everybody should try it. It’s really 
fun!” Dimmer exclaims. “Until you 
actually have control of the airplane 
and feel what it’s like to be mobile in all 
three planes, the ability to break gravity 
... It’s like going to church for me.” w 


For more information on the Edmonton 
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34° WWE WEEKIY MARS -MAR 11,2008 EDUCATION 


rity of social media means organizations 
can’t afford not to be Linkedin. Can you Digg it? 


SEAN JOYNER / sean@vueweekly.com 
ust this morning, | updated my 
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= SOCIAL 
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tions like CNN or the Government of 
Canada can utilize social media depart- 
ments to deliver their messages, what 
about smaller organizations: non-prof- 
its, sole proprietorships or small busi- 
nesses? How—or more importantly, 
why—would they see a need for Twit- 


ter, Facebook and podcasting? 

The Business Link, a government- 
run information service that holds 
training events, tries to provide some 
of the answers to these questions. 
They hold brown bag presentations 
on a regular basis to help small busi- 
ness and non-profits improve their 
marketing strategy and increase visi- 
bility online. 

Dean K Owen, a local podcaster, 
blogger and IT professional, is a regu- 
lar presenter for the Business Link. 
His presentations offer the structure 
and focus for businesses to incorpo- 
rate social media into their marketing 


_. Your career in the 


Strategies, regardless of their level of 
knowledge on the subject 

“For the most part, this is all new to 
them,” Owen says. “They've heard the 
words but don’t know what they 
mean. I try to keep it simple, because 
I want the folks who are afraid of it, 
haven't done it or are curious to see it 
as an easy step.” 

During the three-hour session, 
Owen addresses the obstacles faced 
by many organizations when 
reassessing their marketing and pro- 
motion strategies—obstacles like fear. 
The fear of online marketing, accord- 
ing to Owen, is in the mystery sur- 
rounding it. Many times, organizations 
become obsessed with the vast field of 
technologies and advancements that 
are available and are too frightened to 
take the first step. Owen's presenta- 
tions, which cater to the social media 
beginner, demystify the online market- 
ing world and offer participants the 
tools needed to implement podcasts, 
blogs and marketing tools into their 
marketing plans. 

“AS a consumer and a producer, 
content is very important to me,” 
Owen says. “My theory is, ‘Don’t 
worry about the technology, worry 
about the content.” 

Dean says that every company or 
organization can benefit from online 
marketing—it’s global, accessible and 
(usually) free. The trick, he says, is to 
know your audience and how to find 
them. Or, in many cases, how to 
make them find you. This is especially 
true with smaller organizations that 
have limited budgets and are looking 
for ways to maximize their marketing 

“It's called social media for a rea- 
son,” Owen says “There's a strong 
element of people out there who are 
doing that type of thing—not just to 
promote their business, but also to 
promote their social causes. The com- 
munications tools are fundamental 
elements.” 


BROADENING ONE'S audience is not as 


difficult as it may at first seem. Some- 
times, it just takes a little trial and 
error. Since the majority of social 
media and networking websites are 
free, the only expense is time. The 
payotf, Owen believes, is more than 
worth the sacrifice. 

“Fundamentally, the key to business 
is to find out what your customers 
want and to give it to them,” he says 
“One way to find out is to ask them— 
engage in conversation, Maybe Face- 


_ printing industry starts here! 


Digital Graphics Communications Diploma 


Call 780-644-6000 


Your Questo 
a Career starts here. 


Look around — printed materials are everywhere 


Learn print media technologies, operate state-of-the-art equipment and 
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EDUCATION 


MAR 5 MAR 11, 2009 


book will work for you, maybe it won't 
Maybe‘a blog will work for you, maybe 
it won’t—but you've got to try it.” 

Owen teaches participants how to 
develop online strategies oe 
what he calls “touch points.” Blog- 
ging and podcasting are just two 
touch points that can be used to tie 
a larger strategy together Placing 
too much focus on one area, 
according to Owen, is another mis- 
take businesses and organizations 
often make when they venture into 
social media. A broader view of the 
audience, Owen says, is the key to 
online outreach. After an audience 
is identified, its possible to fine tiger: 
the strategy and tools for custom 
marketing 

A perfect example of this was seen 
in last year's US presidential race 
Owen views Barack Obama's cam- 
paign as an ideal bottom-up market- 
ing strategy 

“{He] garnered a lot of his support 
by going to the grassroots and get- 
ting small groups of people to talk 
to other small groups of people 
Owen says. “That's proof of where 
we are as a culture right now. Peo- 
ple have always wanted to commu- 
nicate with each other, and now we 
have the tools to do so - 

As technologies and methods of 
online marketing advance—almost 
faster than we can keep track—so 
change the ways people seek out 
their information. This cultural shift 
means the desire to create a face-to- 
face connection with companies and 
non-profits is becoming more main- 
stream. Owen believes organizations 
should embrace this change and cre- 
ate a more open and accessible pub- 
lic image 

“People are doing what people like 
to do, which is talk to other people 
The days of running an ad in the local 
newspaper every Wednesday aftg;- 
noon and garnering a lot of business 
just doesn’t work anymore,” he says 
“You have to build your strategies, so 
.that there are multiple places for you 
to put and grow your message, help 
your community and engage your 
customers.” Vv 


The presentation on “Podcasting, Blog- 
ging and Online Syndication” takes 
place Thu, Mar 12 (6 pm) at 100, 
10237-104 St or via video conferencing. 
The cost is $35. For more informa 
or to register call 780.422.7722 or visit 
canadaBusiness.ca/alberta/events 


wusweeny 35 


Julius 


Citadel's Caesar can’t keep up the 
fireworks, but still packs punch 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 

n its opening moments, the 

Citadel's production of Julius 

Caesar is wonderfully cinematic: 
like a quick-cut montage, each of 
thg.major characters is introduced 
with a few seconds of spotlight and 
their name projected onto a back- 
drop screen in decorative, spattered 
cursive. Violent violin stabs and dis- 
cordant piano swarm like angry bees 
while a violent ritual is granted 
sparse flashes of red light. 

Director James MacDonald's Julius 
Caesar is heavy on style, which befits 
and benefits the plot of conspiracy 
and betrayal. Well cast and carefully 
envisioned, it's at its best when 
those stylistic elements frame and 
deepen Brutus's struggle to put the 
good of Rome ahead of the rise of 
his ally and friend, Caesar. 

The set is a wiry, expressionistic 
metal framework; a platform and 
staircases are held up with criss- 
crossed steel, lanterns that look like 
jagged spears and an orchard with 
sterile wire plants. Bretta Gerecke’s 
designs suggest the script’s violence, 
but leave it for human hands to 
accomplish 

The expert cast—many wisely 
plucked from the Freewill Players— 
does so notably, with important 
characters garbed in robes that seem 
almost religious in fashion, red and 
black, while commoners are planted 
in garb that lacks a particular period 
association other than “modern.” 

Rick Robert's Marcus Brutus is a 
figure of force: the sensible guy who 
holds great influence on the popula~ 
tion. It’s easy to see why; Robert 
plays him so well reasoned and 
believably committed to the com- 
mon good. The surrounding conspir- 
ators add their own flavours, from 
John Kirkpatrick’s more sinister Cas- 
sius to Chris Bullough’s sly Decius 
Brutus, and Frank Zotter, who has 
fluid, uniquely charismatic delivery 
as Casca, adds extra pull to every 
Seepe he’s in. Ashley Wright as Cae- 
Sar is a cunning performance that 
portrays the character in good and 
bad lights; all the more doubt for the 
others to mull over. 

Blair Williams as Marcus Anthony 
is a particular delight; Julius Caesar's 
“agience is grounded in its speeches, 
and here they're all at an incredible 


UNTIL SUM, MAR 16 


JULIUS CAESAR 

DIRECTED BY JAMES MACOONALD 

WRITEN BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 
STARRING JULIEN ARNOLD, CHRIS BULLOUGH, 
J OWN KRKPATRICK, TROY 0 DONNEL 
AVAJANE MARKUS 

CTADEL THEATRE (H08- 101A AVE, 85-75 


REVUE 


level. His is the best of the bunch: 
subtly twisting his audience (who, 
beside us, line the stairwells of the 
Maclab lit with flashlights), turning 
their cheers to outrage with such 
compelling delivery. “Friends, 
Romans, Countrymen, lend me your 
ears” he cries over the cacophony, 
and we’re thrilled to watch him 
practice crowd control of the highest 
calibre. 


MACDONALD'S STAGING keeps the 


lengthier scenes engaging to watch, 
and the little gestures he adds dress 
up the background: little rituals, 
from presenting a blade to mourning 
hand gestures to the circle celebra- 
tion that begins the play make Cae- 
sar less a script and more a world of 


its own, colourful and deadly. 

Some of the initial steam cools 
down in the second half, despite the 
cast’s best attempts to carry on 
through a long, drawn-out denoue- 
ment: with the major highlights in 
the front-loaded script having been 
hit, there’s a little less excitement to 
ride, and also a tonal change as we 
descend into wintry civil war, which 
is tense and just a bit tedious. 

The stylistic choices that invigor- 
ated the first half seem more sub- 
dued: the stabs of music come less 
frequently (or maybe they’re just less 
jarring when they do), the chaos 
seems thinner, and unlike the first 
half, which was filled with differing, 
grandiose speeches on betrayal, 
most of the key moments seem simi- 
lar in presentation, 

The careful crafted style doesn’t 
completely fade, of course, and 
there's still some punch left for the 
finale. One particularly powerful war 
scene has a spectre looming in the 
background as soldiers fire weapons 
and fall dead. But that scene stands 
mostly alone in the lesser half of an 
otherwise riveting production. w 


Back on the train 
Nibroc’s young cast make its 
simple love story work like a charm 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 

potent simplicity is at the 
At of Blarney Theatre’s 

The Last Train to Nibroc: 
there are no world-turning dramatics 
or game-changing twists, but none 
feel necessary. What we have instead 
is a script that takes a minimalist 
approach to the sweeping love story: 
two young people meet and some- 
thing sparks—in this case, they 
spend the rest of their enjoyable 
stagetime together fanning those 
hints of a flame. 

We meet Raleigh and May as they 
meet each other on a crowded train 
speeding across America. He plunks 
down in the only remaining seat 
(beside her, nose buried in a book) 
and begins the conversation that, 
essentially, makes up the bulk of the 
play. The script’s engaging enough 
to require little else: set in the ‘40s, 
war is ever present in the periphery 
and affects both character's lives, 
but never directly interferes in the 
story arc. 

It's the duo's banter and disagree- 
ments that make up Last Train's dra- 
matic arc, and playwright Arlene 
Hutton’s characters are strong 
enough to make banter alone engag- 
ing: they give each other more than 
enough grief (she’s uptight but he’s a 
bit of a rascal) and the disconnect 
between the two gets pretty fun—it’s 
a testament to the strength of both 
the script and the cast that Friday 
night’s tiny audience was frequently 
lit with pockets of laughter. When 
the characters find common ground, 
though, the atmosphere noticeably 
shifts to something a little more ten- 
der, even when they're still arguing. 


THE SET IS unchanging: just a triple- 


TTAM -< 
MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2009 


ARTS 


UNTILSUN, MAR 
THE LAST TRAIN 


TO NIBROC 

DIRECTED AY JOHN SPROULE 

WRITEN BY ARLENE HUTTON 

STARRING ADAM BURGESS KENDRA CONNOR 
VARSCONATHERTRE (1099-89 AVE 15-20 


REVUE 


purpose bench that acts as train 
seat, outdoor bench and porch 
chair, lit sparsely. The stark atmos- 
phere created by the set is:suitable, 
a simple location that gives the 
actors a place to let the drama 
unfold, That puts quite a load onto 
the two actors, of course, but the 
pair here is capable of carrying the 
show on conversation alone. 

Kendra Connor, in particular, 
shoulders the dramatic burden 
effortlessly. As the up-nosed May, 
she’s delightful (for us) and bitter 
(often, to Raleigh) as she gets mad 
and sputters: “I'm not mean, I’m reli- 
gious!” she cries in a last line of 
defence in flawless belle accent. 
Connor never loses that strong char- 
acter, even as her subtext shifts, as it 
often does, from pining to pissed off 
to somewhere in between. 

Adam Burgess, too, has moments 
as Raleigh, though he doesn’t quite 
have the pull that Connor does. But 
when he conjures up mischievous 
charm, the chemistry deepens and 
the moments they find together are 
beautiful. ' 

There’s a few story tilts that lack 
the emotional punch they're written 
to have, but that’s background nit- 
picking at best when the script leans 
so heavily on the actors and they 
deliver. Do people ever meet like 
this anymore? The Last Train to 
Nibroc makes me hope so. ¥ 


Spread it round 


Martin Bélanger brings it all together in Grande Theorie Unifee 


Rebirth 


Brian Mcintosh resurrects U of A opera 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 


en Brian Mcintosh became 
the director of the U of A's 
Opera Workshop, he ended a 


period of program limbo that had been 
going on for a number of leaderless years. 

“It took them a few years to fill the 
space—I'm the filling of that space,” 
he explains. “Universities sometimes 
move a little bit slowly with those kind 
of things, due to things like funding 
And recessions,” he laughs. “It’s just 
the natural cycle of university educa- 
tion, I'll be doing it until | retire.” 

With 29 years of professional opera 
experience under his own belt, Mcin- 
tosh certainly knows the direction he 
wants to point the program in: bigger, 
better and guiding students towards a 
more competitive level. Already, there’s 
been master classes with world- 
renowned opera singers and trips to the 
Edmonton Opera dress rehearsals. 

Most importantly, though, Mcin- 
tosh has ended the program's perfor- 
mative drought: the fall semester 
saw the student's performing select 
scenes from a handful of operas. And 
now Mcintosh is directing one full 
student production to cap off the 
year: a two-night run of Hansel And 
Gretel, performed in English and 
starring a different cast of young 
voices each evening 


Ks | FAL WAR SAT MAR 7 (70 PA 

ce | HANSEL AND GRETEL 
ce 
oa. 


DIRECTED BY BRIAN MCINTOSH 
WRITTEN BY ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK 
TIMMS CENTRE (87 AVE & 112 ST), $10- $15 


THE CHOICE OF OPERA w 
decided for him—"l didn’t have 
guys in the program,” he says, and. 
the operatic take on German fairyt 
which contains a higher number of 
female voices over more masculine 
tones, was selected. But it’s one t! 
caters to the program’s current 1 
students, giving them that ne 
taste of real-world experience 
‘The only way [for students t 
lear it is to do it; you can’t leam 
of a book,” Mcintosh e» 
We're trying to give our yo 
the opportunities they n 
skill ready for if they're goi 
when they graduate, into further train- 
ing or the real world of singing in og 
“We'd be classified as one of 
smaller opera programs, but 
aspirations of trying to grow 
bit bigger. Not necessarily to con 
pete against them,” he clarifies, “but 
to have a place for young singers 
from this part of Canada t 
they don’t necessarily ha\ 
Toronto to get their education.” w 


SHERRY DAWN KNETTLE / sherry@vueweekly.com 


artin Bélanger considers 
himself a dissident. A sci- 
ence enthusiast whose art 


is inspired by the natural world of 
biology and physics, the Montréal 
choreographer is a renegade who 
draws on his experiences in science, 
theatre, dance and cinema to rein- 
terpret the world and return it to us 
stamped with his wildly altered, 
entertaining point of view. 

Take Bélanger’s approach 
towards athletics, for example. 
Ask him how he feels about our 
sports-minded society, and he'll 
tell you. “I don't like it! I want to 
militate against it!” 

It's the competitive nature of 
sports that Bélanger doesn’t care for, 
and although he agrees that it’s a 
necessary part of life, he believes it’s 
only one small component among 
many dynamics found in the natural 
world. 

But'that doesn’t stop him from 
using sports equipment in his per- 
formances, and this weekend, he'll 
bring a show to Edmonton that 
involves putting a new spin on bas- 
ketballs, Pilates balls, gymnastics 
ropes, and trampolines: Grande 
Theorie Unifee, presented by Bryan 
Webb and Bélanger’s own Produc- 
tion LAPS:company. 

“Things that are used for sports 
can definitely be used for something 
different,” he says. “So we give them 
a new meaning—which is less about 
competition, and more about cre- 
ation and construction and new life. 
Philosophically, the piece is very 
much about freedom and creation 


THU, MAR 6 SAT, MAR,7 (8 PM) 


Lt 

= | GRANDE THEORIE UNIFEE 

coe | PRESENTED BY PRODUCTIONS LAPS 

© | CHOREOGRAPHED BY MARTIN BELANGER 
CATALYST THEATRE (0529 GATEWAY BLVD), $20-$25 


and other possibilities as opposed to 
competition and aggressiveness. 

“One of the keywords is playful- 
ness,” he continues, adding that the 
piece has a circus atmosphere, with 
people seated around the stage. It’s 
a format that allows the audience 
members to witness one another as 
they watch the show. “The seating 
plays a little bit with the idea of ‘the 
happening.’ There is a kind of 
togetherness—a non-competitive, 
playful approach.” 


AMONG OTHER THINGS, nis 


dancers take on the roles of live- 
ly, sexy cheerleaders, but instead 
of pitting audience members 
against one another by creating 
an aggressive, competitive 
atmosphere, they bring people 
together through laughter. 

“Cheerleading is usually used ina 
world where you want to cheer more 
for one team more than the other, so 
again—there’s the idea of competi- 
tion. But what if you used cheerlead- 
ing for something other than 
competition?” says Bélanger, who 
uses random 20th-century buzzwords 
like “trans-fats,” “ecology” and “glob- 
alization,” and places them within the 
realm of cheerleading, where his 
high-energy dancers shout them out, 
getting the audience wound up and 
ready for the show. 


The highly theatrical work 
includes some entertaining, risqué 
behaviour, as well as commentary 
on art and society, and of course, 
lots of drama and humour. 

“I'm hoping that the fun is con- 
tagious!" says Bélanger, who 
welcomes audiences of all ages 
and from all backgrounds to the 
show, which he promises will 
transform our everyday reality 
into a new realm of creativity and 
imagination. W 


6, EDMONTON“YOGA STUDIO 
y 4 Hatha lyengar Ash 


12039 — 127 street 


www.edmontonyogostudio.com 


tel 451.8131 


€monton GH 


i 


WUEWEERLY 


3] 


WwW 


MAR 5=MAR 11,2009 =\W7UTS\ 
vOs.t p 


Lazy inred 


Hibbard’s show is light on 
the bold, heavy on the baffling 


ADAM WALDRON-BLANN / adam @vueweskycom 

n her small show at Harcourt 
[i= Karen Hibbard seems 

determined to hide her long 
experience as an artist behind 
apparently intentionally ama- 
tpgarishly made works and a 
nonspecific artists statement. 
The Bold and the Baffling 
definitely baffles. 

The_works in The Bold and the 
Baffling are of three kinds. The 
first thing seen on entering the 
gallery space is a sculpture con- 
structed from furniture and small, 
crudely made clay figures. On the 
left-hand wall is a long, narrow 
horizontal painting which seems 
mostly devoted to demonstrating 
a contrived absence of drawing 
skills, and most interesting visual- 
ly for its generally uniform coat- 
ing of slightly iridescent 
transparent paint above the picto- 
rial elements. Finally, on the far wall 
are a collection of linoleum prints on 
coloured paper 

The pints do the least of the three 
to position Hibbard as an outsider, 
because they do not feature much of 
an attempt to look poorly made, 
despite the curious way they are 
hung. They are also the most imme- 
diately intelligible, featuring a depic- 
tion of pipe-like objects spitting 
drops of liquid, as well as some 
more vague other objects. A corpo- 
real implication springs to mind, 
haying to do with blood and various 
bodily systems which can be 
abstracted to a series of tubes. But 
despite some vaguely heart-shaped 
images (the real kind of heart, that 
is), Hibbard doesn’t seem to care 
what we think the pictures are like 

According to the brief description 


UNTILSAL MAR 
THE BOLD AND 
E BAFFLING 


Ee 
=< 
= WORKS BY KAREN HIBBARD 
HARCOURT HOUSE (10216 - 112 ST) 

of her ideas for the show, she is “fas- 
cinated by cyclical patterns,” and 
although she started out examining 
biological systems she has happily 
realized that almost anything can be 
described as such. She even gives a 
few examples of random bits of the 
world—social structures, the city, 
nature, human behavior, et cetera— 
seemingly quite proud of her simple 
philosophizing. Unfortunately, such 
vagueness doesn’t give us much to 
chew on, and the prints offer little 
visual excitement to go alongside. 
The systems seem unsystematic and 


Heavy things 


Hide’s exhibit exhilarates, but 
could stand for more background 


SARAH HAMILTON / hamilton@vueweekly.com 
here's a lot of polarized rhetoric 
| in the arts community about 
the value of modernism within 
our own art history, so much so that I 
think we occasionally forget why we 
liked it at ali in the first place 
Walking into Facets of Form: The 
Sqpipture of Peter Hide and his 
Contemporaries is a pleasant 
reminder of the reasons modernist 
sculpture captivated us, the audience, 
in the first place. Curators Peter Hide 
and Betsy Boone have pulled some of 
Hide’s strongest, most ambitious work 
agg placed it alongside work by 


UNTIL SAT, MAR 21 


FACETS OF FORM 
WORKS BY PETER HIDE AND 
HIS CONTEMPORARIES 

FAB GALLERY (12ST & 7 AVE) 


(Ze) 
be 
=< 
a 


Anthony Caro, Tim Scott, Michael 
Steiner and Alan Reynolds. 

The work on the entrance level of 
the gallery belongs exclusively to Hide, 
save for one sculpture by Steiner. 
According to Hide, this work served as 
inspiration for some of his own sculp- 
tures, and stands as a nice parallel 
against Anthony Caro’s sculpture. 


the elements them interchangable Ie t 
and nction. Perhaps mua) i ™ “ 
her attempting to address “cycles 


addiction,” but a superficial ste Te 
tion of addiction and purposeless, 
ugly art hardly seems exciting. 


| HOPED THAT looking back at the long 
‘painting and the sculpture might offer 
some kind of sense of purpose to the 
exhibition, but was frustrated 
there by Hibbard’s reliance on 
faux-outsider art techniques. Her 
drawing in the long painting 
makes it impossible to tell what 
the figures within are doing or 
for, and while it certainly suc- 
ceeds in being baffling, it’s even 
less bold than either the prints or 
the sculpture; the awkward sil- 
houetted figures occupy a dull, 
lifeless visual space with only a 
few points that really catch inter- 
est. Here I wonder again if she is 
trying to call upon some idea of 
addiction as a wasteland, but if 
she is, the unastonishing link 
results in an uninteresting image. 

In the sculpture at least 
there is a little boldness on dis- 
play, and despite her repeated 
insistence on crude tech- 
niques, her roughly shaped 
smurfs are at'least sometimes 
understandable in their 
actions. One can even see a link in 
some of them to the alleged subject 
of addiction, as the gnomes perform 
actions which seem related to the 
cycle which she wants to discuss, 
but the overturned armchair and 
other broken pieces of furniture 
make an uninspiring stage. 

It seems that through the whole 
collection, Hibbard is trying to give 
herself a voice of authenticity as she 
tries to speak about addiction and 
everything else cyclical by aping an 
Art Brut aesthetic and presenting 
herself as an outsider. Unfortunately, 
these works lack the vibrancy of 
successful works in that style, and 
her posturing is essentially play-act- 
ing. The theoretical backing of the 
works seems simplistic and uncon- 
sidered, and most importantly they 
are boring to look at. w 


Steiner’s work, “Judgematic 1,” is unas- 
suming, especially next to Hide's 
grander works, but it is visually intrigu- 
ing. The shadows conceal the mecha- 
nisms of the work—how it supports 
itself and how it is held together. The 
lighting in this space gives all the sculp- 
tures an ominous elusiveness. 

“High and Over,” which requires its 


38 


UEWEEKLY MARS ~ MAR. 2009 


ARTS 


Spending the greater portion of this past _ 
weekend at the Expanse Movement Arts 
Festival, | was among a few scores of 
audience members watching everything 
from emerging dancers and choreogra- 
phers to international-calibre dance 
artists and choreography. 

Personally, | find dance in its con- 
temporary form as the most con- 
ducive experience that exists purely 
in the affect between thinking bod- 
ies, be it dancer to dancer or dancer 
to audience or even audience to 
audience. It is a live art form that 
exchanges and communicates imme- 
diately—or doesn't—on a plane that 
is far more reactive than engaging 
with object-based works. When a 
piece resonates, that experience can 
lead to immediate new lines of 
thought and action for audience and 
performers alike. When a piece does- 
n't work, it’s hard to tell if it’s just 
you, as unlike visual media, there is 
a shared audience that politely claps 
no matter what the outcome. 

Only finally, after years of scratching 
my head at the uniform reception, 
someone finally noted the general 
atmosphere was one of apathy. Not in 
the least surprising, but also alarmingly 
accurate, this sentiment did not come 
from an audience member, but from a 
performer describing the Edmonton 
audience. 

From dance to music to literary to 
visual arts, apathy or any lack of emotive 
interest is definitely noted from the sea 
of crossed arms and stiff upper lips. 
Some people genuinely enjoy them- 
selves and appreciate the arts, of 
course, but more often than not they 
show their agreeability through pres- 
ence alone. 


RARELY THE DIPLOMAT, | often pub- 


Own room, is a circular work over 
nine feet high and 12 feet wide. The 
steel beams are fastened with a uni- 
form row of bolts, some of them miss- 
ing. Combined with the earth-toned 
paint, the sculpture feels like some- 
thing stumbled upon in a post-indus- 
trial wasteland, like it was once a 
small part of a large machine. 

Alan Reynolds’ work stands out in 
the exhibition. Amidst the welded steel, 
Reynolds’ sculpture is the only wood 
work. However, Reynolds disguises the 
wood in thick paint, so that it appears 
to be iron or steel. Anthony Caro’s 
work, “Box Piece 7,” is characteristic of 
Caro’s interest in geometry and bal- 
ance. “Box Piece” also serves as the 
best example of how these sculptures 
interact with the space. The gallery 
lights bounce off the steel, but the geo- 
metric cut-outs cast heavy shadows on 
the floor underneath it. 


THIS EXHIBITION gives Hide the ‘opportu- 


nity to speak about his work, as well as 


wee» 

- ficly. Hine about how much | dislike 
art. The sentiment is not accrued from 
encountering any specific works, but 
is mostly just a general disposition 
_from an apathetic environment. It may 
“not be the art—in whatever form— 
that is irritating, but the reactions and 
{lack of) communication it receives 
and illicits, 

Art, in any formation, doesn’t exist 
in a bubble. It always exists on a mul- 
tifaceted plane and can be so much 
more than just selfish construction and 
consumption. Apathy is the worst 
response one could wish for, as it’s a 
sign that, overall, the work hasn't 
moved or challenged anything or any- 
one, for better or for worse. 

In the almost seven years since I've 
been a freelance arts writer in this city, 
shifts have been noted in the develop- 
ment of dialogue within the arts commu- 
nities, but not so much with its outreach 
to new audiences. 

| have no recollection of when or 
why | started avidly attending visual 
art exhibitions specifically, as scoping 
out visual art in Edmonton was never 
a priority or even a particularly memo- 
rable experience, at least not until | 
started striking up conversations with 
increasingly familiar faces. Some of 
those faces would become friends and 
associates, and it was a particular 
interest in the people that led me to 
wonder why there was not more rigor- 
Ous support for what each were trying 
to accomplish. Many state the com- 
munity here is just too small and 
nobody wants to step on anybody 
else’s toes with criticism, but that 
attitude is more a hindrance to growth 
to both the relationship as people as it 
is a block to the relationship to their 
art. It is out of respect that one should 
vocalize their opinion, as anything 
short of that basic human dialogue is 
a death to expression. 


Amy Fung is the editor of PrairieArt- 
sters.com. 


the work of his peers, which is impor- 
tant, because Modernist sculpture is not 
the easiest art form to engage with, and 
as the art community continues to 
examine its own art history, it’s impor- 
tant for the artists to have their say and 
to tell their stories. With this in mind, | 
found the absence of interpretive mate- 
rials jarring. FAB produced an accom- 
panying catalogue and a brochure, but 
there's no interpretive material inside 
the gallery itself—there are no didactic 
panels and the title cards, though pres- 
ent, are small. Though the interpretive 
brochure says why Boone and Hide 
wanted to present this. exhibition, there 
needs to be something that compels the 
viewer to look at each sculpture and tie 
the work of Hide to the work of the 
other artists represented. Knowing that 
modernist sculpture is not the easiest 
art form to engage with and one that 
the public is generally uninformed 
about it, the absence of the curatorial 
voice does a disservice to a worthwhile 
exhibition. w 


ARTS WEEKLY 


PAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 700.428.2809 
OR E-MAIL GLENYS AT LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
DEADUNE IS FRIDAY AT 3 PM 


RIAN WEBB DANCE Catalyst Theatre, 85 Ave, 103 St, 
780.452.3282 © Production LAPS’ presentation of Grande 
Théorie Unifée, choreographed by Martin Bélanger # 

Mar 5-7 * {student/senior) at TIX on the Square 


ZERO DANCE-SPRING AHEAD Artery, 9535 
Jasper Ave * The Sun Will Retum: Amtrak by Good 
Women, Yellow Ribbon Dancers, Lin Snelling with Michael 
Reinhart and Estheranna StBuble, Jen Wong, Michelle 
Milenkovie, Trevor Anderson (filmmaker/rocker), Anthea 
Black (installation), and the MZD climbers * Sat, Mar 7, 
Bom # $12/$10 (MZD member) 


GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10186-106 St, 
780.488.6611 © INTENSIONS: Fibre artworks; until Apr 
18 © Artist talk on /atensions: Message and Medium in 
Fibre Art. with Mary Sullivan Holdgrafer and Matt Gould; 
Sat, Mar 7, 2-3pm # Discovery r 


AMISKWACIY ACADEMY 101 Airport Rd, 
790.424.1270 * Open House arts and craft sale ¢ Mar 9, 
open house 6:30-8:30pm; craft sale 2:30-6:30pm 


ANT BEAT GALLERY 26 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, 
780.459.3679 ® Alberta landscape paintings by Russ 
Hogger * Opening Sat, Mar 14, 1~4pm 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA Enterprise Square, 100, 
10230 Jasper Ave, 780.422.6223 » POLAROIDS: 
Photographs by Attila Richard Lukacs selected by 
Michael Morris; opening: Mar 7; The history of art is rich 
with images that are provocative and challenge societal 
norms. Sexuality and violence are integral to this history. 
POLAROIDS addresses questions of power, masculinity 
and desire with images of nudity and sexual activity, This 
content will disturb some and inspire others. Parents and 
educators are encouraged to preview the exhibition « 
Exhibition Preview Tour: with Attila Richard Lukacs 
and Michael Morris: Fri, Mar 6, 6pm, free * Interactive 
Walk- ‘Tours: Brian Webb, Mar 12; André 
Grace), Mar 19; Tedd Kerr, Mar 26; 7-8pm, free * SYL- 
VAIN VOYER: SURVEY 1957—PRESENT: until Mar 22 © 
JOHN FREEMAN: THE HORIZON AS IT. SHOULD BE: 
Digital photographs; until Mar 22 © LEAVING OLYMPIA: 
Unveiling the Idealized Nude; until May 18 * A SENSE 
SUBLIME: (Sth Century Landscapes; until May 18 © Free 
(memiber)/$10 (adult)/$7 (senior/student); $5 (6-12yrs)/free 
(5yrs and under)/$20 (family—2 adults, 4 children) 


CENTRE O’ARTS VISUELS DE ALBERTA 9103-95 
Ave, 780.461.3427 * MEL! MELO: Artworks by Sebastian 
Guiller, Gilberte Gagné, and guest Robert McLean, and 
works from the Group Partners # Until Mar 11 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621-82 Ave, 
780.498.1984 # CAA CULTURE: Gil paintings by Christ! 
Bergstrom ® Until Apr 30 4 


CROOKED POT GALLERY 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain, 
780.963.9573 * Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm ¢ NATURAL 
SELECTION: Marilyn Henker’s nature-based pottery 


FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY Rm 1-1, Fine Arts 
Bldg, 112 St, 89 Ave (780°492.2081) © Open Tue-Fri 
10am-Spm, Sat 2-Spm ¢ FACETS OF FORM: Sculptures by 
Peter Hide and his contemporaries, curated by Betsy 
Boone © Until Mar 21 


FRINGE GALLERY 10516 Whyte Ave, bsmt of the Paint 
Spot, 780.432.0240 * HELICON: Artworks by Harcourt 
artists ® Until Mar 30 © Opening reception: Mar 7, 1-5pm 


FRONT GALLERY 12312 Jasper Ave, 780.488.2952 © 
Woodcuts by Lisa Brawn © Paintings by Kari Duke; 
opening: Mar 14 


GALLERY AT MILNER Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl 
Sit Winston Churchill Square, 780.496.7030 * ODYSSEY: 
Sculptors Association of Alberta © Until Mar 30 


GALLERY IS 4930 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.341.4841 « 

PAINTERLY PAINTINGS: Landscapes by Jeri-Lynn Ing « 

Through March * Opening reception: Fri, Mar 6, 6-8pm, 
antst in attendance 


GREENLAND Cloverbar Rd, Hwy 15 E, 
780.466.7503 * ARTISTS AND FLOWERS: Artworks by 
the Emerging Artists Society of Alberta « Mar 14-15, 
10am-5pm 


HARCOURT HOUSE 31d Fl, 10215-112 St, 780.426.4180 
*° Main Gallery: THE GERMAN AUTUMN IN MINOR 
SPACES: Photographic works by Allen Ball and Kimberly 
Mair ¢ Front Room: THE BOLD AND THE BAFFLING: 
Anworks by Karen Hibbard * Until Mar 21 


HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY-RED DEER Sunworks, 
4924 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.346.8937 * WORKING 
TITLE: 2nd part of an installation project by 3rd year 
visual art students from Red Deer College. First part is 
al the Red Deer College Library * Mar 6-Apr 17 ¢ 
Opening reception: Fri, Mar 6, 6-8pm 


'CON HAIR GALLERY 10150 Jasper Ave, main level, 
Commerce Place, 780.426.1021 » BEAUTY AND THE 
GEASTIS}: Paintings by Cory Montemurro * Until Mar 14 


JEFF ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place Senior Gentre, 
10831 University Ave, 780.433.5807 * FOSTER AND 
UNGSTAD: Artworks papier tole and decoupage by 
Millard Foster and pottery by Magdalene “Mag” Ungstad 
* Until Apr 2 * Opening reception: Mar 11, 6:30-8:30pm 
JOHNSON GALLERY + Southside: 7711-85 St, 
780.465.6171; New artworks by Sylvia Dubrule, Linda 
Nelson, Ruth Vontobel-brunner, Shirley Thomas and pot- 
‘sty by Helena Ball * Northside: 11817-80 St, 
780.479.8424; Artworks by Audrey Pfannmuller, Jim 
Painter, pottery by Peggy Heer * Through March 


KAMENA 5718 Calgary Tr S, 780.944.9497 * Mon-Wed, 
Fri 10am-6pm; Thu 10am-7pm; Sat 1am-5Spm « 
Featuring artworks by various artists 


LANDO GALLERY 11130-105 Ave, 780.990.1161 ¢ THE 
CANADIAN ROCKIES LOOP: Paintings by Tatjana Mirkov- 
Popovikei * Mar 6-28 * Opening reception: Mar 7, 24pm 
LATITUDE 53 GALLERY 10248-1065 St, 2nd Fi, 
780,423,5353 * Main Space: LADY THINGS-OH, 
MOTHER. Artworks by Robyn Cumming * Projex Room: 
A COUNTESS DREAM: Esther Scott-Mackay * Mar 6-Apr 
4 © Opening reception: Fri, Mar 6, 8pm © Artist tall: 
With Robyn Cumming: Mar 7, 1pm * Wet and Paste: 
with Ed Pein and Johannes Zits, collaborative collage 
and drawing sessions.; Sat, Mar 7, 7:30-11:30pm; free 


LOFT GALLERY A.J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 
Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park, 780.998.3091 * Open: 
Thu 5-9pm, Sat 10am-4pm © BEGINNINGS: Art Society 
of Strathcona County * Mar 5-Apr 25 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St, 
780.407.7152 * COMMON CONTRAST: Photographs; 
until Mar 8 * DOMESTICITY: Artworks from the Alberta 
Foundation for the Arts Collection—a twist on everyday 
domestic objects; Mar 14-Apr 9 


MCPAG (Multicultural Centre Public Art Gallery) 
5411-51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.2777 « EXODUS: 
Artworks by Tyler Dixon; Until Apr 1 * Dining Room 
Gallery: Paintings by Myma Hanmer; Until Apr 2 


MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE 
INSTITUTE 9 Mission Ave, St. Albert, 780.651.8176 « 
Aboriginal Veterans Display * Gift Shop © Finger weay- 
ing and sash display by Celina Loyer 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 St. Anne Street, St 
Albert, 780.459.1528 » THE BISHOP WHO ATE HIS 
BOOTS; Celebration of the life of Isaac and Sadie 
Stringer and their mission to the Arctic « Until Mar 15 


NINA HAGGERTY Stollery Gallery 9704-111 Ave, 
780.474.7611 * TECHNO PICTURES; Paintings by Mik- 
a-Low © Until Mar 27 ¢ Opening reception: Thu, Mar 
12, 7-9pm 7 


PICTURE THIS GALLERY 959 Ordze Rd, Sherwood Park, 
780.467.3038 Paintings, sculptures and folk art by vari- 
ous artists ¢ Until Mar 7 


PLATINUM CENTRE 24 Boudreau Rd, St. Albert ¢ 
GALLERY A-GO-GO: Art auction featuring artworks by Bruce 
Allen, Elaine Classen, Angela Grootelaar, Douglas Haynes, 
and others * Mar 7, 7pm (door), 8pm (auction) © 
Fundraiser for Profiles Public Art Gallery * $40 at Profiles, 
Musée Héntage, Arts and Heritage Foundation Office 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, St 
Albert, 780.460.4310 * A WAY INTO PLACE: Artworks 
by Verne Busby, Cindy Delpart, Judith Martin and Bruce 
Thompson * Mar 19-Apr 12 * Opening reception: Mar 
19, 7-Spm © An Evening with Artists ... Art Auction 
Fundraiser: An Evening with Artists Art Auction sup- 
ports Profiles Public Art Gallery and its community art 
programming; Mar 7 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA 8555 Roper Rd, 
780.427.1750 * Celebrating 100 Years of the UFA in 
Rural Communities Exhibit ¢ Until Mar 2S # Free 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave, 
780.453.9100 © AATE EN LA CHARRERIA: Crattsmanship 
and design distinctive to the Mexican cowboy; until Apr 
13 © HEIGHTS OF FASHION: History of the Elevated Foot; 
until Mar 8 © Government House: Tours on Sat. Sun, 
holidays, 11am-4:30pm, ph 780.427.2281 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St, 780.488.3619 * PAS 
NATURE MORTE: Artworks by Lynn Malin ® Until Mar 10 


SNAP GALLERY « Print art by Guy Langevin * Feb 26- 
Apr 11 * Opening reception: Thu, Feb 26, 7-3pm 


STEEPS OLD GLENORA 12411 Stony Plain Rd & 
Artworks by Trevor Waurechen # Meet the artist: Mar 8 
Until Mar 31 


SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY 420 King St, Spruce 
Grove, 780.962.0664 « ABSOLUTE ABSTRACT: 
Members show ® Until Mar 7 


STEPPES GALLERIES 1253, 1259-91 St » WEST 
GALLERY: PLACES: Artworks by Christine Wallewien; 
until Mar 31 © EAST GALLERY: CONTINUANCE: Mixed 
media artworks by Jayme Chalmers; until Mar 10 * E 
kelley.brent@bldg-inc.ca 


STUDIO GALLERY 11 Perron Street, St. Albert, 
780.460.5993 * SECRET SURFACE: Paintings by Daniel 
yanHeyst ® Mar 7-28 © Opening reception: Sat, Mar 7, 
1-4pm. 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St, 
780.452.9100 © THE AAT OF THE BRICK™. until May 3 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA MUSEUMS Earth 
Sciences Building, U of A Campus. 780.492.5834 « 
10th annual Science Sunday for kids * Sun, Mar 8, 12- 
4pm; www.museums.valberta.ca 


VISUAL ARTS ALBERTA 3rd Fi, 10215-112 St. 
780.421.1731 * LOOKING GLASS: Photographs by 
Roberta Murray and Leon Strambitsky * Until Mar 21 


LITERARY 


AUDREYS BOOKS 10702 Jasper Ave, 780.423.3487 * 
Poetry Nights the 2nd Fri each month * Poetry with 
Sharron Poulx-Turner and Anna Marie Sewell * Fri, 
Mar 6, 7:30pm 


CITY ARTS CENTRE 10943-84 Ave, 780,932,4409 « 
TALES. Monthly Storytelling Circle: Tell stories or 
come to listen; 2nd Fri each month * Until June, 8pm; 
$3 (free first time) © Fri, Mar 13, 8-10pm 


ROSIE'S 10475-80 Ave. 780.439.7211 * TALES. 
EDMONTON STORYTELLING CAFE T.A.LES. Alberta 
League Encouraging Storytelling open mic * First Thu 
each month, 7-Spm * Pay-What-You-Will (min $6); info 
at 780.992.4409 * TALES Edmonton Storytelling Café: 
Celtic Cauldron: Featuring storytellers Dawn Blue, 
Kathy Jessup and Kate Quinn; Mar 5 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 2-06 Pembina Hall, 


780,492 2972 © Lecture and book-signing with Timothy 
Snyder, author of The Red Prince: The Secrat Lives of a 
Habsburg Archduke # Fri, Mar 6, 3pm © Free 


UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909-86 Ave, 780.422.8174 « 
THE POETS’ HAVEN: Monday Night reading series pre- 
sented by Stroll of Poets * Every Mon, 7pm * $5 door 
* Featuring spoken word artists Dorothy Ansdell, Kathy 
Fisher, Connie Lioyd, Joy-Ruth Nickelson, and 
Marguerite Redshaw; Mon, Mar 9 


THEATRE 


THE ADDLEPATED NDGE John L Haar Theatre, 10045- 
155 St * Grant MacEwan College * Comedy by Stewart 
Lemoine ® Mar 13-21, 7:30pm; Sun, Mar 15, 2pm * $14 
(adult}/$8 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square 


AGA-BOON Festival Place, 100 Festival Way, Sherwood 
Park, 780.464.2852 © By Dimitri Bogatirev * Theatre of 
Physical Comedy * Mar 13-14, 7:30pm; Mer 15-15, 2pm 


ANNIE Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave, 
1.866.540.7469 * Broadway Across Canada # The time- 
less tale of Little Orphan Annie, a musical about never 
giving up hope * Mar 10-15 @ Tickets: at Jubilee 
Auditorium box office 780.451.8000 


BENEATH THE ICE Westbury Theatre, TransAlta Arts 
Bams, 10330-84 Ave, 780.409.1910 © Fringe Theatre 
Adventures * Written by Edmonton filmmaker and shad- 
‘Ow puppeteer Eva Colmers. While exploring Inuit culture, 
myths and legends, Beneath the Ice addresses issues of 
climate change * Mar 10-15 * $23.50 (adult/$19.50 
(student/senior)/$12.50 (child) at Fringe Theatre box 
Office, tickets.fringetheatre.ca 


CHIMPROV Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.433.3399 * Rapid Fire Theatre presents comedy 
every Sat, 11pm, except for the last Sat of each month 
until June 13 © $10/$8 (member) at TIX on the Square 


CORNER GASSED Jubilations Dinner Theatre, 8882- 
170 St, Phase II, WEM, 780.484.2424 © Until Mar 29, 
Wed-Sat 6:30pm; Sun Spm 


DIE-NASTY Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.433.3399 © Live improvised soap opera directed by 
Dana Andersen # Every Mon, 8pm 


DOUBT, A PARABLE Citadel's Shoctor Theatre, 9828- 
101A Ave * By John Patrick Shanley * Mar 7-29, 
7:30pm, 1:30pm @ Tickets at the Citadel box office 
780.425.1820 


EAST OF BERLIN Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St « 
Theatre Network * By Hannah Moscovitch * Mar 10- 
29, 8pm Tue-Sat; 2pm Sun * Sun, Wed, Thu: $27 
{adult)/$23 (student/seniors); Fri-Sat: $29 (adult/$25 
(student/senior}; Preview: Mar 10-11: $22; Tue: 2 for 
$28 available in advance through TIX on the Square; 
opening night available at Theatre Network 


JULIUS CAESAR Citadel's Maclab Theatre, 9828-101A 
Ave ® Shakespeare's gripping political thriller. Part of the 
Mainstage Series ® Until Mar 15, 7:30pm, mat 1:30pm « 


Free Pre-Show Chat prior to the matinee on Sat. Mar 14 


THE LAST FIVE YEARS Third Space, 11516-103 St « 
Two One Way Tickets to Broadway and Round Barn 
Productions * A contemporary musical chronicling the 
five-year life of a marriage, from meeting to break-up * 
Mar 12-14, Bpm; Sat, 2pm © $20 at TIX on the Square 


THE LAST TRAIN TO NIBROC Varscona Theatre 
10329-83 Ave, 780.433.3399 © By Arlene Hutton, starring 
Kendra Connor and Adam Burgess, directed by John 
Sproule © It’s Christmas, 1940, on a crowded train a 
young man in uniform and aspiring writer sits next to 
May * Until Mar 8, Tue-Sat 7:30pm, Sat-Sun 2pm * $20 
{adult}/$15 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square 


THE LOVE LIST Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 1615-109 
Ave, 780.483.4051 * By Norm Foster. A comic spin on 
the quest for perfection © Until Apr 12 © $55-$85 


MO" FAUX Third Space, 1516-103 St © Norther Light 
Theatre's annual fundraiser event hosting three fantasti- 
cally faux divas, Celine, Barbra and Cher as well as 
food, cocktails, and a silent auction * Mar 7, 7pm * 
$30 at Northern Light Theatre, 780.471.1596 or at 
wwww.northemlighttheatre.com 


RAVEN STOLE THE SUN Dow Centennial Centre, Shell 
Theatre 8700-84 St, Hwy 21, Fort Saskatchewan. 
780.992.6400 * By Drew Hayden Taylor, based on a tradi- 
tional Tlingit story as recounted by Shaa Tléa Maria 
William, presented by Red Sky, a contemporary 
Aboriginal performance * Mar 11-12, 10:15am and 
1:15pm * $15 (adult}/$12.50 (senior/student\/$10 (child) 


RAVEN STOLE THE SUN AND THREE TRICKSTERS 
Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts. 4308-50 St 
Leduc © By Drew Hayden Taylor, based on a traditional 
Tlingit story as recounted by Shda Tl4a Maria William, 
presented by Red Sky, a contemporary Aboriginal per 
formance * Mar 14, 2pm © $16 ladult)/$12 (child 12 
and under) at TIX on the Square 


SPRINGBOARDS NEW PLAY FESTIVAL Third Space. 
11516-103 St * Workshop West # Featuring different 
plays and play excerpts every evening. Pitch to Play, a 
fun and competitive process to choose Workshop West's 
2009/10 Playwriting Unit * Mar 12-15 and Mar 19-22 


STAGE STRUCK 20091 Walterdale Playhouse, 10322-83 
Ave * Edmonton Regional One-Act Festival Association 
featuring comedy, drama, puppets, mime, solo perform- 
ances and new works by local playwrights Chad Carlson, 
Gerald Osbom, Barbara North, Michele Vance Hehir and 
Zillur Rahman John * Mar 6-7, 7pm * $18 (adult week- 
end pass)/$16 (student/senior weekend pass)/$10 
{adult}/$8 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square, door 


THEATRE OF PHYSICAL COMEDY—AGA-BOOM 
Festival Place, Sherwood Park # Mar 13-15, 7:30pm; 
Mar 14-15, 2pm * $27 at Festival Place box office, 
TicketMaster 


THEATRESPORTS Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.448.0695 © Rapid Fire Theatre’s weekly insane 
improv show © Every Fri (11pm) * Until July 31 © $10/ 
$8 (member) at TIX on the Square 


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Edmonton Columbian Choirs 


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Tuesday, March 17, 2009 
7:00p.m. 


McDougall United Church 
10025 101 Street 


Tickets: $15* 
(*plus applicable service charges) 


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For information contact Brenda at 780.760.3270 
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MARS-MAR TI, 2009 = W7UTEI 


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EDMONTON Do you have what it takes? 


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MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2009 


or ane 


@vueweokly.com 

those painful things in 
ovies rarely render in 
at truly resonates, that 
elevates the material above a level of 
facile catharsis or emotional pornog- 
raphy. Atrocities, life imprisonment, 
genocides, tax audits, terminal can- 
cer. Yet that last one, however daunt- 
ing, never goes too long without 
some fresh taker eager to step up to 
the plate and give it a whack. Most 
often, it seems the younger the afflict- 
ed protagonist, the better. You know 
how it is. Die young, leave a beautiful 
blah-blah-blah. You'd roll your eyes if 
they weren’t so full of tears. 

Among the virtues of One Week, 
our most t entry into this fraught 
subgenre, is its ability to avoid getting 
too bogged down in the despair of 
being young, hopeful and ostensibly 
healthy only to suddenly find out 
Death's in the waiting room checking 
his watch. Written and directed by 
Michael McGowan (Saint Ralph), this 
decidedly quirky road movie, narrated 
by some anonymous literary sage 
(actually Campbell Scott) with a great 


1 with disease 


“nl ured One Week can’t 
hake the cancer-movie clichés 


OPENS FAL, MAR 
ONEW 

WAITTEN & DIRECTED AY MICHAEL GOWAN 
STARRING JOSHUA JAKSON, UAE BALABAR, 


CAMPBELL SCOTT 
tok 


DRAMA 


deal of privileged knowledge, is so 
thoroughly infused with winky little 
detours into flashback and fantasy, 
into little anecdotes about what hap- 
pened to characters met briefly en 
route by our hero, that it attains.a 
welcome layer of detachment, some- 
thing that helps to stave off the inert 
bathos that is so often the cancer of 
cancer movies. 

If only this same approach could 
also keep One Week from succumbing 
to cheap national boosterism and a 
palette of locations and vistas that 
amounted to something more than 
what feels like an extended advert for 
Canadian tourism or, worse, a 
telecommunications provider. Toron- 
tonian Ben (Joshua Jackson) sheds his 
everyday obligations and hits the road 
after getting his death sentence, in 


part because he realizes that he never 
wanted to live a life of passive con- 
formity. Yet the greatest hits itinerary 
of his cross-Canada trek sure feels 
like the same one your polyester- 
slacked grandparents would take, 
albeit in a Winnebago instead of a 
gorgeous old Norton. 


BEN'S ENGAGED to Samantha (Liane 


T 


” 
x 
= 
all 
= 


DVDETECTIVE 


JOSEF BRAUN 
ivdetective@vueweekly.com 


As the studio-backed auteur films of the 
1970s climbed into the stratosphere, those 
delirious heights from which the whole 
heady shotqumwedding of art and com- 

uld soon come crashing down, 
in cinema slowly emerged 


available to the movie 
brats whi red Hollywood. These 
Movies eaply and required 
reless ften made on weekends 
between regular jobs over very long periods 
of time. partly why so many of 
the lasting the independents from 
the 70s concern men at work. From Peter 
Falk's convivial crew in A Woman Under the 


Influence to Henry Sanders’ inward abattoir 


‘labourer in Killer of Sheep, blue-collar life 


and the poles of wild times and desperate 
dreams of transcendence it engenders found 
anew and often exhilarating level of expres- 
sion. Yet one of the most indelible and 
entertaining examples of the working man’s 
movie, one that’s genuinely regional in every 
sense of the term—save racially—has 
been long forgotten and is only now making 
acelebrated retum. 

Watchmaker Film has lovingly packaged 
the first DVD release of The Whole 
Shootin’ Match, the feature debut of a 
scrawny. Texan named Eagle Pennell, 
accompanied by A Hell of a Note, his 25- 
minute dry run which showcases the same 
inspired comic pairing of actors Sonny Carl 
Davis and Lou Perryman. Authenticity is a 
precarious word to throw around when dis- 
cussing movies, but if we invoke it to 
describe how temperament and tendencies 
teflect content, than Pennell’s the real thing. 
He told stories about strangely lovable— 
and occasionally detestable—losers, 
dreamers and drinkers whose shaggy charm 
could never be accused of benefiting from 


FILM CAPSULES /42 [9 | 


Balaban of Last Chance Harvey), a 
pretty actuary. He's a failed-novelist- 
turned-schoolteacher, a guy who's 
just too damned nice to really pur- 
sue his dreams with the necessary 
Tigour. Cancer may very well extin- 
guish his life with brutal efficiency, 
but it does give him the gift of gump- 
tion. He buys the motorbike on a 
whim. He takes up a spookily-apt 


ame from the bottom 


excess polish. And these films, reputedly 
constructed from single takes, sometimes 
under-lit, sometimes overexposed, radiate 
ramshackle enthusiasm. There are bits of 
humour in Pennell’s work, not to mention 
certain images of vast landscapes or 
gloomy bars, that are so instantly winning, 
yet they'd never satisfy the technical or sto- 
rytelling standards of even the most slouch- 
ing film academy. They exude faith in the 
pleasures of watching human behaviour 
and in only the most mundane forms of 
catharsis, blotchy black and white and 
boom shadows be damned. And they speak 
to the inner life of the labourer. In one mem- 
orable scene, a character watches a movie 
and sincerely wonders what the director 
does for a living. 


A HELL OF A NOTE announces the sense of 
flow that is Pennell's modus operandi. It's 
first sequence finds Davis and Perryman 
resigning from roof tarring in a marvelously 
fluid gesture: they both whip it out and piss 
on the as-yet un-tarred roof, their streams of 
urine converging into a creeping puddle 
heading strait toward the boots of their 


FILM 


cranky and imminently former employer. 
They then head to a bar to drown sorrows, 
meet girls, get in awesomely awkward 
fights, dance and ponder new opportunities. 
A sudden injection of tragedy brings it all to 
a grinding halt, but most of A Hell of a Note 
is cyclical and un-dramatic, the sense of 
inevitability kept buoyant by often sublime 
gags and an endearing undercurrent of 
friendship declared. 

This is even more the case with The 
Whole Shootin’ Match, which features no 
such tragic conclusion but rather builds 
up to a moment of clarity, or at least as 
close to one as this hillbilly Hope and 
Crosby can hope to approximate. Loyd 
(Perryman) and Frank (Davis) have evi- 
dently been pals a long while, having col- 
laborated in a number of failed 
get-rich-quick schemes, everything from a 
flying squirrel farm to the chinchilla busi- 
ness. Things kick off as Loyd proposes 
another dazzling new enterprise: 
polyurethane. Hang onto your hats. 

The distinctions between Perryman and 
Davis’ characters are more pronounced 
here. Loyd is the persistent optimist and 
inventor—one of my favourite scenes con- 
veys Loyd’s silent glee over his crafting of a 
spinning wand that makes bubbles. Frank is 
the philandering family man whose innate 
cheerfulness and obvious love of Loyd keep 
him within safe distance of depression and 


MAR 5 - MAR 14,2009 


proposal found inside the rim of a 
cup of Timmy's and goes west on his 
own instead of going in for debilitat- 
ing treatments. He takes photos of 
giant objects, stumbles upon the 
Stanley Cup, smokes reefer with 
Gord Downie—admittedly, pretty, 
cool. He takes a horseback ride in 
Saskatchewan, where he most 
improbably drinks Steam Whistle 
with a horny farmer. (Product place- 
ment trumps verisimilitude.) He gets 
lost in the woods in Banff and surfs 
off of Vancouver Island. As I recall, I 
don't think anything happens to him 
in Manitoba, alas. Along the way he 
considers what really matters, lists 
life's compromises, and ponders the 
deep subjectivity of food odour, an 
Issue never resolved 
If looming death doesn’t over-bur- 
den One Week, it hardly injects it with 
a great deal of urgency, either. jack2™ 
son emanates sweetness and famil- 
larity, but can’t seem to convey the 
minimal panic, revelation and/or 
insanity required by the situation. 
McGowan falls back on sentimentality 
and staying shackled to over-prudent 
story editing when he could have cho- 
sen to explore at least a couple of 
roads less traveled, which is the 
secret gift waiting inside the road 
movie for those willing to roll with it. 
So One Week is often a bit dull, some- 
times wince-worthy, yet so genuinely 
good-natured you still walk out root- 
ing for it, hoping that its title isn't a 
prediction for how long it'll last in 
theatres. wv 3 


complete alcoholic collapse. As the story 
ambles on its way, with more bars, fights, 
dancing, drinking and working en route, 
Loyd and Frank are teased by success when 
Loyd's hew super-mop—he has a revelation 
in an automated car wash—gets picked up 
by a local manufacturer who gives them a 
whopping $1000 just for signing a contract. 
You can probably guess how things turn 
out. The final sequence finds them looking 
for Indian treasure in the hills outside 
Austin and coming to what feels like some 
sort of fork in the road, even if neither Ob 
them is entirely cognizant of the fact. 

Perryman and Davis embody the 
dreams of those Americans who feel 
alienated by the larger society they 
inhabit yet never stop trying, in that 
deeply American way, to beat the system. 
Pennell connected with his characters so 
strongly that his own story came to 
resemble theirs even as he revealed an 
artistic vision never granted to them. Pen- 
nell nurtured a legend of failed potential 
all too aligned with his body of work, and 
he died, following years of drinking, pro- 
fessional and personal self-sabotage, ane 
even intermittent homelessness, in 2002. 
He was just shy of 50. It's a shame he 
didn’t stick around long enough to see 
what sort of success his good ol’ boys 
would achieve. His best work survives 
and will continue to do so. w 


* 
4} 


WUEWEE! 


{nr 


THE WRESTLER 


WOW FRUEEAN CHER COM 


MRT © 200 A SHOP ST SATE 6 LO 
ATED. SERA CONTENT, MRT COMRSE LNACE 


FRESHWORKS 


GROUP SCREENING 
THURSDAY MARCH 5 7PM 


IRISH FILM FESTIVAL 


FOR SCREENING TIMES GO TO METROCINEMA ORG 


FAVA 


FILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY: ALBERTA 


DOWNSTREAM 


SUNDAY ar 2&4PMi « FILMMAKER LESLIE IWERKS IN ATTENDANCE 


FEAR OF TMAGHS: Withee 


» AFGHANISTAN 


MONDAY ar 7PM « DIRECTOR NELOFER PAZIRA IN ATTENDANCE 


sao WITH DAVE CLARKE & JEFF PAGE PRESENTS: 


ON DEADLY | 
LN 


WEDNESDAY «: 8:00PM 


en 


OW DEADLY ean 


All Metro screenings are held at Zeidler Hall in the Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave. 


For more information, call 425-9212. or log on to www.metrocinema.org 


Metro operates vith the support of: 


CA Found ation 


&B Canada Council Conseil des Arts 
<> forthe arts du Canada 


he 
: 


CAPSULES 


OPENING THIS WEEK 


DEATH OR CANADA 

DIRECTED BY RUAN MAGAN 

SAT, MAR 7 (7 PM); METRO CINEMA (9826 - 101A AVE) 
PART OF THE IRISH FILM FEST 

* 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 

It's unfortunate that the only film showing 
as part of Metro's annual Irish Film Fest 
that we were able to get a screener for is 
this joint Irish-Canadian documentary 
about refugees fleeing the potato famine. 
The Irish Film Fest has been a source of 
some gems in the past, but this one most 
definitely isn’t one of them. 

Death or Canada has the look and 
feel of a Sunday-evening CBC documen- 
tary, though would have to be considered 
a poor example even of that genre. The 
film, which outlines the causes of the 
famine as well as the experience of 
Toronto dealing with a stream of refugees 
that tripled the city’s population and 
whose rampant disease served as an 
early public health crisis, trades between 
talking heads and historical reenact- 
ments, and while both techniques have 
their own unique flaws, overall the prob- 
lem is that director Ruan Magan doesn't 
seem to trust the story to be interesting 


GARNEAU 
theatre 


freshworks jj 


MARCH 5 


NY a 2) 
punt 


Fe y, Lighting &.? 


cinematography 


enough on its own. 

That's evidenced by the talking heads 
in as much as nearly every last one of 
them goes out of his or her way to explain 
how important this event was, a strange 
kind of disaster boosterism that only 
seems to underscore the fact the event is 
considered a historical footnote for a rea- 
son. It’s really no surprise that almost 
everyone interviewed here is either Irish 
or of Irish descent (or that the Irish Film 
and Television Academy saw fit to nomi- 
nate it for an award): this is a definitive 
experience for a people, as they point out 
frequently, though they seem to leave out 
the corollary that it’s of somewhat less 
significance to North America, let alone 
the world, as a whole, (And | say this as 
someone whose North Irish Catholic roots 
have left him well-versed in the centuries- 
tong fucking the Micks have endured, from 
both fate and the Brits.) 

The historical reenactments, some- 
where around the level of opening day at 
Fort Edmonton, don’t help much, either. 
They're used mostly to spell out, in as 
obvious a manner as possible, the prob- 
lems the talking heads are already eluci- 
dating: “[The British] looked at us as | 
might look at sheep,” says one historian, 
as the camera cuts to, duh, sheep graz- 
ing. Better still is the poor Irish farmer 
who explains to a visiting priest that the 
country is ruin, right after the narrator 
explains that the priest found the coun- 
try in ruin. Magan does this so frequent- 
ly, you almost wonder if he’s trying to 
convince himself that the story he’s 
telling is worth it. 

The good news here is that the other 
films showing will most certainly be a 
step up. Of particular interest are 
O'Donoghue's Opera, a musical parody 
that enjoys something of a cult status in 
Ireland, and is showing here with Flea 
Ceoil, and 32A, a coming-of-age drama 
from director Marian Quinn. 


DOWNSTREAM 

DIRECTED BY LESLIE IWERKS 
SUN, MAR 8 (2 PM &:4 PM) 
METRO CINEMA (9828 ~ 101A AVE) 
etek 


BRYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 

Made famous not only by being shortlist- 
ed for an Academy Award in the best 
short documentary category, but also by 
being singled out as a documentary wor- 
thy of being censored for its anti-tarsands 
stance by Alberta Culture Minister Lind- 
say Blackett, Downstream will be mak- 


é- 
Camera\ess 
animation 


COME AND LEARN FROM ran 


+ & 


NEW FILMS 
BY FAVA MEMBERS 


$8/ SIOAT THE DOOR Cech 
9722-102 STREET, EDMONTON 
AB - T5K 0X4. 780 429 1671 


9:30pm 
caeAwe workshop 


CATE Nifidation eC | we 


EL MARS; MAR 11, 2909 


FILM 


“DEATH OR CANADA 


ing its debut in Edmonton on March 8. 

The film follows a defining incident in 
the life of Dr John O'Connor, a community 
physician formerly based in Ft McMurray 
In 2001, Dr O'Connor began making regular 
fly-ins to the remote community of Fort 
Chipewyan to care for the people there. He 
began noticing abnormally high rates of 
rare cancer cases as Well as other dis- 
eases in the population he was treating 
and he raised the alarm over his concems 
That's when all hell broke loose. 

O'Connor was charged with a number 
of offences by Health Canada, Environ 
ment Canada and Alberta Health, who 
accused him of raising undue alarm in the 
community, double billing and irresponsi 
ble practices to the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons in Alberta—charges which 
threatened his license to practice medi- 
cine. The government tried to assassinate 
his character in an attempt to shut him 
up. Dr O'Connor was forced to move to 
Nova Scotia to escape the furor over his 
concerns. In the meantime, independent 
study of Lake Athabasca near Fort 
Chipewyan proved the doctor's fears— 
there are high levels of toxins caused by 
tarsands in the lake. 

The film illuminates what was going 
on in the minds of some of the majo: 
players in this real-life drama. From Dr 
O'Connor himself to Kevin Timoney, the 
ecologist who produced the report which 
substantiated the doctor's concerns, to 
former chief of Mikisew Cree First Nation 
George Poitras, to residents of Fort 
Chipewyan. Though it can sometimes run 
the risk of becoming a weepy polemic on 
the tarsands, ultimately it is a moving 
film centred on how easy it is for govern- 
ment and industry to lust after profits and 
ignore what is happening to isolated Abo- 
riginal communities unlucky enough to 
live downstream from the largest indus- 
trial project in the world. 


Following the 2 pm sereening, a pane! 
discussion featuring the major players 
from the movie as well as director Leslie 
lwerks and other interested parties will 
follow. 


SAVING LUNA 

DIRECTED BY MACHAEL PARFIT, SUZANNE CHISHOLM 
WRITTEN BY PARFIT 

kkk 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 
A young child loses his family at sea 
He swims to an agreeable community 


FILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY- ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


vernment 


ere. They 
_ A custody bat- 


oticed that in the pod, he 
k a mother, and switched 
jo unenthusiastic mama 
il|, he was an independent 
10 enjoys the company of boats 
@ life, and petting by human 


ha 
After mR 2 ditches his pod, his sightings 
by local fisherman, paddlers and joy-ride 
boaters becomes talk of the town. That's 
about when video journalist Michael Parfit 
and his wife Suzanne Chisholm show up. 
He was to spend three weeks document- 
“jing the toddler whale, but three years later 
Parfit is still by his side, day and night, pro- 
tecting under the guise of filming. 

{f Parfit and Chisholm didn’t show up 
then, or left after their assignments time- 
line expired, this would be an entirely dif- 
ferent doc. It would be made of retro-fitted 
talking heads and news footage, cheesy 
re-enactments and cross-fading newspa- 
per clippings. But after the first time he 
pointed his camera at Luna and pressed 
record, he began following him with stalk- 
er-like obsession. If Luna were a human, 
the filmmakers would have been slapped 
with a restraining order early. But, of 
course, many would accuse Luna with 
reciprocating the attention. 

Luna’s personality is real and therefore 
he’s the real hero of this movie. The expe- 
rience is all the more entrancing and, at 
times, heartbreaking because his person- 
ality is so rich. It's as crafted as a charac- 
ter in a scripted film. Luna's persona is a 
multidimensional one with his many 
charms and faults. He's social and playful, 
but he doesn’t know his limits and often 
puts his life and the lives of others in 
danger. He doesn’t know the difference 
between 4 canoe and an airboat, a cheer- 
ful child and a hateful fisherman, and 
that's when the custody battle rattles. 

Should he get to stay and play, even 

though it will probably reduce his life 
expectancy? The government thinks not, 
and try to sequester him into a distant pod. 
But if he didn’t like the Orcas before, why 
would he like them now? Considering his 
showboating, maybe an aquarium is the 
perfect place. But the Mowachaht band 
believe Luna is the reincarnation of their 
chief who passed just before the whale 
showed up—just after the chief said he'd 
return as an Orca. There's no easy answers 
and Saving Luna captures it all. 
__ The doc, decorated with awards, earns 
it's stripes through simplicity. All the 
drama and humour is there waiting for a 
camera, and Luna, most certainly, is not 
camera shy. 


NOW PLAYING 


E HENDRICKS 
BROTHERS, i 


or ws ees 
A habit for popular media to make sense 
of teen idols is to endlessly compare 


SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
eat 

Fri-Sat 7:00, poset Sun-Thu 8:00 
Bat 7100 9:05; ye Sus thu 8:00 


CINEMA AT THE CENTRE/ 
SierA Mion an ent. FILM CLUB 


NA GIRLS (14A, coarse lan- 


Het arch 11: 6:30; Norwegian 
with English subtitles; free 


Pr Sat 145, 435" PO, 
Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:35, 7:10, 9: 
Sun-Thu 1:45, 4:35, 7: 
Poe perte 
ee 
11:50; Sun-Thi 

9:45 


etl 
AEG 
45, 7:30, 9: 

1:50, 4 745, 7:20, 
MARLEY AND ME (PC) 


Fri-Sat 1:40, 4:20, 7: 
12:00; Sun-Thu 1:40, 
9:35 


as 
So 
ae 


VALKYRIE (PG, violence, coarse 


) 
Fri- pat 1-20, 4:15, 6:50, 9:25, 11:55; 
Sun-Thu 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:25 
THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 
Daily 2:00, 4:50 
SEVEN POUNDS (144, mature 


themes) 

Fri-Sat 4:30, 7:15, 9:50, 12:15; Sun- 
Thu 4:30, 7:15, 9:50 

YES MAN (14A) 

Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:40, 7:25, 10:00, 
12:10; Sun-Thu 1:25, 4:40, 7:25, 
10:00 

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD 


STILL (PG) 
Fri-Sat 1:20, 4:05, 6:45, Be, 11:25; 


Sun-Thu 1:20, 4:05, 6:45, 9:1 
DOUBT (PG, mature themes) 
Daily 4:15, 9:20 
FROST/NIXON (PG, coarse lan- 
, Not recommended for young 


BOL 
Rare 15) oth 
05, 


TWRIGHT PG. eae 

Fri-Sat 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40, 12:10; 

Sun-Thu 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40 
5 2 


MADA\ 
AFRICA (G) 


Daily 1:55 
CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


14231 137th Avenue, 780.732.2236 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal.violence, 
Re passe Daly 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 
3:30, 4:45, 6:15, 7:00, 8:45, 9:45, 
10:30 
ONE WEEK (PG, coarse lang 
Fri-Tue, Thu 1:50, 4:20, 7:1 9 
Wed 4:20, 7:10, 9:20; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 

FIGHTER: THE LEGEND 


STREET 
OF CHUN-LI (14A, violence) 
Daily 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50, 10:40 


e) 
:205 


CONCERT 
Ns aan 


FIRED UP '14A, coarse Janguage) 
Daily 2:20, 4:50, 7:40, 10:1 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

Daily 1:20, 4:00, 7:05, 9:40 
FRIDAY THE 13TH (18A, sexual 
Daily 5: Baly 10,1020 10:20 
HE'S JUST NOT BEAT IY INTO YOU 
(PG, coarse language, sexual con- 
Fri, Thu 12:40, 3:40, 6:30, 9:30; 
Sat 3; 730 


, 6:30, 9: 


CORALINE (PG, not recommended 
for young fi 


Daily 72:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:45, 10:15 
PUSH (14A, Violence) 

Daily 10:40 

Daily aestirivhy 6:40, 8:50 


PAUL BLART: MALL COP ase 
Daily 12:15, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9: 


HOTEL FOR DOGS (G) 
Daily 12:10 
GRAN TORINO (144, language may 


Daily 1:40, 7:20 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 


Toe, Th 

Fri-Tue, Thu 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 10:00; 
Wed 3:50, 6:50, 10:00; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY 

Ce eee not available) 


CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 
1525-99 St. 780.496.8585 
WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 
Ris becore bes 
aily 12:00, 12:45, 
2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:00, 8:15, 
10:00, 10:40 
ONE WEEK (PG, coarse lan: juage) 
Fri-Wed 12:16, 4:15, Tiga O40; ) 
Thurs 4:15, 6:45, 9:40; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Thu 1:00 
STREET FIGHTER: THE LEGEND 
OF CHUN-LI (14A, violence) 
Daily 1:30, 4:50, 7:40, 10:25 
JONAS BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 
No passes Daily 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 
7:00, 9:15 
FIRED UP {i coarse ) 
Daily 7:45, 10: pa 
JAG lan DE MELE (IN 
ileal (PG, language may 


oO 

Ba 00, 4:30, 7:50 

THE INTERNATIONAL (14A, vio- 
lence) 


) 
Fri, Sun-Thu 12:00, 3:40, 7:10, 
10:00; Sat 3:40, 7:10, 10:00 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
Daily 1:30, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 


tent) 

Daily 12:30, 3:50, 7:20, 10:15 

THE PINK PANTHER 2 (PG) 

Daily 1:45, 4:20 

CORALINE (PG, not recommended 
for young children, frightening 


scenes) 

Daily 1:15, 3:50, 6:55, 9:25 

TAKEN (14A, violence) 

Daily 12:45, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 12:45, 4:40, 7:30, 9:50 

GRAN TORINO (14A, language may 
offend) 


Fri-Tue 1:15, 4:10, 7:15, 10:05; Wed 
1:15, 4:10, 10:05; Thurs 4:10, 7:15, 
10:05; Star and Strollers Screening: 

Thu 1:00 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 


violence) 

Daily 12:30, 4:00, 7:05, 10:20 
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY 

Cee pee not available) 


CITY CENTRE 9 


STONE OF DESTINY (PG) 
Dolby Stereo Digital Daily 12:40, 
3:40, 6:50 
JONAS BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
Dee eat 3D a 

ily 12:00, 


Zs 420, paar 9:20 
CONFESSIONS OF A 


SHOPAHOLIC oh 

DTS Digital Fri-Tue, 12:20, 3:20, 
7:00, 9:40; Wed 12:20, 3:20, 9:40 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
ost Coarse language, Sexual con- 
oS Digital Daily 12:10, 3:30, 6:30, 
TAKEN (144, pee) 

DTS Digital Daly 12:50, 3:50, 6:40, 


9:10 
FIRED UP be Geta language) 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 


DTS Digital 
Stereo Digital, No passes Dally 
12:30, 4:10, 7:45 


HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
(PG, coarse , Sexual Con- 


es 

- Thu 3:40, 6:30, 9:25; Sat- 
an 12:45, 3:40, 6:30, 9:25 
THE PINK PANTHER 2 (PG) 
Mor 4:25; Sat-Sun 1:45, 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:15, 7:10; Sat-Sun 
1:20, 4:15, 7:10 
THE INTERNATIONAL (144. vio- 
lence) 
Daily 9:35 
FRIDAY THE 13TH (184, sexual 
content, Scenes) 
Daily 9: 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 
violence) 


) 
En, Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; Sat- 
Sun 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 
JONAS BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 
Digital 3d, No passes Fri 4:45, 7:00, 
9:10; Digital 3d, No passes Sat-Sun 
12:40, 2:40, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10; Digital 
3d Mon-Thu 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 
CORALINE (PG, frightening scenes, 
not recommended for young chil- 


dren) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:10, 6:45; Sat-Sun 
1:30, 4:10, 6:45 

WpTGuMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
fore On 2 Screens Fri, Mon- 


Thu 4:00, 6:30, 7:30, 10:00; Sat-Sun 
12:30, 2:00, 4:00, 6:30, 7:30, 10:00 


DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 
LNB2144 


WATCHMEN (18, brutal violence, 


730; Set 
Bay 7:30; Sat-Sun 1:45 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 


violence) 

Daily 6:55 9:15; Sat-Sun 1:55 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 

Daily 7:10 9:10; Sat-Sun 2:10 
THE INTERNATIONAL (14A, vio- 
lence) 

Daily 9:05 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 7:05; Sat-Sun 2:05 

PUSH (14, violence) 

Dally 7:15; Sat-Sun 2:15 

THE UNINVITED (14A, frightening 


scenes) 
Daily 9:20 
EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY 
Royal Alberta Museum, 102 Ave. 128 St. 
780.439,5284 
EASY LIVING (PG) Mon 8:00 


GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 


2020 Sherwood Drive, 780.416.0150 
WATCHMEN (138A, brutal violence, 


scenes) 
Rot a 3:30, 6:30, 7:00, 
10: 10:30; Sat- ‘Sun 12:00, 2: 


Mon-Thu 6:30, 7:00, 10:00, 10:30 
FIRED UP (14A, coarse 

Fri 4:30, 7:15, 9:40; Sat-Sun 1: 
4:30, 7:15, 9:40; Mon-Thu 7:15, 
9:40 

CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

Fri 3:50, 7:20, 9:45; Sat-Sun 12:50, 
355, 7:20, 9:45; Mon-Thu 7:20, 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
ae. coarse language, sexual con- 


ent) 
F410, 7:10, 10:10; Sat-Sun 1:10, 
4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Mon-Thu 7:10, 
10:10 
THE PINK PANTHER AES 
Fri 3:45; Sat-Sun 12:10, 3:45 
TAKEN 
Fri 4:20, 
4:20, 7:30, 


14A, violence) 
230, 9:50; Sse 
9:50; Mon-Thu 7:30, 


Fri 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; Sat-Sun 1:00, 
200, 6:45, 9:30; Mon-Thu 6:45, 


SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 


) 
Daily 6:50, 9:25; Sat-Sun 2:00. 
GRANDIN THEATRE 
Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
‘St Albert, 780.458.9822 
PUSH (14A, violence) 
Daily 1:15, 3:25, 7:15 
THE UNINVITED (144, frightening 


scenes) 

Daily 5:30, 9:30 

HOTEL FOR DOGS (G) 

Daity 1:00, 3:00, 4:50 

GRAN TORINO (14A, language 
May offend) 

Daily 6:45, 9:00 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
za 12:35, 2:20, 4:05, 5:50, 7:40, 


WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 
gory scenes) 

No passes Daily 1:20, 4:35, 7:55 
FRIDAY THE 13TH (184, sexual 
content, gory scenes) 

Dally 8:45 

THE PINK PANTHER 2 (PG) 


- 1:10, 3:05, 5:00, 6:50 


780.352.3922 
Date of Issus only: Thu, March 5 _ 
THE CURIOUS CASE OF 
BENJAMIN BUTTON (PG, coarse 
language, not recommended for 


ye Fase 


HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
i Coarse language, Sexual con- 
ten 

Thu, Mar 5: 6:50, 9:30 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 


. Thu, Mar 5: 7:00 


SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 


violence) 

Thu, Mar 5: 6:55, 9:20 
PUSH (14A, violence) 
Thu, Mar 5; 9:10 


i METRO CINEMA 
9828-1014 Avo, Citadel Thestrs, 
Tanz 212 
GARAGE (STC) 
Fri 8:00 


DEATH OR CANADA (STC) 

Sat 7:00 

32A (STC) 

Sat 9:00 

DOWNSTREAM (STC) 

Sun 2:60, 4:00 

O'DQNOGHUE'S OPERA AND 
CEOIL (STC) 

Sun 6:30. 

THE FRONT LINE (STC) 

Sun 8:00 


ENCORE PRESENTATION OF 
NELOFER PAZIRA'S "FEAR OF 
IMAGES: CASTING CALL 
AFGHANISTAN" (STC) 

Mon 7:00 

STITCHES (STC) 

Tue 8:00 


TURKEY T: ON DEADLY 
rol 


THE SEVENTH CONTINENT (STC) 
Thu 7:00 


PARKLAND CINEMA 7 


WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
scanes) 
7:30; 

Sat-Sun, Tue 1:30 

THE: ITEFBATIONAL, (14A, vio- 


Baty 0:30; Sat-Sun, Tue 1:00; 
Movies For Mommies: Tue 1:00 
PUSH (14A, violence) 
Daily 6:55, 9:10 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 
violence) 

7:00, 9:25; Sat-Sun, Tue 12:50, 
308 


CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (FC) 
Daly 650, £00; Sat-Sun, Toe 12:46, 


HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
ae coarse language, sexual con- 
Daly 6:45; Sat-Sun, Tue 3:25pm 
TAKEN (144, violence) 


3s 7:05, 9:05; Sat-Sun, Tue 1:10, 


ee ae 

Sat-Sun, Tue 1:05, 3:15 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
naa 710, 9:15; Sat-Sun, Tue 12:55, 


ONE WEEK (PG, coarse language) 
Daity 6:50, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:30 
THE WRESTLER (144, senial con- 
tent, nidity, coarse lang 

Bally 7:00, 910: Sat-Sun 200 ey 


SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM 
WEM, 8882-170 St. 780.444.2400 
STREET FIGHTER: THE LEGEND 
OF CHUN-LI (144, violence} 
Daily 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30 
JONAS BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 
No passes Daily 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 
6:30, 9:00 
THE INTERNATIONAL (14A, vio- 
lence) 
Fri, Sun-Thu 1:30, 4:40, 7:20, 10:15; 
Sat 4:40, 7:20, 10:15 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
Daily 1:20, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO YOU 
(PG, coarsa language, sexual con- 
tent} 
Fri-lue, Thu 12:30, 3:50, 7:10, 
10:10; Wed 3:50, 7:10, 10:10; Star 
and Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 
CORALINE (PG, not recommended 
for young children, fnghtening 


scenes) 

Daily 12:50, 4:00 

PUSH (144, violence) 

Fri-Wed 1:40, 4:50, 7:30, 10:20; Thu 
1:40, 4:25, 10:20 

TAKEN (14A, violence) 

Daily 12:20, 2°45, 5:00, 7:40, 10:15 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Fri-Tue, Thu 1:10, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20; 
Wed 4:20, 6:50, 9:20; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 
GRAN TORINO (14A, language may 
offend) 

Daily 7:15, 9:50 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 


violence) 

Daily 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 
WATCHMEN (184. brutal violence, 
gory scenes) 

No Daily 1:00, 4:30, 8:00; 
Fr 1:30, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00; 
Mon Thu 3:00, 6:30, 10:00 
WATCHMEN: THE IMAX 
EXPERIENCE (18A, brutal violence, 


gory scenes) 

No passes Daily 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 
10:30 

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: 
MADAMA BUTTERFLY 
(Classification not available) 

Sat 11:00 


WESTMOUNT CENTRE 


111 Ave, Groat Rd. 780.455.8725 
ATEN (18A, brutal violence, 


Botby Stare renee Digital, No passes 
Poti eit: Sat-Sun 12:30, 
4:30, 8:10 


SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144 
violence) 


) 
Dolby Stereo Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 
7:15, 10:00; Sat-Sun 1:15, 4:10, 
7:15, 10:00 
MILK (144, coarse language) 
DTS Digital Fri,Mon-Thu 6:35, 9:30; 
Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:35, 6:35, 9:30 
THE READER (184. sexual con- 
tent) 
DTS Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 7:00, 
9:50; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:55, 7:00, 
9:50 


| __ WETASKIWIN CINEMAS | 


THAIN 


FIRED UP (14A, coarse ) 
Daily 7:05, 9:15; Sat-Sun 1:05, 3:15 


WATCHMEN (184. brutal violence, 


Pst sun Mon: 

Sat Sun 6:40, 9:40; Thu 

7:15; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30; Thu, Map 
5: midnight show 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144. 


wiolence) 
Daily 7:20, 9:25; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:25 


| 
BENJAMIN BUTTON (PG, coarse 
language, not recommended for 


Baiy 7:20; Sat-Sun 7:00 


rT 


2 | 


<4 


MARS-MAR1i 2009 «wureweexmy 9943 


FILM CAPSULES 


tam with those that came before 
them—David Cassidy, Menudo, New Edi- 
tion, as though | really need to list them 
off. But most comparisons, like a brief 
scene in which the Jonas Brothers arro- 
gantly mock a news report of clips of 
themselves and their grand boyband 
predecessors, fails to dig deep into how 
these the teen idols really evolve. Such a 
task in the generation of 24/7 news 
broadcast would likely require too much 
time and attention to be given to detail, 
@@hr set of performers to be analyzed as 
though a unique, significant contribution 
to the whole of artistic expression in the 
West. Such work is often left to pop cul- 
ture academics, years of tireless research 
to result in an essay buried deep within a 
university journal that libraries only allow 
you to borrow for three days. 

The Jonas Brothers, in their colourful 
Dionysian spectacle of a feature film, 
make me nervous as they demonstrate an 


ability to shift that culture into a much 
scarier place than NKOTB could have 
imagined. To me, they're the rich, idolized 


_ brown-haired family-who live in a man- 


sion on the outskirts of town, flaunting a 
practically incestuous sexuality through 
their togetherness—the talent to be 
musically competent and the embodiment 
of boyish decadence. Read Germaine 
Greer's The Beautiful Boy to witness the 
demonic history of male youth in imagery, 
naively destructive in the thoughtless 
wielding of their physical prowess. 

Here's the thing—at least I'm trying to 
make it interesting. 

Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert 
Experience transports the viewer to a 
dizzying underworld of mediocre songs and 
discomforting visual effects. On a radically 
mobile stage in front of a mob of fans of 
predictable behaviour, the boys— Joe, 
Kevin and Nick—draw a line of uncertainty 
between whether they take advantage of 
the 3D effects of the film or the effects do 
so over them. Lead vocalist Joe conducts 
the central energy of the performance, 
darting from end to end as pre-teen hands 


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mercilessly tear at the leg of his skinny 
jeans. Kevin, aka the legal one, is the curly 
mopped, baby-faced elder, turning into a 
fine, sweaty mess as he plays three or four 
Notes on an endless stream of expensive- 
looking guitars. Nick is shy (and apparently 
the most instrumentally savvy, playing 
drums, piano and guitar while singing), 
standing still in front of the microphone 
until unleashing a sporadic bout of back- 
flips and cartwheels. 

Essentially, you get what you pay for—a 
sensory, ideological meltdown designed for 
kids unaware of how deep the unconscious 
really goes. As far as media-wide criticism 
of the film goes, the film's centerpiece is an 
erotically charged scene backstage as the 
perspired band changes out of their shirts, 
right before tossing their clothes on the 
lens of the camera. When | was a kid, you 
had to stay up late Friday night and get 
those awkward thrills from The Showcase 
Revue. 


STREET FIGHTER: 

THE LEGEND OF CHUN-LI 

DIRECTED BY ANORZES BARTKOWIAK 

WRITTEN BY JUSTIN MARKS 

STARRING KRISTIN KREUK CHRIS KLEIN, NEAL MCOONOUGH 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 
One of the appeals of Street Fighter 2, 
the video game we can thank for at least 
two ridiculous films now, was that it was 
a bit of a button-masher; really anyone 
with the slightest familiarity with a game 
controller could bash at the high kick/low 
kick buttons and at least make it to Bal- 
rog. Shame the same concept doesn't 
work for films. 

There's a chance director Andrzej 


1 Flo Rida 
Right Round 


2T.. 
Dead and Gone feat. Justin Timberlake 


3 Britney Spears 
Circus 


4 Kelly Clarkson 
My Life Would Suck Without You 


5 Eminem 
Crack a Bottle feat. Dr. Dre and 50 Cent 


6 Kings of Leon 
Usé Somebody 


7 Lily Allen 
F**k You (Explicit Version) 


8 The Fray 
You Found Me 


9 Karl Wolf 
Africa 


10 Kanye West 
Heartless 


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Bartkowiak and writer Justin Marks know 
what they're doing, but they sure don’t go 
out of their way to show it. Street Fight- 
er: the Legend of Chun-Li, is a mess 
even for a brainless fight film, a movie 
riddled with gaping plot holes, ridiculous 
conceits and terrible acting that doesn’t 
even have the decency to break it up with 
suitably cool action sequences. 

The story is thin even for a film based 
on a fighting tournament—although, 
speaking of which, why do neither of 
these films just go ahead and base their 
story on a goddamn fighting tournament? 
It's built-in drama, light on the character 
work and plot they're not really interest- 
ed in anyway, and heavy on ass-kicking. 
It worked, kind of, for Bloodsport. Any- 
way, it's a pretty classic tale of revenge: 
young Chun-Li (Kristin Kreuk, who will 
have a career until her skin starts to sag) 
watches M Bison (Neal McDonough, 
who really deserves better after some 
pretty sharp TV work) kidnap her father, 
and eventually grows up to hunt him 
down. She gets some help from Gen 
(Robin Shou, who reads his lines like he’s 
dubbing a ‘70s kung fu film) and eventu- 
ally stops Bison's nefarious and more or 
less entirely random plans to bulldoze 
some Bangkok slums. 

Piled on top of that is a laundry list of 
misguided choices and flat-out errors so 
glaring you have to wonder if anyone 
even watched this thing before shipping 
it off. How is it that Bison has an Irish 
accent—which drifts in and out—when 
his missionary parents died before he 
could even talk? How does one of 
Bison's top henchwomen not even rec- 
ognize Chun-Li when he's been watching 
her grow up, waiting for her eventual 
revenge? Why does Chris Klein do a bad 
Christian Slater impression while trying 
to play a badass Interpol agent? These 
and many more could be overlooked, if 
not forgiven, if the action was at least 
exciting, but the fights, and the film, 
lack even the excitement of watching 
someone else play Street Fighter. \t's a 
sad day when the campy JCVD flick 
stands as the best Street Fighter movie 
ever made. 


ON DVD 


FROZEN RIVER 

WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY COURTNEY HUNT 
STARRING MELISSA LEO, MISTY, UPHAM 
nnn 


BRIAN GIBSON / brian@vueweekly.com 

With its shots of icebound water, bingo 
halls, reserves and backwood motels, it's 
easy for us up here, north of 40, to see 
Frozen River as a wanna-be CBC TV 
movie about our native land. 

But Courtney Hunt's film drives most- 
ly along roads just south of the border, 
around Massena, NY (45 degrees N). Its 
acclaim in the US (Grand Jury Prize at 


Sundance, two Oscar nominations) may 
have something to do with dramatic 
tensions—cross-border smuggling, 
Native vs white justice, territorial dis- 
putes—that our southern neighbours 
aren't too familiar with. But this seem- 
ingly small-scale debut (actually shot in 
Plattsburgh, NY) rolls along on enough 
strong acting turns, then twists away 
from a predictable tragic route, snow- 
balling into a mighty little film. 

The plot has something of the force 
of a Raymond Carver story, usually set 
among hard-scrabbled lives. The 
pained, worn look of Ray (Melissa Leo) 
greets us in the opening frames. She 
lives in a beaten-up old trailer with 
her two kids, teenaged TJ (Charlie 
McDermott) and young Ricky, and 
she’s trying to scrape together enough 
cash for their new trailer home. But 
Dad's skipped out on them and gone 
back to gambling. Out looking for his 
car, she finds that it's been casually 
repossessed by Lila (Misty Upham), a 
young widowed Mohawk who lives 
alone in a trailer home on the reserve 
In their clash, Ray and Lila spark up an 
uneasy partnership as smugglers. 

The look of the film is not, perhaps, as 
visually striking as it could be, with some 
shots a little too obvious in their intended 
resonance (especially lingering views of 
signs, like “High Stakes Bingo”). But if 
Hunt doesn’t clearly mark out her full 
potential visually, her screenplay is tight 
and interesting enough to make her a 
first-time director to watch out for (the 
dise’s only extra is a commentary by Hunt 
and producer Heather Rae). 

On Ray and Lila’s Christmas Eve run, 
the film veers towards too-obviously 
tragic territory, with some irony as a 
stocking stuffer, only to get back onto 
solid but icy ground, leaving us shaken 
When the climax comes, Frozen River 
doesn’t crack from any tragic weight, 
but slides into a perfect mix of the 
fateful and fitting, the forsaken and 
redeemed. And in our plunging econo- 
my, the film seems darkly prescient in 
its portrait of people selling them- 
selves out, selling themselves short 
and still slipping deeper into debt. 

Nothing feels forced here, thanks also 
to the cast. Leo's been rightly praised for 
her role as a tough, morally numbed and 
narrow-minded but family-driven mother. 
Yet Upham is nearly as good as a woman 
whose sullenness is as much self-protec- 
tion as rightful resentment. 

And then, the political rippling out a 
little from the personal, there are larger 
issues of abandonment, responsibility, 
and reconciliation. Differences border 
each other—differences that aren't 
judged or ranked, but simply set side by 
side. State law is uneasily balanced by 
native justice. And two children, ignorant 
of their cultures’ tense stand-offs, swing 
together on a merry-go-round. w 


)NO DOGS ALLOWED 


"by Brian Gibson 


ye te end d to projec 
ete 


human foibles, assumption 
n beasts. Animal 


d, cuddly se 


soem to be 


al pups o1 


MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2008 


. ALM 


MUSIC 


LUKE DOUCET /55 QP? | 
NOISY COLOURS / 56 [ 1 Ett 


UNDEROATH / 57 


Sink my toes into the ground 


Rachelle van Zanten trades couch surfing for a cabin in the woods 


EDEN MUNADO / eden@vueweekly.com 

ometimes some time away 
Si home is just what a per- 

son needs to gain a better 
appreciation for having some solid 
roots in the ground. Of course, some 
people need longer than others before 
they come to that point. 

“I've been living on the road since 
probably about 1997 or '98 and | felt 
like it almost killed me last summer,” 
Rachelle van Zanten recalls. “So I 
decided to build a log cabin last fall 
on my own land and it was exactly 
what I needed—I needed to get root- 
ed, grounded, and be close to my 
family and my animals and nature, 
and so my dad and I built a cabin on 
our homestead.” 

While building a cabin might 
sound like a difficult undertaking, 
van Zanten had a couple of secret 
weapons. One was her dad, who 
had a good grasp on the process 
having already built a log house and 
another cabin. The other was the 
wood itself, specifically some logs 
that van Zanten’s grandfather had 
cut in 1952 with a broad axe and 
crosscut saw, and which were recy- 
cled irtto building material for the 
new cabin. Still, the endeavour has 
been one long learning process for 
van Zanten herself. 

“I learned how to do everything 
from the start—how to put in plumb- 
ing—and we had a flood that froze 
into an ice pond underneath my bath- 
room,” she laughs. “It’s really interest- 
ing being a homeowner instead of 
being a couch surfer.” 


WHILE VAN ZANTEN now has a place to 


call her home, though, couch surfing 


on 
PAUL CHES 
HULBERT'S, $10 


JAMES STEWART / jstewart@vueweokly.com 
When it came time to record the fol- 
low-up to his 2007 debut Piece the Pic- 
ture, Paul Cresey returned to the 
familiar confines of Failsafe Studios 
with his former guitar instructor Dave 
Stoten once again behind the boards. 
With a growing desire to expand upon 
the stripped-down acoustic folk rock 
that has garnered him national atten- 
tion, Cresey turned to some experi- 
enced musicians to try his hand at 
Collaboration on his new record, When 
Beauty Has Passed. 

“| found that the recording labels we'd 


Kt | SAT MAT 
= | RACHELLE VAN ZANTEN 
Ee | npn Longe 


a. 


played a large role in the creation of her 
new album, Where Your Garden Grows, 
from the drafting of her band through to 
the writing and recording of the songs. 
“I picked up Hamish [Wall, bass] 
and Graham [Roby, drums] when | 
was touring Germany,” she remem- 
bers. “Their British band Goldrush 
was playing at the Orange Blossom 
Festival in Beverungen, which is in 
central Germany, and I was just com- 
pletely blown away by their groove—it 
was a very John Paul Jonés/John Bon- 
ham kind of groove—so I snuck back- 
stage and proceeded to woo them 


with some doughnuts that I had just 
bought from a vendor.” 

Two months later Wall and Roby 
flew to France to meet van Zanten 


and they haven't stopped since. The 
two players have even made their 
mark on van Zanten’s writing, jam- 
ming out grooves with her during 
soundchecks, which van Zanten 
would then turn into the songs on 
Where your Garden Grows, writing 
lyrics during long hours of travelling. 

“It’s very rare that you click with a 
band like that, and every show we've 
had there’ve been magical elements,” 
she enthuses. “I never get tired of 
playing with them, I never get tired of 
being around them, so it’s the perfect 
working relationship. We've maybe 
had one fight in two and a half years 
and it was over food.” vw 


been in touch with were looking fora 
more fleshed out sound, something a lit- 
tle more complete. And | was looking for 
a different sound this time around too,” 
Cresey explains. “Not that I’m trying to 
sell out or anything, but my songwriting 
has developed in that direction.*It's too 
easy to get dismissed as just another 
folky guy with an acoustic guitar.” 

Cresey worked closely with the musi- 
cians on the record, carefully working 
through parts with the cellist or suggest- 
ing fills for the drummer. More important- 
ly, he learned when to sit back and allow 
the process to happen naturally. 

"| was there for each and every 
recording session. | was in the booth 
giving the thumbs-up or thumbs-down, 
like Julius Caesar,” he laughs. “Well, 
not really. But everyone had some real- 


ly great ideas, stuff that | wouldn't 
have come up with on my own. It was 
really valuable having their perspective 
and artistic input.” 

After learning he'd been nominated 
for a 2008 Canadian Folk Music award 
for Young Performer of the Year, Cresey 
headed out to St John’s, Newfoundland 
late last year to attend the ceremony 
and experience the culture of folk tradi- 
tion on the Canadian east coast. 

“St John’s is so beautiful; I’ve 
already written a couple of songs 
about how much | loved it there. | met 
a lot of really cool people and musi- 
cians out there, like Murray McLauch- 
lan, Chrissy Crowley and Ariel Rogers 
{widow of Canadian folk icon Stan 
Rogers]. It was a great honour and a 
real shock to be nominated.” w 


NO COVER LIVE MUSIC EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON FROM 4-6 PM. 
HAPPY HOUR DRINK PRICES 2 TO 7PM! > BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 


SATURDAY, MARCH 7... LUCIE IDLOUT 


STARLITE ROOM IN ASSOCIATION WITH JHC & OH SNAP! PRESENT 


MUSIC 


10551- SZ Avenue {Upstairs! } 


730-432-5053 


FRIDAY MARCH 13 


CD RELEASE 


EA HIBALLS & SHOTS ALL NITE 
OORS AT BPM 


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SATURDAY MARCH 21 


BYU BOON AS 
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“MIAUINAY RAAPAU 92 


4G | WEEKLY MARS -MAR,11, 2008 , 


Rault every Thu and Fri 4-Gpm 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE One 4 Fives 
(blues, Slowbum stripped down): 8- 


BRIXX BAR Adaline, Daniel Moir, 
Hector Factor; Sam {door}; $8 (door) 
CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB Open 
stage hosted by Alberta Crude; 6-10pm 
COAST TO COAST PUB AND GRILL 
‘Open Mie at the pub: hip hop open mic 
every Thursday night with host Yak 
Dollaz 

DRUID Guitar heroes 


DUSTER'S PUB Thursday open jam 
hosted by The Assassins of youth 
{blues/rock); 9pm; no cover 

DVB Open mic Thursdays 

ECO CAFE-VILLAGE AT PIGEON 
LAKE Open Mic Nights 1st and 3rd 
‘Thu every month; 6:30-8:30pm; open- 
mic@deadmensdog.com 

ENCORE CLUB Mustard Smile (5- 
piece rock ensemble); $12 


HULBERT'S Stephen Maguire (Irish 
singer/songwriter); 8pm: $10 {door} 
HYDEAWAY All ages art spece: 
Justin Wayne Shaw's "Sprawl" 
Opening Party featuring No Hands, 
Falklands, Burro; Bom 


JAMIMERS PUB Thursday open jam; 
7-11pm 

J AND R BAR AND GAILL Open 
stage with the Poster Boys 
(pop/rock/blues), 8:30pm-12:30am 
JULIAN'S PIANO BAR-CHTAEAU 
LOUIS Graham Lawrence (jazz piano), 
8pm 

B'S PUB Open jam with Ken 
Skoreyko; 9pm 

UVE WIRE BAR AMD GRILL Open 
Stage Thursdays with Gary Thomas 
MANDOLIN BOOKS Joel Alan K and 


Jennifer lade Kerr (acoustic sat); pass 
the Hat after the show; 7pm 


IC 


NORTH GLEMORA HALL Jam by 
Wiki Rose Old Time Fiddlers 


RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players; Spm-Tam 
RIVER CREE RESORT The Neil Deal 
{Neil Young tribute band); 10pm 


‘STARLITE ROOM God Made Me 
Funky, Dawn In The City, Teadeka; Bpm 
(door); $10 (door) 


URBAN LOUNGE As |t Standz (EP 
eee perty), The Rumble Strippers: 


WILD WEST SALOON Collean fae 
and Comerstone 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL Clarinet 
Masterclass: Jana Starling: 7:30pm; 


free 
BALLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 
Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Big Rock 
‘Thursdays: DJs spin on three levels 


BUDDY'S Wet underwear contest 
with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


FILTHY McNASTY'S Punk Rock 
Bingo with DU SWAG. 


FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Requests with DJ Damian 

GAS PUMP Ladies Nite: Top 
40/dance with DJ Christian 
GINGUR SKY Urban Substance 
Thursdays 


HALO Thursdays Fo Sho: with Allout 
DJs DU Dagres, Junior Brown 


KAS BAR Urban House; with DJ Mark 
Stevens; 9pm 

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays: 
funky house/techno with DJ Colin: 
Hargreaves, house/breaks with DU 
Krazy K. hardstyle/techno with DJ 
Decha, tech trance/electro with DU 
‘Savage Garret) no minors; no cover 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Bingo at 
9:20pm followed by Electroshock 
Therapy with Dervish Nazz Nomad and 
Plan B (electro, retro) 


ON THE ROCKS Salsaholic 
Thursdays: Dance lessons at 8pm; 
Salsa DJ to follow 


OVERTIME SOUTH Ratro to New: 
classic rock, R&B, urban and dance 
with DJ Mikes; Spm-2am; no cover 


PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT Hit It 
Thursdays: breaks, electro house spun 
with Pl residents 

RENDEZVOUS PUB Metal Thureday 
with org665 


‘STARLITE ROOM Music Ist and The 


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Techno Hippy Crew: Bassnectar, Kush, 
Arora, Shamik and quests; 8pm. 
STOLLI'S Dancehall, hip hop with DU 
Footnotes hosted by Elle Dirty and 
ConScienee every Thu; no cover 
‘TEMPLE Tainted Thursdays: Electro 
Pop, india Rock and Rot! 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


‘ANS CAFE Dale Nikkel (CD release) 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Jason 
Greeley 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ with 
Fionnie After Work hosted by Ron 
Rault every Thu and Fri 4-Gpm 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Raisin’ Cain 
BLUES ON WHYTE Fathead 
BONNIE DOON HALL This is War, 
Farewell to the Sunset, They Call me 


Voltron, Goose (metal); all ages; 7pm; 
$10 (door) 


BRDX BAR Ayan Boume Band, 
Darren Frank, Farideh; 9pm (door); $10 
(door) 

CAFE LEVA Mark Ceaser, Kirby 
Criddle 

CARROT Live music Fridays: This Girl 
That Boy {folk jazz); all ages; 7:30- 
9:30pm; $5 (door) 

CASINO EDMONTON V.l.P (pop/rock) 
CASINO YELLOWHEAD The Rum 
Brothers (show band) 

COAST TO COAST Open Stage every 
Friday night with host Leona Burkey at 
9pm, 


DINWOODIE LOUNGE Politic Live, 
Krystle Dos Santos, Emee E 

DV8 TAVERN Live music every Fri; 
Spm: $5 


EDDIE SHORTS fled House (blues), 
Spm. 


ENCORE CLUB Craig Moritz Steve 
Fox $12 


FESTIVAL PLACE Carlos del Junco 
(blues), 7:20pm; $36 (table /$34 
{box}/$30 (Theatre) at Festival Place 
box office, TicketMaster 


FRESH START CAFE Live music 
Fridays: Peter Pirquet—The Prairie Cats 
Trio; 7-10pm; $5 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Jay Wiltzen 
{CD release party, folk/pop), David 
Blair, Stephanie Bosch; 8pm (door); 
$10 


HULBERT'S Kyler Schogen Band 
{stripped downl: 8-10pm; $10 (door) 


IRISH CLUB Jam session: Born; no 
cover » n 

IVORY CLUB show 
Wats, She anand Ea § 
and quests 


SEFFREY'S Jaffrey's Tiki Party: Terry 
(MeDade) and the Tiki Boys: $15 
JEKYLL AND HYDE (PUB) Every 
Friday: Headwind (classic pop/rock), 
‘Spm: no cover 

SET NIGHTCLUB The Heathor 
MeXenzie Band 
JUUAN’S PLANO BAR-CHTAEAU 
eee Crete ance ee 
MACLAB CENTRE FOR THE 
PERFORMING ARTS-LEDUC John 
Wort Hannam, 8pm; $25 {adult}/$20 
(student/Senior} at TX on the Square 
MYER HOROWITZ THEATRE Luke 
Dovost and the White Falcon, Amelia 
Curran; 6:30 (door), 7:30pm (show), 
$20 at TicketMaster 

ON THE ROCKS Love Junk with DJ 
Shawnibis 

180 DEGREES Sexy Friday night every 
Friday 

PALACE CASINO-WEM July 
PARKLAND GRILL Allan-Les 
Ropehan and the Blues Busters ; Spm- 
Jam 

PAWN SHOP Do You Remember The 


First Time...» Cage Dancers,Sexy 
Ladies, Yummie Drinks, Oh My; 9pm; 
$s 


httpy/Awew.taceabook com/event.php? 
eid=51625391724 

RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players, Spm-2am 

RIVER CREE RESORT The Neil Deal 
(Neil Young tribute band}; 1pm 
‘STARLITE ROOM The Environmental 
Conservation Students Association, 
presents: Wool on Wolves, Rheubius 
‘and Omega Theory; 3pm (door), $10. 
(door) 

STEEPS—OLD GLENORA Live 
Music Fridays: Rob Taylor (roots/world 
beat; 8:30-10:30pm 

STRETCH PUB One Nite Stan 


TEMPLE Zeitlos with Audi Paul, David 
Stone and Zemrok 


TOUCH OF CLASS-CHATEAU 
LOUIS Joey Lawrence (pop/rock); 
8:30pm 

am LOUNGE Mourming Wood: 


WILD WEST SALOON Colleen Rae 
and Comerstone 


YARDBIRD SUITE Yerdbird Suite 
Allstars (play Count Basie); 8pm 
(doorl/Spm (show); $22 (member)/$26 
(quest) at TicketMaster 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL Cello 
Masterclasses: Raphael Wallfisch; 
2;30-530pm; free 

Choralfest North Spotlight Concert; 
7:30pm: $10 at 780.488.7464, the door 


TIMMS CENTRE FOR THE ARTS 


> 


sett 
o lish), 
DJS 


BANK ULTRA LOUNGE Connected 
eae Peers Nestor 
Dalano, Luke Morrison 
BAR-B-BAR 0.) James; no cover 
BAR WILD Bor Wild Fridays 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Friday 0's 
Rates Wl Floor: Eclectic 
Jams with Nevine-indie, soul, 
motown, new wave, electro; 
Underdog: Perverted Fridays: Punk and 
‘Ska from the ‘60s "70s and 80s with 
Fathead 
BOOTS Retro Disco, retro dance 


We made ‘em famous! DJ 


Bupoys 
Eddy Toonflash, come early to avoid 


lineup, no cover before 10pm 
CHROME LOUNGE Platinum VIP 
Fridays 

EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock, hip hop, 
house, mash up; no minors 
ESMERELDA'S Exiles Freakin Frenzy 
Fridays: Playing the best in country 
FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) Top 
tracks, rock, retro with OJ Damian 
GAS PUMP Top 40/danca with DJ 
Christian 

HALO Mod Clubs indie rock, new 
‘wave, Brit pop, and ‘GOs soul with DJ 
Blue Jay, DJ Travy D; no cover before 
10pm; $5 (after 10pm) 

GINGUR Ladies Room: with Bomb 
‘Squad, DJ OB the Teacher 

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Hypnotig Friday. 
Breakbeat, house. progressive and 
electro with Groovy Quvy, DJ Fuuze 


NEWCASTLE PUB Fridays House, 
dance mix with DU Donovan 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 0.) 
‘Anarchy Adam {Punk} 

OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New: classic 
fock R&B, urban and dance with DJ 
Mikee; Spm-2am; no cover 

PLAY NIGHTCLUB The first bar for 
the queer community to open ina 
decade with DJ's Alex Brown and 
Eddie Toonflash; Spm (door; $5 
www.playnightclub.ca 

RED STAR Movin’ on Up Fridays: 
indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ 
Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson 


ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 


‘SPORTSWORLD INLINE AND AND 
ROLLER SKATING DISCO Top 40 
Request with a mix of Retro and Disco, 
7-10;30pm; waww.sports-world.ca 
STOLLE'S Top 40, A&B, house with 
People’s DJ 

STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 with DJ 
Tysin 

SUEDE LOUNGE DJ Nic-E Remixed 
every Friday 

TEMPLE TG Psydays; Spm 
WUNDERBAR Fridays with the Pony 
Girls, DJ Avinder and DJ Toma; no 


VENUE GUIDE 


780 433 1525 * BOOTS 10242-106 St, 780.423.5014 * BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 * BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 * CHATEAU 
LOUIS: JULIAN’S PIANO BAR/ROYAL COACH/TOUCH OF CLASS 11727 Kingsway, 780.452.7770 * CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB 2021 Millbourne Rid, West, 
780.462.6565 * CHROME LOUNGE 122 Ave, Victoria Trail * COAST TO COAST PUB AND GRILL 5552 Calgary Trail, 780.439.8575 * CONVOCATION HALL Arts Bidg, U of A, 
780.492.3611 * COPPERPOT RESTAURANT Capital Place, 101, 9707-110 St, 780.452.7800 « CROWN PUB 10709-109 St * DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave » DOW 
CENTENNIAL CENTRE Shell Theatre, 8700-84 St, Hwy 21, Fort Saskatchewan, 780.992.6400 * DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 * DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 
780.474.5554 © DV8 TAVERN 6307-99 St, www.DVETAVERN.com * ECO CAFE Village at Pigeon Laka » EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM Phase Ill, 780.489,SHOW * 
EGREMONT HOTEL Egremont {near Bonnyville), 780.736.3653 * ENCORE CLUB 116 957 Fir St, Sherwood Park, 780.417.0111» FIDDLER'S ROOST 8906-99 St * FILTHY 
MCNASTY'S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 * FLUID LOUNGE 10105-109 St, 780.429.0700 * 4TH AND VINE WINE BAR 11358-104 Ave, 780.497.7858 * FOX 10125-109 St, 
780,290,0680 * FOXX DEN 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert,780.459,0295 * FRESH START CAFE Riverbend Sq, 780/433,9623 © FUNKY BUDDHA 10241-82 Ave, 780.433.9676 + 
GAS PUMP 10166-114 St, 780.488.4841 » GINGUR SKY 15505-118 Ave, 780.913.4312/780.953,3606 * HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423, HALO « HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 
15120A (basement), Stony Plain Ad, 780.756.6010 * HILLTOP PUB 8220-106 Ave, 780.490.7359 * HOOLIGANZ PUB 10704-124 Si. 780.452.1168 * HULBERT'S 7601-115 St, 
780.436.1161 * HYDEAWAY ALL AGES ART SPACE 10209-100 Ave « IRON BOAR PUB 4911-51 st St, Wetaskiwin # IVORY CLUB 2940 Calgary Trail South * JAMMERS PUB 
11948-127 Ave, 780.451.8779 * J AND R BAR AND GRILL 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403  JEFFREY’S CAFE 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 « JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB and 
RESTAURANT Riverview Inn, 10209-100 Ave, 780.426.5381 (pub)/780.429,5081 (rest) « JET NIGHTCLUB 9221-34 Ave, 780.465.6552 * KAS BAR 10444-82 Avo, 
780.433.6768 * KINSMEN COMMUNITY CENTRE-LEDUC 50 Corinthia Dr, Leduc * KINGSWAY LEGION 10425 Kingsway @ve * B'S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St. Albert, 
780.460.9100 * LEGENDS PUB 6104-172 St, 780.481.2786 * LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 « LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRILL 1107 Knotwood Ad. 
East * LOOP LOUNGE 367 St Albert Rd, St Albert, 780.460.1122 * MACLAB CENTRE FOR PERFORMING ARTS (LEDUC) 4208-50 Si, Leduc * MANDOLIN BOOKS 6419- 
112 Ava * MicDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10026-101 St » MORANGO’STEK CAFE 10116-79 St * MURRIETA'S 10612-82 Ave, 780.438.4100 » NEWCASTLE PUB 6105-50 
Ave, 780.490.1999 * NEW CITY 10081 Jasper Ave, 780.969.5065 « NIKKI DIAMONDS 8130 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6006 * NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-1094 Ave « 
O’BYRNE’S 10616-92 Ave, 780.414.6766 * 180 DEGREES 10730-107 St, 780.414.0233 » ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 * OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 
10304-111 St, 780.423.1643 « OVERTIME SOUTH Whiternud Crossing, 4211-106 St, 780.485.1717 * PALACE CASINO-WEM 8882-170 St, 780.444.2112 * PARKLAND 
GRILL 5322-44 272, Spruce Grove, 780 884 4579 » PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 * PLANET INDIGO-JASPER AVE 11607 Jasper Ave « PLANET 
INDIGO-ST. ALBERT 812 Liberton Dr, St. Albert * PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10220-103 St e QUEEN ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY HALL 10425 University Ava * RED 
PLIANO-PIANO BAR 1533 Bourbon St, WWEM, 8882-170 Si, 780.486.7722 « RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 « RENDEZVOUS PUB 10108-149 St * ROSE- 
BOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 * SECOND CUP-STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq * SECOND CUP 12336-102nd Ave * 
SECOND CUP-124 STREET 12336-124 St, 780.451.7574 » SIDELINERS PUB 11018-127 St, 453-6006 « SPORTSWORLD 13710-104 St » STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 Si. 
780.428.1099 » STEEPS-OLD GLENORA 12411 Stony Plain Rd, 780.488.1505 » STEEPS TEA LOUNGE-COLLEGE PLAZA 1116-82 Ave, 780.988.8105 * STOLLI'S 2nd F 
10G68-82 Ave, 780,437,2293 * STRETCH PUB 10208-99 Ave, Ft. Saskatchewan, 780.992.3287 * SUEDE LOUNGE 11806 Jasper Ave, 780.482.0707 » TAPHOUSE 9020 
McKenney Ave, St Albert, 780,459,0860 * UNION HALL Argyil, 99 St, 780.702.2582 « URBAN LOUNGE 10544-82 Ave, 780.437.7699 * WHITEMUD CROSSING LIBRARY 
4211-106 St, 780.496.1822 * WILD WEST SALOON 12912-50 St, 780.476.3388 * WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 » Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, 
\Wwww.yaterhours.com * YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Camagie Dr, St. Albert, 780.459,0295 


* ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611 * AVENUE THEATRE 
9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 * BANK ULTRA LOUNGE 10765 Jasper Ave, 780.420.9098 « 
BILLY BOB’S LOUNGE Continental Inn, 16625 Stony Plain Rd, 780.484.7751 « BLACK DOG 
FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 * BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 
* BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 * BONNIE DOON HALL 9240-83 St, 


(a ee ee 


MSI 


Flaming Lips show there’s some hope for the music industry 


ENTER SANDOR 


2 
S STEVEN SANDOR 
S | steven@veweek!y.com 


There are people who have been waiting 
to see Watchmen since news came that 
the film was in pre-production. Same 
goes with that new Star Trek film. |, on 
the other hand, have patiently waited to 
see Christmas on Mars since news first 
surfaced that the Flaming Lips were mak- 
ing a weird science-fiction movie in lead- 
man Wayne Coyne's backyard. 

COM did the film fest circuit before it 
was released on DVD. Actually, it’s still 
doing festivals; it will be featured at 
Canadian Music Week in Toronto next 
month. | finally had the chance to see it a 
couple of weeks ago, and | keep coming 
back to both the score and film. While 
there are times when it's obvious that it 
was shot on a home-movie budget— 
where beat-up microwave ovens and digi- 
tal displays have been put together to 
create spaceship supercomputers and 
guys in the band's road crew over-act as if 


they were in an Oliver Stone film times 
10—I am still amazed that Coyne and 
company were able to get a major distrib- 


_Utor to release such an ambitious and 


abstract project. 

COM is influenced heavily by Russian 
science fiction, slow-paced (think Solyaris), 
where plot is secondary to tone. Really, the 
story is a mess—but the film works simply 
because the haunting score combines so 
well witl the black-and-white images. 
Despite all of the obstacles, from shooting 
a movie at home to the lack of professional 
actors, Christmas on Mars conveys dark 
feelings of loneliness and isolation. 


BUT THAT'S WHAT has always amazed 
me about the Flaming Lips. The band has 
survived on a major label despite having 
artistic ambitions that are anything but 
mainstream. Warner put out Zaireeka, 
maybe the strangest album concept of all 
time—a record which required the listen- 
er to play four CDs all at once, and in 
synch with each other. Christmas on Mars 
may be easier to set up in a fan's home, 
but it is by no means an easy way to 
spend 83 minutes. 


black furry creature from Mars 


That the Lips can survive on a major 
despite having no hope of becoming pop 
Superstars is one reason | think that, well, 
maybe the record industry isn’t 100 per 
cent evil. 

In terms of rock-art movies, the only 
comparison | can think of is Drawing 
Restraint 9, which featured Bjérk in an art 
film by American Matthew Barney. The 
film had no dialogue, only music from 
Bjork and collaborators like Wild Oldham 
and Leila, accompanying a rather gory 
take on the Japanese tea ceremony. 

When my wife and | saw it two years 
ago, we had to get advance tickets to see 
it at a Toronto art-house. Both showings 
sold out, with lineups for any remaining 
tush seats going round a block. 

Once again, it was a case of some- 
thing that was totally inaccessible cross- 
ing over into the mainstream. And all | 
can say is, “Well done.” We need more 
musicians to fool the industry and actual- 
ly sneak some art out there. w 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chief 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and author 
living in Toronto. 


cover 


SAT 
LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Jason 
Greeley 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of 
the Dog) live acoustic music every 
Saturday atternoon; this week: Lucie 
Idlout 48pm: no cover 

‘ANOS CAFE Dale Nikkel (CD release) 


GLUES ON WHYTE Saturday* 
Aftemoon Jam; (evening) Fathead 


BRIXX BAR Subvert (PK Calgary), DJ 
Fuure, Smokey Bandits, Agent 
Orange, Wadjit: Spm (door); 2 room, 
event with Temple, $10 (before 
Vipmi/$15 latter Tipm) 


CARROT Open mic Saturdays, 7:320- 
10pm; free 


CASINO EDMONTON VP 
(pop/rerk) 


CASINO The Rum 
Brothers (show band) 


CROWN PUB Acoustic Open Mic 
wath Marshall Lawrence and Tim 
pe 1:30pm (sign-up), every Sat, 


DVS TAVERN Live music every Sat; 
Som, $5 


EARLY STAGE SALOON-STONY 
PLAIN Saturday Live Music 


Oe muRTS Red House (blues), 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE 
Naughty by Nature (hip hop); Spm; 
Ockets at TicketMaster 


EGREMONT HOTEL Mi. Lucky 
(bvesreots) :30pm-1:30em, 


ENCORE CLUB Craig Moritz, Steve 
‘ax $12 


FESTIVAL PLACE Intemational 
Ay St tare 0 
ky lordan: (din- 
e/$30-$38 (show) 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Taki 
Modication; 8pm. 4 


NULBERT'S Paul Crasey (CO 
party: Ops $10 (dog) {CO release 


Lat and Stephanie Basch; 7:30pm; 

510 (door, donation); pro-~ 
ceeds to Oxfam Canada and Amnesty 
‘ternational = 


HILLTOP PUB 0; ic host- 
rit ld 
"RON BOAR PUB Jazz in 


Wetaskiwin featuring jazz trios the 
1st Saturday each month: this month: 
The Doug Bemer Trio; Spm; $10 


WORY CLUB Dueling piano show 
with Jesse, Shane. Tiffany and Erik 
and guests 


JAMMERS PUB Saturday open jam, 
3-7:30pm, country/rock band Spm- 
Zam 


JEFFREY'S Jeffrey's Tiki Party: Terry 
(McDade) and the Tiki Boys; $15 


JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB Headwind 
(classic pop/rock}; Spm; no cover 


SET NIGHTCLUB The Heather 
McKenzie Band 


JULIAN'S PLANO BAR-CHTAEAU 
a Petro Polujin (classical guitar); 


KINGSWAY LEGION Dark 


KINSMEN COMMUNITY CENTRE 
‘Open Gig: featuring Grounded Star, 
3pm (door), 4pm (shaw); $6/$3 (under 
10) at door, contact 
‘opegiq@yahoo.ca, 780 986.4875 to 
fegister to perform at this event 


LB'S PUB Molsons Saturday open 
stage every Saturday afternoon host- 
‘ed by Gord Macdonald; 4:30-Sam 


MORANGO'S TEK CAFE Saturday 
‘open stage: hosted by Dr. Oxide; 7- 
10pm. 


O'BYRNE'S Live Band Saturday 3- 
Tom; DJ 9:30pm, 

180 DEGREES Dancehall and Reggae 
night every Saturday 

ON THE ROCKS Love Junk with DU 
Wil 


PALACE CASINO-WEM July 


PAWN SHOP Passenger Action (CD 
release party), Molten Lava, Sweater 
Contest; 9pm, 

QUEEN ALEXANDRA HALL 
Northern Lights Folk Club: Lennie 
Gallant; 3am (matinee), 8pm (show 
SOLD OUT); $18 [advi/$22 (door); child 
6-12 1/2 price (door); tickets at TIX an 
the Square, Acoustic Music, Myhre's 
Music 

RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest » 
dueling plano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players; Spm-Zam 


REXALL PLACE Eagles; Spm 


RIVER CREE Queen Nation (Queen, 
‘tributa) 


STARLITE ROOM The Jimmy Swift 
Band, The Soulicitors; 3pm (door): 
tickets at TicketMaster, Blackbyrd 
TAPHOUSE Daniel Wesley Band; 155 
(door) 
TOUCH OF CLASS—CHATEAU 
LOUIS Joey Lawrence {pop/rock}, 
8:30pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Rachelle van 
Zanten (CD release); $10 


WILD WEST SALOON Colleen Rae 
and Comerstone 


YARDBIAD SUITE Yerdbird Suite 
Allstars (play Count Basie); 8pm, 
(door)/Spm (shaw) $22 (memberl/$26 
(guest) at TicketMaster 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL Cello 


Masterclasses: Raphael Wallfisch; 
2:30-5-30pm; free 


TIMMS CENTRE FOR THE ARTS 
Hansel and Gretel: A fully-staged 
‘opera production (in English), 
University Symphony Orchestra; 
7:30pm; $30 (adultl/$15 (sanion/$10 
{student) 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Classic 
Landmarks Masters: Music That 
Changed the World: Edmonton 
Symphony Orchestra, William Eddins 
{conductor}, Pieter Wispelwey {cello}; 
8pm) Symphony Prelude: 7:15pm, 
Upper Circle (Third Level) Lobby with 


7-10:30pm; www.sports-world.ca, 


STOLLES ON WHYTE Top 40, R&B, 
house with People’s DU 


SUEDE LOUNGE The Finest 
Underground House with DJ Nic-E 
every Saturday 


TEMPLE Oh Snap!: Every Saturday, 
Cobra Commander and quests; Spm 


WUNDERBAR Featured DJ and local 
bands 


Y AFTERHOURS Release Saturday 


LIVE MUSIC 


DT Baker 
DJS 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Saturday 


Os on three levels. Main Floor: 
Menace Sessions: alt 
Tock/electro/trash with Miss 
Mannered 


BUDDY'S Undie night for men only, 
free pool and tourney, DJ 
Arrowchaser 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock. hip hop, 
house, mash Up 


ESMERALDA'S Super Parties; Every 
Sata different theme 


FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays Gone 
Gold Mash-Up: with Harmen B and, 
DU Kwake 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with OJ Damian 
GINGUR SKY Soulout Saturdays: 
Lingerie Party with Invinceable, 
Spyce, capone, Rocky; 10pm (door); 
$10 Sat, Mar 7 

HALD For Those Who Know: house 
every Sat with DJ Junior Brown, Luke 
Morrison, Nestor Delano, An Rhodes 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizle Saturday: 
DU Groovy Cuvy and guests 


NEWCASTLE PUB Saturdays: Top 
40) requests with DJ Sheri 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Punk 
Rawk Saturdays with Todd and Alex 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Saturdays 
‘Suck with Greg Gory and BlueJay 


PLANET INDIGO-JASPER 
AVENUE Suggestive Saturdays: 
breaks electro house with Pl residents 


RED STAR Saturdays indie rock, hip 
hop, and electro with DJ Hot Philly 
‘and quests 


RENDEZVOUS Survival metal night 


SPORTSWORLD ROLLERSKATING 
DISCO Sportsworld Inline and Roller 
‘Skating Disco: Top 40 Request with a 
mix of retro and disco, 14:30pm and 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Errol Zastre; 
donations: 


BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT Jazz on 
the Side Sundays: Don Bemer, March 
8 - 


BLUES ON WHYTE Cold Feet 


DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Celtic 
Music Session, hosted by Keri-Lynne 
Zwicker, 47pm 

EMPIRE BALLROOM Open Mic 
Sundays battle of the bands; 9pm 
(door); $10 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Souljah Fyah 
Sundays; Bpm; $10 (door)/$5 {stu- 
dent)/$5 (restaurant/pub employees 
wath pay stub) 

HULBERT'S Sunday Songwniters 
Stage: Mark Ceaser; 7pm; $5/person 
minimum charge 

LOOP LOUNGE Jam hosted by JU, 
Lenny B and the Gats; 4:30pm "til 
Whenever 

NEWCASTLE PUB Sunday acoustic 
‘open stage with Willy James and 
Crawdad; 3-6pm 


NEW CITY Open Mic Sunday hosted 
by Ben Disaster; 9pm (sign-up); no 
cover 

O'BYRNE'S Open mic jam with Robb 
Angus (the Wheat Pool) 


ON THE ROCKS Shocker Sundays: 
Mar 8 with the Runble Strippers; Spm 


RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH Jazz and 
Reflections: Sunday aftemnoons: an 
‘afternoon of jazz and spiritual reflac- 
tion, Mar 8 with Rolanda Lee and the 
Canadian Hot Stars; 3:30-Spm 


RIVER CREE Queen Nation (Queen 
‘tnbute) 


ROYAL COACH-CHATEAU LOUIS 
Patro Polujin (classical guitar); 5pm 


SECOND CUP Live music every Suny 


CLASSICAL 


WHITEMUD CROSSING LIBRARY 
Music on A Sunday Aftemoon: 
Kathleen de Caen (cello), Matt Jaffray 
{oboe); 2pm; tree 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Sun 
‘Showcase: Edmonton Symphony: 
Orchestra, William Eddins (conductor), 
Pieter Wispehvey (cello: 2pm 


DJS 


BACKSTAGE TAP AND GRILL 
Industry Night: with Atomic Improv, 
Jameoki and DJ Tim 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sunday 
Aftemoons: Phil, 2-7pm; Main Floor: 
Got To Give It Up: Funk, Soul, 
Motown, Disco with DJ Red Dawn 


BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB Latest and 
greatest in House, Progressive and 
Trip-Hop; Rudy Electro; 10pm-2:30am, 
guest DJs inquire at 
kelly@michetti.com 


GINGUR Ladies Industry Sundays 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Get Down 
Sundays with Neighbourhood Rats 


OVERTIME DOWNTOWN Sunday 
Industry Night: Requests with DJ Bo 


WUNDERBAR Sundays DJ Gallatea 
and XS, quests; no cover 


MON 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sleeman 
Mondays: liva music monthly; no 
cover 


BLUES OM WHYTE James 
Armstong 


DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Open stage 
Mondays with different songwriters 
hosting each week presented by 
Jimmy Whiffen of Hole in the Guitar 
Productions; 8-12 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Jazz Night, - 
7pm; $10 [dooe\/$5 (student) 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 


PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY 
HALL Acoustic instrumental old tima 
fiddle jam hosted by the Wild Rose 
Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm 


ROSE BOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE The 
Legendary Rose Bow! Monday Jam: 
hosted by Sherry-Leo Wisor/Mike 
McDonald (altemating) Spm-12am 


SECOND CUP-GATEWAY Marty 
and Lil; 7-Spm 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL Aefae! 
Wallfiseh: Edmonton Chamber Music 
Society; 8pm; $30 (adult)/$20 (sen- 


« THURSDAYS « 


EDMONTONS HOTTEST INDY BANDS 
MARCH Sth 


AS IT STANDS & THE RUMBLE STRIPPERS 


MARCH 12th 


WEST OF WINNIPEG & GUESTS 


$4.25 
Jager Shots 
ALL NIGHT! 


MUSIC 


MARS MARTI, 2009 «<‘wursweexny 47 


CENTURY 


ats el G SH 


et SOSHHOSHHSHHKSCOHOEHSHHOSHEHSHOSEOH ESOS ESESESS. 


CASINO 


SWC $39* 


MAY 
=) 
$34*/$44* 


>-ALL SHOWS DOORS AT 7PM - (3103 FORT AD + 643-4000 


<3 | BACKLASH BLUES 
= 


AOLAND PEMBERTON 
roland @vueweekly.com 


Contrary to popular belief, being a trailblaz- 
er isn't always very satisfying. You get the 
pleasure of trudging through the lowest 
ranks of the art, hammering away at-unre- 
sponsive crowds, only to influence some- 
one else who will cannibalize your ideas 
with no reference to the source material. 
Sometimes though, it isn’t so aggressive. 
Influence is inherent in all art forms, and in 
music the chain of repetition comes around 
more often than not. The influence of ‘80s 
music on today’s electronic world is 
notable. With all due credit to other synth- 
pop trendsetters such as Duran Duran and 
Depeche Mode, | think the most culturally 
relevant band of the bunch at the moment 
has to be the Human League. 

A group of plucky English musicians 
with an urgent sense for melody and pas- 
sion, the Human League was mainly led 
through the vocals and creative direction of 


i 
alll fee. 


Sanne? 


Philip Oakey and the groundbreaking pro- 
duction of Martin Rushent. The band’s 
Magnum opus is. Dare, a raucous, colourful 
trip through Oakey’s relationships and psy- 
che. It's a record that stands the test of 
time, beyond 'the encased megahit “Don't 
You Want Me,” presenting many deep cuts 
with vaguely sociopolitical undertones and 
intricately designed dance floor workouts. 

The group's innovative electronic tech- 
niques (Dare is one of the first albums to 
be completely done without traditional 
instrumentation) and vocal phrasing have 
been expanded upon for years but never 
as frequently as in modern dance culture. 
Albums from Hot Chip and Cut Copy last 
year both had the emotional delivery and 
melodic turns of the Human League's best 
work and upcoming releases from Junior 
Boys (playing at the Starlite Room on 
April 7th) and the Juan Maclean are filled 
with similar takes on understated beauty, 
complex computerized arrangements and 
laborious lyrical phrasing. 


MORE CANADIANS than just the Hamil- 


tonians are feeling the inspiration. Mon- 


It was many years ago now 


treal's Tiga hae an upcoming album 
called Ciao/-that featuressa Soulwax. 
produced slow burner called “Love Don't 

Dance Here Anymore,” towehing on 
what happens in the club around 2:30 
am in a way reminiscent of the League's 
"The Sound Of The Crowd.” “When 
you're in love, you know you're in love" 
is the opening line to the group's “Love 
Action (| Believe In Love).” Silly Kissers 
2 lo-fi pop group of Edmonton ex-pats 
living in Montréal, features simila; 
girl/boy vocal dynamics and five songs 
with love in the title {including a song 
called “When I'm In Love"). 

Perhaps this is just another take on the 
cyclical natute of music. Dare came out 
almost 30 years ago and it's taken this long 
for it to become culturally relevant on a 
mass scale. Our generation of musicians 
and music fans might be finding the Human 
League ethos more appealing nowaday 
They were a loose.group of pop artists find 
ing a way to harmonize with machines in 
an organic manner and that is an aestheti 
that makes the most sense to today’s tect 
savvy generation of hipsters. w 


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ai 
MAR 5 - MAR 11,2009 


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(MEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 0! 
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MARS -MAR 7.2009 W/UISWIEEKLY 49 


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5D = \WwSWWEEKIY ~—-MAR5-MAR.11, 2009 MUSIC 


around and he 
was really hard to 
A * miss. 

NY-LEE & HEA HANDSOME FELLAS, “Music was 
: like electricity to 
him,” she con- 
tinues. “It just 
“DEM MUNI Ov z flowed through 
Musician and writer Terry Cox passed _—him and it just 
away on February 9 in BC. This weekend animated his 
his friends in Edmonton will be coming whole being, 
together the Empress Ale House to even when he 
remember a man whose presence was __was just sitting 
felt by many through his music, his writ- there listening 
ing and his years here at Vue Weekly. to it. You really 
Sherry-Lee Wisor is one of those whois got that al $0 
counted among Terry's friends, from his 

"We used to have a band back when! reviews—his 
first started playing music couldn't sing reviews were 
and | really wanted tohave abandandmy always very, 
boyfriend kicked me out of my other band, very thoughtful, Sf 
so | called up all of my friends that played © sometimes really hilariously scathing, but 
music and invited’ them to join this band,” _—the guy listened to all sorts of music with 
she remembers. “Terry was great to play great respect for what people were 
with. He rocked so hard, he was from anoth- doing. | think it was the sincerity that 
er planet. |! had met him through Jr Gone — was the thing that seemed to be the 
Wild back in the day and he was always = common denominator in all the stuff that 


SATURDAY MARLH 
THE HIALK DOG 4 


M425 - 82 AVE. SHOW STARTS 4PM 


a 


riseagainst.com www.myspace.com/riseagainst ; 


got the stamp the next little while,” Wisor Says. “| can't 
of Terry’s even imagine what that would be like.” 
approval. That In addition to Try-Polar, there will be an 
Whole visceral, open stage, and Wisor will also be play- 
from-the-gut — ing:a few songs, including Cracker's 
rock ‘n’ roll— _— “Low,” which she used to play in the Bod- 
he liked the kins with Terry. 

rough edges, “That's the kind of raw emotion that 
and you geta __ Terry personified all the way,” she 
lot of insight explains of the song choice. "He was in 
from really a lot of ways an open wound, but just 
looking at pure goodness at the same time. | never 
Music thathas heard him say a cruel or mean word 
those kinds of about anybody no matter what he was 
elements to it. going through, and the kinds of situa- 
And he just tions he got himself into can bring out 
lived that gen- the ugliest in us, and he never got really 


erally, | think.” ugly, that's for sure.” w 
T-shirts are rm sil 
being made for For another view of Terry Cox, goto ‘|\ sper A ery, 


the event, with —_thetyee.ca/Music/2009/02/26/TerryCox/ 

all proceeds going to a tax-free savings  Sherry-Lee Wisor also recorded two trib- rs Special Thaeks to: 

fund for Terry's son Covey Fleck (whose _—_utes to her friend: the Rolling Stones’ bd mi VUE} 

band Try-Polar will be performing). “Before They Make Me Run” |§ —" eat 
“Terry was a freelance writer anda  (youtube.com/watch ?v=AHKAps40k- § 

3 


; 
musician, so he didn’t have any pension, so c&feature=channel_page) and Crackers _1— wy E? | 
it's just something to help Covey along for = “Low” youtube.com/watch’*=DiwsmgbLHY), PARKLAND Mogetumes PFTTZY 


= 5 y : oe pe 
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@vuewookly.com 
parisons to Paul Simon, 
and James Taylor, Kitch- 
ngwriter Dale Nikkel is 
ct not to be missed, but on 
‘tour he’s an’act you very 
s—if you don’t know the right 
is. Nikkel will be playing a sig- 
ber of house concerts—an old 
ea that has fund a new popularity in 
bess ci ind very few shows in the 
traditional sense. In fact, Saturday's show 
at Axis Café is the only actual show listed 
on the singer's MySpace page. 

For Nikkel, house concerts provide a 
number of practical benefits—such as 
filling in some space between café and 
bar dates—as well as the subtler bene- 
fits that come with playing a show in 
such an intimate setting. 

"| love to play house concerts, it’s a 
really devoted audience,” he explains. 


CRACK 


“It's great for the audience and it's also 
great for me because | get to play for 
people who are listening. Often in the bar 
or even in coffee-shop culture, the frus- 
tration for songwriters is that the songs 


WITH SPECIAI 


BUIESH 


INTRON AUT 


(Ga 
— 
eae ver 


SATURDAY 


WINO 


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THE SKYE 


arent getting heard so much. I'm a story- 
teller as much as a songwriter, so it's 
really a perfect setting for what | do,” 

House concerts can also be viewed as 
a return to the roots that folk music came 
from. Practised in kitchens and living 
roams all over the world, folk music is 
music by and for the people, and a con- 
cert that takes place ina house brings the 
music back to that personal level on 
which it was intended to be heard. For 
Nikkel, the simplicity of an artist telling 
Stories to a rapt audience fits into his 
“less is more” mindset 

“lm a little bit old fashioned, | guess —4 
don’t have a cell phone, | don’t have a 
microwave oven, | try not to drive my car, | 
have the smallest car possible, | don’t 
watch much TV, | try to walk places as 
much as | can, | try to cook whole foods as 
much as | caa—t'm trying to live creatively 
and simply,” he says. “ It's just so beauti- 
ful, people in a venue listening to songs, 
no amplification needed and just an 
acoustic guitar and people to listen to the 
songs. | guess that all comes together with 
this striving for simple living.” w 


AP RIL pe 


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WUEWEEKILY — MARS=MAR 11, 2009 MUSIC 


cova aden Qvueweekly com ’ 


een a lot of road in 

t's life since he 
ised his latest album, 
Rich, just over a year ago. 
er/guitarist has seen stages 
Edmonton ranging from the 
jubilee. Auditorium to the Folk Fest to 
Rexall Place, and he’s seen a few 
more across the country, south of the 
border and even over the sea. But he's 
always shared those stages with oth- 
ers, opening for the likes of Blue 
Rodeo and Corb Lund, so he’s quite 
happy to still be touring Blood’s Too 
Rich a year later, especially given that 
he's setting out on his own headlining 
tour this time around. 

“We've been touring the record for a 
long time, but we've been the opening 
act or we've been doing multi-act bills 
like in Europe with Oh Susanna and 
myself and Melissa [McClelland]—that 
means I’m only playing eight or 10 or 
12 songs a night maximum, and we've 
just started this tour and we're doing 23 
or 24 songs a night. 

"In a lot of ways it feels like we're 
finally really touring this record and I'm 
pretty excited, so I’m not burned out on 
this yet,” he continues, adding, “by the 
end of this tour maybe I will be, and I'm 
making a new record in June.” 


EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 

ack when vinyl ruled the music 

kingdom, the physical limita- 

tions of the medium meant 
that most records clocked in some- 
where around a half an hour in 
length. Then when compact discs 
came along with enough room for 74 
minutes of music, many artists started 
Packing the tunes onto their releases 
for no other reason than because they 
could. In a large number of cases, that 
approach meant more filler on 
albums. It’s refreshing, then, to find 
that there are still some musicians 
around who aren’t overly concerned 
with the sheer volume of material on 


FA, MAR 6 (7:30 PM) 


LUKE DOUCET 
WITH AMELIA CURRAN 
HOROWITZ THEATRE $20 


= 
co 
a 


FOR THAT NEW. record, Doucet has done 


something he hasn't for quite some 
time, stepping down from the produc- 
tion chair and hiring an outside pro- 
ducer. The impetus for his decision can 
be traced to Doucet’s determination not 
to repeat himself as he moves forward 
from Blood’s Too Rich, an album where 
he buried himself within the song 
structures and gave himself the free- 


le my time and take it slow 


Luke Doucet steps to the front after a year of shared stages 


dom to really play his guitar without 
complicating the whole process with 
an onslaught of technology. 

“I tried to give myself a little bit of 
leeway to play and have fun,” he 
says. “The advent of Pro Tools and 
all the fancy technology has allowed 
us to over think, and one of the 
things | like about the records from 
the early ‘70s that | grew up listen- 
ing to, notso much by choice but 
because my parents played them for 
me when I was a kid, was that 
there’s an ease about them. You 
kind of get the feeling that there are 
moments during the music when the 
band are not really thinking ‘Well, in 
two more bars we have to change to 
the key modulation and the tempo 
change and whatever's going to 
happen next,’ but rather just kind of 
get lost in it, and I wanted to allow 
for some of that to happen. 

“When I suggest ease I don’t mean 
that I think everybody should listen to 
Eagles ballads,” he adds. “But when a 
song has a simple format and it goes 
on long enough for people to start 
enjoying the moment and playing off 
each other and interacting, maybe even 
on somewhat of a subconscious level, | 
value that and I think in this day and 
age there’s very little of that.” wv 


My sweet one 


Lucie Idlout’s heartbreaking ‘Lovely Irene’ 


SAT, MAR 7 (4 PM) 


LUCIE IDLOUT 
BLADK 06, REE 


an album so much as they are with 
the quality. One of those people is 
Lucie Idlout, whose sophomore 
record, Swagger, is a tight set of 10 
songs that dips into some deep emo- 
tional territory and gets its point 
across in just over 30 minutes. 

“1 don’t know if I was specifically 
trying to write a 35-minute album, but 
1 was definitely trying to write an 
album that was going to convey 
exactly all the emotions that 1 wanted 
to convey and be just long enough, 
but not a minute longer,” Idlout says 
about the album's creation. “1 hate it 
when you have an album full of mate- 
rial where it’s sort of 50 per cent great 
and 30 per cent good and then anoth- 
er 20 per cent ‘Why the fuck did you 
put that on there?’ I put together 
tunes that seemed to make the most 
sense and that made me feel good 
and that would work if you were 
doing a little road trip.” 


ONE OF THE SONGS on Swagger is 


“Lovely Irene,” a heartbreaking tale of 


inspires 


abuse. It’s a difficult song to listen to, 


* but it’s also one that has opened up 


dialogues where there is too.often 
only silence. The mayor of Iqaluit, 
inspired by a line in the song, 
changed the name of the city street 
that the women’s shelter is on to 
Angel Street; she then went to the 
mayors of the rest of Canada’s capital 
cities and asked them to follow suit, 
with Fredericton on board already and 
several others working towards doing 
the same. 

“Angel Street’ is a version of ‘Love- 
ly Irene,’ the difference being the 
band that I recorded it with as well as 
the addition of a children’s choir— 
three of the members of Blue Rodeo 
recorded the ‘Angel Street’ version 
with me, along with the Angel Street 
Angels from Iqaluit,” Idlout says quiet- 
ly about what has happened with her 
song. “I think the thing for me that 
makes it the most honest and the 
most real is that the eldest boy [in the 
choir] is the son of Sylvia Lyall, who 
was murdered by her common-law 
husband. He comes to this choir fully 
knowing what his contributions are 
and he’s just so brave. 

“It's impossible for me to get 
through without getting really choked 
up.” Vv 


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MUSIC 


MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2009 


55 


TUE 


WITH SPECIAL GUEST 


AMELIA CURRAN 


< 
MARCH 6 
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Be_LiIVENATION.com ow 
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ticketmaster (780) 451-8000 
TICKETS ALSO AT THE DOOR 


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The colours come back 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweokly.com 


shanti Marshall isn't quite sure 
what direction her band Noisy 
is headed in. To be fair, 


the group has only been around since 
August; in that brief time it’s managed to 
put out a release that points in a number 
of musical directions. Edgy riff-rock, 
more expansive, abstract instrumenta- 
tion and even strummy ballads all pop 
up on Sound -> Colour Synesthesia, and 
the diversity of material suggests a band 
that’s gleefully trying on this and that 
sound to find the perfect fit. 

This particular line-up may not 
even be the final roster. Another per- 
manent member could find room in 
the ranks yet to fill in the low end 
with bass; according to Marshall, a 
few candidates have already come 
and gone, but the band has yet to find 
the right one. 

“We tried the bass player thing, and 
it just seems to not work out every 
time,” Marshall laments. “We're 
always open; we want to try introduc- 
ing other instruments. | play clarinet, 
so | think maybe in the future we may 
incorporate that. | play piano, so we 
might experiment with that. But in 
terms of a bass player, it’s kind of up 
in the air. We like the way we are 
right now. We're experimenting.” 


FUTURE MUSICAL INKLINGS and bana 
members aside, the present Colours 
are Marshall (who also covers extra 


FAI, MAR 6 (0 PM) 


Itt 

= | NOISY COLOURS 
coe | WITHCITY OFSAILS! GROUNDED STAR 
2 | WINDERBAR, $5 


guitar and keyboard), guitarist Louis 
Mendez-Lozano and drummer Robert 
Latte. That first summer gig was at 
Remedy Café, and since then the play- 
ers have been adding an increasing 
number of shows to their itinerary 
and managed to float their album 


around to some bubbling reviews 
though Marshall seems to think of i 
more as a record of the band’s firs: 
steps more than a proper release. 

“It’s kind of funny,” Marshall says 
“It was more, I think, to have some 
thing to put up on MySpace that wa 
of good quality, just to have around. | 
know | wasn’t thinking of it as an 
album release. It’s just kind of some- 
thing saved,’on a disc,” she laughs 
“We wanted to show people what we 
were doing.” vw 


YE 


ii OnE rokmn FINGERIITS) 


MARCH 


ATTACKINBLACK,COM / DINEALONERECORDS.COM_ 


Sus 


MAR 5 - MAR 11, 2009 


MUSIC 


WIKOOYM / carolyn@vueweekly.com 

yhen Underoath’s Christo- 
| J pher Dudley takes the inter- 
view call, he’s wandering 
ound models of the Millenium Fal- 
sn and hairy Wookie costumes. He 
its that this visit to a Star Wars 
bit in Sydney, Australia is really” 


jnole enterprise—like many of us, he 
ppreciates the original trilogy—but 
does have a thing for movies and 
ir memorabilia. 

It’s fitting, really, given that the 
etalcore band pulled a Willy Wonka 
id handed out about 25 golden tick- 
with its latest album, Lost in the 
ound of Separation. These shiny tick- 
Is give their lucky holders free access 
» any Underoath show for life. 

"if one of our favourite bands did it, 

ye would actually be really excited,” 
explains. “We were thinking, man 
we could get into any Radiohead 
ow we wanted for the rest of our 
ife for free, that would be the most 
azing thing ever, so we decided to’ 
lo that.” 
Even though Dudley and company 
ave really defined Underoath as a 
e act, the guys seemed to want to 
oid a replay of the premature deliv- 
of an album before its due date. 
hile the internet leak of 2006's 
Define the Great Line did little to hurt 
ie album’s financial development, it 
as still a heartbreak. The golden 
ets are the ultimate reward for the 
timate fan. 


DEROATH HAS ALWAYS been blessed 
y loyal fans. Despite slagging by 
ose who call the band’s grinding 
ifs “un-metal” or disparaging com- 
ents about changes between 
bums, the six-piece keeps its fans by 
eping it interesting. 

)) “Pretty much every record that 
)We've put out has been pretty differ- 
int than the one before it. We try to 
lush ourselves every time we go into 
he studio. if people like it, then awe- 
ome, but if they don’t, then there’s 


WE 

MAR 9 (8 PM 
PHAR WALLASCH 

AAWET SCOTT HOYT 
DCATION HALL, U OFA, $10-$30 
RIA KOTOVYCH / maria@vueweekly.com 
‘mention of English arts and culture 

€n conjures up thoughts of Shake- 
peare or Jane Austen. But fewer people 
ight make an immediate association 
Btween England and classical music. 
‘Omoting British composers’ music is 
portant for cellist Raphael Wallfisch; 
brtunately, he has many works from 
lich to choose. 

For our instrument, the cello, there 
48 been a fantastic amount written by 
bmposers since Elgar, and even Elgar's 
biitemporaries,” he says over the phone 
om London. “And right up to the present 
ay, there has been a tremendous inter- 


srdy. He’s not even a huge fan of the © 


TUE MAR 10 (7 PM) 


= 

— 

=| UNDEROATH 

coe | WITH NORMA JEAN, INNERPARTYSYSTEM 
2 | EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE $27 


always the old records,” Dudley says. 
“The way that we see it is we would 
rather write songs that we have a 
blast playing live, because that’s going 
to come across and kids are going to 
have fun live, and it’s better than us 
writing a bunch of songs that we 
think people are going to like, and 
then playing them and not being 
whole-hearted about it.” 

That said, Lost in the Sound of Sep- 


est in the cello, so we have a big reper- 
toire which |'m delighted to play.” 

Wallfisch’s interest in his homeland’s 
music began early. His father, a concert 
pianist, also played and promoted English 
composers’ music. Growing up in this 
environment, Wallfisch knew many com- 
posers, both as artists and as family 
friends. 

While Wallfisch speaks very fondly of 
England's music, he adds that some 
famous British composers haven't always 
been held in the highest regard. 

"There is a very unfriendly description 
of British music which encompasses a 
certain type of folk-song-based music typ- 
ified by Vaughn Williams and people. 
(Some] call it ‘cow-pat music,’ whieh 
refers to the countryside where you'd 
step into some cow mess, you know,” he 
laughs. “But that's ridiculous!” 

Like many Romantic composers, 


\ ticket stub in your hand 


jnderoath rewards loyal fans by pulling a Willy Wonka 


aration isn't too far off from the 
album that came before it. After 
more than a decade, the band seems 
to have found a sound to explore 
with the wisdom that comes with the 
experience. 

“It's one of those things where 
we're not really changing what we 
sound like on every record now, and I 
think the reason for that is because 
we're getting older, and we're realiz- 
ing, ‘Hey, this is the kind of music that 
we want to play,’” Dudley explains. 
“When you're 16, 17 years old writing 
music, you're, like, ‘I don’t know what 
I want to do; I just want to do this and 
do that and do that." w 


Vaughn Williams was inspired by his 
nation’s folk music. Other British com- 
posers, after having studied abroad, 
might subtly fuse the new country’s stylis- 
tic elements into their own, Wallfisch 
describes. 

As for the British composers whose 
works he performs, Wallfisch does note a 
similarity in their approaches. 

“They use the cello in a very lyrical 
way, which is what attracts me to their 
music,” he explains. 

Wallfisch’s interest in English art and 
culture doesn't stop at music. He enjoys 
theatre, also noting that England is home 
to many talented painters. Yet, these arts 
might not receive as much publicity as 
they deserve, he adds. 

“| think the British on the whole have 
tended to be a little bit shy in promoting 
themselves, and so it goes with the 
British characteristic!” he laughs. w 


MUSIC 


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LIVE HOURS: WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY 7PM — 2AM 
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‘NEW SOUNDS 


Shout Out Out Out Out, Reinte- 
gration Time (Normals Welcome) 
If Shout Out Out Out Out's first album, 
Not Saying/Just Saying, rose up out of 
Edmonton’s boom times, an ideal 
soundtrack for a generation surround- 
ed by money and yet still swimming 
in debt, then the band’s new one, 
Reintegration Time, is a fitting fol- 
lowup, coming as it does when the 
freeflowing coin of the past few years 
has slowed to a trickle. 

Right from the record's opening 
there's a sense that 
it’s going to take 
more work to make 
it through this 
album than it did 
the previous one. 
That's very much 
because SO4 has 
avoided tuming Not 
Saying/Just Saying 
into a blueprint for 
future efforts. 

The opening 
track of Reintegra- 
tion Time, “Run,” 
fades in from a distance, its beat 
propulsive but cloaked in a new dark- 
ness that unfolds slowly as a welcom- 
ing bass line enters, leading into some 
majestic chords that soar across the 
tune. “Run” builds slowly, its shifting 
dynamics and sounds almost imper- 
ceptible at times, until they've taken 
over and legs are moving and heads 
bobbing in time. By the time that first 
track has ended, it feels as though it's 
miles removed from where it began, 
and yet still only the introduction to 
something more. 

What that is, exactly, is a trip that 
covers a shadowy version of the elec- 
tronica soundscape that SO4 is at home 
in, moving through eminently dance- 
able tunes like the bouncing “Guilt Trips 
Sink Ships” and the trance-inducing 
“Bad Choices,” as well as “Coming 
Home,” a hypnotic and aggressive col- 


recordsa&cds 


an imaginary country tPico 
tim hecker 


top 10 sellers 


laboration with Cadence Weapon and 
some crazy prog-dance-rock on “How 
Do I Maintain” parts one and two. 

Part of what makes Reintegration Time 
work so well is the refusal to rush any- 
thing, giving each piece the space it 
needs to breathe, rising and subsiding as 
it moves along towards what seems an 
inevitable conclusion in the title track. 
But it’s really the final three songs, 
"Remind Me in Dark Times,” “In the End 
It’s Your Friends” and “Reintegration 
Time,” that provide a climax and resolu- 
tion to the record. 

After the smooth- 
ness of the SO4/San 
Serac collaboration 
“One Plus Two Plus 
Three,” “Remind Me 
in Dark Times” 
begins with a force- 
ful bass, joined by a 
series of synths 
seemingly blown in 
on an apocalyptic 
wind that leaves 
plenty of space for 
the uneasy feeling 
that pervades the track until it becomes 
more forceful as the number of notes 
rise during the chorus, laying back again 
afterwards. 

After nine minutes, “Remind Me in 
Dark Times” recedes back into the bass, 
clearing the path for “In the End It’s 
Your Friends,” its chorus of “In the end 
it’s your friends that'll fuck you over” a 
warning on the surface but a veritable 
call to arms for the band and likemind- 
ed souls bubbling underneath. 

Finally, there is "Reintegration Time”; 
like the album opener, the closing num- 
ber is an instrumental structured as a 
crescendo, but when it finally gives 
away it devolves into a distant whisper, 
releasing into nothingness over nearly 
five minutes it’s the sort of closer that 
Jeaves one breathless, acting as the per- 
fect culmination to a remarkably whole 
record. —EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


10443a - 124 street 
780.732.1132 
www .listenrecords.net 


grand tour of tunisia 2 


sunburned hand ¢ 


Bayonets!!I, To the Point! (Bart) 
To the Point! isn't just a bad pun o; 
Bayonets!!!’s name: this tape (and 
digital download) 
jets by in just ovey 
eight minute; 
breezy even for 
band that take 
pride in playing a 
set thal tops out a| 
15 minutes on a 
luxurious day. What they lack j 
length they more than make up for jn 
punch, however: made up of forme, 
members of both the Wolfnote and 
MBP (including, full disclosure, vi, 
employee Bryan Birtles, though, full: 
disclosure, no one around here like 
him) Bayonets!!! blister through 
punk-influenced noise like laconi: 
demons, arty tics balanced with a s| 
sense of humour, whether it's simp! 
chanting the names of each ban: 
member for 43 seconds ("Ballad «: 
Bayonets”) or teaching a history les 
son in between bursts of freneti: 
noise (“Last Spike,” an album hig! 
light). This is more than sharp enough 
to warrant enough repeats to make | 
seem as long as a normal albu: 
— DAVID BERRY / david@vweweekly.com 


Bibio, Vignetting the Compost 
(Mush) England’s Stephen Wilkinson 
aka Bibio, has released a gorgeou 
throwback con 
cept album in 
Vignetting the Com 
post. In it, the sell 
zien? es} mg 
musician/produ 
er/experimentaiist 
has captured a 
hour's worth of evocative ‘60s Brit-foll 
instrumentals, wrapped neatly 1 
warm, warbled analogue ribbc 
These songs are true vignettes, avei 
aging two minutes each, comple 
with accompanying snapshot artwo: 
The cinematic quality of the album 
reminds listeners of Wes Anderson’ 
soundtracks, and as a fellow listenc: 
noted, “this is music you can se 
—MIKE ANGUS / mikeangus@vueweekly.com 


These are Powers, All Aboard 
Future (Dead Oceans) | think you 
have to respect a band that pushes the 
boundaries n 

matter what. |! 

pretty easy to have 
your first album 
well received and 
then continue to 
craft album afte! 
album within the 
bounds of the same formula. Thal’s 
why, though it gets a little repetitive al 
times, These are Powers’ newest disc 
is a success. Originating as a cacopho 
nous wail, These are Powers has mel- 
lowed things out considerably on “!! 
Aboard Future. It retains some of the 
same grating sounds but these a!¢ 
now used mostly for effect—and ove’ 
all the album has a lot more dow! 
tempo dancey beats where onc 
metallic drum sounds emanated fro™ 
speakers in a way that made you think 
the band was just about to go off the 
rails. It's a lot more atmospheric, it’s 4 


lot calmer, but it’s nothing you would 
have expected. And the liner notes— 
interpretations of the songs by !’ 
artists hailing from New York, Chicag? 
and Beijing—are brilliant. —BRYAN BIATLS 
/ bryan@vueweekly.com 


Tickets Available At New City, Megatunes, 
Freecloud Records & Blackbyrd Myoozik 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 


NO MINORS 10081 JASPER AVENUE 


01. s/t magneticring 

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04. march of the zapotec beirut 
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06. fruit of the womb sun city girs 

07. meriweather post... animal collective 

08. havilah the drones 

09. malevolent grain wolves in the throne room 
10. for the whole worfd to see death 


FRIDAY 
MAR 13 


KY 


MUSIC 


MAB 5 MAR 11, 2009 


2, No Line on the Horizon (inter- 
scope) As U2's earnest, urgent ‘80s 
rock and ironic ‘90s experiments faded, 
se-bands third 
d e has seen 
i Dublin four- 
‘some's discs lose 
‘con ty, coher- 

nce and force. 
'the group's 
best recent songs 
seem bound for softly soaring, sports- 
anthem status. Unfortunately, No Line 
on the Horizon—some Of its best 
moments found, likely thanks to pro- 
ducers and occasional co-writers Eno 
and Lanois, on the edges of the songs 
put not often in the Edge’s guitar—is a 
rocky, not rocking, road, Off in the dis- 
tance float some mushy lyrics from 
pono and some annoying rock clichés, 
from “oh-oh” refrains to choral back- 
ups. "Fez—Being Born” is a fascinating 
collection of fragments from the band’s 
past, and there are some great opening 
riffs, but most of the songs slip away 
from view, and memory, pretty quickly. 
BRIAN GIBSON / brian@vueweekly.com 


rh 
FOLLOW THE TRACKS 


LINE AT VUEWEEKL vc 
ON 


The United Steel Workers of Mon- 
treal, Three On the Tree (Weewerk) 


Songs about hard work, songs about © 


struggle and songs 
about drinking are 
what you'd expect 
"| from a band with 
such an obviously 
blue-collar 
moniker, and the 
Montréal-based alt- 
country sextet certainly doesn’t disap- 
point. The gruff, vaguely Tom Waits-y 
voice of singer Gern F, who trades off 
lead vocal duties with the equally sweet- 
voiced Felicity Hamer, adds just the right 
I've-been-in-a-few-too-many-bar- 
fights-after-walking-the-line-and-had- 
to-shoot-the-guy feel to the bands 
spirited playing. A few of the union- 
focused tracks are a little too straightfor- 
ward (“We will rise up, rise up / Rise up 
strong! / No one will stand alone”), but 
the band excels at singing about good 
ol’ union standbys: let’s skip out of the 
meeting, go get piss drunk and talk 
about that time the cops fucked with us. 
— SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 


Vangel, Biblio 
(5&1/4) This 
) album synthesizes 
some space-age- 
like psychedelia, 
industrial electron- 
ic beats, random 
sounds and yes, 
jazz, into an oddly cohesive mix. In 
“Cold Rain,” the synths occasionally 
withdraw to allow a far-away-sound- 
ing whistle to accentuate the drums. 
Then, the song concludes with a 
waterfall solo. And “Broken Jazz 
Hands” throws some tango into the 
Middle of everything else. While such 
disparate elements might not seem 
like they could work together to make 
a song, they do. One common theme 
underlies each song, and ultimately, 
the album: at every level, there’s a suc- 
cessful matching of sounds and styles 
that you'd rarely ever hear together. 
—MARIA KOTOVYCH / maria@vueweekly.com 


=| OLD SOUNDS 


EDEN MUNRO 
= | eden@weweekiy.com 


Phish, Hampton Comes Alive (Elek- 
tra) Originally released: 1999 Phish. A 
band that tends to generate either 
fanatical loyalty or intense hatred—or 
at least disinterest. It makes sense, 
though; Phish doesn’t exactly traffic in 
easy listening tunes of the sort that are 
good for a little background mood. It’s 
hard to ignore a band that jumps around 
all herky jerky 
between goofball 
anthems and long 
and meandering 
instrumental pas- 
sages. 

The band is 
impressive in its 
ability to engage 
in performances 
that are marked 
as “legendary” in 
its catalogue. Last 
Tuesday saw the 
release of a 
seven-disc DVD set of the band’s 
seven sets over two nights on August 
16 and 17, 1996. A couple of years 
later, on November 20 and 21, 1998, 
the band engaged its audience for 
another famous performance which 
saw release on the six-disc set Hamp- 
ton Comes Alive. 

That's right: six discs. And not a 
repeated song amongst them, adding 
up to 45 tunes spread over the two 
nights, which is a lot of music to com- 
mit to taking in. Sure, in the heat of 
the drug-induced moment (or hour or 
day) the thrill is there, but on record it’s 
all a little more thoughtful. Focus hard 
here and it's hard to argue that there 
aren't some interesting journeys to be 
found. 

There are the solid grooves of “Roses 
Are Free” and “Farmhouse"—do the 
Phish dance in your head, everybody— 
or the healthy sprinkling of covers that 
the band drops throughout—everything 
from Chumbawamba's “Tubthumping” 
to the gloriously and unrepentently 
unfunky version of Will Smith's “Gettin’ 
Jiggy Wit It’—and even the plentiful 


QUICK SPINS 


=) 

=< 

ex | WHITEY HOUSTON 

=H | quickspins@vueweekly.com 


SHOTGUN JIMMIE 
STILL JIMMIE 
YOU'VE CHANGED 
Total Pavement feel 


A little rougher though, like 
Tarmac with small rocks 


TIGHT KNIT 

SUB POP 

Gently plucked gold sounds 
Spun into a sweater vests 
For music store nerds 


BEN KWELLER 
Rian HORSES 
Kweller dons big hat 


Gets twangy, channels Willie! 
City folk approved! 


jamming that fills so much of these 
dises, the players swirling around each 
other as they investigate pretty much 
every corner they possibly can, some- 
times stumbling and other times head- 
ing for the sky. 

The thing with a band like Phish (or 
any other of the jam bands out there) 
is that all the players have to do is 
wander around a musical landscape 
for a time, turning over unturned rocks 
and sticking their heads into nooks 
and crannies without much regard for 
that musical headspace that they 
were in five or 10 
minutes ago, and 
then bring it all 
back around to 
the same song 
for the big finish 
and everybody 
thinks that 
they've been 
blown away by 
some magical 
performance. 

Still, these guys 
are in the upper 
echelons of that 
territory, sometimes ignoring the original 
song but never forgetting that they're 
playing together as a whole. Phish is cer- 
tainly not for everybody, and this particu- 
lar album is no easy listen for anybody 
but the most devout fan, but spend some 
time with it and you'll either come out 
the other end with a new appreciation 
for the band or you'll want to jam a pen- 
cil into your ear. 

Of course, the legend of Hampton 
continues to grow in Phish mythology 
as the band gets set to end its second 
hiatus with a three-night stand at the 
coliseum on March 6, 7 and 8. Unfor- 
tunately, there are only so many Phish 
fans who will be able to find them- 
selves a dancing spot for the actual 
shows, but anyone who wants to 
enjoy the unfolding of the band's first 
stand after its return, you can do so 
very soon after the first show ends. 
All the information can be found at 
phishthoughts.com/nospoilers. News 
editor Scott Harris will be venturing to 
the reunion shows, so look for a com- 
plete report online next week in Diary 
of a Phish Fiend. w 


PSYCHOSTICK 
SANDWICH 

AOCK RIDGE 

Terrible artwork 

Perfectly reflects contents: 
Drunk fat guy joke rock 


INFINITY+-1 

FOOLS GOLD 

An electro mix 

Long gone are the hip-hop jams 
Different but sweet 


RUSH 
RETROSPECTIVE 3 (1989 - 2008) 
ANTHEM 


I've tried to love you 
| learned to play “Tom Sawyer” 
But ... we've grown apart 


| UPCOMING SHOWS... 


>PRIDAY 


peal eel 


FRIDAY 


MARCH 13-< 


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OLD TIMERS 
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MARCH 9" 


COME AND CELEBRATE G'S MOST HONORABLE DEPARTURE 
AND PRAY TO THE MIGHTY FUGI FOR HIS SAFE RETURN 


Clack Mog Prechouse >" 25 Whute Aut 


MUSIC 


MAR 5 - 


MAR1€2009 «= \W7UTEWIEEKLY 


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USIGIAN’S 


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wi ASTROLOGY 


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Y 
ARIES (MAR 21 - APR 19) 

“You never want a serious crisis to go to 
waste,” said Rahm Emanuel, President 
Obama's chief of staff. “It's an opportunity 
to do things that you think you could not 
do before.” While your crisis is nowhere 
near as pressing as those faced by 
Obama's team, Aries, | recommend that 
you adopt a similar attitude in the coming 
days. Just assume that any breakdowns 
you experience will allow you to make 
breakthroughs that were previously 
impossible. Take advantage of a spiritual 
emergency to accomplish a spiritual 
eppetgence. As you deal with a scary trial, 
use it as an impetus to find a sacred trail. 


TAURUS (APR 20 - MAY 20) 

Your key theme for the week is “Healthy 
Obsessions.” Not “Melodramatic Compul- 
sions” or “Exhausting Crazes” or “Manias That 
Make You Seem Interesting to Casual 
Bystanders,” but “Healthy Obsessions.” To 
cary out your assignment in the right way, you 
will have to take really good care of yourself as 
you concentrate extravagantly on tasks that fill 
you with zeal. This may require you to rebel 
against the influences of role models, both in 
yeePactual life and in the movies you've seen, 
who act as if getting sick and imbalanced is an 
integral part of being true to one’s genius 


GEMINI (MAY 21 - JUN 20) 

The closest modern relative of the Tyran- 
nosaurus rex may be the chicken, says 
geneticist John Asara, He came to this con- 


You can feel good! 


=| QUEERMONTON 


ted@wueweekly.com 


This weekend in Edmonton there's an art 
opening featuring dirty gay Polaroids by an 
internationally renowned artist, a CD 
release party featuring Edmonton's 
favourite homo drummer/filmmaker, a mul- 
tidisciplinary salon with new work from 
both the aforementioned drummer/filmmak- 
er and a queer lady printmaker, a collective 
arts and crafts event and a queer karaoke 
| 

And to think less than a decade ago 
Bill Smith, the former mayor of Edmonton, 
wouldn't grant permission for the Pride 
Parade! 

Starting on Friday night, the Art Gallery 
of Alberta will be presenting 


“POLAROIDS: Attila Richard Lukacs and 
Michael Morris.” The show is made up of 
over 3000 Polaroids that have informed 
Alberta-born Lukascs’s highly charged 
grand paintings over the last 20 years. 
Rich with politics, insight and flesh, the 
Polaroids not only afford an opportunity 


* to get into the mind of a complex and fas- 


cinating artist but also cover two decades 
of the queer male experience. From safe 
sex pioneer Richard Berkowitz to Robert 
Mapplethorpe to Andy Warhol, Polaroids 
have always played a vital role in 
empowering queer males to be image 
makers, representing for themselves 
what they could not find elsewhere. It's 
interesting to see this show at the 
moment Polaroid is dying a slow death as 
images of gay men have become com- 
modified and accessible. Both Luckas and 
Morris—an artist who responded to the 


clusion after studying traces of tissue from a 
68-million-year-old bone of the king of 
dinosaurs. | invite you to draw inspiration 
from this theory, Gemini. Try the following 
thought experiment. Envision a couple of 
monstrous influences from your past—big 
bad meanies who hurt you or scared you. 
Imagine they were like Tyrannosaurus rexes 
back then. Close your eyes and see their 
faces glaring from the beast’s skull. But then 
imagine that in the intervening months and 
years they have devolved and shrunk. Pic- 
ture them now as clucking chickens pecking 
at seeds in the dirt. Can you see their faces 
at the top of their bobbing, feathery bodies? 


CANCER (JUN 21 - JUL 22) 

Scientists and fundamentalist Christians 
don't share much common ground, but one 
thing most of them agree on devoutly: 
there's no such.thing as reincarnation. Now 
I'm pleased to be able to offer you the 
chance to rebel against their dogmatic delu- 
sion. You see, Cancerian, it's an excellent 
time to try out the hypothesis that you have 
lived many times before and will live many 
times again. For one week, act as if it were 
true, and see how it changes the way you 
feel, think, and act. What if everything you 
do has repercussions forever? 


LEO (JUL 23-AUG-22) 

This horoscope presents three clues for you 
to work with. Here's the first: | know a psy- 
chotherapist’s son who, while growing up, 
rarely received the benefits of his father's 
psychological expertise. “The shoemaker's 
child has no shoes,” my friend says. Here’s 
your second clue: in the Bible's book of 
Mark, Jesus declares, “A prophet is not 
without honour, except in his own country, 
and among his own relatives, and in his 


own house.” The third clue: a neurologist of 
my acquaintance suffers from migraine 
headaches that he has been unable to cure. 
Now, Leo, | invite you to meditate on how 
these alienations may reflect situations that 
you're experiencing. If they sound familiar, 
take action. It's prime time to heal them. 


VIRGO (AUG 23 - SEP 22) 

One reason I've been put on this earth is to 
expose you to a kind of astrology that does- 
n't crush your free will, but instead clarifies 
your choices. In this horoscope, for instance, 
I'll crisply delineate your options so that you 
may decide upon a bold course of action 
that's most in tune with your highest values. 
Study the following multiple-choice query, 
then briskly flex your freedom of choice. 
Would you rather have love: 1) knock the 
wind out of one of your illusions, thereby 
exposing the truth about what you really 
want; 2) not exactly kick you in the butt, but 
more like pinch and spank you there, inspir- 
ing you to revise your ideas about what it 
means to be close to someone; or 3) spin 
you around in dizzying yet oddly pleasurable 
circles, shaking up your notions about how 
to keep intimacy both interestingly unpre- 
dictable and soothingly stable. 


LIBRA (SEP 23 - OCT 22) 

Cartoonist Gary Larson defines luposlipa- 
phobia as the fear of being pursued by tim- 
ber wolves around a kitchen table while 
wearing socks on a newly-waxed floor. 
According to my reading of the astrological 
omens, there is a real danger you could fall 
victim to that deluded phobia. And it is defi- 
nitely a delusion. No timber wolves will be 
in your immediate future. If you hope to 
avoid this mistaken anxiety, as well as other 
equally irrelevant and unproductive supersti- 


BIEKILY MARS; MAR IT, 2008 


EVENTS 


enormity of Lukacs’s Polaroid collection 
by organizing them into inviting grids— 
will be in attendance. 

The party continues later that night at 
the ARTery for the Wet Secrets’ single CD 
release dance party. Aside from launching 
a new single, the gig is also serving as a 
fundraiser for the band’s upcoming trip to 
the music and film festival SXSW (South 
by Southwest) in Austin, Texas. Trevor 
Anderson, an unflinching Edmonton advo- 
cate, will be beating the night away as 
the band’s drummer. Anderson is also a 
filmmaker whose work is often about 
contemporary queer life set in Edmonton, 
and who's most recent short film, “The 
Island,” will be showing as part of the 
FAVA Freshworks screening on Thursday 
night at Metro Cinema. 

Returning to the ARTery the next night 
Anderson will be performing a monologue 
as part of Mile Zero Dance’s salon series 
that will be ultimately become the frame 
for his next short film. Entitled “A High 
Note,” Anderson says that the film will 
explore his “relationship to my great-uncle, 
Alberta, theatre and theatricality, sex and 
sexuality, addiction and Miss Judy Gar- 
land.” 

This is MZD's 13th salon, and will fea- 
ture a variety of work from dance to spoken 
word to visual art that loosely responds to 
the theme of spring back. Imagining her 
own rites of spring, printmaker Anthea 
Black will be blanketing a section of the 
ARTery in wallpaper she has created that 
explores debauchery, the sacrificing of vir- 
gins and all the other good stuff that comes 
when the snow melts. Black showed simi- 
lar work but with the theme of BDSM at 


tions, you should have a nice long talk with 
yourself as soon as you finish reading this. 
Be very clear and strict and rational as you 
explain how important it is to be very clear 
and strict and rational right now. 


SCORPIO (OCT 23- NOV 21) 

Maybe you shouldn't mend your supposedly 
“evil” ways if your “evil” ways are about to 
mutate into a fascinating new approach to 
goodness. Maybe the very quality that has 
threatened to cause your downfall has now 
become the key to your upgrade. And 
maybe the thing that has made you most 
nervous about yourself about yourself will 
soon start ripening into a beautiful asset 
that will activate reserves of life energy you 
didn’t know you could have at your disposal. 


SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22 - DEE 21) 

Sagittarian Jakob Dylan has created a solid 
musical career for himself. He's a bit defen- 
sive, however, about the possibility that the 
fame of his father, Bob Dylan, has played a 
role in his success. His contracts specify 
that he should never be called “Bob Dylan's 
son.” | understand his longing to have his 
work be judged on its own merits, and | 
sympathize with his urge to be independent 
of his heritage. But in the coming weeks, 
Sagittarius, | advise just the opposite 
approach for you. You will place yourself in 
alignment with cosmic rhythms by expan- 
sively acknowledging all of the influences 
that have helped you become the person 
you want to be. 


CAPRICORN (DEC 22 - JAN 19) 

Throx.com sells you socks in threes, so if 
you lose one you have an extra to take its 
place. Their ingenious marketing plan 
resembles the approach of some 


the Bathhouse event that was part of last 
November's Exposure: Edmonton's Quee; 
Arts and Culture Festival. 


JOHANNES ZITS, a Toronto-based multi. 
media artist who was a featured artist 
during Exposure’s first year, will be back 
in Edmonton and back at Latitude 53 with 
installation and drawing artist Ed Pien for 
Wet and Paste, a collaborative drawing 
and collage event that the gallery will be 
hosting the same night as the salon. Zits’s 
work often focuses on the queer male 
body and how it is used to evoke expres- 
sion and impressions. With lots of space 
provided supplies and a male nude mode} 
the evening promises to be full of inspira- 
tion and interaction. 

If, after you've hit both the Salon and 
the gallery, you are looking to keep the 
night alive, Dance Dance Queer Revolu- 
tion is putting on a fundraiser for and at 
Circles. The alternative venue has been 
home to all of Dance Dance Queer Revo- 
lution events so far. From underground 
activists to same-sex-humping hipsters to 
gender-bending performance artists like 
event host Antonio Bavaro, Circles brings 
together the full spectrum of Edmonton's 
queer community. 

If this has seemed more like an events 
listings than a column—in part it's 
because it is. But more importantly it is a 
snapshot of one weekend in a supposedly 
redneck Prairie city early in the 21st centu- 
ty. While there is still far to go in terms of 
ensuring equality for all, sometimes part of 
moving forward is acknowledging how far 
you have come—something to think aboui 
as you move your clocks ahead. w 


romance-addicts | know, who always date 
two or three people just in case they gei 
dumped by one of them. No bouts cf 
loneliness to worry about! Which brings 
us to my main advice for you this week, 
Capricorn: have a back-up plan. Keep an 
alternative handy. Make sure you won't 
Tun out of the stuff you really need. 


AQUARIUS (JAN 20-FEB 18) 

My Chevy got stolen in San Francisco on a 
January night some years ago. The thief 
broke a window and smashed his way into 
the steering column with a tire iron to gel 
to the ignition wires. Eventually the cops 
recovered the car and returned it to me 
But no repair shop could ever completely 
fix the transmission, and though the car 
sort of worked for another 18 months, | 
was never able to shift it into reverse 
again. Driving a vehicle that only moved 
forward presented problems that required 
creative solutions. It was an apt metaphor 
for my life at the time, when | found it 
impossible to go backward in any way. | 
suspect it will also be one of your opera- 
tive metaphors in the coming months, 
Aquarius. 


PISCES (FEB 19 - MAR 20) 

“The biggest human temptation is to set- 
tle for too little,” wrote the spiritual 
activist Thomas Merton. Judging from 
your current astrological omens, | suspect 
that's a warning you should heed. The 
time has come for you to consider the 
possibility that you aren't thinking big 
enough ... that you need to actively rebel 
against the voices telling you to sit back 
and accept your comfortable limitations. 
In a sense, the cosmos is giving you 4 
poetic license to ask for more. w 


AIKIDO C: UB 10139-67Ave, Old serial 

jue, * Japanese Martial 

to Evry Tue 7309°30pm 6-8pm, 

i Stanley A. Milner Theatre 

tapas 73 yr Winston Churcl sq» The AoA 
the fe 


f -a free art talk with Edmonton sculptor 
Thu, Mar 5, 7:30pm 
GROUP Braeside” 
Soorera cui ae sce 
ie jurehill Ave, * For 
It en of alcoholic and dysfunctional families 
Meat Mon a 3 including holi ys, 7:40pm 
Resource Engineerin 
BOA Nanni vabora coEASG # OF Pi. 
a course—as society moves towards a signifi- 


cant ‘of energy coming from renewable sources 
© Mars.4oe 


11205- 


(68pm © CNEC. pea Wet Som) = He 
fas: Thu (6- 


CAR-SHARING CO-OP OF EDMONTON Robbins 
Health beerring Center, GMC City Centre Campus, Am 
9-315, 109 St. 104 Ave, 780.907.1231 ¢ Car Sharing 
Cooperatives-How they work presented by Tanya Paz 
and Mark Goldblatt ¢ Mar 12, 7:30pm © Free 


CHESS Chess Club and Society of Alberta 
Chess Knights, 780.474.2318 * Leam to play chess; 
ities for all ages including classes, school pro- 
grams and toumaments © rientessrcoeshawiea 


DOWNSTREAM Metro Cinema, Zeidler Hall, Citadel 
Theatre, 9828-101A Ave * Canadian premiere, docu- 
ane sereening and after the 2pm screening a 
ne! discussion with Dr. John O'Connor, Linda 
unean, De David Swann and George Poitras * Sun, 
Mar 8, 2pm and 4pm ® $10 (proceeds to benefit the 
people of Fort Chipewyan) at TIX on the Square, door 


EDMONTON ESPERANTO SOCIETY Rm 1812, 
10025-102A Ave, 780.702.5117 © Fri, noon-Ipm © 
vaughn@sewardconsulting.com 


EXPRESSION AGAINST REPRESSION Sub Stage, 
U of A Students’ Union Bldg * Open mic featuring the 
People's Posts and Dear, a night of cultural resistance 
to colonialism, oppression, occupation and injustice * 
Sat, Mar 7, 6-9pm * Free 


FILM AND VIDEO ARTS SOCIETY — ALBERTA 
(FAVA) Metro Cinema, 9828-101A Ave ¢ Freshworks 
soreening series: Showcasing 7 local artists. Some 
films ret contain adult material « Thu, Mar 5, 7pm 
* $10/$6 (student/senior) 


IMAGES ALBERTA CAMERA CLUB Pleasantview 
Community Hall, 10860-57 Ave, 
780.962.6561/780.469.9776/780.452.6224 © 
Featuring presentations, Wiest workshops, out- 
ings, and competitions. All levels of petiaraptiers 
welcome * Meet the 2nd and 4th TI 

Sept-May, 8pm 


iu each month; 


INTENSIONS: MESSAGE AND MEDIUM IN 
FIBRE ART Alberta Craft Council, Lower Gallery © 
Artist Talk * Sat, Mar 7, 2-3pm ‘ 

| WRITE AS 1 LIVE Timms Centre for the Arts, 87 
Ave, 112 St, U of A © Lecture by Dany Laferriére (in 
French with English supplement) ¢Thu, Mar 5, 7:30pm 


LEAP AHEAD IN LIFE Unity Church of Edmonton, 
13210-106 Ave, 780.913.6466, 780.477.5351 ¢ Film 
showing © Fri, Mar 6, 7pm; Sun, Mar 18, 1pm  « 
$12 (door) 


M.AD.E IN EDMONTON Grant MacEwan 
Downtown Campus, 105 St Bldg, Rm 5-142 ¢ 
Landscape architect Mathieu Casavant of Nip 
Paysage (Montreal). Host reception to follow * Mar 
5, 7-Spm ® $5 (student/MADE member)/$10 (non- 
member) at the door 


NANO TECHNOLOGY Telus World of Science Star 
Theatre, 11211-142 St ¢ Nano Technology and the 
Next Generation of Solar Cells, presentation by Dr. 
Oavid Rider and Sean McClure ® Tue, Mar 10, 7- 
8:30pm © Free 


OPPORTUNITIES IN A GREEN ECONOMY CAREER 
FORUM TEL150 Telus building, Uof A Rm, 111 St, 87 
Ave * Leam about green careers, eco-entrepreneurs, 
and ingovative careers in the green economy. Featuring 
=a Tad Hargrave, Stephani Carter, Don lveson, 
(aas Rodenburg * Thu, Mar 5, 5-8pm © Free; pre-reg- 
ister T: 780 492.431 '3, Email: amy.roy@ualberta.ca 
RESPONSES TO APARTHEID Lecture 12 Tory Bldg, 
Tory Building Lecture 12, U of A © Panel and discus- 
sion featuring Or Baha Abu-Laban, Dr. Anas Muwais 
and Paggy Morton * Thu, Mar5, 7pm Free 
RICHARD FRUCHT MEMORIAL LECTURE 
AND STUDENT CONFERENCE Humanities Centre L 
|, Uof A, wwwarts.ualberta.ca/-agas © Public lec- 
ture, Making Virtual Worlds: Games and the Human for 
2 Digital Age with Thomas Malaby * Mon, Mar 9, 7pm 
LE NET ZERO ENERGY HOUSE 9927-87 
St, wawwsriverdalenetzero.ca * Get ideas on ener 
Savings from this zero energy house open for self- 


Quided tours most Sat afternoons until Mar, 1-4pm 
* Free 


SPEAKING TRUTH TO POWER Stanley Milner 


ey Fim 6, 7 Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 
780.474.8445 © Presented by Edmonton Immigrant 
Services Association featuring presentations, work- 
shops, stories and arts to raise awareness on racism 
with Julio Garcia (hip-hop), The People’s Poets; 
Pragya Sharma; and others issue of racial diserimina- 
tion © Sat, Mar 7, 10am-Spm 


SUGARSWING DANCE CLUB Pleasantview Hall, 
10860-57 Ave, www.sugarswing.com. 780.604.7572 
® Dots n’ Stripes Dance Night: Come dressed in 
Polka Dots and Stripes * Sat, Mar 14, 8pm {begin- 
ner lesson), Spm-1am (dance) 


VEGETARIANS OF ALBERA Riverdale Community 
Hall, 9231-100 Ave * Squash: Potluck and annual 
cook-off © Sun, Mar 14, 5:30pm 

WELCOME TO THE REEL WORLD Civil 
Engineering Building (CEB) 325, www.iweek.ualber- 
ta.ca ® Global issues film and speaker series fea- 
turing the film Quilombo Country * Mar 11, 5pm 


WOMEN IN BLACK in front of the Old Strathcona 
Farmers’ Market © Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 
10-i1am, each month, stand in silence for a world 
without violence 


WOMEN ONLY BICYCLE REPAIR BikeWorks, 10047- 
80 Ave {enter through Back Alley), 780.433.2453 © 


Edmonton Bicycle luters’ Society ® (first and third 
Sundays of each month) * Mar 15 © Free 
COMEDY 


FACTORY Gateway Entertainment Centre, 
34th Ave, Calgary Trail © Thu, 8:30pm; Sat, 8pm and 
10pm ® Aaron Foster; Mar 5-7 © Bob Angeli; Mar 12-14 
* Greg Wilson; Mar 19-21 * Dennis Ross; Mar 26-28 


COMIC STRIP Bourbon St. WEM, 780.493.5999, 
www.thecomicstnip.ca * Hit or Miss Mondays: Each 
Mon Best of Edmonton Tuesdays: Each Tue © 
Tommy Johnigan, Andrew Iwanyk, and Shawn 
Gramiak; Mar 4-8 ¢ Hit or Miss Monday's: Mar 9 * 
Andrew \wanyk; Tue, Mar 10 © TJ Miller, Mike 
Harrison and Kevin McGrath; Mar 11-15 


DV8 8307-99 St, 780.760.0077, www.dv8tavern.com 
* Drilling for Comedy * Mar 10, 9pm (door) 


FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 
780.464.2852 * AGA-BOOM: Theatre of Physical 
Comedy by Dmitri Bogatirev * Mar 13-15 


LAUGH SHOP 1105-6606 137 Ave, net 
Mall, 780.476.1010 © Wed-Sat 8pm; Fri-Sat 7:30pm 
and 9:45pm ® Wed amateur open mic night; 8pm © 
Rob Brackenridge; Mar 5-7 ® Brian Lazanik from 
Toronto; Mar 12-14 


LION'S HEAD PUB Radisson Hotel Edmonton South, 
4440 Gateway Boulevard, 780.437.6010 © pone 
open mic night every Sun (9pm) hosted by Lars Callieou 


STEEPS TEA LOUNGE-COLLEGE PLAZA 11116-82 
Ave, 780.988.8105 * Amateur Comedian Night: every 
Tue, 8-10:30pm © For info contact 
robyn@steepstea.com 


QUEER LISTINGS 


AFFARM SUNNYBROOK-RED DEER Sunnybrook 
United Church, Red Deer, 403.347.6073 * Affirm wel- 
come LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and 
allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month 


BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP « A social 

tot for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd 
ue every month, 8pm ¢ 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bwedmonton 


BOOTS BAR AND LOUNGE 10242-106 St, 
780.423.5014, www,bootsbar.ca * 2nd Thu: Illusions 
Social Club © 3rd Wed: Edmonton 0 Society * 2nd 
Tue: Edmonton Rainbow Business Association * Every 
Fri: Philosophy Café © Fri and Sat DJ SeXXXy Sean 
10-3 © Long Weekend Sundays feature the Stardust 
Lounge with Miss Bianca and Vanity Fair 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB 117258 Jasper Ave, 
780.488.7736 * Nightly $pm-3am, Fri 8-3pm * Sun: 
Rotating drag shows with Mz Bianca and Mz Vanity 
Fair in The Stardust Lounge and GoDiva and Donnatella 
NE1 in The GaDonna Show, DJ WestCoastBabyDaddy - 
© Mon: Amateur aoe with Mia Fellow, mid- 
night, DJ WestCoastBabyDaddy * Tue: Free pool and 
toumey, DJ Arrowchaser * Wed: Hump day with DJ _ 
Sexxy Sean ¢ Thu: Wet underwear contest with Mia 
Fellow, midnight, DJ WestCoastBabyDaddy ¢ Fri: We 
made ‘em famous! DJ Eddy Toonflash, come early to 
avoid yeu no cover before 10pm * Sat: Undie night 
for men only, free pool and tourney, DJ Arrowchaser 


EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) Unitarian Church 
of Edmonton, 10804-119 St ¢ A group of older gay 
men and their admirers who have common interests 
meet the 2nd Sun, 2:30pm, most months for a social 
period, a short meeting and a guest speaker, discussion 
nel of a potluck supper. Special interest groups meet 
for other social activities throughout the month. E: 
edmontonpt@yahoo.ca, 
Www. primetimersww.org/edmonton 


GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION www.teamed- 
monton.ca ® Women's Drop-In Recreational 
Badminton; Oliver School Gym, 10227-118 
$t,780.465,3620; Wed, 6-7:30pm * Bootcamp; 
Lynnwood Elementary School at 15451-84 Ave; Mon, 
7-8:15pm; bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca * Bowling: 
Gateway Lanes, 100, 3414 Gateway Blvd; Sat, 5-7pm; 
bowling@teamedmonton.ca # Curling: Mon, 7:15- 
9:15pm), Granite Curling Club; 780.463,5942 « 
Running: Sun, Tue, Thu; running@teamedmonton.ca * 
Swimming: NAIT pool; 11762-106 St; Tue, 8-Spm, Thu, 
7:30-8:30pm; swimming@teamedmonton.ca * 
Volleyball: Tue Recreational: Mother Teresa 
Elementary School at 9008-105A, 8-10pm; Thu inter- 
mediate: PSSRe Aca: 101 Airport Rd, 8- 
10pm; recvolleyball@teamedmonton.ca, 
volleyball@teamedmonton.ca * YOGA (Hatha): Free 
Yoga; every Sun, 2-3:30pm; Korezone Fitness, 203, 
0875-1 15 St; yoqa@teamedmonton.ca 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB various locations * 
Crossdressers, transsexuals, friends and supporters 


meet 2nd Thu every month. For details go to 
http://aroups yahoo.com/aroup/edmonton llusions/ 


an uU i ane ‘ peeietasad 

ion for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identi- 

fied and.queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, 

ae pale and peat oie 3rd Thu 
fall/winter terms). Speakers Series. 

Contact Kris (kwells@ualberta ca) 


KOREZONE FITNESS 203, 10575-115 St « LIVING 
POSITIVE 404, 10408-124 St, www.edmlivingposi- 
tive.ca, 1.877.975,9448/780,.488.5768, © Providing con- 

ial peer support to Rene living with HIV * Tue, 
73pm: Support group ¢ Daily drop-in, peer counselling 
MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION Faculté St. 
Jean, Aim 3-18, 780.490.7332 © Program for HIV- 
AD'S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in 
French, English and other African languages * 3rd 
and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month © Free (mem- 
ber}/$10 (membership) © Pre-register 


MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB www.ceoci- 
ties.com/makingwaves_edm * Recreational and 
Competitive swimming with coaching, beginners 
encouraged to participate. Socializing after practices 
* Every Tue, Thu 


PFLAG Pride Centre, 9540-111 Ave * A support group 
for parents and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans- 
gender and queer people # Meet the Ist Wed each 
month September-June, 7-9pm; T: Ruby 780.436.1998 
after 6pm; E: edmontonab@pflagcanada.ca 


PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10270-103 St, www playnight- 

club.ca © Open Thu, Fri, Sat * The first bar for the 

ues community to open in a decade with DJs Alexx 
own and Eddie Toonflash 


PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON 9540-111 Ave, 
780.488.3234, www.pridecentreofedmonton.org * 
Open Tue-Fri 1-10pm, Sat 2-6:30pm ¢ LGBT Seniors 
Drop-in: Every Tue/Thu, 2-4pm * CA: Every Thu (7pm) 
Suit Up and Show Up: AA big book study group meet 
every Sat, noon * Youth Understanding Youth: Youth 
up to 25 years, support and social group meet every 
Sat, 7-Spm; yuy@shaw.ca * Womonspace: Board 
meeting Ist Sun each month, 10:30am-12:30pm ¢ 
Trans Education/Support Group: Meet the 1st and 3rd 
Sun, 24pm, of each month; www.albertatrans.org 
Men Talking with Pride: Every Sun (7pm); facilitator: 
Rob Wells robwells780@hotmail.com © HiV Support 
Group: Meet the 2nd Mon of each month, 7pm © 
Hanssen Transsexual, Intersex and Questioning 
(T1Q) Alliance; topo meeting the 2nd Tue each 
month, 7:30pm * Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex 
and Questioning. Education, advocacy and support for 
men, women and youth; PFLAG Edmonton: Meet the 
ist Wed each month, 7pm * Free short-term, solution- 
focused drop-in counse! ing every Wed, 7-10pm * 
YouthSpace: drop-in for LGBTO for youth up to 25; Tue- 
Sat, 3-7pm 


ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209- 
123 St. 780.482.1587, www.rwuc.org * Soul OUTing: 
an LGBT-focused alternative worship * 2nd Sun each 
month, 7pm; worship Sun, 10:30am; people of all sex- 
ual orientations welcome. A LGBT monthly book club 
and film night. Info email jravenseroft@rwue.org 


ST. PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH 11526-76 Ave, 
780.436.1555 © People of all sexual orientations are 
welcome © Every Sun (10am worship) 


WOMONSPACE 780.482.1794, 
Www.womonspace.ca, pvomiatine eee ea) oA 
Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton 
and surrounding atea. Organized monthly activities 
from dances, games nites, golf tournament, ete. 
Monthly newsletter and reduced rates included with 
membership. Confidentiality assured 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6557 * Open 
Daily (noon) * Sat-Tue Karaoke with Tizzy and Patrick 
© Sat-Sun Pool Tournaments 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


ART AND ENTERTAINMENT CHARITY AFFAIR 


Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts, Leduc * 
Fundraiser in support of the enhancement of health 
services at the Leduc Community Hospital and public 
health centres of Beaumont, Leduc and Thorsby * 
Mar 7 © $50 at 780.980.4536 


CHILD HAVEN Maharaja Sa Hall, 9257-34A 
Ave, www.childhaven.org * 7th Annual Dinner * 
Sat, Mar 14, 6-10pm 


EDMONTON JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Royal 
Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave, 780.487.0585 « 
Featuring 6 films including wie eE feleased docu- 
mentary The Case for /srae/ (PG); Boston attomey 
Jeffrey Robbins will facilitate a Question and 
Answer forum immediately following the film on 
Mar 8 © Sun, Mar 8; Sun, Mar 15 # $10 (sin- 

1e)/$50 (festival pass) at TIX on the Square or the 
Wee Federation of Edmonton 


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY-FESTIVAL 
PLACE Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 © . 
Celebration, dinner and show including a Women’s 
Health Fair, an address by Iris Evans and music with 
Amy Sky and Marc Jordan * Mar 7 © $30 (din- 
ner)/$30-$36 (show)/$50 (dinner and show) at 
Festival Place box office, TicketMaster 


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY-HYDEAWAY 
10209-100 Ave © From Half a Chance to the Whole 
World: featuring quest speakers, local musicians, 
and local art * Mar 7, 7pm 


RIBBON ROUGE Dinwoodie Lounge, Students’ 
Union Building (SUB), 780.965.7364 * A night of 
fashion, art and music; a fundraiser for HIV/AIDS 
relief © Fri, Mar 6 

STARS OF HOPE Jubilee Auditorium * Benefit per- 
formance in pine of the Kids With Cancer 
Society © Mar 7, 7pm © $17.85 at TicketMaster 
TERRY COX RUN Empress Ale House, 9912-82. 
Ave, 780.953.8423/780,497.5488 * A musical trib- 
ute to Terry Cox featuring TC's son Covey Fleck and 
his band Tri-Polar; open stage * Sun, Mar 8, 6pm 


‘BVENTS 


TOP 30 FOR THE WEEK OF MARCH 5, 20 
1. Chris Issak- Mr. Lucky (reprise) 
2. M. Ward —Hold Time (merge) 


3. Animal Collective —Meriweather Post Pavilion (domino) 
4. Dan Auerbach Keep It Hip (nonesuch) 

5. Brett Dennen — Hope For The Hopeless (dualtone) 

6. Deep Dark Woods - Winter Hours (black hen) > 
7. The Derek Trucks Band - Already Free (sony) 

8. AC. Newman — Get Guilty (last gang) 

9. Beast - Beast (universal) 

10. V/A—Dark Was The Night (4ad) 

11. Andrew Bird — Noble Beast (fat possum) 

12. Jill Barber - Chances (outside) 

13. Geoff Bemer — Klezmer Mongrels (jericho beach) 

14. Neil Young — Sugar Mountain: Live At Canterbury House (reprise) 

15. Joh n Frusciante - The Empyrean (record collection) 

16. Bon Iver - Blood Bank (jagjaguwar) | 
17. Eleni Mandell - Artificial Fire (zedtone) / 
18. Passenger Action - S/T (smaliman) 2 
19. Willie Nelson & Asleep At The Whee! - Willie & The Wheel (bismeaux) 
20. William Elliott Whitmore - Animals In The Dark (anti) 

21. Bruce Springsteen — Working On A Dream (columbia) 

22. Steve Earle & The Del McCoury Band - The Mountain (new west) 
23. Mark Olson & Gary Louris - Ready For The Flood (new west) 

24. Antony & The Johnsons - The Crying Light (secretly canadian) 
25. Jorma Kaukonen — River Of Time (red house) 

26. Kasey Chambers & Shane Nichols - Rattlin’ Bones (sugar hill) 
27. Colin Linden — The Water (true north) 

28, Combichrist- Today. We Are All Demons (metropolis) 

29. Southside Johnny — Grapefruit Moon (leroy records) 

30. Franz Ferdinand - Tonight (domino) 


PROPAGANDHI 


SUPPORTING CASTE 


Legendary and unrepentant residents of 
humankind’s ideological peanut-gallery, 
Propagandhi does not disappoint with 
Supporting Caste - a collection of 
boundless power and depth that is a 50 
000 watt forward-thinking tip-of-the-hat to 
the giants—Voivod, Rush, SNFU, Sacrifice, 
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MAKE SURE M ceE.COM/ME 


10355 Whyte Ave. Sho , online ai atunes.com 434-6342% 


es 
ow Fenfale fronted semi-pro caver band seeks bass or 
ro tented msn hee ton ton te [be Who You Are. Do CSMIER: ni u loves 
jodemn. Experience a mi 
<= audition. forcoverband@gmail.com to arrange audition 
WANT TO PLACE CLASSIRED There is still time to be ait of The Works—North I've travelled the world with my sax. | seek an expe- 
‘WEEKLY, Bite 3-4! Jpeg : wet ctd Lora st . FREE Ota ae & tin Ape rienced eral yee eee 50- za loc 
tival forks Art Market-Final Deadline gigs and possible internat’! travel. Ross 
DEADUNE IS NOON THE TUESDAY BEFORE PUBLICATION 15, 2009. ea ila .ab.ca for alice 780. 707.3879 
tion on reduced rates for applications recei 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES between Feb 16 and Apr 15, 2009, Chali Art 


Looking for one or two open minded health 
conscious people interested in working from home 
full or part time. Clinically tested patented prod- 
ucts. No inventory to carry. 

For information call Ken at 780.454.6971 


mererwip@yahoo.ca America’s LARGEST Outdoor FREE Art & Design 
EDUCATIONAL Festival! Volunteer! Download. your application at 
Dirty City Hearts is seeking a guitar player. please con- www.theworks.ab.ca 
~~ __ Free Acting Classes tact us through facbook, myspace 
sign up at freeactingtips.net (www.myspace.com/dirtycityhearts) or call Volunteer website for youth 14-24 years old. 
Audition and camera tips. 780.938.3037 for more details www.youthvolunteer.ca 


www.vadastudios.com 


FRAMING 


PICTURE FRAMES 


MOVIE DOSTER SHOE Danny_boyspence8099@yahoo.ca Wheels. 780.429.2020 
sa eal iy 2 % Sead ani pes The Loudhailers seeking piano 
Eagan oa Ph Justin 780.760.7284 VOLUNTEER 


HELP WANTED 


@@Sitor/Reporter wanted to join production team of 
north central Edmonton community newspaper. 
Experience essential. Send resume and writing sam- 
ples by March 20 to: Rat Creek Press, PO Box 39024 
Norwood APO, Edmonton AB TSB 478 or e-mail to: 
info@ratcreek.org. No phone calls please. 


The Cutting Room is looking for 
Assistants and Stylists 
Please drop off your resume at 
10536 -124 Street 


Drivers wanted: $15+/hr, Wed (night). Thu (day), 
perm/PT. Must have mini-van or truck. 
Looking for reliable, responsible parson. 
Ph 780.907.0570 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL, TEACH ENGLISH: 
Wé train you to teach. 1000's of jobs around the world. 
Next in-class or ONLINE by correspondence. Jobs quar- 
anteed. 7712-104 St. Call for info pack 1.888.270.2941 


%* MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


MODAL MUSIC INC. 780.221.3116 
Quality music instruction since 1981 
Guitarist. Educator 
Graduate of GMCC music program 


ARTIST TO ARTIST 


The Handmade Mafia, a craft collective, is starting a 
monthly market in Edmonton on the ist Sat every 
month starting Apr 4 at the Savoy and Orange Hall 
Looking for handmade funky, unique crafts and art 
For info E: Ally: msallyng@gmail.com, Amy: amy- 
jedgar@hotmail.com 


Peter Hide ART TALK: The ASA and the EPL presenta ares. 9 Yo 
free ant talk with Edmonton sculptor Peter Hide. Thu, BIG FOUR BUILDING 
sagt? 30pm ies Stanley ae Theatre FRI 3-10 SAY 10-9 SUN 11-6 
(downstairs) 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq STAMPEDE PARK CREATION 1S ECSTASY! rts for Humanity: 
Steeps—Old Glenora: for open mic—Spoken word +t y e with Anodea Judith, Ph.D. We ir : te 
First Thursday every month. Contact Adam Snider to Expo admission only $12 Purchase advanced tickets online. Quantum Event.with G.W. Hardin 


sign up adam.snider@gmail.com 


Alberta Screenwriters Initiative, Alberta Film Partners 
are seeking submissions of feature fi ts 0 
genre, to a maximum length of 250 . from 
Alberta based ser ers. Deadline: Mar 16 
Info ph: Nicholas M. 10.422.8174 or, www. 
arsquild ab.ca 


SICLAS 


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So 
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Contest Deadline: June 1, 2009 Spm. Smafler Than 
A Breadbox Deadline: Mon, ‘May 1. 2009 


MUSICIANS 


Blues man looking to form or oin rock ‘n’ blues band. 33 
yrds experience, singer/so! f, frontman, plays gui- 
tar, harmonica and dobro, Call 709.573.0444 or E; jim- 


Hardrock band seeks EXPERIENCED drummer, south- 
side jamspace. Have songs written, demo available. NO 
\TEURS, if you've never played in a band don’t call. 
Paul 780.233.4269 


Singer/songwriter looking to form or jain @ rock band. 
Infl: audioslave, velvet revolver, stained, seether, 3doors 
down, pearl jam. Please contact me at 


www.theloudhailers.com 


Extreme metal band looking for skilled bassist. Our style 
is Death/Black metal; infl: Morbid Angel, Beathemoth, 
Mayhem, Marduk, etc. Must have Pro Gear. 18 yrs+ 
renegade5445@yahoo.com 


Heavy metal project looking for guitarists, bassist, and 
p ig 


drummer for writing/recording. Infl. incl. GWAR, 
Ramstein, Lamb of God. Serious ing. only please. 
Spencer 780.962.7885 


Metal band looking for bass player. 
Call John at 780.920.3268 


Help support the Youth Emergency Shelter Society 


Programs for youth 
780.468.7070; yess.org 


my EXHIBITOR 
OPPORTUNITY 
1-877-560-6830, 


SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK 


WANTED: JAMMERS for open public monthly jai jam 

on the second Sunday of the month at 9119-1 
Ave. Rock, country & old time music. Ph. 
780.973.5593, randyglen®JumpUpDj.com 


VOLUNTEER 


Do you love the ARTS? Join us and be a part of North 


You don't have to change your life to change theirs! 
In.as little as one hour a week, you can make a dif- 
ference in the life of a child! Become a Big Brother, 
Big Sister or In-School Mentor today! Call Big 
Brothers Big Sisters at 780.424.8181 


Volunteer drivers and kitchen help urgently needed. If 
you're available weekdays, 10am-1pm call Meals on 


Dr's Appointment Buddy—Accompany new refugee 
immigrants to their medical appointments to give sup- 
port and assist with paperwork. Thu, 10:30am- 
2:30pm. Transportation not required. Leslie 
780.432.1137, ext 357 


is in full bloom with Daffodil Days: 
Canadian Cancer Society's fundraiser. Support the 
Canadian Cancer Society by purchasing daffodils 


for $5 a bunch or $8 a mini-pot. Preorders available 
until Mar 13, blooms arrive on Mar 31. For info call 
780.437.8414, E Carol CarolG@cancer.ab.ca 


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MARCH 27-29 2009 


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62 


a) 


VIUISWVEEIOLY —MARS-MARy{1. 2009, CLASSIFIEDS: 


“is 
OLUMIN 


ourse, it acci- 
vhether an accidental 
s during vaginal inter- 
tor vice versa, an acci- 
ation of the vagina during 
3@. Is there anything that can 
e to prevent weird vaginal conse- 
when this happens? Douche? If so 


ant Buddy-Accompany new refugee 
‘their medical appointments to give sup- 


UVER FOUNDATION is looking for 


lunteers for presentations and special 
Call Carmen at 780:444,1547 


S. Project Adult Literacy Society needs volun- 

work with adult students in the ESL English 

a Second Language Program. Call 780.424.5514 
~ Training and materials are provided 


Guerilla Gardening need volunteers to help plant 600 

sapling trees along baseline road. E theurbangreen- 

i il.com, T, 780.432.6181 for info. Facebook: 
hittp://edmontongg blogspot.com 


_ The Support Networkc Volunteer today to be a 
Distress Line Listener. Apply on line at: www.thesup- 
portnetwork.com or call 780.732.6648 


Break the Code! Help an adult to read and write. Call 
Jordan Centre for Family Literacy 780.421.7323 
www.famlit.ca 


Cross's Humanitarian Issues need 

jolunteers to help promote humanitarian issues to the 

dmonton Community. We are hoping to expand our 

youth team (12-24 yrs old). Contact Laura Keegan at 
3 laura. keegan@redcross.ca 


Senior's Birthday Entertainment 
Senior recreation/activity centre needs volunteer 
entertainers for monthly afternoon parties. 
Weekday message Karen 780.468.1985 seesa.ca 


if of our 


Fun and Inspiring 
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Public Outreach is offering great positions for anyone 
_ looking to gain valuable work experience in a fun and 
flexible environment. 


S part of an Outreach Team, you will engage in meaning- 
dialogue in order to promote sustainable funding on 
ct group of non profits. Our Teams enjoy 
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With flexible scheduling, excellent training, and scholar- 
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To apply, please send resume with cover letter 
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what kind would be best? 

Other question: my current SESP has a 
rather large penis (braggin’ again) with a 
downward bend. This makes vaginal inter- 
course doggy style amazing, but every other 
position from the front that we've tried is 
pretty painful, Any suggestions for positions 
that we may not have thought of that 
would benefit from this kink in the dink? 
LOVE, OUCHIE 


_ DEAR OUCH: 


Excellent bragging! And who could blame you? 

The anus/vagina question is eternal and 
vexing and probably (thankfully) somewhat 
blown out of proportion. There is of course 
a subset of women who have vaginas like 
the princess and the pea, except the pea is 
anything and everything that could possibly 
cause a vaginal infection, and the princess 
is a vagina. So, many or, really, most vagi- 
nas simply aren't that delicate. You should 
try to avoid cross-contamination, of course, 


The CRC is seeking energetic, caring, committed vol- 


unteers to become Prevention Educators for its 
RespectED: Violence and Abuse Prevention Program. 
Canadian Red Cross/RespectED Training Program 
begins fall 2008. www,redcrass.ca/enar, Education 
4 Coordinator: 780.702.4158 / E: 
edmonton.respected@redcross.ca 


Elder Abuse Victim Advocate—Assist, provide tele- 


phone support. Mature volunteers, 35+, with calm 
Manner and excellent communication skills wanted. 
Volunteers receive intensive training and support. 
Commitment Two 2 hr shifts/month, plus attendance 
at monthly staff meeting. Daytime Mon, Tue, or Thu 
8am-5pm. Leslie 780.432.1137, ext 357 


Volunteer for your local Red Cross. Help us make our 


mission of assisting the most vulnerable in our com- 
munity and around the world possible. Volunteer for 
Red Cross. To volunteer call 780.423.2680 / E: wz- 
* edm-dm@redcross.ca 


Volunteers Needed to work with new immigrants in a 


variety of tasks and with some great fun events and 
outings! Many exciting shifts available! Call Judy 
780.424.3545, ext 249 


Risa Up: Radio Free Edmonton on CJSR FM 88 


seeking people with a critical ear who will be at 
protests, picket-lines, blockades, any sites of struggle 
between people, corporations or governments to sim- 
ply bring a recorder and send us the footage. E: rise- 
upradio@cjsr.com; Samy Power, 780.492.2577 ext. 4 


Had Enough? Cocaine Anonymous 780.425.2715 


py whip and dung 


but as long as you stick with the front-to- 
back wipe and other basic common-sensi- 
cal hygienic measures, honestly, you'll be 


- fine. Has anything bad happened yet? How 


long have you been back-to-fronting with 
this wow-that's-young-but-hey-good-for-you 
hot guy, anyway? 

The accidental brushing-up-against | 
imagine must happen in so many acts of 
intercourse that if it were a likely route 
to infection we'd all be ... well, eww. 
There’s no funny, clever way to describe 
the state of suffering from bacterial 
vaginosis. 

Your other accidental exposure, the “it 
just slipped in” part, though: really? This | 
don't think I've ever even heard before, that 
he'd be going about his anal business and 
accidentally perform vaginal intromission 
now and then. That doesn’t sound like such 
a great idea (although, again, have you had 
any problems?) but | think it could be avoid- 
ed. Ask him to pay attention! Maybe he 


SERVICES 


SACE-Public Education Program: Sexual 
Assault Centre of Edmonton (www.sace.ab.ca) pro- 


vides crisis intervention, information, counseling, 
public education services. For a customized pres- 
entation T; 780.423.4102/F: 780.421.8734/E: 
info@sace.ab.ca; www.sace.ab.ca/24 Hour Crisis 
Line: 780.423.4121 


Ames an International Medical Graduate 


ing licensure? The Alberta International 
Medical Graduates Association is here to help. 
Support, study groups, volunteer opportunities—all 
while creating change for tomorrow. www.aimga.ca 


could use a hand as a sort of vestibule- 
guard {a doorman, if you will), or you could. 


Maybe one of you could adjust an angle to. 
make it less likely. Maybe you could, | 


dunno, insert a small device to block the 
entrance, which could be fun, anyway? 

My best advice after “don’t do that,” 
though, is just to keep everything clean. 
Wash before (not douche, just wash). Wash 
after. Pee a lot. Cleanliness is next to, well, 
possibly not godliness in this case, but cer- 
tainly UTl-lessness. If you don't believe me, 


* you can ask a porn star. | was looking 


around for one to quote on this and found 
one | happen to know personally {although 
fot that personally), being interviewed at 
my very own home paper. It’s Lorelei Lee, in 
the Bay Guardian's sex blog 
(sfbg.com/blogs/sexsf/2009/02/ask_a_por 
n_star.html): “Most performers shower 
immediately after every shoot,” says 
Lorelei. “We are probably some of the 
cleanest people you know. That said, some- 
times we do get UTIs or yeast infections or 
BY, in which case we go to the doctor like 
everyone else. Not too sexy, but not the end 
of the world either.” 


So there you have it. Take a shower 
Take two. 

Now, about your bendy guy. That's really 
funny, since people who talk about womex: 
sexual anatomy and response (that would Be 
me) are forever pointing out that you can 
have things stuck up there all your life and 
never have an orgasm from it because that 
Spot, you know the one, just doesn’t get 
enough attention unless the penetrative 
device has a bend in it. Fingers (crooked) 
work. Purpose-made toys work. That thing 
Most obviously intended for penetrative pur- 
poses, though, that just doesn’t work. Except 
when it does! You're having the time of your 
life? Isn't that good enough? I'm sorry, bay 
there really is no other fix. Your fella’s may 
bend, but it doesn’t want to bend back. You 
don't want to be responsible for what could 
happen if you try to bend it back. So | think 
you're going to have to count your blessings 
and stick with what works. At least, in your 
Case, it works very well indeed, and that is 

so much better than it works for so many 
other couples that all | can say is keep that 
guy; you'd miss him 

LOVE. ANDREA 


Canadian Mental Health Association, 


www.cmha-edmonton.ab.ca Education Program 
is pleased to offer workshops to give you the skills 
to intervene with people who may be at risk for 
suicide. Follow the links to ASIST or call 
780.414.6300 


Have you been affected by another person's 
sexual wiowr? S-Anon is a 12-Step fellowship 
for family members and friends of sex addicts. Ph 
780.988.4411 for meeting locations and info, or visit 
WWW.sanon.org 


‘4s suo OUT OM 


Edmonton 78 


LOCAL CHAT. CALL FREE: code 2815 


ADULT 


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11910 127 Ave main floor 
A small place for a big deal 
780.452.7440 


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NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Help Line 
24 Hours a Day—7 Days a Week 

If you want to stop using, 

Local: 780.421.4429 

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Other cities 


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Time to change the law 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweakly.com 

n the grand scheme of things there’s really not a “good” way to die, but if 
[= had to generate a list of decidedly bad ways to go, being smothered to 

death by grain certainly deserves to be somewhere near the top. 

Such was the fate of 35-year-old farm labourer Kevan Chandler, who died in June 
2006 while cleaning out a grain silo on a farm near High River. As horrific as Chan- 
dler’s death was, it was all the more tragic because it likely could have easily been 
avoided. The fatality report into the incident, which was released at the end of Janu- 
ary, made a number of what one hopes would be self-evident recommendations, 
including that another worker should be present in case anything goes wrong in simi- 
lar situations and that hazard assessments should be completed so farm workers are 
suitably informed about potentially dangerous situations before they begin work. 

But the key recommendation stemming from the inquiry into Chandler's 
death is that the province’s outdated Occupational Health and Safety Act 
should be amended to cover paid farm employees, who are currently excluded 
from practically all provincial labour and health and safety legislation. 

It's a common sense move that all but two provincial govemments in Canada 
have already taken. and one which labour and farm worker organizations have 
been calling on the government to make for years, making the self-evident point 
that today’s industrialized factory farms are workplaces like any other. 

The death toll of farm workers in the province is truly staggering. Figures 
released this week by the provincial government indicate that 19 people, 
including five children, died on farms last year, a 58 per cent increase over 
2007, matching the average number of people killed on farms annually for 
more than a decade. More than 1000 farm workers are also injured each year. 

In the past week first the NDP and later the Liberals called on the govern- 
ment to include farm workers under provincial health and safety legislation. 
The government's response to this long-standing problem is to continue to 
consult with “farm organizations” and wait for a report on those consultations 
to the legislature. Given how many and for how long workers have been dying 
in Alberta’s fields, it’s high time the government stopped talking and started 
acting. It’s time to change the law. w 


Issue No 699 / Mar 12 - Mar 18, 2009 / Available at over 1400 locations 


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REVIEW EXCEEDS AT BEING OFFENSIVE 


Sarah Hamilton's review of Joscelyn Gar- 
diner’s exhibit Missionary Position ("Bad 
sex,” Feb 12 - Feb 18, 2009) exceeds 
being offensive. Gardiner’s exhibit deals 
with a horrific history of enslavement, 
violence, oppression, sexual abuse and 
the dehumanization of these slaves. To 
compare this subject matter to “contem- 
porary sexual politics,” and “bad sex” is 
both trite and offensive. 

What a privileged position Hamilton 
must be in to say that a strictly post- 
colonial and feminist reading is unre- 
warding. To say that Thistlewood Is 
captivated by the abuse he subjects his 
slaves to makes one wonder whether 
Hamilton actually read the accompany- 
ing texts. The show is not about Thistle- 
wood's sexual indulgences that help him 
get through the confinements he was 
subject to (aww, the poor fellow), but 
rather about the women who have lost 
all-semblance of identity through the 
daily detached, ritualized abuse enacted 
on them by Thistlewood. By portraying 
Thistlewood as an anti-hero, Hamilton is 
making excuses for rape culture. 

Is Hamilton seriously comparing his 
detached (not captivated) accaunts of 


Pad Bln, Jost Brau, Rob Gry Car Conrati, eson Fstx Gwyn DyeuBian Gibson, > 10800104 Street 
Hart Golbeck, Tamara Gorzalk, James Grasdil, Sareh Hamiton, Jan Hostyn, Whitey Houston, «4. ABTSJ.1L7 
Connie Howard, Maria Kotuvych, Keith Liggett, Andrea Nemerson, Carlyn Nikodym, Stephen 
Notley, Mary Christa O'Keefe, Roland Pemberton, TB Playes, Steven Sandor, Adam Smith, James 
Stewart Adam Waldron-Biain, David Young, Daren Zenko 
PAINTING THE EDMONTON SUN 
DISTRIBUTION Clark Distribution, Barrett DeLaBarre, Alan Ching, Audit Bureau of Greulations 
Raul Gurdian, Dale Steink, Bob Filey Maly Yrs cae 
——_— moe i 1s SSS SSE ae a oe SSS RE a =4 53.2 & ——_— 

4 if VASES WUISBIGUS MARR: MARR, 20081) 


abuse to “how few people speak kindly 
of their lovers when they are not around 
in contemporary life.” Lovers? And how 
about this little nugget dropped by 


Hamilton: “What if we were to be 
judged publicly based on our private cor- 
respondences? How would our private 
thoughts measure up to public scrutiny 
three centuries from now?” Sarah, | 
don’t know what crowd you are having 
“bad sex” with, but please note that 
these diary entries are not “shoddy erot- 
ica," and | hope that three centuries 
from now rape and enslavement is not 
perceived as any norm of sexual rela- 
tions. The diary is a daily account of the 
sexual abuse of enslaved women. | seri- 
ously doubt you have any personal point 
of reference here. 

What is.wrong with this reviewer? 
Did she not read the artist statement? 
Perhaps you could ask your art reviewer 
to spend less time on trying to be clever 
and step outside her limited realm of 
experience to evaluate what the artist is 
trying to convey. This review exceeds at 
being offensive and moves into a place 
of chosen arrogant ignorance. 

C BARRY 


SOMETHING'S PHISHY : 


| told my wife, after going out for dinner 
and seeing a movie, what | felt like 
doing to this week's rag (Vue Weekly, 
Mar 5 - Mar 11, 2009): tag(ging) it, 
bag(ging) it, sell{ing) it to the butcher in. 


the store. But my friend Wilson came 
over, looking for his long lost love, Suzie 
Greenberg. | told him to peel off my 
socks if he wants to. He told me to 
Jiboo—and keep on drinking too. BAD 
IDEA: the boss needs a sample in a jar. 
Ahh, to be Prince Caspian on the waves. 
Thanks for wasting your time with 
me. Here's to reunions and free down- 
loads! Maybe even a Canadian show in 
the future too! [washyourfaceand- 
drivemetovalencia ... ] 
SEAN ATKINS 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
whether critical or complimentary. Send 
your opinion by mail Nue Weekly, 10303 
- 108 Street, Edmonton AB T5J 117), by 
fax (780.426.2889) or by email (let- 
ters@vueweekly.com). Preference is 
given to feedback about articles in Vue 
Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for 
length and clarity. 


CORRECTION 


Last week's article on worker retraining 
("I'd like to hear my options, so | can 
“weigh them,” Mar - Mar 11, 2009) mis- 
takenly stated that GE “is currently look- 
ing to see if something s similar can be set 
~up for in other provinces of the country, 
where some other GE call centres ze 


also facing the prospect of layoffs.” The 
article should have read that | ey had 
previously done so. We apologi: for any 
confusion this may have caused. 


a palpable sense 
nsion developing within 
nternational Criminal 
u >), On account of the March 
4 decision taken by several of its 
judges to issue the court's first arrest 
warrant for a sitting head of state. 
Official "Wanted” posters bearing 
Sudanese President Omar Hassan al- 
Bashir’s face will soon be tacked to 
the walls of many an ICC intern’s 
office, but in the meantime, everyone 
is scrambling to manage the sudden 
influx of attention that the ICC has 
received from around the world. 

Criticism is rife, with many ques- 
tioning why the ICC has elected to 
indict yet another African, and why 
nothing has been done to address the 
seemingly obvious crimes that were 
committed in Gaza during the recent 
Israeli bombardment. Perhaps the 
most salient fear is that the warrant 
will do nothing but embolden al-Bashir 
and cripple ongoing efforts at cultivat- 
ing peace in Darfur, a concern which 
illustrates the age-old tension between 
peace and justice and illustrates the 
complexities facing the nascent court. 

As the ICC itself puts it, “the Inter- 
national Criminal Court, governed by 
the Rome Statute, is the first perma- 
nent, treaty-based international crimi- 
nal court established to help end 
impunity for the perpetrators of the 
most serious crimes of concern to the 
international community.” 

Unlike other criminal tribunals of 
the past, such as the post-World War 
il Nuremburg Trials and the Interna- 
tional Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, 
the ICC has broad jurisdiction over 
crimes committed in any of the 108 
signatory party nations to the Rome 
Statute, which came into effect on July 
1, 2002 (meaning any crime commit- 
ted previously is inadmissable before 
the court), 

Under the Rome Statute, the ICC 
has the power to investigate and try 
three categories of crime: crimes 
against humanity (murder, extermina- 
tion, enslavement, forcible deporta- 
tion of a population, imprisonment 
that is in violation of international 
law, torture, fape and/or sexual slav- 
ery, persecution, enforced disappear- 
ance, apartheid, and other inhumane 
acts), war crimes (including grave 
breaches of the Geneva Conventions, 
the targeting of civilians and the use 


<ICC 


of child soldiers) and genocide. A 
fourth category of crimes, called 
“crimes of aggression,” is not yet 
included in the Rome Statute but is 
expected to be defined by a review 
conference in 2010. 


AS OF MARCH 4, 2009, the icc was 


investigating four situations, in the 
Democratic Republic of Congo, Cen- 
tral African Republic, Uganda and 
Sudan. These investigations have led 
to the indictment of 13 individuals 
(two of whom are now dead), includ- 
ing Thomas Lubanga Dyilo of DR 
Congo. Lubanga’s case is the first to 
have gone to trial at the ICC, and pro- 
ceedings began in January. The 
alleged founder of the Union des 
Patriotes Congolais and of the Forces 
Patriotiques pour la Libération du 
Congo, Lubanga has been accused of 
enlisting and conscripting children 
under the age of 15 to fuel warfare in 
the Ituri district of DR Congo. 

Ihad the great fortune of being able 
to attend the first three days of this 


historic trial, during which opening 
statements were made by the prose- 
cution, the victims representatives 
and the defence. On the third day, the 
first witness was brought to the 
stand—a young Congolese boy who 
spent the morning detailing how he 
had been abducted by Lubanga’s 
forces and forced to relocate to a 
rebel training camp deep in the 
forests of Ituri. That same afternoon, 
following the noon recess, the wit- 
ness attempted to retract everything 
that he had previously said, claiming 
that a western NGO operating in East- 
ern Congo had convinced him to lie 
about his status as a child soldier. 

The trial quickly moved into closed 
session to sort out the witness's sud- 
den about-face, and it is now believed 
that the individual was so intimidated 
by Lubanga’s presence that he felt 
obliged to retract his initial testimony. 
Indeed, when the boy began to tell a 
different story in the afternoon, 
Lubanga was seen to ease back in his 
chair and laugh. 

All of the ICC's other cases are in 
various stages of pre-trial arrange- 
ments. For example, the case of Jean- 
Pierre Bemba Gombo, the alleged 


president of the Mouvement de la 
Libération du Congo, who is accused 
of committing various war crimes and 
crimes against humanity in Central 
African Republic just moved in January 
through the confirmation of charges 
stage. During this process, the prose- 
cution was obliged to demonstrate to 
the case’s three judges that sufficient 
evidence had been collected to pro- 
ceed with an actual trial. 

Other indictees, such as Bosco 
“Terminator” Ntaganda-of Eastern 
Congo, Joseph Kony of Uganda and 
al-Bashir of Sudan, are still at large in 
Africa. This fact raises the interesting 
question of how the ICC—which 
maintains no standing police force— 
manages to apprehend its alleged 
criminals. Indeed, despite each of 
these countries, with the exception of 
Sudan, being signatory members of 
the Rome Statute—which obliges its 
parties to do everything within their 
power to apprehend indicted nation- 
als—many nations are either unable, 
due to a lack of centralized govern- 
ment influence, or unwilling to extra- 
dite the accused to ICC headquarters 
in the Netherlands. 

The five indictees who currently 


reside at the ICC prison in the Hague 
have either been captured by host gov- 
€rnments (as was the case for Luban- 
ga, who was apprehended by the 
Congolese military in March 2007) or 
arrested by other governments when 
an indictee happens to be traveling 
through its jurisdiction (as was the 
case for Bemba, who was apprehend- 
ed in Belgium in May 2008). It is, after 
all, within the power and responsibility 
of any signatory party, such as Bel- 
gium, to carry out arrests on behalf of 
the ICC whenever an indictee is identi- 
fied within its borders. 

In light of all this, al-Bashir will 
almost certainly refuse to hand him- 
self over to the court—he has been 
quoted as having said that the ICC 
could “eat” its indictment—and will 
therefore face trial in the Hague only 
if he happens to be toppled in a coup 
or if he is apprehended while travel- 
ling abroad. 


ANOTHER CONTROVERSIAL aspect of 


the ICC relates to its apparent pen- 
chant for indicting Africans, to the 
exclusion of any other group of peo- 
ple. It should be noted, however, that 
in three of the four situations that the 
ICC is currently investigating—DR 
Congo, Central African Republic and 
Uganda—the court was invited by the 
countries themselves to assess the 
nature and scale of crimes committed 
within their borders. Only in the 
instance of Sudan was the court 
empowered to investigate on the 
basis of a ruling issued by the UN 
Security Council. While it is true that 
the ICC’s chief prosecutor, Luis 
Moreno-Ocampo, has the power to 
initiate his own investigation, this 
power has never been utilized. 

In this light, the ICC should not be 
blamed for exclusively investigating 
African cases. If anything, it is the 
interest of African nations themselves 
in seeking justice, as well as the 
authority of the UN Security Council, 
that has directed the court's activities 

Many people also question why the 
ICC has been hesitant to investigate 
individuals such as former US presi- 
dent George W Bush, former US sec- 
retary of defense Donald Rumsfeld 
and the various military masterminds 
behind Israel's recent conflict with 
Gaza. The simple explanation is that 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 


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Issues is a forum for individuals and organizations 
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‘of importanée to the community, Their commentary 
isnot necessarily the opinion of the organizations 

‘they represent of of Vie Weekly 


Royalty breaks not the solution 


Investment in health, education would stimulate 
much more than handing billions to the oil industry 


RICARDO ACUNA / walberta.ca/parkland 

\t doesn't seem to matter what the ques- 
tion is these days, because the Alberta 
government only seems to have one 
answer—whatever the problem, the 
solution is the same: cut royalties. 

For someone whose job it is to com- 
ment on public policy in Alberta this can 
be quite frustrating; whenever | think I've 
written my last column on royalties, the 
government goes and makes another 
change and | feel compelled to write 
about royalties once again. 

The problem the government is dealing 
with this time is the collapse of global 
neoliberalism and the subsequent impact 
this has had in Alberta. 

The latest projections from the Confer- 
ence Board of Canada are that Alberta's 
economy is expected to shrink by 0.5 per 
cent this year. After leading the country in 
economic growth for the better part of 
the last decade, 2009 will see Alberta 
near the bottom of the pack. It will be the 
first negative growth the province has 
seen in almost 25 years. 

The collapse of global oil and gas 
prices has also meant that the industry 
has put all new drilling and expansion 
plans on hold. The Canadian Association 
of Oilwell Drilling Contractors is now pre- 
dicting that there will be 33 per cent 
fewer wells drilled in 2009 than in 2008. 
Likewise, major refinery, upgrader and 
tarsands expansion plans have been 
indefinitely put on hold. The Canadian 
Association of Petroleum Producers is 
predicting a 50 per cent drop in 2009 in 
investment in non-conventional oil. 

The Alberta economy has shed over 
25 000 jobs since November, which, 
although it is a misleading statistic since 
it doesn’t account for the number of well- 
paying full-time jobs that have been 
replaced by entry level part-time service 
sector jobs, is alarming in a province that 
a year ago was trying to deal with a sup- 
posed shortage of skilled labour. 

The greatest impact, of course, is in 
construction. Alberta's recent oil and gas 
boom was essentially a construction 
boom. The jobs created were not, for the 
most part, long-term operating and main- 
tenance jobs, but rather short-term jobs 
building new industry infrastructure and 
expanding existing projects. Given the 
significant slowdown in new projects and 
expansions, these are the jobs that are 
disappearing. 

Add to that the collapse of the residen- 
tial housing market—the other key suppli- 
er of construction industry jobs—and you 
get a sense at the extent of the crisis 
which, frankly, is just beginning in Alberta. 

When people don’t have jobs, they 
don't have money. When they don’t have 
money, they don’t spend:money. When 
they don’t spend money, the economy 


shrinks. And when the economy shrinks, 
industry puts more people out of work, 
which starts the cycle again. It's a ridicu- 
lously flawed economic system, but until 
Albertans mobilize to-replace it, it’s the 
only one we've got. 


$0, FACED WITH this economic spiral and 
the potential of tens of thousands of 
Albertans losing their jobs in the next year, 
Ed Stelmach and his provincial government 
have decided to take action to stimulate 
the economy and create new jobs. 

The action? Energy Minister Mel 
Knight announced last week a new royal- 
ty holiday for companies embarking on 
new drilling projects this year. The cost of 
this new royalty holiday to the provincial 
treasury? An estimated $1.51 billion. 

That, of course, is in addition to the 
$1.2 billion royalty break announced last 
April, and the further $1.8 billion 
announced in November. That makes a 
total of $4.5 billion the government will be 
handing out to the oil and gas industry by 
way of royalty breaks in an attempt to re- 
stimulate the economy and create jobs. 
And that's before you factor in’ the $2 bil- 
lion investment in carbon capture and stor- 
age, and the sweet royalty deals given to 
Suncor and Syncrude as part of the imple- 
mentation of the “new” royalty regime. 

Will it work? Sadly, according to fig- 
ures and projections from both govern- 
ment and industry, the answer Is a 
fesounding “no.” 

The main problem small and mid-sized 
drilling companies are having today is in 
being able to secure financing for new 
projects. Offering a royalty break does 
absolutely nothing to provide these com- 
panies with the cash up front they need 
to dig the holes in the first place. The 
result will be that there will be little to no 
new drilling as a result of this giveaway. 

Even if it were to generate new 
drilling, however, in terms of “bang for 
the buck” there are much better ways this 


money could be invested. According to 
the government's own formulas oil and 
gas extraction has one of the lowest jobs 
created per dollar invested ratios of any 
sector in the economy. 

According to these government mod 
els, for example, every dollar invested in 
health care will generate almost seven 
times as many jobs as the same dollar 
invested in oil and gas extraction. Educa- 
tion creates 5.5 times as many jobs per 
dollar, and investment in transit and mass 
ground transportation a whopping 49.4 
times as many jobs. 

The models also measure impact of 
investment on GDP (the economy) and 
show that investment in health care gen- 
erates a similar impact on the economy 
as drilling while generating more jobs 
and investment in education actually gen- 
erates a greater impact on GDP and deliv- 
ers more jobs. 

The only thing that investing these bil- 
lions in the oil industry will accomplish is to 
continue the Conservative legacy of making 
our economy more dependent on the fate of 
the oil and gas industry, which is what got 
us into this mess in the first place. 

At the same time, the government has 
hinted that the upcoming provincial budg- 
et will include cuts to planned infrastruc- 
ture in both health care and education 
and will likely also include cuts to core 
funding in those areas. 

If ever there was a time for the provin- 
cial government to stop trying to find ways 
to pad the pockets of their friends in the oll 
and gas industry, and actually implement 
policies which will contribute to the long- 
term well-being of Albertans at large and 
their province, this is it. Sadly, it looks as 
though, once again, our interests come 
second in the eyes of the government. v 


Ricardo Acufia is executive director of the 
Parkland Institute, a non-partisan public 
policy research institute housed at the 
University of Alberta. 


FRONT 


Peace now 
Canadian doc a timely reminder of the 
still-present threat of nuclear weapons 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 

th so many things to 

worry about these days, 

from the deepening global 
recession to the increasingly dire 
issue of climate change, most people 
could be forgiven for not spending 
too much time fretting about that 
Cold War-era standby preoccupation 
of impending nuclear annihilation. 
With the Soviet Union long gone and 
Ronald Reagan safely underground, 
the threat of nuclear war seems to 
have been relegated to the same 
dusty pile as the air raid siren and 
duck-and-cover newsreels. 

Bul On occasion there's an event 
that jars us out of the collective 
comfort which lets us all forget 
that there remain an estimated 
27 000 nuclear weapons spread 
around the world. The threat of a 
non-existent nuclear program was 
one of the pretexts for the US inva- 
sion of Iraq, and claims that Iran 
has ambitions to join the nuclear 
club have resulted in no shortage 
of sabre-rattling. Most recently it 
was the revelation that in February 
two nuclear missile-carrying sub- 
marines, one British and one 
French, had somehow managed to 
collide in the North Atlantic, offer- 
ing a cogent reminder that not only 
do these weapons remain, but that 
many remain active, pointed at one 
another and waiting for the order 
to launch. 

it's this still-present threat posed by 
nuclear weapons that makes the new 
National Film Board documentary 
The Strangest Dream, being 
released March 15 in Edmonton as 
part of a national run of screenings, 
such a timely reledse. 


SUN, MAR 15 (2 PM) 


THE STRANGEST DREAM 
DIRECTED BY ERI BEONARSK 

METRO CINEMA (878 101A AVE FREE 
FOLLOWED BYADISCUSSION WITH 
DOUGLAS ROCHE 


PREVUE 


THE FILM chronicles the remarkable 
life of Joseph Rotblat, a brilliant Polish 
physicist who became the only scien- 
tist to walk away from participation in 
the Manhattan Project, removing him- 
self in 1944 on moral grounds from 
the quest to create the world’s first 
weapon of mass destruction when it 
became apparent that Nazi Germany 
was no longer actively working on 
developing its own atomic bomb. 

Rotblat went on to become one of 
the most important figures in the 
international movement against 
nuclear proliferation, in 1957 co- 
founding with Bertrand Russell the 
influential Pugwash Conferences on 
Science and World Affairs—named 
for the small Nova Scotia town 
which hosted the first gathering—to 
bring together scientists, scholars 
and public figures for discussions 
about the dangers of nuclear prolif- 
eration and steps to reduce the 
threat of global conflict. 

While far from a household name— 
in part because their annual gather- 
ings exclude the media and never 
attribute any statements to the indi- 
viduals involved in order to encour- 
age honest dialogue—the Pugwash 
Conferences nevertheless had a sig- 
nificant impact on non-proliferation 
advances, including the permanent 
Washington-Moscow hotline and the 
idea of a ban on nuclear testing, 
which was first discussed at a 1963 


ON LAWFUL LAWLESSNESS: CLEMENCY 
IN DEATH PENALTY CASES 


PROFESSOR AUSTIN SARAT 
WILLIAM NELSON CROMWELL PROFESSOR OF 
JURISPRUDENCE AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
AMHERST COLLEGE 


FRIDAY, MARCH 20 
4:00 - 5:30 P.M. 
ROOM 237 LAW CENTRE 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 


Free and open to the public - 
Light refreshments will be provided 


. Sponsored by the Centre for Constitutional Studies, 
the Department of Political Science, and the Department of Sociology 


CENTRE for CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES 
Centre d'études constitutionnelles 
www. law. ualberta.ca/centres/ccs 


meeting chaired by Rotblat. In recog- 
nition of their decades of effort, Rot- 
blat and the Pugwash Conferences 
were jointly awarded the 1995 Nobel 


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Pressing the reset button 


New Obama administration means the 
tide has turned in US-Russia relations 


g | DYER STRAIGHT 


. gwynne@vueweekly.com 


Over the past year the United States and Russia 
have been drifting into a hostile relationship, driven 
by the US decision to install anti-missile defences in 
eastern Europe, the war in Georgia last August and 
the recent fiasco over Russian natural gas supplies 
to Europe. There was nervous chatter about a new 
Cold War, but last month US Vice-President Joe 
Biden said that the Obama administration was going 
to “press the reset button” in its relations with Rus- 
sia. Now it has done it. 

At the NATO summit on March §, the alliance 
agreed to resume high-level contacts with Moscow 
in the NATO-Russia Council, which were suspended 
after the Georgian war. The following day, US Secre- 
tary of State Hillary Clinton met Russian Foreign 
Minister Sergei Lavrov in Brussels and gave him a 
mock reset button. 

“There was a rather con- 
frontational approach 


the past quarter-century. The sole practical result of 
the program, over the whole of its existence, has been 
to pour money into the pockets of American defence 
contractors. But the Russians are too paranoid to 
accept that, and the. program has such strong support 
in Congress that the Obama administration is merely 
“reviewing” it, rather than cancelling it outright. 

As for the war in Georgia last August, it was 
Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvili who started 
it, not the Russians. They responded violently to 
Georgia's attempt to conquer South Ossetia in a sur- 
prise offensive, but they did not stay long in Georgia 
itself, nor did they seize the capital, Tbilisi, although 
the road was wide open. 

Hillary Clinton still insists that the door is open to 
Georgian membership in NATO, but that would simply 
tum it into a two-class alliance..Regardless of what 
promises they made, NATO countries would never 
really fight a war with Russia on Georgia's behalf. 

{t's the same with the quarrel between Russia and 
Ukraine over the price of gas that left half of eastern 
Europe freezing in their homes last December. There 

was incompetence and 
bloody-mindedness 
aplenty on both sides, 


towards Russia in the | but it wasn’t part of 
prior administration,” she There was incompetence some Russian master- 
explained. 4 plan for world domina- 
The notion of a new . tion. So it is high time to 
Cold War was pretty silly and bloody-mindedness reset the relationship. 


anyway, since Russia, 
unlike the old Soviet 
Union, is not a “peer com- 
petitor” to the United 
States. It has only half 
America’s population, its 
former industrial base has 
largely evaporated, and 
the only areas in which it 
is technologically compet- 
itive with the rest of the 
developed world are 
defence and space. Even 
if there were a NATO- 
Russian confrontation, it 
would be a little local dif- 
ficulty, not a world-span- 
ning Cold War. 

None of the disputes 
and misunderstandings 
between Washington and Moscow came from a hos- 
tile intent on either side. Take the anti-ballistic missile 
(ABM) defences being built in Poland and the Czech 
Republic. The Bush administration said that the inter- 
ceptor missiles and radars of the system were there 
to intercept nuclear-tipped long-range missiles fired 
by Iran, and expected the Russians to believe it. 

Unsurprisingly, the Russians didn’t believe it, because 
Iran has neither missiles capable of reaching the United 
States nor any nuclear warheads to put on them. So 
Moscow thought the ABM system was really intended 
to shoot down Russian missiles and thus undermine the 
country’s ability to deter the United States. 

Russia worked itself into such a lather about the 
ABM missiles that President Dmitry Medvedev 
announced on the day after Barack Obama's election 
victory last November that short-range Russian mis- 
siles would be installed in Kaliningrad, a Russian 
enclave on the Polish border, to destroy those Ameri- 
can bases on short notice. But the ABM missiles are 
in the wrong place to intercept Russian ICBMs, and 
they don’t really work anyway. 


THEY HAVE NEVER worked properly, despite tens of 
billions of dollars poured into the ABM project (aka 
“Star Wars,” National Missile Defence, etc) during 


WUWEWEEILY, ... MAR 12- MAR 18,2008 


( yARONT 


aplenty on both sides, but it 

wasn’t part of some Russian 
master-plan for world 

domination. So it is high time 


to reset the relationship. 


There are belligerent 
minor players on both 
sides, but the Obama 
administration seems 
to have sent out orders 
to squelch them. Last 
week, for example, a 
couple of Russian 
bombers flew to within 
a couple of hundred 
kilometres of Canada’s 
Arctic coast, a mere 
5000 kilometres from 
the Canadian capital. 

Canada scrambled 
fighters to “send a 
strong signal that they 
should back off and 
stay out of our air- 
space,” according to 
Defence Minister Peter McKay, and Prime Minis- 
ter Stephen Harper sternly declared that Canada 
would not be intimidated. “This government has 
responded every time the Russians have done 
that,” he said. “We will defend our airspace.” But 
the Russians were not in Canada’s airspace. 

"The Russians have conducted themselves profes- 
sionally,” responded General Gene Renuart, the 
American officer who commands NORAD, the Cane- 
da-US air defence alliance, in an implicit rebuke to 
the sabre-rattling Canadians. “They have maintained 
compliance with the international rules of airspace 
compliance and have not entered the internal air- 
space of either country,” 

That is probably just what the Obama administra- 
tion wants from Russia: a professional relationship 
between two grown-up countries that know and 
respect the rules. For a start, Hillary Clinton and 
Sergei Lavrov committed the two countries to nego- 
tiate a new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) 
by the end of the year, but more will follow. The tide 
has turned. w 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based independent jou'- 


nalist whose articles are published in 45 countries. 
His column appears each week in Vue Weekly. 


| 
: 
! 


id Youth Services Minister 
ik has ordered a special 
nto the recent case of a 


t sage ‘ 
21 eM 

Alberta’ foster care system, 

t ouncement a small vic- 


ment review will never 


it will be public,” Notley said. 
start.” 
October Notley released a 


pot of confidential quarterly reports - 


by the province's child and youth 
gavtesic obtained through a freedom 
of information request which detailed 
ongoing abuses in the foster-care sys- 
tem and found that some children 
were being left in unsafe placements 
due to a lack of other options. 


BACK TO THE TAP 

The Federation of Canadian Munici- 
palities (FCM) at a March 7 meeting in 
Victoria passed a non-binding resolu- 
tion calling on municipalities to 
“phase out the sale and purchase of 


bottled water at their own facilities 


_ where appropriate and where potable 


water is available.” The resolution, 
which pointed out that three litres of 
water are required to manufacture a 


-one-litre bottle and that 40 to 80 per 


cent of bottles are not recycled, also 
encouraged FCM members to develop 
awareness campaigns “about the pos- 
itive benefits and quality of municipal 


* water supplies.” 


Council of Canadians National 
Chairperson Maude Barlow, who is 
also special advisor on water to the 
president of the United Nations Gen- 
eral Assembly, hailed the move. 

“The FCM’s new policy opposing 
bottled water is a decisive victory for 
public water,” Barlow said. "This reso- 
lution sends an important message to 
the rest of the world about the leader- 
ship of Canadian municipalities in 
reclaiming water as a public 
resource.” 

Initiatives to phase out the sale of 
bottled water at city facilities already 
exist in 27 Canadian municipalities, 
but Edmonton is not on the list and 
has no plans for such a move. 


MAINSTREAM MEDIA DEATH WATCH 


More bad news emerged this week 
on the struggling Canadian main- 


stream media landscape, with both 
CTVglobemedia and CanWest 
announcing moves in the face of 
declining revenues. 

CTV announced March 10 it is lay- 
ing off at least 24 employees who 
work on its Canada AM morning 
show across the country and is can- 
celling its only remaining early morn- 
ing local newscast, First News in 
Montréal. The move follows the 
announcement last month that the 
company was slashing 118’jobs at its 
A Channel stations and cancelling a 
number of local news programs. 

A day earlier CanWest, which is 
teetering on the brink of bankrupt- 
cy, announced it has sold the US 
magazine The New Republic to for- 
mer owner Marty Peretz, from 
whom CanWest purchased the 
magazine in 2007. Canwest Presi- 
dent and CEO Leonard Asper said 
in a release the sale of the “non- 
core” US publication was part of 
CanWest's “on-going efforts to 
improve our balance sheet.” 


CULLIS-SUZUKI TO SPEAK AT U OF A 
Environmental activist Severn Cullis- 
Suzuki will deliver the keynote 
address at the Sierra Youth Coalition 
Sustainable Campuses Conference, 
being held this weekend at the U of 
A. The public speech, which is free 
with a Food Bank donation, takes 
place on Saturday, March 14 at 5 pm 
in the Engineering Teaching and 
Learning Centre (ETLC) room 1-001 
on the U of A campus. —SCOTT HARRIS / 
Scott@vueweekly.com 


et 


both the United States and Israel (and 
by extension, the Occupied Palestin- 
jan Territories and Hamas) are not 
party to the Rome Statues, meaning 
no country, nor Moreno-Ocampo, has 
the power to force an ICC investiga- 
tion in these countries. While the UN 
Security Council could request pro- 
ceedings, in light of the extreme 
power that both the US and Israel 
wield in the United Nations, such a 
request is unlikely to occur. 


BUT PERHAPS the biggest and most 
existential question posed by the pres- 
ence of the ICC is the extent to which 
its fight against impunity should take 
precedence over the pursuit of peace. 
This dynamic is perhaps best exempli- 
fied by the ICC’s activities in Norther 
Uganda, where war between the brutal 
Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the 
often dismissive government of Ugan- 
da has raged for 23 years. 

The ICC has indicted five members 
of the LRA, including its alleged 
leader Joseph Kony, for various war 
crimes and crimes against humanity, 
possibly the most heinous of which 
has been the LRA’s alleged wide- 
spread use of child soldiers. Indeed, 
some estimates suggest that nearly 
20 000 Ugandan boys and girls have 
been abducted into soldiery and sexu- 
al slavery at the hands of the LRA. 

Several controversies arise out of 

S engagement with Northern Ugan- 
da. EGE example, from 2006 to 2008, 


the LRA and the government of Ugan- 
da met in the southern Sudanese cap- 
ital of Juba to partake in what many 
experts and Ugandans believed were 
the most significant peace talks to 
have occurred during the years of 
conflict. Though many proponents of 
the ICC point to its indictments as 
being a contributing factor to the 
LRA’s willingness to attend the Juba 
Talks, it quickly became apparent that 
if Kony were to sign an agreement 
and surrender, he would immediately 
be transferred to the Hague to await 
trial. While the LRA attempted to 
negotiate its way out of the indict- 
ments, the government of Uganda 
had no real power to rescind the ICC 
warrants unless it provided a formal 
guarantee to the prosecutor that it 
would effect similar trial procedures 
in Uganda (what international law 
calls “the principle of complementari- 
ty”). As such, regardless of whether 
Kony managed to wrangle his way 
out of an ICC indictment, he would 
still be obliged by international law to 
face trial in Uganda. Naturally, the 
LRA found this unacceptable, and the 
Juba Talks collapsed. 

The LRA has since regrouped on 
the other side of the DR Congo-Ugan- 
da border, and has launched dozens 
of attacks that have killed hundreds of 
innocent Congolese civilians since 
December 2008. 

Fears of a similar escalation are 
growing in Darfur now that the court 
has indicted the president of Sudan, 
and many now worry that with no 
“escape route” being offered to al- 
Bashir, he has no real incentive to 


engage Darfur’s various rebel move- 
ments in peace talks. Others are 
afraid that the various rebel factions 
operating in Darfur will perceive the 
indictment as a gesture of interna- 
tional sanction of their cause, inspir- 
ing them to escalate the severity of 
their attacks. 

Nevertheless, it remains very diffi- 
cult to predict the myriad possible 
outcomes of an ICC indictment 
because the organization is still so 
very young. 

If the court manages to impress 
itself upon the world as a tangible 
threat against impunity, this would 
clearly be a positive development. But 
a precedent must be established in 
order for this threat to be realized, 
and it remains to be seen how the 
court intends to do this without com- 
promising efforts towards peace in 
troubled areas. Over the course of 
human history, immunity from prose- 
cution has been one of the strongest 
means of ensuring the viability of 
peace negotiations and the ICC has 
begun to remove this option from the 
toolkit of international mediators. 
Whether a new means of resolving 
the peace-versus-justice question can 
be devised is anybody's guess. v 


Carl Conradi is an Edmontonian who is 
currently working within the ICC's office 
of the prosecutor as part of a year-long 
conflict management fellowship. He has 
also spent time conducting negotiation 
workshops for youth in northern Soma- 
lia and has volunteered at a child sol- 
dier rehabilitation centre in northern 
Uganda. 


“FRONT 


Alberta Views 2009 
Short Story Competition 


ut 2005 WINMING SHORT sToRY 


A rosary in one hand, a spoon in the other, each nun recites a 
Hail Mary per mouthful, and lingers, eyes shut, in an ecstatic 
flush before tasting the next bite and fingering the next bead. } 


THE CALLING || 


80 ALAUETA TENS DEC seenIAM 2808 


Stories should be no longer than 3,000 words, and not previously | 
published. Include a separate cover letter with story title and author's ) 
name. Author's name must not appear on the story itself. The entry 

fee of $30 includes a year’s subscription to Alberta Views. Deadline 

for submissions is June 30, 2009. 


The winner will be published in our December 2009 issue and 

will receive a prize of $1,000. The contest is open to all residents of 
Alberta except employees of Alberta Views. Include a SASE if youd 
like your manuscript returned. Please don't send originals. 


Mail your submission to: 

Alberta Views Short Story Contest 
Suite 208 - 320 23rd Avenue SW 
Calgary, AB T2S 0J2 


Or e-mail: shortstory@albertaviews.ab.ca with “Short Story Submission” 
in the subject line. The attached entry must be in .txt or doc format. 


albertaviews 


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10) iS MAR 1DEAMAB 182000) Mae? 


Vaccines and autism 


WELL. WELL, WELL 


health@weweely om 


if we're to believe CNN's Campbell Brown 
brought us the whole story with her Feb- 
rwary 12 coverage of the immunization 
contraversy, the only cause for concern is 
the one posed by parents opting out of 
vaccine programs. And if we're to believe 
Newsweeks Sharon Begley (“Anatomy of 
a Scare,” February 21, 2009), the entire 
controversy was built on a house of cards 
that has now been demolished. 

The Huffington Post and Robert F 
Kennedy Jr, however, add key information 
omitted from the other stories. The US 
"vaccine court’ on February 20, 2009 
awarded the parents of 10-year-old Bailey 
Banks a lump sum of over $810 000 plus 
an estimated $30 000 to $40 000 annually, 
based on an unequivocal ruling made in 
June of 2007 that his brain damage was a 
direct result of his MMR vaccine. 

His was not an isolated ruling. A CBS 
investigation has found that the vaccine 
court has awarded close to $2 billion in 
compensation to over 1300 families claim- 
ing vaccine damages since 1988. “In many 
of these cases,” writes Kennedy, “the gov- 
ermment paid out awards following a judi- 
cial finding that vaccine injury lead to the 
child's autism spectrum disorder.” 

But in many of the successful cases, 
though medical records show the children 
display classic symptoms of regressive 


Social Work 


autism, the word “autism” was avoided. The 
courtis, in Kennedys words, “quite willing to 
award millions of dollars in taxpayer funded 
compensation to vaccine-injured autistic chil- 
dren, so long as they don’t have to call the 
injury by the loaded term ‘autism.”” 

In Bailey's case, evidence provided by 
a neurological exam 16 days after his 
MMR shot had shown Acute Disseminat- 
ed Encephalomyelitis (ADEM), which ied 
to Pervasive Developmental Delay. The 
court ruled Bailey's ADEM “severe 
enough to cause lasting, residual dam- 
age,” and that he “would not have suf- 
fered this delay but for the 
administration of the MMR vaccine,” 

Care taken to avoid a link between 
vaccines and autism is understandable: a 
causal link would do irreparable damage 
to vaccine programs. Care taken is there- 
fore extensive; jury trials aren't allowed, 
vaccine defenders have unlimited 
resources for expert witnesses and litiga- 
tion costs while plaintiffs cover legal 
costs on their own. And, Kennedy informs 
us, plaintiffs have no right to discovery 
against the pharmaceutical industry or 
the government—US government epi- 
demiological data of vaccinated children 
has been kept out of the hands of plain- 
tiffs and independent scientists. 

The Centers for Disease Control has 
also actively suppressed and defunded 
epidemiological studies that might estab- 
lish a causal link, and refused to fund 
research comparing vaccinated groups 
with unvaccinated-by-choice groups of 
children not in the public school system. 


.../t’s about making a difference. 


At MacEwan your social work education prepares 
you for practice in an increasingly diverse society. 


The goal of a social worker is to assist individuals, 
groups, and communities to reach their full potential by: 


© supporting children and families at risk 
¢ helping individuals cope with mental illness or 


overcome addictions 


© enhancing the quality of life for new 


Canadians and seniors 


Visit www.MacEwan.ca/socialwork or call 780-497- 


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566. 


Fu page 


VACCINES HAVE in some instances been a 
great gift and saved lives. But they have 
also become big business, and business 
needs growth. Opposition to mass vaccina- 
tion programs is, contrary to common 
belief, gaining momentum with good rea- 
son. The Journal of Child Neurology has 
published an analysis of previously pub- 
lished research that had initially concluded 
fo connection between vaccines and 
autism—and now concluded it had wrong- 
ly drawn those conclusions, that there is in 


fact a significant link between blood levels 
of mercury and diagnosis of an autism 
spectrum disorder. 

The award to Bailey's family followed 
a judgment by the same court that had 
thrown out three claims involving MMR 
and autism, a victory hailed by vaccine 
proponents as proof that doubts about 
vaccine safety had been demolished. But 
in light of this new information, that's 
clearly not the case. 

Dr Bernadine Healy, former director of 


the National Institutes of Health, has 
called for more research into sub-groups 
potentially at increased risk of vaccine 
reactions. In a CBS interview late last 
year, she said she believed “governments 
have been too quick to dismiss the con- 
cers,” and that she “takes issue” with 
the decision of the Institute of Medicine 
Not to look for susceptibility groups. S 
along with thousands of others, right 
opposes the stalling of science out of fear 
what the research might yield. w 


Thank you Edmonton! 


We did it? Miorethan 132,000 energy-effcient light bulbs have been delivered to homes in 
Edmonton. That means energy savings of more than 62,040 MWh and over 49,135 tonnes of co. 
€missions reduced — that’s equivalent to 9,440 cars off Edmonton roads for one year! 


Congratulations to everyone who volunteered with Project Porchlight, 
reduced Edmonton's footprint, and helped spread the mes 
that simple actions matter. 


Project Porchiight pr 


ENCANA. mG 
por aay @ifionton 


Sssage 


sdly thank 


Aberia | 


Visit edmonton.ca/ecovision to 
get involved in your community, 
and onechange.org for news on 
upcoming campaigns. 


onechange.ore 1.866.585.6359 


SMC 


Your Rights Under Medicare 
& How to Fight For Them! 


As medicare comes under increasing attack by privateers and profiteers, civil 
society is fighting back to preserve Canada’s most important social program. 


Steven Shrybman's practice focuses on international trade and 

public interest litigation, including issues conceming health care, 

the environment, human and labour rights, the protection of public 
services, flatural resources policy, and intellectual property rights. 
Steven frequently speaks, and has written extensively, on the impact 
of international trade law on diverse areas of Canadian policy and 
law. He has also been involved in drafting and promoting conventions 
on cultural diversity and access to water as a human right. 


Friends of 
Medicare 


www.friendsofmedicare.ab.ca 


FRIENDS OF MEDICARE 
SPEAKERS SERIES 


Presenting Steven Shrybman 


March 26 - 7:00 PM 
Stanley Milner Library 


Downtown Edmonton 


Library theatre, de 


FRONT MAR 12eaMAR TRIO ROTTEN 11 


Build it and they will play — 


INFINITE LIVES 


ic] 
us 
= 
<= : 
5 | infinitelives@vueweekly.com 
Few things set a nerds astral heart—that's 
the heart that pumps ectoplasmic fantasy, 
rather than blood—to beating fast like the 
promise of being able to quickly and easily 
create his own games, realize his own par- 
ticular vision in near-pro style. Ever since Bill 
Budge and Electronic Arts dropped Pinball 
Construction Set on us in 1983, that’s been 
the golden dream: here are the tools; all you 
nerds need to do is click a few buttons, drag 
a few icons and next thing you know you've 
got your very own masterpiece ready to 
show off to all your admiring friends. Maybe 
itcould even get you girls! 

God, Pinball Construction Set. That shit 
was a revelation, the first real point-and-click 
GUI | ever laid my delicate, unathletic hands 


on. This was before the popular introduction 
of the mouse—{ wouldn't touch my first Mac 
until the next year, at an Apple demo booth at 
Klondike Days—so | had to actuate the 
pointer in PCS with a joystick ... my Tandy 
Deluxe Joystick, to be specific. Beige box 
with a little spring-loaded stick, trim wheels 
to fine-tune the centring so the pointer 
wouldn't drift, two totally unergonomic 
spring-loaded buttons. Man, those buttons 
had a lot of throw ... so mechanical; the mem- 
ory is still encoded in my hands of how it felt. 

From then on | was hooked, hooked 
into decades of construction sets: Adven- 
ture Construction Set, Racing Destruction 
Set, the level editor in Lode Runner, the 
track editor in Excitebike, RPG Maker, 
RPG Maker 2, Fighter Maker, Duke 
Nukem's “Build” engine, Tenchu Zs mis- 
sion editor, and on and on and on through 
LittleBigPlanet with no sign of the hooks 
working their way out of my cheek. 

And after all that, a quarter-century of 


12... vi WrereKiy — MAR 12.-MAR 18,2009 


mJ 


iy 


“quick and easy” creation of my own, per- 
sonal wonders, how many completed proj- 
ects? That's right. My pinball board an 
unplayable mess of maxed-out kickers and 


multiball launchers, an orgy of chaotic 
_ physics and not much else. My ACS adven- 


tures, maybe one room and a title with the 
rest auto-completed by the program's Al, a 
mess of nonsensical tiles, non-sequitur mon- 
sters and treasures. My APG Maker opus got 
as far as modelling my next-door neighbour's 
apartment; the only “treasure” | created was 
a bong the player could find under a pile of 
comic books. And LittleBigPlanet? Well, if 
you've been putting off necessary surgery 
because you don’t want to be in the hospital 
when my “Sack Trek: Arena” is released, I'd 
say just go ahead and let your doctor book 
you in; after six hours of wrestling with my 
Gorn model to get him to chuck boulders 
without breaking his own arm, | powered 
down in disgust and haven't been back. 

My relationship with construction sets is 


FRONT 


ee ee ee eee ee 


congruent with the relationship our consumer 
society as a whole has with all the pasta 
makers, Bowflex machines, treadmills, Thigh- 
Masters and step-aerobics kits that clog our 
garage sales and flea markets. “Quick and 
easy” is an irresistible pitch, whether it's 
pushing the fantasy of effortless rock-hard 
abs, guitar expertise in half an hour, “Hero of 
the Beach” status after a few minutes with a 
Charles Atlas pamphlet, instant jiu-jitsu, Big 
$$$ In Your Spare Time ... or becoming the 
next Shigeru Miyamto with a few mouse 
gestures. After the money order's in and the 
six to eight weeks of waiting is over, cold 
reality—nothing worthwhile is free, easy or 
instant, ever—sets in and the Magic Wish- 
ing Stone gathers dust in the closet. 


THIS TIME, though .... this time's going to be 
different! | got myself a copy of BioWare's 
2002 D&D RPG Neverwinter Nights, com- 
plete with the “Aurora” adventure-building 
toolset, and I'm bound and determined to 
spend the month figuring this shit out. The 
box-copy bait-and-switch here is particularly 
nefarious: sure, building the areas—spooky 
forest, blighted village, spider-infested 


ee ewe ew nee es 


cave—is click-and-drop easy, but making 


~ anything actually happen is pure, badass, 


nut-crushing computer programming. Thank- 
fully, I've got 4 community of dedicated 
nerds on my side, an online, distributed, ad- 
hoc university of guides, cheat-sheets and 
tutorials ... and like a good little freshman, 
I've got an arsenal of brand-new notebooks, 
pens and highlighters right here to absorb it 
all. I'm going back to school, kids, and this 
time I'm not going to drop out until | finish 
my thesis: a short rural romp wherein the 
player faces a plague of troublesome imps 
and their hippie enablers. 

But ... goddamn is it ever a pain in the 
ass. Brain aching with integers, string vari- 
ables, custom tokens, scripts and func- 
tions, thwarted by syntax errors and plain 
old-fashioned fuckups, | still turn for solace 
to the daydream of “Quick and Easy" . 
this moming, | think I've watched the first 
five minutes of Bruce Branit’s film World 
Builder (tinyurl.com/worldbuilder) like, 10 
times. Holographic parsing of natural ges- 
tures? For someone with a life filled with 
disappointing affairs with construction 
sets, that's pure escapist pornography. w 


Best. Ode. Ever. 


TB sings, Dave whines 


IN THE BOX 


DAVEYOUNG AND TB PLAYER 


> 
(abd 
— 
S 
inthebox@vueweekly.com 


x= 


The Oilers spent last week in Eastern 
Canada and came back with a 4-2 loss to 
the floundering Senators, a 4-1 win over 
the hapless Maple Leafs and a 4-3 OT 
loss to the struggling Habs. The Montréal 
game inspired TB to rhapsodize about his 
beloved Habitants—again. Then he 
wrote a song about Ethan Moreau. No 
songs from Dave—just whining. 


THOSE WHO CAN'T, TEACH. THOSE WHO 
CAN, TEACH VERY WELL It takes more 
than skill and grit to win championships 
in hockey. It takes a coach who knows 
what his resources are and how to utilize 


them properly and players who are smart ~ 


enough to see the game as it is and 
know their role. Case in point: the 1975 - 
76 Montréal Canadiens. This squad 
steamrolled the league en route to their 
first of four consecutive Stanley Cups. 
They did this under one of the most suc- 
cessful coaches of all time, William 
“Scotty” Bowman (who later added 
Detroit and Pittsburgh Cups to his trophy 
case). Bowman obviously knew what he 
was doing. And “it” obviously rubbed off 
on his players, as no less than 13 players 
from the ‘75 - ‘76 Habs went on to coach 
either NHL or junior teams. Two of them 
(Jacques Lemaire and Larry Robinson) 
have won Cups of their own as bench 
bosses. Oddly enough, Ken Dryden, who 
had arguably the best hockey mind on 
that team, never did coach. He did, how- 
ever, write The Game. Best. Hockey book. 
Ever. 18 


WHEN DOES THE PLAYOFF RACE 
START? | can’t believe the Oilers still 


have a fighting chance to make the play 

offs. I've been struggling to get behind 
the team and cheer in the fashion I've 
become used to nearly every March 

Playoff drives are often more exciting 
than the playoffs themselves, especially 
when the Oilers are in that annual Fight 
for Eighth. It's exciting and not a little 
draining watching the Oilers scratch, bite 
and sweat for every possible point 

Meanwhile, you're straining to catch up 
on out-of-town scores, doing quick math, 
calculating Magic Numbers and dream- 
ing up scenarios that would allow the 
Oilers to remain in the race. You know, 
that's exactly what's missing right now— 
that mood of desperation and urgency 
The Oilers do not come across like a 
team fighting for its playoff life. DY 


TBS ODE 10 MOREAU (TO THE TUNE OF 
“THAT'S AMORE’) 


When the stick hits your eye 
You refuse to say die 
That's a-Moreau 


If the energy’s slack 
Puts the team on his back 
That's a-Moreau 


Even breaking his neck 
He'll still finish the check 
That's a-Moreau 


Left to his own device 
He'd still be on the ice 
That's a-Moreau 


THIS WEEK'S OILER DEFINITION 
“Gilbert O'Sullivan”: 1) A mélange of 
two Oiler players’ surnames (Tom 
Gilbert and new arrival Patrick O'’Sulli- 
van). 2) ‘70s Irish pop star, known for 
the #1 Billboard hit “Alone Again (Nat- 
urally).” w 


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IDISH 


Dressing them up 


Madison’s Grill misses the mark during Downtown Dining Week 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 

can get dressed up with the best of 
[r= Well, not really. I do like to 

pretend once in a while, though. 
But it was never more apparent how 
woefully inept I am at the whole mas- 
querading thing than at Madison’s 
Grill the other night. I thought the 
Downtown Dining Week promotion 
might be my opportunity to step into a 
different world, if just for a few hours. 
And it was. It just wasn’t quite the 
world | was expecting. 

Downtown Dining Week is a promo- 
tion that encourages diners to satisfy 
their hunger pangs at some of Edmon- 
ton’s downtown restaurants. From 
March 6 to 15, you can choose from a 
special menu at as many of the 23 par- 
ticipating restaurants as you want. It’s a 
fixed price menu, it runs during both 
lunch and dinner and it’s supposed to 
be something of a deal. 

The promotion, with its promise of 
innovative menus at bargain-ish 
prices, hooked me, and I found myself 
intrigued by the thought of dining at 
Madison's Grill. 

But from the moment | stepped into 
the grandiose, stately room, | felt 
somewhat inadequate. My heels 
weren't quite high enough, my hair 
wasn't coiffed enough and my fake 
diamonds didn’t shine bright enough. 

The long rectangular room is ele- 
gant, sophisticated and imposing and 


JA 


CELEBRATING 20 YEARS 
IN BUSINESS 


Ms | MON-THU AM 108M 11-10 
FRI(TAM- IDAM & 11 AM- 11 PM 

oo | SAT(QAM- 1AM 8 5PM 11 

SUN (GAM 11 AM 5 PM 10 PM) 


MADISON'S GRILL 
TOS JASPER AVE, TNA) 227 


so were most of the diners, sitting with 
impeccably straight backs in dark 
leather chairs. Everything was grand. 
The tables, covered with pristine white 
linens, were set up in precise and 
orderly rows, and even the huge white 
pillars and oversized ferns were metic- 
ulously placed. The rich coffee- 
coloured walls did lend a touch of 
warmth, but the whole effect never 
once threatened to cross over into 
cozy and intimate temntory. 

We were seated in the middle of 
room and presented with our menus. ! 
glanced at the regular menu, but | 
was there for the Dining Week menu. 
For $50, you get to choose between 
two appetizers, three entrées and two 
desserts. It was a quick decision. | 
wanted the Roasted Squash and Beet 
Salad, the Grilled Salmon, and the 
Espresso Créme Brulee. 

1 made my husband order off the 
regular menu. Sometimes special 
deals also mean special portion sizes, 
and I couldn't resist conducting a little 
experiment. 

While my husband pondered, we 


GRILLED BROME LAKE DUCK BREAST 
WITH HOMEMADE SMOKED DUCK SAUSAGE 


OPEN FOR DINNER MONDAY - SATURDAY 
For more details and the full menu visit www,jacksgrill.ca 


5842-111 Street = Reservations: 780-434-1113 


ordered two glasses of the lovely 
Dona Paula Malbec ($10 a glass). Our 
somewhat reserved waiter took our 
order courteously enough, but first 
impressions were of someone who 
might have taken their training a bit 
too seriously. 

My husband finally decided that the 
Madison's House Salad ($10) and the 
Grilled Elk Striploin ($41) might make 
worthy comparison material, and it 
just so happened that they were also 
what he felt like eating. 


WE PLACED OUR ORDER with our 
perfunctory waiter and tried rather 
unsuccessfully to settle in comfort- 
ably. We were still trying when two 
salads appeared before us. Mine 
was served on a humble rectangular 
plate. My husband's, served on a 
much grander square plate, dwarfed 
mine—a lot. 

Aside from size, neither was partic- 
ularly thrilling. 1 found a few squash 
spears and possibly even fewer baby 
beets nestled in a puddle of dill- 
speckled yogurt. “Living greens” were 
scattered overtop, and the whole 
thing was drizzled with a sweet-and- 
sour vinaigrette. The promised pista- 
chios didn’t even make an 
appearance, and the squash was dis- 
turbingly crunchy. 

The salad that occupied the space in 
front of my husband was undeniably 


bigger, but not better. The dried blue- 
berries and spicy pine nuts helped a bit, 
but the long stems on the various 
pieces of greens didn't. 

My salmon arrived sitting atop a 
stew of potatoes, shrimp, scallops and 
mussels. It looked every bit as impres- 
sive as the elk that was taking centre 
stage across the table from me. And if 
it hadn't been overcooked and dry, it 
might have been very good. The soupy 
broth, teeming with flavour, did a 
respectable job of adding a bit of need- 
ed moisture, though. 

The elk, on the other hand, was 
beautifully tender and the potato hash 
scattered undemeath it did a marvelous 
job of soaking up all the juices. 

Dessert, while elegantly presented, 
also ended up being a bit underwhelm- 


ing. The dark chocolate/espresso 
ganache was intense and silky, bu! 
when our spoons dipped down a bit fur 
ther, they met with a Bailey’s layer that 
seemed slightly curdled. 

I guess you could say the little 
annoyances sprinkled throughout the 
night added to the experience. Water 
glasses that weren’t refilled as 
requested, finished plates that lan- 
guished far too long, a late quality 
check on our very-nearly-finished din 
ners ... 

When you spend $137.55 before tip 
dinner should be astoundingly memo 
rable. : 

I quite like my world without Madi 
son’s. But I still have time to find a 
downtown restaurant or two thal 
might fit in it nicely. v 


Size doesn’t matter 


:| GREAT HEAD 


& 
ms | JASON FOSTER 
C49 | preathead@vueweekly.com 


LITTLE SCRAPPER IPA 
HALF aR BREWING, WINNIPEG, 
MANITOBA, $15.99 FOR SIX PACK 


In our corporatized, neo-liberalized world, it 
seems that everything is about being bigger 
and meaner. Whether it's corporate merg- 
ers, supersized fast food or huge box stores 
itis the same deal: get bigger at all costs. 

Sadly it is the same thing in the beer 
world, as mega-brewers gobble each 
other up to become even bigger and more 
dominant. In the corporate tussle beer 
drinkers get forgotten, and we must set- 
tle for second-rate industrial brew. 

This depressing trend makes the entry of 


Winnipeg's Half Pints Brewing Company 
into Alberta all the more satisfying. As their 
name indicates, they are not very big. Half 
Pints only started back in 2006, as the 
micro-est of microbreweries. It has served a 
small, yet loyal, population in Winnipeg 
with honest, dedicated beer. Most of their 
sales come from a handful of accounts 
around their town..Despite their size and 
limited availability their beer has become 
widely known in Canadian beer circles. This 
says a lot about what they are doing. 

And, due to the bravery of an Alberta 
distributor, we can now find Half Pints in 
Edmonton (at select liquor stores such as 
Sherbrooke Liquor). For that we should be 
thankful. Currently there are two Half 
Pints products available—Phil’s Pils and 
Little Scrapper India Pale Ale (IPA). 

| chose to take a closer look at the IPA. It is 
an orange-gold beer with a lingering white 


head and impressive lacing on the side of the 


ae) 


glass. The aroma is an airy blend of grassy. 
citrus hop and honey malt sweetness. 

The flavour feels, at first, a little thin. The 
aroma makes me expect more crisp mali 
from the beer than it delivers. However, hops 
quickly rush in to fill the space. A savoury 
grassy hop flavour and bittemess rises and 
dawdles over the roof of your mouth after 
the swallow. The bittemess is not overpow- 
ering by any means, but it is the dominant 
component of the beer. This is as it should be 
with an IPA. The finish puts out a'continuec 
earthy, citrus hop linger along with a moder- 
ately dry sensation over your tongue. 

One word of warning: be careful with the 
pour. Half Pints has sediment at the bottom 
of the bottle, which is not a problem as long 
as you pour with a slow and steady hand, 
and leave a centimetre or two behind. Con- 
sider this evidence of their commitment to 
producing real, natural beer. 

There are more complete IPAs in the 
world, but you are unlikely to find them in 
Edmonton. If you are looking for a drink- 
able, hop-focused beer, this is one you 
should seek out. Despite its size, Half 
Pints offers a gallon of spirit. w 


=|AT HOME 


| JAN HOSTYN 
= Jan@vueweekly.com 


Holidays and celebrations are all good. So 
we celebrate, even if the holiday isn’t real- 
ly “our” holiday, Take St Patrick's Day. I'm 
not Irish. | don’t think | even have a drop of 
Irish blood in me. But that never seems to 
matter. Back when | 
carried a backpack 
full of crayons and 
ate peanut butter 
and jam sandwiches 
~ out of my Minnie 
Mouse lunch kit 
every day, St 
Patrick's Day mat- 
tered. We had little 
parties, wore green 


(FROM CHATELAINE) 


11/2 cups flour 


1 tsp baking soda 
1/2 tsp salt 


clothes and ate | perature 
green food. 1 cup lightly packed brown sugar 
| grew up and the | 2 eggs 


focus seemed to 
turn to beer—green 
beer. And since | 
cant say the 
thought of drinking 
green beer ever 
made me tingle with 
anticipation, we are 
not going to turn 
beer green today. 
We are, however, 
going to celebrate 
St Patrick's Day. 
With beer. Stout to 
be exact. 

Except, instead of simply drinking it, 
we are going to up the excitement level a 
bit. We are going to combine it with but- 
ter and sugar and chocolate and all things 
good and make a cake. OK, so maybe it's 
not all that exciting, but it’s better than 
turning beer green. 

\'m not sure what the thinking is, put- 
ting beer in cake, but here goes—Choco- 
late Guinness Cake. 

First | dispatched my husband to the 
liquor store for some Guinness, the one 
ingredient | was missing. I'm guessing 
you can make it with any stout, but the 
name is Chocolate Guinness Cake. 

Once he reappeared, lugging a six- 
pack of the stuff, | turned on my oven to 
380° before | had a chance to forget. 

Then | got out all my assorted pans 
and bowls and beaters and spatulas 
and measuring cups, picked a lucky 
bow! and dumped all the dry ingredi- 
ents in. You know, the flour, cocoa, bak- 
ing powder, baking soda and salt. Now, 
if | was following the recipe exactly, | 
would have sifted them. But | don't like 
to sift. So these dry ingredients just got 
dumped in and stirred. 

Beating the butter and sugar togeth- 
&r proved to be a challenge. My new 
annoying mixer—the one that doesn't 
seem to understand the meaning of 
“slow"—proceeded to get clumps of 
the stuff all over the counter, walls, 
ceiling and floors. 

Things got easier after that. The butter 
and eggs had turned into a creamy mass 
and were no longer determined to make a 
Mess of my kitchen. | added the eggs, 
first one and then the other, beating after 
each one. Finally, | mixed in the vanilla. 

| traded my messy mixer in for a 


1 tsp vanilla 
Guinness 


3 cups icing sugar 


ature 
1/3 cup beer or milk 
1 tsp vanilla 


CHOCOLATE GUINNESS CAKE 


3/4 cup cocoa powder 
11/2 tsp baking powder 


3/4 cup unsalted butter, at room tem- 


1 cup dark stout beer, such as 


1/2 cup cocoa powder 
1/2 cUp unsalted butter, room temper- 


more controllable spatula and stirred 
in the flour mixture and the beer— 
about 1/3 of the flour mixture, then 
1/2 a cup of the beer, another 1/3 of 
the flour, the rest of the beer and then 
the rest of the flour. | didn’t even get 
anything on the walls. 

| divided the batter between two 
parchment-lined nine-inch pans and 
threw them in the oven for 22 minutes. 

It didn’t seem long enough to bake a 
cake, but it was. 
Both layers were 
done when the timer 
chimed its four little 
dings. And both lay- 
ers definitely looked 
and smelled like 
chocolate cake. But 
the jury was still out 
on the flavour—the 
few crumbs | man- 
aged to dislodge 
weren't big enough 
to render any sort of 
judgment. 

So the layers 
cooled and then | 
mixed up all the 
icing ingredients. It 
was just a matter of 
beating up the but- 
ter and adding the 
cocoa and some 
icing sugar, then the 
milk (you can use 
Guinness instead, 
but | passed on that 
option) and vanilla, 
and finally the rest of the icing sugar. 
Onto the cake that went and voila— 
Chocolate Guinness Cake. 

| was skeptical going into the whole 
taste-test thing. Chocolate cake and beer 
are both good, but tagether? 

Moist, dense, rich, chocolaty and just 
plain good. Really. And you would never 
guess it had beer in it-unless you already 
knew it’s there. 

The verdict—kind of an interesting St 
Patrick's Day thing. But overall, eat your 
cake and drink your beer. w 


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WUEWEEKLY 


ometimes you have to work for a dump 


... but Castle’s steep fall lines will get you going 


BOBBI BARBARICH / bobbi@vueweekly.com 

f all the ski resort marketing 
Ove out there, Castle 

Mountain (skicastle.ca) has a 
truly interesting advertising cam- 
paign. I'd seen “Our dumps are white 
and fluffy” stickers slapped on bath- 
room stalls and towel dispensers in 
gas stations, on snowboards and on 
bar tables throughout southern BC 
and Alberta. But until this trip I'd 
never been there. 

After driving five and a half hours 
south from Edmonton, we pull into 
the little village at the base of Graven- 
stafel Mountain, the larger of two 
comprising the resort. Before we're 
even out of the car I see the sticker— 
sporting a stick figure on a toilet—on 
the side of a Jeep. 

I, too, appreciate a good dump. But 
this winter has been a little lacking in 
the dump department, Not one month 
ago, stiff yellow grass bent in the 
wind alongside dry highways. Small 
mounds of grey-black snow moulded 
into minor ice heaps by wind and 
warm air were the only evidence of 
Mother Nature's feeble attempt at 
winter. The month of February had Mr 
Groundhog chilling in flip-flops, sip- 
ping a margarita. 

At one time, only 60 000 skiers per 
year rose to Gravenstafel’s challenge 
Featuring intense and technical fall 
lines, it attracted a mostly expert 
crowd. By nature, experts are relative- 
ly few and a mountain featuring 
almost all black or double black runs 
is guaranteed to scare away the once- 
per-season warriors. 

To remedy this, Castle opened the 
bottom of Mt Haig three seasons ago. 
It has since attracted an additional 
20 000. I wasn’t interested in Mt Haig 
on my way here, but sometimes con- 
ditions will change my mind. 

Gentle cruisers abound. The blue 
and green runs are textbook perfect 
intermediate terrain, bordered by 
thick trees saving the runs from icy 
hell created by chinook winds that 
sometimes plague the southern 
resort. My partner Jay and! have a 
blast cruising down quiet groomers 
on a Monday afternoon. 

Castle is the only Alberta resort 
where it’s possible to own private ski- 
in/ski-out property. Huckleberry Chair 
rises from a base village clustered 
with homes that have been there 
since the late ‘60s. Now the resort is 
expanding—maybe a good time to 
buy, I think. No one’s around, there’s a 
recession ... I could work in 
Crowsnest Pass or Pincher Creek. The 
chutes on the backside of Graven- 
stafel could make any die-hard line- 


IDE 


‘ou 
MOUNTAIN 


driver monogamous, while the frugal 
skier will definitely get some quality 
vertical for a good price. 

Ski Canada recently calculated Cas- 
tle as having the fifth best vertical 
drop for your dollar. For every dollar 
you spend, you get 18 metres. The 
resort's 863-metre vert will cost you a 
measly $48. Despite not being noted 
in Ski Canada's alphabetical listing of 
the top 10 best powder resorts—the 
magazine also forgot Powder King in 
northern BC—Castle was regarded as 
the best unspoiled natural freeride 
terrain, with less than one person per 
skiable acre. 


WE FINISH THE DAY sweaty and thirsty. 
Conditions might not be the powdery 
heaven they were last year, but 
they‘re perfect for drinking. The T-bar 


Pub, conveniently located between 
the two mountain bases, is a classic. 
Retired skis, snowboards, boots and 
terrain signs from West Castle, Castle 
Mountain’s predecessor, complete the 
décor. Several pints and a scrump- 
tious thin-crust pizza later, something 
strange begins to happen. 

“Don’t walk out wearing your ski 
boots, you'll mess up the base!” yells 
a local as his buddy steps outside. Jay 
and I have obviously come at the 
right time. It’s snowing, something 
Castle, along with the majority of 
resorts further south, have been a lit- 
tle thirsty for this year. We down 
another beer because bed is only a 
short stumble to the lodge—another 
rarity for an Alberta resort. 

The new hostel-lodge is quiet 
(castlerental.ca). Perhaps it’s the snow 
blanketing the roof offering some 
sound insulation, but more likely it’s 
because we're the only ones here. It’s 
quaint—you have to take your shoes 
off when you come in the door—with 
only 10 hotel rooms occupying the 
second floor, and the other floors are 
hostel rooming. We get our own bath- 


room.and satellite TV upstairs, but 
beer makes me sleepy and I’m dream- 
ing of powder face washes before 
South Park's theme is over. 

As the sunrises, wind howls 
through the deserted parking lot, a 
few centimetres of snow swirling 
about. No people and a little snow 
could be the makings of a good day. 

But something is going drastically 
wrong. A very important feature on 
Castle’s property is not moving: the 
Sundance chair. Unless | want to 
hook a hard plastic T under my crotch 
for a mile up the mountain, I won't be 
riding Gravenstafel today. 

“We usually have 14 wind-affected 
days per season, where the chair is 
stopped for a short time or longer,” 
explains Andrew Rusynyk, Castle’s 
Marketing Director. 

It’s more than “affected” today, I 
note. “Think it will open?” My toes are 
crossed. 

“Not unless the winds slow to less 
than 70,” he shrugs. “People want the 
roller coaster excitement to be on the 
way down, not up.” 

If you like roller coasters, particu- 


larly the gleeful drop after a slow 
climb ripe with anticipation, Castle is 
the perfect place to introduce your 
stomach to your throat: it's home to 
Canada’s best fall line skiing. 

A little run known as Lonestar 
drops 516 continuous metres down 
Gravenstafel’s backside at a sensuous 
37-degree angle. Lonestar is the 
longest officially uninterrupted line in 
our nation. 

Murphy's Law and Minus 1, further 
into the valley between Gravenstafel 
and Mount Haig, are slightly shorter but 
they make up for lost length with steep- 
er degrees. This is no beginner hill. 

The chutes, while affected by total 
snowfall, aren’t affected by windy 
days. As long as you're coo! with the 
T-bar, that wind will actually fill in the 
lines you made on your last run, giv- 
ing you fresh tracks all the wind- 
swept day. 


OPTING NOT TO BE DRAGGED nearly 


2000 metres uphill, | tromp over to the 
Huckleberry chair on Mt Haig. There's 
a lot to be said for Gravenstafel’s 
right-hand man. I wouldn't be riding 
anywhere today if this area wasn’t 
here. Or, I'd have to suffer through the 
cursed T-bar. “It's not so bad,” frowns 
Andrew. “That was previously the 
only way to the top.” 

Were the snow more impressive or 
the T-bar a bit shorter, hell, even if I 
was a skier, I would have no problem 
gritting my teeth as the archaic mode 
of mountain transport dragged me up 
the hill. But today, as my upper thighs 
shiver at the length of that invasive 
thought, I stick to Mt Haig. 

The skiff of snow and lack of 
human presence makes for another 
day of fun riding. Jay and | stick to 
Sidewinder and Outrider, bordered by 
Haig Glades and the ski area bound- 
ary. Beyond that boundary is a world 
of untracked backcountry, some of 
which was featured in a recent War- 
ren Miller presentation. 

Mt Haig’s East Face was conquered 
in 2006 for the first time by local skier 
Peter Hodgson. His 12 minutes of fame 
ran on film in tandem with Miller's “Off 
the Grid” at select showings. 

My chance of hiking to and mas- 
tering this avalanche-happy run are 
hilariously unlikely—but there's 
something to be said for dreaming 
beneath Gravenstafel’s jagged shad- 
ow. There are nearly 1500 hectares 
of territory to explore at Castle, and 
1 only managed to venture through 
a few hundred. That's as good a 
reason as any to head back. After 
all, that's probably how Hodgson 
was first inspired. w 


16<, WE WEEICLY _MAR 12 MAR, 
“ u 


1 


SNOW. ZONE, 


Ji Teele 


in the last month, the Canadian snow- 
board team has carved out some con- 
siderable worldwide recognition. Jasey 
Jay Anderson has led the way for 
many years but now boarders in other 
disciplines are stepping it up. In total 
they have collected 15 World Cup 
medals this season and there should 
be several more to come. 

Last week, high up a mountain in 
Japan, junior boarder Ziggy Cowan from 
Banff grabbed a boardercross bronze 
medal at the World Juniors. The week 
before Maélle Ricker of Squamish BC took 


gold in a ladies FIS World Cup boarder- 
cross event held in Sunday River, Maine. 

The weekend prior to that (three 
weeks ago if you're counting), Anderson 
and Alexa Loo won bronze in the dual 
slalom. On the same weekend Canadians 
Jeff Batchelor and Brad Martin took Gold 
and Silver at a FIS World Cup halfpipe 
competition. 

In case you're counting, this is Ander- 
son’s 53rd World Cup medal. He has 
already gathered enough points to be this 
year’s World Cup dual slalom champion. 

These results certainly prove that 


FIS / Oliver Kraus 


Canada is no longer a flash in the pan at 
these events and that our extensive train- 
ing programs are starting to show divi- 
dends. At one of the World Cup halfpipe 
events, Canadians occupied seven of the 
top eight spots. That's pretty awesome 
considering we only have eight full-time 
members on the national team. 

A quick scan of the leading boarders 
reveals that most reside in British Columbia, 
Ontario and Québec. Alberta still lags behind 
in this department, but there are two from 
near here—Calgary and Canmore—Zigay is 
quickly climbing the ranks, w 


amenities and extens 
ue, refitecvOU DESERVE Ii V° 


SAWRIDGE INN 


AND CONFERENCE CENTRE 


JASPER 


SNOW ZONE" 


y Snowboards - Skateboards 


Rabbit Hill — 60cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| | Snow Valley — 60cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs now open. 
1} Sun Ridge — 60cm base, 4em of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Edmonton Ski Cab — Open. 


| Alberta 
. Canada Olympic Park — 70cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 


|| Lake Louisa — 160-183cm hase, 20cm new snow. 9 lifts and 125 runs open. 
|) Marmot Basin — 107cm base, no new snow. 6 lifts and 76 runs open. 

) Mt Norquay — 85cm base, 26cm of new snow. All lifts and 26 runs open. 

) Nakiska — 21-100cm hase, 180m of new snow. 5 lifts and 28 runs open. 


|} Tawatinaw — 50cm base. All lifts and runs open. 


B.C. 


a Kicking Horse — 160cm base, 31cm of new snow. 


} Panorama —56-101cm base, 11cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Powder King — 145-342cm base, no new snow. 

|} Red Mountain — 194cm base, 27cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

| Revelstoke — 101-236cm base, no new snow. 5 lifts and 52 runs open. 

) Silver Star — 145-200cm base, 37cm of new snow. 11 lifts and all runs open. 
"| Sun Peaks — 138-177cm base, 34cm of new snow. 10 lifts and 122 runs open. 
| Whistler/ Blackcomb — 183cm base, 13cm of new snow. 

|| White Water — 220cm base, 34cm of new snow. 


|U.S.A. 


} 49 North — 160-239cm base, 23cm of new snow. 4 lifts and.70 runs open. 
| Big Sky — 150-223cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
| Crystal Mountain — 177cm base. 7 lifts and 45 runs open. 
) Great Divide — 99cm base. 7 lifts and 80 runs open. 
Lookout Pass — 172-259cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 


i 2 inc PTE: SEG ES 


CONDITIONS REPORT 


|Local 


Castle Mountain — 97-152cm base, no new snow. All lifts and 50 runs open. 


Sunshine Village — 165cm base, 22cm of new snow. 12 lifts and 103 runs open. 


Apex — 186m base, 25cm of new snow. 3 lifts and 68 runs open. 
Big White — 189cm base, 33cm of new snow. 15 lifts and all runs open. 
Femie — 216-224cm base, no new snow. 8 lifts and 110 runs open. 


Kimberley — 97cm hase, no new snow. § lifts and 77 runs open. 
Mt. Weshington — 156cm base, no new snow. 3 lifts and 46 runs open. 


Get up to date conditions, easy to search @ vueweekly.com 


Mt Spokane — 127-216cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Schweitzer Mt. — 221-279cm. 8 lifts and all runs open. 

Silver Mt. Resort — 145-256cm base. 

Sun Valley — 94-167cm base. All lifts and runs open. - 


All conditions accurate as of Mar 11, 2009. 
0 


Snowboards - Skateboards 


man 12 MAR temo rs 17 


Crank the turns and 


spread it like butter 


SKI TIPS 


= 
& | AGMH geet 
SF | keithi@vweweekly.com 


Up until the recent dump, there seemed to 
be a pattern of a little snow every night 
on a hard packed base. Butter snow: the 
top is soft and the middle is hard. When 
dropping into a tum, the ski holds effort- 
lessly if you even half try. But how do you 
spread it smoothly and evenly? 

Andy Mills was an American down- 
hiller years ago. He was a smooth carver 
and we used to get folks to mimic his 
motions, known as “Andy Mills Turns.” 
Done right, it's like skiing on the twin rails 
of a railroad track without the clickity 
clack of the ties to rattle your knees. 

Start on a moderate slope. Ski across 
the fall line in a fast traverse, before you 
move into your turn make a wedge. For 
just a moment, keep your weight even on 
both feet, then step onto the uphill ski (the 
one that will dominate when you finish 
the turn), drive your knee hard into the 
middle of the tum and ride the ski around 
and across the fall line 

Stay in a wedge. Now do the same in 
the other direction. Use the inside ski as 
an outrigger to balance. Don't lift it. Keep 
weight on it, almost as much as on the 


outer ski. Keep the skis turning evenly. 

Now, speed up the tums, still without 
\ifting the inner ski. Keep them both firmly 
on the snow. As you start making faster 
tums, smaller radius or on steeper terrain, 
you will find the skis naturally become 
parallel, loosing the wedge. 

By this point you've trained the outer 
ski, so work on the inner ski. As they 
become parallel, stop worrying about the 
outer ski driving though the turns and 
start thinking of the inner knee pointing 
into the tums. 

Throughout this whole process, think 
about riding the twin rails and holding the 
ski all the way through the.turn, all the 
way around until they are across the hill 
and you are ready to start the next tum. 

As you become comfortable (a couple 
of runs) add one more element. Think of 
the initiation of the turn as a “step” 
where you consciously step onto the 
uphill ski and then drive both knees 
together into the middle of the turn 
radius. Step, point, step, point. 


AS YOU BECOME familiar with the 
feeling of the skis biting, several 
things will happen. First, you will be 
skiing faster in more control. Second, 
you will find the greatest pressure 
(where you are pushing the hardest on 
your skis) will come in the middle of 


i 


BI: @4 1" Tr 
) iy oa ie [ER 


AVAILABLE AT 


the turn with your skis pointing down 
the hill, not at the end of the turn with 
your skis going across the hill. Third, 
your speed will become even. No more 
speed up in the middle of the turn and 
slow down at the end as you check 
your speed. And last, your balance will 
improve with elimination of the stop- 
go speed check at every turn. 

There are other things that happen. 


10054-167th ST. 
EDMONTON AB, 483-2005 


=| 


Bob Prodor 


Your hip will swing into the middle of the 
tum. Your pole plant will become lighter 
in effort. You'll find it easier to face down 
the hill as the speed builds letting your 
skis swing back and forth below you tum- 
ing on their own. 

The most amazing will be the effortless 
smooth nature of the turn and the 
increased control you'll feel. Like spread- 
ing butter. w 


HART GOLBECK 
hart@vueweekly.com 


| = EAL LINES 


Every once in a while you hear about a 
photo contest related to skiing and snow- 
boarding and you wonder if it's worth the 
effort. This time Sunshine Village and its 
sponsors are making sure you take notice 
by introducing multiple categories and 
winners. 

Surprisingly, this is Sunshine’s first ever 

* photo contest and it isn’t just for still photog- 
raphy; the resort is looking for videos as well 

It also isn’t limited to extreme cliffs 
and air but includes categories like big 
mountain, terrain park, ski school, family 
and many more. The lineup of prizes is 
amazing. Up for grabs are brand new 
Salomon Czar skis, Salomon Answer 
snowboards, Nokia handsets, free ski 
weekends and a multitude of Pepsi prod 
ucts and lift tickets. 

The contest closes on May 10, giving 
you some time to plan and maybe get out 
ona couple of occasions to craft your work 
You know the Calgary crowd is going to be 
out there on a regular basis but we Edmon 
tonians may be a little more creative. 

First you better visit the web page at con- 
test skibanff.com and read the rules and famil- 
iarize yourself with the categories. At the same 
time you can view a few of the early entrants 
and see what you're up against. Then, don your 
cinematographer's hat and choose your sub 
jects wisely. 

Snow conditions are the least of your 
worries because lately, just like here, it’s 
been snowing on a regular basis on the 
slopes of Sunshine Village. w 


AS SUT 


SWVEEILY MARJ2o MARAB 2099 


SNOW, ZONE 


ee skicastle.ca | 1.888.SKITONS 


Check out castlevacations.ca for the Best in the West ski’n sleep packages 


A child is born in a bear's den, 
£-\ He wrestles the beast to its 
- Mdeath, grows to obscene 
y stature and fashions himself a cloak 

i ear’s hide. Then he pulls 

at musket and shoots the 


ie Griz, this mythical 
_and powder provider 
ore likely born from an 
S reverie than local 


rugged mountain aes- 
r obsession. 

e legend of Fernie is root- 
ed in the solitude of tree riding in my 
youth. Before cheap two-way radios, 
before anyone thought of setting meet- 
g places, | loved riding here. Skiing 
and riding the glades, groups were 
often separated. My memories are of 
deep snow, the smell of pine and the 
texture of tree moss, digging through 
the tree runs, sucking deep breaths as 
sweat trickles down my back. 

Perennially among the best-snowed 
BC mountains, it’s also one of the clos- 
er slopes to Edmonton. The six and a 
half hour beeline takes us through the 
foothills past Crowsnest Pass, Frank’s 
Slide and big truck Sparwood. 

With a population of around 5000 
people, Fernie’s snow and terrain 
has inspired a steady inflow of pow- 
derhounds, while pumping out com- 
petitive riders at a bizarre pace. 
Skiers from the Fernie freeride team 
have recently blitzed to the podium, 
making names for themselves 
around the world. Built from 100 per 
cent local stock, their resumes boast 
a wide range of achievement, from 
Jérémy Duchaine’s 2007 world 
record for the longest rail on skis to 
Martha Burley's second place finish 
in the World Telemark Freeskiing 
Championships. Members of the 
team will be competing and filming 
this year from Switzerland to Alaska 
to their own backyard. 


\ 


INCREDIBLE 
2009 SIRT 
PACKAGE 


FREE CONTINENT 


1402 Bow Valley Trail 
Canmore, Alberta T1W 1N5 
www.canmoreinn.com 


ABOVE THE FRONT DESK in the Wolf's 
Den Lodge stands a life size diorama 
of several animals including a grey 
wolf howling into the abyss. This kind 
of sincere dedication to the art of the 
wild suggests we’re staying in the 
right place—right on the hill and at a 
price tough to beat. 

The journey finds me in the compa- 
ny of the singularly-named Yasir. Not 
an avid rider, he had packed several 
Detroit Red Wings jerseys to ward off 
the wind and cold, as well as some 
old track pants. He planned on a visit 
to the lost and found to get some 
loaners for the rest of his gear. 

The boom years of everybody in the 
freshest, fanciest gear from pro to 
beginner made his get up all the more 
refreshing and respectable. But if Yasir 
were to fit into any big hill in Western 
Canada, Fernie would be the one. 

There is an annual weeklong festi- 
val and competition in Fernie where a 
person is selected who truly exempli- 
fies the mountain spirit, the spirit of 
the Griz. If the selection were made 


T 


$9 


ER PERSON, PE 
BASED ON 2. ADULTS 


ly side of alpine life 


= FERNIE 


from this weekend alone, | would vote 
for Yasir. Proud in Detroit red and 
white he snowflaked down the hill, 
getting closer to real turns with each 
caught edge. 

As for the mountain itself, we 
arrive during an uncharacteristic 
drought. Though often admittedly 
crusty, the riding is still fun; there are 
serious and characteristic inversions 
in the momings and bright blue skies 
in the afternoon. 

On our first day | do some short hik- 
ing to rider's right of the Timber Chair 
where there are a few decent lines in 
softer snow. According to some other 
hikers, the farther up along this ridge 
you go, the more interesting things get. 
A popular backcountry ride is to hike 
for a while in this direction then drop 
off the backside. 

At the top of the Timber Chair, The 
Lost Boy’s Café looks prime with a 


PER NIGHT (PLUS TAXES) 


balcony and picnic tables that jut over 
the slope and into the horizon, out 
towards Fernie five kilometres in the 
distance. Later in the day after check- 
ing out mid mountain, I search the 
more eastern flanks where the well 
gladed trees aren't hiding much pow, 
but the crowds are super light so just 
cruising and relearning the fabled Fer- 
nie is enough, not to mention check- 
ing out the interesting chalet and 
cabin developments that checker this 
part of the mountain. 

I also peer into the new rail 
park. It boasts a long lineup of 
varying rails and platforms for jib- 
bers at all levels of talent, but 
apparently the $75 lift ticket price 
isn’t enough since entrance to the 
park dings the partakers of said 
jibbery an extra five bucks. 

After riding, Yasir and I join some 
hill employees to engage in the long 
held Fernie tradition of hot tub poach- 
ing. We end up soaking in a hotel 
below the Elk Chair, toasting among 
comrades until the sky turns purple 
and the sun sinks behind the Lizard 
and Currie Bowls. 

Fernie hospitality is serious. The 
Aussie friendliness that is so wide- 
spread in the community can momen- 
tarily make one suspicious that these 
friendly chaps are either slow or 
needy. But as | take the place in, I see 
them for what they are: respectable, 
hard riding, beer swilling folk with an 
enviable lust for life. 


OUR SECOND DAY of riding brings Yasir 


a day closer to mastery of toe side 
turning. He commences a steady 
yadel as he comes down the hill 

Non-existent lift lines and the jovial 
atmosphere in the Griz Bar are impor 
tant additions to the day’s riding. Most 
of the locals often claim to stick to the 
flanks of the mountain on days like 
these, riding left of the Timber Chair 
or right off Boomerang. 

Following their lead | poach a hid- 
den turn under a tree here or there 
On my final run of the day I share a 
lift up the Boomerang chair with some 
lifties who seem learned in the ways 
of this mountain, so I follow them. 
From a few metres behind, | skit on 


their tails into a narrow path leading 
to a traverse. Through the trees to the 
right of Boomerang, they slice down- 
ward directly across a run and into 
another tree pass. I give chase. There 
are patches of undisturbed snow 
everywhere, as I ride hard to keep up 

At the end of the day Yasir and I 
notice smoke billowing up from a 
buzzing little resto just down the hill, 
connected to the far end of the Wolf’s 
Den. Gabriella’s Little Italy pasta joint 
is an unpretentious shot at quality 
Italian cuisine. With the modest 
grandeur of Fernie in the background, 
its red checker table cloths, friendly 
service and affordable vino are all 
built up around a fine dining experi- 
ence right on the hill. Several people 
have recommended it to me as a pil- 
lar of the Fernie experience 

We begin the affair with a bottle 
of Citra Montepulciano D’Abruzzo, 
the suggested, reliabie, affordable 
favourite (one litre, $22). While very 
tempted by the “World Famous Trip 
for Two around Italy,” a six-course 
voyage for two, it came across as 
slightly too romantic. We both try 
the zesty garbanzo tomato soup 
($5), spicy and simple, while I select 
the special, an impressive seafood 
linguini ($22) and Yasir the Griz 
makes his bold statement with 
Gab’s Spicy Penne ($18). As we eat 
the place fills up with sweaty skiers 
and boarders, freshly showered 
couples, and a couple of large 
tables of folks who definitely have 
something to celebrate 

This kind of festivity is common 
throughout town. Little crowds of 
hitchhikers gather to snatch up open 
seats in cars heading to 
At night \ 
towns get ghostly, the people o 
nie come out, screening new 
films, ducking in and out of the hand- 
ful of buzzing pubs 

This is what locals do in a lively 
mountain town. Riding is still tt 
number one priority, but they know 
how to make the best of off days 
Whether they believe in the Griz or 
not is beside the point. All it takes is 
one good dump—or, as the legend 
goes, a musket shot to the sky. v 


i from the 


mountain 


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‘Manian ets Tews “19 


WUEWEEKLY 
(té 


Mass 


appeal 


Don’t expect to compare the film to the Citadel’s take on Doubt 


KRISTINA DE GUZMAN / kristina @yueweekly.com 


ithout a doubt, theatergo- 
ers who also’happen to be 
film buffs will be compar- 


ing the Citadel production of John 
Patrick Shanley’s 2005 Pulitzer 
Prize-winning Doubt, a Parable to 
the Hollywood version starring Meryl 
Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman. 
But don’t expect to hear New York 
accents or references to the Bronx. 

Actor Clarice Eckford, who plays 
the young, naive Sister James, admits 
that not having to worry about per- 
fecting accents is not only easier for 
the actors, but also easier for the 
audience—especially for those whose 
attentions are easily diverted away 
from the story as a result of wonder- 
ing if the actor has said it right. 

Don’t expect to see the four Oscar- 
nominated performances from the 
film to be relived onstage, either. 

“Our director [Tom Wood] specifi- 
cally told us not to see the film. He 
hasn't seen it. None of us have seen 
it. | don’t think anyone who's work- 
ing on the show has seen the film at 
all,” Eckford reveals. “His reason for 
that was he didn’t want us to copy 
anybody's performances, because he 


THU, MAR 12—SUN, MAR 28 


DOUBT, A PARABLE 
DIRECTED BY TOM WOOD 

WRITTEN BY JOHN PATRICK SHANLEY 
STARRING LALLY CADEAU, JOHN WLLVATT, 
CLARICE ECKFORD, KAREN ROBINSON 
CITADEL THEATRE (9020-101A AVE), $50 -$76 


PREVUE 


thought that might complicate the 
rehearsal process.” 

Of course, with the amount of 
buzz the film has received, to escape 
it entirely isn’t exactly an easy task, 
as Eckford confesses to seeing trail- 
ers here and there. 

The superficial surface of Doubt, a 
Parable's story—and the first thing 
most likely to grab the attention of 
those drawn to sensational tales—is 
a Catholic priest sex scandal. Set in 
St Nicholas, a Catholic church and 
an all-boys school, strict Sister Aloy- 
sius (Lally Cadeau) accuses the pro- 
gressive Father Flynn (John Ullyatt) 
of having a too-close relationship 
with one particular student. Howev- 
er, there is more to Shanley’s script 
than finger-pointing directed 
towards the Catholic Church. 

“The sex scandal between the 


priest and the boy is almost the side 
story of what’s going on,” Eckford 
notes. “The whole play is more about 
what happens when people have too 
much conviction and have too much 
certainty over their suspicions. 

“It really kind of throws the 
audience for a loop, because what 
they're used to is having clear evi- 
dence that this person has com- 
mitted this crime or not and then 
they make their decisions right 
away,” Eckford continues. “Where- 
as with this play, it makes them 
think a little bit more about the 
fact that when there isn’t clear evi- 
dence, it’s way more difficult to 
jump to conclusions about guilty 
or innocent.” 


WHILE THE PLAY'S original setting in 


New York may not hold as much 
importance in the Citadel production, 
the 1960s time setting certainly does. 

“{Doubt] is set in a time when the 
pope basically came out and said 
that the Catholic Church needed to 
take on a friendlier face. The old 
school Catholic regime was very 
strict and quite judgmental,” Eckford 
points out. “This play kind of reflects 
that change where, for example, 
nuns lost their habits and started 
dressing in a little more of a casual 
way. The priests basically became 
more part of the community.” 

Eckford subsequently relates the 
opposing attitudes to the conflict her 
character experiences. 

“(Sister James] is caught in the 
middle because she’s quite young, 
and she’s coming into [the school] 
when it’s still in that old regime. She's 
very much wanting to break out of 
that and be more connected to her 
students and be friendlier with them.” 

Despite the dark themes sur- 
rounding the play, the audience can 
expect moments of humour coming 
from none other than the seemingly 
rigid Sister Aloysius. 

“That's funny, because one thing I 
read about nuns is humour plays a 
big part in their lives,” says Eckford 
regarding the paradox of Sister Aloy- 
sius. “They don’t experience sexual 
intimacy but they experience intima- 
cy amongst themselves and with 
each other. [Humour] allows them to 
escape oppression through jokes 
and laughter. 

“Mystery is a key element of this 
play. [The humour] allows the audi- 
ence to laugh before getting drawn 
into the story.” w 


20-— WWE WEEKLY MAR12- MAR 18, 2009 


i. Ss O05 3t RAM - ST RAM 


cf 


My Dad’s a total Nazi 


The sins of a father affect a son” 
in complex East of Berlin 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 

don’t mean this as criticism, but 
Jam all of the Holocaust stories 

we hear, true or fictitious, are 
from the perspective of (or about) the 
victims—accounts that certainly 
deserve to be told, but not the only 
ones that can come from one of the 
most horrendous acts of the 20th 
century. And as much as we want to 
think of every member of the Nazi 
party as a one-dimensional monster, 
they were real men and women who 
had to at least be aware of the atroc- 
ities they were spearheading. 

Hannah Moscovitch's East of 
Berlin, then, examines the side of 
the Holocaust that we never see: a 
story of a former perpetrator, and 
just how long the repercussions of 
wartime horrors can last. The play 
follows Rudi, sent reeling from the 
discovery that his father was a 
prominent SS officer. The revelation 
not only fractures his image of his 
father, but also his sense of self. 

Needless to say, the script treads 
some morally ambiguous ground, 
but that’s what attracted the show’s_ 
director, Alisa Palmer. 

“| have a background in the philos- 
ophy of history, and so I've done a lot 
of work in theatre with issues of the 
abuse of power,” she explains over 
the crackle of cellphone-to-cellphone 
communication, “different periods of 
history where there were very ordi- 
nary people that get drawn into terri- 
ble endeavours in their life, and can’t 
understand how they got there, how 
they became the bad person, 

“It's [with] the privilege of hind- 
sight we can say those people were 
good and those people were bad. But 
as soon as you enter into the details, 
you see it’s not as simple as that.” 


PALMER PRAISES moscovitch’s 


THU MAR 12- SUN, MAR 28 (8 PM) 


EAST OF BERLIN 
DIRECTED BY ALISA PALMER 

WAITEN BY HANNAH MOSCOUITH 
STARRING IANA DONNELLY PAUL DUN 
BRENDAN GALL 

THEROXY 1708-124 ST), $29-§29 


PREVUE 


script—her first full-length play—as 
sensitive but unsentimental with its 
subject matter, even praising her 
ability to inject some humor into 
such a story. East of Berlin was devel- 
oped in Toronto at Tarragon theatre, 
a place that carries a reputation for 
helping foster new plays. 

“(Tarragon Artistic Director] Richard 
Rose has a really unforgiving eye,” 
Palmer jokes. "He sets the bar high for 
new work when it hits the stage.” 

East of Berlin's Toronto debut last 
November drummed up some wild 
acclaim and two Dora award nomi- 
nations (culminating in one win, for 
set design). That growing acclaim led 
to a second, successful run in Toron- 
to, and now a Canada-wide tour 
After letting the material rest for a 
year, Palmer didn’t have much trou- 
ble getting the little nuances back. It 
probably helped that the same cast 
signed back on, which, according to 
Palmer, makes revisiting the material 
a further exploration of the script’s 
heavy subject matter. 

“(Having the same cast is] a really 
good litmus test for whether you've 
made choices along the way that are 
really good,” Palmer says. “If they're 
not strong, after a year of being away 
from the project, they will kind of 
fade, and you'll have to rediscove! 
everything. It was quite quick that 
the story came back to them, and 
with that confidence comes a level of 
relaxation that allows the material to 
be deeper and more detailed and 
more nuanced.” w 


ntimate ocean 


EO presents a stripped-down, intense The Pearl Fishers 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 
ife is, sadly, often about com- 
| promise. We rarely have unfet- 
ered access to what we truly 
want, and so we are left trying to fig- 
ure out how to get the most out of 
what we can get. 

That's a lesson Edmonton Opera 
artistic director Brian Deedrick is learn- 
ing doubly with the company’s latest 
production, Georges Bizet’s The Pearl 
Fishers. Not only is at a piece all about 
how two friends can find some way of 


THU, MAR 12, SAT, MAR 14 (7:30 PM) 


THE PEARL FISHERS 

DIRECTED BY BRIAN DECORICK 

WRITTEN BY GEORGES BZET 

CONDUCTED BY ROBERT DEAN 

STARRINGAMY HANSEN, COLIN ANSWORTH, GRE 
GORY OAL ANDREW STEWART 

WINSPEAR CENTRE (0720-12 AV) 24-11 


OPERA 


dealing with the fact they both love the 
Same woman, Deedrick has had to 
make compromises simply in putting 
the show on. For Fishers, the EO has 
moved from their usual home in the 
Jubilee to the more intimate confines of 
the Winspear—but the change of venue 
has brought other changes with it. 

“It's such a privilege, because this is 
the one chance, in this town, where 
you get to hear opera the way it was 
meant to be heard,” explains Deedrick, 
clearly wound up from a day of tech 
work. “But because of the nature of the 
stage, you have to change how it's 
meant to be seen, but that's the trade- 
off. The Jubilee lets you do grand 
opera, and it's big and you get all the 
sets, all the costumes, all the chorus, 
all the dancers, everything. Here, if you 
want to hear something beautifully, 
you have to make a sacrifice.” 


OUT OF RESPECT for the demands of 


the venue, then, The Pearl Fishers will 
drop the chorus and spectacle, 
instead focusing on the story, simple 
In scope though epic in emotion. The 
opera centres two fishermen, Zurga 
and Nadir, who reconcile after years 
of bitter dispute over Leila, a woman 
they once loved. This being opera, 
their entente does not last long: soon 
Zurga rediscovers Leila, and all the 
old emotions are brought up, with dis- 
astrous consequences 

For Deedrick, Pearl Fishers is an ideal 
opera for the more subdued confines of 
the Winspear, and not just because he'll 
get to show off his singers’ voices with 
several notable pieces 

“{With just the four actors}, you 
have a very intimate telling of it, and 
the focus goes on not just beautiful 
singing, but also the nature of the 
characters,” he says. "This is really a 
multifaceted triangle of love: The love 
between the two men is just as strong 
as the love between both of them to 
the same woman, which is where the 
tragedy comes from, and here you 
really get to feel all those emotions 
right up close. There aren't 40 angry 
pearl fisherman: it’s just a few people 
on the edge of the ocean.” v 


Edmonton Columbian Choirs 


Tuesday, March 17, 2009 
7:00p.m. 


McDougall United Church 
10025 101 Street 


Tickets: $15* 
(*plus applicable service charges) 


For information contact Brenda at 780.760.3270 
Heather at 780.484.8325. Email: hbedford@shaw.ca 


www.edmontoncolumbianchoirs.ca 


Columbian Choirs 


Edmonton's Family of Choirs 


Smooth Jazz 


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Drums & Song 
Lighting the Fire 
Round Dance 
Performers 
Projections 
Lantern Magic 
"Fire Spectaclel 
Songs for Spring 


phone: 780.760.2229 visit: Winterlight.ca 


MAR 12-MAR 18.2009 29 


Space case 


Shaw’s Spraw/ intrigues, but gets lost 
in the background at Hydeaway 


SARAH HAMILTON / hamilton@vusweekly.com 
ustin Wayne Shaw's exhibition, 
Sprawi, now on at The Hydeaway, 
shows a fascination with gross 

rban space. In his artist statement, 

Shaw says he’s just returned from a 

year away, seeing major North Ameri- 

can cities like Toronto, Montreal, New 

York and Miami. The result is five 

moderate-scale works, titles “Sprawl 

1,” “Sprawl 2” and so forth, and one 

large-scale work called “Super 

Sprawl.” 

Shaw's work gives the impression 
that he viewed these cities from the 
tops of skyscrapers, insulated from 
their noise and bustle through triple- 


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pane glass and safety rails. His simple 
pen-and-ink drawings capture the 
fascination that many of us have with 
urban areas—a dense, geometric 
sprawl that extends beyond our field 
of vision. Shaw’s sprawl is not an 
Edmonton sprawl; it is a New York 
kind of sprawl. The roads and side- 
walks have been eliminated, and 
there are no signs of individual 


human life within the buildings (such 
as clothes-lines or curtains). It is 
building piled upon building; a centu- 
ry of different architectures mashed 
up into one big structure. His work is 


not grim or post-apocalyptic, though: 
his clean style and slightly-lilted lines 
give the structures an energy that is 
evocative of graphic novelists, partic- 
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—-- as 


22 STEVENS MAR? MARIE 2008: 


MY STICKING POINT is with the venue 

The Hydeaway is a great music 
venue—a not-for-profit all ages art 
and music space that happens to have 
one of the most amazing views of the 
river valley. The venue is small 
enough that a moderate-sized crowd 
makes the place look packed, and the 
sound quality of the band of the hour 
is always clear. However, since the 
set-up of the Hydeaway is more akin 
to the legion than an art gallery, it’s 
best you attend for the music and 
fundraisers and leave the art to hap- 
penstance. There isn’t a lot of wall 
space and the space that there is hap 

pens to be over the comfortable, but 
permanently occupied, booths. | can 
blithely craw over patrons to look at 
pictures, but | doubt many other art 

sters would be so gregarious, so, | 
wonder, why are we doing this to the 
artists? Come opening night, everyone 
just wants to eat hotdogs and listen to 
the band. No one looks at the art. 

Not that hot dogs and beer and live 
music are a bad thing—but why are we 
wasting their time (and ours) giving 
them their own shows just to treat their 
work like wallpaper at a hipster-run 
IHOP? Venues like the Artery and the 
Hydeaway are great for small concerts 
however, in my experience at both 
venues, the art is rarely a focus at 
musical events and the venues aren’ 
open to the public otherwise. Art seems 
to be a glamourous backdrop for the 
local-indie-hipster scene, something | 
think devalues the work of the artists 
Shaw's work is interesting, but it gets 
lost in the atmosphere of the space. v 


search the most 
comprehensive 
guide to the 
edmonton arts 


Living with Ghosts 


HOPSCOTCH 


3 | 

o 
= opscatch@vueweekly.com 

Just last week | was reading Roberto 
Bolaho's short story “Dentist” and | was 
struck by something said by the titular 
character regarding what one feels 
when in an empty building, or rather, a 
seemingly empty building: “the reason 
you re anxious or afraid is that you 
know. deep down, that there is no such 
thing as an empty building; in every so- 
called empty building, someone is hid- 
ing, Keeping quiet, and that’s the 
terrifying thing: the fact that you are 
not alone ... even when everything indi- 
cates that you are.” 

The dentist's little monologue is very 
much a detour, having no direct conse- 
quence on the rest of the story, yet this 
passage stood out, | suppose, because 
it rings absolutely true; an empty build- 
ing becomes anxiagenic precisely when 
you don't fully believe it to be empty, 
when you sense a presence whose 
intentions are, at best, unnervingly 
ambiguous. And this passage lingered 
in my mind just long enough for me to 
notice how it flowers fully in an alto- 
gether different text, Ghosts (New 
Directions, $14.50), César Aira’s won- 
derfully strange, characteristically taut 
and yet irreducible 1989 novel, trans- 
lated by Chris Andrews and now pub- 
lished for the first time in English. The 
novel takes place largely within the 
confines of a Buenos Aires apartment 
building still under construction. The 
building, still without doors, flooring or 
even windows, is ostensibly empty, yet 
the family of a Chilean immigrant work- 
er is squatting there—along with a 
company of phantoms who typically 
appear during siesta, naked and cov- 
ered in dust. The ghosts are all male. 
Are they immigrant workers who died 
on the job? Aira doesn't say. The date 
is December 31st. The heat, we're told, 
is supernatural, 

Was Bolajfio thinking of Ghosts when 
he wrote “Dentist”? {t's certainly possi- 
ble. since Ghosts was first published 
long before “Dentist” and Bolafio was a 
vocal admirer of Aira’s work. As well, 
there is the curious coincidence regard- 
ing the Chilean origins of both Aira’s 
central characters and of Bolano him- 
self. In fact, Ghosts, in its ebulliently 
playful, frequently funny way, is some- 
What obsessive in its cataloging of the 
distinctions between the Chilean and 
Argentine characters and mores. In any 
case, the way the dentist's digression 
on anxiety and empty buildings speaks 
to Aira’s novel made the reading of it 
that much more pleasing. However, 
until well into the novel's final third, 
when they make a proposal that will 
put a character's life in mortal danger, 
Aira’s ghosts are not necessarily ren- 
dered as terribly frightening. Actually 
the living squatters seem perfectly at 
®ase with the daily apparitions of the 
dead squatters, Raul, the family patri- 
arch and building's nightwatchman, 
®Ven stores wine in the thorax of a 
Ghost to keep it cool, (Maybe this is a 
Chilean thing?) 

Though it drifts between a multitude 


of characters for the first half or so, 
Ghosts does ultimately settle on a sin- 
gle protagonist—RaGl’s daughter, 
Patri—and while Aira tends to subvert 
traditionally coherent storytelling when- 
ever possible, there is an identifiable 
dramatic climax. But Ghosts is also a 
kind of jazzy essay, which performs its 
jig with one foot in vividly detailed, 
more or less realistic people, places 
and behaviour, and unfettered, often 
dazzling abstraction. The in-between 
state of a partially finished building 
evokes the purgatorial or transitory. 
“The architectural key to the 
built/unbuilt opposition,” Aira writes, 
“is the flight of time toward space. And 
dreaming is that flight. While habits, 
whether sedentary or nomadic, are 
made of time, dreams are time-free. 
Dreams are made of pure space, the 
species that arrayed in eternity.” Seen 
through Aira’s lens, the novel's setting, 
like its personage, is both material and 
rather less than material, And the pres- 
ence of the ghosts, like that of the 
Chileans, calls into question the way 
we feel about architectural space, 
and—especially in places like Alberta, 
which draws so many with its promise 
of expansive, neatly contained and 
unsullied property—about the value we 
place on the seeming newness of newly 
built or renovated homes, places 
offered as a sort of tabula rasa upon 
which we can identify as exclusively 
ours, places we can gradually forge the 
imprint of our own experiences on and 
invest with our dreams of the future, 
unburdened by the psychic complica- 
tions engendered by a history. 


THESE THOUGHTS lingered with me as 
well as | continued to read Barry Cur- 
tis’ Dark Places: The Haunted 
House in Film (Reaktion Books, 
$19.50), one of the most intriguing 
recent movie-related books |'ve come 
across’in a while. Curtis has an espe- 
cially deft hand with examining how a 
wide variety of cultural influences, 
from the Gothic to the Surrealists, con- 
verge to shape the 21st century notion 
of the ghost story. And he articulates 
in crisp, precise language the power of 
historical burdens on place and the 
Numerous expectations we place on 
homes, even as out notions about what 
constitutes a good home evolves in an 
age simultaneously characterized by 
the conflicting lures of nostalgia and 


“ecological awareness. 


The discovery of Dark Places, which is 
an essay primarily concerned with archi- 
tecture and ghost stories, at the same 
moment that | discovered Ghosts, an 
essay-like ghost story deeply interested 
in architecture, has made for one of those 
deeply pleasurable coincidences a reader 
comes across now and then, when books 
come into your hands almost by accident 
only to then start speaking to one anoth- 
er, while you just sit back and take it all 
in, picking up one book to continue from 
page 91 just as the other is being put 
down on page 129. It's like literary tag- 
team wrestling. As soon as I'm finished 
writing this I'm planning on going back 
and digging into Dark Places again. 
Except I’m alone, here in my apparently 
empty house, and it’s a little bit, | don’t 
know ... creepy. v = — 


MacEwan | School of 


Communications 


FREE INFORMATION SESSION 


www.MacEwan.ca/soc 


“Fragments Of A Landscape” 
Russ Hogger 


Exhibit Opening: Saturday, March 14, 1 - 4 PM 
Artist in Attendance 


26 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, AB 
459-3679 


www.artbeat.ab.ca 


Bi a nase 


¢ 
. a? > 


vo 


The Bantt 
Choral Workshop 


with Jon Washburn and 
the Vancouver Chamber Choir 


Program dates: August 17 - 23, 2009 
Application deadline: March 27, 2009 


Repertoire: Fin deutches Requiem (A German Requiem), 
Op. 45 (version for two pianos), by Johannes Brahms 


Set in the beautiful mountains of Banff National Park, 

the Banff Choral Workshop offers amateur choral singers, 
students, and educators the opportunity to rehearse and 
perform with one of North America’s eminent choral 
ensembles — the Vancouver Chamber Choir, Under the 
guidance of master conductor Jon Washburn, this enlivening 
program will include rehearsal, study, and performance of 
Brahms's Requiem. 


For more information fen 
LY 
The Banff Centre 


inspiring creativity 


and to apply: 
1.800.565.9989 
www.banffcentre.ca 


Another world 


Robyn Cumming creates captivating, 
otherworldly women in Latitude exhibits 


ADAM WALDRON-BLAIN / adamwh@vueweekly.com 
obyn Cumming’s show at Lat- 
Re« 53 actually contains two 
eparate bodies of work, 
although they do share many com- 
monalities beyond their photographic 
nature. Cumming’s attention to detail 
in her staged images and their magi- 
cal, mysterious nature connect the 
two collections, 

Oh, Mother, the older of Cum- 
ming’s two collections on display, 
serves as an apt introduction to her 
techniques and themes, although it’s 
not as powerful as the larger Lady 
Things. The images contained are 
large, straightforward portraits of 
women, presumably mothers both by 
the title and our assumptions based 
on their age and slightly domestic 
presentation, all of whom are crying. 
Although they are dressed in nighties, 
all are made-up expertly, with the 
colour streaming from their eyelids 
down their faces with their tears. The 
women present an interesting collec- 
tion of impressions from their poses, 


== UNTIL SAT, APA4 

5S | LADY THINGS / 
OH, MOTHER 

WORKS BY ROBYN CUMMING 

LATITUDE 53 (10248 - 106 $1) 


= 
> 


expressions and, importantly for 
Cumming, their surroundings. 
Although each woman generally 
appears against a white backdrop, the 
careful staging of these photographs 
is very visible in their subtle framing, 
with faint background elements rein- 
forcing the shape of the picture and 
shaping our experience of the image. 
More than the women’s slightly the- 
atrical demeanor, these careful, 
almost invisible frames make clear 
the construction of the image, and in 
the end make or break the images. 

It is in the larger, newer collection 
that we see how this particular con- 
struction plays a pivotal role in Cum- 
ming’s images. The essay by Heather 
Zwicker that accompanies the show 
briefly discusses the changing role of 


framing techniques in Cumming’s 
practice as she has moved from 
involving much more explicitly the 
atrical draping into these two recen\ 
projects. Indeed, the difference 
between 2007's Oh, Mother and 
2008's Lady Things is noticable, 
although there is sense that Cumming 
is still working through the changes 
herself. In Oh, Mother, the subtle, 
ghostly framing images contribute to 
a presentation that recalls Hollywood 
connecting public and private 
images—something well explored 
especially in photographic work. In 
Lady Things, however, Cumming com 
plicates things by emphasizing the 
magic that we see creeping into one 
of the Mother images.as mist. 


LADY THINGS TAKES the same ingre 


dients as Oh, Mother: a group o! 
anonymous women who are clearly 
as much a part of the elaborate stag 
ing as their surroundings, as evi 
denced in this case by thei: 
glamorous outfits. Covering the mod 
els' faces, however, Cumming 
emphasizes their lack of identity, 
instead of allowing us to easily con 
struct one for them like the filmic 
mothers. The women are presented 
as shamanistic outsiders: imbued 
with powerful magic, unknowable 
and sexual, yet unreachable because 
of their separation from society. The 
images share these characteristics 
their technical and formal elements 
intimately tied to the content, espe 
cially when the delicately draped or 
found framing elements are present 

Again, the images live and die by 
their framing: in one case an obvious 
non-diagetic frame seems forced and 
railroads us into a single interprete 
tion of the image, no matter its beau 
ty. At the worst is an image of a tall 
woman with a hairy face, which 
stands apart from the rest by the out 
right absence of Cumming’s signature 
device and an awkwardly differen| 
camera angle, which give the image a 
character very much apart from the 
rest. The best images are probably th« 
three in black which share a wall 
described by Zwicker as the artist's 
mother: as a result of their almos! 
effortlessly subtle framing, and Cum- 
ming's beautiful production, they are 
the most otherworldly masks of the 
collection, including one incredible 
one fashioned of mist, echoing one o! 
the best of the Oh, Mother collection 
With them is an image of a woman 
head turned sideways, caught in 
powerful blast of wind. These po! 
traits are captivating, as well as being 
beautiful to look at, presenting 2 
sense of power, creating a com 
pellingly complicated network 0! 
pseudo-magical influence between 
viewer, artist and subject. w 


Alberta’s 


ECAET DIARY FOR A 
Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St, 
u.milezerodance.com * 


f tyson Pan 
Imonton’s Dnipro Choir, an 
violin * Mar 19:20 « $25-$75 at 


— 
i 10186-106 St, 

7 . INS: MESSAGE & MEDIUM 

FIBRE ART, Unti CASKET COVERS: Mary 


18 ® BACKYARD ART: 


y igie Davidson; until Apr 
E Matt Gould; Until air 1B. 
ean cies 
ii) Texture le artist Dana = 
POO ETttAte 18 s 
BEAT GALLERY 26 St. Anne Street, St. Albert. 
eK © FRAGMENTS OF A LANDSCAPE: 


Alberta landscape paintings by Russ Hogger * 
Gheving Sat, Mar 44, 1-43 5 


ART OF ALBERTA ules luare, 100, 
10230 Ave, 780.422.6223 ¢ POLARUIDS: 
Photographs by Richard Lukacs selected by 
Michael Morris; The history of art is rich with images 
that are provocative and challenge societal norms. 
Sexuality and violence are integral to this history. 
addresses questions of power, masculinity 


ind desire with images of nudity and sexual activity. 
This content will disturb cored inspire others. 


Peet aca oe Re aL to preview the 
sitare unt de f, 
Toure en Webb, Mor 12-Ande Grace), 


Mar 19; Tedd Kerr, Mar 26; 7-8pm, free * SYLVAIN 
VOYER: SURVEY 1957—PRESENT. until Mar 22° JOHN 
FREEMAN: THE HORIZON AS IT SHOULD BE: Digital 
eres until Mar 22 © LEAVING OLYMPIA: 
inv ae idealized Nude; until May 18 ¢ A SENSE 
SUBLIME: 19th ae ee until May 18 © 
Free {(member)/$10 (elf $5 (6- 
ul 


ten {yrs ai ults, 4 


{family—2 a 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621-82 
Ave, 780.498.1984 © CAR CULTURE: Oil paintings by 
Christ! Bergstrom # Until Apr 30 


POT GALLERY 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain, 


CROOKED 
780.963.9573 * Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm * NATURAL 
SELECTION: Marilyn Henker’s nature-based pottery 


FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY Aim 1-1, Fine Ans 
Bldg, 112 a Ave (780.492.2081) « we Tue-Fri 
10am-Spm, Sat 2-Spm * FACETS OF FORM: _ 
Sculptures by Peter Hide and his contemporaries, 
curated by Betsy Boone * Until Mar 21 


FRINGE GALLERY 10516 Whyte Ave, bsmt of the 
Paint Spot, 780.432.0240 * HELICON: Artworks by 
Harcourt artists « Until Mar 30 


FRONT GALLERY 12312 Jasper Ave, 780.488.2952 © 
Woodeuts by Lisa Brawn © Paintings by Kari Duke; 
opening: Mar 14 


GALLERY AT MILNER Stanley A. Milner Libra 

Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Square, 780.496.7030 

Meee Sculptors Association of Alberta ¢ Until 
ar 


GALLERY IS 4930 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.341.4641 
* PAINTERLY PAINTINGS: Landscapes by Jeri-Lynn 
Ing © Through March 


GREENLAND NURSERIES Cloverbar Rd, Hwy 16 E, 
fee ° Raisis AND ba “ty 

° |= 
‘ Af merging Artists Society o ita * Mar 


rere 3rd Fi, ake St 
6 6180 Main : 


MINOR Photographic works 
pee Bail and mbar Mair © heaton: THE 
'OLD AND THE Artworks by Karen 
Hibbard © Until Mar 21 


HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY-RED DEER Sunworks, 
4924 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.346.8937 © WORKING 
TITLE. 2nd part of an installation project by 3rd year visu- 
al art students from Red Deer College, First part is at the 
Red Deer College Library # Until Apr 17 


ICON HAIR GALLERY 10150 Jasper Ave, main level. 
Commerce Place, 780.426.1021 * BEAUTY AND THE 
BEASTIS} Paintings by Cory Montemurro ¢ Until Mar 


a ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place Senior 
Ventre, 10831 University Ave, 780.433.5807 ¢ 
FOSTER AND UNGSTAD: Artworks papier tole and 
Gecoupage by Millard Foster and pottery by 
Magdalene “Mag” Ungstad © Unt Apr 2: 


JOHNSON GALLERY Southside: 7711-85 S 
780.465.6817 ; New artworks by Sylvia Dubrule, Vind , 


nate es eek hse 
‘sau Aw nnmuller, Jim 
"a pote by Feng Hee» fvough Marth 
(AMENA 5718 Calgary TS, 780.944.9457 » Mon 
Wed, Fri - b . 

Featuring ee Sat 10am-5pm * 
‘ANDO GALLERY 11130-105 Ave, 780.990.1161 
( RRDAN ROLES toa by Tatjana 
er 10248-19 St. na 


MOTHER: Photo series by Robyn Cumming * 
* amie 


Room: A COUNTESS DREAM: Textil 
Esther Scott-McKay # Until Aad fond 


LOFT GALLERY A. J, Ottewoll Arts Contre, 590 
Re ee Park, ae ° 
an: Thu }, Sat 10am-4pm * BEGINNINGS: Art 
Society of Strathcona County ® Until Apr 25 
McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 1 
St, 780.407.7152 © AFTER WORK: HE FRIENDS. 
CHAIRMAN SHOW: Artworks by healthcare staff, 
{ecu Tesidents, students and volunteers * Mar 14- 
ir 


MCPAG Contre Public Art Gallery) 
5A11-51 Stony Plain, 780.963.2777 © EXODUS: 
Artworks by Room 


| Tyler Dixon; Until Apr 1 © 
Gallery: Paintings by Myrna Hanmer; Until Apr 2 


MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE 
INSTITUTE 9 Mission Ave, St. Albert, 780.651.8176 © 
Aboriginal Veterans Display * Gift Shop * Finger 
weaving and sash display by Celina Loyer 

MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 St. Anne Strect, St. 
Albert, 780.459.1528 © THE BISHOP WHO ATE HIS 
BOOTS: Celebration of the life of Isaac and Sadie 
Stringer and their mission to the Arctic # Until Mar 15 


NINA HAGGERTY Ses Gallery 9704-111 Ave, 
780.474.7611 © TECHNO PICTURES: Paintings by 
Mik-a-Low © Until Mar 27 * Opening reception: Thu, 


Mar 12, 7-S3pm 

GALLERY 10183-112 St, 
780.452.0286 © Tue-Sat 11:am-5pm ¢ 
COLOURS-NEW PAINTINGS: ae fy Giuseppe 
Albi © Opening reception: Thu, Mar 19, 7-9pm, artist 
in attendance 


PORTAL ART GALLERY 300, 9414-91 St, 
780.702.7522 © Tue-Wed, Fri-Sat 10am-5pm; Thu 12- 
8pm ¢ DIPPED IN THE COLORS OF SPRING: 
Artworks oy Giselle Denis and Cheri Denis * Until 
Mar 31 © Closing reception: Sat, Mar 14, 5-8pm © 
Closing Mar 31 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, St. 
Albert, 780.460.4310 © A WAY INTO PLACE: 
Artworks by Verne Busby, Cindy Delpart, Judith 
Martin and Bruce Thompson * Mar 19-Apr 12 ¢ 
Opening reception: Mar 19, 7-Spm 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA 8555 Roper 
Rd, 780.427.1750 * Celebrating 100 Years of the OFA 
in Rural Communities Exhibit * Until Mar 29° Free 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave, 
780.453.9100 © ARTE EN LA CHARRERIA: 
Craftsmanship and design distinctive to the Mexican 
cowboy; until Apr 13 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St, 780.488.3619 « 
RELEASE: Prints by Akiko Taniguchi * Mar 14-31 « 
Opening reception: Sat, Mar 14, 2-4pm 


SNAP GALLERY 10309-97 St, 780.423.1492 * SCENT 
OF MEMORY: Print art by Guy Langevin * Until Apr 11 


STEEPS OLD GLENORA 12411 Stony Plain Rd © 
Artworks by Trevor Waurechen ® Through March 


STEPPES GALLERIES 1253, 1259-91 St ¢ WEST 
GALLERY: PLACES: Paintings by Christine Wallewien; 
until Mar 31; closing reception: Sat, Mar 21, 2-4pm 
EAST GALLERY: © RECENT WORKS: Etchings by 
Oksana Movcha; Mar 12-May 5; opening reception: 
Sat, Apr 11, 2-4pm © E: kelley.brent@bidg-ine.ca 


STUDIO GALLERY 11 Perron Street, St. Albert, 
780.460.5993 © SECRET SURFACE: Paintings by Daniel 
vanHeyst * Until Mar 28 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St, 
780.452.9100 © THE ART OF THE BRICK™ until May 3 
* Pi Day!-Sat, Mar 14, noon-4pm * LEGO® Bricks 
Building Challenges: Sat, Mar 21, 11:am-4pm 


VISUAL ARTS ALBERTA 31d Fl, 10215-112 St, 
780.421.1731 © LOOKING GLASS: Piers by 
Roberta Murray and Leon Strembitsky * Until Mar 21 


LITERARY 


AUDREYS BOOKS 10702 Jasper Ave, 780.423.3487 
® Poetry Nights the 2nd Fri each month ® Author Ann 
Eriksson will read from her new novel, In the Hands of 
Anubis; Mar 19, 7:30pm ¢ Poetry Night: Poet Laureate 
Ted Bia launching his new release, The Invisible 
Poem and Poems for a Small Park: Mar 20, 7:30pm 


CARROT CAFE 9351-118 Ave, 780.471.1580 © 
Carrot poole © Every Tue, 7-9pm; A critique 
circle the 4th Tue every month 


CHAPTERS—ST. ALBERT 445 St. Albert Rd, Unit 30, 
St. Albert * Book signing and reading of Among 
Friends with Robinson Koilpillai and author Allan 
Sheppar © Sat, Mar 21, 2pm # Free 


CHAPTERS-SOUTH POINT 3227 Calgary Tr * Book 
signing and reading of Among Friends with Robinson 
Koilpillai and author Allan Sheppar ¢ Sun, Mar 22, 
2pm @ Free 

CITY ARTS CENTRE 10943-84 Ave, 780.932.4409 © 
TALES. Monthly Storytelling Circle: Tell stories or 
come to listen; 2nd Fri each month © Until June, 8pm; 
$3 (free first time) © Fri, Mar 13, 8-10pm 


ROSIE'S 10475-80 Ave, 780.439.7211 * TALES: 
EDMONTON STORYTELLING CAFE TALES. Alberta 
League Frcoursaing Storie open mic ® First 
Thu each month, 7-Spm * Pay-What-You-Will (min 
$6); info at 780.932.4409 


UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909-86 Ave, 780.422.8174 * 
THE POETS’ HAVEN: Monday Night reading series 
presented by Stroll of Poets * Every Mon, 7pm * $5 
door * Featuring local spoken word artists, Doug 
Elves, Lisa Guenther, Anna Marie Sewell, Titilope 
Sonuga, and Gina Varty; Mar 16 


THEATRE 


‘THE ADDLEPATED NDGE John L Haar Theatre, 10045- 
155 St Grams Maceien Balioga's Comedy by Stewart 
Lemoine © Mar 13-21, 7:30pm; Sun, Mar 15, 2pm ¢ $14 
(adult}/$8 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square 


AGA-BOON Festival Place, 100 Festival Way, 
Sherwood Park, 780.464.2852 * By Dimitri Bo jatirev 
© Theatre of Physical Comedy * Mar 13-14, 7:30pm; 
Mar 15-15, 2pm 


ANNIE Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave, 
1.866.540.7469 * Broadway Across Canada * The 
timeless tale of Littla Orphan Annie, a musical about 
never giving up hope * Until Mar 15 ® Tickets at 
Jubilee box office 780.451.8000 


BENEATH THE ICE Westbury Theatre, TransAlta Arts 
Bars, 10330-84 Ave, 780.409.1910 © Fringe Theatre 
Adventures * Written by Edmonton filmmaker and 
shadow puppeteer Eva Colmers. While exploring Inuit 
culture, myths and legends, Beneath the /ce addresses 
issues of climate change * Until Mar 15 * $23.50 
{adult}/$19.50 (student/seniori/$12.50 (child) at Fringe 
ox office, tickets.fringetheatre.ca 


BEANARDA ALBA/RONDEL Grant MacEwan 
College, Centre for the Arts, Theatre Lab, 10045-155 
St, 780.497.4340 © Bemarda Alba, musical directed 
by Seeman * A powerful matriarch imposes a 
strict rule of confinement on her household following 
her second husband's funeral * Rondel by Kenneth 
Brown, inspired by the structure of one of Arthur 
Schnitzler’s works, La Ronde * Mar 18-22, 7:30pm, no 
aia ‘on Mon; Sun, Mar 22, 2pm © $7 at TIX on the 
quare 


CHIMPROV Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.433.3399 © Rapid Fire Theatre presents comedy 
every Sat, 11pm, oat for the last Sat of each month 
until June 13 * $10/$8 (member) at TIX on the Square 


CORNER GASSED Jubilations Dinner Theatre, 8882- 
170 St, Phase Il, WEM, 780.484.2424 © Until Mar 29, 
Wed-Sat 6:30pm; Sun Spm 


DIE-NASTY Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.433.3399 © Live improvised soap opera directed 
by Dana Andersen * Every Mon, 8pm 


DOUBT, A PARABLE Citadel's Shoctor Theatre, 
9828-101A Ave © By John Patrick Shanley * Until 
Mar 29, 7:30pm, 1:30pm ® Tickets at the Citadel box 
office 780.425.1820 


EAST OF BERLIN Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St « 
Theatre Network # By Hannah Moscovitch ¢ Until 
Mar 29, om Tue-Sat; 2pm Sun * Sun, Wed, Thu: $27 
(adult)/$23 (student/seniors); Fri-Sat: $29 (adult)/$25 
(student/senior), Tue: 2 for $28 available in advance 
through TIX on the Square; opening night available at 
Theatre Network 


JULIUS CAESAR Citadel's Maciab Theatre, 9828- 
101A Ave * Shakespeare's gripping political thriller. 
Part of the Mainstage Series ¢ Until Mar 15, 7:30pm, 
mat 1:30pm ¢ Free Pre-Show Chat prior to the mati- 
nee on Sat, Mar 14, 12:45pm 


THE LAST FIVE YEARS Third Space, 11516-103 St 
* Two One Way Tickets to Broadway and Round 
Barn Productions * A contemporary musical chroni- 
cling the five-year life of a marriage, from meeting 
to break-up * Mar 12-14, 8pm; Sat, 2pm # $20 at 
TIX on the Square 


THE LOVE LIST Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 
Ave, 780,483,4051 * By Norm Foster. A comic spin on 
the quest for perfection * Until Apr 12  $55-$85 


ONCE UPON A MATTRESS Tegler Auditorium, 
Concordia Campus, 780.479.9269 © Family musical 
presented by Theatre at Concordia An adaptation 
of the fairy tale The Princess and the Pea. music by 
Mary Rodgers, lyrics by Marshall Barer, book by Jay 
Thompson, Dean Fuller, and Marshall Barer. Directed 
Ey Caroline Howarth * Mar 12-13, 7:30pm, Mar 14- 
if coals $10 {adult)/$8 (student/senior)/$5 (child 
under 


PRIME TIME WEEKEND Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave, 780.448.0695 * Rapid Fire Theatre Playground: 
Fri, Mar 13; Nose Bow! champions: Sat, Mar 14; 
Improv © Mar 13-14, 8pm @ $5 (high school stu- 
dents)/$10 everyone else); no adv tickets, at door only 


RAVEN STOLE THE SUN Dow Centennial Centre, 
Shell Theatre 8700-84 St, Hwy 21, Fort 
Saskatchewan, 780.992.6490 * By Drew Hayden 
Taylor, based on a traditional Tlingit story as 
recounted by Shaa Tléa Maria William, presented by 

led Sky, a contemporary Aboriginal performance ® 
Mar 12, 10:15am and 1:15pm # $15 (adult)/$12.50 
(senior/student)/$10 (child) 


RAVEN STOLE THE SUN AND THREE 

Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts, 4308-50 St, 

Leduc * By Drew Hayden Taylor, based on a traditional 

Tlingit story as recounted by Shéa Tléa Maria William, 
resented by Red Sky, a contemporary Aboriginal per- 
mance * Mar 14, 2pm © $16 (adult)/$12 (child 12 

and under) at TIX on the Square 


SPRINGBOARDS NEW PLAY FESTIVAL Third 
Space, 11516-1083 St * Workshop West Featuring 
differant plays and play excerpts every evening. Pitch 
to Play, a fun and ua process to choose 
Warkshop West's 2009/10 Playwriting Unit ¢ Mar 12- 
15 and Mar 19-22 


~ 10 LOST YEARS Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Ra, 


Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995 * Based on the 1973 _ 

book by Barry Broadfoot, about people and communi- 

ties during the “Dirty 30s" * Mar 20-21, 7:30pm © 

$20 acta 15 (student/senior) * $20 (adult)/$15 
student/senior) at Horizon box office, TicketMaster, 
lar 21: SOLD OUT 


THEATRE OF PHYSICAL COMEDY—AGA-BOOM 
Festival Place, Sherwood Park # Mar 13-15, 7:30pm: 
Mar 14-15, 2pm © $27 at Festival Place box office, 
TicketMaster 


THEATRESPOATS Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.448.0695 * Rapid Fire Theatre's weekly insane 
improv show # Every Fri (11pm) Until July 31 « 
$10/ $8 (member) at TIX on the Square 


THEATRE DES ABONNES La Cité Francophone, 
8627-91 St ® L'uni Thédtre * Two one-act plays are 
undertaken by citizens of the Francophone community 
® Mar 21-23, Bpm; Mar 24, 2pm. 


A YEAR OF WINTER Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave, 780.434.5564 # Shadow Theatre * By Scott 
Sharplin, starring Tracey Penner and James Hamilton, 
directed by John Hudson * Mar 19-29 


A YEAR OF WINTER Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave, 780.434.5564 © Shadow Theatre, a world pre- 
miere by Scott Sharplin * Mar 18 (preview}-Mar 29, 
Tue-Sat 7: ; Sat-Sun mat: 2pm _# $10 (pre- 
views)/Tue: fwo-for-One; Sat mat: Pay-What-You-Can 
{gbor/opening night, Fri-Sat: $25 (adult)/$22 (stu- 
dent/senior)/weekdays, Sun mat: $20 (adult)/$17 
{student/seniar at TIX on the Square 


ic Destination — | 


TOP 30 FOR THE WEEK OF MARCH 12.2009 


1. Neko Case - Middle Cyclone (anti) | 
2. Buddy & Julie Miller — Written In Chalk (new west) 

3. Chris Issak - Mr, Lucky (reprise) 

4. Dan Auerbach — Keep It Hip (nonesuch) 

5. Justin Townes Earle — Midnight At The Movies (bloodshot) 
6. Propagandhi - Supporting Caste (smaliman) 

T. Animal Collective - Merriweather Post Pavilion (domino) 
“6. Deep Dark Woods — Winter Hours (black hen) 

9. M. Ward — Hold Time (merge) 

10. V/A-Dark Was The Night (4ad) 

11. Napaim Death - Time Waits For No Slave (century media) 
12. Brett Dennen — Hope For The Hopeless (dualtone) 

13. Elvis Perkins - Dreamland (xl) 
14. The Derek Trucks Band - Already Free (sony) 
15. Buried Inside - Spoils Of Failure (relapse) | 
16. A.C. Newman - Get Guilty (ast gang) 

17. John Frusciante - The Empyrean (record collection) 

18. Andrew Bird — Noble Beast (fat possum) 

19. Willie Nelson & Asleep At The Wheel - Willie & The Wheel (bismeaux) 
20. Neil Young— Sugar Mountain: Live At Canterbury House (reprise) 
21. Bruce Springsteen - Working On A Dream (columbia) 

22. Geoff Bemer— Klezmer Mongrels (jericho beach) 

23, Mark Olson & Gary Louris - Ready For The Flood (new west) 

24. Beast - Beast (universal) 

25. Jill Barber — Chances (outside) 

26. Kasey Chambers & Shane Nichols ~ Rattiin’ Bones (sugar hill) 

27. Passenger Action - S/T (smaliman) 

28. Combichrist - Today We Are All Demons (metropolis) 

| 29. William Biliott Whitmore - Animals In The Dark (anti) 

30. Southside Johnny - Grapefruit Moon (leroy records) 


HANDSOME FURS 


FACE CONTROL 


Face Control is the second album by 
Montreal's Handsome Furs, 2007's Plague 
Park was their first. Alexei Perry and Dan 
Boeckner wrote the songs on Face Control 
together. The album was recorded and 
mixed by Arlen Thompson at Mount 
Zoomer. 


ON Sale Now! 


v2 


Pass the Haneke’s 


Metro considers one of world cinema’s 
most provocative auteurs 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 
here are reasons to be grateful 
for the existence of Austrian 
filmmaker Michael Haneke, 
even if you don’t exactly fall in love 
with his movies. He is a master crafts- 
man, as devoted to technical preci- 
sion as the finest Hollywood 
journeyman, as formally rigourous-as 
the most innovative arthouse maver- 
ick and, most impressively, has main- 
tained this standard while working in 
different languages and different 
countries with distinct industries. He's 
prolific—10 features in 20 years, with 
another on the way—yet a case can 
be made for his having never made a 
single film that’s contributed to what 
he describes as the disempowerment 
of the audience. Long after the golden 
age of foreign and art film distribu- 
tion, Haneke has held unrelentingly to 
a mandate of consistently challenging 
movies and survived, even thrived. 
And that’s fascinating in itself: large 
numbers of people see Haneke’s 
films, yet not a one of them promises 
a good time in any normal sense. 
They’re downright unpleasant. And 
there is no release. 

The 10 features tell a story in them- 
selves, of a singular career, of an aes- 
thetic, of an evolving social critique, of 
an increasingly amalgamated Europe 
and globalized world. Thanks to Metro 
Cinema’s generous full retrospective, 
Edmonton filmgoers can watch it all 
unfold completely and chronologically, 
one chilling, enigmatic, unbroken sin- 
gle-shot scene at a time. 

Based on actual events, The Seventh 
Continent (1989) is a sort of diptych 
that’s devastatingly effective in its sim- 
plicity. A bourgeois family of three is 
shown performing quotidian tasks— 
closing doors, preparing breakfast, 
tying shoes—often in close-ups that 
show no preference for faces or offer 
clues that might convey an internal 
life. This series of what would be 
inserts in a conventional movie is 
strangely riveting, brimming with a 
certain tension. Devoid of scoring and 
making use of black leader between 
scenes, there's genuine beauty to the 
clipped rhythm of it all, to the collage 
of room tones, and the superbly speci- 
fying actors—including the late Ulrich 
Muhe, a Haneke regular—embody the 
tone plausibly. Haneke's debut follows 
the course of the family’s routines, 
checking in to see how they alter over 
three years, until the machinery of 
their “lifestyle” suddenly collapses in 


‘96 


one of cinema's most sustained 
sequences of intensely concentrated, 
near-wordless action. The result is 
really a perfect movie on its own 
terms, with an inspired balance of 
overt polemic and ambiguity. It also, to 
a surprising degree, perfectly encapsu- 
lates so much of what's to come. 


BENNY’S VIDEO (92) advances certain 


aspects of its predecessor while focus- 
ing more pointedly on what is surely 
Haneke’s central zone of interest: visu- 
al media. The horrific Oedipal journey 
of teenage Benny (Arno Frisch) is one 
filtered through the abstraction of 
increasingly accessible video technolo- 
gy, which Haneke proposes as facilitat- 
ing voyeuristic tendencies to ever-more 
alarming degrees. A crudely made 
video of animal slaughter is slowed- 
down in replay, making what was ini- 
tially intended as a quick, relatively 
painless death into a weirdly aestheti- 
cized bloodbath. Benny, almost always 
placid, seems completely untouched by 
the real, in the Lacanian sense. He 
seems to process the world exclusively 
through video screens. Video becomes 
a component in teenage mating rituals, 
which themselves house experiments 
in punishment. So there is watching, 
there is death, and there is the cleaning 
up afterwards. There's also a mother- 
son vacation to Egypt, where the 
unruliness of the greater world is still 
kept always at arm’s, or, as it were, 
eye’s length. It’s also kind of boring, but 
this very carefully nourished boredom 
seems vital to how this all works. 
Haneke’s gaze can be at once that of a 
visionary director and that of an espe- 
cially patient anthropologist. If you can 
jive with both sensibilities, you're in for 
the long haul. 

There is, however, the problem of 
Funny Games ('97) to contend with. 
Haneke’s most notoriously merciless 
work, an anti-thriller in which a pair of 
absurdly polite hooligans (one of whom 
is Frisch, as though picking up where he 
left off) terrorize another of Haneke’s 
bourgeois families on holiday, is brutal, 
but it’s also quickly numbing and over- 
intellectualized while feeling intellectu- 
ally facile. Haneke seems to have had a 
checklist of items he considered anti- 
thetical to genre moviemaking—kill the 
dog, kill the kid, break the fourth wall— 

, and went about dutifully seeing each 
through. The irony lies in how, at the 
best of times, the very sort of polished 
Hollywood thriller Funny Games explic- 
itly opposes can actually prove far more 


THU, MAR 12-THU MAR 26 
MICHAEL HANEKE 
RETROS 


PECTIVE 
FEATURING CODE UNKNOWN, FUNNY GAMES, 
CACHE TIME OF THEWOLF, MORE 
PANEL DISCUSSION FRI, MAR 13(8 PM) 
METRO CINEMA (9828 1OTA AVE) 


thought provoking than such exercises 
in didacticism. Yet Haneke was clearly 
happy with the results. He re-made the 
thing, shot-for-shot, as his English-lan- 
guage debut with Hollywood stars in 
2007. I wonder if he liked the market- 
ing—Warner pitched it exactly as if it 
were a generic thriller. 

With Code Unknown (2000), Haneke 
arrives at a major tuming point and deliv- 
ers what may be his finest work. His first 
film made in France inverted the hermeti- 
cally sealed strategy of Funny Games, 
broadening his perspective to take in a 
larger network of character types, relation- 
ships, social confrontations and causali- 
ties, and Juliette Binoche, who from her 
first moment onscreen introduces a 
warmth and fullness of character previ- 
ously unseen, if not un-permitted, in 
Haneke’s work. Brilliantly book-ended 
with scenes of deaf-mute children playing 
charades—an elegant expression of the 
title—the remainder of Code Unknown 
consists of scenes, nearly all of them play- 
ing out in single, unbroken shots, that 
explore questions of what is and isn’t 
other people's business, from a young 
black man’s attempt at forcing an act of 
social justice to Binoche's paralysis when 
overhearing domestic violence to a photo- 
journalist's resurrection of Walker Evans’ 
fabled journey through the New York sub- 
way system taking surreptitious photos of 
strangers. Like the unseen, rather obnox- 
ious director who at one point auditions 
Binoche’s actress, the photojournalist 
seems to be hunting for a “Teal face.” Yet, 
while I'd argue that Code Unknown 
explores inter-connectivity with greater 
resonance than films like Paul Haggis’ 
Crash or Fatih Akin’s The Edge of Heaven, 


Haneke is never so assuring. The charac- 


ters here, spanning class, race, nationality, — 


education and age, are given freer reign to 
reveal a richness of attitude, anxieties and 
even fleeting moments of happiness and 
relief. But their environment doesn’t make 
room for complete vulnerability and so 
many masks are wom that the very notion 
of witnessing truth becomes futile. This 
was the first Haneke I saw, and it remains 
a personal favourite, 


HANEKE'S EMBRACING of France and 


its great actresses continued to great 
acclaim—and even greater controver- 
sy—with The Piano Teacher ('01), an 
adaptation of fellow Austrian Elfriede 
Jelinek’s novel. Isabelle Huppert’s 
Erika Kohut, an instructor obsessed 
with a 17-year-old pupil, is a creature 
of a sort I’m not sure the movies had 
ever previously given us: intensely 
sexually repressed, sadomasochistic, 
obsessive, icy in that way that disguis- 
es overwhelming anguish, capable of 
Electrian hysteria, and never for a 
moment less than magnetic. It is a 
career-capping performance, and with 
Huppert that says a lot. 

When Huppert returns for Haneke's 
criminally under-seen dystopian 
drama Time of the Wolf (03), the only 
way she can kick things off properly is 
to get sprayed with her murdered hus- 
band's blood and then vomit in the 
first five minutes. From there, the 
apocalypse is a paddleboat ride. 
Whatever disaster befell society 
before the story begins is—and here’s 
a surprise—left undefined. Yet in 
destroying the social order, the media 
and consumer-based society, it’s also 
robbed Haneke of the key subjects of 
his entire canon. The good news is 
that Haneke not only rises to the 
occasion but also proves just what a 
shrewd and atmospheric storyteller he 
can be with a minimum of elements. 
And of course, as Huppert’s Anne and 
her children traverse the countryside 
to fend for themselves, the customs of 


civilized society will haunt them in 
~ their every encounter. (It'll be inter- 
esting to see how this film compares 
to John Hillcoat’s forthcoming The 
~ Road.) Whether you know Haneke’s 
work or not, I urge you to catch this 
one in arare public screening. 
Haneke’s almost perverse emphasis 
on the irresolvable finds its apotheosis 
in Caché ('05), another hit, and his most 
recent, though hopefully not last, 
French film. Pairing Binoche with 
Daniel Auteuil, Caché returns to the sin 
ister voyeurism of Benny’s Video by way 
of David Lynch’s Lost Highway, when a 
bourgeois Parisian couple starts receiv- 
ing anonymous videocassettes that fea- 
ture only unedited footage of their 
home's exterior, Haneke has insisted in 
‘interviews that he hasn't been especial- 
ly interested in specificity of location in 
his films and that readings emphasiz- 
ing the conditions of a certain national 
culture are usually made out of a fail- 
ure to recognize how these stories 
could take place anywhere in the first 
world. It’s a respectable and quite 
instructive stance, but I still think it 
makes Caché that much richer a movie 
when we account for the particularities 
of the Algerian War and the Paris mas 
sacre of 1961. There is a ghost lurking 
in this story that demands to be reck- 
oned with. Itis a ghost not dissimilar to 
' those haunting other nations, but it 
looms over these characters with a par- 
ticular gravity, making it an interesting 
companion piece to Alain Resnais’ 


masterpiece Muriel. 

Which bri to the present, 
post-Funny Games US and pre-The 
White Ribbon, Haneke's first Austrian 


| years. Despite the 
ive—not to mention 


reaction ts of his last movie 
Metro's é reminds us that 


there's every reason to anticipate 
more provocative and fascinating 
work from Haneke. I only hope there 
continues to be room in the world for 
the likes of him. v 


‘7 » WAR 17% Marte nnd 


“qexchinene 


Satirizing ourselves and Others 


DVDETECTIVE 


Be math 


oo 


Pew people ever, and certainly no one else 
recently, have taken such gleeful pleasure 
in being a B-list celebrity as Bruce 
Campbell. Rising to a certain degree of 
cult fame for his smirking, square-jawed 
heroics in Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead series— 
as good an introduction to B-level comedy 
horror aS exists—and popping up in 
enough good-natured, gory cult films 
(Bubba Ho-tep, The Man with the 
Screaming Grain) to at least overshadow 
the Standard paycheque crap of the semi- 
notorious, he’s recently developed some- 
thing of a cottage industry with lampoon- 
ing his own level of fame, first with his 
comic novel Make Love! The Bruce 
Campbell Way, and now with My Name 
is Bruce, out on DVD. 

As with Make Love!, My Name is Bruce 
features Bruce Campbell as Bruce Campbell, 
bad-tempered parody of a struggling B-list 
actor, a man whose notoriety only serves to 
keep him in cheap films and cheaper booze. 
Stuck filming a sequel to “the worst film he’s 
ever made,” he is rescued, in a manner of 
speaking, by a fanboy in need of help ridding 
his small Oregon town of a centuries-old, 
murderous Chinese ghost. At first passing it 
off as just another crappy movie, he soon 
figures out that the blood is very much real, 
and he’s just going to have to step up to his 
monster-killing alter ego. 


Obviously, this is meta enough to 
choke a horse, but self-parody plays very 
well into Campbell's persona. Possessed 
of those classic leading man qualities— 
strong jaw, strong coif and as manly as a 
lumberjack riding a horse—that bring a 
certain ridiculous gravity to his endlessly 
cheesy one-liners and hamming, not 
unlike a more rugged Leslie Nielsen, 
Campbell quite obviously has a whole lot 
of fun making bad jokes about himself; 
his humour is roughly that of a punny 
uncle, but everything here is done with.a 
wink, anda highly staged one at that, and 


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the combina- 
tion of self-awareness and energy is an 
endearing enough mix. The jokes here 
don't exactly disguise their approach. but 
that’s part of the fun: as with most B-hor- 
ror, we always know what's coming, and 
the pleasure involved is in how over-the- 
top the execution is going to be. 

My Name is Bruce is certainly the type of 
film that's going to grate on anyone who 
doesn't share its goofy humour, and it's nei- 


CONTINUES ON PAGE 29 


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M SCREENING AND DISCUSSION 


NEB Sunday Cinema with Project Ploughshares, 
and Canadian Pugwash Group present 


A film about Nobel Peace Laureate 10sep 
Pugwash, and nuclsarweapons. | 


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Featuring a post-screening discussian with the Hon. Doug 


Sunday, March 15 | 


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THE FILMS OF 


MICHAEL HAN EKE eg 


PRESENTED IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE WIRTH INSTITUTE 
C0-CURATED BY BILL BEARD 


ES a OF; ON 
m 3) 


Wirth Institute 


FOR AUSTRIAN AND CENTRAL EUROPEAN STUDIES 


BENNY'S VIDEO FRIDAY «7PM 
PANEL DISCUSSION AFTER: ETHICS & POLITICS IN THE CINEMA OF MIGHAEL HANEKE 
71 FRAGMENTS OF A 
GCHRONOLOCGY OF CHANCE 
SATURDAY AT 7PM 
FUNNY GAMES THE PIANO TEACHER 
SATURDAY ar 9PM SUNDAY ur 9:15 


TIME OF THE WOLF 
THE CAST 
SUNDAY ar 4:30 PM MONDAY <r 77M 


CACHE 
MONDAY ar 9:15PM 


FUNNY CAMES 
SUNDAY ar 7PM & WEDNESDAY ar 8PM TUESDAY ar 8PM 


Pee THESTRANGEST 
See «DREAM SIMI 


All Metro screenings are held at Zeidler Hall in the Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave. 
For more information, call 425-9212. or log on to www.metrocinema.org 


Metro ope 
1 
ats 
“ ur 


tes with the support of 


GD Foundation 


“Arts 


Canada Council 
for the Arts 


Conseil des Arts 
du Canada 


Bloody kids 


Let the Right One Inis a coming-of-age story with vampires 


JOSEF BRAUN / josef@vueweekly.com 


Stockholm housing complex 12- 


f [= 1982, and in some anonymous 


year-old Oskar stands knife in * 


hand before the window in his ginch, 
rehearsing revenge, or, More accu- 
rately, assuming the role of his 
oppressor. His reflection in the glass 
is doubled, rendering him ghostly in 
our first glimpse of him. Oskar is ash- 
blonde, elfin, soft-spoken, inward and 
mercilessly bullied at school by a 
bunch of boys who look like girls. His 
parents are divorced. He's an only 
child and seems virtually alone in the 
world. But on this night he sees a 
strange car pull up. A middle-aged 
man and a little girl are moving into 
the apartment next door. The man 
immediately sets about covering up 
their windows with cardboard. For 
Oskar, who keeps a private scrapbook 
of news clippings on murder and 
death, the weirdness and secrecy that 
surrounds his new neighbours 
appeals instantly. Soon, this curiosity 
will turn into heartsickness. Oskar is 
going to fall in love for the first time. 
Preadolescent romance isn't some- 
thing typically located in the comfort 
zone of most movies, but Let the 
Right One In isn’t most movies. 
Oskar and Eli will connect the same 


GARNEAU 
theatre 


9722-1027 STREET, EDMONTON 


AB 15K 0X4 /80 429 1671 


AVAILABLE NOW 


LET THE RIGHT ONE IN 
DURECTED Y TOMAS ALFREDSON 

WAITEN BY JOHN AMIDE LNGOUIST 
STARRING HARE HEDEBRANT, LNA LEANDEASSON 
KKK 


ON DVD 


way a lot of kids connect, through a 
sense of mutual alienation. Yet Eli's 
particular sense of exclusion is more 
acute, and more permanent. When 
Oskar asks how old she is, she tells 
him 12 ... though she’s been 12 fora 
long time. When he tells her he likes 
her, she asks him if he'd like her even 
if she weren't a girl. He’s puzzled, but 
that’s just part of love's delirium. It 
takes Oskar a while to accept what 
we've by now figured out. Eli is a 
vampire. This creates complications. 
But it also places Eli, who recognizes 
the genuine fascination with blood in 
Oskar’s murderous fantasies, in the 
role of his protector. 


LET THE RIGHT ONE IN, directed by 
Tomas Alfredson and freely adapted 
by John Ajvide Lindqvist from his own 
novel, is something special. It offers a 
highly original spin on the weary 
corpse that is the vampire film, yet 
rather than clutter itself with irony or 
obvious metaphors, it completely 
respects the rules of vampire mythol- 
ogy, something evidenced in the title 
itself. It is hushed, it's pace methodi- 
cal. It dazzles even while it draws you 
in like a hot bath. The sense of isola- 
tion felt by Oskar and Eli, so perfectly 


UPCOMING 


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March 21 & 22 9:30am-4;30pm. 

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Y MAR 12.- MAR 18, 2008 
EdDA Be AAbd - SU HALA 


VIDEO INSTALLATION RECEPTION 


embodied with childish awkwardness 
by Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leander 
sson, is heightened by the use of very 
shallow depth of field—it’s rare that 
more than a single character is in 
focus at any time. The pervasive snow 
and night conjure an atmosphere of 
crisp wintry dreamscape in which 
colours stand out, vivid and hand- 
some. Close-ups or medium shots are 
Starkly contrasted by static wide shots 
in scenes of violence, so that the vio- 
lence plays out before our eyes as 
though on a stage. 

This stylization is woven into the 
look and sound and story itself. Eli's 
guardian—perhaps slave?—gasses a 
teenager in the woods; a more awk- 
ward form of abduction is hard to 
imagine. When he strings up his vic 
tim from the ankles and prepares to 
drain his blood it's hard not to notice 
how the woods are lit up like a foot 
ball field. But Let the Right One In 
never tries to pass itself off as grit) 
realism. Many of the special effects 
are lovingly old school. There’s per- 
verse pleasure in the spectacle of a 
woman rolling down a flight of stairs 
covered in rabid cats. It’s somehow 
closer to fairytale, albeit a nightmar 
ish one riddled with ambiguities sur 
rounding death, child autonomy, 
sexuality and gender—something 
dealt with explicitly in the novel but 
wisely only hinted at in this far more 
subjective treatment. It was one of the 
most remarkable films of 2008 yet 
failed to open in Edmonton. It’s now 
on DVD. w 


FILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY-ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


= 
” 2 | 


splattery as Campbell's 
e who appreciates their 
Ithy amount of groans will 
leasure as Campbell 
ing of his fans (who also 

shit that flies here). 


10 ee 


hard in that regard, 
cogent critique of 


with a woman, bloated, 
ly awake, rolling her motor- 


little recourse but to light a 
other beer and call the 
a p, her slovenly apathy ele- 
vated to a kind of childlike helplessness. 
Moments later, she's scooped up by a team 
of soldiers with guns drawn, her scooter is 
hooked to a helicoptor, and she's whisked 
away to some kind of internment camp set 
upinan elementary school. 

Her confusion is quickly replaced with 
sinister pat r the people have been gath- 
ered here und der the guidelines of the New 
Copenhagen Criteria, a brutally rational 
doctrine that has decreed that, for the good 
of society, those that have taken more than 
they've contributed are going to be put to 
death. Joining our motorized alcoholic are 
an angry punk couple, a rotund arts director, 
a brother-and-sister combo who run a strip 
joint/brothel and an impostor who's work- 
ing with the Mandela resistance, a group 
hoping to save the dregs from death. 

{t would be tempting to call How to Get 
Rid of the Others a satire of right wing 
ideals, its criteria an extreme example of the 
excessive eon responsibility the right 
can sometimes demand of people, but even 
if it does lean on the right harder than the 
left, one of the best parts of the film is that 
it speaks to a more general undercurrent of 
disgust with those we see as somehow not 
earning their keep as well as we are. There 
is a sharp indictment here of those that 
cheat welfare, sure, and also of artists of 
questionable value (one of the choicer lines 
in the film has the unsympathetic military 
man tasked with interviewing each detainee 
to determine their fate saying they get a lot 
of artists, because “they have a low income, 
usually ith some kind of substance 
abuse”), but Others take shots at almost 
everything we look down our noses at, from 
obesity to aesconatle sex practices. 

And it's that sort of indictment of the audi- 
ence’s values that really helps the film linger 
in the mind. It's somewhat hurt by how hard 
it tries to force your opinion—it's not excep- 
tionall : ay you to your own 

‘people here—and there's a 

subplot ‘involving a 

ver overseeing the whole 
Get Rid of the Others 
ig you see the 


same mn offering enough humanity to 
make you feel a bit guilty for even consider- 
'ng the idea. Its an outright challenge to both 

ig erst all good 


FRI, MAR 13 - THU, MAR 19, 2009 


firm 
EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY 


Royal Alberta Museum, 102 Ave, 128 St. 
780.439.5284 


THE LADY EVE 
Mon 8:00 bis 


CHABA THEATRE-JASPER 


6094 Connaught Dr. Jasper, 
780,852,4749 
THE INTERNATIONAL (144, vio- 


lence) 

Fri-Sat 7:00, 9:00; Sun-Thu 8:00 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG 

Fri-Sat 7:00, 9:00; Sun-Thu 8:00 


Se 


130 Ave 50 St. 780.472.9779 
THE UNINVITED (14A, frightening 
scenes) 
Fri-Sat 1:55, 4:55, 7:35, 9:55, 
ee Sun-Thu 1:55, 4:55,°7:35, 


NEW IN TOWN (PG, coarse lan- 


) 
Psat 1:10, 4:0s0, 6:40, 9:10, 
‘ee Sun-Thu 1:10, 4:00, 6:40, 


INKHEART (PG, frightening 


scenes) 
| Daily 1:45, 4:35, 7:10 


UNDERWORLD: RISE OF THE 
LYCANS (184A, gory scenes) 
Fri-Sat 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 9:50, 
12:00; Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 
9:50 

LAST CHANCE HARVEY (PG) 
Daily 9:45 

- BRIDE WARS (PG) 

Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 9:20, 
11:35; Sun-Thu 1 :30, 4: 15, 7:15, 
9:20 

BEDTIME STORIES (G) 

Fri-Sat 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 9:40, 
11:45; Sun-Thu 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 
9:40 

MARLEY AND ME (PG) 

Fri-Sat 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35, 
ae Sun-Thu 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 


“VALKYRIE (PG, violence, coarse 
language) 

Daily 6:50, 9:25 

THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 
Daily 2:00, 4:30 

YES MAN (14 

Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:40, 7:25, 10:00, 
12:40; Sun-Thu 1:25, 4:40, 7:25, 
10:00 

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD 
STILL 


(PG) 
Fri-Sat 1:20, 4:05, 6:45, 9:15, 
11:25; Sun-Thu 1:20, 4:05, 6:45, 
9:15 
BOLT (G) 
Fri-Sat 1:15, 4:00, 7:05, 9:30, 
11:30; Sun-Thu 1:15, 4:00, 7:05, 
9:30 
TWILIGHT (PG, violence) 
Fri-Sat 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40, 
one Sun-Thu 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 


CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


14231 137th Avenue, 780.732.2236 
ae TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


Flue, Thu 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 
7:40, 10:10; Wed 5:10, 7:40, 

10: 10; Star and Strollers Screening: 
Wed 1:00 

THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) 

No passes Daily 2:00, 4:50, 8:00, - 
10:40 

MISS MARCH (184, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 


ui 
Ro passes Daily 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 
10:15 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 


asses Bal 

lo 12:00, 1:00, 2:30, 
a de 4:45, 6:50, 7:00, 8:45, 10:00, 
5 

ONE WEEK (PG, coarse e). 
Fri-Tue, Thu 1:50, 4:30, 7: 40,8 9: 9:50: 
Wed 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Wed 1 

Sees BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
DISNEY Y DIGITAL 3D (G) 

Daily 12: 

FIRED iin PA, cou coarse language) 
Daily 1:40, 

Sanienenee a A 

Fri-Tue, 1 ES 2b, 40, 7:05, 9:40; 
Wed 1: 20, 4 

HE'S JUST NO THAT INTO 


YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content 


ent) 
Daily 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:20 
CORALINE (PG, not recommend- 
ed for young children, frightening 
Scenes) 
Digital 3d Daily 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 
10:20 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 
Daily 1:30, 4:10, 6:40, 8:50 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 12:30, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:50 
GRAN TORINO (144A, language 
may offend) 
Daily 9:10 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
eee 
Daily 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45 


CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 


1525-99 St, 780.436.8585 
ae TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


J 
ead: 11:55, 1:30, 2:25, 


9: 130, 40: 00; Star bad Strolers. 
Screening: Thu 1:00 
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 


(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
puta! violence) 


No passes Daly 1:00, 4:00, 7:40, 


pe MARCH (184A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 
fice e) 

res Daily 12:15, 3:50, 7:50, 
WATCHMEN (184A, brutal violence, 
gory Re) 

No passes Daily 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 
3:40, 5:00, 6:15, 7:10, 9:00, 10:00, 
10:40 

ONE WEEK (PG, coarse language) 
Fri-Wed 12:15, 4:20, 6:45, 9:40; 
Thurs 4:20, 6:45, 9:40; Star and 
Strollers Screening: Thu 1:00 
FIRED UP (14A, coarse language) 
Daily 1:15, 4:10 

THE INTERNATIONAL (14A, vio- 
lence) 

Fri-Wed 12:00, 3:40, 7:00, 10:10; 
Thurs 7:00, 10:10 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

Daily 1:30, 4:20, 6:50, 10:15 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
You as coarse language, sexual 
conten 

Bay 13.0, 3:50, 7:20, 10:15 
CORALINE (PG, not recommend- 
ed for young children, frightening 


scenes) 
Digital 3d Daily 12:15, 3:30, 6:30, 


TAKEN (14A, violence) 
Dally 12:45, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 12:45, 4:40, 7:30, 9:50 
GRAN TORINO (14A, language 
may offend) 
Daly 7:00, 9:50 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 
violence) 
Daily 12:40, 4:00, 6:45, 9:40 
METROPOLITAN OPERA: 
ORFEO ED EURIDICE 
(Classification not available) 

it 11:00 


10200-102 Ave, 789.421.7020 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

DTS Digital Fri-Sun, Tue-Thu 12:50, 
8:40, 7:00, 9:40; Mon 12:50, 3:40, 
9:40 


HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO ~ 
yeu (PG, coarse language, sexual 


tent) 
oe Digital Fri, Sun-Thu 12:15, 
3:30, 6:0, 9:40; Sat 6:30, 9:30 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 
DTS Digital Fri-Sat, Mon-Tue, Thu 
7:00, 3:50, 6:50, 9:10; eniBeD. 
9:10; Wed 1:00, 3:50, 9: 


WATCHMEN (18A, Feat ae 


ory scenes) 
yy Stereo Digital, No passes 
Daily 12:30, 4:10, 7:45 


CORALINE 3D (PG, not recom- 
mepdes for young children, fright- 


Baia 3d Scorely 12:40, 3:20, 6:40, 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
BIS Digital Daily 1:10, 4:00, 7:10, 


id 


OPUS ARTE: UN BALLO IN 
MASCHERA (Opera, classification 


FILM WEEK 


not available) 


vem Presentation Sat-Sun 1:00 


4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:25, 6:55, 9:20; 
Sun 1:50, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20 
TAKEN (144, violence) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:40, 7:20, 9:45; Sat- 
Sun 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45 
PUSH nae violence) 
Daily 9: 
HE'S TUBE NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content) 
Fn, Mon-Thu 3:40, 6:40; Sat-Sun 
12:45, 3:40, 6:40 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:45, 9:30; Sat- 
Sun 1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:30 
CORALINE 3D (PG, frightening 
scenes, not recommended for 
a children) 

lon-Thu 4:10, 6:35, 9:00; Sat- 
Sun 1:30, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 
WATCHMEN (184A, brutal violence, 
gory scenes) 
No Passes, On 2 Screens Fri 4:00, 
4:50, 7:30, 8:30; No Passes, On 2 
Screens Sat-Sun 12:30, 1:10, 4:00, 
4:50, 7:30, 8:30; On 2 Screens 
Mon-Thurs 4:00, 4:50, 7:30, 8:30 
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 4:15, 6:50, 9:40; Sat- 
Sun 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:40 
pee TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
No passes Fri, Mon-Thu 4:30, 7:00, 
9:25; Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:30, 7:00, 
9:25 
MISS MARCH (184, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 

juage) 
ri, Mon-Thu 4:45, 7:10, 9:50; Sat- 

Sun 2:00, 4:45, 7:10, 9:50 


DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 


660148 Ave, Camrose, 780.608.2144 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


BS 
aily 7:15 9:15; Sat, Sun, Tue 2:15 
WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 


Pe scenes) 

aly 7:30; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:45 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144A, 
violence) 

Daily 6:45 9:00; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:55 
TAKEN (144, violence) 

Daily 7:10 9:10; Sat, Sun, Tue 2:10 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 


Daily 7:05 9:05; Sat. Sun, Tue 2:05 
GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 
2020 Sherwood Drive, 780.416.0150 

ee TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


(PG) 

Fri 4:10, 7:10, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:10, 
4:10, 7:10, 9:50; Mon-Thu 7:10, 
9:50 

THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) 

No passes Fri 4:20, 7:30, 10:10; 
Sat'Sun 12:30, 4:20, 7:30, 10:10; 
Mon-Thu 7:30, 10:10 

MISS MARCH (18A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 
guage) 

‘No passes Fri 3:50, 7:20, 9:45; 
Sat-Sun 12:50, 3:50, 7:20, 9:45; 
Mon-Thu 7:20, 9:45 

WATCHMEN (138A, brutal violence, 
gory Sel 

No passes Fri 3:30, 6:30, Recs 
10:00, 10:30; Sat-Sun 12:00, 2: 
3:30, 6:30, 7:00, 10:00, 10:30; 
Mon-Thu 6:30, 8:00, 10:00 
FIRED UP (14A, coarse langu: fe) 
Fri 4:30, 7:15, 9:40; Sat-Sun 1: 
4:30, 7:15, 9:40; Mon- a 
9:40 

HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 


ema :00, 9:30; Mon-Thu 9:30 


TAKEN (14A, violence) 

Fri 4:15, 6:40, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:20, 
4:15, 6:40, 9:20; Mon-Thu 6:40, 
9:20 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 

Fri 4:40, 7:40, 10:20; Sat-Sun 1:20, 
440, 7:40, 10:20; Mon-Thu 7:40, 


GRAN TORINO (14, language 
ol 

Fa Mon-Thu 6:50; Sat-Sun 1:00, 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 

Fri 3:40, 7:05, 10:15; Sat-Sun 


in. 


12:40, 3:40, 7:05, 10:15; Mon-Thu 
7:05, 10:15 


8712-109 St. 780.433,0728 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 


= 6:50, 9:25; Sat-Sun 2:00 
GRANDIN THEATRE 
Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
St. Albert, 780.458.9822 
Date of issue only: Thu Mar 12 
PUSH (14A, violence} 


Thu Mar 12: 1:15, 3:25, 7:15 
THE UNINVITED (144, frightening 


scenes) 
Thu Mar 12: 5:30, 9:30 
HOTEL FOR DOGS (G) 
Thu Mar 12: 1:00, 3:00, 4:50 
GRAN TORINO (14A, language 
may offend) 
Thu Mar 12: 6:45, 9:00 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Thu Mar 12: 12:35, 2:20, 4:05, 
5:50, 7:40, 9:25 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 

jory scenes) 

iW Mar 12: 1:20, 4:35, 7:55 

FRIDAY THE 13TH (184, sexual 
content, gory scenes) 
Thu Mar 12; 8:45 
THE PINK PANTHER 2 (PG) 
Thu Mar 12: 1:10, 3:05, 5:00, 6:50 


LEDUC CINEMAS 


780.352.3922 
ion TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
aay 7:05, 9:20; Sat, Sun 1:05, 
3:2! 


WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
ory scenes) 
ri, Sat, Sun 6:40, 9:40; Mon-Thu 
7:15; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 
violence) 
Daily 6:55, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:55, 
3:20 
FIRED UP (144A, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, 9:15; Sat-Sun 1 
3:15 
METRO CINEMA 
9628-1014 Ave, Citadel Theatre, 
780.425.9212 
ETHICS AND POLITICS IN THE 
CINEMA OF MICHAEL HANEKE 
(STC) 
Fri 9:00 
71 FRAGMENTS OF A 
CHRONOLOGY OF CHANCE 
St. 
t 7:00 
THE STRANGEST DREAM (STC) 
Sun 2:00 
THE CASTLE (STC) 
Sun 4:30 
THE PIANO TEACHER (Rf, dis- 
turbing scenes) 
Sun 9:15 
TIME OF THE WOLF (STC) 
Mon 7:00 
CACHE ay 
Mon 9:1 
FUNNY GAMES US (144A, violence 
«disturbing content) 
Tue 8:00 
FUNNY GAMES (STC) 
Sat 9:00; Thu 9:00 
CODE PaRown (STC) 
Sun 7:00, Wed 8:00 
BENNY'S MIBED. (STC) 
Fri 7:00, Thu 7:00 
| PARKLAND CINEMA7_| CINEMA 7 
190 Century Crossing. Spruce Grove, 
780.972.2332, Serving Spruce Grove, 
Stony Plain; Parkland County 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


fc) 

aily 6:45, 9:20; Sat, Sun, Tue 

12:45, 3:10 

WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 
y 7:30; 

Sat-Sun, Tue 1:30 

PUSH (14A, violence) 

Daily 6:55, 9:10 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 

violence) 

Daily 7:00, 9:25; Sat-Sun, Tue 

12:50, 3:30 

CONFESSIONS OF A 


SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
ey 6:50, 9:00; Sat-Sun, Tue 1:10, 
3:2 


TAKEN (144A. panes) 
aor 7:05, 9:05; Sat-Sun, Tue 1:00, 


HOTEL FOR DOGS (G) 
Sat-Sun, Tue 1:05, 3:15 


PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 


Daily 7:10, 9:15; Sat-Sun, Tue 
12:55, 3:00 


10037-£2 Ave, 780.433.0723 
ONE WEEK (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 6:50, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:30 
THE WRESTLER (14A, sexual 
content, nudity, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, 9:10; Sat-Sun 2:00 


| SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM | 
WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.444.2400 
mee TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
{ 
Fri-Tue, Thu 12:10, 2:40, 5:00, 
7:30, 10:10; Wed 5:00 
10:10; Star and Strollers 
Wed'1:00 
THE LAST HOUSE ON TH! LEFT 
(1BA, gory scenes, sexual vio! 
brutal violence) 
No passes Daily 1:40, 4:40, 7:40. 
10:20 
MISS MARCH (18A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse 
guage) 
No passes Daily 12:20, 2 
7:50, 10:30 
STREET FIGHTER: THE LEGEND 
OF CHUN-LI (144, violence) 
Daily 1:10 
THE INTERNATIONAL (144, vio- 
lence) 
Daily 9:45 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
Fri-Wed 1:20, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30; Thu 
1:20, 4:10, 9:40 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content) 
Fri, Sun-Thu 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 
9:50; Sat 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 
CORALINE 3D (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, fight- 
ening scenes) 
e ital 3d Daily 12:30, 3:20, 6:30, 
:20. 
oan {14A, viole 
Fri-Tue, Thu 4:00, 
4:00, 10:15 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 
Daily 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:15 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 1:30, 4:20, 7:10 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 
Fri-Tue, Thu 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 
9:40; Wed 3:40, 6:40, 9:40; Star 
and Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 
WATCHMEN (184A, brutal violence, 
gory scenes) 
No passes Daily 1:00, 4:30, 8:00 
No Passes Daily 2:30, 6:30, 10:00 
WATCHMEN: THE IMAX 
EXPERIENCE (184, brutal vio- 
lence, gory scenes) 
BNA asses Daily 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 
) 
METROPOLITAN OPERA: 
ORFEO ED EURIDICE 
(Classification not available) 
Sat 11:00 


Screening 


111 Ave, Groat Rd. 780.455.8725 
WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 


gory scenes) 

y Stereo Digital, No passes Fr 
Mon-Thu 8:10; Sat-Sun 12:30, 
4:30, 8:10 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144. + 
violence) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 
7:15, 10:00; Sat-Sun 1:15, 4:10, 
7:15, 10:00 

MILK (14A, coarse language) 
DTS Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 6:35, 
9:30; Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:35, 6:35, 
9:30 

THE READER (184, sexual con- 


Fi, Mon-Thu 7:00, 9:50; 
, 7:00, 9:50 


780.352.3922 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
) 
Baty 7:05, 9:20; Sat, Sun 1:05, 
3:21 


WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence)! 


gory scenes) 

j, Sat, Sun 6:40, 9:40; Mon-Thu 
7:15; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30 

a violence, Coarse 


Balt "00 9:25; Sat-Sun 1:00, 
CONFESSIONS OF A 

LIC (PG) * 
Daly 6:55, 9:25; Sat-Sun 125, » 
3:2 ; 


Why watch the Watchmen? 


Zach Snyder’s take is passable, but by no means necessary 


DAVID BERRY / david @vueweekly.com 
T= most annoying part of the del- 
uge of promotion for Watchmen 
was the part that kept insisting 
that Zack Snyder was a “visionary 
director.” I suppose if you take visionary 
to mean “one who can see,” you have a 
S2ir comment, but Snyder's short fea- 
ture career to this point consists of 
remaking an iconic zombie film (while 
heavily cribbing from a far more inter- 
esting modem take on the genre, 28 
Days Later) and two graphic novel adap- 
tations so slavish, he freely admits to 
using the originals as storyboards. If 
every artist had such vision, the most 
anticipated Hollywood blockbuster of 
the year would be Canterbury Tales On- 


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PRESENTED BY 


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POUTYPOOL 


WEDNESDAY 
MARCH 18™ 


7PM.EMPIRE CITY CENTRE 


NOW PLAYING 


WATCHMEN 

DIRECTED BY ZACK SNYDER 

WRITEN BY DAVID HAYTER, ALEXTSE 
STARRING MALIN AKERMAN, BILLY CRUDUE 
MATTHEW GOODE, JADE EARLE HALEY 
JEFFREY DEAN MORGAN, PATRICK ILSON 


bo o.8 


COMICS 


gins: The Second Nun. 

To emphasize, though, it’s not just his 
choice of projects, but how he realizes 
them, that often dooms Snyder's movies 
to mediocrity at best, which is certainly 
the case with Watchmen. Snyder seems 
capable of only picking up on, or at least 


only focusing on, the most obvious, sim~ 
ple aspects of the work he's interpreting, 
as if he’s heard a two-line synopsis and 
pushed ahead whole hog. When Paul 
Verhoeven was tasked with adapting the 
fascistic Starship Troopers, he turned it 
into a sexy popcorn film that critiqued 
fascists; when Snyder took on the simi- 
larly brutal, bloodlusting 300, he made 
their abs look really sweet. 

A similar problem afflicts Watchmen: 
though it's undeniably beautiful to look 
at—which, given Snyder's admissions 
about fidelity to source, is basically say- 
ing he did a great tracing job—Snyder 
loses a lot of what's really compelling 
here, well beyond the necessary exci- 
sions for running time and narrative 


BASED OM THE BEST-Seti} 


| POUTYPOOL 


IN THEATRES MARCH 20™ 


clarity: I'm no fanboy who demands a 
carbon copy of the book on screen— 
and if I was, | could probably be sated 
by the fact that the first hour or so of 
the film is virtually a shot-by-shot 
recreation of the comic, edits cutting 
like panels—but Watchmen, like most 
really compelling works of art, suc- 


ceeds mostly on its humanity, a certain . 


grounding of its soap operatics in richly 
detailed quotidian life. The graphic 
novel's heroes are sociopaths, neu- 
rotics and otherwise decidedly dam- 
aged individuals, living in a grimy, 
paranoid world; the film's heroes are 
sexy (save Rorshach) ass-kickers who 
sometimes get sad, without much con- 
cer outside their circle. 


FOR THOSE UNFAMILIAR, the story cen- 
tres around a group of “costumed 
heroes,” average people who have 
decided to dress up and fight crime. The 
lone exception in their group is Dr Man- 
hattan, the result of a nuclear accident, 
essentially a god on earth who has so 
altered the world that the US won the 
Vietnam War, Richard Nixon is serving 
his fifth term after abolishing term limits 
and the blue-hued superman is basical- 
ly the only thing that stands between 
the world and nuclear annihilation, a 
one-man missile shield. Largely in 
forced retirement until one of their 
number ends up dead, the heroes start 
investigating the death, led by the 
obsessive, paranoid, brutal Rorschach. 
Now, to be fair to Snyder, this isn't 
necessarily a bad adaptation, just a kind 
of plodding, unimaginative one. Though 
he does focus too-much on the fancy 
superhero aspects and not enough on 


the grounding milieu, besides that he 
gets about as much right as he does 
wrong. Though Malin Akerman is abou; 
as miscast as possible as Silk Spectre, ; 
void of emotion in the closest thing the 
story has to a female lead, the othe, 
main characters fare much bette; 

Matthew Goode is a bit too prissy for the 
Adonis-like genius Ozymandias, by 
Billy Crudup does a lot underneath bic 
paint as Manhattan, and both Jeffre, 
Dean Morgan (the Comedian) and Jacki 
Earl Haley (Rorschach) are terrific a 

violent sociopaths, the former smirking 
and the latter growling. Patrick Wilson 
really shines, though, bringing a perfect 
mix of neutered do-goodery to Nite Ow, 
an upstanding if somewhat reluctan; 
crusader, 

And while the film deserves some 
credit for engaging for most of iis 
two-and-a-half hour running time, i: 
the end it’s pretty hollow. If you're too 
lazy to read the actual graphic nove), 
it’s a passable Coles Notes version 
but otherwise, there are better super 
hero films out there, and a better ve; 
sion of this story at the bookstore. v 


MARCH EASTER EGGS 
by Brian Gibson 


have bee 


2 around 
the ratched 

th the DVD, wh 

had to be hunt 


they 
d out by 

or thos th 
too much time on their hands 
fele}slernellit-Melnmuel (Um elelinimeli 
view ho could activate them . 
by clicking 
menu feature 


THE FULL STORY'S ONLINE AT VUEWEEKLY.COM 
ee 


on inconspicuous 


| They've been to the outback, the backcountry, 
the bush, the ballet, camping, hiking, 
trekking, paddling, dancing, drinking, 
dining. They've been downtown, 
uptown, on the town, the playground, 
the dog pound, Motown. They've 
been on the ice, on the rocks, 


The Chisel Toe 
Available in 
Brown and Black 


www.blundstone.ca 


Campers Village - 
Gravity Pope - 


walked many city blocks. 
And they're just 
getting started. 


Pull on comfort since 1870. 


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10442 Whyte Ave - 780-439-1637 


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Doesn't matter what you call it, Witch rules 


RYAN BIRTLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 
.ock ‘n’ roll has long been 
=< about posturing. As the excess 
wof the ‘80s flowed into the 
stripped-down esthetics of the ‘90s, a 
new rock ‘n’ roll posture emerged— 
apathy. For many it was a put on: 
even while the members of a band 
such as Nirvana took pains to remind 
fans they were in it for the music 
alone and: were troubled by and even 
resented the fame they had achieved, 
they rolled with it, for the most part, 
and not against it. Kurt Cobain was 
perturbed when MTV wasn’t playing 
his video, he checked radio play num- 


bers, he phoned management when 
hy Were ood In short, regardless 
of what he the media, he wasn’t 


nearly as apathetic as he let on—he 
cared about whether his band was 
successful or not. 

Witch is different. When it comes 
to gaining attention and fame for 
what the band is doing, Witch—whose 
members are based in the neighbour- 
ing states of Vermont and Massachu- 
setts—could honestly take it or leave 


it. In fact, they might even prefer to _ 


leave it. Though Witch formed in 
2005, the number of interviews the 
band has given could be accurately 
described as a handful. After releasing 
its eponymous debut album in 2006, 
the’band took a year off. What's more, 
the members almost never practice. 
Guitarist, vocalist and songwriter 
Kyle Thomas, whose voice spills out 
in the slow drawl of those kids at your 
high school who skipped class to 
hang out in their cars listening to a 
Bob Marley tape and. smoking funny- 
_ Smelling cigarettes, holds that when 
the band started there was no plan in 
place, no burning desire to conquer 
the world. Unlike some other bands, 
there were no T-shirt designs ready to 
go and no smokin’ bio written before 
the first practice. : 
_ “don’t think we were really think- 
ing about it, about what the big pic- 
(ure was. It was just like—we’re 
gonna do it and see what happens 
and do it-when we wanna doit. It’s 
loose, that's for sure,” he laughs from 
the band’s van as they return to Ver- 
mont after a tour stop. “We've just 
been doing it the same way for years 
and it’s never got any more organized 
and we've never got any tighter as a 
live band, and when we go on tour 
©veryone's constantly making fun of 
£ach other. 1 dunno—it's hilarious.” 


T CAN'T BE IGNORED that a part of 


ee ed 


FAL MAR 13 (8 PM) 


but 
— 
co WITHTHE GET DOWN, TWIN FANGS 
Oe | NEW CITY, S30 
what drove interest in Witch early on 
was the involvement of indie-rock 
hero J Mascis, who put down his gui- 
tar to take up drums in the band. But 
to attribute this attention solely to 
Mascis would be to ignore the quality 
of the songs Witch has produced. 
Swirling psychedelic dirges that often 
flow into speedy hardcore—the kind 
from the ‘80s—Thomas's songwriting 
focuses on pop structures while max- 
ing out the distortion, flipping the 
tempo and taking you on a wild ride. 
Oh yeah, you can pump your fist to it, 
too. Arguments over whether it’s 
stoner rock, heavy metal, hardcore or 
whatever are immaterial—this shit 
sounds good. 

“People just really feel the need to 


- attach a name to something and they 


can do that, whatever, I don’t really 
care,” says Thomas. “Actually the bass 
player of [San Diego-based band] 
Earthless said that we're more like 
stoner-pop, because they're kind of 
like pop-song formats in a way. I 
thought that was funny. I dunno, man, 
it’s annoying to have people constant- 
ly place a genre on you, but it’s going 
to happen no matter what.” 

When Witch's second album— 
2008's Paralyzed—was released, fan- 
boys were in a tizzy about how much 
the band’s sound had changed from 
its first release. Thomas once 
described the shift as “less weed, 
more speed” but, while there is more 
of a hardcore element, it’s not as if it 
sounds like’a whole new band. 

“That was kind of confusing to me 
that some people think that it's so dif- 
ferent,” Thomas admitted about the 
eruption on music blogs and message 
boards which followed the release of 
Paralyzed. “Honestly, it was a long 
enough period between the albums 
that it was impossible for them to 
sound the same. My songwriting style 
just changes a lot. 

"{ get bored. I can’t just do the 
same thing over and over again—that 
seems stupid.” 

But that stuff about never practis- 
ing, that can't be true right? It’s just a 
lie in a bio, just a bit of that rock ‘n’ 
roll posturing—a little bit of, “Look 
how awesome we are we don’t have 
to practice,” right? No—Witch is differ- 


ent. When asked if the band ever 
practised, Thomas replies, “Not at all. 
“We hadn't actually played with J—I 
mean, we did a tour in the fall on the 
West Coast, but Mario [Rubalcaba] 
from Earthless was playing drums 
because J was doing some other 
shit—so before this tour we had one 
practice where we just ran through 
the songs once with J, and then we 
played our first show in Toronto, but 
before that we hadn't played together 
in almost a year,” he continues, 


~——ONTHRCAVER 


TV ROCK / 40 


FAUNTS / 43 


chuckling. “The first show was pretty 
rough, but after that one it got better." 


$0 WHAT IS the future of witch? It's 
anyone’s guess, really. It would be a 
terrible loss to have the band disap- 
pear into the ether forever, though it’s 
done so for significant lengths of time 
only to emerge even better—though 
no tighter’or more organized. Thomas 
says he has been working on new 
songs, however, so if all goes well 
then this won’t be the last Edmonton 


has heard from Witch 

“| have a lot of little pieces of things 
but nothing really substantial yet—I 
have songs that could be songs but 
they don’t really have that special thing 
yet, so I'm just waiting for that to hap- 
pen,” he says before musing about 
whether or not the new songs will 
incite the same furor as his last batch. 

“Actually the newer stuff sounds 
more like the first album a little bit, I 
don’t know what they'll say,” he 
laughs. 


t 


‘$ 


UA MAROM VSS Fy 


10551- 32 Avene {Upstairs!} 
730-432-5053 


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LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Duff 
Robison 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ with 
Ronnie After Work hosted by Ron 
Rault every Thu and Fri 4-6pm. 
BLUE CHAIR CAFE Robin Hunter 
‘and the Six Foot Bullies; 8pm; pay- 
what-you-can, 

BLUES ON WHYTE James 
Armstong 

CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB Open 
stage hosted by Alberta Crude;"6- 
10pm. 

COAST TO COAST PUB AND 
‘GRILL Open mic at the pub: hip hop 
open mic every Thu night with host 
Yak Dollaz 


DRUID Guitar heroes 


DUSTER'S PUB Thu open jam host- 
ed by The Assassins of youth. 
(blues/rock}; 9pm; no cover 


DVB Open mic Thu 


ECO CAFE-VILLAGE AT PIGEON 
LAKE Open Mic Nights ist and 3rd 
Thu every month; 6:30-8-30pm; open- 
mie@deadmansdog.com 

ENCORE CLUB Mourning Wood; $6 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Open jam: 
6:30pm 

HULBERT'S Tanner Gordon; 8pm: 
$10 (door) 

JAMMERS PUB Thu open jam: 7- 
iipm 

J AND RA BAR AND GRILL Open 


stage with the Poster Boys 
{pop/rock/blues), 8:30pm-12:30am: 


JET NIGHTCLUB Marcy Playground, 
One Day Late, Second Hand Smoke; 
7pm; $15.75-$20 at TicketMaster 
JULIAN'S PIANO BAR-CHATEAU 
LOUIS Graham Lawrence (jazz piano); 
8pm 

LB'S PUB Open jam with Ken 
Skoreyko; 9pm: 

LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRILL Open 
Stage Thu with Gary Thomas 
NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by 
Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers 

RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 


Piano Players; 8pm-lam_ 


RIVER CREE Hank Show (Hank 
Williams Sr. tribute) 


URBAN LOUNGE James Murdock 
Band, Paul Bellow, West of Winnipeg: 
Spm; no minors; $6 


WILD WEST SALOON Suite 33 


CLASSICAL 


JUBILEE AUDITORIUM Bizet’s The 


Pearl Fisher, Edmonton Opera, with 
Cofin Ainsworth and Gregory Dahl, 
Amy Hansen, directed by Brian 
Deedrick: sung in French with English 
supertitles; 7:30pm; Opera Talks: 
Kaasa lobby: hosted by Dr David 
Cook, 6:45pm: tickets at Jubilee 
Auditonum box office. 780.429.0600 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Bizet's 7he 
Pearl Fishers: Edmonton Opera; 
7:30pm; $24-$110 at the Edmonton, 
Opera box office, 780.429.1000; per- 
formed in French, with English sur- 
titles projected above the stage 


DIS 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 
Entertainment” 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Big Rock 
Thu: Dus on 3 levals=Topwise 
Soundsystem spin Dub and Reggae in 
The Underdog: 


BUDDY'S Wet underwear contest 
with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


FILTHY McNASTY'S Punk Rock 
Bingo with DJ SWAG. 


FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Requests with DJ Damian 


GAS PUMP Ladies Nite: Top 
40/dance with DJ Christian 


GINGUR SKY Urban Substance Thu 


HALO Thursdays Fo Sho: with Allout 
Dus DJ Degree, Junior Brown 


KAS BAR Urban House: with DJ 
Mark Stevens; Spm 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays: 
funky house/techno with DJ Colin 
Hargreaves, house/breaks with DJ 
Krazy K. hardstyle/techno with DJ 
Decha, tech trance/electro with DJ 
Savage Garret; no minors; no cover 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Bingo at 
9:30pm followed by Electroshock 
Therapy with Dervish Nazz Nomad 
and Plan (electro, retro) 

ON THE ROCKS Salsaholic 
Thursdays: Dance lessons at 8pm; 
Salsa DJ to follow 

OVERTIME SOUTH Retro to New 
classic rock. R&B, urban and dance 
with DJ Mikee; 9pm-Zam; no cover 


PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT Hit It 
Thursdays: breaks, electro house spun 


with Pl residents 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Metal Thurzday 
With org666: 


‘STARLITE ROOM Music 1st and The 
Techno Hippy Crew: Bassnectar, Kush 
Arora, Shamik and guests; 8pm 
‘STOLU'S Dancehall, hip hop with DJ 
Footnotes hosted by Elle Dirty and. 
ConScience every Thu; no cover 


TEMPLE Tainted Thursdays: Electro _ 
Pap, Indie Rock and Roll 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


ARTERY Edmonton Festival of the 
Guitar Women Will Rute the World 
Music Summit: The Mo Lefever Trust, 
Rhonda Stakich, The Good Lovelies; 
6:30 (door), 7pm: $18 {advi/$20 (door) 
at TIX on the Square 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Du! 
Robison 


AVENUE THEATRE Audio/Rocketry, 
Lions for Sheep, City of Sails, Luca; 
no minors; 8pm (door); $10 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ with 
Ronnie After Work hosted by Ron 
Rault every Thu and Fri 4-Gpm 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Little Miss 
Higgins (roots/bluas; $20; SOLD OUT 


BLUES ON WHYTE James 
Armstong 


BRIX BAR Friday The 13th 
Heavyweight Bass Massacre with DZ 
(San Fran); Phateat, Oub Affiliates and 
Jme J; Spm (door), $20 at 
TicketMaster, Foosh, Blackbyrd 


CARROT Live music Fridays: Karen 
Parkka (jazz); all ges; 7:30-9:30pm; 
$5 (door) 

CASINO EDMONTON Souled Out 
(pop/rock) 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Crush 
(pop/rock) 

CENTURY CASINO Shanneyganock 
(rock/pop); 7pm; $24.95 at 
TicketMaster 

COAST TO COAST Open Stage 
every Fri night with host Leona 
Burkey at 9pm 


DV8 TAVERN Live music every Fri; 
Spm; $5 

EDDIE SHORTS Stevie Ray and 
Whole Lotta Trouble (blues) 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Full 
Moon Party; Spm; $22.50 at 
TicketMaster 


7 
ENCORE CLUB Oceanic (new wave 
Celtic rock band) 

FRESH START CAFE Live music 
Live Jim Findlay Trio (jazz); 6-Spm; 


GRANT MACEWAN DOWN- 
TOWN-CAMPUS 


CAFETERIA 
Music Is A Weapon Weekend: Opus _ 
MC {conscious hip hop); 12pm; free 
HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Romi Mayes 
{CD release party), Chloe Albert; 
7.30pm (door), 8pm (show); $12 
{adv)/$15 (door)/$8 (studien/senior) at 
TIX on the Square, at the Haven, 
www.thehavensocialclub.com, 
780.755.6010, 


HULBEAT'S The House Kats; 8pm; 
$10 (door) 

HYDEAWAY All ages art space: The 
Burning Hell, Kim Barlow, Jill Pollock, 
Jessica Jalbert 

TRISH CLUB Jam session; 8pm; no. 
caver 

IVORY CLUB Dueling piano show 
with Jesse, Shane, Tiffany and Erik 
and quests 

JEFFREY'S SMOOTH Jazz Trio (con- 
temporary jazz band); $10 

JEKYLL AND HYDE (PUB) 
Headwind (classic pop/rock); every 
Fri; Spm: no cover 

JULIAN’S PIANO BAR-CHATEAU 
LOUIS Graham Lawrence (jazz piano); 
8pm 

KINGSWAY LEGION Canteen: 
Christine Home 

LBS PUB Slowburn (blues/roots); 
9:30pm-Zam 

LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR Chris 
Ford, 89m 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Witch, 
J Mascics of Dinosaur Jr, Kyle 
Thomas and Asa Irons of Feathers, 
Dave Sweetapple; no minors; tickets 
at New City, Megatunes, Freecloud 
Records, Blackbyrd 

OLD TIMERS CABIN Full Moon Folk 
Club: Le Vent Du Nord (CD release), 
The Pure; 8pm; $17 at TIX on the: 
Square $20 (door) 


ON THE ROCKS GO!; 10pm 

180 DEGREES Sexy Friday night 
POLISH HALL James Hunter, guests; 
8pm 

PALACE CASINO (WEM) The Jags 
PARKLAND PUB Dwayne Cannan 
(blues, “50s/'60s, roots, originals); 
Spm-lam 

PAWN SHOP The Faunts (CD release 
panty), The Whitsundays, Rolland, 
Pemberton Ill (Cadence Weapon); 
Spm; $10 (before 10pm\/$12 (after 
10pm) 

RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players; Spm-2am. 
RENDEZVOUS PUB In Oath of Hera, 
Mervyn Albin, Harpazo Falls 

RIVER CREE Hank Show (Hank 
Williams Sr. tibute) 


STARLITE ROOM Friday The 13th 
Heavyweight Bass Massacre with 


VENUE GUIDE 


WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 * BOOTS 10242-106 St, 780.423.5014 * BRIXX BAR 10080-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 * BROOKLYN'S LOUNGE 9216-34 Ave + 
BUDDY'S 117258 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 * CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Avayill Rd, 780.463.9467 * CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780 424 9467 * CHATEAU 
LOUIS: JULIAN’S PIANO BAR/ROYAL COACH/TOUCH OF CLASS 11727 Kingsway, 780.452.7770 * CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB 2021 Millbourne Rd, West, 
780.462.6565 * CHROME LOUNGE 13? Ave, Victoria Trail * COASTTO COAST PUB AND GRILL 5552 Calgary Trail, 780.439.8675 * CONVOCATION HALL Arts Bldg, U of A 
780.492.3611 * COPPERPOT RESTAURANT Capital Place, 101, 9707-110 St, 780,452. 7800 » CROWN PUB 10709-109 St * DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave * DRUID 
11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 * DUSTER’S PUB 6402-119 Ave, 780.474.5554 » DV8 TAVERN 8307-99 St, www.DV8TAVERN.com * ECO CAFE Village at Pigeon Lake * 
EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM Phase Ii!, 780.489.SHOW * ENCORE CLUB 116 957 Fir St, Sherwood Park, 780.4170111* FIDDLER'S ROOST 8906-99 St * FILTHY 
MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 * FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 10025-105 St * FLUID LOUNGE 10105-109 St, 780.429.0700 « 4TH AND VINE WINE BAR 
11358-104 Ave, 780.497.7858 © FOX 10125-109 St, 780.990.0680 » FOXX DEN 205 Camegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295 * FRESH START CAFE Riverbend Sq, 780.433.9623 + 
FUNKY BUDDHA 10341-82 Ave, 780.433.9576 » GAS PUMP 10166-114 St, 780.488.4841 * GINGUR SKY 15505-118 Ave, 780.913.4312/780.953.3606 « HALO 10538 Jasper 
Ave, 780.423. HALO HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 151204 (basement), Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.6010 * HILLTOP PUB 6220-106 Ave, 780.490.7359 * HOOLIGANZ PUB 10704 — 
124 St, 780.452.1168 * HULBERT'S 7601-115 St. 780.436.1161 * HYDEAWAY ALL AGES ART SPACE 10209-100 Ave » IRON BOAR PUB 4911-51st St, Wetaskiwin * IVORY 
CLUB 2940 Calgary Trail South * JAMMERS PUB 11948-127 Ave, 780,451,879 * JAND R BAR AND GRILL 4003-106 St, 780,436 4403 * JEFFREY’S CAFE 9640 142 St. 
780.451.8890 * JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB and RESTAURANT Riverview Inn, 10209-100 Ave, 780.426.5381 (pub)/780.429.5081 (rest) * JET NIGHTCLUB 9221-34 Ave, 
780.466.6552 * JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 11455-87 Ave, 780.429.1000 * KAS BAR 10444-82 Ave, 780.433.6768 * KINGSWAY LEGION 10425 Kingsway Ave, 780.425.8654 
Ave * LB'S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St. Albert, 780.460.9100 * LEGENDS PUB 6104-172 St, 780.481.2786 » LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 * LIVE 
WIRE BAR AND GRILL 1107 Knotwood Rd. East * LOOP LOUNGE 367 St Albert Rd, St Albart, 780.460.1122 « MACLAB CENTRE FOR PERFORMING ARTS (LEDUC) 4303: 
50 St, Leduc * McDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10025-101 St « MORANGO’STEK CAFE 10118-79 St * MURRIETA'S 10612-82 Ave, 780.438.4100 * MUTTART HALL 
Alberta College, 10050 Macdonald Dr « NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 * NEW CITY 10081 Jasper Ave, 780.989.5066 * NIKKI DIAMONDS 8130 Gateway 
Blvd. 780.439.8006 * NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-109A Ave * O'BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 * OLD TIMERS CABIN 9430-99 St * 180 DEGREES 10730-107 
St, 780.414.0233 » ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 ¢ OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 10304-1117 St, 780.423 1643 * OVERTIME SOUTH Whitemud Crossing, 
4211-106 St. 780.485.1717 » PALACE CASINO-WEM 8882-170 St, 780.444.2112 * PARKLAND GRILL 5322-44 272, Spruce Grove, 780 884 4579 « PAWN SHOP 10551-S2 
Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 * PLANET INDIGO-JASPER AVE 11607 Jasper Ave * PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT 812 Liberton Dr, St. Albert * PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10220-1023 
St * POLISH HALL 10960-104 Si « RED PIANO-PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 * RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 « 
RENDEZVOUS PUB 10108-149 St * ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT CENTRE Concordia School of Music, 112 Ave, 73 St * ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St. 
780,482.5253 * ST. TIMOTHY'S ANGLICAN CHURCH 2420-145 St, 780.483.5506 * SECOND CUP-STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq * SECOND CUP 
12336-102nd Ave * SECOND CUP-124 STREET 12336-124 St, 780.451.7574 * SIDELINERS PUB 1018-127 St, 452-6006 * SPORTSWORLD 13710-104 St * STARLITE 
ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 * STEEPS-OLD GLENORA 12411 Stony Plain Rd, 780.488.1505 * STEEPS TEA LOUNGE-COLLEGE PLAZA 11116-82 Ave, 780.988.8105 
* STOLLI'S 2nd Fi, 10368-82 Ave, 780.437.2293 = STRETCH PUB 10208-99 Ave, Ft. Saskatchewan, 780.992.3287 * SUEDE LOUNGE 11806 Jasper Ave. 780.482.0707 * 
TAPHOUSE 9020 McKenney Ave, St.Albert, 780.458.0860 * UNION HALL Argyll, 99 St, 780.702.2582 * URBAN LOUNGE 10544-62 Ave, 780.437 7699 « WHITEMUD 
CROSSING LIBRARY 4211-106 St, 780.496.1922 * WILD WEST SALOON 12912-50 St, 780.476.3288 « WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St. 780.436.2286 « X WRECKS 93 Ave, 50 
St. 780 466 8069 * Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St. 780.994.3255, www.yafterhours.com * YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St. Albert, 780.459.0295 


Freestylers, DU Degree vs. Battary 
Daphuturvs. Joust and Animauy \- 
Cobra Commandér; Spm (door), $2 =) 
TicketMaster, Foash, Blackbyrd 


‘STEEPS—OLD GLENOAA |, 
Music Fridays: Geoff Wybenga; 
8.30-10:30pm 

TAPHOUSE The Turn, Se7en Sides 
White Lightning: 8pm (door) 
TOUCH OF CLASS-CHATEAY 
LOUIS Barry Prete [pop/roek): 8 21), 


URBAN LOUNGE Line of Sigh 3p., 
$5 (door) 


WILD WEST SALOON Suite 


X WRECKS Allan-Lee Ropchian ang 
the Blues Busters; 8-12 


YARDBIAD SUITE George 
Blondheim Trio, PulPerry; Bpm ( 
‘Spm (show); $20 {member)/$24 
(quest) at TicketMaster 


CLASSICAL 


MUTTART HALL Edmonton Cla 
Guitar Society; Pavel Stevi 
{adult}/$25 (student/senior/E 
member) at TIX on the Square 
CO ee 


DJS 


BANK ULTRA LOUNGE Conca: 
Fridays: 91.7 The Bounce, Nesio 
Delano, Luke Morrison 


BAR-B-BAR DJ) James; no cover 
BAR WILD Bar Wild Fridays 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE f;; 0). 
Spin Wooftop and Main Floor: Eni 
jams with Nevine—indie, sou! 
Motown, new Wave, electro; 
Underdog: Perverted Fridays: Punk 
and Ska from the '60s 70s anc 
with Fathead 

BOOTS Retro Disco: retro dan 


BUDDY'S We made ‘em famo 
Eddy Toonflash, come early to 
fineup, no cover befose 10pm 
CHROME LOUNGE Platinum 1 
Fridays 

EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock, hip hop 
house, mash Up; no minors 


ESMERELDA'S Eves Freakin Fren 
Fridays: Playing the best in country 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DJ 
Damian 

GAS PUMP Top 40/dance with DJ 
Christian 

HALO Mod Club: indie rock, new 
wave, Brit pop, and ‘60s soul v 
Blue Jay, DJ Travy D; no cover belore 
10pm; $5 (after 10pm) 

GINGUR Ladies Room: with Bomb 
Squad, DJ OB the Teacher 

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Hypnotig Friday 
Breakbeat, house, progressive anc 
electro with Groovy Cuvy, DJ Fuuze 
NEWCASTLE PUB Fridays House. 
dance mix with DJ Donovan 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 0. 
Anarchy Adam (Punk) 


OVERTIME BOILER AND TAP- 
ROOM SOUTH Retro to New. cla 


* ALL SAINTS CATHEDRAL 10035-103 St * ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave * ATLANTIC TRAP 
AND GILL 7706 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611 * AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 
780,4772149 * BANK ULTRA LOUNGE 10765 Jasper Ave, 780.420.9098 * BILLY BOB'S 
LOUNGE Continental Inn, 16625 Stony Plain Rd, 780.484.7751 * BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 « BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 » BLUES ON 


— 


Nasit 


They're not Ticketbastards 


STEVEN SANDOR 
n@wueweekly.con . 


2 OE SANDOR 
= 


OK, a few weeks ago in this column space 
| took what | assumed would be an unpop- 
ular stance. | defended Ticketmaster's 
practice of redirecting online customers to 
its Ticketsnow.com resale service. 

Now, fll defend the company again. 
Actually, !am aan to defend the concert 
business in general. 

Here in Ontario, the Ministry of the 
Attorney General is planning to take Ticket- 
master to task, beginning an investigation 
into the pricing of concert tickets and sport- 
wi events—especially in tough times. 

Now, it's nice to know that the govern- 
ment, in times where people are losing jobs, 
is tackling important issues, like the afford- 
ability of lower bowls to see the Jonas 
Brothers or if it's dirty pool that Maple Leaf 
Sports and Entertainment can boost prices 
to see the Leafs, Raptors or Toronto FC. 

There are two key issues | have with 
this embarrassing display of politicking. 

1. Why are concert-ticket prices so 
high? Because the music-business model 
has changed. In the times that preceded 
the era of the download, musicians actu- 
ally made money from record sales and 
often treated touring as a break-even or 
even money-losing option that would help 


promote the sales of CDs, cassettes, vinyl 
and merchandise. 

Now, thanks to downloading and pira- 
cy, bands and the industry itself see the 
CDs and vinyl as the promotional tools. 
Concerts are where the money is made. 
That's one of the major reasons why the 
price of CDs has continued to fall and 
concerts cost more and more to attend 

If government wants to legislate how 
much it costs to go to a concert, well, then 
it also needs to do a hell of a lot more to 
protect bands from losing record sales. 

“Minister (Chris) Bentley wants to 
ensure families and music fans are being 
treated fairly when they buy tickets for 
concerts and other events,” a source in 
the Ministry was quoted by The Canadian 
Press last week. Are jobs in the concert 
business not So important? 

And, what about protecting artists 
from copyright infringement? 

The two items need to be addressed 
together. The loss of album sales has had a 
direct impact on the price of concert tickets. 

2. This is an even more basic argument. 
Ticketmaster, other than service charges, 
does not set the ticket prices. The promot- 
ers who put on the shows settle on the 
prices, after figuring how much they have 
to pay the bands, the security, for the hall 
rentals and equipment—and insurance. 


| WILL MAKE IT simple. Let's say, to 


book a band in Edmonton, the promoter 


has to promise to pay $5000. Also, an 
opening band costs $2000. That's $7000 
on talent. Then, ani insurance premium 
costs $1000. That brings to the total to 
$8000. Security staff will cost $1000, and 
the rental of a PA and staging equipment 
costs another $1000. That's 10 grand 
The promoter knows the venue holds 500 
people. If there is no guest list, tickets 
would have to be priced at $20 each for 
the show to break even. Now, a promoter 
has to make a living, too, so there will be 
added costs for profit. 

It's a major risk. If the promoter 
doesn't sell enough tickets, the 
bands. and fixed costs still need to 
be paid. Money could be Jost. So, the 
promoter needs to price according- 
ly—a number high enough to lessen 
risk, but not high enough to scare 
away ticket buyers 

Demographics make up huge chunks of 
the decisions. A band aimed at teens will 
attract kids spending their allowances. 
Meanwhile, a band aimed at thirtysome- 
things will get its fair share of people 
who will spend money at shows. It’s how 
the system works. 

And Ticketmaster has nothing to do 
with it 

Nor should governments. w 
Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chief 


of Vue Weekly, now an editor and author 
living in Toronto. 


‘ork. R&B, urban and dance with D+ 
Mike, Spm-Zam; no cover 


PLAY NIGHTCLUB The first bar for 
the queer community to apen ina 
decade with Du's Alex Brown and 
Eddie Toontlash: Spm (door); $5 
www playnightelub ca 


RED STAR Movin’ on Up Fridays: 
indie, rock. funk, soul, hip hop with: 
OJ Gatto, OJ Mega Wattson 


ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 


‘SPORTSWORLD INLINE AND 
AND ROLLER SKATING DISCO Top 
40 Request with a mix of Retro and 
Disoo; 7-10;30pm; www.sports- 
world.ca 


STOLLU'S Top 40, A&B, house with 
People’s DJ 


ee PUB Top 40 with DJ 
sin 


SUEDE LOUNGE DJ Nic-E Remixed 
every Fri 


TEMPLE 7.6.1 Psydays: Spm; B 
Traiats/ DJ Sweetz on Mar 13 
WUNDERBAR fii with the Pony 


Girls, DJ Avindar and DJ Toma; no 
cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Foundation Fridays 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


ARTERY Christian Hansen and the 
Autistics (Power Leopard CD release 
party), Matthew Skopyk. Roland 
Pemberton Il! (OJ set) 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dutf 
Robison 


AVENUE THEATRE Al Else Fails 
{CO rulesse pany), Calculating 
Collapse, AMNW, Stallord, Shattered 
Suns, all ages: 7pm (door); $15 
{tedeomed at the shaw for a free 
Copy of AEFS new discl/$15 (door, 
without the dise) 


SLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of 
the Dog: live acoustic: music every 
Sat afternoon, this waek The Greg 
Cockerill Band: 46pm; no cover 
GLUE CHAIR CAFE Raul Brothers 
(Tooss/blues); $15 


GLUES OM WHYTE Sat Aftermoon 
Jam: (evening) James Armstong 
ROO BAR Solipsiom (CD release, 


A Fistlul office, Ursa: 
Sprit $10 dood 


BROOKLYN'S LOUNGE Lascivious 
Burlesque St Patrick's Burlesque 
Show; Spm; $5 

CARROT Open mic Sat; 730-10pm; 
free 


CASINO EDMONTON Souled Out 
(pop/rock! 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Crush 
(pop/rock) 


CENTURY CASINO The Fortunes. 
$29,95/$39.95 at TicketMaster 


CROWN PUB Acoustic Open Mic 
with Marshall Lawrence and Tim 
Hanwill; 1:30pm (sign-up), every Sat. 
25pm. 

DV@ TAVERN Live music every Sat, 
Spm; $5. 

EARLY STAGE SALOON-STONY 
PLAIN Saturday Live Music 


EDDIE SHORTS Stevie Ray and 
Whole Lotta Trouble (blues) 


ENCORE CLUB Oceanic (ew wave 
Celtic rock band) 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Anna © 
Beaumont; 8.30pm 


HILLTOP PUB Open Stage/mic host- 
ed by Sally's Krackers; 3pm 


HOOLIGANZ PUB Eve Hell and the 
Razors, The Burnin’ Sands; Spm; $5 


HULBERT'S Heather Blush; 8pm; 
$10 (door) 


HYDEAWAY All Ages Art Space; 
Bayonets, Mount Analogue, Gift 
Eaters, Dead Beats 


IRON BOAR PUB Jazz in 
Wetaskiwin featuring jazz trios the 
1st Sat each month: this month; The 
Don Bemer Trio; Spm; $10 


IVORY CLUB Duelling piano show 
with Jesse, Shane, Tiffany and Erik 
and guests 


JAMMERS PUB Sat open jam, 3- 
7.30pm; country/rock band $pm-2am 


SEFFREY'S Marco Claveria (tradi- 
tional Latin); $15 


JET NIGHTCLUB Acronycal, The 
Tum, One Day Late; 9:30pm (show): 
$10 (adv\/$12 (door) 

JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB Headwind 
(classic pop/rock]; Spm; no cover 
JULIAN’S PIANO BAR-CHATEAU 
LOUIS Graham Lawrence (jazz 
piano}; 8pm 

KONGSWAY LEGION Canteen: 
Christine Home 


LB‘S PUB Molsons Sat aftemoon 
open stage hosted by Gord 
Macdonald; 4:30-Spm 


MORANGO'S TEX CAFE Sat open 
stage: hosted by Dr. Oxide; 7-10pm_ 


O'BYANES Live band Sat 3-7pm; 
0) 9:30pm 


160 DEGREES Dancehall and 
Reggae night every Sat 


ON THE ROCKS Quoia; 9pm 
PALACE CASINO (WEM) The Jays 


PAWN SHOP K’Naan; 9pm (door); 
tickets at TicketMaster 


PAWN SHOP Hot Panda (CD 
felease party), Rah Sah, The 
‘Whitsundays; Spm, $10 (before 
10pm)/$12 (after 10pm) 

RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hortest 
dueling piano show featuring the 
Red Piano Players; Spm-2am 
RIVER CREE Long Aun (Eagles trib- 
tite) 

STARLITE ROOM Bruce Read 
Benefit, Etown Beatdown, This is 
War and Miskatonic, $pm (door), $10 
(door) 


Destruction, Krisuin, Mantic Ritual 


TOUCH OF CLASS—CHATEAU 
LOUIS Barry Pretz (pop/rock), 
8:30pm 


“URBAN LOUNGE Line of Sight: Spm 


7 $5 (door 
WILD WEST SALOON Suite 33 


YARDBIRD SUITE George 
Blondheim Trio, PiPerry; 8pm (doorl/ 
Spm (show), $20 (member)/$24 
{guast) at TicketMaster 


CLASSICAL 


ALL SAINTS CATHEDRAL Eviogies: 


Da Camera Singers. John Brough 
{artistic director); 8pm; $20 
{adult)/$15 (student/senior) at TIX on 
the Square 


ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT 
(CENTRE Make a Joyful Noise: 
Festival Gity Winds Advanced Band 
and the Concordia Concert Choir, 
7.30pm; $10 (adultl/$8 (senior/stu- 
dent/child) at door and adv-at 
Concordia’s business office 


JUBILEE AUDITORIUM Bizet’s The 
Paarl Fisher, Edmonton Opera, with 
Colin Ainsworth and Gregory Dahl, 
Amy Hansen, directed by Brian 
Deedriek, sung in French with English. 
supertities; 7:30pm; Opera Talks: 
Kaasa lobby: hosted by Dr David 
Cook 6:45pm; tickets at Jubilee 
‘Auditorium box office, 780.429.0600. 


McDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 
Snapshots of Europa’ Mill Creek 
Colliery Band and the Edmonton 
Swiss Men's Choir, 7:30pm; $17 
{adult)/$13 (student/senior) at TIX on 
the Square, door 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Bizel’s The 
Pearl Fishers: Edmonton Opera; 


7:30pm; $24-$110 at the Edmonton 
Opera box office, 780.429.1000; per- 
formed in French, with English sur- 


titles projected above the stage 


DJS 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sat DJs 


on three levels. Main Floor: Menace 
Sessions: alt rock/electro/trash with 
Miss Mannered 


BUDDY'S Undie night for men only, 
free pol and toumey, DJ 
Arrowchaser 

EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock. hip hop, 
house, mash up 

ESMERALDA'S Super Parties: Every 
Sata different theme 

FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays Gone 
Gold Mash-Up: with Harmen B and 
DJ Kwake 

FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DJ 
Damian 

GINGUR SKY Soulout Saturdays 
HALO For Those Who Know: house 
every Sat with DJ Junior Brown, 
Luke Morrison, Nestor Delano, An 
Rhodes: 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizle Saturday, 


| DJ Groovy Cuvy and guests 


NEWCASTLE PUB Sat Top 40, 
requests with DJ Shen 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Punk 
Rawk Saturdays with Todd and Alex 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Saturdays 
Suck with Greg Gory and BlueJay 


PLANET INDIGO-JASPER 
AVENUE Suggestive Saturdays 
breaks electro house with Pl resi- 
dents 

RED STAR Sat indie rock, hip hop, 
and electro with Du Hot Philly and 
quests 

RENDEZVOUS Survival metal night 
‘SPORTSWORLD ROLLERSKATING 
DISCO Sportsworld Inline and Roller 
Skating Disco; Top 40 Request with a 
‘mix of retro and disco; 1-4:30pm and 
7-10:30pm; wwaw.sports-world.ca 


STOLLI'S ON WHYTE Top 40, R&B. 
house with People’s DJ 

SUEDE LOUNGE The Finest 
Underground House with DJ Nic-E 
every Sat 

TEMPLE 0h Snap 3 room event with 
B Traits, DJ Sweet, Erin Eden, Bass 
jun-key 

'WUNDERBAR Featured DJ and 
local bands 


Y AFTERHOURS Aelease Saturday 


SUN 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Jim Findlay 


BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT Jazz on 
the Side Sundays. Mike Lent 


BLUES ON WHYTE Super Stack 


DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Celtic 
Music Session, hosted by Keri-Lynne 
Zwicker, 4-7pm 

EMPIRE BALLROOM Open Mic 
Sundays battle of the bands; Spm. 
(door); $10 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Souljah Fyah 
‘Sundays; 8pm; $10 (doorl/$5 (stu- 
dent)/$5 (restaurant/pub employees 
with pay stub) 

HORIZON STAGE Hotel California 
(classic rock, Eagles tribute); 7:30pm; 
$25 {adult)/$20 (student/senior) 


HULBEAT'S Sunday Songwriters 
Stage: 7pm; $S/person minimum, 
charge 


HYDEAWAY All ages art space: Z- 
Day featuring Zeitgeist end perform: 
ances by Drake's Theory, All Else 
Fails, The Equation 


LOOP LOUNGE Jam hosted by JJ, 
Lenny B and the Cats; 4:30pm ‘ti! 
whenever 

MACLAB CENTER FOR THE ARTS 
Country Blend (tribute to the Legends 
‘of country music); 2pm; $20 at TIX on 
the Square, Leduc Chamber of 
Commerce, door 


NEWCASTLE PUB Sunday acoustic 
open stage with Willy James and 
Crawdad; 3-6pm. 

NEW CITY Open Mic Sunday hosted 
by Ben Disaster Spm (sign-up: no. 
caver 

O'BYRNES Open mic jam with 
Robb Angus {the Wheat Pool) 

OM THE ROCKS Shocker Sundays 
with King Muskafa 

RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH Jazz 
and Reflections: The Don Berner Trio; 
3:30-5pm; collection at door 

RIVER CREE Long Run (Eagles trib- 
ute) 


Polujin (classical Guitar); Spm 


SECOND CUP Live music every Sun: 
24pm 


« THURSDAYS « 


EDMONTONS HOTTEST INDY BANDS 


MARCH Sth 


ANOS & THE RUMBLE STRIPPERS 


MARCH 12th 


WEST OF WINNI 


& GUESTS 


Ratti 


ReSTIL HER@ SECSNB HAND SM@KE 4 
SEPTEMBER STONE ORDER OF CHAOS 
é ai dll ata 

CRiush Co 
SIX GUNS @VER - 
SUNSET TRIP 


THE FINALS ON APRIL aH” 
TH WO HOMERS WL PLAY IT 


AT THE URBAN LOUNGE 
TICKETS S10.00@URBAN 


i 
a 


Jager Shots 
ALL NIGHT! 


~ WAR 12 -MAR 18, 2009" W7E 
QOUS. St HAM-STSAM YS 


CENTURY 


CASINO 


EARLY ST PADDY'S PART” 


annevoanas 


SIRT ATS 39° 


ROAIBLIT 
AE BRO MD CTR CAS 


i 


ALL SHOWS DOORS AT 7PM + 13103 FORT AD » 643-4000 


Extrasensory 


Swe od 


~~. 


cS 


ROLAND PEMBERTON 
roland @yueweekly.com 


Some asshole broke a window at the Hyde- 
away, the fledgling licensed all-ages venue 
connected to the old Econolodge and the 
Jekyll. and Hyde. Instead of incurring the 
irritatingly high costs of replacing said 
glass, the venue's superheroic promoter 
Cecil Frena decided to fix this problem 
through a different kind of transparency. 
After receiving numerous offers from local 
Musicians, a fundraiser was developed and 
the result was more than enough income to 
get a new window as well as subsidize the 
cost of the quarterly Edmonton music CD 
newsletter that Frena ships to college radio 
for our benefit. But | figured as much. | sup- 
pose it's a good thing that I'm a psychic. 
Clairvoyant, voodoo man, gyspy, what- 
ever you want to call me, | was ahead of 
three developments during this Sunday 
night marathon. Enduring a rotating gallery 
of guitar acts, | was a little disappointed 
by the singularity of Edmonton's burgeon- 
ing talent. My brief generation of synth- 
tempered acts has been replaced by a lo-fi 
personal dynamic, a rockist reaction to the 
commercialization and oversaturation of 
electro-house in recent years. It seems 
that approaching a genuine synth aesthet- 
ic based on European traditions and 


BACKLASH BLUES 


abstract melodicism would somehow 
betray the workmanlike Dirt City rock 
ethos. That isn’t to say the music that was 
played wasn't worthwhile. 

Taking in an Eamon McGrath set at 
5:30 pm may seem beside the point, but it 
was an interesting view on a passionate 
performer. Known for his hedonism and 
devil-may-care attitude, seeing McGrath 
frock out on an empty floor for a seated 
audience where he was playing (possibly) 
without alcoho! while nursing a tender 
voice was a special moment of revela- 
tion. As blurry as his rep is, you have to 
consider his focus on stage as undeni- 
able. There's a certain mystique about 
him that instantly creates interest, 
regardless of his reputation. 

The fact that he was playing this event 
reminded me of Sean Nicholas Savage's 
brilliant anthem in his name, “Eamon,” a 
song that !ampoons his (alleged) drug- 
addled stage frenzy (“Doin’ shows on 
ecstasy!") and maudlin lyricism (“He's so 
unhappy!"). After | spent much of the night 
singing that song's praises, Sans Aides 
(nee Peter Sagar) randomly brought his 
posse on stage for a completely unrelated 
chorus line take on that local favourite. 
Maybe that one was pretty obvious. But 
during Sagar's creative set incorporating 
live looping of drums and atmospheric qui- 
tar textures, | remarked on a similarity to 
the approach of Animal Collective ... imme- 
diately before he launched into a cover of 


perception and 


value 


ae 
“Ponytail” by AC member Panda Bear P., 
ceptive? Sure. Psychic? Possibly. 


AFTER A HILARIOUS romp'through chris 
mas traditions and drunk-dialing etiqueti. 
from the multi-talented Doug Hoyer and , 
emotionally stirring performance from Jir, 
Cuming, we were treated to a rollicking 
blues set from Michael Rault. Beyond th, 
obvious retro touchstones and “old s0,)) 
thapsodizing people typically afford hin, 
Rault actually reminded me a |o: 
Michael Jackson. R&B roots, methodica! 
measured delivery, complete contro! 9j 
tone and pitch and a knack for melodi: 
that only seem to sound good with jy, 
voice, he fits an atypical profile in 
head. It also doesn’t hurt that he’s a com 
plete natural on stage. The first song 
played after his set was "Black A 
White* by Michael Jackson. thought t 
Was really weird. | guess as long as he 
doesn't dye his skin black and get a tasi: 
for Faberge eggs, he should be safe 

More important than my latent myst\ 
abilities, this event affirmed the identi, 
and communal aspect of Edmonto 
music scene. When something goes aw 
we deal with it together and in a way 
that we can all understand, through 
understanding and shared creativity. 
an important message to make to othe; 
scenes and within our community. We 
stand together no matter what one per 
son decides to try and take from us. v 


DIARY OF A PHISH FIEND 


Available this week at vueweekly.com 


WINSPEAR CENTRE Erik Santos 
and Toni Gonzaga 


CLASSICAL 
CONVOCATION HALL Madrigal 


Sim rvin Due or): 
2pm (adunty/$10 [ ide 
at TIX on the Square 


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Celebrating Alberta Composers: | 
Coristi Chamber Choir, 8pm; $18 
(adult at TIX on the Squar 
Gramophone\/$12 ( 
TIX on the Squai 
(adult. door 1/$15 (student/senior 
door) 


ST. TIMOTHY'S ANGLICAN 

CHURCH An Evening with Epsilon 
{contemporary woeal ensambh 
and Mingle wine ba 
at 7pm; $15 (door) 
Timothy's Choral Scholar Program 


WHITEMUD CROSSING LIBRARY 


Attemoon: Amy 


DJS 


BACKSTAGE TAP AND GRILL 
Industry Night: with Atomic Improv, 
Jameoki and DJ Tim 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sunday 
Afternoons: Phil, 2-7pm; Main Floor. 
Got To Give It Up: Funk, Soul, 

Motown, Disco with DJ Red Dawn 


BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB Latest and 
greatest in House, Progressive and 
Trip-Hop; Rudy Electro; 10pm- 
2:30am; quest Ds inquire at 
kelly@muchetti.com 


GINGUR Ladies Industry Sundays 


NEW CITY SUBURBS (jet Down 
Sundays with Neighbourhood Rats 


OVERTIME DOWNTOWN Sunday 
Industry Night: Requests with DJ Bo 


WUNDERBAR Sundays DJ Gallatea 
and XS, quests; no cover 


MON 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sleeman 
Mondays: live music monthly; no 


en 


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HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Jazz Night 
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PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY 
HALL Acoustic instrumental old time 
fiddle jam hosted by the Wild Rose 
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hosted by Shemy-Lee Wisor/Mike 
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STARLITE ROOM Destruction, 
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WINSPEAR CENTRE The Cowboy 
Way- Riders in the Sky, the 
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7:30pm; $20-$65 at Winspear box 


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BAR WILD Bar Gone Wild Mondays 
Service Industry Night: no minors; 
Spm-2am 

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Floor: Eclectic Nonsense, 
Confederacy of Dunces, Dad Rock, TJ 
Hookah and Rear Admiral Saunders 
BUDDY'S NIGHTCLUB Rudy 
Electro latest and greatest in House, 
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230am, intefested guest DJs inquire 
at kelly@michetti.com; karaoke with 
Tiny, amateur Strip contest; Ipm- 
12am, 

FILTHY McNASTY'S Metal 
Mondays: with DJ SWA.G 


FLUID LOUNGE Mondays Mixer 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Daniel and Fowler (eclectic tunes) 


TUE 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Billy 
Wiseman 

DRUID (JASPER AVENUE) Open 
Stage with Chris Wynters 


LB’S PUB Ammar’s Moosehead 
Tuesday open stage every Tuesday 
night Spm-lam; featuring guests 
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O'BYAME'S St. Patricks Day Celtic 
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Toms (Celtic), DJ Hector Medougal 
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ation; MeCuaig: Spm 


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Massacre’ Powerload {AC/DC 


Cele 


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‘SECOND CUP STANLEY MILNER 
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SIDELINERS PUB Tuesday All Star 
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YARDBIAD SUITE Tuesday Nights 
Jam Sessions: Dino Dominelfi 
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Shelley Younge (flute), Jetf Campbell 
{clarinet}, David Quinn (bass clarinet), 
Russell Whitehead (trumpet), Aaron 
Au (violin), Tanya Prochazka (cello), 
Roger Admiral (piano), Brian Jones 
(percussion), Mark Hannesson {live 
electronics), Angela Schroeder (con- 
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jor)/$10 (student) 


McDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 
Spring Bouquet: Edmonton 
Columbian Choirs: 7pm; $15 at TX 
‘on the Square 


DJS 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main 


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Wootftop: with OJ Gundam 


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ESMERALDA'S fletro every Tua: no 
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FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Latin and Salsa music, dance lessons 
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Beats and brains 


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ef 


Christian Hansen & the Autistics is the thinking dancer’s party band 


MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE / marychriste@vueweekly.com 
i Sie is great, as long as 
there's also something real. I 
like spectacle backed by a 
human truth, something you try to 
discover—even if it’s as simple as a 
good show that engages.” 

Christian Hansen tilts righteously at 
the fallacies of the creative arts, with 
bandmates Scott Shpeley and Molly 
Flood making common cause. The 
Spectacle Myth is a favourite target— 
the notion that fun is vacuous; 
amusement is the enemy of the mind, 
incapable of reckoning or revelation. 

“Musicians now often focus on 
each other, how they play, their ped- 
als. They're only engaging the aural 
sense,” Hansen elaborates. “We want 
to play for more than the three of us. 
We want to communicate with the 
audience—and we try really actively. 
When we play live, it’s not about the 
music, but about performing, experi- 
ence, exchange. You can’t get that 
from the Internet, CDs, video.” 

Shpeley picks up Hansen’s thread. 
“Every day we get flooded by media 
We want to invite people to move, to 
dance. Even dudes.” 

“Especially dudes." Hansen adds 


38 


SAT, MAR 14 (9PM) 
CHRISTIAN HANSEN & 


THE AUTISTICS 
WITH MATHEW SHDPYX, ROLAND PEMBERTON I 
THEARTERY, S10 


Lt 
——) 
co 
o 
a 


He sighs and turns to Shpeley. 
“We're all love, man. We gotta get 
tougher stories.” 

Christian Hansen & the Autis- 
tics do actually have tougher stories, 
but those are woven into their music, 
a juxtaposition of bleak and frothy 
propelling the Edmonton-based trio 
into relevance—electro-bards adeptly 
chronicling our fraught and awesome, 
narcissistic and alienating, portentous 
and potentially apocalyptic digital age 
in the middle North America of the 
early 21st century. 

On one hand, Christian Hansen & the 
Autistics assemble deceptively simplis- 
tic, playfully layered dance music that 
harkens back to the supremely cheese- 
ball house of late ‘80s/early ‘90s, but 
rattles that cage with a piecey postmod- 
em approach and promiscuous musical 
influences ranging from nouveau 
orchestral geek pop to all stripes of hip 


WWE WEEMS MARTE MARIS) 2009 


hop, vintage ad jingles to anthemic sta- 
dium rock, early video game bleeps and 
boops to ‘80s John Hughes film sound- 
tracks and the cacophonous erratic 
audio percolation of modem existence . 


THEN INTO THIS cozy oddball musical 
bed, Hansen—in a creaseless buoyant 
croon that jostles intriguingly with its 
sonic realm—tucks in sad-fucker por- 
traits of contemporary life: an Ameri- 
can sex tourist wobbling drunkenly to 
island music while a bevy of exotic 
prostitutes is rounded up for his pick- 
ings, an uneasy dude giving into his 
girlfriend's fantasy of having two men 
at once, a chronic masturbator stuck 
in a dead-end life, an aspiring Alber- 
tan yearning for boom bling, a man 
haunted by childhood sexual abuse by 
a priest and more. Hansen’s stories 
have the crackling feel of literary 
short pieces, deftly drawn and heart- 
breaking particulars nestled in broad- 
er strokes of moody ambiguity 
peppered by numbing everyday static, 

The band’s forthcoming debut, 
Power Leopard, vividly catalogues 
these and other tentative navigations 
of murky societal waters, set to 
almost disturbingly dance-compelling 


synth-soaked beats and melodies. 
“Oh, baby you left me and my bro- 
ken heart,"" Hansen says wearily. “It’s 
not that it isn’t worthy, but I’m look- 
ing for a new way to say it, and 
there’s so much more to say. | like 
using specifics in songwriting; details 
of the uncomfortable weirdness of 
the modern world.” He rankles 
against more creative falsehoods. 
“And you can say a lot as a charac- 
ter. People assume the singer's talk- 
ing as themselves in songs, and 
somehow that has more credibility. 
They think something made up isn’t 
emotionally authentic. | don’t believe 


that. When I write, I use things that _ 


happened to me, happened to other 
people, things I heard on the news, 
whatever—I meld them together. I'm 
expressing myself, not necessarily 
expressing my experiences.” 


He shrugs. "Besides, | can.) 
write when I'm happy. It’s bulishj; th 
tortured artist. I create bette: ,, ), 
things are fine. If I'm depress... 
not making mUSiC—I'm sitting 2\,,, 
in my room, eating ice crea,, 
watching shitty TV.” 

Anyway, CH&A provide the 1), 
for anxiety alongside probine 
soul-crushing jobs and relati: 
social networking perils an, , 
wealth gap. 

“Just because it has a danc 
doesn’t mean it has to be friv: 
Hansen stresses. "For us, it’s no: 
‘dance music,’ but a beat and a -; 
line you can hook into, then ence, 
ing others to have as much fun as ,, 
are live, to have a physical respon; 
the music. It's cool to challenge \ 
people think is ‘rocking.’ We rock }\; 
than a band with stacks and guitars y 


~~ MAGNIFYING 
1) POWER LEOPARD 


by Mary Christa O'Keefe 


"It was the right way to 
Il at fi 
don't hear cowbell enor 
a proclamation: ‘dance is ba 


approach to music” 


Ouch! 


Romi Mayes is achin’ in her bones 


EDEN MUNRO / eden@yueweekly.com 


innipeg songwriter Romi 
Mayes scored big with her 
last album, Sweet Some- 


thin’ Steady, when she hooked up 
with Texan producer Gurf Morlix, 
who was behind the board for a few 
of Lucinda Williams's earlier 
records, along with a host of other 
artists. The teaming of Mayes and 
Morlix was an ideal fit, and the two 
of them recently wrapped up a sec- 
ond album together, Achin In Yer 
Bones. Mayes spoke with Vue Week- 
ly about the collaboration 


VUE WEEKLY: This is the second album 
you've done with Gurf Morlix at the 
helm. Did you know you were 
going to work with him again after 
finishing Sweet Somethin’ Steady? 

ROMI MAYES: Yeah, pretty. much. | was- 
n’‘t a hundred per cent sure what 
was gonna happen, but the way it 
went was Sweet Somethin’ Steady 
was such a success and people 
liked it so much and then Gurf and 
1, we toured together, we stayed 
really close friends. I'd go visit with 
him and his wife and we'd go fish- 
ing. He'd already been privy to 
some of the writing I’d been doing 


MUSIC 


FAL MAR 13 (8 PM) 


| ROMI MAYES 
HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB, $15 


PREVUE 


and already had ideas, so by the 
time it was time to plan another 
album I knew I was going to use 
Gurf again, for sure 


VW: Was the recording process differ- 
ent this time, having done it once 
already? 

RM: The chemistry between us was 
already there—our music sensibili- 
ties we had learned were the same, 
we'd spent a lot of time over the 
last few years listening to music 
together, going to see shows 
together and talking music togeth- 
er, so we knew we were on the 
same page. And then the fact that 
we were such good friends—last 
time when we did Sweet Somethin’ 
Steady we had to sort of find how 
to communicate with each other a 
little bit more sensitively, we were 
sort of being careful of how we 
said things and trying to be 
respectful, but this time we were 
just so relaxed, so the producer to 


rt the album, | think. It’s just the 
atchir 


our attention. You 
And then it's kind of 
ck’. The song sums up our 


THE FULL STORY'S ONLINE AT VUEWEEKLY.COM 


artist relationship was so secure 
that the trust was there. 

And this time I had a lot mor 
production say as well because | 
Knew my boundaries with Gur! a 
little bit better, rather than wit! 
Sweet Somethin’ Steady | just suri ol 
humbled myself completely to hin 
and listened and learned. This !\me 
I went in with a little bit more con 
fidence that I had a lot to bring to 
the table with ideas, and we so!! 0! 
worked together more. He sill 
played the role of producer really 
well, he still pulled out the best ° 
songs and of me through the whole 
process, but it was smoothe’. |! 
was almost safer to.work toge(! 


VW: What did Gurf bring to the album 
as a producer? ; 
AM: if any other producer ‘°" 
approached this album it would hav« 
sounded completely different. 1° 
songs would still be somewha! (ht 
same—I mean, he didn’t rearrano* 
the songs, | maintained the arrans* 
ments that 1 had—but the approach \" 
each song, the groove to each song) 
Gurf’s style is a lot of half-time beall 
and a lot of space, and he’s r¢é') 
great with getting guitar tones ang 
that’s such an important part o! '"'* 
album. This album’s sound is a !0! °" 
electric guitars and space, so! thin’ il 
it was a different producer it cou! 
have ended up being just a straight 
rock ‘n’ roll album for all | know! 
think that the producer's role is 0!*" 
understated in a lot of albums. ¥ 


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Aussie duo forgets trouble and shakes aleg 


CAROLYN NIKODYM / carolyn@vueweekly.com 

aking music has to be one of 
ME: best jobs in the world. 

Sure, there are hurdles and 
hardships—making money comes to 
mind—but as soon as you put a smile 
on one person's face, the magic of 
music begins. 

TV Rock's brand of Aussie electro 
house has been the cause of more 
than a few smiles. The duo’s debut 
album—2006's Sunshine City—was the 
highest selling record of that year 
down under, and the single “Flaunt It” 
broke chart history by being the 
longest running song on the Aus- 
tralian Top 10. 


“At the time, we started our own . 


record label because we couldn't get 
signed,” says the aptly named Grant 
Smillie from his Melbourne studio, 
“no one actually wanted to sign that 
record when we first did it.” 

After the success a major deal was 
forthcoming, but so was the pressure 
of a chart-topping followup. 

“We tried that and to be honest, we 
suck at writing pop,” Smillie laughs. 
“If you go out to write and make a hit 
record, | don’t think you can ever do 
that. I think you need to write a 
record that you love and want to play 
and if it happens to connect beyond 
that, then fantastic. I think if you try 
and manufacture a hit, you tend to get 
something that’s not quite something 
that you play all the time, because it’s 
that fraction too crossover to what 
you want to do. But, look, at the end 
of the day, you can only look forward 
and not look too far back.” 

They just want to produce solid 
dance-floor hoppers, and so far, it has 
paid Smillie and his partner Ivan 
Gough to keep it simple, to take it one 
day at a time. Efforts to garner an 
audience outside of Australia have 
borne fruit, aided by the airplay by the 


2 | Til) MAR 19 (9 PH) 
>| TV ROCK 
a 


LUCKY 13, $18.75 


likes of Pete Tong and Roger Sanchez. 

“When you've got those guys play- 
ing your records and ringing and ask- 
ing when the next one’s going to be 
out and what remixes you've got 
going, it sort of helps out a lot. If those 
guys are playing it then the rest seem 
to follow, so we've been quite lucky,” 
he says. “So the support from that kind 
of thing, that’s the most important part 
about what we do. If you can get a 
couple of those guys on your side, then 
it’s half the battle won.” 


THE OTHER HALF, of course, is getting 


people up on the dance floor. TV 
Rock's electro house might be great on 


the radio, but the true nature of dance 
music is really felt on the dance floor- 
it demands audience participation. 

“If you turned off the music and you 
watched people dancing, you'd thinl 
they were all nuts and you should 
lock them up and put them in a mer 
tal institution, because without the 
music, it’s just a crazy kind of thing 
that we do,” Smillie says. “But I thin! 
that it's important, because it’s just a 
release. | think you go out, you work 
hard, you do what you do—music 
brings out the best part of it. You can 
forget whatever happened during 
your week, as shit as it was, and you 
go out in a social environment thai 
you all come together, everyone has < 
dance and you let yourself go. I don 
know, maybe it’s just becoming pop 
culture, and they should be teaching it 
in school—go ahead and dance. get 
involved.” vw 


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ES STEWART / jstewart@vueweekly.com 

h today’s shifting musical market, 
junts has been able to make the 
most of exploring different outlets 


ible to reconcile their individual 
edules to allow for the more tradi- 
jal route of touring, touring and 
touring, the members instead 
ind ways to release their atmos- 
tic pop music through different 
dia, most notably with 2007's high- 
successful soundtrack to BioWare's 
Effect video game. Citing the 
id's recent deal with Rough Trade 
lishing [Animal Collective, Black 
luntain} in the UK, bassist Scott 
lant explains how the band uses 
se alternate outlets. 


he 
mo: 


BIRTLES / bryan@vuoweekly.com 
because soul music has a sort of 
ful quality to it doesn’t mean its 
titioners are particularly wistful 
mselves. Longtime soul singer and 
itarist James Hunter seems like the 
d of guy more accustomed to back 
ippin’ and hearty laughs than he is to 
‘ing in his beer. Playing with the 
me band for well over a decade, a 
S 4 about their longevity and abili- 
get along for such an extended 
‘ic d of time might elicit an answer 
g platitudes about being relaxed 
sang with the flow, but no—he'll 
e of that. 
ops each other money you see. 
can remember who owes who 
ihat’s basically it,” he laughs over 
ng Connection from his home in 
d. “The thing is that there's no dan- 


et the band’s music into the world. 


The results are in 


unts returns with a bigger lineup and a new record 


FAL, MAR 13 (9 PM) 


= 
= | FAUNTS 
coe | WITH WHITSUNDAYS, ROLAND PEMBERTON Ii 
2 | PAWN SHOR STO 

“Touring isn’t really a huge focus 
for us. From a financial and a 
scheduling point of view, it’s just 
not something we can afford to do. 
The music industry has changed 
quite a bit over the years, and there 
are a lot of different ways to get 
your music out there besides just 
touring and playing shows. We've 
been able to license our music to 
reach people, and along with inter- 
net sites like Pitchfork [who recent- 
ly gave Faunts a favourable review] 


ger of us falling out because we all hate 


each other anyway.” 
Though his music has been referred to 


and others we've been able to get 
our name out there. The Rough 
Trade deal will help with that a lot 
too. I mean, our label [Friendly Fire 
Records] would obviously prefer us 
to be touring,” he chuckles. “But 
they understand our situation.” 
When the band is able to head out 
of town, it makes the most of it, like 
with last year’s well-received set at 
New York City's famed CMJ industry 
showcase, where Faunts was able to 
make some valuable contacts. 
“Friendly Fire is based out of New 
York, so we were able to get a nice 
spot and it went well. We actually met 
the guy that runs Pitchfork down 
there, so we were able to kind of get a 
foot in the door. It’s nice to make 


those smaller things happen that can 
benefit you down the road.” 


FAUNTS’ PARTNERSHIP with Friendly 
Fire records started with the good 
folks at CJSR, who sent the band’s 
2005 debut High Expectations/Low 
Results to the label, which reached out 
to the band soon after and has 
released and re-released everything 
the band has done since 

"They've been such a great label to 
work with,” says Gallant. “just extreme- 
ly dedicated and helpful. They've given 
us a lot of creative freedom, and they 
really let us do things our own way. 
They are small enough that we can call 
them up and talk directly to the head of 
the label, but large enough that they 
can help us in ways we wouldn't be 
able to do ourselves.” 

When it came time to record the’ fol- 
low-up to High Expectations, Faunts 
tured again to Graham Lessard to help 
shape and guide the band's pop-influ- 
enced leanings. Intimately familiar with 
the band’s dream-pop sound, Lessard 
wasn’t content to just sit back and 
press record, taking a more active role 
in the Feel. Love. Thinking. Of. sessions 

“He really did produce this record; 
he was almost like another member 
of the band in a lot of ways. It was 
really helpful to have someone else’s 
perspective that wasn’t in the band.” 

With the band’s lineup fleshed out 
over the years to include Gallant on 
bass guitar and third Batke brother Rob 
on guitar/keyboards, Feel.Love.Think- 
ing.Of. marks the first time that the cur- 
rent line-up has written and released 
music under the Faunts moniker. With 
an emphasis on incorporating all mem- 
bers’ creative viewpoints, the band had 
to revisit its songwriting process, one 
that in the past had favoured a more 
internal approach. 

“Before, songs would often be 
brought in more or less finished, but 
with this record we tried to approach 
things with more of a collective 
effort, and to arrange and write parts 
as a band,” Gallant admits. “I think 
that the songs have a different feel 
to what the band has done before as 
a result, with more of a pop-oriented 
full band sound.” w 


as “blue-eyed soul,” Hunter rejects such 
a label. Blue-eyed soul isn’t just a white 
guy making soul music—it's a whole dif- 


MUSIC: 


ferent thing. 

“| don't really call it blue-eyed soul, 
especially in my case— just sort of call 
it soul. | think the old description of 
blue-eyed soul usually applies to people 
like the Righteous Brothers and it's a 
different feel really,” he says. “I've 
never really acknowledged that term— 
it's either soul or it ain't.” 

And while Hunter's latest disc, 
The Hard Way, was released to 
excited reviews nearly a year ago, 
working on new songs hasn’t come 
easy—though he insinuates that for 
him it never does. 

“It’s like pulling teeth actually, it’s 
quite a hard one. Writing songs, you've 
gotta make up your mind about what 
you're actually writing about, what the 
subject matter is, and then you've gotta 
make it rhyme,” he laughs. “So some 
songs slip out naturally and then some 
you've really gotta get the crow bar 
and the vaseline and force ‘em out. It's 
a hard process actually, but it'll be 
worth it once it's done.” w 


Naked on Jasper 


eis 


Show @7 


or BSE ST 


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Special Thanks to: 


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MAR 12 MAR 1:2009 Sowueweemy 43 


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sy” MAR 12 MAR 18. 2009 MUSIC 


Kimberly Spears 


NOTES 


EDEN MUNRO 
eden @vueweekly. 


"i 
WITH AHONDA STAKICH THE MO LEFEVER SEPTANT 
ARTERY, STB (ADVANCE, $20 (000A) 


The sassy trio of women that make up the Good Lovelies are 
shirking today’s gloom and doom with a little bluegrass, some 
three-part harmonies and a hearty laugh. They'll be playing the 
Women and Music Summit at the ARTery along with jazz 
singer/songwriter—and former Edmontonian—Rhonda Sta- 
kich and local jazz guitarist Mo Lefever. 


PREVUE 

SAY, MAR ott 

ALL ELS) 

WITH.AMNWY, CALCULATING COLLAPSE STALLORD, SHATTERED SUNS; SUBURBAN SYNDROME 
AVENUE THEATRE, $15 (ALL AGES) 


Rippin’ metal riffs and brutal death metal growls mark local 
beast All Else Fails’ brand new album Against the Darkening Sky. 
It's good. It’s loud. And did | mention the ripping riffs? Well, there 
are some pretty killer leads in there, too, and one ‘monster of a 
pick slide on “Act IV.” 


T 

14(0 

KIMBER SPEARS 

FORT HOTEL FORT SASKATCHEWAN (9923-10281) $6 


Kimberly Spears was born in Red Deer, raised in rural Manitoba, 
Studied Music in Victoria and Brandon, lived in Winnipeg, spent 
time in Nashville and Orlando and now lives in Gibbons, AB. All 
those miles come together on her new album, Losing a Layer, 
Which she'll be letting loose at her CD release show in Fort 
Saskatchewan. 


WIN GI tea BAYONETS!! 
HYOEAWAY, S10 (ALL ABES) . 


This is a release party for two of the bands on the bill, though for one of 
them ita bit out of time. Mount Analogue is coming up from Calgary to 
felease a three-inch CD of post-punk—or “Avant-Garbage,” as the 
band's ile Gift Eaters will be following in Bayo- 
Nets!!! recent footsteps and releasing a cassette tape. Will a reel-to- 
"eel from Dead Beats be far behind? 


The Good Lovelies 


PREVUE 

SAT, MAR 14 Me 

SOLIPSIS 

WITH URSA MINER, A FISTFUL OF NICE 
BUX S10 


Solipsism: 1) The theory that the self is the only thing that can 
be known and verified. 2) The theory or view that the self is the 
only reality. 

The local band that takes this philosophy term as its name is 
releasing its first EP. Sentimental, this week. The band’s music is 
well-suited to its name, with a grungy trance-like approach to 


~ the tunes that unfolds naturally. 


PREVUE 

SAT, MAR 14 (8 PM) 

DA CAMERA SINGERS 

ALL SAINTS’ ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL $15 -$20 (ALL AGES) 


Old favourites and newly commissioned works come together on 
the program for Da Camera Singers latest concert, with the 
themes of death, dying and remembrance tying it all together. 


PREVUE 

THE, MAR 17 (7 PM, 

EDMONTON COLUMBIAN CHOIRS 
MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH, $15 (ALL AGES) 


The Edmonton Columbian Choirs—the Young Columbian 
Singers, the Junior Columbian Singers and the Chanteuses 
Ladies’ Choir—are presenting a program entitled Spring Bou- 
quets. Look for a mix of sacred and secular music that covers 
folk songs like “The Log Driver's Waltz” to the premiere of 
“Every Child Has Known God,” a piece commissioned for this 
concert. 


Wea 18 (10 PM 
THE DIVORLEES 
BLACK DOG, FREE 


Out of the wilds of New Brunswick come the 
Divorcees, a band of outlaws cut from the same dirty 
cloth that the original outlaws like Waylon and Willie 
were. The band lays its philosophy out pretty damn 
directly with a torn and frayed sound and throw- 
down-the-glove lyrics like “You ain't gettin’ my coun- 
try without a fight,” and the band will no doubt be 
laying it all on the line with its upcoming sophomore 
record, Last of the Free Men. w 


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= NEW SOUNDS 


Chris Cornell, Scream (Interscope) 
Chris Cornell’s latest record will likely 
be a polarizing one amongst his fans— 
the LP was produced by the very hip 
hop Timbaland, and it finds Cornell 
leaving behind most of the guitars that 
have largely defined his music in the 
past, at least in his role as the frontman 
of Soundgarden and then Audioslave. 
Now, synths and layers of vocals, along 
with plenty of bleep-blorp sounds, are 
at the forefront of 
the singer's songs. 
That's not to say 
that nane of the 
traditional instru- 
ments in the rock- 
band arsenal are 
here—“Time" fea- 
tures both guitar 
and organ in its 
soundscape—but 
they are put into 
the service of the 
electronics that 
Timbaland and 


TIANYO 


Revenge,” both vocally and in the use of 
synthesizers as the driving sound here. 

Of course, while it’s impressive that 
Cornel! willingly moves beyond the 
comfort of his past—even his previous 
two solo albums, while carving out 
new territory, still held to the general 
instrumentation of his other bands— 
the ability of music to generate a 
sense of excitement is often accom- 
panied by the possibility of failure; 
unless one is 
walking the musi- 
cal tightrope, so 
to speak, there’s 
little chance of 
achieving any real 
thrill. 

Scream does 
occasionally fum- 
ble—the dragging 
chorus on “Sweet 
Revenge”—but 
more often pulls 
ahead—the 
smoky and soulful 


Cornell use to light 
the way. 

Scream is a dense piece of work—an 
admirable thing when it comes to music, 
especially with someone of Cornell's 
stature who could quite easily rest on his 
past successes, both artistic and finan- 
cial. 

But rather than taking the easy 
route, Cornell threw himself into a 
new way of working, constructing the 
songs alongside Timbaland in the stu- 
dio, letting the approach guide him 
without worrying about turning in 
another slab of the uninspired heavy 
rock that he had been mired in for 
three albums with Audioslave. 

And inspired is the key word when it 
comes to Scream—Cornell uses his 
voice as an instrument in new ways, 
relying on it for percussive elements at 
times, and he embraces a more soulful 
approach generally throughout on 
songs like “Enemy” and "Sweet 


ist= 


recordsé&cds 


face control rico 


slow burning hid- 
den track, “Two Drink Minimum,” 
harkening back to the minimalist 


sound of Cornell's two previous solo 


albums, and the urgent delivery of 
"Other Side of Town.” 

“Ground Zero,” one of the tracks that 
is farthest removed from’ Cornell's earli- 
er works, is arguably one of the most 
successful on Scream, melding a hip- 
hop beat with soul vocals in the lead 
and the background, trippy scratching 
and strings, eventually devolving into 
an acoustic-guitar-and-spaced-out- 
effects passage at the close. 

Even with its flaws, Scream is more 
interesting than anything Cornell 
accomplished in his time with 
Audioslave, and his willingness to try 
something that is so vastly removed 
from the typical rock approach is wel- 
come in a musical scene where the 
same old, same old is too often cele- 
brated. —EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


104430 = 124 street 
780.732.1132 
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07. merriweather gost... animal collective 
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09. havilah the drones 

10. for the whole world (o see death 


G wren 


MAR 12-MAR 18, 2009 


Musi 


The Deep Dark Woods, Winte, 
Hours (Black Hen) Dark SONGS of 
betrayal, remorse and redemption 

steeped in trag; 

tional America, 
songwriting—{j,;, 

the whispereg 

wistful opening 
track, the Dee; 
Dark Woods deli, 

€rs 12 captivating 
songs, hinting at influences from th, 
Band to Gram Parsons to outlaw coun 

try. Gone are the jazzy, organ-fuseq 
blues ballads of 2007's Hang Me, o/, 
Hang Me. Instead, violins (and produce; 
Steve Dawson's pedal steel) are featured 
prominently, creating a more straigh; 

ahead, folk-country feel—though th, 
band's signature dueling guitar solos ay 

also present here. —MIKE ANGUS / mikean 
gvs@vueweskly.com 


Drakes’s Theory, Anasthesia Toxem i; 
(Independent) Prog rock is called “pr. 
gressive” for a reason. It takes a bunch 
weird shit and 
smushes it togeth 
knowing, I gue 
sometimes hopin 
that it'll work o1 
for the best in th 
end. Like Edmon 
ton band Drak: 
Theory. Operating on jazz structur 
most of the songs on Anesthesia Toxem) 
flow from head, to variations on {}\ 
theme, to solos. Except, this stuff hits y: 
like that new LRT train—it's hard and {as 
and there’s a possibility it's from thi 
future. The amount of arranging ani 
thought that would have to have gon 
into an album like this boggles m 
mind—tt's not a background album, you 
either sit down and give it a close liste: 
or you don’t. But the rewards for doin: 
so are vast. And with crystal clear pr 
duction, Anasthesia Toxemia never sufter 
from being under-realized, a real possi 
bility for music as dense as this. —BAYAli 
BIATLES / bryan@vueweekly.com 


Drake's Theory plays the Hydeaway o 
Sun, Mar 15 at 8 pm. 


Jody Glenham, Focus Pull (indepen 
dent) From the melancholy piano 
chords and wistful vocal that open the 
album on “Coffec 
Soaked’—"Working 
in a coffee shop 

Listening t 
strangers talk 

How the world 
seems so trivial 

she sings—to the 
hopeful-yet-hushed tones of closing 


~ number “Lime’—‘Let’s make the best ©! 


it ‘cause this mess could get sticky— 
Focus Pull is alive with emotion, Jody 
Glenham’'s voice tender and nuanced as 
she deliver her words. Her piano—the 
instrument at the heart of the record—i 
inextricably linked to her voice, the two 
instruments so entwined as to act as 
one spine throughout the record. Nol to 
be dismissed is the band that accompa 
nies Glenham, though—on “Buttons 
with its underlayer of acoustic guitar, 
some sirifigs and a drum beat that oscil 
lates between swinging and pounding, 
or the wah-wah guitar, soaring orga" 
and rolling thunder of the drums on 
“Whisky (So Cold)’—not so much giving 
the record an added depth as much as 
shading in the holes and darkening the 
edges. —EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 


Eleni Mandell, Artificial Fire (Zed- 
On her seventh full-length, 

pe, LA-based songstress 
. i Eleni Mandell dips 
into her past 
_seductions and 
even harder-to- 
read relational ter- 
ritory for a 
ulti-tonal explo- 
~  fation of feminine 

desire, mapped from its earliest urgent 
seenage pangs to emotional fumblings 
after barely-adult encounters and fur- 
sas on to more grown-up entangle- 
two songs that reach 
n scale for comfort. 
pia too sophisticated to treat 
with linearity or literalism, 
Fire wanders across times, 
ons and moods, Sometimes her 
cal landscape is glowingly languid 
gravid with expectation, at other 
sempentine guitars undulate 

: ate-'70s rock, or 
breakneck through a 
breakdown or breakaway. 
: flirts, pouts, 


and varied 
inamoratos ted appetite 
for romantic agate and a sonic 


identity that recalls the best of Chryssie 
ee early Attractions-era Elvis 
elivered with impeccable 
ship and verve. —MARY CHRISTA 


Le Vent du Nord, Mesdames et 
messieurs! (Borealis) The challenge 
for anyone recording a live album is to 
find a way to translate the energy of a 
live performance 
onto disc. Fora 
band like Québec 
foursome Le Vent 
du Nord, which is 
deservedly 
renowned for their 
charismatic and 
spirited stage shows—as anyone who 
caught them at 2006's Folk Fest can 
attest to—getting the feel just right is 
essential. Luckily for fans of these rising 
stars of traditional folk music from 
Québec, Mesdames et messieurs! proves 
up to the challenge. Recorded in 2007 at 
the Festival Mémoire et Racines, the 
album opens on a sombre note, “Uheure 
blue” offering a musical tribute to a 
recently departed friend, but soon builds 
in toe-tapping, hurdy gurdy-filled ener- 
gy. The boys are outnumbered by the 
many guests who join them on stage 
{including members of Edmonton’s the 
McDades) before concluding with a spir- 
ited all-together finale. —SCOTT HARRIS / 
scott@vueweekly.com 


Le Vent du Nord plays the the Old 
Timers Cabin (9430 - 99 St) on Fri, Mar 
13 (8 pm), presented by the Full Moon 
Folk Club. 


<2 |OLD SOUNDS 


EDEN MUNAG 
= | eden@weweekiycom 


LA Guns, LA Guns (Polydor) Origi- 
nally released: 1988 More than two 
decades after the band’s full-length 
debut, Guns N’ Roses is still a viable 
creative entity—if a somewhat weath- 
ered one, with Axl Rose the last man 
standing when it comes to those who 
played alongside him on 1987's 
Appetite For Destruction. While Rose 
was first out of 
the gate with a 
major label deal, 
and he’s managed 
to hold onto the 
lion's share of the 
glory up to this 
day, the mid-'80s 
LA music scene 
was an incestu- 
ous place that 
saw musicians 
regularly jumping 
between bands. 

One of the infi- 
nite variations of 
band lineups that came out of that time 
involved Rose and guitarist Traci Guns 
teaming up to start GNR. The partner- 
ship was not to last, though, and Guns 
went on to revive his own LA Guns, 
which itself saw several personnel 
changes leading up to the band's self- 
titled debut in. 1988. 

LA Guns was very much caught up 
in the aftermath of Guns ‘N Roses, 
when every major label was out to 
corral the next big thing, and every 
band wanted nothing more than to be 
that big thing. But, while GNR went on 
to interplanetary success, and many a 
lesser band stumbled and fell hard 
without seeing much more than brief 
regional popularity, LA Guns stood 
out—though only partially because of 
the band’s songwriting. 

The band's lyrics were typified by 
those in “Sex Action”: “I've been 
around this great big world, yeah / 
Had my share of shady deals and girls, 
hey / Now, I've been thinking of the 
coming attraction / The wink of an eye 
and the gleam of satisfaction.” 


QUICK SPINS 


= 

= 

cx | WHITEY HOUSTON 

SE | quickspins@vueweekly.com 


THE ROADHAMMERS 


ll 

MONTAGE MUSIC 

Big, shiny country 

How can something so polished 
Be this fucking dull? 


HEAVY GHOST 

ASTHMATIC KITTY 

Mish mash of cool shit 
Like a mime playing a saw 
With Nina Simone 


1 WAS A KING 
i AKING 


Teenage Fanclub-esque 
But with a touch more balisack 
And weirder accents 


LA Guns was not the sort of band 
that spent much time concerning itself 
with the larger world; what mattered 
to Guns and his bandmates was the 
sleazy gutter that they had emerged 
from. It was a place of grime and dirt, 
where the players might have 
dreamed large, but they were living 
one day to the next. 

Musically, LA Guns was nothing rev- 
olutionary, but the band played every 
power chord, every bluesy riff, every 
rabid guitar solo like that moment was 
all that the band had to live for, and 
maybe it was. In 
1988, the group 
was involved in 
a scene that was 
exploding, yet 
they were also in 
clase enough 
quarters to see 
friends scram- 
bling to get out 
of the muck only 
to fall back into 
obscurity. 

It's very likely 
that a large part 
of the reason 
that LA Guns was signed had to do with 
Guns’ role in the genesis of GNR, but 
when it comes down to it there was 
considerable distance between the two 
groups. Appetite For Destruction is cer- 
tainly scuffed up to a point, directly ref- 
erencing GNR's street life, but there's a 
sheen to the production and a profes- 
sionalism to the music that LA Guns’ 
debut shirks in favour of relishing the 
life they were leading. 

Despite “Cry No More,” a gentle 
acoustic guitar and strings instrumental 
piece, there's a desperation that hangs 
heavy over tracks like “Nothing to 
Lose”—"You give me one more reason 
/ One more reason to die’—and “Down 
in the City’—"Sex fiends, Acid Queens, 
livin’ on a bad dream / This town never 
sleeps.” This was a band that was far, 
far away from polished, and at times the 
rudimentary riffs that form the back- 
bones of tunes like “No Mercy” and Hol- 
lywood Tease”—all thrashing groove 
and very little memorability—are tiring, 
but LA Guns also personified the Holly- 
wood scene even better than GNA. w 


ELECTROLUMINESCENT 
MEASURES 

BLACK MOUNTAIN MUSIC 
Minimal synth gold! 


Comes from where? Berlin? Prague? nope 
Hamil-fucking-ton! 


WAVVES 
WAVVVES 
FAT POSSUM 


Waves of distortion 
Disguises the pop smarts and 
Bringeth the headache 


GE 
EARLY OUTPUT 1996 - 1998 
TEMPORARY RESIDENCE 
[like it a lot 
When dudes aren't even trying 
And still destray minds 


GEOFF. BERNER 
BOB WISEMAN 


MAINSTREAM SUCCESS TOUR 


with Doug Hoyer 
°4) at theARTery 


7 9533 Jasper Avenue - entrance on 1010 Avenue He 


Tickets $13 at the door, S10 in advance 
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Doors at 8pm. Show starts at 9pm sharp! 


MAR 12-MAR 19,2008 


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‘Cross yonder over the hill 


Classical guitarist escaped from communist Czechoslovakia 


MARIA KOTOVYCH / maria@vueweokly.com 

t might seem odd to read about 
= Hendrix and classical music in 

the same sentence. But Czech 
classical guitarist Pavel Steidl takes 
it further—he performs a piece called 
“Hommage a Jimi Hendrix,” an 
improvisational work by Italian com- 
poser Carlo Domeniconi which emu- 
lates the sound of the late rock 
guitarist. 

“| like this way of interpretation to 
make my own version. | think it’s also 
a part of the Italian style. Of course, if 
you play Johann Sebastian Bach, it’s 
better not to do your own version, but 
maybe play Bach,” Steid! laughs, 
speaking over the phone from the 
Czech village of Skryje. 

But Steidl admits that he wasn’t 
always a fan of Hendrix’s music. 

“Actually, Jimi Hendrix was for me 
always too much, too much, too 
much, too extreme,” he says. “But a 
few years ago, I was travelling to Aus- 
tralia, and on the plane, between the 
movies, there was a live concert of 
Jimi Hendrix. So | started to listen, and 
I said, ‘Oh, God. He's incredible.’ It’s 
incredible what this man was doing.” 

Steidl is friendly and enthusiastic as 
he discusses his music and his life; 
yet, this same man once lived under 
the oppressive and corrupt commu- 


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THIS WEEK'S 
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ARTIST: 


i | FAL MAR 13 (0 PM) 


= | PAVEL STEIDL 
= MUTTART HALL, ALBERTA COLLEGE, $25 $30 


nist system of the former Czechoslo- 
vakia. Finding it difficult to live there, 
Steidl took political asylum in the 
Netherlands in 1987. 

“[It was] such a situation that, for 
instance, they called you to the Min- 
istry of Interior and they asked you to 
give some information to the secret 
police about your friends. It is impos- 
sible, | mean. This happened to me, so 
I decided to leave the country,” he 
explains. 

Steid] also notes that individual 
artists had different experiences 
under communism. 

“Some people, they think it was 
actually much easier. | mean, the art 
had much official support of the poli- 
tics. You didn’t get much money, but if 
you were really skillful and had good 
friends in the right places, you got 
many concerts, more concerts than 
everyone,” he explains. 


BUT STEIDL'S OWN experience as a 
musician contributed to his decision 
to leave Czechoslovakia. 

"I left the country because the 


system, the government in that tim, 

was not supporting young artists ;, 
travel to other countries. But th, y 
loved money very much. So we had 
such contracts, with only one of, 

cial management here in Czechos|,, 
vakia—that contract was that 
between 40 - 60 per cent of the fee 

you had to give to that manage 

ment. Forty - 60—it’s a lot,” ). 
laughs. “This was the reason that 
they allowed you to go if you got an 
invitation. And I had a friend wh 

invited me to west Europe to play 
concert, and I took the chance. 

“Freedom—people, often th: 
think that freedom is the right to y, 
tomorrow where you like and to « 
what you like—I don’t think so 
think freedom is the right to ) 
what you are, and not pretend tha 
you are something different than 
you are. And I was sufferin 
because you had to pretend a lot in 
that system, you know,” he conti: 
ues. “And of course, if you pretend 
well, you could be also happy, but ; 
was quite difficult. 

“I'm very happy now that the sys 
tem changed—and of course, nothing 
is perfect—but at least there are man 
things which give you freedom and a 
chance to let other people know that 
you exist.” v 


EVENTS WEEKLY 


Fax free listi 
ceed See ot cereal sen 
Deadline is Friday at 3 pm 


CLUBS/LECTURES 


ADVENTURE INK Stanley Milner Library, 
780.496.7032 © Machu Picchu: Presentation on Peru 
* Mar 19, 7pm © Free; www.epl.ca/Adventurelnk 
AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB 10139-87 Ave, Old 
Strathcona Community League, ® Japanese Martial 
Art of Aikido * Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm 


THE ARCHIVE OF EVERYTHING: CULTURE, 
HISTORY, THEORY HC L-1. U of A campus * 2008- 
09 Broadus Lecture Series: Featuring Michael 
O'Driscoll * Lecture One: Aspirations: The Time of An 
Archive, Mon, Mar 16, 3:30pm © Lecture Two: 
Silence: The Intervening Archive, Wed, Mar 18, 
a * Lecture Three: Archiviologies: The Archival 
(Re)Turn, Fri, Mar 20, 3:30pm 


AWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP Braeside 
Presbyterian Church basement, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, 
Bishop St, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. Albert © For 
adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families 
* Meet Mondays including holidays, 7:30pm 


BOARD LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Grant 
MacEwan College, City Centre Campus # Gat on 
Board: Organizational Effectiveness ® Sat. Mar 21; 
$55.30, registration closes Mar 14, http://boardlead- 
ership09.eventbrite.com; linfo: E: voluntarysec- 
torevents@macewan.ca, T: 780.497.4780 


BUDDHIST LECTURE SERIES SG! Edmonton 

Centre, 10711-107 Ave, 2nd Fl © Lecture followed 
@ question and answer discussion period ® Sat, 
jar 21, 1-2pm 


CANADIAN NATIVE FRIENDSHIP CENTRE 11205- 
101 St, 780.479.1999 * Basketball; Mon (5-7pm) * 
Healing Circle; Mon (6-8pm) * Boxing; Mon/Thu (7- 
Spm), Tue (5-7pm) * Volleyball; Tue (6-8pm) © 

Sewing Circle; Tue (6-8pm) ¢ Beadwork Class; Wed 
{6-Bpm) © C.N.EC. Pow-wow; Wed (6-Spm) # Hi 
Hop Class; every Thu (5-7pm) © Cree Class: Thu (6- 
8pm) © Elders and Residency; Fri {all day) © Safe 
Using and Harm Reduction; last Fri each month 
(1iam-12pm) * Tobacco Reduction; every Fri (1-2pm) 
* Drop-in Night; Fri (6-Bpm) 

CARP EDMONTON Barnett House, 1010-142 St « 
Meeting: Alberta Pharmaceutical Strategy * Tue Mar 
17 © Pre-register at 780.455.9727, e-mail: carped- 
montonbe@telus.net 


CAR-SHARING CO-OP OF EDMONTON Robbins 
Health Learning Center, GMC City Centre Campus, Rm 


9-315, 109 St, 104 Ave, 780.907.1231 © Car Shari 
Cooperatives-How they work presented by Tanya P. 
and Mark Goldblatt * Mar 12, 7:30pm ¢ Free 


CHESS Edmonton Chess Club and Society of Alber 
Chess Knights, 780.474.2318 © Lear to play chess 
Opportunities for all ages including classes, schoo! 


. programs and tournaments * 


fovingchessnuts@shaw.ca 


EDMONTON BICYCLE COMMUTERS BICYCLE 
780.433.1270 ¢ Mechanic Course ® Thu, Mar 12. 7 
Spm © Free, pre-register at jbeollier@shaw.ca 


EDMONTON ESPERANTO SOCIETY Rm 1812, 
10025-102A Ave, 780.702.5117 © Fri, noon-1pm © 
vaughn@sewardconsulting.com 


EDMONTON JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY Stanley 4 
Milner Library, Edmonton Rm ® Women Writers and 
“Our Miss Austen”, talk by Isobel Grundy ® Sat, Mar 
21, 2-4pm © Free 


EDMONTON NATURE CLUB Royal Alberta 
Museum * Monthly meeting: Photographing 
Alberta's Smaller Morey with speaker Ter 
Thormin © Fri, Mar 20, 7pm (coffee), 7:30pm (meet 
ing) * Admission by donation 

FERTILITY AWARENESS CHARTING CIRCLE 
Steeps College Plaza, 11116-82 Ave ® Justisse holis 
tic reproductive health practitioner Megan Lalonde 
will presen Healthy practices: improving and support 
ing female reproductive health through diet and 
lifestyle ¢ Thu, Mar 12, 6:30-8:30pm © $5 (Suggested 
donation}; www. fertilityawarenesschartingcircle ora 


HIDDEN CORE BELIEFS CAN MAKE YOUR LIFE 
SUCK Life Enrichment Centre, upstairs, 780.462.449! 
® Enlightening New Thought Lectures by Dr. Jaclyn 
Darby © Every Sun, 11am, in March * Donation 


HIV EDMONTON-LUNCH AND COMMUNITY 
FORUM Canterra Suites, 11010 Jasper Ave * 
Forum on HIV, Disclosure and the Law, moderator * 
Glenn Betteridge * Mar 19, noon-2pm * Free; RSV 
by Mar13to Tsion Dameke Abate T: 780.488.5742 
xt. 229; E; tsion.d@hivedmonton.com; www.hived- 
monton.com 


“HOME” ENERGISING SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY 
FOR PASSIONATE LIVING Gameau/Ashbourne 
Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 Ave ® Home: Blends 
music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred tex\s 
to Beeryite you for passionate living ¢ Every Sun 3- 
Spm * Info at uce.home@gmail.com 


IMAGES ALBERTA CAMERA CLUB Pleasantview 
Community Hall, 10860-57 Ave, 


780.962.6561/780.469.9776/780.452.6224 « 
Featuring presentations, s rs, workshops, out- 
ings, and competitions. Ail levels ae faphers 
welcome * Meet the 2nd and 4th Thu each month: 
Sept-May, 8pm 


er Pythagoras is 
umbers." He 


meets one’s destiny on the road 
d it,” says a French proverb. 


} are you led into the cir- 

that ultimately activate the full- 

s of your gifts. These mysteries will soon 

e oh i for you, Taurus. 

xoming plot twists will lead you to where 
u didn't even know you needed to go. 


MINI (MAY 21 - JUN 20) 
hris Farley was “a wrecking ball of joy,” 


according to one of his friends. The Sat- 
urday Night Live comedian loved to pro- 
voke merriment wherever he went, 
relentlessly shepherding the mood 
toward celebratory exuberance. I'm not 
Saying you should try to ignite conviviality 
with that much ferocity in the coming 
days, Gemini. But | do think this is a spe- 
cial phase of your astrological cycle, 
when you have an extraordinary capacity 
for spreading witty inspiration and cat- 
alytic fun—and for collecting the useful 
rewards generated by that good stuff. 


CANCER (JUN 21 - JUL 22) 

As | compose your horoscope, I'm sitting 
in a restaurant in San Francisco's China- 
town dining on something the menu 
refers to as a Milky Golden Prize Delight 
Bun. And I'm thinking, | bet it's going to 
be a kind of Milky Golden Prize Delight 
week for you Cancerians ... a Sweet 
Creamy Lusty Elixir week ... a Rich Thick 
Tasty Brilliance week. If you can manage 
it, | suggest you try to have a dream one 
of these nights in which you find a deli- 
cious morsel of the sun in a bowl of pud- 
ding, and savour it all while listening to 
the full moon sing you a thrilling lullaby. 


LEO (JUL 23 -AUG 22) 

| predict that you will go to a grungy thrift 
store to shop for bargain kitchen items 
but will instead buy a magic snow globe 
depicting a dolphin drinking beer from a 
fountain that’s shaped like a silver stiletto 
pump, and when you get this talisman 
home you will discover that it gives you 
the power to hover and cruise a few feet 
off the ground, plus tune in to the secret 
thoughts of people who confuse you, and 
even time-travel into the past for brief 


ten-minute blasts that allow you to 
change what happened. And if my predic- 
tion's not accurate in every detail, | bet it 
will nonetheless be metaphorically true. 


VIRGO (AUG 23 - SEP 22) 

The foxglove plant can either be a hex or 
a healer. If you eat its flowers, your heart 
fate will zoom to a dangerous rate and 
your digestive system will go haywire. If, 
on the other hand, you have certain car- 
diac problems and partake of the fox- 
glove's leaves, they will steady and 
strengthen your heart. | bet you can think 
of several influences in your life whose 
powers can be equally contradictory. 
According to my reading of the omens, it’s 
an excellent time to get very clear about 
the differences, and take steps to ensure 
that you'll be exposed as little as possible 
to the negative effects. 


LIBRA (SEP 23 - OCT 22) 

The agitation and commotion seem to be 
dying down. The bitching and moaning 
are diminishing. And yet, from what | can 
tell, the Big Squeeze is still squeezing 
you, which probably means that it’s going 
to get trickier for you to extricate your- 
self. Want my advice? Don't take 
“maybe” for an answer. Negotiate with a 
mischievous look in your eye. Learn more 
about the productive value of unpre- 
dictability by studying three-year-olds and 
free spirits who have nothing to lose. 
Most importantly, do whatever it takes to 
deflect the propaganda and slip past the 
symbolic gestures so that you can pene- 
trate to the core of the real feelings. 


SCORPIO (OCT 23- NOW 21) 


“Here's what I’m looking for,” said a per- 


sonal classified | read online. “Someone 
who can tear me away from living inside 
my head ... who sees things in me that | 
don’t see myself.” That's exactly what | 
want for you right now, Scorpio. Whether 
this someone shows up in the form of an 
ally or enemy or beloved animal or invisible 
friend, | don’t care. The important thing is 
that he or she awakens you to certain mys- 
teries about you that you've been blind to, 
and helps free you from the unconscious 
delusion that all of reality is contained 
inside the boundaries of your skull. 


SAGITTARIUS (NOV 22- DEC 21) 
This would be a perfect week to practise 
writing love letters. It's not yet a 
favourable time to actually send the love 
letters you compose, however. You need 
some work before you'll be ready to pro- 
duce the finished products. You've got to 
drain off the chatter that’s at the top of 
your head before you'll be able to pene- 
trate to the more interesting truths that 
lie at the bottom of your heart. But if you 
do your homework—churn out, say, at 
least three eruptions of rabid amour— 
you'll prepare yourself well to craft a 
thoughtful meditation that will really 
have a chance to make an impact. 


CAPRICORN (DEC 22- JAN 19) 


| decided to call my cable TV company to 
inquire about a mistake on my bill. From 
past experience, | suspected this would be 
a visit to the suburbs of hell. My expecta- 
tions were soon fulfilled. After being cycled 
through three phases of the automated 
system, | was told by a machine that I'd get 
to speak with an actual person in 16 min- 
utes. Then | was delivered into the aural 
torment of recorded smooth jazz. But a 


minute into the ordeal, something wonder- 
ful happened. The muzak gave way to a 
Series of great indie rock tunes, including 
three I'd never heard before. A song that | 
later determined to be Laura Veirs’ “Don’t 
Lose Yourself” became my instant new 
favourite. By the time the billing consultant 
was ready for me, my mood was cheery. | 
predict a comparable sequence for you, 
Capricom. An apparent trip to the suburbs 
of hell will have a happy ending that expos- 
es you to fresh sources of inspiration 


AQUARIUS (JAN 20 -FEB 18) 


In response 'to the recession, some compa- 
nies have come_up with an ingenious way 
to avoid raising prices: they reduce the 
amount of product they offer by shrinking 
the packaging. The makers of Skippy 
Peanut Butter, for instance, restructured the 
bottom of the jar so that only 16.3 ounces 
could fit inside instead of the previous 18. 
In the coming weeks, Aquarius, | suspect 
you will be having to deal with metaphori- 
Cal versions of this strategy. Now that I've 
told you, maybe you won't be fooled. 


PISCES (FEB 19- MAR 20) 


In the past few weeks you have veered 
close to the edge of blissful triumph 

From what | can tell, you averted total 
ecstatic breakthrough and fantastic rag- 
ing success by only the narrowest of 
margins. If you don’t want to go all the 
way in the coming days—if you'd rather 
remain faithful to your fear of success 
and fall back into your humdrum comfort 
Zone—you should slam on the brakes 
immediately. But | warn you: the cosmic 
pressure to push you over the top into 
loopy, grinning, shameless victory is 
almost irresistible. w 


Unity Church of Edmonton, 13210-106 Ave, 
5351 © Film showing * Sun, Mar 18, 1pm © 


ENERGY HOUSE 9927-87 St, ? 
.ca ¢ Get ideas on energy savings from this 


E oan Be self-guided tours most Sat afternoons 


STUDIO Did eraeseaed Business Link Centre, 

St, 780, 22 © Hear the ins and outs, dos and 
prox el of establishing a serious studio 
St anted by the Alber Craft Council * Tue, 

joon-ipm ; 
DANCE CLUB Pleasantview Hall, 10860-57 Ave, 
780.604.7572 © Dots n’ Stripes Dance 
dressed in Polka Dots and Stripes * Sat, Mar 14, 
iner lesson), Spm-1am (dance) 


ree Sra 
5 . 10ar and Sun, Mar 15, 11am-Spm 
i 21, 1/am-5pm; Sun, Mar 22, noon-Spm 


Riverdale Community Hall, 9231-100 

| annual cook-off * Sun, Mar 14, 5:30pm 
in Hall, 11018-97 St # Lecture by 

munist Party of Canada ¢ Fri, 


5 D einem Bldg We) 
issues )and speaker 
the Hawk Takes One chick by Jane 


Strathcona Farmers’ 
am, each month, 


EPA Ares, 1004780 Ave enter 
© Edmoi icycle Commuters’ 
slaty * (first and third Sundays of each month) * Mar 15 © Free 
207 care 51-118 "People i 
eisthue eM ee People in Pants 


= 


Bourbo fons tachon ® Bost norton 


|, Mar 18 * Bobcat 
Mar 19-21 © Sean 
jun, Mar 22 


| Way, She | Park, 
e of Physical Comedy by 


LAUGH SHOP 1105-6606 137 Ave, Londonderry Mall, 
780.476.1010 © Wed-Thu 8pm; Fri-Sat 7:30pm and 9:45pm * Wed 
amateur open mic night; 8pm © Brian Lazanik from Toronto; Mar 
12-14 © John Beuhler from Vancouver, Mar 19-21 


LION'S HEAD PUB Radisson Hotel Edmonton South, 4440 
Gateway Boulevard, 780.437.6010 * Comedy open mic night every 
Sun (Spm) hosted by Lars Callieou 


STEEPS TEA LOUNGE-COLLEGE PLAZA 11116-82 Ave, 
780.988.8105 * Amateur Comedian Night: every Tue, 8-10:30pm * 
For info contact robyn@steepstea.com 


QUEER LISTINGS 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-RED Sunnybrook United Church, 
Red Deer, 403.347.6073 © Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their 
friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month 


BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP « A social group for bi- 
Curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue every month, 8pm * 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bwedmonton 


BOOTS BAR AND LOUNGE 10242-106 St, 780.423.5014, 
www.bootsbarca ® 2nd Thu: Illusions Social Club * 3rd Wed: 
Edmonton 0 Society * 2nd Tue: Edmonton Rainbow Business 
Association ® da Philosophy Café © Fri and Sat DU SeXXXy 
Sean 10-3 ¢ Long Weekend Sundays feature the Stardust Lounge 
with Miss Bianca and Vanity Fair 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.7736 © Nightly 
Spm-3am, Fri 8-3pm © Sun: Rotating drag shows with Mz Bianca 
and Mz Vanity Fair in The Stardust ou and GoDiva and 
Donnatella NEI in The GoDonna Show, DJ WestCoastBabyDaddy * 
Mon: Amateur strip contest with Mia Fellow, midnight, DJ 
WestCoastBabyDaddy * Tue: Free pool and tourney, DJ 
Arrowchaser © Wed: Hump day with DJ Sexxy Sean * Thu: Wet 
underwear contest with Mia'Fellow, midnight, 
WestCoastBabyDaddy ® Fri: We made ‘em famous! DJ Eddy 
Toonflash, come early to avoid lineup, no cover before 10pm * Sat: 
Undie night for men only, free pool and toumey, DJ Arrowchaser 


EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) Unitarian Church of 
Edmonton, 10804-119 St * A group of older gay men and their 
admirers who have common interests meet the 2nd Sun, 2:30pm, 
most months for a social period, a short meeting and a quest speak- 
er, discussion panel or a potluck supper. Special interest groups 
meet for other social activities throughout the month. E edmon- 
tonpt@yahoo.ca, www.primetimersww.org/edmonton : 


GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION www.teamedmonton.ca * 
Women’s Drop-In Recreational Badminton; Oliver School ae 
0227-118 St,780.465.3620; Wed, 6-7:30pm * Bootcamp; Lynnwood 
Elementary School at 15451-84 Ave; Mon, 7-8:15pm; 

bootcam| medmonton.ca * Bowling: Gateway Lanes, 100, 
3414 Gateway Blvd; Sat, sifu bowling@teamedmonton.ca * 
Curling: Mon, 7:15-9:15pm), Granite Curling Club; 780.463.9942 * 
Punting, Sun te eaeumin ned e Seoinina: 
NA 11762- ; Tue, ), Thu, eee 
mming@teamedmonton.ca e vale Tue Recreational: Mother 
Teresa Elementary School at 9008-105A, 8-10pm; Thu intermediate: 
Amiskiwaciy Aca my 101 Airport Rd, 8-10pm; 
recvol medmonton.ca; volleyball edmonton.ca * 
YOGA (Hatha): Free Yoga; every Sun, 2-3:30pm; Korezone Fitness, 


203, 10575-115 St; yoga@teamedmonton.ca 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB various locations * Crossdressers, 
transsexuals, friends and ecrroe meet 2nd Thu every month. For 
details go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/edmenton_illusions/ 


INSIDE/OUT U of A Campus * Campus-based preanicton for les- 
bian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, 
greta student, academic, straight allies and support staff © 3rd 

hu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. Contact Kris 
{kwells@ualberta.ca) 


KOREZONE FITNESS 203, 10575-115 St * LIVING POSITIVE 
404, 10408-124 St, www.edmlivingpositive.ca, 
1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768, * Providing confidential peer sup- 
port to people living with HIV © Tue, 7-Spm: Support group * Daily 
drop-in, peer counselling 

MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION Faculté St. Jean, Rm 3-18, 
780.490.7332 © Program for HIV-AID'S prevention, treatment and 
harm reduction in French, English and other African languages * 
3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-Spm each month © Free (member)/$10 (mem- 
bership) * Pre-register 


MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB www.geocities.com/mak- 
ingwaves_edm © Recreational and competitive swimming with 
coaching, beginners encouraged ta participate. Socializing after 
practices ¢ Every Tue, Thu 

PFLAG Pride Centre, 9540-111 Ave * A support group for parents 
and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people 
‘© Meet the Ist Wed each month September-June, 7-9pm; T: Ruby 
780.436.1998 after 6pm; E: edmontonab@pflagcanada.ca 


PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10220-103 St, www.playnightclub.ca « Open 


‘Thu, Fri, Sat © The first bar for the ees community to open ina 


decade with DJs Alexx Brown and Eddie Toonflash 


PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON 9540-111 Ave, 780.488.3234, 
www.pridecentreofedmonton.org * Open Tue-Fri 1-10pm, Sat 2- 
6:30pm © LGBT Seniors Drop-in: Every Tue/Thu, 2-4pm * CA: Every 
Thu (7pm) © Suit Up and Show Up: AA big book study group meet 

t, noon * Youth Understanding Youth: Youth up to 25 years, 
support and social group meet every Sat, 7-Spm; yuy@shaw.ca * 
Womonspace: Board meeting 1st Sun each month, 10:30am-12:30pm 
® Trans Education/Support Group: Meet the 1st and 3rd Sun, 2-4pm, 
of each month; www.albertatrans.org * Men Talking with Pride: 
Every Sun (7pm); facilitator: Rob Wells robwells780@hatmail.com * 
HIV Support Group: Meet the 2nd Mon of each month, 7pm * 
Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex and Questioning (TTIQ) Alliance; 
Support meeting the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm * Transgender, 
Transsexual, Intersex and Questioning. Education, advocacy and sup- 
port for men, women and youth; PFLAG Edmonton: Meet the Ist_ 
Wed each month, 7pm * free short-term, solution-focused drop-in 
counseling: Wed. 7-10pm * YouthSpace: drop-in for LGBTQ for 
youth up to 25; Tue-Sat, 3-7pm 


PRISM BAR 10524-101 St, 780.990.0038 * Every Wed: Free Pool; 
Karaoke, Spm-midnight * Every Thu: Prism Pool League; 7-11:30pm 
Every Fri: Steak Nite; 5-Spm; DJ at 9:30pm * Pasta Tue: Mar 10 * 
St. Patrick's Day Party: Mar 17 * Womonspace Games Nite: 7pm; 
Mar 20 © Taco Tue: Mar 24 « DJ; Mar 28, 10pm * Crazy Girl Love: 
Art show and entertainment; Mar 31, 8pm 


ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209-123 St, 
780.482.1587, www.rwuc.org * Soul OUTing: an LGBT-focused alter- 


MARIS 


native worship ® 2nd Sun each month, 7pm; worship Sun, 10:30am 
people of all sexual orientations welcome. A LGBT monthly book 
club and film night. Info email {ravenscroft@rwue.org 


ST. PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH 11526-76 Ave, 780.436.1555 * 
People of all sexual orientations are welcome ® Every Sun (10am 
worship) 


WOMONSPACE 780.482.1794, www.womonspace.ca, womon- 
space@gmail.com * A Non-profit lesbian social organization for 
Edmonton and surrounding area.<Organized monthly activities from 
dances, games nites, vie tournament, ete. Monthly newsletter and 
reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6557 © Open Daily (noon) « 
Sat-Tue Karaoke with Tizzy and Patrick * Sat-Sun Pool Toumaments 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


CHILD HAVEN Maharaja Banquet Hall, 9257-34A Ave, www..child- 
haven.org * 7th Annual Dinner * Sat, Mar 14, 6-10pm 


EDMONTON JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Royal Alberta Museum, 
12845-102 Ave, 780.487.0585 © Featuring 6 films including the just 
released documentary The Case for Israel (PG) * Sun, Mar 15 * 
$10 (single)/$50 (festival pass) at TIX on the Square or the Jewish 
Federation of Edmonton 


EXPLORING RESPECT, EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY Stanley 
Milner Public Library, Sir Winston Churchill Sq * Exploring verious 
approaches in film which can assist in the sensitization of persons 
with intolerant attitudes to race. Featuring the films: 0, Canada; 
When Strangers Become Neighbours; Me and the Mosque; 
Aboniginality * Wed, Mar 18, 6:30-3pm 


42 HOUR COMIC CHALLENGE Happy Harbor Comics Vol 1, 10112- 
124 St, 780.452.8211 » Happy Harbor Comics hosts comicbogk mak- 
ing fundraiser © Sat, Mar 14, 10am-10pm 


HARMONY BRUNCH Ramada Inn, 11834 Kingsway, 780.458.5515 
Canadian Multicultural Education Foundation, brunch featuring 
Promoting Peace and Harmony in Our Changing World with speaker 
Chief Mike Boyd, poet Ted Blodgett * Sun, Mar 15, 12:30-3pm * 
$20 (incl buffet brunch, speakers) 


LATIN ELEMENTS Royal Alberta Museum * ¢De Dénde Vengo? 
Un Vuelo Hacia Nuestras Raices? (Where Do | Come From? A_ 
Voyage Back To Our Roots): With Gabriela Mistral, Latin American 
Schoo! Music and Dance ensembles, De Menor 2 Mayor. Fifteen 
Cents, Xilonen (Nicaraguan folkloric dance group), Victor Jara 
(dance ensemble) * Sat, Mar 14, 6:30pm (door), 7pm (show) © $15 
E: Sergio.Gaggero@qov.ab.ca, T; 780.914.6574 

MAC AND CHEESE LUNCHEON Shaw Conference Centre, _ 
780.990.1000 * Luncheon in support of the Inner Cities Agencies 
Foundation ® Thu, Mar 19 © $150 at www.icaf.ca 

RAINDANCE Hydeaway All Ages Art Space, 10209-100 Ave * 
Edmonton World Water Day Celebration: All ages, concert and art 
ehibit featuring eco-speakers * Sun, Mar 22, 2-10pm * Mar 22, 2- 
10pm © Free (proclamation ceremony on Fri, Mar 20, noon at City 
Hall) > 

ST. PATRICK'S BURLESQUE SHOW Brooklyn's Lounge, 9216-34 
‘Ave Lascivious Burlesque * Sat, Mar 14, Spm * $5 


WANE dees VOsrsemEECEY. AOR 


“7 


RuPaul to the rescue? 


53 | QUEERMONTON 


oS TAMARA GORZALKA 
tam@wueweeky.com 


| was never particularly bothered by being 
confused for a boy, which started happening 
some time around Grade 4 and never really 
stopped. | work with kids in my day job and it 
saddens me how confused they get with my 
short hair. Sometimes one will call me a “he” 
and the others will quickly correct him or her. 
Every now and then kids will stare at me for a 
little while before just flat-out asking my gen- 
der. On my very first day with my very first 
class, one of the kids asked me why | looked 
the way that | did—so “masculine” and 
“tomboyish.” He later quietly asked me if | 
was a bisexual. And he's only 11 years old! 

[t's important to note that such things 
only happen when my hair has recently 
been cut short. And while I'm not both- 
ered by the confusion, | am sad for kids 


who are taught to judge gender down 
such hard lines, based almost entirely on 
the length of someone's hair. 

I'm not trans and I'm not gender queer 
but | am fascinated by the way that gender 
walls work inside our society. For example, a 
transwoman in St Catharines, Ontario is 
suing a women’s-only fitness club that 
denied her membership. It's easy to just get 
upset that the awful gym owner that would- 
n't let her join, but it's a situation that’s a bit 
more complicated than that. The woman 
was pre-op at the time and has since com- 
pleted her surgery, so one can easily under- 
stand the oltrage of women using the 
shower next to someone who just happened 
to have male genitalia. Is that their prob- 
lem? Yes, it probably is. Does that mean that 
its the gym owner's responsibility to notify 
all his patrons that a transperson will now 
be using the facility? Well, no, the woman 
probably would have been upset if a letter 
had gone out outing her to all the other 


members. There's just no easy solution with 
fiow the gym could have avoided conflict. 

One option is to create gender-neutral 
washrooms and showers, but officials in 
Chennai, India, who recently announced 
plans to build toilets exclusively for trans- 
gender people, are discovering that does- 
n't please everyone either. 

“| don’t agree with this,” said Aasha 
Bharati, president of the Thamilnadu Ara- 
vanigal Association, a group dedicated to 
working for the rights of transgender people 
in India. “We want to mingle with the main- 
stream. We don't want to be separated like 
this. Using separate toilets will open the way 
for discrimination. We want to be considered 
as females. In our hearts, we are women.” 


PRESUMABLY THE ISSUE over the Ontario 
woman using the facility had more to do 
with the locker room and bathrooms than 
the gym equipment, so perhaps it's time to 
accept the fact that women’s-only gyms 
and gendered bathrooms just don’t make a 
whole lot of sense. 

Of course, the idea is far too horrifying 
for most to accept—that we could all 


2 CLASSIFIEDS 


IF YOU WANT TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN 
VUE WEEKLY, PLEASE PHONE 780.426.1996. 


DEADLINE IS NOON THE TUESDAY BEFORE PUBLICATION 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


Looking for sne or two open minded health 
conscious people interested in working from home 
full or part time. Clinically tested patented prod- 


ucts. No inventory to carry. 
For information call Ken at 780.454.6971 


EDUCATIONAL 


Free Acting Classes 
sign up at ffeeactingtips.net 
Audition and camera tips. 
Wwww.Vadastudios.com 


FRAMING 


PICTURE FRAMES 
MOVIE DOSTER SHOE 


HELP WANTED 


The Cutting Room is looking for 
Assistants and Stylists 
Please drop off your resume at 
10536 -124 Street 


Drivers wanted: $15+/hr, Wed (night). Thu (day), 
perm/PT. Must have mini-van or truck 
Looking for reliable, responsible person. 

P Ph 780.907.0570 


Had Enough? 
Cocaine Anonymous 780.425.2715 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL, TEACH 
We train you to teach. 1000's of jobs around the wocld. 
Next in-class or ONLINE by correspondence. Jobs guar- 
anteed. 7712-104 St. Call for info pack 1.888.270.2941 


MUSICAL INSTRUCTION 


MODAL MUSIC INC. 780.221.3116 
Quality music instruction since 1981_ 
Guitarist. Educator. 
Graduate of GMCC music program 


ARTIST 10 ARTIST 


SHOW ME THE MONEY!-FUNDING AND 
GRANTS INFO SESSION: The Alberta Music 
Industry Association Information Session on 

Funding and Grants, with representatives from the 
Foundation Assisting Canadian Talent on Recordings 
(FACTOR), Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA), 
Canada Council, the Alberta Cultural Industries 
Association {ACIA), and the X92_9 Exposure Travel 
Grants. Tue, Mar 24, 6:30pm (door), 7pm (session) at 
TransAlta Arts Barns, CE Boardroom, 10330-84 Ave 
Free (Alberta Music member)/$5 (non-member) 


The call to nominate Edmonton's 3rd Poet Laureate 
will remain open until 4:30pm, Fri, Mar 27. 
Nomination forms can be found on the Edmonton Arts 
Council website at www.edmontonarts.ab.ca 


The Handmade Mafia, a craft collective, is starting a 
monthly market in Edmonton on the 1st Sat every 
month starting Apr 4 at the Savoy and Orange Hall. 
Looking for handmade funky, unique crafts and art 
For info E: Ally: msallyng@gmail.com, Amy: amy- 
jedgar@hotmail.com 


Steeps—Old Glenora: for open mic—Spoken word 
First Thursday every month. Contact Adam Snider to 
sigh up adam.snider@gmail.com 


Alberta Screenwriters Initiative, Alberta Film Partnérs 
are seeking submissions of feature film scripts of any 
genre, to a maximum length of 250 pages, from 
Alberta based screenwriters Deadline: Mar 16 
Info ph: Nicholas Mather 780.422.8174 or, www.writ- 
ersquild.ab.ca 


art of The Works—North 
Outdoor Art & Design 


There is still time to be a 
America’s Largest 


FORM OF ee 


Card# Exp.__/__ 


Postal Code_ 
Phone 426-1996 from 9am-5pm Mon-Fri e Email pa menemT com ° 10303-108St. Edmonton 


Deadline Tues at Noon » Print legibly on lines at right * Up to. 45 Characters per line « Every letter, space or mark counts as one character * Allow one space following punctuation 


Festival! The Works Art Market-Final Deadline Apr 
15, 2009. Contact dawn@theworks, ab.ca for informa- 
tion on reduced rates for applications received 
between Feb 16.and Apr 15, 2009. Chalk Art 
Contest Deadline: Jame 1, 2009 Spm. Smaller Than 
A Breadbox Deadline: Mon, May 1, 2009 


MUSICIANS 


Edmonton—Northem Harmony, The Canadian A Cappella 


Festival: looking for new talent for their upcoming gala 
A cappella groups—no instruments: submit a demo 
Tecording to the Northern Harmony web site, 
www.northembarmony.ca by Miar 23. For info contact: 
Michael Yereniuk or Jessika Dlamon, Executive 
Producers, 780.456.6625, info@northernharmony.ca 


Blues man looking to form or join rock ‘n’ blues band. 33 


yrds experience, singer/songwniter, frontman, plays gui- 
tar, harmonica and dobro. Call 709.573.0444 or 
E jimmererwtp@yahoo.ca 


Dirty City Hearts is seeking 2 guitar player. please con- 
tact us through facebook, myspace 
(wwww.myspace.com/dirtycityhearts) or call 
780.938.3037 for more details 


Hardrock band seeks EXPERIENCED drummer, south- 

side jamspace. Have songs written, demo available. NO 

AMATEURS, if you've never played in a band don't call 
Paul 780.233.4269 


Singer/songwriter looking to form or join a rock band. 
Infl: audioslave, velvet revolver, stained, seether, 3doors 
down, pearl jam. Please contact me at 
Danny_boyspence8099@yahoo.ca 


The Loudhailers seeking piano 
Ph Justin 780.760.7284 
www.theloudhailers.com 


Extreme metal band looking for skilled bassist. Our style 


is Death/Black metal; infl: Morbid Angel, Beathemoth, 
Mayhem, Marduk, etc. Must have Pro Gear. 18 yrs+ 
renegade5445@yahoo.com 


Heavy metal project looking for guitarists, bassist, and 


drummer for writing/recording. Infl. incl. GWAR, 
Ramstein, Lamb of God. Serious ing. only please. 
Spencer 780.962.7885 


Metal band looking for bass player. 
Call John at 780.920.3268 


Female fronted semi-pro cover band seeks bass or gui- 


tar oriented musician with gear. Rock/pop from the ‘80s 
to modem. Experience a must. E: 
audition.forcover band@gmail.com to arrange audition 


HC LASSIFI EDS FOUR wee $20 


suddenly be using the same place, in all 
our naked bathroom vulnerability. Why 
not just give them a separate washroom 
if it's such a big deal? But think how many 
people would be pleased if all the gay 
men and lesbians were secluded in their 
own gyms, their own locker rooms. You 
know, for their own safety and whatnot. 

Granted, it'll take a huge cultural shift 
to see changes in trans acceptance, but | 
do believe that one day it will happen. 
And maybe, just maybe, we'll have televi- 
sion to thank. ~ 

Law and Order: Special Victims Unit is 
airing episodes of sympathetic transition- 
ing teenagers and the evil parents who 
don’t support them. 7he Real World has 
Katelynn, a post-op transwoman who had 
her surgery just three months before enter- 
ing the house. Ugly Betty has a supermodel 
as a main character's brother. Sister? 

And now we have AuPaul’s Drag 
Race—three parts America’s Next Top 
Model, one part Project Runway and a 
whole lot of parts gay, this reality show, in 
which RuPaul is searching for an heir to 
her throne, is amazing—it's the best thing 


I've travelled the world with my sax. | seek an expe- 
rienced female musician/Vvocalist, 50-60, for local 
Gigs and possible internat'l travel. Ross 
780.707.3979 


WANTED: JAMMERS for open public monthly jam 


on the second Sunday of the month at 9119-1284 
Ave. Rock, country & old time music. Ph. 
780.973.5593, randyglen@JumpUpDj.com 


Lig ix Sal Sia te Die 
Canadian Cancer Society's fundraiser. Support the 
Canadian Cancer Society by purchasing daffodils 


for $5 a bunch or $8 a mini-pot. Preorders available 
until Mar 13, blooms arrive on Mar 31. For info call 
780.437.8414, E Carol CarolG@cancer.ab.ca 


happening in gender variant visibility 

‘The show last week went from sijy 5, 
over-dramatic to poignant and movir| 
when the girls were asked to compete jo, 
contract with MAC Cosmetic’s Viva Gj, 
line, which donates all of its Proceeds j 
AIDS research. The winner was Los Ang; 
les-based queen Ongina, who broke doy, 
when she was announced as the winne 
tears she told the crowd that she had 
diagnosed with HIV two years earlier. ¢) 
said that she had never meant to come 
this way, that her parents didn’t even kn, 
but if she could help one person the 
was worth it. | cried a little. 

A stunned Ru quickly composed hers, 
and told those assembled that “If one , 
is in pain, we were all in pain. If one 0; 
is in trouble, we are all in trouble.” 

If we can continue showing these , fj 
of positive and normalizing—as norm q 
a drag queen reality show is going i 
anyway—experiences on televis 
maybe we'll slowly become less «9; 
cerned with who we share the batho.) 
with. And maybe my faux-hawk will si 
confusing small children. w 


VOLUNTEER 


Do you love the ARTS? Join us and be a par 
America’s LARGEST Outdoor FREE Art & De 
Festival! Volunteer! Download your applicat 
www.theworks.ab.ca 


Volunteer website for youth 14-24 year 
www.youthvolunteerca 


VOLUNTEER 


You don't have to change your life to change 


WE’RE HIRING 


Public Outreach, Canada’s leader in face-to-face 


fundraising, is currently hiring its fall staff. Our 


fundraisers spread awareness and raise funds 


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. You have two ways to go here. The 
first is to ask him about it and (probab’> 
feel better when he (probably) insists that 


s 
A te nta cl e in 0 u [ 0 C ket 0 'f : ’ though. Boys will be boys, and boys wil 
BEun look at bondage porn. 


that last thing again?” cles. The odd thing about the tentacles, — pedia.wikia.com/wiki/HowTo:Avoid_ten 
Its tentacle porn. It's Japanese, Extreme- beyond the fact that they exist at all (they  tacle_rape) or Dwight Schrute’s blog 


i id the he likes you just the way you are, and if 
| ANDREA NEMERSO! < ly Japanese. Innocent schoolgirl types, were invented to get around restrictions on © (nbe.com/The_Office/dwights- he wanted a Japanese bondage girl he 

F | atsex@atsn column, a drawn anime/hentai fashion with giant — depictions of non-tentacular intercourse), is blog/2008/05/the-curious-rise-of-tenta- _ would have tried to date them back when 
Sees et eyes and giant boobs and teensy little bod- that they are so... uninspired. They Never —_cle-sex-in-manga/). It even has its own _he was dating, and he’s sorry he freaked 
i ‘ia pe Y .. ies clad in teensy little schoolgirl uniforms, seem to be attached to an interesting mon- —_ soda (tentaclegrape.com). you out. The second is to just shrug and 


until they're not and get non-consensually ster with any motivations besides rape and —_LOVE, ANDREA 
multi-penetrated by ... tentacles. (How did _they have a very limited repertoire of sexual a preference for option two, but | will 
you think that sentence was going to end?) acts. They're very “bad teenage date’-— DEAR ANDREA: understand if you can’t let it go and feel 
Anyway, | got the idea and! stored it _ stick itin, stick it in, stick itin—but unlike a  / found some very weird porn on my _\ike you have to confront him 
away and brought it out occasionally to —_ bad teenage date they can do all the stick- boyfriend's computer (I swear | wasn't Just practise telling yourself that fan- 
amuse ‘or shock people, and | totally for- _ing-in at the same time. Whoopty-do snooping!). Its bondage stuff with Japan- _tasy is fantasy and reality is reality ana* 
_ got I'd still never seen any myself until | Here's what | do like about tentacle ese girls and, really, | don’t know what's. many people harbour fantasies they not 
went looking for something else and _— porn: making fun of it has turned into a going on. He’s never even mentioned an _ only can't act out, but wouldn't even want 
somehow stumbled over the tentacles _ sort of online cottage industry, and if interest in anything like this! Does he _to given the opportunity. Make sure you 


go about your business. | do kind of have 


and it all came back to me. you look around you can find some hilar- _—_ want to tie me up? (Not my thing.) Does _ believe this yourself before you confront 

It's the dullest thing ever. I'd seen ious examples, like the grumpy beasties he wish | was Japanese? Help! him, otherwise your skepticism is sure to 
enough hentai (anime pom) to expect this (it at “Ghastly’s Ghastly Comic: Tentacle LOVE. TALL, BLONDE, NOT TIED UP show, and he will get all defensive and 
tends to be weirdly slow and standardized | Monsters and the Women Who Love end up accusing you of not trusting him 
and repetitive and badly dubbed). It's not Them” (ghastlycomic.com), who are DEAR BLONDIE: and going through his stuff and that is not 


the easiest sort-of porn to project yourself © offended that anyone might think they'd |'m sorry! | don’t believe you weren't somewhere you want to be. See why I'd 
into even for a person who likes pom more © commit an act of "bestiality." See also © snooping, mind you, but |'m still sorry. _ pick the second option? 
than | do. And that's the stuff without tenta- © “How To Avoid Tentacle Rape” (uncyclo- © Please don't take this too much to heart, —_ LOVE, ANDREA 


ne Abuse We al Reel agua tele- Acall a apr! - ae rgtaresih 5 Sy 
B m7 ne support. Mature volunteers, 35+, with calm Communities: Questions about philosop! 
; Ds. See aE Buddy Accompany new refugee manner and excellent communication skills wanted. programs? 780.944.4687 Visit: www.adhe.ca te IS 
ee nar Litaetndciie ison ial Volunteers receive intensive training and support. Se ee Jackie James - Upscale Companion 
2:30pm. Transportation not required, Leslie pit all 2hr an ieee pu Serene Would you like to help people/families affected by Petite Brunette COUGAR - St - 90 Ibs 
780.432.1137, ext 357 z Bae 5 sea 1a? ; 357 Alzheimers? Socialize with seniors while assisting TIGHT, Tanned & Toned - 780.887 4989 
Ney ee “ext with games and activities. ElderCare Edmonton, ee a Bee om 
— Ww . TacKieja fare-playmate. 
enthusiastic volunteers for Peecietiie natepectl Voluntear for your local Red Cross. Help us make:aur he 3 abo 5 aia 
events. Call Carmen at 780.444.1547 mission of assisting the most vulnerable in our com- Northside Studio 


munity and around the world possible. Volunteer for 
Red Cross. To volunteer call 780.423.2680 / E we- 
PA.LS. Project Adult Literacy Society needs volun- edm-dm@redoross.ca 
teers to work with adult students in the ESL English 
as a Second Language Program. Call 780.424.5514 
Training and materials are provided 


11910 127 Ave main floor 
A small place for a big deal 
780.452.7440 


Lc # 42943170001 
Volunteers Needed to work with new immigrants in a 
variety of tasks and with some great fun events and 

. = outings! Many exciting shifts available! Call Judy 
Guerrilla Gardening need volunteers to help plant 600 780.424.3545, ext 249 
sapling trees along baseline road. E: theurbangreen- 


ing@qmail.com, T: 780.432.6181 for info, Facebook: Rise Up: Radio Free Edmonton on CUSR FM 68 
httpy// edmontongg. blogspot.com seeking people with a critical ear who will be at H : 00's af HO aughty girls! 
protests, picket-lines, blockades, any sites of struggle 2 ' sara Sig 


Networic Volunteer today to be a between people, corporations or governments to sim- 1 
oy 
2 try 


The Support 
Distress Line Listener. Apply on line at: www.thesup- —_ply bring a recorder and send us the footage. E: rise- 
Porthetwork.com or call 780.732.6648 upradio@cjsr.com; Sam Power, 780.492.2577 ext. 4 
for recording equipment and details 


Break the Code! Help an adult to read and write. Call 


&. 
& 


Jordan Centre for Family Literacy 780.421.7323 Volunteers Needed! to assist new immigrants on first 
www.famlit.ca time shopping trip for essentials. 2-3 hrs. occas. = Calgary 
weekdays. Call Judy 780.424.3545, ext 249 3 i 4 % : 


Volunteers to help promote humanitarian issues to the Volunteers Needed! to help adult immigrants learn 3 eee 2 
Edmonton Community. We are hoping to expand our English. 3-4hrs/wk. No exp. req., various locations. j : J . Other cities 
youth team (12-24 yrs old). Contact Laura Keegan at Judy 780.424.3545, ext 249 ss + 817-8 34-4044 

laura keegan@redeross.ca . 


= Meals on Wheels, volunteer kitchen help and drivers 
Senior's Birthday Entertainment. ‘ needed, weekdays 10am-1pm. Call 780.429.2020 
Senior recreation/activity centre needs volunteer 
entertainers for monthly aftemoon parties. 
Weekday message Karen 780.468.1985 seesa.ca 


Canadian Mental Health Association—Edmonton 
Region Board Recruitment. For info visit www.emha- 
A A . ® itted vol- edmonton.ab,ca, click on Volunteer. Contact Abigail 
ae tBe ts eae SE aicn Eaicacae tor po Parrish-Craig at grammaabby@shaw.ca 
RespectED: Violence and Abuse Prevention Program. 


HOT 


Canadian Red Cross/RespectED Training Program Rortuea al aS The'Support J £ : 3 b ab: eS talk 
begins ee Education Network, 780.732.6648. vnww.thesupportnetwork.com .% aa Comp 
edmonton. respected@redcross.ca ; } 
E.C_AW-AR. (EDMONTON COALITION AGAINST 
WAR AND RACISM) Volunteers welcome. Calgary 


vaww.wage-peace.com for info/contacts, 780.988.2713 


403-313-3330 


SERVICES A) nana rere eases ey 1-900-287-0000 s2s-0nin 


for family members and friends of sex addicts. Ph 


SACE-Public Education Program: 780.988.4411 for meeting locations and info, or visit 
Assault Centre of Edmonton (www.sace.ab.ca) pro- www.sanon.org 
vides crisis intervention, information, counseling, - : 
public education services. For a customized pres- Jewish Family Services Edmonton/TASIS 


sie lnetolatialal wh: 2h 


entation 1: 780.423.4102/F: 780.421.8734/E: _ (Transforming Acculturative Stress Into Success): A 
info@sace.ab.ca; www.sace.ab.ca/24 Hour Crisis free program for Immigrant Women 
Line: 780.423.4121 We're taking gealiais coe ea pore ites } 
- - nimi ture shock and the sense o| ;: ; 
Are you an International Medical Graduate pecanent xperened by ore trained profes- ae. LOCAL CHAT. CALL FREE: code 2315 
ficensure? The Alberta Intemational sional immigrant women. Call Svetlana ’ > 
Medical Graduates Association is here to help. 780.454.1194, E: community@jfse.079 < 
Su study groups, volunteer opportunities—all | ——___—___________2 == a 3 
while creating for tomorrow. www.aimga.ca : | he 
: CL I} RA g 
Canadian Montal Health Association, §=—— 7 ; ray Ht T = Y=) 
moncarcameninnahon sion oe, [can (Crmceliime 
i ffer workshops to give you the skills 
aaa people at i be at risk for “ifyou ol pee ae ecm help 
suicide, Fellow the Hk te ASIST or call Toll free: 1.877.463.3537 r = 


John L. Haar Theatre 
~ 40045 - 155 St. Edmonton, AB a, | | { Q Ke 
A 


epated Nixie 


March 13-21 


2009 i 


www.MacEwan.ca/Creativity 


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SCOTT HARRIS / seott@yueweekly.com 
f nothing else, one has to give credit to the denizens of “Oil Country” for 
[= obstinance in maintaining their collective 20-year grudge against for- 
mer Oiler owner and guy-who-sold-Wayne-Gretzky Peter Pocklington. 

There was a palpable sense of glee last week in the city when news hit that 
the local poster boy for unregulated capitalism had been arrested in California 
on fraud charges after making the somewhat dubious claim when he filed for 
bankruptcy in August 2008 that his personal assets totalled a mere $2900, 
compared to his almost $20 million in debts. 

Media coverage prominently featured file photos of the infamous press confer- 
ence with a teary Wayne Gretzky dabbing his tears ("I told Mess 1 wouldn't do this”), 
and online discussions hailed the arrest as comeuppance for the great betrayal. 

Don't misunderstand, I'm as tickled as anyone that Pocklington might face a decade 
in the clink after a lifetime of arrogance and questionable business dealings, but come 
on, people, let’s hate the guy for the right reasons. In the grand scheme of things, does 
trading a guy being paid millions of dollars to smack around a piece of rubber for our 
entertainment really compare in importance to Pocklington’s abhorrent behaviour in 
the 1986 strike at the Pocklington-owned Gainers meatpacking plant? 

Pocklington's loathing of unions and commitment to breaking the United Food 
and Commercial Workers Local 280P led:to one of the most violent strikes in 
provincial history, as city police in unmarked riot gear acted as Pinkertons for the 
daily busloads of scabs Pocklington sent to the plant. The “Battle of 66 Street” last- 
ed six months, over 400 members of the union were arrested and untold hardship 
was suffered by the families of the 1200 workers as they outlasted, against all odds 
and in the grips of a recession, the combined power of Pocklington, weak provin- 
cial labour laws and the police. 

Pocklington walked away from it all in 1989, leaving the provincial govern- 
ment, and Edmonton taxpayers, saddled with a plant $100 million in debt. Gov- 
ernment-owned ATB Financial in 2000 abandoned efforts to recover $71 million 
in outstanding loans owed by Pocklington. The impacts of Pocklington’s deal- 
ings and political influence in the province go on and on, and it’s this history 
that we should all be outraged by decades later, not a hockey transaction. ¥ 


Issue No 700 / Mar 19 - Mar 25, 2009 / Available at over 1400 locations 


WUEWEEKLY 


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4 WWEWEEKLY 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 


= LETTERS 


YAY, NEWSPAPERS! 


Steve Anderson’s column ("No future at 
all,” Mar 5 - Mar 12, 2009) was a wel- 
come and succinct review of the sad 
state of affairs in journalism today— 
and likely to deteriorate more, being 
dependent on the whims of profit-seek- 
ing media owners. 

| look forward to Mr Anderson's solu- 
tions he says are coming in his next col- 
umn. His column reminded me of an 
article by Charles Lewis, former 60 Min- 
utes staffer and founder of the Center for 
Public Integrity, in the September 2007 
issue of the Columbia Journalism 
Review, which reviewed many successful 
not-for-profit media, including the Asso- 
ciated Press, Harper's, Mother Jones, 
Foreign Affairs, National Geographic, 
Delaware State News, The Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor, The-NewsHour with Jim 
Lehrer and National Public Radio. Most 
of these media are funded by philanthro- 
py and Mr Lewis called on foundations, 
supported by local citizens, in association 
with local colleges and universities to 
promote “accurate, non-partisan informa- 
tion to our national discourse.” In addi- 
tion, in Canada, tax laws could be 
modified to encourage donations to inde- 
pendent journalistic enterprises. 
The newspaper is not doomed. On the 


bus, train, plane or anytime you are just 
sitting there it is something entertaining 
and educational to do—and is so much 
lighter and easier to deal with than a. com- 
puter. Newspapers are relaxing—you can 
scan a page and read what you want, 
even if only headlines. What else do peo- 
ple do sitting on the john? You can hardly 
take a computer into the bathroom. 

A free press is essential to a free and 
democratic society, and any steps taken 
to arrest the decline in independent 
journalism are appreciated. 

MAC WALKER 


YAY, SABZY! 


| have just read your recent review of 
Sabzy Café ("We're all in this together,” 
Mar 5 - Mar 11, 2009). | had just eaten 
at Sabzy and | have known the owners 


for years, so | was interested to hear ~ 


what the reviewer had to say. 

The space is inviting and the staff is 
friendly and happy to explain the food. 
The reviewer made a brief mention that 
there are plenty of vegetarian options— 
which is true—but | felt that this fact 
deserves more explanation. Creating 
menu options that vegetarians and vegans 
alike can eat was always in the minds of 
the‘owners. Using healthy oils where 
another chef may have chosen butter, as 
an example, includes the vegan diner. 

If you’re vegetarian or vegan, | 
highly recommend Sabzy. The food is 
excellent and the variety of flavours 
are incredible. 

JASON MELNYCHUK 


YAY, DEATH! 


| wanted to drop a line and say good 
work on the Death and Dying article 
(“At least you won't die wondering,” 
Mar 5 - Mar 11, 2009). | am a free 
lance writer, hospice volunteer anc 
online student of thanatology with 
World University. | was pleased to see 
that there is a course at U of A and 


* feel the topics of death and dying are 


not only fascinating, but necessary !n 
our day and age. 

Thanks for a good read, 
SANDRA TONN 


YAY, CONNIE! 


The article by Connie Howard on how 
science corrects itself ("To science. ! 
felt that | could help," Mar 5 - Ma! 
12, 2009) was wonderful. | loved the 
history, and we can learn so much: 
from it. These are eternal truths 
Much appreciation for Connie's £2" 
tastic column 

TODD PENBERTHY 


Vue Weekly welcomes reade! 
response, whether critica! o' 
complimentary. Send your opinio’ 
by mail (Vue Weekly, 10303 - 108 
Street, Edmonton AB T5J 1L7), bY 
fax (780.426.2889) or by em2!' 
(letters@vueweekly.com). Pree! 
ence is given to feedback abou! 
articles in Vue Weekly. Wé 
reserve the right to edit fo’ 
length and clarity. 


a 


is thick with pix- 
el or celebrat- 
traditional news 
lamentations are 
of journalism as a 
nocracy, the watchdog 
and industry, the last 
; against the hordes of 
jiased opinion. Those cele- 
brating wonders of aggre- 
gated news feeds and a new age of 
democratic information creation and 
pres the common people, for the 
people. 
Unfortunately, | haven't yet found the 
common people blogging the news in 
the places | haunt: rural towns, villages 
and hamlets north of the city of 
Edmonton. How can these communi- 
ties overcome pressures that threaten 
to take away their voices, their identity, 
and possibly their very existence? 

T hold the dubious honour of being 
the last person to freelance for two 
small rural Alberta weeklies. For most 
of the decades those papers existed, 
they operated under the flags of the 
Morinville Mirror and the Redwater Tri- 
bune, amalgamating into the single 
Morinville-Redwater Town & Country 
Examiner just before Christmas in 2008. 

Fewer than five years previously, 
they had been bought by a large 
national media corporation, and on 
March 11, 2009, the Town & Country 
Examiner, along with the 46-year-old 
Jasper Booster, became the first Alberta 
weekly papers to cease operations. In 
a statement quoted in both papers’ 
final editions, Craig Martin, the execu- 
tive vice-president operations Western 
Canada for owner Sun Media/Que- 
becor, claimed their “economic model 
in today’s challenging environment no 
longer made business sense." 

Even if rural residents are willing to 
buy the economic argument—one I 
Suspect is difficult to maintain under 
close scrutiny given the likelihood that 
very paper in the company’s national 
empire operates on the same econom- 
ic model—the death of a local paper in 
asmall community is dire indeed. 

_ “All of us in rural Alberta know the 
importance of [local papers], it’s usu- 
ally the only way we found out what's 
happening in our communities,” says 
Mel Smith, the mayor of Redwater, a 
town that has been working flat out to 


<|MEDIA 


accommodate the expected popula- 
tion growth coming from nearly $15 
billion in bitumen upgrader projects 
planned for the region—projects cur- 
rently on hiatus while financial insti- 
tutions and corporations alike assess 
their risk positions in the wake of the 
sub-prime mortgage fiasco. 

“We don’t have access to radio 
locally, the dailies out of the cities 
won't cover—for the most part—our 
local news, so we rely heavily on the 
weeklies,” Smith explains. 

Writer Stephen Dafoe was both a 
reporter and editor for the Morinville 
Mirror and Redwater Tribune papers. 
On deadline for his latest book, Dafoe 
spoke on these issues through an 
email interview. 

"The loss of a community paper is 
particularly tragic when it is the only 
source of local news in the community. 
If we want to know what's going on 
provincially or federally, we have a 
multitude of print, audio and video 
sources to enlighten us on the issues 
of the day, but the issues important to 
the towns and villages in rural Alberta 
are not going to be covered by the 
larger media outlets unless the story 
has a larger appeal,” Dafoe writes. 
“Without community weeklies, the 
local hockey team, baseball team, 
scout troop, volunteer fire department 
and all the other people who play a 
part in making communities places 
people want to live, go unrecognized.” 

While much of the province has at 
least one large daily newspaper avail- 
able from either Edmonton or Calgary, 
Dafoe says these papers serve a very 
different niche than do rural weeklies. 

“I really compare Sturgeon Coun- 
ty’s proximity to Edmonton with 
Canada's proximity to the United 
States,” Dafoe says. “In terms of news 
coverage, you will seldom see Cana- 
dian issues covered on American tele- 
vision unless it directly affects 
American interests. The same is true 
with Sturgeon County, or any other 
that borders on Edmonton.” 

The analogy also holds for small 
communities bordering any large 
metropolitan area such as Calgary, 
Vancouver or Montréal. 


‘the news today, oh boy 


| Alberta weeklies the latest media casualties, and 
3 local rag leaves a big hole in small communities 


LARGE ISSUES can and do impact 
rural communities says Vicki 
Zinyk, the chief administrative 
officer for Bon Accord, a town 
of around 1500 people in Stur- 
geon County, located only 
minutes from the military 
base on the northern edge 
of Edmonton. But mean- 
ingful discussion of 
such issues, she 
argues, suffers when 
small papers in 
those communi- 
ties disappear. 

“In the case 
currently, we're 
undergoing a signifi- 
cant amount of pressure to 
regionalize or centralize; the 
Case in point is the Capital Region 
Board,” Zinyk says. “A larger city 
newspaper may not cover the view of 
the smaller communities and the rural 
communities that are going to be, in 
my view, the most significantly impact- 
ed by the concessions that are made.” 

Even when rural stories are cov- 
ered by the larger dailies, they rarely 
reflect the real-life impact events have 
on smaller communities. Urban read- 
ers may recall the massive fires last 
year at Newbrook, a hamlet in 
Thorhild County, located near the 
base of infamously deadly Highway 63 
to Fort McMurray. While media came 
in droves to capture photos, video 
and stories of the fire and its fight, 
only the local weeklies covered the 
closure of Newbrook’s single elemen- 
tary-junior high school, a decision 
requiring local children to be bussed 
by highway to schools at the soon-to- 
be-dissolved village of Thorhild. 

It's a void the Internet is unlikely to fill 
anytime soon. While many rural com- 
munity governments do have an online 
presence, Zinyk notes that web access 
in rural areas can be problematic. 

“[The Internet} gets your message 
out to the province at large or people 
who are researching overall, but it 
generally doesn’t cover—or isn’t nec- 
essarily the best forum—for the rural 
residents, because it’s not as personal 
of a tool,” she explains. “It doesn’t 
cover all of the events, it doesn’t 
cover the nuances that you get from a 
community newspaper that helps you 


gaina 
by eulbiSrenr 
insight to the 
individual issues. A 
website is just that: it's a 
means of hosting information, but 
it doesn't provide the nuances or 
insight that a newspaper might on 
issues.” 

Thorhild County, also on my former 
beat, has a total population of about 


_3000, double that of the town of Bon 


Accord but spread across an area of 
nearly 2000 square kilometres. 

The county is largely agricultural 
with minimal industrial development, 
meaning that in practical terms the 
county has to operate on both limited 
population resources and a small tax 
base. At the moment, much of the 
county and indeed, much of rural 
Alberta, does not have home-based 
access to high-speed Internet. 

Deputy Reeve Charles Newell 
agrees that web access is a huge issue 
for rural residents, making the Inter- 
net a poor alternative to disappearing 
print media. 

"Being informed is the only way 
you're going to stop a lot of these petty 
prejudices and things like that because 
that’s how this stuff gets started, not 
actually knowing truthfully what's going 
on,” he says, expanding on the problem 
of community cohesiveness and the 
dangers of relying on local grapevines 
and word-of-mouth. "A good paper can 


Even 

the more 
mundane ele- 
ments of 
nance will be 
challenged 
ties, towns and 
other governmental 
bodies are required by 
law to post notices 
regarding public hearings 

and related development 
matters, a requirement that 
could pose problematic in the 
case of a community where 
local publications are no longer 


> 
S 


ae : 
available. Newell notes that doing 
S g 
> 


direct mailings to each person listed 

on the county’s tax rolls would be 

extremely expensive, even for such a 
small population as Thorhild County 


THE PEOPLE quoted in this article are 
people who fell within my beat, a large 
part of the counties of Thorhild and 
Sturgeon which together encompass 
nearly 4000 square kilometres—rough- 
ly 7.5 times the geographic size of the 
city of Edmonton. At their full comple- 
ment, the papers had a combined edi- 
torial staff of two—editor and 
reporter—but played a critical role in 
reflecting the communities and their 
issues. In many of the hamlets, villages 
and towns | reported for, there are 
communities with vibrant people, phe- 
nomenal spirit and great hope for the 
future, despite facing enormous pres- 
sures from many sides that threaten 
their very sustainability. 

The day-to-day chronicles of any 
community's life are held by its local 
media. Journalism has been referred 
to as a rough draft of history, but in 
tural areas, particularly ones where 
the population is declining and the 
old-timers are literally passing on, 
that rough draft might be the only his- 


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Obama and the Gulag Archipelago 


: | DYER STRAIGHT 


gwynne@2vueweekly.com 


In his first week in office, President 
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the notorious detention camp at Guan- 
tanamo Bay. It was a promise kept and a 
corner turned—but Guantanamo is only 
the most visible part of an entire archipel- 
ago of extralegal and often secret US 
prisons that extends halfway around the 
planet. Like the “Gulag Archipelago” of 
the old Soviet Union, made famous by 
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, most of its 
inmates are people who were seized only 
on suspicion, and many of them were tor- 
tured to get “confessions.” 

{t was widely assumed that shutting 
down Guantanamo was just the first step 
in winding up the whole shameful sys- 
tem, but the signals sent by the new 
administration since then have not been 
reassuring. Last monthpUS government 
lawyers made a series of interventions 
which suggested that it would be busi- 
ness as usual, Bush-style, for the thou- 
sands of detainees trapped in other parts 
of the secret prison system managed by 
the United States. 

Last week came the first sign that 
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“illegal enemy combatants,” a label con- 
trived by the Bush administration to justi- 
fy detaining people indefinitely without 
ever bringing them before a court or even 
granting them prisoner-of-war status. 
Only 242 prisoners are still held at 


_ Guantanamo, but that is just the tip of an 


iceberg. There are thousands more held 
in legal black holes at Bagram airbase in 
Afghanistan, in Iraq, Djibouti and the 
prison ships, at the US base on Diego 
Garcia in the Indian Ocean, and in the 
countries where the Central Intelligence 
Agency has been outsourcing the more 
severe forms of torture (notably Egypt, 
Morocco and Jordan). 

An exact count of the detainees is 


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impossible, because in many cases even 
their names are not known, but estimates 
run as high as 18 000 people. Some of 
them have been held for as much as 
seven years. 

Some of them were involved in acts of 
violence against Americans, others at 
least gave the matter some thought, and 
some are completely innocent, just as at 
Guantanamo. All were classed as “illegal 
enemy combatants,” which meant that 
they had no legal recourse against their 
imprisonment. 

Since his first bold gesture about 
Guantanamo, Obama has seemed to be 
drifting towards the view of the Washing- 
ton security establishment, which would 


phone: 780-4290606 


rather lock up innocent people than risk 
letting a dangerous person go free. When 
Judge John Bates of the US District Court 
for the District of Columbia, hearing the 
case of four men held at Bagram, asked 
the new administration if it intended to 
change the Bush-era policy of keeping the 
detainees out of reach of the courts, the 
answer was no. 

The Bagram detainees wanted Judge 
Bates to extend last year's Supreme Court 
decision, which gave Guantanamo 
inmates access to the US courts, so that 
prisoners in other extralegal prisons 
abroad could also benefit from the ruling. 
The Bush administration had opposed 
their request, but Judge Bates asked the 
Obama administration if it wanted to 
“refine” its position. “Having considered 
the matter, the government adheres to its 
previously articulated position,” replied 
the Justice Department, re-affirming the 
Bush policy 


IN ANOTHER CASE last month, involving a 
lawsuit by several former detainees 
against a subsidiary of Boeing that sup- 
plied aircraft for the “rendition” flights that 
had delivered them to various destinations 
for torture, the Obama administration 
repeated the Bush demand that the case 
be dismissed because discussing it in 
court could damage national security and 
relations with other nations. (Translation 
we did send them for torture, but letting 
the case proceed would embarrass the 
people who did the torture for us.) 


fax: 780-4250533 


mail: 11003 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton AB TSK OK? 


It was looking pretty grim for a while 
as if Obama's decision to shut down 
Guantanamo and halt torture by US gov- 
ernment agencies was mere window- 
dressing for a policy that had not really 
changed at all. Even now it is not sure 
that he is going to change the policy fun- 
damentally; after all, he has fallen into 
the clutches of the Washinaton consen- 
sus in his Afghanistan policy. But drop- 
ping the category of “illegal enemy 
combatants” is a hopeful sign. 

The Justice Department said that sus- 
pects will in future be held according to 
legal standards set by the international 
laws of war. In itself, that only means 
that there will be no more torture and no 
more renditions, and that the United 
States must provide information about all 
the people it holds. It does not mean it 
will release them until after the “war” is 
over, even though the “war on terror,” like 
the “war on crime” or the “war en drugs,” 
could last for decades 

Nor does promising to treat the 
detainees according to the Geneva Con- 
ventions oblige the Obama administration 
to give them access to the US court sys- 
tem. That will require a separate deci- 
sion, and Obama will not make it until he 
thinks the country is ready (if he makes it 
at all). But this is a start. v 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 
published in 45 countries. His column 
appears each week in Vue Weekly 


FRONT 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 


Pride and prejudice 


Edmonton and Calgary anti-racist activists 


prepare for ‘White Pride Worldwide Day’ 


SCOTT HARRIS / scott@vueweekly.com 
C=" may be 300 kilometres 
south of the city, but anti-racist 
‘activists in Edmonton say that 
the activities of a Calgary-based white 
“supremacist group are still too close 
for comfort. 

So for the second year in a row, 
Edmonton activists will be making the 
trip down the QEII this weekend to 
join Calgarians in opposing a march 
being organized by the Aryan Guard— 
a self-proclaimed white nationalist 
group—to mark what its members call 
“White Pride Worldwide Day,” held to 
coincide with the United Nations dec- 
laration of March 21 as the Interna- 
tional Day for the Elimination of 
Racial Discrimination. 

Andru, who asked that only his first 
name be used, is one of the people 
who will be making the trip. He says 
it’s important for people from Edmon- 
ton to join their neighbours to the 
south in challenging the Aryan Guard 
because of the close connection 
between the two cities 

“Edmonton is just up the road from 
Calgary, and a lot of the people who 
are involved in the white power 
movement in Calgary are actually 


2IRACISM 


from Edmonton. Theyjust went down 
to Calgary because they thought it 
would be easier for them to establish 
a base there,” Andru explains. 

He adds that while there hasn't 
been much white supremacist activity 
in Edmonton of late—the last time a 
similar march was organized here 
was in 2004, while local musician Pat 
Bourne’s house was firebombed by 
racist skinheads in 2006—there’s 
always a chance that the problem 
might again come north. 

"There's a bit of a concern that with 
the situation in Calgary disintegrating, 
as is often the case with these white 
power groups—they start infighting 
and bickering amongst themselves— 
with so many of them coming from 
Edmonton that they might try to start 
something up here again.” 

Andru isn’t the only one thinking 
the Aryan Guard might consider 
moving to Edmonton. The group’s 
online discussion board has a sec- 
tion devoted to Aryan Guard Edmon- 
ton, and a thread on the board 


discusses the need for a similar 
march here, while another encour- 


ages organizing a more active Aryan 


Guard group in the city (one post 
from March 11 reads, "Hey, yeah still 
nothing is really happening in 
Edmonton, I see some swastika graf- 
fiti, but nothing more, and coloured 
people are trying to start sh*t with 
me almost everyday, because | have 
a shaved head and don't put up with 
their jungle boy sh*t.) 

Andru says that those kinds of 
ideas aren't something that can sim- 
ply be ignored because they're on the 
margins, and it’s all the more impor- 
tant to challenge them when they 
move from obscure discussion boards 
to downtown Calgary—and before 
they come to Edmonton. 

“We're simply there to try to neu- 
tralize what we think is a very dan- 
gerous message,” he says. 
“Particularly as Alberta is becoming 
more diverse ethnically speaking, cul- 
turally speaking, to have groups like 
this continue to go out there on the 
prowl is really dangerous and it’s in 
the interest of maintaining some sort 
of peace and solidarity and cohesion 
among all segments of our society 


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FRONT 


that we are trying to collectively stand 
up about this.” ; 


KYLE MCKEE, the 23-year-old founder 
of the Aryan Guard who moved to 
Calgary three years ago from Ontario, 
however, defends the Aryan Guard's 
right to promote what it sees as prob- 
lems in Canadian society. 

“We're just basically trying to raise 
awareness of the racial problems that 
we have in Canada, trying to build a 
future for white people,” he claims. 
"The people that built this country, 
[that] made it one of the most desir- 
able countries to be in in the world, 
are kind of just being bent over. We 
gotta fuckin’ bend over and accept 
everything that's coming into the 
country, not the other way around. I 
think a better policy would be if peo- 
ple like this country and wanna come 
to this country they come here not 
with the intention of changing it but 
with embracing it.” 

He says the point of White Pride 
Worldwide Day is simple. 

“We'd just like to promote white 
pride. It’s been a pretty taboo sorta 
thing,” he says. “I guess, as you can 
see by the response it’s getting, that 
white pride is kinda viewed as a 
racist thing, you gotta be some sort 
of a raving racist to be proud to*be 
white. We don’t feel that should be 
the case, so we'd like to just keep 
pushing it so that hopefully, eventu- 
ally, we can just have our own day, 
you know, white pride day.” 

Keeping the focus on “white 
pride” is the reason McKee says the 
group is asking its supporters to not 
bring Nazi paraphernalia to the 
march, despite the group’s unapolo- 
getic bent towards Nazism (National 
Socialism) online, including links to 
numerous Nazi websites, the pro- 
motion of a CD including lyrics like 
“The spirit of Hitler will rise again / 
And help us take back our lands” 
and, until a few days ago, a gallery 
of pictures which included members 
saluting Nazi flags and celebrating 
Adolf Hitler's birthday. 

“Most of us are National Socialists 
and we feel that that would be a good 
political platform for this country. My 
personal opinion is that there’s a lot of 
misunderstood ideas of what happened 
or didn’t happen during the Second 
World War,” he says. “But our websites 
and discussion boards are one thing. 
This march ... it’s not supposed to be 
promoting a political ideology, it’s sup- 
posed to be promoting pride.” 

But Andru argues there’s another 
reason the group hides its racist and 
Nazi sympathies behind notions of 
pride and claims that it is simply a 
“white civil rights activist group” exer- 
cising free speech. 

“They know that their message is 
just repulsive. They know that with the 
exception of a select few individuals 
people will not rally to that sort of 
cause,” he says. “So what they're trying 


_to do is to somehow, in a feeble way, 


essentially just strip away the overtly 
violent and odious nature of what 
they're trying to do under the guise of 
‘Well, we're just people who have an 
opinion, and if you believe in a free 
society we should be able to share that 
opinion with others.” 


LEV, WHO ALSO asked that his sur- 


name not be used, is a member of 


Anti-Racist Action Calgary (ARA), 
the group that issued the call for a 
counter-demonstration. He con- 
cedes that McKee’s group has the 
right to present their message, but 
says that so.do groups which dis- 
agree with the Aryan Guard. 

“ARA has not contacted the city to 
clamp down, to not issue permits, we 
haven't really tried to stop them legally 
from being able to do this,” he says. 
"The way we see it is we're expressing 
our equal right to express our opinion, 
which is opposed to theirs.” 

But Lev stresses that recognizing the 
right to free speech—provided that it 
doesn't violate Canadian hate laws— 
doesn’t mean letting the Aryan Guard 
march unopposed, even if it risks 
bringing them more attention. Last 
year, the 300 people who tumed up to 
oppose the Aryan Guard outnumbered 
them by more than six to one. 

“Our coming out in larger num- 
bers gives more media attention, 
more public attention to the Aryan 
Guard than they would otherwise 
get, and that is something that 
makes them happy,” he admits. “At 
the same time, we think that doing 
that is the most effective way we 
can resist them, because if nobody 


.in the city knows they exist because 


nobody turned up to their rally and 
the media didn’t cover it, maybe we 
have some kind of fuzzy moral high 
ground for ignoring them, but at the 
same time they're free to run the 
streets with impunity and nobody, 
from shopkeepers to the people who 
run the venues in the city, nobody 
knows who they are, so nobody 
denies them business, nobody outs 
them to an employer, it just makes 
things easier for them.” 

Lev points to an attack in July of a 
Japanese tourist by a 17-year-old Cal- 
garian alleged to be a member of the 
Aryan Guard, who kicked the woman 
repeatedly with steel-toed boots, as the 
type of incident that happens when 
people ignore racist groups. The teen 
was convicted in a Calgary courtroom 
on March.13. 

Lev says the approach of ARA in 
reducing such incidents in the future 
is to “make life difficult” for the Aryan 
Guard in the hopes that younger 
members who are attracted to the 
group but aren’t committed racists 
won't stick around 

“We believe that the best way to 
deal with a group like the Aryan 
Guard is to confront them, it’s not to 
ignore them and hope that they go 
away because experience has shown 
us that they don’t,” he says. “Frankly, 
if Kyle McKee wants to spend the rest 
of his life ‘Sieg Heiling’ a poster of 
Hitler on the wall there’s not a Jot we 
can do about it, and there’s not a 
whole lot of harm he can do. It’s 
when they come into numbers that is 
the problem and that’s basically what 
we try to prevent. 

“All we really want is for people to 
know the Aryan Guard exists, because 
most people don’t need to be con- 
vinced that neo-Nazi gangs in their 
city is a bad thing, they just need to 
know that it does already exist,” he 
says. “Once we get that information 
out we think we've won most of the 
battle because people will just make 
up their own minds and decide that 
they don’t want Nazi thugs in their 
community.” Ww 


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ISSUES 


they represent or of Vue Woetiy 


An island no longer 


Alberta needs to get with the program and 


implement an economic stimulus plan 


GIL MCGOWAN / www.afl.org 
So, how bad is the Alberta economy, really? 
There is some truth in the reassuring 
words spoken by provincial government 
representatives last week. It's true, for 
example, that Alberta's new. unemploy- 
ment rate of 5.4 per cent (up from 4.3 per 
cent just a month earlier) is still among 
the lowest in the country. It’s also true 


B A i LO U T S PUBLIC SOLUTIONS IN CRITICAL TIMES 


April 3-5, 2009 Chateau Louis Conference Centre 
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Individuals - $175 PIA members, $200 non-members 
Table of seven - $1050 PIA members, 

$1225 non-members 

Subsidies and volunteer opportunities for people 


on low-income 


For more information and to register contact 
Public Interest Alberta 
(780) 420-0471 
pialta@telus.net 
' www.pialberta.org 


albertaviews 


Other plenary speakers include: 

Or Elaine Bernard — Harvard University, Boston 
Margrete Strand Rangnes — 8/ue Green Alliance, 
Washington D.C. . 

Or Robert Woollard — Doctors for Medicare, Vancouver 
Diane Gibson — Parkland Institute, Edmonton 


that 5.4 per cent is about the average 
level for unemployment in Alberta over 
the past 20 years. 

So, there's no reason to be too con- 
cerned, right? 

Well, actually, there is. In fact, there 
are at least three reasons why we should 
be seriously concerned. 

First, because the unemployment rate 


Public Interest Alberta's 34 Annual Advocacy Conference 


EL 


in Alberta has never before—and | mean 
never—spiked a full percentage point in 
one month. Second, because the Ameri- 
can economy—which we are almost 
entirely dependent upon to purchase our 
energy exports—continues to sink with 
no end in sight. Third, because our 
province's energy and construction sec- 
tors—which together have formed the 
heart of our oil-sands driven economy— 
continue to shed high-paying jobs at an 


__ alarming pace. 


Depending on which estimates you 
look at, between $97 and $241 billion 
dollars in-oil sand investment has been 
taken off the table in the past two 
months. As a result, the next generation 
of mega-projects, which were supposed 
to keep Albertans working and the provin- 
cial economy humming for the next five to 
10 years, has essentially evaporated. 

Taken together, this means that our 
current unemployment rate of 5.4. per 
cent is almost certainly not our final des- 
tination, but rather a way station 
glimpsed briefly as we move to even 
more dismal jobless figures, the likes of 
which we haven't seen in Alberta since 
the darkest days of the ‘80s oil bust. 

So, what do the Alberta and federal 
governments need to the about this rapid- 
ly deteriorating situation? 

First of all, they need to get their 
heads out of the sand and realize that 
simply crossing their fingers and hoping 
for a quick end to the global recession 
does not constitute an economic strategy. 

At the federal level—after being 
pushed to the brink by the Liberal-NDP 
coalition—the Harper government is 
reluctantly doing at least some of what 
needs to be done. 

In particular, they have grudgingly 
accepted the notion that during times of 
economic contraction, the public sector is 


the only sector that can keep the econo-— 


my moving forward. But federal spending 
has so far fallen short of the benchmark 
of two per cent of national economic 
activity (GDP) agreed upon by other indus- 
trial nations. 

The Harper government has also so far 
failed to repair Canada’s dysfunctional 
Employment Insurance (El) system. Virtu- 
ally all experts agree that the best way to 
stimulate spending and help individuals 
and families weather the recession is to 
get money directly into the pockets of the 
unemployed, but there's a serious prob- 
lem: ill-conceived “reforms” introduced in 
the deficit-cutting ‘90s mean that the 
threshold for qualifying for El has been 
set too high and the benefits have been 
set too low. As a result of the high eligi- 
bility requirements, only 23 per cent of 
unemployed Albertans currently qualify 
for benefits—the lowest rate in the coun- 
try. Even the minority who do qualify earn 


a much smaller share of their pre-unem- 
ployment income and can collect for 
shorter periods than had previously been 
the case. 

So, if the Harper government is really 
serious about helping Canadians through 
this recession, it needs to increase both 
the amount and duration of benefits, 
loosen eligibility rules and get rid of the 
perverse inequities that make it much 
more difficult for Albertans to qualify for 
benefits than people fiving in other parts 
of the country. 

The bottom line is that a lost job is a 
lost job: it shouldn't matter if it was lost 
in Edmonton or Halifax. 


AT THE PROVINCIAL LEVEL, the situation 
is, in many ways, even more frustrating 
Alberta stands alone as one of the only 
jurisdictions in the industrialized world 
that has so far refused to consider imple- 
menting a major stimulus program. This is 
all the more frustrating because there is 
probably no other jurisdiction in all of 
North America better positioned to do 
more for its citizens than Alberta. 

People may disagree with the rationale 
for Ralph Klein’s “war on the debt,” but i 
has left Alberta with one of the best cred- 
it ratings in the world. My question is 
this: what was the point of all the sacri- 
fices made by Albertans to earn our sta- 
tus as a debt-free province if that status 
isn't used to help citizens in tough times? 

The good news is that the upcoming 
provincial budget (expected to be handed 
down on April 7) presents a golden oppor- 
tunity for the Stelmach government to 
make up for lost time by bringing three 
strands together. 

First there’s the fiscal capacity available 
as a result of our impressive credit posi- 
tion. Second, there is the large (and grow- 
ing) pool of skilled tradespeople newly 
idled by the collapse in oil sands spending 
And third, there's the well-documented 
“infrastructure-gap” that was left as a 
result of 13 years of under-spending on 
public projects by the Klein government 

Put these strands together and we 
could have the makings of a win-win-win 
budget scenario. Albertans win because 
of the jobs and spin-offs created. They 
win again because they finally get long- 
overdue public infrastructure. And the 
government wins because they'll be able 
to build everything at reduced cost— 
because they won't be competing with a 
booming private sector. 

Unfortunately, all of this depends on 
the Alberta government realizing that |! 
can't afford to simply wait out the reces- 
sion, It also means it would have to tear 
up their own politically inspired balanced- 
budget legislation that prohibits the gov- 
ernment from running deficits. 

At this point we can all take heart In 
the fact that the rest of the world has 
begun to embrace a healthy skepticism 
when it comes to the free-market mania 
that inspired things like Alberta's bal- 
anced budget law. Let's hope that mem- 
bers of the Stelmach cabinet do the 
same—and soon. w 


Gil McGowan is president of the Alberta 
Federation of Labour, Alberta's largest 
union organization, representing 140 000 
people in 30 unions. 


conversation with a friend the other 
pee ver gevomients talk 
of “getting tough on crime” as a poten- 
tial prelude to an increase in public-pri- 
vate partnerships in the penitentiary 
system | thought, for the millionth time, 
that public relations messages are very 
often a prelude to something we may, in 
the end, not welcome at all. 

Media messages about Bill C-6—the 
Canadian Consumer Product Safety 
Act—have been about our safety, but 
may well be a prelude to massive and 
unwelcome loss of freedom of choice. 
One Alberta company, Modern Design, 
has had a giant taste of what a raid on 
products deemed unsafe by someone in 
high places feels like. 

On the moming of January 15, Modern 
Design staff were greeted by RCMP and 
Health Canada officials with a warrant to 
search for unapproved natural health 
products they'd allegedly been supplying 
to naturopathic doctors and herbalists. 
Officials spent 11 hours going through the 
premises with a fine-tooth comb, confis- 
cating the entire inventory, computer hard 
drives and sales records. 

Much of this was over things as innocu- 
ous as folic acid and amino acid supple- 
ments, and about bio-identical hormones, 
synthetic versions of which are used every 


b> FUTURE SHOP 


single day by doctors everywhere. 

Naturopathic doctors (NDs) are highly 
trained, but rather than work with phar- 
Maceuticals, they work with therapeutic 
substances that are more organic and 
less foreign to the human body than are 
drugs. The problem NDs are running into 
is twofold; many of the products they 
use are being denied Health Canada 
approval with natural product numbers 
(NPNs), and they themselves as naturo- 
pathic doctors have, as of October of 
2008, been denied prescribing authority 
for things like bio-identical hormones 
that now require a prescription. 


THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS rely on 
bio-identical hormones to counter 
declining ones. Low hormone levels 
equal compromised immune and stress 
responses, and illness, and supplemen- 
tation can slow and prevent the process. 

“It was a grey area until last October,” 
says Bruce Lofting, vice-president of the 
Alberta Association of Naturopathic Doc- 
tors. “Now we've been told by our health 
minister that we won't be given any pre- 
scribing authority, at least not for now. In 
November, we notified Alberta NDs to 
discontinue using them, but the problem 
is that the patients that rely on them will 
have a hard time accessing them, as MDs 
tend to prefer synthetic options.” 

Given the extent of the training natur- 
opathic doctors receive, and that the 
health care services they provide are 
largely preventative and reduce the bur- 
den on our medical system, and given 


LONDON | 
DRUGS | 


name of safety 


that pharmacists, dentists and midwives 
have limited prescribing authority appro- 
priate to their fields, one might ask why 
the resistance here in Alberta? “We 
Weren't given any kind of substantial 
answer to that question,” says Mike 
Nowacek of the Alberta Association of 
Naturopathic Doctors. 

The decision, like Bill C-6, is presum- 
ably about safety, but it robs us of the 
freedom to determine what therapeutic 
substances we put into our bodies when 
we're ill, and the irony is that bio-identi- 
cal hormones are much safer than syn- 
thetic ones. They deserve either natural 
product approval or legal prescription 
access by naturopathic doctors. The 
products being ever more tightly regulat- 
ed make most over-the-counter and pre- 
scription medicines look downright evil. 

Our more progressive West Coast 
Neighbours appear to be quickly moving 
toward making limited prescribing authori- 
ty for their naturopathic doctors a reality. 
Alberta Health Services has said the 
province is looking for innovative ways to 
bring emergency room wait times down, 
and while expanding health care to 
include naturopathic care would do little 
to that end in the short run, it would do a 
lot to reduce the numbers of us seriously 
and frequently ill in the long run. 

| take that back—it would do plenty 
in the short run also. Adverse drug reac- 
tions are common reasons for emer- 
gency room visits. They're common 
causes of all kind of trouble, and natural 
therapies have no such track record. w 


MEDIA 


CONTINUED FROM PAGE § 


tory recorded outside of private 
diaries and personal memories. 

As active observers of community 
life, the closure of a rural weekly 
means an end to chronicling a com- 


‘munity’s history, a history that may 


disappear entirely if, in its haste to 
lock the doors, management forgets 
or refuses to pass along the often 
decades-long histories contained in 
its periodical archive 

The situation for small papers 
throughout Alberta, and across 
Canada, seems increasingly shaky. 
George Brown, president of the 
Alberta Weekly Newspapers Associa- 
tion. was unavailable for an inter- 
view; he had been laid off from his 
day job as publisher of two rural 
Albertan weeklies just minutes 
before I called. 

Like nearly a third of the province's 
weeklies, the small papers Brown 
worked for are also owned by Sun 
Media/Quebecor. Great West, which 


‘ runs Edmonton's See Magazine, owns 


many others, leaving only a handful 
of truly independently owned papers 
covering their respective communi- 
ties, a level of concentration which 
becomes more troubling as these cor- 
porations look at ways to cut back to 
weather the recession 

Back in the blogosphere, those 
who laud the death of print may see 
these changes as freedom from the 
gatekeepers and restrictions of cor- 
porate media. And they may be right 


Freedom from national corporate 
ownership could be another nail in 
the coffin of sustainable rural com- 
munities, or it could be the opportu- 
nity to create something new 
something local, the freedom to take 
back the chronicle of the communi- 
ty’s life for the community itself. 

For Dafoe, awareness and rele- 
vance are the keys to successful 
community journalism, whether 
online or in traditional newsprint 

“The sad thing about Web 2.0 is that 
it makes us all journalists, filmmakers 
book reviewers, movie critics and radio 
hosts and seeks our commentary on 
every piece of information posted on 
the Internet, from the mundanity of 
what our friends are having for lunch 
to correcting the views of professionals 
in almost any field. Andrew Keene 
refers to the trend as ‘The Cult of the 
Amateur’ and I believe that is precisely 
what the blogosphere is. That is not to 
say that there are not gifted writers 
with terrific insights posting on the 
blogs, but they, for the most part, are 
not held to the same accountability that 
newspaper reporters are or ought to be 
held,” Dafoe argues 

“With respect to community jour- 
Nalism, even one objective blogger 
with a following is of greater value to 
the community than a print publica- 
tion that falls to be relevant to its 
readership. I think many community 
papers have forgotten that and used 
the present economic climate as an 
excuse to address problems that 
were created long before the dread- 
ed ‘R word’ became the latest head- 
line trend." w 


KOOCO > 


mobile 


Keodo 


(CTolele er-||| 


Edmonton City Centre 
Kingsway Garden Mail 
Londonderry Mall 
West Edmonton Mail 


MAR‘19 = MAR'25, 2009- 


wusweeay if 


In Soviet Russia, game plays you! 


| INFINITE LIVES 


It's a weird thing, this “retro,” especially 
as it gets layered on top of itself. Ata 
certain point it creates an effect like look- 
ing into a mirror when there's another 
mirror behind you, a tunnel of regression 
down into the dimness where infinity lies. 

I'm reclining on the couch, reading old 
zines, nicely mellow thanks to my acciden- 
tal discovery of what I've since leamed is 
known as a “Kalimotxo”"—poured the last 
inch of last night's cheap wine into what | 
thought was a half-full coffee cup of same, 
only it tums out the mug contained Coca- 
Cola; after the initial “Eeww!" reflex ... dee- 
lish. The zines are from my wife's collection 
of Ben Is Dead back numbers from the mid- 
‘90s, specifically the legendary (I'm told) 


Te= : 


ABOUT pUR ECONOMY 7 


CAPTAIN , HAVE THE 
POOR EXECUTED, 
WOULD YOU7 


“Retro Hell” issues. Good stuff, funny in 
that old zine way you don't get so much in 
the Blog Millennium, and here's where the 
psychedelic mirror-regression begins; this is 
fetro-retro, an 11-year-old magazine about 
20- or 30-year-old pop-culture artifacts. 

‘Course, this isn’t really a trip down my 
personal Memory Lane. These writers are 
southern Californians, not northern Alber- 
tans, and their old familiars are still exot- 
ic unknowns; they had the Sherman Oaks 
Galleria and the medicine chests of the 
doctors they babysat for, | had the half- 
broken homes of the neighbourhood feral 
children and the poorly concealed Pent- 
house stashes of their laid-off boilermak- 
er dads. They had Rodney Bingenheimer, | 
had Mike Sobel. Digging down through 
the retro of others is a kind of double 
archeology, where the familiarity of 
shared reference provides hooks for com- 
prehending an alien time and place. 

I've been having a similar experience 


WHATEVER SHALL WE Do \~ 


SIMPLE , YOUR 
HIGHNESS.” 


playing through the Soviet Unterzdgersdorf 
adventure games (monochrom.at/suz-game). 
Designed by Austrian art/theory collective 
monochrom, the Suzoeg (I'm just going to 
use the abbreviation from the .exe file) 
games place you in the eponymous notional 
country, a tiny (2.5 square kilometres) nation 
that is “the last existing appendage republic 
of the USSR,” completely surrounded by the 
Republic of Austria. In this milieu—hasical- 
ly, a broken-down farmstead littered with 
antiquated junk—you go around solving 
more-or-less standard-issue adventure- 
game puzzles expressed through the lens of 
the tattered remnants of Leninist/Stalinist 
social/material culture. . 


ON THE SURFACE LEVEL, this is enjoyable 
comic nostalgia. Not so much nostalgia for 
the Soviet era, but nostalgia for the jokes 
we made during the Soviet era about the 
(perceived) foibles of life behind the Iron 
Curtain, the Yakov Smirnoff riffs, SCTV 


ELIMINATE THEM Avp 


EVERYTHING LL BE SUPER! 


COMPLETELY 
DEVASTATEP. 


cracking wise about “Soviet minicam!"—a 
rusted-out old baling machine as the diesel- 
powered “8-Bit Agrarian Memory Drive;" a 
gallery of People’s Triumphs lauding such 
accomplishments as the development of a 
superior sugar beet; characters getting 
patriotically misty-eyed over the perfect 
utility of cardboard boxes. As entertain- 
ment, it’s an enjoyable frolic through a 
MAD magazine theme-park of Soviet kitsch. 

But what can we leam from this? Based 
as it is on politically motivated western 
lampoons of Eastern Bloc existence, what 
(if anything) can the twice-temoved retro of 
Suzoeg tell us about the reality of living ina 
totalitarian agrarian/industrial/ideological 
state, a time and place that is living memo- 
ry for millions of people ... and a version of 
which is, right now, a daily reality for mil- 
lions more? Here, the adventure-game 
medium gives us much more than do the 
surface gags. As any adventure gamer will 
tell you, playing these games is an exercise 
in controlled frustration, in failing and start- 
ing over, failing and starting over, failing 
and starting over until you figure out exactly 
where and when to use which item in order 


ee 7 ~ cre 

to progress. Adventure gaming, at its heart 
is unforgiving, faceless bureaucracy. 

Nothing brings this home better than 
the “error” messages in the series’ second 
chapter, Soviet Unterzégersdorf Sector 2 
Adventure games all have a stock set of 
phrases your character will utter when 
you try to get him/her to do something 
that doesn’t return a valid in-game result 
“That doesn’t make sense” or “What am | 
supposed to do with this?” As a properiy 
indoctrinated Unterzdgersdorfer with good 
political hygiene, Suzoeg Zs Comrade 
Nikita Perostek Chrusov responds to such 
adversity with right-thinking slogan: 
Given the trial-and-error nature of adven- 
ture gaming, these situations come up 
every few seconds... sayings like, “Hege| 
knew all along!” and “I can see that there 
will be a revolutionary transformation 
between the capitalist and the communis: 
period!” quickly lose their humour and 
become something like a nightmare. Con 
Stant frustration met with constant propa- 
ganda, the “progress” he speaks o{ 
seeming more and more like an empty 
promise with each ineffectual click. w 


What’s in a name? 


IN THE BOX 


> 
Gu 
=< 
S DAVEYOUNG AND TB PLAYER 

== | inthebox@vueweekly.com 

Oiler update: a streak of three straight 
OT losses (damn you Saku Koivu, Marty 
Reasoner and John-Michael Liles!) was 
ended with a thrilling St Patrick's Day 
shootout win over the St Louis Blues. The 
playoff race continues and the Oilers are 
still a contender. 


WHAT'S IN A NAME? I’ve decided to 
finally take on the age-old question: does 
the name of a team have any effect on the 
performance of that team? Is a team better 
because it’s called the Crushers, or would 
it be just as good if it were called the 
Pylons? Using advanced research tech- 
niques, data collection methods and statis- 
tical analysis (actually, a pencil and some 
scrap paper) I've sorted the names of all 
the NHL teams and counted their respec- 
tive Stanley Cup totals. Teams with: 
Canadian-centric names (Canadiens, 
Maple Leafs, Canucks): 33 Cups 

Animals (Red Wings, Sharks, Bruins, ete): 
19 Cups 

Geographical (Islanders, Capitals, Stars, 
etc): 10 Cups 

Historical (Flames, Rangers, Blackhawks, 
etc): 9 Cups ; 
Forces of nature (Hurricanes, Avalanche, 
Lightning): 4 Cups 

Mythological creatures (Devils): 3 Cups 
Name-the-team fan contests (Flyers, 
Sabres): 2 Cups 

Named by the owner to match a pre-cho- 
sen colour scheme (Kings): 0 Cups 

You want a winning team? Naming it 
after the pre-eminent hockey country in 
the world can’t hurt (unless you're the 
Canucks). Also, don’t let the fans pick a 
name for you. TB 


LAW OF AVERAGES News Flash: mathe- 
matically, the average Oiler is not an 
Oiler. The average Oiler is Edmonton cast- 
off Jason Chimera. Confused? Follow this 


logic. Using the current Oiler 23-man ros 
ter (skaters only) the average Oiler has 
eight goals, 14 assists and 42 PIM. The 
average Oiler is also 27 years old (born in 
1982), 209 pounds and 62”. Jaso: 
Chimera is the closest candidate out 
there | could identify league-wide: Chim- 
mer currently has eight goals, 13 assists 
and 35 PIM. He is also 29 years old, 216 
pounds and 6'2". Want more? Spell oui 
the names in the Oiler roster. The team’s 
first names average 4.9 letters (Jason) 
and the surnames average 7 letters 
(Chimera). DY 


WHAT'S IN A NAME? (PART DEUX) 
About 10 years ago, | was watching an 
Oilers/Avalanche game when | heard the 
commentator say that the puck had been 
“kicked ahead by Foote.” The fact tha! 
the commentator had no idea what he 
had said made it all the more awesome 
For the last few seasons, I’ve kept an 
unofficial list in my head of possible vari 
ations of this, and printed a few every 
year. My favourites from last year were 
“Belted by Van Allen” and “The puck gets 
coughed up by Zelepukin.” So here's this 
year's list of silly things that keep my 
mind amused. Nerdtastic. 

Good anticipation by Eager. 

It's curtains for Draper. 

Emery gets called for boarding. 

Poked ahead by Finger. 

Well played by Fiddler. 

And Neal gets knocked to his knees 

A smart play by Reasoner. 

That's some fine footwork by Walz. T8 


THIS WEEK'S OILER DEFINITION 

_ "St Patrick's Day”: 1) March 17. A cele- 
bration of St Patrick, Ireland's beloved 
patron Saint. (He's also the patron sain! 
of New York, Boston and Nigeria) 2) 
March 17, 2009. The day that New Jer: 
sey's Martin Brodeur unseated “St 

’ Patrick Roy with 552 NHL wins by a goal- 
tender; the new league record. Roy 's 
Notoriously rumoured to be so vain, he 
probably thinks St Patrick's Day is about 
him. Not anymore. w 


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op chop! 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 
ince barbecuing on a cold, dark 
St without a smidgen of 
propane left in the tank is pretty 
much impossible, my husband and I 
headed out to Chop Restaurant and 
Bar on the ever-busy Stony Plain Road: 

They don’t take reservations after 
5:45 on Friday and Saturday nights, but 
how busy could it be at 8:30 pm on a 
Saturday? Massively busy, evidently— 
the rodeo was in town. After finally 
finding a parking spot to wedge our 
modest car into amongst all the mas- 
sive SUVs and shiny 4x4s, we discov- 
ered that the crowding factor inside 
Chop was even worse. People covered 
every square inch of available space 
and, facing a wait of over an hour to 
get a table, we decided our bodies did- 
n't really need steak after all 

Another night, no rodeo, and we 
found ourselves at Chop again, on a 
Sunday this time 

We were met with subdued light- 
ing, understated sophistication and 
that was about it. There were no host- 
esses, no hordes of hungry people 
and no visible customers. After pok- 
ing our heads around a wall or two to 
announce our presence, a hostess had 
us seated in the almost empty room 
within seconds. 

Muted tones surrounded us on all 
sides—earthy greens, browns and 
creams. Unadorned walls, luxurious 
seats and rich wood tables made a 
simple but elegant statement. They 


Ss MON (17 AM 11 PM);TUE-THU (11 AM 12.AM); 
aa 

1 CH 

17595 STONY PLAIN ROAD, 780.487.2467 


define themselves as “fine casual,” 
and although I’m not exactly sure 
what that means, it seemed to fit. 

In no time we were greeted by our 
waiter, who, after greeting us, 
launched into “the spiel.” It began 
with his name and then just kept 
going, touching on everything and 
anything Chop. Evidently everything 
at Chop is made in-house, their steaks 
are all cut on the premises and then 
broiled at 1800° to seal in the juices, 
and they recommend you eat steak. 

Our waiter then quietly disappeared 
and left us to peruse the menu. Chop 
is very much a steakhouse, but a 
steakhouse with a few refined twists. 
Instead of fries, you get “fresh house- 
cut pommes frites with Grana Padano 
Parmesan shards, sea salt, pepper and 
three dips.” You get the idea. 

Since my husband really needed his 
steak, we launched right into the 
entrées. He ordered the 14 oz New York 
Striploin ($34), so 1 went against house 
recommendations by ordering the 
Macadamia Crusted Mahi-Mahi ($30). 


WHEN MY HUSBAND ordered his steak 


medium, a discussion ensued as to 
exactly what was meant by “medi- 


Te ae 


YOUR INNER CAJUN 


Aik DAY GRILL 


Kingsway « St. Albert - Edmonton City Centre 


South Edmonton Common - Red Deer « Westlawn 
Leduc + Jasper Avenue » Spruce Grove 


um"”—evidence that Chop takes their 
steaks seriously. 

Since we were having quite the 
fancy dinner (for us anyways), red 
wine was a must. They have an 
amazing wine list, including a huge 
selection of wines by the glass, 
though we finally decided on a half- 
litre of Clay Station ($26). 

In the midst of sipping our lovely, 
full-bodied wine, a basket with three 
warm buns found its way to our table. 
We sampled a bit of the sourdough 
and ancient grain and, while okay, 
they were not overly memorable. 

Then our entrées arrived; again, sim- 
ple yet sophisticated. A square white 
plate held the generous cut of steak, a 
hefty and creamy mound of wasabi- 
infused mashed potatoes and a few 
token but colourful veggies. My mahi- 
mahi was gently nestled on top of a 
mound of those same mashed potatoes. 
Scattered around the fish was a ring of 
barely wilted, garlic-butter-sauteed 
spinach, dotted with red pepper slivers. 

The steak, although tender and juicy, 
was cooked unevenly simply because it 
was cut unevenly—curious considering 
they pride themselves on cutting their 


Jan Hostya 


own steaks. But the mashed potatoes 
were divine; creamy and chunky all at 
the same time. And the wasabi added 


quite the intriguing twist. 

My mahi-mahi looked spectacular 
but the sautéed spinach mixture tasted 
like salt, albeit salt with a hint of garlic 
It was carted away, and in time came 
back adorned with a new spinach mix- 
ture, but by this time the fish was dry 
and my husband's plate was looking 
decidedly empty. The mashed potatoes 
were still divine, however, and the 
spinach was more than edible. 

My stomach still needed some- 
thing, so we ordered dessert—their 
signature Twenty-Four Layer Choco- 
late Cake ($14). The towering wedge 
of rich, decadent, chocolate quickly 
erased any lingering mahi-mahi 
memories. And the side dish of 
smooth and velvety vanilla ice cream 
might possibly have been even better 

“Fine casual” or not, dining at Chop 
is an event. The prices are definitely 
not casual, but some of the food is 
fine. If you go, eat steak. And the 
wasabi-infused mashed potatoes. And 
the cake. Just not when there's 2 
radeo in town. ¥ 


Cajun Jambalaya 
- 
<) 


14 


MAR 19 - MAR 25,2009 


YMATIUK / sharman@vueweokly.com 
e Vietnamese sub is one of 
those things I have known about 
for years, but have never gotten 
sound to trying. When I'm craving 
for lunch I usually stick to 
pho, salad rolls and noodle bowls, but 
while I'm glancing out a window from a 
_ restaurant in Chinatown, | always see a 
sign for Vietnamese subs and think, “I 

must try one of those.” 

I'd heard from two of my friends 
that Van Loc has the absolute best 
Vietnamese subs in town, and at bar- 
gain basement prices. I decided to try 
out my first sub with someone who 
has an experienced palate, a friend of 
mine from work, Jason Lee, 

There was ample parking on 98 
Street, a stark contrast from 97th, 
when we walked in for lunch on a Fri- 
day. The menu offers a variety of subs 
ranging from assorted meats to chick- 
en. Jason and I decided on the 
Sausage sub for $3.50 and BBQ ham 
for a whopping $4.00. While we were 
waiting for our subs, | started reading 
a restaurant review from a few years 
back posted on the wall. It immedi- 
ately caught my attention because the 
writer said he ordered shrimp salad 
tolls. I love salad rolls. 1 looked at the 
billboard menu again and didn’t see 
it, but when we asked if they had 
them, they magically appeared from 
the back of the shop; four for $4.50. 

If you're wondering what exactly a 
Vietnamese sub is, it's quite the 
departure from your typical Viet- 
namese noodles and soup. The sand- 
wich of choice from Van Loc comes 
on a Vietnamese baguette stuffed 
with the meat, thinly sliced pickled 
carrots, cucumbers, and cilantro. We 
had a choice of spicy or not, and we 
both chose not. The subs are placed 
in a toaster oven for a few seconds 
and the larger-than-foot-long 
baguettes are wrapped and ready to 


freshness & mie 


DAI (8:30 AM-7 PM) CLOSED TE 
VAN LOC 


S 
= 
SS | 10648- 90S7, 700.413.8867 


go in a few minutes. 

I asked where they got the bread 
from, but all I got for an answer was 
that it was a special order. My own 
memories of Vietnam are filled with 
wonderful breakfasts with fresh tast- 
ing baguettes, often arriving in the 
morning in a basket on a bicycle from 
a bakery nearby. Vietnam was part of 
the French colonial empire in Indochi- 
na in Southeast Asia, and while the 
French were forced out at the end of 
the French Indochina war, the influ- 
ence of French culture has remained 
in Vietnamese cuisine next to noodle 
soups and vermicelli bowls. _ 


WHILE MOST PEOPLE GET their subs to 


go, Jason and | sat down at one of the 


since 1997 


TEL: 780.158.3819 
BEST AL YOU CAVEAT SOSH INTO 


M5 Si 


a, 


yy Buy one bento at $9 99 & 


gel the 2nd one half price 


two tables to get our fill of subs, office 
gossip and a little of the Vietnamese 
variety show on the restaurant's televi- 
sion. We had ours cut down the middle 
to share and found both the Viet- 
namese sausage and the BBQ ham to 
be excellent choices. I found the bread 
soft with a thin crispy crust; the cilantro 
and lightly pickled carrots made the 
sandwiches taste fresh, and not heavy, 
making ita light, yet filling, lunch. 

We learnt that Loi Van Thai and his 
family have been making tasty subs at 
Van Loc for 11 years. Jason figured out 
that the family could also speak Can- 
tonese, so he helped me out by asking 
my questions for me. He tried asking 
again where they got their bread from, 
but the answer came with laughter. He 
translated for me that it was a trade 
secret, and they weren’t confessing 
where the tasty baguettes were from 

I’m not sure if it was because I was 
doing a review, or because of Jason's 
handy dandy Cantonese skills, but we 
got a free sample of dessert. I would 
have guessed it was a doughnut, but 
instead it was a deep fried sweet 
potato with a yellow bean paste 
inside. 1 found the treat to be quite 
tasty and not as sweet as I would 
have expected. Jason thought it was 
top shelf and said he would certainly 
come back for the $1.75 delight. 

1 was extremely pleased with my 
first Vietnamese sub experience, and I 
was shocked that for $14 we got two 
subs, shrimp salad rolls, and two cans 
of pop. Van Loc is obviously a popular 
place as there was a constant flow of 
people coming to pick up orders or 
place one for a sub. If you're looking 
for something different, kick it to the 
quieter street in Chinatown, just make 
sure you don’t go on a Tuesday as it’s 
the only day this quaint little sub shop 
isn’t open. For $3.50 a sub, Van Loc is 
certainly a quick and healthy down- 
town deal to be had. w 


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DISH 


15 


Beefy Italian 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 


hen you first meet Sonny 
Wz corporate executive 
chef of the Sorrentino’s 


empire, your initial impression might 
lead you to believe that he is a some- 
what quiet and reserved man. And 
while that may hold true through the 
obligatory round of preliminary 
chitchat and the first few sips of 


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SONNY SUNG 
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE CHEE SORRENTINO AND 
BISTECEA 


PROFILE 


steaming hot coffee, it abruptly 
changes at the mere mention of Bis- 
tecca. He becomes animated and 
engaged, his eyes flashing and his 
arms waving, and the realization 
dawns: this is one passionate man 

Bistecca has been dubbed Edmon- 
ton’s first “Italian” steakhouse. It begs 
the question—what, exactly, is an Ital 
ian steakhouse, and how is it any dif- 
ferent from any of the typical, 
run-of-the-mill Alberta steakhouses 
that grandly occupy so much of our 
city's prime real estate? 

“Essentially, it’s a simple take on 
steak,” Sung says as he launches into 
an in-depth description..“First, we 
take the best steaks available—Spring 
Creek Ranch Premium Alberta Beef. 
Then we pan sear them before they 
go on the grill. it holds in the juice 
and brings out the flavour. At the end 
they are brushed with one of the 
finest olive oils-it gives them a bit of a 
peppery taste-and sprinkle them with 
some sea salt and fresh herbs. That’s 
it—take the best ingredients, always 
all natural, and prepare them simply.” 

Evidently there's some extremely 
good beef roaming through the Italian 
countryside, very similar to the quality 
of what you find here in Alberta. What 
we were missing was the Italian way of 


preparing that beef, so Carmelo Rago, 
owner of the Sorrentino’s conglomer- 
ate, decided to remedy that. 

Sung first analyzed all of the steak- 
houses around Edmonton and “didn’t 
see anything special.” So he hopped 
on a plane to Las Vegas and ate steak 
at some of the best steakhouses 
America has to offer. 

Back in Edmonton, armed with a 
few hints and tips, he went to work 
designing Bistecca’s menu. “It’s a rus- 
tic Italian restaurant that offers great 
steaks. Alberta has such good beef 
that we wanted to take advantage of 
having such a great product.” 

Sung isn’t Italian himself, and 
much of his background is in French 
cooking. “French cooking is one of 
the best for learning the fundamen- 
tals. Their cooking takes a lot of time 
Italian cooking means taking the best 
products and putting them together in 
a very simple manner. They are 
essentially two different worlds.” 

So, when Sung joined Sorrentino’s 
about nine years ago, he had to learn 
about the Italian side of cooking. “Thad to 
learn every single thing—from the inside 
and outside. And then I had to build a 
team, one that works well together. It 
means I'm constantly learning. | still 
sometimes work seven days a week.” 


SUNG OVERSEES BOTH Bistecca and 


Sorrentino’s downtown (and their 
chefs, Joon Yoo and Albert Kwok), but 
his real passion is cooking. “I work 
side-by-side with my chefs, cooking 


JOON YOO 
CHEF, BISTECCA 


JAN HOSTYN / jan@vueweekly.com 


young. 


and he gets it right away.” 


confidence in. “He's extremely good for 
a young chef. He has a lot of potential to 
become someone in the future.” 

As for Yoo, he says that he welcomed 
the challenge of Bistecca and feels 
comfortable running it, especially with 
Sung's help. 

He's also quietly modest. “Maybe it's 
huge, running Bistecca, | don’t know. | 
don't find it hard. | like trying new 
things, so | welcome the challenge.” 

Right flow, Yoo is simply enjoying it 
all—and working. He typically puts in 
about 11 hours a day, six days a week. 
“| just want to cook all the time.” Except 
at home—there his wife does the hon- 
ours. W 


right along with them. I want them 
perfect. If I.can get them to 80 per 
cent, I'm happy.” 

His mission is to give his clientele 
“the best meal that they can have, 
one that no one else can give them 
That's why they come to see you, to 
get the best.” 

And Sung has very definite opinions on 
what constitutes the best. Bistecca’s care- 
fully set tables, with their pristine white 
tablecloths, are noticeably lacking in the 
usual assortment of bottled sauces. Cus- 
tomers even have to ask for salt and pep- 
per. "If you buy a good product, why spice 
it up? Why ruin the quality of a great 
steak? It’s my job as a chef to season 
everything perfectly for you. We test 
everything before we send it out—when it 
gets to you, it doesn’t need seasoning.” 

He does admit that he has made 
one concession—ketchup. When 
Bistecca first opened, there was no 
ketchup to be found on the premis- 
es. “We deep-fry the French fries in 
olive oil—that makes them healthy 
yet still taste great. Why would you 
want to put a convenience food 
loaded with sugar and salt on 


Even though the white chef's jacket quickly approaching has “Joon Yoo" carefully embla- 
zoned on it, it’s hard to believe that the man wearing it so confidently bears the same 
name. After all, Joon Yoo is the chef at Bistecca, Edmonton's first Italian steakhouse. It's 
quite the lofty and prestigious position. And the man striding towards me is young—very 


But it is most definitely Yoo. Apparently age and ability do not necessarily go hand-in- 
hand—he’s all of 27 years old. Sonny Sung, the corporate executive chef of the 
Sorrentino’s empire, says, “Yoo has the passion you need. | can explain anything to him 


And so Yoo, who came to Canada from Korea just seven years ago, now runs 99 
per cent of Bistecca’s kitchen. Sung is behind him, offering guidance and support. 
Quite the accomplishment, considering Yoo knew nothing about cooking—or English, 

for that matter—when he first arrived here. 
’ His first couple of years were spent learning the language. And, because he had to 
eat, he began to cook. But that sparked an interest and led him to enroll in NAIT's 
Culinary Arts program. As soon as he graduated, he went to work at Sorrentino’s. 

Despite his age, he’s an award-winning chef; he won two silver medals at the 
International 2006 Food and Hotel Asia competition and is frequently described as 
"the top apprentice in Canada.” And he is someone Sung seems to have complete 


Alberta’s 
electrical workers 


EE Ve Li 


Ve & 


‘ 


eccer., 


ork Union! 


Jan Hostyn 


them?” But the customer outcry was 
too strong, so now Bistecca offers 
ketchup. Ketchup that Sung makes 
though—it gives him control over 
the ingredients. But you still won't 
find it on the tables. 

Sung says that, because he a pas- 
sion for cooking, he never feels stress 
“1 own the job, I don’t do the job.’ 
Instead, he calculates and plans 
ahead. “If something goes wrong 
there has to be a reason. You figure 
out what’s wrong and you fix it.” 

But he also admits that something 
does go wrong every single day. And 
with an impish grin, divulges that, 
“Sometimes you just have to go into 
the freezer to cool down.” 

So yes, Bistecca is a steakhouse, 
but Sung believes it’s unlike any 
steakhouse you've ever experienced 
There’s the rustic Italian menu; 
there’s the focus on healthy, natural 
ingredients; and there's the decep 
tively simple but utterly delicious 
treatment of all the menu items, the 
beef in particular. Just don’t expect 
the cornucopia of condiments thal 
simply add clutter. w 


E 


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MAH 19 MAR 25, 2009 


DISH 


Plenty of fru 
but not kiwi 


tie 
LP, 


New Zealand is a new and blossoming 


wine region. It's had several consistant- 


vintages that have delivered many qual- 
ity wines. Typically, though, one expects 
Sauvignon Blanes and Pinots from the 
Southern Islands. When | was offered a 
couple of bottles of their latest vintage, 
| thought it would be OK, but | was 
quite excited when one was a Merlot- 
Malbec blend. This is a common but not 
typical blend from Bordeaux—Malbec 
added to offer some extra depth and 
colour to the Merlot—but | was sur- 
prised to hear that New Zealand was 
trying their hand at that grape. The 
Pinot Gris was a little more expected 
but, nevertheless, worthy of a try. 

| started with the Pinot Gris. The 
deep yellow juice showed a hint of 
oranges and offered up a very 
relaxed nose with lots of underlying 
citrus notes. | found the wine slight- 
ly acid, moreso than most, but it had 
a decent body and structure to it. 
The taste of nectarine was 
strongest, particularly at the front of 
the palate, but it disappeared a lit- 
tle quickly for my tastes. 

Overall, | found the wine to be a pleas- 
ant drink at a more than fair price. 

Next was the Merlot-Malbec. This wine 
showed as a limp, watered down juice 
with a lighter colour than one would 
expect. But with a good sniff of the odour, | 


LANGANO 


was drawn to close 
my eyes and imag- 
ine the colours. It 
sounds complete- 
ly silly but the 
Nose was 
intoxicating, 
partly due to 
the punch of 
alcohol but 
also the 
earthy 
undertones. 
A pleasure 
to smell but 
what of the 
taste? 

| found 
the wine to 
be quite tart 
and loaded 
with tannins. 
Slowly the 
overreliance 
on tannins 
fades and it 
offers up 
deeper 
flavours of 
spice and 
leather. These. 
flavours linger 
for quite a 
while. 

| found this wine 
to be one of dueling personalities. Limp 
colour and weak start with tremendous 
nose and flavours towards then end. 


bie ‘ 
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Again, 
for the price, ' 
worthy of a try. | do look forward to seeing 
What the future holds for this winery. w 


sisal aden iia dea thanenag ome kariteneanioen 


U 
I 


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DISH, 


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EDISH | 
= WEEKLY 


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Here's an excellent solution—bring 
your lunch to work. Whether you 
already do or you never have, here's 
another suggestion—get your brown 
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centre's selection of fine cheeses, 
amazing breads, out of this world condi- 
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make you forget about that overpriced 
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taste some seriously, seriously top shelf 
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Revelstoke rising 


Sophomore year is about pedigree, 
powder and double the terrain 


JEREMY DERKSEN / snowzone@vueweekly.com 
f Jive never been here before,” says 
[= red coat. Inching to the edge, 
I peer over a three-metre cliff at 
giant marshmallows. Skirting the rocky 
precipice, my friend Vince and I enter 
the boulder field from the penphery. 
The twoscouts ahead of us are 
staking cliff warning signs on Revel- 
stoke Mountain Resort’s myriad 
cliffs—over 100 signs and counting, 
according to Troy Leahey, RMR ava- 
lanche forecaster. "We had two 
patrollers devote about a week to find- 
ing and marking all the cliffs they 
could find in new terrain opened this 
year,” he comments. Even for some 
who work here this is frontier territory. 
Somewhere below is civilization 
the day lodge that still serves as the 
main base for the resort (including 
guest services, cafeteria and gift shop) 
until construction finishes at the 
Nelsen Lodge base some time this 
March. But up here we're christening 
virgin terrain. “I'm thinking of calling 
it Boulderdash,” red coat quips 
Time evaporates in crystallized 
snow contrails, sun baking the rocks. 
We're late for a Sunday afternoon 
rendezvous and we have to relay a 
message. I try my cell phone. There's 
reception, just. | dial RMR base opera- 
tions. No answer, just a recorded 
message. Then dead air. 


PARALLELS IN HISTORY, abridged. in 


1885, the famous last spike on the 
Canadian Pacific Railway was pounded 
just west at Craigellachie, extending a 
lifeline over the Canadian Cordillera. It 
was part of a nation-building exercise 
to unite east and west. 

This fall, RMR turned the final screw 
on its gondola extension, uniting the 
base to the top of Mount McKenzie 
and launching the resort into the 
record books for longest vertical in 
North America with 1713 metres. Add 
the Ripper Chair in North Bowl, and 
RMR opened the season with 50 per 
cent new terrain. With each new step, 
sidecountry and frontcountry become 
more integrated and accessible 

At 15.2 kilometres, the run Last Spike 
now Officially claims the North Ameri- 
can title for longest run. It beats the for- 
mer champ, Whistler's Peak to Creek, 
by almost two kilometres. RMR is easily 
a match for Whistler in other areas as 
well—terrain, fall lines and powder. 

Not that Whistler is the best yard- 
stick, just the one most readily known 


= REVELSTOKE 


to skiers by virtue of its persistent 
number one rankings in ski magazine 
surveys. For variety and challenging 
terrain, Vince likens RMR more close- 
ly to its nearest neighbour, Red Moun- 
tain, where “even the most advanced 
skiers can scare themselves.” 

Personally I think RMR can bump 
off Whistler in a few of those ranking 
categories. For what it’s worth, I'm 
hoping it does. 


VERTIGO. GREELEY BOWL. pointed over 


skis. Torpedo-shaped hut rattled by 
cresting winds, a black missile hun- 
kered into the mountain, braced 
against snowy blasts. The in-bounds 
markers have moved up since the pre- 
vious year, Opening a Death Star saddle 
so’wide it could swallow Nakiska. 

Across the new alpine bowl, big lines 
beckon. We gamble, not sure where 
they're leading. To the left, the pitch 
drops below sight line; all that’s visible 
is a runout some 50 or 60 feet below. 

Lower down, off the Ripper, the 
Back Forty glades shunt us repeatedly 
out to the boundary. Soon it becomes 
clear it’s a kind of skier’s reverse vor- 
tex. Gravitational] drift spirals you 
away from the middle. The woods get 
thicker and thicker as we work our 
way in. To get to some of the best, 
most challenging runs you have to 
bushwhack. If you follow the easy 
lines, they'll spit you out 

At one point Vince is levered across 
a chute, his skis suspended at tip and 
tail, bowing in the vacant space 
beneath his boots. Below him is a short 
drop into a narrow barrel line buffeted 
by rock and tree on either side. A tech- 
nical line that takes guts and skill. No 
way out but down. This is what the 
dedicated come for. And they are. 

The masses, however, have yet to 
swarm the resort. In its debut year RMR 
notched 97 000 visits. This year's predic- 
tion is for 130 000. Those aren't bad 
numbers but they pale next to Whistler's 
average of over 1.5 million skier visits 
annually. Perhaps that’s a concern for 
shareholders, but for skiers it’s ideal. 


SKI HISTORY is a living thing here. You 
can feel it in the mornings when you 
walk into the Modern café—with its 
sumptuous scents, earthy wood décor 
and alpine art on the walls—and run 


into tour operators like Scott New- 
some, the first-ever ACMG certified 
snowboard guide. There's a vibe at the 
Village Idiot or the Cabin on a Saturday 
night. Ski paraphernalia plasters the 
wails. In almost every nook you'll find 
lifties, heli guides, ski patrollers and 
other types of alpine connoisseur. 

It’s the potential for discovery that 
attracts them here. But the phenome- 
non isn’t new. Big lines have just 
become more accessible with the 
advent of a major investor and the 
accompanying big lifts. 

Revelstoke is headquarters for the 
Canadian Avalanche Centre, as well 
as a long skiing tradition stemming 
back to the beginning of CPR rail serv- 
ice in the late 1880s. In 1891, a small 
group of transplanted Scandinavian 


skiers formed the Revelstoke Ski Club, 
which now lays claim to the title of 
the longest running ski club in Cana- 
da. (Nelson, BC formed a club earlier 
but it was inactive for a period.) 

Back then, many Canadians still 
referred to skis as “Norwegian snow- 
shoes.” The town was variously 
known as the “Cradle of Western Ski- 
ing” and “Capital of Canada’s Alps.” 

By the 1920s and ‘30s, Revelstoke 
was an international hotspot for ski 
jumping. The town claims several 
famed North American jumpers 
including Nels Nelsen, the namesake 
for RMR’s base village. 


Hucking one of many soft kick~ 


ers, | imagine Nelsen rattling down- 
hill on splintery wooden planks, 
feet bound to the hulking boards 


~ NORDIC GETAWAY / 20 
BOARD TIPS / 22 


Supplied 


with soft leather straps. The snow 
is dusted with pine needles, the 
sides of the run lined with specta- 
tors in breeches and top hats. But 
it’s all a blur as he launches into 
the air and thrusts his body for- 
ward, flying nearly 80 metres 
before coming back to earth. 


AN HOUR LATE, mildly sunburnt ané 
still vibrating with excitement, Vince 
and I finally make our afternoon 
meetup with Ashley Tait, RMR com 
munications manager. During our 
visit she reports that the first show 
suite at Nelsen is complete. 

Beyond that, a small, carpeted 
oasis several hundred square fee! 
wide serves as the lodge’s sole func” 
tional area. There’s a small ticke! 


ne ig ee Br — 
18 ~~ WWE WEEN —_MAR19- MAR 25, 2009 


SNOW ZONE 


oms and a rental shop 
tic, state-of-the-art ski 
nology. The other two 
little but rebar, concrete 


main buildings, a series 
to trees indicate where 
ill eventually go in. 

with the economy 
R real estate sales 
and bills mounted. The 
cture financing 
the end, former 


; sort, which is largely 
state sales for prof- 
ity meeting on 


new owl would stand firm. 

Sree ceaicusly optimistic 
about the mountain's future, saying that 
the ownership is “prepared to weather 
{the economic downturn] because 
frankly, it’s a great product.” Last year 
RMR sold the most real estate of any 
resort across North America, with $130 
million. This year, skier numbers are up 
by 14 per cent, making RMR an anom- 
aly in an industry plagued by poor snow 
and low visitation. 

But he also warned that resort 
financing is still going to be tight until 
the economy revives, making major 
new additions unlikely in the near 
future. One of the upsides for skiers in 
slightly lower income brackets is that 
under the Gaglardis the resort is con- 
templating offering a more affordable, 
second-tier” real estate product. 

Call the banker? Or “Kill the 
Banker?” Tough choice. The latter, a 
sidewinding mogul field beneath the 
gondola, rides like the stock market. 
Unpredictable, with sudden drops and 
unexpected obstacles. But when it's 
ripe, it’s one hell of a good time. 


VISION. THAT'S WHAT it takes to-build 
the best ski resort in North America. 
Over 20 years the community of Rev- 
elstoke has harboured its dream. Now 


February 2 (reported in the Revelstoke 
, Tom Gaglardi said the . 


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i's coming to fruition. But looking 
ahead in the midst of the current 
social climate is tricky. 

For some perspective, | seek out 
Greg Hill. An accomplished freeskier 
and backcountry touring athlete, Hill 
set a world record by skiing 50 100 
vertical feet in a single 24-hour 
Span—without the assistance of lifts. 

Formerly: based in Whistler, he now 
lives in Revelstoke. Why? ” The lure of 
an undeveloped town surrounded by 
endless ski mountaineering adven- 
tures, combined with an unparalleled 


~ amount of perfect powder and deep 


endless winters,” he answers. “This 
Place seemed ideal, affordable and 
comfortable with the deepest, lightest 
snowbelt in Canada.” e 

The mountains aren't changing. 
Backcountry enthusiasts will always 
have a wide range of choice from Mt 
Revelstoke to Frisby Ridge. Some even 
skin up the slopes at the resort. And 
RMR is the only North American resort 
to offer lift, cat, heli and backcountry 
nding in one location (although for the 
time being the heli-pad is still stationed 
several kilometres from the base.) 

The question is, what will happen to 
that “undeveloped town” over time, 
now that a major corporation is head- 
ing up resort development. Hill is posi- 
tive but philosophical. “It's brought a lot 
of new people to town and increased 
the opportunity for employment. 
There's nothing wrong with that,” he 
Says. “I think the heart of the town still 
remains. Will it remain forever?” 

One thing that hasn't changed is the 
local talent. There’s always been a 
strong contingent of alpine skiers, he 
Says. But with the new resort, he says, 
‘There is a rise in freeskiers. It will grow 
an amazing generation of skiers. Ican't 
wait to ski these lines with my kids.” 

Proof positive: a major freeskiing 
tour organizer has recently been in 
talks with RMR to examine the possibil- 
ity of hosting an event on the moun- 
tain. Nothing has been confirmed to 
date but it's only a matter of time. Hill 
concludes, “No place can compare with 
the position of this town.” 

One more reason why Revelstoke 
will soon be the dominant ski locale 
in North America. If it isn’t already. w 


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CONDITIONS REPORT 


Local 


Rabbit Hal — 60cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Snow Valley — GOcm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs now open. 
San Finige — 60cm base, 4cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Edmonton Ski Chub — Open. 


Alberta 


Canada Olympic Park — 70cm base, no new snow. 5 lifts and 7 runs open. 
Castle Meuntam — 76-157cm base, no new snow. All lifts and 50 runs open. 
Lake Louise — 174-194em base, 24em new snow. 9 lifts and 125 runs open. 
Marmet Basin — 107cm base, no new snow. 6 lifts and 79 runs open. 

Mt. Norquay — 85cm base, 3cm of new snow. All lifts and 26 runs open. 
Hakiska — 22-108em base, 23cm of new snow. 5 lifts and 28 runs open. 
Sunshine Vilage — 180cm base, 31cm of new snow. 12 lifts and 106 runs open. 
Tewatinaw — 50cm base. All lifts and runs open. 


/ B.C. 


Apax — 191cm base, 17cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Big White — 196cm base, 20cm of new snow. 15 lifts and all runs open. 
Femie — 225-224cm base, Sem of new snow. All lifts and 110 runs open. 
Kicking Horsa — 17 {cm base, 32cm of new snow. 

) Kimberley — 104cm base, no new snow. 5 lifts and 77 runs open. 

| Mt Weshingtoa — 212cm base, 28cm of new snow. 3 lifts and 58 runs open. 
Panorama — 59-110cm base, 21cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 


Get up to date conditions, easy to search @ vueweekly.com 


} Powder King — 148-352cm base, 18cm of new snow. 

Red Mountain — 194cm base, 10cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

"| Ravelstoke — 101-236cm base, no new snow. 5 lifts and 52 runs open. 

1 Saver Star — 155-203cm base, 20cm of new snow. 12 lifts and all runs open. 
Sun Peaks — 139-175em hase, 14cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Whistler/ Blackcomb — 224cm base, 82cm of new snow. 

White Water — 238cm base, 31cm of new snow. 


}U.S.A. 


AQ North — 188-269cm base, 40cm of new snow. 4 lifts and 70 runs open. 

Big Sky — 152-228cm base, 17em of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 

Crystal Mountain — 155cm base. 7 lifts and 45 runs open. 

Great Divide — 101cm hase. 7 lifts and 80 runs open. 

Lookout Pass — 231-338cm base, 45cm of new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Mt. Spokane —.137-244cm base, no new snow. All lifts and runs open. 
Schweitzer Mt. — 241-305cm base, 18cm of new snow. 8 lifts and all runs open. 
Silver Mt. Resart — 170-264cm base. 

Sun Valley — 81-172cm base. All lifts and runs open. 


All conditions accurate as of Mar 18, 2009. 


n Ride ie 


Powe ards - Skateboards 


DAVE BUCHANAN / daveb@vueweekly.com 


en it comes to Nordic skiing 
destinations in Alberta, the 
usual suspects—Banff, Lake 


Louise, Canmore, Jasper—seem to have 
a lock on our wintry imaginations. And 
no wonder. These places offer exten- 
sive trails, terrific scenery, almost guar- 
anteed snow and luxurious 
accommodations. 

All of which is fine, if you can 
afford it. But there are other options— 
smaller, less well-known places that 
have the same snow and scenery, the 
trails without all the trappings and 
perfectly comfortable (if sometimes 
rustic) lodgings—all for half the price 
of the fancypants mountain resorts. 

The Bearberry Nordic Centre 
and Cabins, in the rolling foothills of 
the Rocky Mountains near Sundre, 
Alberta (a three-hour drive from 
Edmonton) and a recent discovery for 
me, is one such place. Our family paid 
a visit a few weeks back, and what a 
curious little gem we found. 

Bearberry calls itself a Nordic 
Centre but this label doesn’t quite 
capture the unique feel of the 
place. “Nordic Centre” suggests 
ski clubs, legions of volunteers, 
loppets and the like. In fact, Bear- 
berry is a private working farm 
(beef, mainly), with a handful of 
cabins for rent throughout the 
year and about 35 km of cross- 
country ski trails in the winter. 
The Nordic Centre is a sideline to 
the main farming operation, and, 
as a result, it has a kind of home- 


. grown, off-grid feel to it. 


Currrent owners Adrian and Inge 
Klis, originally from the Netherlands, 
bought the place 15 years ago. While 
visiting Alberta on a holiday they fell 
in love with the landscape around 
Sundre and decided they wanted to 
make a new home there. 

For the Klises, the transition to 
life in rural Alberta wasn’t always 
easy though. They were city folks, 


— 
= 
cc 
Ss 


GETAWAY 


who spoke practically no English, 
and they had never cross-country 
skied in their lives. Yet they found 
themselves the proud owners of a 
small Nordic Centre. 

In the early years, winter was a 
quiet, isolated time on the farm, so 
Adrian and Inge embraced the 


MAR 19.- MAR 25, 2008 


SNOW, ZONE 


Pica fe Sundre’ S Nordic secret 


Nordic Céntre concept as a way oi 
socializing, getting to know thei 
neighbors and improving their Eng- 
lish in the bargain. A handful oi 
Nordic enthusiasts would venture 
out to Bearberry on weekends and 
soon skiing became a communal! 
activity and an initiation into Cana 
dian culture. 

Meanwhile, Adrian and Inge began 
to learn the business, picking up the 
basics of trail maintenance and groom- 


ing. Adrian also began to expand the 
operation. When they bought the place, 
it featured a single cabin. Over the 
years, Adrian has added eight more 
cabins and expanded the ski trails. 

Visitors come from across the 
province, but not in hoards exact- 
ly. Promotion of the place is low 
key. They have a basic website 
(bearberrycabins.com), and rely 
mainly on word of mouth. Adrian 
admits the cross-country skiing 
business is no great money maker 
for them, but he has other reasons 
for continuing it. “I like to meet 
people, to socialize, and to be out- 
side, to work. This is why we do it. 
Not to get rich.” 


WE ARRIVED AS THE sun was set- 


ting In an orange blaze on a Fri- 
day night, and I admit that our 
first impressions were a bit 
dodgy. The Bearberry road sign 
had seen better days, the trails 


hadn’t been groomed in a while 
and the disheveled biathlon range 
looked like it hadn’‘t been used 
since the Calgary Olympics. Our 
hearts sank a bit. 

But we were worried for nothing, 
it turns out. When he saw that we 
were keen skiers, Adrian offered to 
groom the trails for us the next day. 
I was skeptical, but sure enough, 
early the following morning | met 
him in the meadow; he was out with 
his snowmachine setting tracks 
before most of his guests had had 
their first cup of coffee. 

This kind of hospitality, we 
learned, is part of the deal at Bear- 
berry. The services might strike 
some as minimalist, but ask for 
something and you'll probably get it. 
When I told Adrian that our snow 
tire-less city car could barely make it 
up the hill to our cabin, and that we 
were concerned about driving up 
and down between the main trails 


and our cabin, he track-set a ski trail 
practically from our door through 


. the woods to the main trails so we 


could ski back and forth. 

The actual ski trails offer a bit of 
everything for the classic enthusiast: 
some pleasant up-and-down runs 
through the aspen forest, a pretty 
meadow loop and a lovely trail along 
the top of the James River valley. Only 
about 15 km of trails were track-set 
when we were there, but plenty more 
had been skier-made, and Adrian 
would have set more if we'd asked. 


OUR CABIN WAS ALSO a pleasant 
surprise: spacious, bright, practical- 
ly new and a steal at $150 a night. 
The accommodations at Bearberry 
span the rusticity spectrum, from 
tiny shacks sans running water 
(mainly for summer use), to spa- 
cious family-sized cabins like ours, 
with modern kitchens, Jacuzzi tubs 
and satellite Tv. 

What's most impressive about 
the layout of the place is the way 
most of the cabins are spread out, 
not clustered together in an 
orderly compound. Our Eagle 
Cabin, with a stunning hill-top 
view, was a five-minute drive 
from the main office—at night, 
while out stargazing, we could 
just make out the lights of the 
next closest cabin down below us 

It didn’t take us long to realize that 
the slight air of dilapidation about the 
place (trail signs falling off, a variety 
of disused out-buildings) was, in fact, 
a disguise meant to scare off the fan- 
cypants set. 

But for those who can see past the 
beard, Bearberry offers a picturesque, 
unpretentious, and inexpensive Nordic 
getaway experience. It’s the kind of 
place you almost don’t want to write an 
article about, for fear of letting too 
many people in on the secret. v 


c ® FALL LINES 


A | hat@vveweekly.com 


Marmot Basin 


slom 


Up at Marmot Basin, snowfall was lacking in late January, but 
since then the weather gods have been providing steady snow- 
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Recently, southern Alberta's Castle Mountain Resort has been 

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March 21 the resort is hosting its annual King of the Castle 
dual slalom followed by a party and dance in the day lodge 
with a live performance by Suite 33. 

On Sunday there'll be a public viewing for entrants in 
the second annual Powdertales Film Festival. This festival 
is open to anyone as long as you are not a professional 
filmmaker, producer or director. There are several cate- 
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sure this will be a raucous time. With a maximum time 
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out and have a look. Or better yet, with everyone busy in 
the lodge the slopes will be all yours. 

If you have some extra cash around because you 
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As humans, we want to be comfortable. 
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bikers’ bums, neoprene for cold surfing, 
caffeine for boring moming meetings and 
adjustable bindings for snowboarding. 
But one of the biggest mysteries to a bur- 
geoning boarder is just where to put 
those bindings to be comfy in a sport 


known for its unforgiving face-plants and 
breathtaking butt checks. 

While it’s entirely a manner of pref- 
erence, you don’t really know what 
you prefer until you've spent some 
serious time in the snow. Before you 
can do that, stand on your binding-less 
board wearing your boots. Stand in a 
bit of a squat and see how comfort- 
able you feel. Your feet should be 
slightly wider than shoulder width— 
have someone push you to find if 
you're stable. If you tip easily, widen 
your stance. Look at where your feet 
are and mimic that distance when you 
attach the bindings. 


If you're unsure which foot to angle 


forward, wax your floor, put on some 
clean socks and do a running slide 
across it. If you don’t like housework, 
go play on an icy street. The foot you 
automatically put forward in your slide 
is your front foot. This one will be 
angled more than your back foot— 
details on that later. 

The three basic measurements you 
must choose are stance width, set- 
back and angle. The width of your feet 
affects your board control, which is 
why it’s a good idea to get a buddy to 
push you when you're choosing how 
you want to stand. The wider your 
stance, the more stable you are—so 
if you want be a jib master, spread 
your feet. If you'd rather scream down 
a badass fall line, a narrow stance is 
less stable but allows you easier turn 
transition. 

Once you pick whether it’s park or 
piste, think about powder. The best 
board control comes with a zero or cen- 
tred stance. Use the default holes on 
your board—they're usually set about 


25 millimetres behind the true centre of 
the board. 

If you're planning to carve your 
merry way through miles of vertical, 
set them back an inch. This lets you 
tide deep powpow in a more relaxed 
stance—without worrying about ass- 
over-teakettle nosedives. Too far back 
and you won't be able to turn, howev- 
er. You'll be more worried about eating 
tree without turn control, so play with 
your setback once you're good with 
powder at default. 


THE BIGGEST BINDING question is how 
much to angle them in relation to the toe 
side of the board. In general, a binding 
angle is about 15 degrees or less, but 
getting a better angle on the situation 
will make you a better boarder. 

The stance usually recommended by 
instructors and suitable for most purpos- 
es is the forward stance: the front foot is 
angled roughly 15 - 21 degrees and the 
tail foot at 0- 10 degrees. 

The crappy thing about this stance is 
the wacky way it feels going reverse. It 


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No longer exclusive to those with 
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“altogether: both feet are angled out- 


wards in opposite directions. But 
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ARTS — 


You oughta be in pictures 


POLAROIDS proves to be more than just an exploration of Lukacs’ process 


ADAM WALDRON-BLAIN / adamwb@vaeweekly.com 
ithough his painting-centred 
Az includes a variety of 
works, Attila Richard Lukacs is 
best known for his large-scale paint- 
ings. His scenes of nude or semi-nude 
skinheads, workers and soldiers are 
known internationally, and these form 
the backbone which POLAROIDS: 
Attila Richard Lukacs and Michael 
Morris is built around. Only a handful 
of these are hung, representing Lukacs' 
current practice aS'well as a few exam- 
ples of his past works from the late- 
"80s and ’90s. They are surrounded by 
too many Polaroid photographs to 
count, Lukacs’ studies, reference mate- 
rials and experiments, painstakingly 
grouped together by Michael Moms. 

The main function of the Polaroids is 
to develop a two-way relationship with 
the paintings, not entirely unlike what 
we might imagine their relationship is 
inside of Lukacs’ studio. Lukacs' paint- 
ings are in part assembled from these 
Polaroid studies, each containing just 
one or two figures, with his large can- 
vases containing figures found in sever- 
al photos, often presented here close by. 
At its simplest level, then, Morris’ 
archive gives us a view of Lukacs' 
process which we might otherwise miss. 

But the number of Polaroids is over- 
whelming. As a simple archive, the 
collection of photographs seems like it 
would be of little interest aside from 
instructing us about Lukacs’ tech- 
nigues, and indeed the huge number.of 
12-photo grids can seem impenetrable. 
The images have a kind of sameness, a 
uniformity which is to be expected as 
we watch a time-lapse narrative of 
Lukacs asking his models to perform 
variations of each pose until he finds 
just the one that he needs. 

Although this sameness can make the 
Polaroids difficult to appreciate, at the. 
same time it is quite fascinating 
Although the models are often naked, 
they bring a kind of uniform with them 
even without clothes. Even when they 
stray from his favourite skinheads, the 
figures carry parts of their subcultural 
identities with them in their haircuts, 
their visible exercise regimens and the 
props present, whether a hoodie or a 
pair of boots. This individualized authen- 
ticity of the model expands the function- 
ing of the paintings, where we can see 
the same figures transposed into larger 
scenes and made sure of themselves by 
the uniqueness of their painted body. 


LUKACS’ PAINTINGS are delicately bal- 


aliédbetween logical unity and a jarring 


E | UNTIL MON MAY 18 


WORKS BY ATTILA RICHARD LUKACS 
COLLECTED BY MICHAEL MORRIS 
ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (10230 JASPER AVE) 


VIZA 


sense of the unreal, and each one con- 
tains several layers of reality that we 
understand separately as we experience 
the work, starting with Lukacs’ most 
clearly visible artifice in his paint and in 
nonsensical or non-naturalistic elements 
in the paintings, as he invokes a flock of 
flamingoes or floating text in “Camou- 
flage.” The central figures of the paintings 
are where most of this complexity lies, as 
we are forced to reconcile the presenta- 
tion of these figures, which exist between 
the heroic nude and the salacious, per- 
haps pomographic photograph, with our 
ideas of what the subcultural aesthetic 
they carry with them represents, as well 
as what the are doing. 

Beyond this play of sex and vio- 
lence, explicit or implicit depending on 
the painting, the Polaroids present 
another tense level of fiction. Separat- 
ing the figures from their unreal sur- 
roundings and isolating them, their 
sense of exaggerated, muscly mas- 
culinity is changed significantly. In the 
paintings, despite their performances, 
the figures often seem curiously 
unaware of themselves, as to permit 
too much self-reflection would be to 
endanger their value as either fascists 
or pin-ups; by allowing just a touch of 
what is perceived as a femininity into 
their sealed-off, painted realities. 
Instead, their situations and actions 
seem routine, despite their nudity and 
sometimes absurdity, and Lukacs 
leaves his subjects with their grim 
facial expressions which are them- 
selves a part of their uniform, a kind of 
posture of hardness and authenticity. 

In the photographs; however, we not 
only see this exposed as a fiction, but we 
see another construction of Lukacs’ 
models, this time much less sure of 
themselves, their authenticities even 
more dangerously held. Play acting with 
wooden beams as guns and dressing in 
costumes is at once antithesis and inte- 
gral to Lukacs’ heroic/erotic masculinity. 
But the extent of the performances and 
their motives are very unclear, as the 
photographs imply one last reality, that 
of the model outside the studio, which 
we can only imagine. It is impossible to 
determine what part of their social per- 
formances, beyond the artificial world of 
paint, is this kind of pretending and what 
parts are backed by conviction. v 


a wre LY 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 * 


ON THE COVER 


if P 


SARAH HAMILTON / hamilton Qvueweoklyeom 


sense of the sublime in Cana- 
| dian landscape painting often 
4S defaults to the Group of Seven, 


with little attention being paid to 19th 
century Canadian painters who were 
really more contemporary to the idea of 
the sublime. The “sublime,” as theorized 
by Immanuel Kant, is the sensation we 
get when our Sense of personal scale is 
obliterated. No matter what you're 
looking at, it is considered a negative 
feeling, because though you may be in 
awe of the landscape (and it usually is a 
landscape you're looking at), you real- 
ize that it’s much bigger and grander 
than you. You start to get the sense that 
your role in the world is quite insignifi- 
cant in the scheme of things. 

A Sense Sublime, now on at the 
AGA, looks at this notion of the sub- 
lime in art and how it was used by 
19th century Canadian painters to try 
and express the Canadian landscape. 
The drawback of their style of paint- 
ing was that it was based in British 


e enough 


$ » Sublime at the AGA looks at Canadian 
o pre-Group of Seven 


tradition and cultivated for the British 
landscape. Frederick Marlett Bell- 
Smith’s “Above Lake Louise” is almost 
unrecognizable as such, where as 
Adolphe Vogt's “The Approaching 
Storm” captures light similar to Syl- 
vain Voyer, but without the contem- 
plative awe of Voyer’s work. There’s a 
landscape by John Singer-Sargent, 
simply titled “Landscape” that hints at 
the hasty brush work that would char- 
acterize later landscape painters. 
Here, in this quick watercolour 
sketch, we not only get a sense of the 
sublime, but of the weather, the ter- 
rain, the temperature outside. 
However talented the artists are in 
this exhibition, Canadian audiences will 
have difficulty connecting with it 
because the style is so estranged from 
how we now imagine Canada to look. It 
truly characterizes a Canada without 
identity, something which we have 
always struggled with, and J sense land- 
scape helps us make that identity. The 
Group of Seven helped construct an 


Completely 


ADAM WALDRON-BLAIN / adamwb@vueweekly.com 
Art-historical referentialitiy is a crucial 
part of Attila Richard Lukacs’ paintings, 
and next door to POLAROIDS the AGA is 
showing Leaving Olympia, an historical 
examination of the nude. In particular, 
the smaller exhibit shows us something 
of the way artistic portrayals of heroism 
and eroticism have changed, especially 
in the last century-and-a-half. Despite 
warnings that the content may not be 
appropriate for all children, Leaving 
Olympia is clearly structured as an edu- 
cational show, packed with informative 
didactic panels, and seems like it is in 
part intended to function as support for 
Lukacs’ work. 

Leaving Olympia begins with an 
explanation of its title as a reference to 
Manet's famous work, and a discussion 
of the way that the nude changed dur- 
ing the century after its 1863 creation, 
through modernist and then feminist 
relmaginations. And the shaw presents 
to us a few examples of this, with a 
few 19th century paintings to set the 
Stage and work by Rodin which serves 
to set things in motion. But despite the 
(Mportance ascribed to this period, the 
bulk of the rest of the work seems to 


ing Oe ard, so instead af see- 
© Changes wrought through the 
20th century, we can only see their 


fesults, especially with the feminist 
work ited, which is drawn largely 
from the “80s and later. A few photo- 
Graphs and drawings are present from 


image of Canada, which, though 
flawed, has contributed to our overall 
Self-identification as the cold and harsh 
wilds of the north. There is a fierce 
pride in being able to say you come 
from a climate so extreme and magnifi- 
cent that it is unimaginable. Consider 
how we engage each other and visitors 
with comments about the weather. This 
is part of our identity that the Group of 
Seven helped construct. 


LOOKING AT THESE WORKS, which are 
SO easy on the eye, so traditional, so 
mundane, we consider that a contem- 
porary audience has little new to learn 
from these works, However, | think 
curator Shane Golby positions the 
paintings strategically. Other exhibi- 
tions in the AGA include a retrospec- 
tive of Sylvain Voyer and a polaroid 
exhibition by Attila Richard Lukacs and 
Michael Morris. These works all draw 
on the history of art for formal inspira- 
tion, though each artist uses tradition 
to create something new, interesting, 


UNTIL MON, MAY 18 


ow 

E= | LEAVING OLYMPIA 

<X | (NVEILING THE IDEALIZED NUDE 

ES | ART GALLERY DF ALBERTA (10230 JASPER AVE) 

the ‘30s and ‘70s, but their relationship 

to this change is inexplicit and their 

example definitely incomplete. * 
The more contemporary work is 

more successful, and viewed as 


less of an historical overview and 
more an exploration of Lukacs’ 
contemporaries, the show is more 
successful. But it is hard for a col- 
lection like this to really seize the 
imagination, despite the mood 
lighting, because one cannot help 
but feel that the work has been 
selected more for a sense of com- 
pleteness than for its own merit, 
no matter how good it may be. w 


and at one time, edgey. 

A Sense Sublime is a call to action, 
in many ways. A call to action against 
the boring, the dull, the inarticulate 
and stale art forms that we drag along 
in the name of tradition. It is a cau- 
tionary tale of 


and arts organizations were dealing 
with. Nearly two years later, we see 
a community which has taken con- 
trol of this issue, which has appro- 
priated empty and underused spaces 
to create new works of art in aman- 
ner not quite 


what happens 
when art 
becomes too 
institution- 
alised and reg- 
imented. And 
it is a reminder 
that new ideas 
can be bom in 
some of the 
most ordinary 
places. It is 
also a 
reminder of 
the respect, if 
subversive, 
that we carry 
for our past. It 
speaks to the 
intelligence 
and spirit with 
which we 
approach art in 
this country. 
Over the past few years we've 
witnessed an innovative use of 
space in the city, from the opening 
of the ARTery and the Hydeaway to 
major installation exhibitions such 
as The Apartment Show (2007) and 
The Bathhouse exhibition (2008). In 
2007, my colleague Mary Christa 
O'Keefe expressed concern for the 
quickly disappearing living, working 
and exhibition spaces that artists 


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done before 


These are 
exhibitions 
that add a 


sense of the 
personal expe- 
rience to 
decrepit and 
mammoth 
concrete 
structures, in 
their own way 
creating a 
sense of the 
urban sub- 
lime 
Curator 
Shane Golby 
does an 
excellent job 
of contextual- 
izing the 
experience of 
picturesque 
artwork within the 19th century. It 
is imperative to bring this experi- 
ence into the 21st century, into 
Edmonton, in to this context. His- 
torical analyses are important to 
an arts community, as they make 
connections and revisit simple 
questions of its audience. When 
was the last time we encountered 
contemporary art that evoked this 
sense of the sublime in us? v 


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MARI9-MAR 25,2008. WUIswiEEKUY 25 


Out of the cold 


Sharplin makes his Shadow debut 


PAUL BLING / blinev@veeweek!y.com 
cott Sharplin’s first work with John 
Ss == wasn't on a play. Rewind 
ack to 1998—when.-rewinding 
was a thing people did—and we find 
Sharplin working at the Altemative Video 
Spot, owned and operated by a certain 
Shadow Theatre Artistic Director. 

“That's how | first met him: hanging 
around the video store, having conver- 
sations about theatre and such, we kind 
of formed a professional relationship 
that went beyond the video store,” 
Sharplin explains. “I would write stuff 
and send him stuff, and he would let me 
know if he was interested in it or not.” 

The friendship proved beneficial for 
both men: Hudson has helped 
Sharplin develop a number of scripts 
over the years, even if they didn’t 


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Boke | THU, MAR 19 SUN, MAR 29 


A YEAR OF WINTER 

DIRECTED BY JOHN HUDSON 

WRITTEN BY SCOTT SHARPL 

STARRING TRACY PENNER, GARETT ROSS 
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quite fit into Shadow’s mandate, and 
now Sharplin has given Hudson the 
freshly-penned A Year of Winter. 

“The first couple of times, it was 
like ‘This is a great script now, but it's 
not for us,” Sharplin explains. “He 
encourages that play to develop, and 
if it develops in a different direction 
than what his mandate is [for Shad- 
ow], then we have to let it go.” 

A Year In Winter is the local play- 
wright's first script to see a-full Shadow 
production, and follows Alice (Tracy 


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Penner) as she searches for Terry 
(Garett Ross), her missing love and an 
unstable visual artist attempting to 
decode his own forgotten past through 
art. Masks play a prominent role: plot- 
wise they “become part of the world” 
surrounding Terry, and let the show’s 
only two actors become a stable of 
other characters in a different way. 

“Modern audiences are used to see- 
ing one actor play multiple parts,” he 
explains. “Especially Edmonton audi- 
ences, they see Fringe shows like that 
all the time. The masks are a slightly 
different way of doing that.” 


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WAITING ART about artists seems to be 
a Sharplin thing: | should mention that 
he’s looking much more clean-cut than 
last time Edmonton audiences saw him, 
in the frazzled black hair and pastel- 
white face of Inferno Sonata's August 
Strindberg, a one-man one act he wrote 
and performed about the half-crazed 
Swedish playwright. Earlier this year, 
his melodrama Black Hearts in the Green 
Room, which ran at the Walterdale, cen- 
tered on a group of actors besieged by 
theatre ghosts. With A Year of Winter fol- 
lowing suit, Sharplin has started to 
notice his own trend. 


“It seems to be a motif for me,” bh. 
shrugs. “Write about what you know, ; 
guess. Most of my friends are artists 
some variety, and I’m an artist, so i: 
familiar to me. But I think a lot of peop 
non-artists, look to artists to understang 
something about themselves. | don’ 
know if it’s a cliché or the truth that ar 
reflects who we are, so I think that a |o 
of people see in those artist's stories 
some narrative that they can relate to 
even if it’s the sort of crazy artists.” 

This show marks Sharplin’s firs; 
professional production in Edmont: 
(he’s had a couple of pro-runs in Ca/- 
gary). Independent work or communi 
ty theatre are the usual gigs: Inferno 
Sonata was Sharplin’s own produc 
tion, and he spent a few years as th 
Walterdale’s Artistic Director. Tha 
said, it doesn’t seem like the leap ont: 
a professional stage has been a diili 
cult one; Sharplin’s biggest observa 
tion seems to be just how condensed 
the process is, as opposed to th 
“rehearse when we can, for month 
on end” method of community worl 

Having his first hometown p: 
show run in the hands of a longtim 
collaborator probably doesn’t hurt | 
comfort level. 

“A lot of directors would look at onc 
script and go, ‘Yeah, this is nice but it’s 
not for us’ and then, ‘Off you go, find 
somebody else.’ John’s a lot more o 
minded than that,” he says. “John reall) 
likes to shake things up, and maybe in a 

way he was looking for something less 
conventional. | was writing for what | 
thought Shadow would want, and final 
ly I sat down and wrote this mostly jus 
for me, and this is the one.” v 


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ARTS 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 


“You may be right 


Doubts stellar cast keeps 
its questions shrouded in ambiguity 


PAUL BLINOV / blinov@vueweekly.com 
1 Senne things aren't black 
and white ... . And sometimes 
they are” goes one exchange 
in Doubt, a Parable, John Patrick 
Shanley’s compelling study of suspicion 
and certainty. The story's currently rid- 
ing the wave of success that follows a 
Pulitzer Prize win (and a movie adapta- 
tion), and the Citadel's production of 
the acclaimed script is an effective ver- 
sion, if a little back heavy. 

Doubt isn’t a heavy, dutiful march 
through questions of morality, instead 
setting them up for us to decode in an 
engaging, efficient story, that’s over in’ 
90 minutes but runs itself deep into 
ambiguous shades of gray. Set ina 
Bronx church school (here, ona 
revolving stage), icy principal Sister 
Aloysius (Lally Cadeau) begins to sus- 
pect that a younger priest, Father Flynn 
(John Ullyatt) may be abusing the 
school’s only black student. It’s 1964: 
as a nun, she can't go to a superior on 
speculation alone—her word won't go 
far in the church’s mostly male hierar- 


UNTIL SUN, MAR‘29 


DOUBT, A PARABLE 
DIRECTED BYTOM WOOD 

WRITTEN BY JOHN PATRICK SHANLEY 
STARRING LAY CADEAL, JON ULUAT, 
CLARICECYFORD, KAREN ROBINSON 
CTADEL THEATRE QB00- 101A AVE) S50- $76 


REVUE 


chy—so along with the impressionable 
Sister James (Clarice Eckford), she 
begins a private campaign to remove 
him from the school. 

Shanley's script is adept at dancing 
around the issue, dropping hints and 
casting suspicion without leaning too 
much to one side: there are so many 
explanations and possible clues scat- 
tered about that I doubt any audience 
would be unanimous on Flynn’s guilt 
As he’s the new, friendlier face of the 
church, Aloysius’ suspicion could sim- 
ply be a case of the old guard fearing 
the inevitable change that looms, but 
Flynn doesn’t seem completely clear: 
though we never see him do any 
wrong, as the story unfolds, suspicion 


BENT OUT OF SHAPE PRODUCTION 


¢ Charlie Tomlinson 
ner Daniela Viaskalic 


Direct umatu 


certainly emerges. 

The script is stripped of any excess 
that could cast favour into either cor- 
ner without offering something for the 
other side, It’s also deceptive in its 
depth; there’s plenty of humour, often 
stemming from Aloysius’ unbending 
will and archaic beliefs—at one point, 
she ridicules adding “Frosty the 
Snowman” to the list of Christmas 
Pageant songs as overly paganistic. If 
anything, Doubt seems back-loaded, 
with most of the influential details 
coming in the last third or so. 


STILL, IT HELPS that the two polarizing 


figures are played by the Citadel's vet- 
€ran stagegoers. Lally Cadeau’s Sister 
Aloysius is made of Old Testament 
stuff, an iron nun willing to step away 
from God in pursuit of what she deems 
evil. Cadeau plays her with a cold 
determination, but that unfaltering can 
be taken as fiercely committed to 
goodness or archaic and desperate 

Ullyatt’s Flynn is a charismatic fel- 
low: he gets a little shifty when he’s 
backed into a comer, but played with 
the utmost care. Given Aloysius's 
unbending drive, he’s the one left to 
keep thing ambiguous to an audience, 
and he expertly lends himself to both 
acquittal and condemnation 

Clarice Eckford is excellent as their 
torn go-between, a young nun caught 
between her superior and Flynn's 
newer, more friendly ideas that sit far 
better with her sunny disposition. But 
the issue itself shifts in the last third 
as Mrs Muller, the boy's mother, 
proves to be the crux that makes 
Doubt work. Played by Karen Robin- 
son far more emotionally than the 
others (except maybe Sister James), 
she manages to blur the right and 
wrong of the entire situation in a sin- 
gle appearance, altering the “right” 
and “wrong” of the situation. 

The finale leaves the truth shrouded: 
Shanley has said that the second act of 
the play is supposed to take the form 
of a discussion in the bar or the drive 
home afterwards, and I'm certain 
that’s exactly right. It will probably 
confirm every audience member's sus- 
picions, one way or another. But not 
without a doubt, and that’s the point. v 


(St. John’s, NFLD 
eronto, ON) 


ner Beth Graham (Edmonton, AB) 


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phone: 780.760.2229 visi: Winterlight.ca 


MAR 19- MAR 25, 2009 


THE NEXT GENERAT/oy 


Sunday, March 22nd 1-3pm East Court 
A meet and greet autograph session with Charlotte Arnold “Holly } Sinclair” 
and Raymond Ablack “Sav Bhandari” of CTV’s Degrassi: The Next Generation. 
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The Berlin Gall 


Brendan Gall’s conflicted character 
covers for any of Berlin's faults 


DAVID BEARY / david@vueweekly.com 

esitation and insecurity are 
He things to portray on 

stage. By the very nature of 
theatre, actors have to know what 
they‘re going to do next, and the art 
of not just making it look natural and 
new each night, but to appear con- 
flicted, to flit around and fight with 
yourself, is one of the rarer skills in 
the acting world: East of Berlin's 
Brendan Gall is nothing short of a 
master of this skill. 

And Gall’s Rudi has plenty of reason 
to be unsure of himself. Growing up in 
a German enclave in Paraguay, he 
spends the first 17 years of his life in 
blissful ignorance of the fact that his 
father is a Nazi war criminal, a doctor 
who spent time at Auschwitz conduct- 
ing experiments on Jewish prisoners. A 
revelation like that is bound to upset 
your worldview just a touch, and it’s as 
much a testament to writer Hannah 
Moscovitch's clarity of character as it is 
to Gall’s disjointed, jumpy reading that 
Rudi comes across as utterly conflicted 
as he does, a man who can barely sort 
out what he’s going to say next, never 
mind how he's going to make his way 
through the world. 

Presented mostly as a monologue, 
though with frequent flashbacks to 
formative times first with the high 
school friend who breaks the news 
(Paul Dunn) then to the Jewish girl- 
friend/spiritual saviour he meets after 
a life-fleeing move to Berlin (Diana 
Donnelly), East of Berlin puts a lot of 
pressure on Gall to engage the audi- 
ence, though he shoulders it without 
fault. Equally adept at Rudi's more 
buoyant, charming moments as his 
more tortured, existential ones, he 
can alternatively have you laughing 
out loud or shocked, often in the 
same breath. A particularly good turn, 
and some indication of the play’s 
humour, comes after his friend breaks 
the news of his dad’s past: as he 
paces wildly, Gall flies through the 
line “I was waiting to—what’s another 
word for kill? Relocate!” with barely 
even a flicker, the casual evocation of 
the Holocaust a subtle attempt to 
downplay his father's role in it 
through droll wit. 

Most of Rudi’s more thoughtful and 


UNTIL SUN MAR 29 
EAST OF BERLIN 


DIRECTED BY ALISA PALMER 

WRITTEN BY HANNAH MOSCOVITCH 
STARRING DIANA DONNELLY, PAUL DUNK, 
BRENDAN GALL 

THEROXY (10708 - 124 ST), $23-$29 


pained moments come when he meets 
Sarah, the aforementioned Jewish gir! 
who's in Berlin looking through her 
own connections to the Holocaust. Stil! 
in denial about his past—he tells her his 
parents died in a car crash, and uses the 
fake name that was on the illicit pass 
port his father obtained for him when 
they fled the country after the war— 
Rudi nevertheless sees Sarah as some 
kind of absolution, proof he is nothing 
like his father (something he already 
tried to prove, unsuccessfully, with his 
childhood friend). One of East of Berlin's 
most powerfully emotional moments 
has Sarah and Rudi fighting about that 
very fact, and it hurts to watch Rudi 
deny it as much as he embraces it, in 
love as much with the idea of Sarah as 
he is with the actual person. 


REVUE 


AND YET, for ail the depth of character— 
there's also something to be said for 
Moscovitch’s ability to explain Rudi’s 
father without necessarily excusing 
him—East of Berlin is ultimately a bit 
lacking. The ending, which I won't run 
here, is the most obvious fault, but 
there’s an extent to which Moscovitch 
writes herself into an inescapable cor 

ner; really the problem is that the play 
can’t seem to trust its story without try 

ing to pump up the drama. 

Granted, this is theatre, and a Holo 
caust play at that, but Moscovitch 
seems to have a need to make almos! 
every moment gripping! and impor 
tant! For the big backdrop, this is still a 
very small, human story about coming 
to grips with your past, featuring an 
actor with a special knack for humani- 
ty, and yet Moscovitch needs almost 
everything about them to get big. It’s 
not quite enough to take away from 
the performances or the relationship 0! 
the characters, but it does hold Eas! o/ 
Berlin back. Gall’s performance works 
as well as it does because of a soft 
touch, and the play as a whole would 
benefit from a similar bent. w 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 ARTS 


eur Michael 
lence played at 
} y a panel dis- 
and politics of vio- 
Benny's Video, 
installment, is a 
juealing pig being air 
top of its skull, captured 
it writhes amongst the 
farm hands. The scene is 
ound and played again 
‘ ere is no doubt that we 
e watching the death of a live animal, 
2 IE eatin: of its death 
through a mediated sense of control that 
still denies us (and the character in the 
film) from actually experiencing the effect 
of the moment. 
The central issue raised during the 
panel, however, sidestepped ethics and 
headed straight into the notion of the 
beautiful. One panelist countered this 
‘opening scene by showing a quiet clip of a 
smiling man forcefully leading a reindeer 
into the bush and skillfully insert a large 
blade into its skull. The panelist then 
called this scene “beautiful” in relation to 
Haneke’s scene, which captured the chaos 
of the struggle and included the squeals 
and the mechanical blast of the air gun, 
ich the panelist described as “cold.” 


DAVID BERRY / david@yueweokly,com 


and political geography is all 
too familiar, Fort McMurray 
nevertheless remains a place shroud- 
€d in considerable ambiguity. For 
any of us, the people who live there 
are barely even an afterthought in the 
discussions that surround the place, a 
collection of Aboriginals, Newfound- 
Janders and young Albertans more or 
€ss indistinguishable from the 
machinery that dots the landscape. 
he Emi Architect Theatre col- 
lective is hoping to shed some light 
‘on those faces, though. 
“A lot of it really was just trying to 
lumanize the oil sands/Alberta expe- 
ence,” explains Jonathan Seinen of 
Meir newest piece, Highway 63: The 
"ort Mac Show. “You read so much 
cMurray and see so 
and we have 
ries, but we were 
tually like for 
ere, whether 
all their lives or 


‘ ! to residents both 

“manent and transient, trying to get 
: feel for the The result is a show 
‘’ out “portraits” of 


: jough its place in our physical 


Beautiful, as an adjective, means 
‘absolutely nothing in this context—espe- 


cially when applied to a visual object. 


Neither scene for me is very “beautiful,” 


- but | am affected in the sense that my 


thoughts, my blood, have been stirred. 
Beautiful, as an emotion, is an arrested 
sensation we often conflate with some- 
thing we encounter in the world. The 
problem here for me is not the death of 
the animals, but the representations of 
their deaths and our relation to the event. 

In both scenes, there is undeniably a 
sense of control on screen and off. We 
as viewers are positioned as privileged, 
but the reindeer scene, which is sup- 
posed to counter Haneke’s coldness, is 
in fact far more disturbing, as the man 
with the knife looks knowingly into the 
camera as he performs. We are no 
longer just voyeurs into a spectacle, but 
we are made implicit through his recog- 
nition of us, and our fullest attention to 
his action. What is beautiful then is an 
archaic sense of desire, or in other 
words, unrequited pleasure. 


ALL OF THIS also reminds me of the 
moral outrage sparked last summer by 
Mexican artist Guillermo Vargas, aka 
Habacuc, who found a malnourished 
Street dog and tied it up in a gallery 
setting as a means to force viewers to 
bare witness to its starvation. A great 
amount of offense was taken at the 
supposed cruelty of letting an animal 


Living in a boomtown 


Highway 63 looks at Fort McMurray through a resident’s eyes 


As | TH, MAR 18-F, MAR 20 (10 

= | suet ca 

| HIGHWAY 63: 

© | THE FORT MAC SHOW 
CHEATED & PERFORMED BY GEORGINA BEAT, 
LAVNE COLEMAN, CHARLOTTE COBEN COLEMAN 
GREG GALE, JONATHAN SEINEN 


LIVING ROOM PLAYHOUSE (11315 106 AVE) 
PAY WHAT YOU GAN 


some of the residents they met with a 
central narrative that follows three 
particularly prominent types of resi- 
dents: a young woman who can't wait 
to leave, a recently arrived Newfound- 


lander looking to get his piece of the 


boom and a reclamation scientist 


attempting to deal with the impact the ~ 


boom is having on the city’s culture 
and environment. 


die (as art), and the opposing argu- 
ments praise Habacuc for magnifying 
the lack of social empathy by forcing 
viewers to confront the inevitable 
demise of a living creature bred from 
the social conditions we all silently 
tolerate. There is nothing aesthetically 
beautiful about watching a street dog 
dying, but there is an ethically charged 
call to arms that does not exist within 
a simple metaphor. 

| remember talking to UK performance 
artist Kira O'Reilly about the Habacuc 
exhibit, which had just caught interna- 
tional attention when she was in town 
last summer, and | was surprised that her 
response was quite negative. Reilly's 
“inthewrongplaceness” received the 
scorn of animal rights activists when visi- 
tors were invited one ata time to witness 
the artist lie naked in bed caressing and 
engaging with the corpse of a dead pig. 
For her, she felt Habacuc’s choice to let 
the animal die instead of at least trying to 
save it was problematic. 

But long after that particular case, and 
the hundreds if not thousands more, | 
wonder why the onus was up to any sin- 
gle person such as the artist—rather 
than directed towards any member of the 
attending public—to live up to his or her 
experience and do something, anything, 
besides stand by and watch. 


Amy Fung is the editor of 
PrairieArtsters.com 


AS SEINEN EXPLAINS, conflicting 
loyalties and of a hope for recla- 
mation feature prominently in the 
psyche of Fort McMurrayites, and 
as such have infected the mood of 
the play, as well. 

“| feel like one of the things that 
stayed with us the-most was the 
sense of trade-offs or balance or 
contradictions, and trying to live 
amongst that confusion,” he says. 
"This oil is wanted and needed out- 
side of this place, so they need to 
develop it, but at the same time, how 
do you do that in a sustainable way, 
that considers all the voices.” 

Of course, one of the other things 
the collective noticed was the people 
on both sides of the issues tended to 
not consider those voices so well, and 
one of their hopes is that the play can 
open some dialogues, especially for 
those of us who are only viewing the 
issues from afar. 

“One of the big challenges of these 
issues is that people seem to have their 
points of view, so people don't even 
seem to have conversations about it,” 
Seinen says. “Our struggle and our 
goal has been to try to discover the in 
between, things that are positive about 
the community, but also the chal- 
lenges. We want to start conversations 
from an honest place.” vw 


ARTS 


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FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 790.425.2889 
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ALBERTA BALLET-ALICE IN WONDERLAND 


Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave, 780.428.6839 « 
Edmund Stripe’s adaptation of Lewis Carroll's classic 
© Mar 27-28 © Tickets at Alberta Ballet box office 


ARDEN THEATRE-LINK DANCE COMPANY 5 St 
Anne St St Albert. 780.459.1542, www.ardenthe- 
atre.com ¢ Part of the On Stage Series with chore- 
ographer Gail Lo * Sun, Mar 23, 11am and 
Spm « Tickets at Arden box office, TicketMaster 


MILE ZERO DANCE-SECRET DIARY FOR A 
COLLAPSED WORLD Freemasons’ Hall, 10308-100 
Ave, 780.424.1573, www.milezerodance.com © 
Interdisciplinary performance preview of new work 
in collaboration with Wendy McNeill © Mar 27-28, 
8pm © $10 (MZD member)/$15 at TIX on the 
Square, door | 

SHUMKA AT 50...AN ANNIVERSARY 

Jubilee Auditorium ¢ Choreographed by John 
Pichlyk and Dave Ganert. and Edmonton's Dnipro 
Choir, and Vasyl Popadiuk on violin © Mar-19-20 ¢ 
$25-$75 at TicketMaster 


GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


A. J. OTTEWELL ARTS CENTRE 590 Broadmoor 
Bivd, Sherwood Park, 780 998 3574 © Juried Spring 
Art Show: Art Society of Strathcona County * Mar 
20. 7-9pm, artists in attendance; Mar 21, 10-Spm; 
Mar 22, 11-4pm 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10186-106 St, 
780.488.6611 * INTENSIONS: MESSAGE AND 
MEDIUM IN FIBRE ART; Until Apr 18 © CASKET 
COVERS: Mary Sullivan-Holdgrafer, until Apr 18 * 
BACKYARD ART: NATURAL IMPRESSIONS: Margie 
Davidson; until Apr 18 » /N JESUS’ NAME: Matt 
Gould: Until Apr 18° Di Gallery: 
DRAWING FROM NATURE Textile artist Dana 
Roman; until Apr 18 


ART BEAT GALLERY 26 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, 
780.459.3679 ¢ FRAGMENTS OF A LANDSCAPE. 
Alberta landscape paintings by Russ Hogger 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA Enterprise Square, 
100, 10230 Jasper Ave, 780.422.6223 « 
POLAROIDS: Photographs by Attila Richard Lukacs 
selected by Michae] Morris; The history of art is 
fich with ages that are provocative and chal- 
lenge societal norms. Sexuality and violence are 


integral to this history. POLAROIOS addresses 
questions of power, masculinity and desire with 
images of nudity and sexual activity. This content 
will disturb some and inspire others. Parents and 
educators are encouraged to preview the exhibi- 
tion; until May 18 * interactive Walk: 


* Tours: André Grace). Mar 19) Tedd Kerr, Mar 26; 


7-8pm, free * SYLVAIN VOYER: SURVEY 
1957—PRESENT. until Mar 22 * JOHN FREEMAN: 
THE HORIZON AS IT SHOULD BE: aiid photo- 
raphs; until Mar 22 LEAVING OLYMPIA: 


ailing the Idealized Nude; until May 18 © Art _ 


For Lunch: Leaving Olympia: The Nude after the 
Feminist Revolution, with Ruth Burns; Thu, Mar 26 
* A SENSE SUBLIME: 19th Century Landscapes; 
until May 18 # All Day Saturdays: Last Sat every 
month, 1-4pm; free with admission; Sat, Mar 28: 
The Doors of Perception * Free (member)/$10 
(adult}/$7 (senior/student); $5 (6-12yrs)/free (Syrs 
and under}/$20 (family—2 adults, 4 children) 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621-82 
Ave, 780.498.1984 © CAR CULTURE: Oil paintings by 
Christ! Bergstrom # Until Apr 30 


CROOKED POT GALLERY 4912-51 Ave, Stony 
Plain, 780.963.9573 * Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm 
NATURAL SELECTION: Marilyn Henker's nature- 
based pottery 


“FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY Rim 1-1, Fine Arts 
Bldg, 112 St, 89 Ave (780.492.2081) * Open Tue-Fri 
10am-5pm, Sat 2-5pm * FACETS OF FORM: 
Sculptures by Peter Hide and his contemporaries, 
curated by Betsy Boone © Until Mar 21 


FRINGE GALLERY 10516 Whyte Ave, bsmt of the 
Paint Spot, 780.432.0240 * HELICON: Artworks by 
Harcourt artists * Until Mar 30 


FRONT GALLERY 12312 Jasper Ave, 780.488.2952 
© Paintings by Kari Duke 


GALLERY AT MILNER Bere Milner Library 
Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Square, 780.496.7030 
* ODYSSEY: Sculptors Association of Alberta; until 
Mar 30 * SHOW OFF Open submission teen art 
show; Apr 1-30 


GALLERY IS 4930 Ross St. Red Deer, 403.341.4641 
© PAINTERLY PAINTINGS: Landscapes by Jeri-Lynn 
Ing * Through March 


HARCOURT HOUSE 31d FI, 10215-112 St, 
780.426.4180 © Main Gallery: THE GERMAN 
AUTUMN IN MINOR SPACES: Photagraphic works 
by Allen Ball and Kimberly Mair * Front Room: 

E BOLD AND THE BAFFLING: Artworks by Karen 
Hibbard © Until Mar 21 


HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY-RED DEER 
Sunworks, 4924 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.345.8937 © 
WORKING TITLE; 2nd part of an installation project 
by 3rd year visual art students from Red Deer 
College. First part is at the Red Deer College 
Library © Until Apr 17 


JEFF ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place Senior 


THE EDMONTON ARTS COUNCIL 


Project 2009. 


Installation: Summer 2010 


PUBLICA 


PUBLICA 


ART 


Budget: $32,800 CAD (maximum, all inclusive) 
Deadline for Submissions: 4:30 PM Tuesday, April 28, 2009 


The application is available on our website: 
www.edmontonarts.ab.ca/publicart/ 


CALL TO COMMUNITY GROUPS - 
Queen Elizabeth Pool Public Art Project 


The Edmonton Arts Council, on behalf of the City of Edmonton, 
is seeking applications from Edmonton community groups 
interested in participating in the Queen Elizabeth Pool Public Art 


Centre, 10831 University Ave, 780.433.5807 © 
FOSTER AND UNGSTAD: Artworks papiertole and 
decoupage a a Foster and pottery by 
Magdalene “Mag” Ungstad ¢ Until Apr 2 
JOHNSON GALLERY * Southside: 7711-85 St, 
780.465.6171; New artworks by Sylvia Dubrule, 
Linda Nelson, Ruth Vontobel-Brunner, Shirley 

and by Helena Ball « 
11817-80 St, 780.479.8424; Artworks by Audrey 
Pfannmuller, Jim Painter, pottery by Peggy Heer * 
Through March 


KAMENA 5718 Calgary Tr S, 780.944.9497 * Mon- 
Wed, Fri 10am-Spm; Thu 10am-7pm, Sat 10am-5pm 
* Featuring artworks by various artists 


LANDO GALLERY 11130-105 Ave, 780.990.1161 © 
THE CANADIAN ROCKIES LOOP: Paintings by 
Tatjana Mirkov-Popovikci # Until Mar 2! 


LATITUDE 53 GALLERY 10248-106 St, 2nd Fi, 
780.423.5353 « Main Space: LADY THINGS-OH, 
MOTHER: Photo series by Robyn Cumming © 

Room: A COUNTESS DREAM: Textile col- 
lages by Esther Scott-McKay * Until Apr 4 


LOFT GALLERY A. J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 
Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park, 780.998.3091 * 
Open: Thu 5-9pm, Sat 10am-4pm © BEG/NNINGS: 
Art Society of Strathcona County * Until Apr 25 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-112 

St, 780.407.7152 © AFTER WORK: THE FRIENDS 

CHAIRMAN SHOW: Artworks by healthcare staff, 

ill residents, students and volunteers * Until 
pr ’ 


MCPAG (Malticultura! Centre Public Art 
ame 5411-51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.2777 © 
EXODUS: Artworks by Tyler Dixon; Until Apr 1 © 
Dining Room Gallery: Paintings by Myrna Hanmer; 
Until Apr 2 

MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE 
INSTITUTE 9 Mission Ave, St. Albert, 780.651.8176 
* Aboriginal Veterans Display Gift Shop Finger 
weaving and sash display by Celina Loyer 


NINA HAGGERTY Stollery Gallery 9704-111 Ave, 
780.474.7611 ¢ TECHNO PICTURES; Paintings by 
Mik-a-Low; until Mar 27 * TEACHINGS FROM A 
KISKINOHAMATOKAMIKOHK; LEARNING FROM 
CHILDREN'S PHOTOGRAPHS: Presentetion by Hedy 
Bach and Merle Kennedy conducted through the 
Women annd Children’s Health Community Based 
Participatory Research Group and Edmonton Public 
Schools; Apr. 2-18; Opening reception: Apr 8, 7-Spm 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 10183-112 St, 
780.452.0286 * Tue-Sat 11:am-5pm * 
COLOURS-NEW PAINTINGS: Paintings by Giuseppe 
Albi ¢ Opening reception: Thu, Mar 19, 7-9pm, 
artist in attendance 


PORTAL ART GALLERY 300, 9414-91 St, 

780.702.7522 © Tue-Wed, Fri-Sat 10am-5Spm; Thu 

12-8pm © DIPPED IN THE COLORS OF SPRING: 

eas by Giselle Denis and Cheri Denis # Until 
far 31 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, 
St. Albert, 780.460.4310'* A WAY INTO PLACE: 
Artworks by Verne Busby, Cindy Delpart, Judith 
Martin and Bruce Thompson * Mar 19-Apr 12 
Opening reception: Mar 19, 7-Spm 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA 8555 
Roper Rd, 780.427.1750 © Celebrating 100 Years of 
the ua in Rural Communities Exhibit ¢ Until Mar 
29 © Free 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave, 
780.453.9100 * ARTE EN LA CHARRERIA 
Craftsmanship and design distinctive to the Mexican 
cowboy; until Apr 13 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St, 780.488.3619 « 
RELEASE: Prints by Akiko Taniguchi Until Mar 31 


SNAP GALLERY 10309-97 St, 780.423.1492 « 
SCENT OF MEMORY: Print art by Guy Langevin © 
Until Apr 11 


SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY-SPRUCE GROVE 
Melcor Cultural Centre, 35, 5 Ave, Spruce Grove, 
780.962.0664 A CONSERVATION 
PORTRAIT—WAGNER NATURAL AREA Paintings and 
nature samples with educational material by Cindy 
Barratt * Until Mar 28 


STEEPS OLD GLENORA 12411 Stony Plain Rd « 
Artworks by Trevor Waurechen ¢ Through March 


STEPPES GALLERIES 1253, 1259-91 St ¢ WEST 
GALLERY: PLACES; Paintings by Christine 
Wallewien; until Mar 31: closing reception: Sat, Mar 
21, 2-4pm © EAST GALLERY: * BLESSING: Copper 
etchings by Oksana Moveha; until May 5; opening 
reception: Sat, Apr 11, 2-4pm © E 
kelley.brent@bldg-inc.ca 


STUDIO GALLERY 11 Perron Street, St. Albert, 
780.460.5993 * SECRET SURFACE: Paintings by 
Daniel vanHeyst ¢ Until Mar 28 


E-ville Roller Derby Presents... 


_ VISUAL 
780.421.1731 * LOOKING GLASS; Photo 


TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 11211-142 St, 
780.452.9100 * THE ART OF THE BRICK™: until May 
3. ® LEGO® Bricks Building Challenges: Sat, Mar 21, 
11:am-4pm * Surprise Mosaic Public Build; Mar 28- 

5 * Walk on the Wild Side with Safari Jeff and 
Shannon's Great Green Adventure Show: Mar 30- 
31° TWO SMALL PIECES OF GLASS: The Amazin 
Telescope: Opens Mar 28 * IMAX: Wild fier ah 
Epic Underwater Struggle for Survival 


URBAN ROOTS SALON 10418 Whyte Ave « 
CREATING SPACE: Artworks by Klaus and other. 
artists, from the collection of Robert and Chris Smith 
© Wed-Sat, Until Mar 28, noon-4pm 


ARTS ALBERTA 3rd Fi, 10215-112 St iy 
B 
peat Murray and Leon Strembitsky # nt Mar 


WEST END GALLERY 12308 Jasper Ave. 
780.488.4892 * Artworks by W.H. Webb * Mar 28- 
Apr 9 © Opening reception: Sat. Mar 28, 1-4pm 


LITERARY 


AUDREYS BOOKS 10702 Jasper Ave, 
780.423.3487 © Poetry Nights the 2nd Fri each 
month * Ann Eriksson reading from her novel, /n the 
Hands of Anubis; Thu, Mat 19, 7:30pm * Poetry 


.Night: Poet Laureate Ted Blodgett, launching his 


new release, The Invisible Poem and Poems fora 
Small Park; Fri, Mar 20, 7:30pm ¢ Other Voices 
readings, pelerstid creative writing students from 
Grant MacEwan College with Lynda Schroeders and 
Gail Sobat; Jordan Serben and Alice Major; Mar 26, 
7pm * Other Voices readings, celebrating creative 
writing students from Grant MacEwan College with 
Kent Falkenberg and Lynn Coady; Dana Wilson and 
Curtis Gillespie; Thu, Apr 2, 7pm 


CARROT CAFE 9351-118 Ave, 780.471.1580 « 
Carrot Writing Circle * Every Tue, 7-9pm; A critique 
circle the 4th Tue every month 


CHAPTERS-ST. ALBERT 445 St. Albert Rd, Unit 
30, St. Albert * Book Signingireading of Among 
Friends with Robinson Koilpillai and author Allan 
Sheppar * Sat, Mar 21, 2pm © 

UTH POINT 3227 Calgary Tr * 
Book signing/reading of Among Friends with 
Robinson Koilpillai and author Allan Sheppar * Sun, 
Mar 22, 2pm © Free 


CITY ARTS CENTRE 10943-84 Ave, 780.932.4409 
* TALES. Monthly Storytelling Circle: Tell stories 
or come to listen; 2nd Fri each month # Until June, 
8pm; $3 (free first time) 


JOHN JANZEN NATURE CENTRE AUDITORIUM 
Fort Edmonton Park, 780.932.4409 © Tales Through 

Time: History and Legend from Across Canada: fea- 

turing storyteller Dale Jarvis, and TALES storytellers 
Dawn Blue, Eniad and Pearl Ann Gooding © Fri, Mar 
20, 7:30pm © $18 at www.tixonthesquare.ca, door, 

Info at E: talesedmonton@hotmail.com 


ROSIE'S 10475-80 Ave, 780.439.7211 ¢ TALES: 
EDMONTON STORYTELLING CAFE TALES 
Alberta League Encouraging Storytelling open mic * 
First Thu each month, 7-Spm ® Pay-What-You-Will 
{min $6); info at 780.932.4409 


STANLEY A. MILNER LIBRARY Main Floor, Centre 
for Reading and the Arts ¢ Writer's Comer: Cherie 
Dimaline ¢ Sun, Mar 29, 1:30pm 


STRATHCONA LIBRARY 8331-104 St, 
780.422.8174 © Writers Guild of Alberta and the 
Editors‘ Association of Canada Present: An Editor's 
Perspective: Writing and Editing for the Ever- 
Changing Media Environment with Joy Gugeler « 
Thu, Mar 26, 7pm © Free (WGA member)/S5 (non- 
member); www.writersquild.ab.ca : 
UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909-86 Ave, 
780.422.8174 © THE POETS’ HAVEN: Monday 
Night reading series presented by Stroll of Poets © 
Every Mon, 7pm * $5 door 


THEATRE 


THE ADDLEPATED NIMIE John L. Haar Theatre, 


10045-155 St * Grant MacEwan College * Comedy 
by Stewart Lemoine © Until Mar 21, 7:30pm * $14 
(adult)/$8 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square 


BERNARDA ALBA/RONDEL Grant MacEwan 
College, Centre for the Arts, Theatre Lab, 10045- 
155 St 780.497.4340 © Bernarda Alba, musi- 
cal directed by Bridget Ryan ¢ A powerful matri- 
arch imposes a strict rule of confinement on her 
household following her second husband's funeral 
* Rondel by Kenneth Brown. inspired by the struc- 
ture of one of Arthur Schnitzler’s works, La Ronde * 
Until Mar 22, Pee no shows on Mon; Sun, Mar 
22, 2pm ® $7 at TIX on the Square 


CHIMPROV Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave, 
780.433.3399 © Rapid Fire Theatre presents come- 
dy every Sat, 11pm, except for the last Sat of each 


month until June 13 © $10, 
on $10/$8 (member) at Tix op, 


CORNER GASSED Jubilations Dinner 7) 
8882-170 St, Phase il, WEM, 780.494.2404 0", 
Mar 29, Wed-Sat 6:30pm; Sun 5pm ‘a 


COSI King’s University College, 9125-50 st « 
Directed by Heather Fitzsimmons Frey and writte, 
by Louis Nowra * A pyromaniac. An obsessive 
compulsive, A junkie. A manic-depressive. Woy 
je want to direct these people in an Italian opera 

is is the challenge facing Lewis Riley * May > 
28, Bpm # $10 (adult}/$8 (student) at Kina’ 
Bookstore, 780.465: 


DIE-NASTY Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Avo 
780.433 3399 ® Live improvised soap opera dirac; 
ed by Dana Andersen * Every Mon, 8pm 


DISNEY'S 101 DALMATIANS Horizon Stage. j\\, 
Calahoo Road, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995 » 
Horizon Players musical directed by Norm Usiskin « 
Mar 26-28, 7:30pm; Mar 28, 2pm-* $20 (adult) 
{student/senior) at Horizon’s box office, 
TicketMaster 


DOUBT, A PARABLE Citadel's Shoctor Thea 
9828-101A Ave * By John Patrick Shanley © (); 
Mar 29, 7:30pm, 1:30pm ® Tickets at the Citad 
box office 780.425.1820 


EAST OF BERLIN Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 s; « 
Theatre Network * By Hannah Moscovitch © |); 
Mar 29, fom Tue-Sat; 2pm Sun * Stin. Wee, 1} 
$27 (adult)/$23 (student/seniors), Fri-Sat: $29 
{adult)/$25 (student/senior); Tue: 2 for $28 at T) 
the Square; opening night at Theatre Network 


EXTINCTION SONG Citadel's Rice Theatre, 992; 
101A Ave © Written and directed by Ron Jenkir 
and performed by Ron Pederson. Part of the Ri 
Series © Mar 28-Apr 19, 7:30pm; mat: 1:30pr 


THE GAME! THE GAMEI! Varscona The 
10325 83 Ave * CBC Edmonton * Sun, Mar 22 
8:30pm © $10 at TIX on the Square 


HIGHWAY 63: THE FORT MAC SHOW The Livi 
Room Playhouse, 11315-106 Ave © Workshop p 
entation, a collective creation based on city iste i: 
the heart of the oil sands development. By Georg 
Beaty, Layne Coleman, Charlotte Corbeil-Coleman 
Greg Gale, and Jonathan Seinen ® Mar 19-20 
10pm; Mar 21, 2pm @ Tickets: PWYC at the door 


THE LOVE LIST Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 15¢ 
109 Ave, 780.483.4051 * By Norm Foster. A 
spin on the quest for perfection * Until Apr 12 « 
$55-$85 


ROBERTO ZUCCO Timms Centre, 87 Ave, 112 
U of A campus © Studio Theatre * By Bernar 
Marie Koltes, directed by Stefan Dzeporosky * 
25-Apr 4 ® $10-$22 at 11X on the Square 


THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Catalyst Theave 
8529 Soa Boulevard * Musical present 
the Odd-Lot Theatre Company * Mar 25-Apr 3 
8pm, no show on Mon; Sun: 3pm * $15 (adult 
{student/senior) at TIX on the Square, door 


SPARK A REVOLUTION Westbury Thea 
Alta Arts Barns, 780.409.1910 * Fringe Theatre 
AEN performance party * Mar 28, Jon 


SPRINGBOARDS NEW PLAY FESTIVAL In) 
Space, 11516-103 St ¢ Workshop West * Feat 
different plays and play excerpts each ev 
Pitch to Play, a fun process to choose Workshoi 
West's 2008/10 Playwriting Unit * Mar 19-2 


10 LOST YEARS Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Ri 
Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995 * Based on the 19 
book by Barry Broadfoot, about people and commu 
nities during the “Dirty 30s” * Mar 20-21, 7:30pn 
© $20 (adults)/$15 (student/senior) SOLD OUT 


THEATRESPORTS Varscona Theatre, 10329-8 
Ave, 780.448.0695 © Rapid Fire Theatre's week!) 
insane improv show * eh) Fri (11pm) @ Until Ju 
31 © $10/ $8 (member) at TIX on the Square 


THEATRE DES ABONNES La Cité Francophone 
8627-91 St © L'uni Théatre * Two one-act plays + 
Undertaken by citizens of the Francophone comr 
nity © Mar 21-23, 8pm; Mar 24, 2pm 


UN CABARET La Cité Francophone, 8627-31 Si ¢ 
UUnitheatre © En francaise/French language pr 
duction. © Revisit the scandalous speakeasy per 
of the 1920s, inspired by the films Moulin fouge 
and The Blue Angel * Mar 26-28, Apr 2-4: 8pm 
Mar 29, Apr 5: 2pm * $23 (adult)/$15 (student/ser 
ior) at TIX on the Square, door 


A YEAR OF WINTER Varscona Theatre, 10329-' 
Ave, 780.434.5564 * Shadow Theatre * By Sco! 
Sharplin, starring Tracey PennerandJames 
Hamilton, directed by John Hudson ® Mar 19-2° ° 
$25-$17 at TIX on the Square 


For more information, contact the Edmonton Arts Council: 
PH: (780) 424 — 2787 
EM: ktrinier@edmontonarts.ab.ca 


SEFIAC EC 


Hot, Fast-paced, Exciting, Girls on 


March 28 2009. Kingsway Hangar (11410 Kingsway) 


EDMONTON ARTS COUNCIL $10 Advance (available at Happy Harbour) $15 Door 
808, 10310 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, AB T5J 2W4 Doors at 6pm Game at 7pm 
(780) 424-2787 Prizes for fans in 70s costume 


www.edmontonarts.ab.ca/publicart www.e-villederby.com 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 ARTS 


rt 


Maris formula is showing 


fared directing. 
y Levin not at 


Fife, the man who hy 
n’s (Rudd) only real 
ea oiatechitd to 
> | OPENSFAI MAR 20 
= Eien B 
mplete with severa ! Mi 
_ worth of instruments and a designated — > | yiTF8YHANBUAG, LARRY LEI 
Peres : humourously blunt ely PAUL RUDD, JASON SEBEL, 
Dette es ne geraly meet Pane 


cruising a real estate open 
emma: looking for —_ grow just enough to not be considered 
‘ “complete wash-ups. 

___ Now, obviously, that’s a formula that 
works, and you certainly won't gener- 
ally find me kvetching about an Apa- 
tow-style comedy, but narrative 
comedy nevertheless relies on a certain 


Adapted from a 13th century ballad, 
Ingmar Bergman's The Virgin Spring ('60) 
is a bracing study in rape, revenge and 
repentance. Against Sweden's larger par- 
adigm shift from paganism to Christianity, 
we see Karin's transition from childhood 
to womanhood, a transition brutally inter- 
rupted. After discarding her body in the 
woods, Karin’s vagabond assailants take 
refuge in a nearby home—the home, it 
turns out, of Karin’s family. The parents 
learn of their daughter's fate and exact 
their wrath methodically and without 

See Itcould almost be a horror movie. 
a raven’s Last House on the Left 
7 ¢ 72), issued to coincide with the theatri- 

cally of the new remake, is itself a 
remake of The Virgin Spring, which serves 
_as a skeleton for something genuinely fresh 
and autonomous. Craven's Mari is, like 
Karin, pretty, somewhat spoiled, and bloom- 
ing into a woman. The cultural upheaval 
‘depicted here; however, is a sort of reversal 


unexpectedness, if not necessarily 
spontaneity; the most basic comedic 
formula in the world is to take a basic 
premise and flip it in such a way that 
the audience wouldn't expect, hopeful- 
ly in a clever or outrageous enough 
way that they react. And given that 
these Apatovian comedies tend to rely 
on a certain level of endearing outra- 
geousness—see the frank discussion of 
all things sex—starting to see how the 
punchlines are developing tends to 
take away some of their oomph. 


THAT'S MOST APPARENT in the first 


of 13th century Sweden, with Maris matu- 
rity coinciding with the sexual revolution 
and its movement away from Christian val- 
ues to neo-pagan ones. Craven accounts for 
the shadow side of this revolution by inject- 
ing elements of violence that vividly recall 
the Manson murders. 

Only a dozen years passed between The 
Virgin Spring and Last House on the Left, but 
moral standards went through their own sort 


of paradigm shift. Yet curiously, while Last 


House on the Left is perhaps more shocking 
than The Virgin Spring, it never reaches its 
predecessor's level of soul-chilling brutality. 
Craven skips Bergman's final sequence of 
repentance, opting instead for an abrupt 
ending signaled simply by the completion of 
the killing. Something's missing here, and 
you don't need to know The Virgin Spring to 
feel it. But this absence is itself indicative of 
something happening in Craven's post-hip- 
pie, teen-exploitation milieu. It’s a far 
sleazier, clumsier movie, and there's some- 
thing to that. It speaks to its age. 


HOWARD HAWKS’ western Aio Bravo ('58) 
drifts across the screen with a hugely 
pleasurable lack of urgency. The siege 


ASFF / 32 | aia) 


FILM CAPSULES / 33 


nny, the Judd Apatow way 


parts of J Love You, Man, before the 
sloppy charm of Rudd and Segel can 
work its magic. Opening with Peter 
proposing to his short-term girlfriend, 
Zooey (The Office's Rashida Jones), it 
pretty quickly gets to some ribald 
chatter, in the form of Zooey’s friends 
praising Peter’s willingness to go 
down on her. We soon find out that 
though Zooey has a gaggle of poten- 
tial bridesmaid’s, Peter’s never been 
much of a “friend guy,” and he 
embarks on a quest to find the perfect 
guy. Things pick up considerably by 
the “man date” montage: until this 


drama unfolds in long breaths, with a slow- 
building romantic subplot, a musical detour 
and a wealth of character development. 
Sheriff John T Chance has to fend off a 
troupe of well-equipped adversaries with 
only Dean Martin's boozer attempting 
recovery and Walter Brennan's cantanker- 
ous old cripple for deputies. Yet Chance 
fever seems too worried. He's John Wayne, 
and this is a movie about tough men ren- 
dered vulnerable yet incapable of self-pity. 
John Carpenter's Assault on Precinct 
13 ('76), which was remade a few years 
back and has recently been newly reissued 
in a special edition, is itself a remake. Its 
roots are not as obvious as Last House on 
the Lefts, but Carpenter's sense of indebt- 
edness is made clear from the opening 
credits that inform us the editor is some- 
one named John T Chance. The reconfigur- 
ing is more radical, with Rio Bravo's sleepy 
Texas town traded in for a Los Angeles 
ghetto, the band of outlaws replaced by an 
army of suicidally determined gang- 
bangers, and, most importantly, Hawk’s 
relaxed amble is forgone in favour of taut- 
ness and severity. Assault is a clipped, 
decidedly unfussy action movie, which 


OMAR 19-MAR 25,2008 (WKUTEWESG 


series comes along to liven things up, 
particularly a hilarious poker night 
Sequence with Jon Favreau, | Love 
You, Man seems in serious danger of 
lolling off into a crude-comic waste- 
land, trotting out two bush jokes and 
some gay humour without much life 

But then Segel shows up with a 
monologue about a potential farter, 
and things are nght where they should 
be, in comfortable buddy-comedy terri- 
tory. There isn’t really a whole lot in 
the way of engaging story here—a bit 
of tension emerges between Sydney 
and Zooey, but it’s never terribly seri- 
ous—but Segel and Rudd have a pretty 
natural chemistry, Segel as efferves- 
cent slacker and Rudd as a man so 
criminally uptight he can’t even give 
Sydney a proper nickname (or, in one 
of the film’s better running gags, do an 
impression that doesn’t sound like a 
leprechaun). They‘re helped by a pretty 
solid supporting cast, too: there’s a 
litany of comedic talent here—a lot of 
it pulled from UCB and SNL alum— 
especially Sarah Bums as Zooey’s des- 
perate single friend Hailey and JK 
Simmons as Peter's dad. 

For the laughs, though, this is thor- 
oughly in the Apatow mould, adding 
nothing if not necessarily taking away 
from the form. There are worse styles 
to take on, but enough imitators will 
turn anything into something as staid 
as a three-camera sitcom. v 


also makes direct nods to Sam Fuller—the 
child killing—and Akira Kurosawe—the 
silent waves of baddies closing in—while 
cementing Carpenter's particular directori- 
al voice. It's pretty terrific 

There are goofy, low-rent cop show 
aspects to Assault you'd never associate 
with a studio-backed, star-studded class-act 
like Rio Bravo: Carpenter's ninja-movie, all- 
synth score, the sometimes comy lines, ie: 
“There are no heroes any more; only men 
who follow orders.” Yet collectively, these 
elements brim with modest charisma and 
quiet individuality, traits perfectly in keeping 
with Hawks’ men and women. And Carpen- 
ter's insertion of a woman into the quartet of 
cornered, insufficiently armed heroes who 
must hold their own against the urban 
ambush is inspired, simultaneously main- 
taining a tough-talking, Hawksian spin on 
heterosexual courtship and infusing their 
dialogue with an active, modern female 
presence. Overall, Assau/twill never be con- 
fused with the classical majesty of Aio 
Bravo, but it's exemplary of another era and 
another approach to genre filmmaking, a 
paragon for anyone trying to breath new life 
into an old idea. w 


y pat 


Image consciousness 


~ ASFF gives young filmmakers a platform 


DAVID BERRY / david@vueweekly.com 

ew artforms demand the collab- 

oration of filmmaking. Writers 

and visual artists can sequester 
themselves in offices and studios and 
never involve the outside world until 
it's time to show a finished project, 
but even the barest-bone independent 
film needs a troupe to pull it off, and 
usually considerably more than that 
to get a quality finished project. 

It was in light of that fact that the U 
of A Society for Creative Filmmaking 
was born. Just into their fifth year, the 
society aims to bring together people 
from the university and surrounding 
area who interested in displaying their 
ideas and talents on the silver screen. 

“Membership is very open,” 


ANH 


In-depth business knowledge - plus the enterprise application 
software skills you'll need to put that knowledge to use on the 


job. That's what you can expect from NAIT's Bachelor of Business 
Administration in Enterprise Management. 


— | FAL MAR 20-SAT MAR 21 (7 PM) 
£2 | ALBERTA STU 
FILM FESTIVAL 
PRESENTED BY 
THEU OF A SOCIETY FOR CREATIVE FILMMAKING 
METRO CINEMA (9028 - 101A AVE) 


LECTURE BY JOSH MILLER SAT, MAR 21 (4:30 PM) 
MILWER LIBRARY (7 CHURCHILL SQ) 


explains Nathan Brown, current treas- 
ure and a member of the society since 
its founding. “It’s good to know 
actors, it’s good to know writers, it’s 
good to know editors. Films need a lot 
of people to make them work, so 
we're trying to bring people together.” 

Though that takes the form of regu- 
lar meetings and putting together 


E CA 
ES E 


Et 


The BBA degree delivers lots you might not expect, too: a choice 


of five concentrations, including Accounting, Finance, Marketing, 


Management, and Human Resource Management. Andthe _ 
flexibility to study how you want - full-time, part-time or online. 


JR Shaw School of Business - where leaders learn. 


nN 


teams to create films for 24- and 48- 
hour film fests put on by both FAVA 
and the Edmonton International Film 
Fest, their biggest project is the Alber- 
ta Student Film Fest, going up this 
weekend at Metro. Featuring 23 films 
from independent filmmakers across 
the province, as well as a workshop 
and several chances for the filmmak- 
ers to meet and talk with each other, 
Brown explains the fest is a crucial 
part of the society’s mandate. 

“We felt there was a lack of oppor- 


U 


BBA Information Session 
Thurs. April 9, 6:00 pm 
Shaw Theatre, 

NAIT Main Campus 


APPLY NOW. 


VISIT NAIT.CA/BBA OR CALL 780.471.8874. 
EDUCATION FOR THE REAL WORLD 


NAB 18 - MARS, 208, 


ert 


tunity for young Albertan filmmakers, 
so we wanted to fill that void, and 
provide a public venue for their work 
to be screened,” he says, “There's a 
lot of focus on getting the government 
to bring in other companies that 
aren't necessarily Alberta filmmakers 
to shoot here, but there isn’t a lot of 
support for the grassroots stuff that’s 
going on. We felt that this would be a 
step in the right direction for that.” 


AND THOUGH TIMES have changed 


PAUL RUDD 


even since the society's founding, in 
terms of both the means of filmmakin, 
becoming more democratized 3), 
more opportunities for up-and-cor)),, 
filmmakers to show off their wor} or 
sites like YouTube and Vimeo, 5; ., 
still feels a public event like the festiy.;) 
is crucial. Besides bringing filmma\ 
together, it provides a focus for ;, 
public that’s often lacking online 

“There's still something Unique 
about going to a theatre that you just 
don't get from watching it on YouTi, 
or something,” he says. “And beside 
those things can feel pretty clutter. 
everyone’s a filmmaker if you have 
webcam, but something like this re.) 
ly sort of distills that down and force 
people to pay more attention. yo), 
need time and effort to be good a 
your craft, and these people a, 
devoted to filmmaking.” w 


; > HANEKERING FO 
diy) NEW HORROR io 


a 


hy Brian Gibson 


THE Full s vi : ONLINE AT VUEWEEKLY COM 


JASON SEGEL 


“SMART INVENTIVE 


AND HILARIOUS. 


YOU'LL BE QUOTING IT FOR A LONG, LONG TIME’ 


Ben Lyons, AT THE MOVIES 


“ONE OF THE FUNNIEST 
MOVIES OF THE DECADE’ 


Steve Oldfield, FOX-TV 


STARTS FRIDA 


“THE SMARTEST 
COMEDY OF 
THE YEAR!” 


Liam Mayclerm, CBS-TV 


“IT’S THE 
REAL DEAL- 
A HILARIOUS, 
FOUL-MOUTHED, 
BIG-HEARTED 
SURPRISE’ 


CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES 
FOR LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES 


- SAVING LUNA 


AE PART 
| a SANE CASH 
| Ft ahel 


OMAR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 
A young child loses his family at sea. He 
swims to an agreeable community and is 
_ embraced. The government thinks he 
doesn’t belong there. They want to take 
him away. A custody battle of oceanic 
proportions ensues. No, this is not the 
Flian Gonzalez story. It's Saving Luna, 
the Luna story. A loving and loved orca 
that charmed some citizens of Nootka 


Sound, BC, and frustrated or enraged the 
rest. 

Marine biologists who tracked Luna's 
early life noticed that in the pod, he 
couldn't pick a mother, and switched 
between two unenthusiastic mama 
Orcas. As well, he was an independent 
player who enjoyed the company of boats 
over marine life, and petting by human 
hands over giant fins. 

After he ditches his pod, his sightings 
by local fisherman, paddlers and joy-ride 
boaters becomes the talk of the town. 
That's about when video journalist 
Michael Parfit and his wife Suzanne 
Chisholm show up. He was to spend 
three weeks documenting the toddler 


‘EXCEPTIONAL! 


A TERRIFIC FILM. SEE IT.’ 


eer mancemcz, AMIOVIES 


“qaRRIson FO 


peeve Hasna 


whale, but three years later Parfit is still 
by his side, day and night, protecting 
under the guise of filming. 

\f Parfit and Chisholm didn’t show up 
then, or left after their assignment's time- 
line expired, this would be an entirely dif- 
ferent doc. It would be made of 
retro-fitted talking heads and news 
footage, cheesy re-enactments and cross- 
fading newspaper clippings. But after the 
first time he pointed his camera at Luna 
and pressed record, Parfit began follow- 
ing him with stalker-like obsession. If 


Luna were a human, the filmmakers © 


would have been slapped with a restrain- 
ing order early. But, of course, many 
would accuse Luna with reciprocating the 


SAVING LUNA 


attention 

Luna's personality is real and therefore 
he’s the real hero of this movie. The expe- 
rience is all the more entrancing and, at 
times, heartbreaking because his person- 
ality is so rich. It's as crafted:as a charac- 
ter in a scripted film. Luna’s persona is a 
multidimensional one with his many 
charms and faults. He's social and playful, 
but he doesn’t know his limits and often 
puts his life and the lives of others in 
danger. He doesn’t know the difference 
between a canoe and an airboat, a cheer- 
ful child and a hateful fisherman, and 
that's when the custody battle rattles 

Should he get to stay and play, even 
though it will probably reduce his life 


expectancy? The government thinks not 
and try to sequester him into a distant 
pod. But if he didn’t like the Orcas 
before, why would he like them now? 
Considering his showboating, maybe an 
aquarium is the perfect place. But the 
Mowachaht band believe Luna is the 
reincarnation of their chief who passed 
just before the whale showed up—just 
after the chief said he'd return as an 
Orca. There’s no easy answers and Sav- 
ing Luna captures it all 

The doc, decorated with awards, earns 
it’s stripes through simplicity. All the 
drama and humour is there waiting for a 


CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE 


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CRRCHAGIY | paisints: MARCH 19 rk 


THE FILMS OF 


MICHAEL HANEKE PT2 


L 


TMS TD 
7 The Alberta 
‘Student Film 


Festival 2009 
FRIDAY « SATURDAY ar 7PM 


oA Sense a Vader 


Keach! Carson's font far the nebiral noel 
aod ker fypht to defosd it. 


es 


All Metro screenings are held at Zeidler Hall in the Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave. 
For more information, call 425-9212. or log on to www.metrocinema.org 


with the s rt of 


ED ie 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 


FILM CAPSULES 


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE 


camera, and Luna, most certainly, is not 
camera shy. 


NOW PLAYING 


THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
DIRECTED BY DENNIS ILIADIS 

WRITTEN BY CARL ELLSWORTH, ADAM ALLECA 
STARRING MONICA POTTER, GARRET DILLAHUNT 
kkk 


JONATHAN BUSCH / jonathan @vueweskly.com 

If you thought Slumdog Millionaire was 
life-affirming, you and the other girls 
around the water cooler ought to move on 
to something more refined. A horror pro- 
duction like The Last House on the 
Left, a grand-and gory investigation into 
the mutual human instinct for survival 
and revenge, is the kind of film that 
deserves to win Oscars, though it never 


GARNEAU 
theatre 


8712 - 109 Street - 455-0728 


» BLUE GOLD 


FRE WAR GER YOUR WATER IS ABOUT TO SERIT 


} ae {SHO OY SUNDAY MARCH 20 


1EET. EDMONTON 
780 429 1671 


FILM 


FAVACA # 


THE LAST HOUSE OM THE LIFE 


will. My silver lining on that cloud is 
when | leave the theatre after such a film 
ends, | feel better than everybody else for 
getting something that many asshead 
critics miss out on. It gives me the chills. 

The Last House on the Left is a pas- 
sionate retelling of Wes Craven's gritty 
1972 debut, closely knit to the original 
plotline but subversively conceived for 
the multiplex to scare the bejesus out of 
the white middle class. On his way to 
prison, trailer park bad guy Krug (Garret 
Dillahunt) trashes the police car and 
slaughters his escorts with a little help 
from his friends. Shortly after his escape, 
the Collingwood family arrives to their 
lakehouse hidden away at the back of the 
woods. Krug and his posse, which 
includes his moody lover Sadie (Riki Lind- 
home) and impish friend Francis (Aaron 
Paul), don’t appear to want to cause trou- 
ble, but when Krug’s nephew Justin 
invites 17-year-old Mari Collingwood 
(Sara Paxton) and her gal pal over to 
smoke a joint, they can’t risk not killing 
the young girls. 

While they're attempting to ice the 
kids in the woods, Mari’s parents Emma 
(Monica Potter) and John (Tony Goldwyn) 
enjoy a bottle of wine and the presump- 
tion that their daughter will return safely 
the next morning. Instead, Krug’s troupe 
of baddies arrive seeking shelter with 
claims of a traffic accident. Neither has 
any idea what the two families have in 
common—not until the daughter comes 
crawling home, almost dead. Enter shit 
left of fan. Kablooey. 

Craven and original Friday the 13th 
auteur Sean S Cunningham share a pro- 
ducing credit on Last House, packing a 
coarse wallop of inspiration behind Greek 
director Dennis Iliadis's marvelous vision 
of fear and torment. The appeal of 
Craven's original is its low-budget 
resourcefulness, while its 2009 successor 
reveres its grindhouse influence within an 
impressively mainstream project that 
boasts a superb script and intense per- 
formances (including Potter who, in one 
scene, uses her MILF-ish sexuality to 
save her own neck). The larger cash flow 
for its production is used to whittle far- 
ther down to the raw nerve, rather than a 


cosmetic teen picnic like last yo 
remake of Prom Night. Last fo, 
envelopes the viewer into a vile, pocs, 
nightmare somewhere betwee, ; , 
Texas Chainsaw Massacre ang j., 
Sweet Hereafter. 

“Well, | just don’t like violent movie 

Honey, you better start. 


MISS MARCH. 
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY ZACH CREGGEN, yy 
MOORE . 


STARRING CREGGAR, MOORE 
Oy 


JOSEF BRAUN / josof@vueweekly.com 

High school senior Eugene (Zach Crey 
gar) is afraid of sex, ostensibly bec 
his brother did it once, got syphilis, hy 
a “retarded” child and went crazy, Np 
ertheless, Eugene's girlfriend Cingj 
(Raquel Alessi) demands some action 
and the date’s set for prom night. Fo, 
some reason that might have actually 
been mildly interesting to explore 
Eugene and Cindi decide to lose the, 
virginity together in the master bedroon 
of a house where about 200 complete 
idiots whoop it up. 

One of those idiots is Eugene's best p 
Tucker (Trevor Moore), whose name, tyair 
cut and Hawaiian shirt should be enouct 
to tip you off to his being a total asshoic 
even before the scene where he stabs his 
epileptic girlfriend in the head for bitin 
his johnson while blowing him because 
he turned on a strobe fight. Tucker ets 
Eugene drunk and Eugene falls down the 
Stairs and goes into a coma for fou 
years. When he wakes up his gir! is gor 
and he’s still a virgin. The set-up, if nor 
the remaining story, is remarkably similar 
to that of The Dead Zone, but know 
what? Not as good. 

In fact, Miss March is just abou! 
the most detestable thing I've got 
paid to sit through in | don't know 


the screening | checked Metacrit 
and was comforted to see that Miss 
March received a total critical rating 
average of eight per cent, meaning 
“Extreme Dislike or Disgust." And fo 
a moment | felt a little closer to ™ 
fellow critics. Thanks Metacrit\: 
Miss March has two writer/dire 
tors—the film’s astounding! 
uncharismatic stars, as it turns ovut— 
yetas Hugh Hefner says during the 
deeply painful cameo, quality is mor 
important than quantity. Miss Marc! 
is not just badly written but over 
written. And slow. That means all 
that unfunny stuff lasts longer 
There's a scene in which a prosti- 
tute employed by a rapper named 
Horsedick.mpeg (Craig Robinson, the 
only even remotely funny person ! 
this movie), crafter of the hit singles 
“I'm Gonna Fuck a White Bitch” and 
“Suck My Dick While | Fuck That Ass 


UPCOMING EVENTS & CLASSES 


FINAL CUT PRO WORKSHOP 
with Perry Thomas 


Members $200 (+GST), 
Non-members $286 (+GST) 


March 26 7pm FREE EVENTI 


SPRING BREAK VID-CAMP 
March 30 - Apr 2 9am-4pm 
$199 (+GST) Ages 11-15yrs. 


March 21 & 22 9:30am-4:30pm 


VIDEO INSTALLATION RECEPTION 


lea Art FD viivigation a: 


FAVA fi 


FILM ax VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY: ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


es nothing in 


profoundly cynical 
, with a special layer 
ow, a pretty big word 
_ If it could have 
anaged to actually be amusing in 
me asinine way | wonder if I'd hate 
iss March less or more. 


AR MOUALLEM / omar@vueweekly.com 
eorge Bush doesn’t care about black 
eople, and kids doesn’t care about 
jot. The latter is according to Disney. 
5; at least that’s what is apparent in 
Race to Witch Mountain, which is 
more about a race than a mountain (not 
hat the mountain is in anyway signifi- 
snt; it’s just a finish line). It's a race 
etween two extraterrestrial teenagers 
nd some bad guys. Why the race? 
Who are the bad guys? Why are they 
acing to this mountain? What happens 
the ET kids lose or win? Not clear, 
not even relevant. 

All you need to know.is this: a UFO 
hot to Earth and visually human-teens 
named Sara and Seth (AnnaSophia 

Robb and Alexander Ludwig) emerged. 
fhey need to get somewhere untold, 
nd the cab driver that takes them 
there is former race car driver and mob- 
er Jack Bruno (Dwayne “The Rock” 
Johnson). Bruno's backstory isn't so 
much plot but just a comic device so 
that when the chase by ominous black 
SUVs ensues, he'll think it’s the compa- 
hy he used to keep that is after him, 
d not because there are two sweet- 
faced aliens in his back seat. 
No matter how much Johnson tries 
ith his character—and he does try 
hard, easily exceeding the standards 
bf acting demanded for a modern Dis- 
ley movie—he can’t salvage a shred 
f character believability. As if he is 
the extraterrestrial, his character 
sks no questions of these kids’ 
fange behaviours and the brouhaha 
hat follows. He's just there to pro- 
ect them and let his “gee-golly” con- 
lusion be the butt of some jokes. It's 
hot until after Seth and Sara lead him 
fough a secret room in a secret 
Ouse down a secret stairway and 


Nous cocoons store extra-secret GPS 
evices and they are attacked by an 
alien in the next-gen RoboCop suit 
hat he, finally, in Disney's favourite 
Parents just don’t understand” tone, 
sk, Just what is going on?” 
They're not from Earth. Case closed. 
Ne chase continues for another hour. 
But if you must know, halfway into 
; ‘(ch Mountain, writers Matt Lopez and 
ark Bomback did dedicate about three 
‘Wutes to explaining the shenanigans in 
ack-and-forth dialogue that has no fur- 
her effect on the plot. Amazingly, the 
" that’s laid gut then, in a scene so 
the score had to be amplified just to 
Se the audience's awareness, is far 
Nore interesting than all the meaningless 
Sol gadgets, effects and explosions that 
Script was written around. w 


any scenes — 


light into a secret jungle where gelat- - 


EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY 


499-5284 
ADAM'S RIB (PG) 
Mon 8:00 


CHABA THEATRE-JASPER 


6094 Connaught Dr, Jasper, 
780,852.4749 | 


WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
far eo” 

8:00 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse lan: ie) 
Fri-Sat 7:00, 9:15; Sun-Thu: B00" : 


| CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 | 


"130 Ave 50 St. 780.472.9779 
THE UNINVITED (144, frightening 
scenes) Fri -Sat 4:30, 9:55, 12:05; 
Sun-Thu 4:30, 9:55 
NEW IN TOWN (PG, coarse Ian- 
guage) Daily 1:10, 6:40 
INKHEART (PG, frightening 
scenes) Daily 1:45, 4:35, 710 
UNDERWORLD: RISE OF THE 
LYCANS (18A, gory scenes) 

Fri -Sat 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 9:50, 
Lee Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 


BRIDE WARS (PG) Fri-Sat 1:30, 
4:15, 7:15, 9:20, 11:35; Sun-Thu 
1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 9:20 
REVOLUTIONARY ROAD (14A, 
coarse language, mature themes) 
Fri -Sat 1:05, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30, 
11:55; Sun-Thu 1:05, 4:05, 6:50, 
9:30 
BEDTIME STORIES (G) Fri-Sat 
1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 9:40, 11:45; Sun- 
Thu 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 9:40 
MARLEY AND ME (PG) Fri-Sat 
1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35, 12:00; Sun- 
Thu 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35 
VALKYRIE (PG, violence, coarse 
language) Daily 9:25 
THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 
Daily 2:00, 4:30 
YES MAN (14A) Fri-Sat 1:55, 4:40, 
7:25, 10:00, 12:15; Sun-Thu 1:55, 
4:40, 7:25, 10:00 
GRAN TORINO (144A, language 
may offend) Fri -Sat 1:25, 4:10, 
7:00, 9:45, 12:10; Sun-Thu 1:25, 
4:10, 7:00, 9:45 
THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD 
STILL (PG) Fri-Sat 6:45, 9:15, 
11:25; Sun-Thu 6:45, 9:15 
BOLT (G) 
Daily 1:15, 4:00, 7:05, 9:30 
TWILIGHT (PG, violence) Fri -Sat 
1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40, 12:10; Sun- 
Thu 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40 
CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


14231 197th Avenue, 780.732.2236 


1 LOVE YOU, MAN (144, crude 
content, coarse BUatAae, 


No pees Fri-Tue, Thu 12:20, 
3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:40; Wed 5:30, 
8:00, 10:40; Star and Strollers 
Screening: No passes Wed 1:00 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse Jarquade) 
No passes Fri-Tue, Thu 12:50, 
8:50, 7:00, 10:00; Wed 3:50, 7:00, 
10:00; Star and Strollers Screening: 
No passes Wed 1:00 

KNOWING (144, violence, frighten- 


ing scenes) 
Daily 1:10, 4:10, 7:20, 10:20 
HAGE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


42:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 
goer ebaly 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 


THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
ruta! violence) 
Daily 2:00, 4:50, 7:45, 10:30 
MISS MARGH (184, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 
guage) Daily 4:45, 8:10, 10:35 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
gory scones} Daily 1:00, 2:30, 4:30, 
40, 8:45, 10:1 
ONE WEEK (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 1:50, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30 
JONAS BROTHERS: THE 3D 
CONCERT EXPERIENCE IN 
DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 
Daily 12:40 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) Daily 1:40 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content) 
Daily 12:45, 3:40, 6:30, 9:20 
CORALINE (PG, not recommend- 
ed for children, frightenin. 
scenes) Digital 3d Dally 2:45, 5:20, 


7:50, 10:25 


* TAKEN (14A, violence) 


Daity 1:30, 4:20, 6.45 9:00 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Daily 12:30, 2:50, 5:00, 7:30, 9:50 
GRAN TORINO (144, 

may offend) : eo 
1-20, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40 
METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA 
SONNAMBULA (Classification not 


available) Sat 11:00 
CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 


1625-99 St, 780.436.8595 
1 LOVE YOU, MAN (144, crude 
content, coarse language) 
No Fri-Wed 1:45, 5:00, 
7:30, 10:15; Thu 4:15, 7:30, 10:15; 
Star and Strollers Screening: No 
Passes Thu 1:00 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-Wed 12:00, 3:30, 
7,00, 9:50; Thu 3:45, 7:00, 9:50; 
Star and Strollers Screening: No 
passes Thu 1:00 
KNOWING (14A, violence, frighten- 
ing seenes) 
Daily 1:15, 4:45, 7:40, 10:30 
Ble TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


Oa 12:00, 1:30, 2:20, 4:15, 4:50, 
6:50, 7:25, 9:30, 9:55 

THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) 

Daily 1:00, 4:00, 7:45, 10:30 

MISS MARCH (184A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 


guage) 

laily 7:50, 10:20 

WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence, 
jory scenes) Daily 1:00, 2:00, 5:00, 
330, 9:00, 10:00 

ONE WEEK , coarse language) 

Daily 12:15, S30; 7:05, 9.45) ‘ 

FIRED UP (14A, coarse language) 

Daily 1:15 

THE INTERNATIONAL (14A, vio- 

lence) Fri-Tue, Thu 3:45, 7:10, 
10:10; Wed 3:45, 10:10 

CONFESSIONS OF A 

SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

Fri-Sun 1:30, 4:30, 6:55, 9:20; 

Mon-Thu 1:30, 6:55 

HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 

YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 

content) Fri Sun 12:30, 3:45, 7:20, 

10:15; Sat 4:00, 7:20, 10:15; Mon- 

Thu 3:45, 10:15 

CORALINE (PG, not recommend- 

ed for young children, fnghtening 

scenes) Digital 3d Daily 12:15, 

3:30, 6:35, 9:10 

TAKEN (14A, violence) 

Fri-Wed 12:45, 4:15, 6:40, 9:15; 

Thu 12:45, 4:15, 10:00 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 

Daily 12:45, 4:45 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 

violence) 

Daily 12:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:40 

METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA 

SONNAMBULA (Classification not 

available) Sat 11:00 

CRUEFEST (Classification not 


available) Thu 7:00 


10200-1402 Ave, 780.421.7020 
1 LOVE YOU, MAN (14A, crude 
content, coarse lanquage) 
aie Digital Daily 12:35, 3:10, 7:00, 
KNOWING (14A, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) 
Dolby Stereo Digital Daily 12:45, 
3:40, 6:40, 9:45 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
Bie Digital Daily 12:25, 3:30, 6:30, 


HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content) b 

Digital Presentation Daily 3:20 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 

A Pet teed Daily 12:55, 


WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 


ae 
Bre Digital Daily 12:15, 8:55, 7:30 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


re Digital Fri-Wed: 1:10, 3:50, 
mal 9:50; Thu 1:10, i 9:50 


4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP a 
ra eal 4:20; Sat-Sun 1:50, 
4: 

TAKEN (144A, violence) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; Sat- 


FILM 


Sun 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language} 
Fri, Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; ae 
Sun 12:50, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 

1 LOVE YOU, MAN (144A, crude 
content, coarse language) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:40, 7:10, 9:45; Sat- 
Sun 2:00, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 
KNOWING (14A, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:00, 6:45, 9:35; Sat- 
Sun 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:35 
TWILIGHT (PG, violence) 

No passes Fri 11:59; Sat 11:30 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 

Fr, Mon-Thu 3:45, 6:30, 9:20; Sat- 
Sun 1;00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:20 
CORALINE SD (PG, frightening 
scenes, not recommended for 

foung children) 

Ti, Mon-Thu 4:05, 6:35, 9:00; Sat- 
Sun 1:30, 4:05, 6:35, 9:00 
WATCHMEN (184A, brutal violence, 

lory scenes) 

i, Mon-Thu 4:10, 7:40; Sat-Sun 
12:40, 4:10, 7:40 
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 4:15, 6:55, 9:40; Sat- 
Sun 1:40, 4:15, 6:55, 9:40 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


) 
No passes Fri 4:30, 7:00, 9:25; No 
passes Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:30, 7:00, 
9:25; Mon-Thu 4:30, 7:00, 9:25 
MISS MARCH (8A, crude con- 
tent, séxual content, coarse lan- 


guage) 
DUGGAN CINEMA-CAMROSE 


660148 Ave, Camrose, 780.609.2144 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


(PG) 
Daily 7:05 9:05; Sat-Sun 2:05 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 


gory scenes) 

laily 7:30; Sat-Sun 1:45 
KNOWING (144, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) 

Daily 7:00 9:10 ; Sat-Sun 2:00 

| LOVE YOU, MAN (714A, crude 
content, coarse language) 

Daily 7:20 9:20; Sat-Sun 2:20 


DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 


Daily 6:55 9:15; Sat-Sun 1:55 
‘ GALAXY-SHERWOOD PARK 


2020 Sherwood Drive, 780.416.0150 
1 LOVE YOU, MAN (14A, crude 
content, coarse language) 
No passes Fri 4:40, 7:40, 10:20; 
Sat-Sun 12:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20; 
Mon-Thu 7:40, 10:20 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri 4:00, 6:50, 9:45; 
Sat-Sun 1:00, 4:00, 6:50, 9:45; 
Mon-Thu 6:50, 9:45 
KNOWING (174A, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) 
Fri 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Sat-Sun 
12:10, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Mon-Thu 
7:15, 10:15 
RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
(PG) Fri 4:10, 7:20, 9:50; Sat-Sun 
1:10, 4:10, 7:20, 9:50; Mon-Thu 
7:20, 9:50 
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scenes, sexual violence, 
brutal violence) Fri 4:20, 7:30, 
10:10; Sat-Sun 12:30, 4:20, 7:30, 
40:10; Mon-Thu 7:30, 10:10 
MISS MARCH (184A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 


guage) 

ri -Sun 3:50, 9:20; Mon-Thu 9:20 

WATCHMEN (138A, brutal violence, 
lory scenes) Fri 3:30, 7:00, 10:30; 

t-Sun 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30; 

Mon-Thu 8:00 

FIRED UP (14A, coarse language) 

Fri 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Sat-Sun 1:30, 

4:30, 7:10, 9:30; Mon-Thu 7:10, 

9:30 

TAKEN (14A, Mee 

Fri 3:45, 7:05, 10:00; Sat-Sun 

12:20, 3:45, 7:05, 10:00; Mon-Thu 

7:05, 10:00 

PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 6:40; Sat-Sun 1:20, 

6:40 

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (14A, 

violence) Fri 3:40, 6:45, 9:40; Sat- 

Sun 12:50, 3:40, 6:45, 9:40; Mon- 

Thu 6:45, 9:40 


= 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
eer 

Daily 6:50, 9:25; Sat-Sun 2:30 


BLUE GOLD (STC) 
Sun 12:01pm 


| __—sGRANDINTHEATRE THEATRE 


Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
‘St Albert, 780.458.9622 

Date of Issue only: Thu Mar 19 

CORALINE (PG, not recommend- 

ed for young children, frightening 


scenes) 
Fri, Mar 19: 1:00, 2:50, 4:45, 6:45 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 


violence) 

Thu, Mar 19; 1:45, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45 
HOTEL FOR DOGS (G) 

Thu Mar 19: 1:05, 3:00, 4:50, 7:00. 


"GRAN TORINO (14A, language 


may offen 
Thu Mar 19: 8:40 
PAUL BLART: MALL COP (PG) 
Thu Mar 19; 4:55 6:40 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 
py, scenes) 

ju Mar 19: No passes 1:20, 4:35, 
7:55 
FRIDAY THE 13TH (184, sexual 
content, gory scenes) 
Thu Mar 19: 8:55 
THE PINK PANTHER 2 (PG) 
Thu Mar 19: 1:10, 3:05, 8:30 


780.352.3922 
aor TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
fay 7:05, 9:20; Sat, Sun 1:05, 
3:20 


1 LOVE YOU, MAN (14A, crude 
content, coarse language) 

Daily 7:10, 9:20; Sat-Sun 1:10-3:20 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, 9:35; Sat-Sun 1:00, 
3:35 

KNOWING (14A, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) Daily 7:05, 9:30; Sat- 
Sun 1:05, 3:30 


METRO CINEMA 


9828-101A Ave, Citadel Theatre, 
780.425.9212 


ALBERTA STUDENT FILM 
FESTIVAL (STC) Fri, Sat 7:00 

A SENSE OF WONDER (STC) 
Sun 2:00 

THE SEVENTH CONTINENT 
(STC) Sun 7:00 

TIME OF THE WOLF (STC) 

Sun 9:00 

71 FRAGMENTS OF A 
CHRONOLOGY OF CHANCE 
(STC) Mon 7:00 

THE CASTLE (PG, coarse lan- 
guage) Mon 9:00 

CODE UNKNOWN (STC) Tue 8:00 
THE PIANO TEACHER [R, dis- 
turbing scenes) Wed 8:00 

CACHE (14A) Thu 7:00 

FUNNY GAMES US (144A, violence 
disturbing content) Thu 9:15 


PARKLAND CINEMA 7 


130 Century Crossing, Spnice Grove, 
780.972.2332, Serving Spruce Grove, 
‘Stony Plain; Parkland County 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse lanauage) 

Daily 7:00; 9:30; Sat, Sun, Tue 
1:06, 3:30; Movies For Mommies: 
Tue 1:00 

1 LOVE YOU, MAN (144, crude 
content, coarse language) 

Daily 7:05, 9:15; Sat, Sun, Tue 
1:05, 3:15 

KNOWING (14A, violence, frighten- 
ing scenes) 

Daily 6:55, 9:25; Sat, Sun, Tue 
12:55, 3:25 

RACE TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 


PG) 

6:45, 9:00; Sat, Sun, Tus 
12:45, 3:00 
WATCHMEN (18A, brutal violence, 


jory scenes) 
Baty 7:30; Sat, Sun, Tue 1:30 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144, 
violence) 
Daily 6:50, 9:20; Sat, Sun, Tue 
12:50, 3:20 
TAKEN (144A, violence) 
Daily 7:10, 9:05; Sat, 
1:10, 3:05 


10937-82 Ave, 780.433.0728 


ONE WEEK (PG, coarse rae 
Daily 6:50, oon Sat-Sun 2: 

THE WRESTLER (144A, sexual 
content, nudity, coarse language) 
Daily 9:10 


un, Tue 


SAVING LUNA (G) 
Daily 7:00; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:00 


SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM 
WEM, 8852-170 St. 780.444.2400 
1 LOVE YOU, MAN (744, crude 
content, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-Tus, Thu 1:20, 4:20, 
7:40, 10:20; Wed 4:20, 7:20, 
10:20; Star and Strollers Screening: 
No passes Wed 1:00 
DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-Tue, Thu 12:40, 
3:40, 6:45, 9:45; Wed 3:50, 6:45 
9:45; Star and Strollers Screening: 
No passes Wed 1:00 


KNOWING (144. violence, frighten- 


ing scenes) 
Daily 12:45, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 
eon TO WITCH MOUNTAIN 
Daily 12:10, 2:40, 5:00, 7:30, 10:10 
THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT 
(18A, gory scanes, sexual violence 
brutal violence) 
Fn, Sun-Thu 1:40, 4:40, 7:45, 
10:30; Sat 2:20, 4:45, 7:45, 10:30 
MISS MARCH (138A, crude con- 
tent, sexual content, coarse lan- 
juage) 
aily 1:50, 4:50, 7:50, 10:30 
CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 
Daily 1:00, 7:20 
HE'S JUST NOT THAT INTO 
YOU (PG, coarse language, sexual 
content) 
Fri -Tue, Thu 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 
9:50; Wed 12:50, 3:50, 9:50 
CORALINE 3D (PG, not recom- 
mended for young children, fnght- 
ening scenes) 
Digital 3d Fri, Sun-Thu 
6:40, 9:20; Sat 12:50, 
9:20 
PUSH (14A, violence) 
Daily 4:10, 10:15 
TAKEN (14A, violence) 
Fri-Wed 1:10, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40; Thu 
1:10, 4:30, 9:40 
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (144 
violence) 
Daily 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 
WATCHMEN (184, brutal violence 
jory scenes) 
aily 12:00, 4:00, 8:00 
WATCHMEN: THE IMAX 
EXPERIENCE (184, brutal vio- 
lence, gory scenes) 
Daily 2:30, 6:30, 10:00 
METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA 
SONNAMBULA (Classification not 
available) 
Sat 11:00 
CRUEFEST (Classification not 
available) 
Thu 7:00 


111 Ave. Grost Rd, 780.355.8725 
KNOWING (714A, violence, inghten- 
ing scenes) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 
7:15, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:55, 
7:15, 9:50 

DUPLICITY (PG, coarse language) 
DTS Digital 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:00, 9:35; Sat-Sun 
1:00, 3:35, 7:00,'9:35 
WATCHMEN (138A, brutal violence 


ore SCENES) 

TS Digital Fri, Mon-Thu 8:10; Sat- 
Sun 12:30, 4:10, 8:10 

THE READER (18A, sexual con- 
tent) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Fri, Tue-Wed 
6:35, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:45, 
6:35, 9:20; Mon, Thu 9:20 


WETASKIWIN CINEMAS 


780.352.9822 
1 LOVE YOU, MAN (144, crude 
content, coarse language) 
Daily 7:10, 9:20; Fn, Sat; Sun, Mon 
1:10-3:20 
WATCHMEN (i8A, brutal violence, 


gory scenes) 

i, Sat, Sun 6:40, 9:40; Mon-Thu 
7:15; Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon 3:30 
DUPLICITY (PG, Coarse languages) 
Daily 7:00, 9:35; Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon 
1:00, 3:35 

KNOWING (14A, violence, fighten- 


ing scenes) 
pe 7:05, 9:30; Fri, Sat, Sun,.Mon 
1:05, 3:30 


CONFESSIONS OF A 
SHOPAHOLIC (PG) 

Daily 6:55, 9:25; Fn, Sat, Sun, Mon 
12:55, 3:25 


MAR19-MAR25,208 wWursweexy 39° 


1. Neko Case - Middle Cyclone (ant) 

2. Buddy & Julie Miller - Written In Chalk (new west) 

3. Chris Issak - Mr. Lucky (reprise) 

4. Dan Auerbach — Keep It Hip (nonesuch) 

5. Justin Townes Earle - Midnight At The Movies (bloodshot) 

6. Propagandhi —- Supporting Caste (smaliman)  * 

7. Animal Collective - Merriweather Post Pavilion (domino) 

8. Deep Dark Woods — Winter Hours (black hen) 

9. M. Ward - Hold Time (merge) 

10. V/A- Dark Was The Night (4ad) 

11. Napalm Death - Time Waits For No Slave (century media) 
12. Brett Dennen - Hope For The Hopeless (dualtone) 

13, Elvis Perkins — In Dearland (x!) 

14. The Derek Trucks Band — Already Free (sony) 

15. Bugied Inside — Spoils Of Failure (relapse) 

16. A.C. Newman — Get Guilty (last gang) 

17. John Frusciante - The Empyrean (record collection) 

18. Andrew Bird — Noble Beast (fat possum) 

19. Willie Nelson & Asleep At The Whee! - Willie & The Wheel (bismeaux) 
20. Neil Young — Sugar Mountain: Live At Canterbury House (reprise) 
21. Bruce Springsteen — Working On A Dream (columbia) 

22. Geoff Bemer — Kiezmer Mongrels (jericho beach) 

23. Mark Olson & Gary Louris — Ready For The Flood (new west) 
24. Beast ~ Beast (universal) 

25. Jill Barber - Chances (outside) 

26. Kasey Chambers & Shane Nichols — Rattlin’ Bones (sugar hill) 
27. Passenger Action - S/T (smaliman) 

28. Combichrist - Today We Are All Demons (metropolis) 

29. William Elliott Whitmore - Animals In The Dark (anti) 

30. Southside Johnny — Grapefruit Moon (leroy records) 


WILLIAM ELLIOTT WHITMORE 
ANIMALS IN THE DARK 


William Elliott Whitmore naturally bridges 
the Americana music scene which 
embraces his sound and the Midwestern 
DIY rock movement which holds him as 
one of their own. His latest album ‘Animals 
in The Dark' is an expansive, cultivated 
sound, without losing any of the palpable 
soul that has garnered the 30 year old such 
critical acclaim. Beginning on October 
23rd, Whitmore sets out on tour with dark 
country rockers Murder By Death. 


MAKE SURE TO FRIEND US at MYSPACE. COM/MEGATUNESEOMOMTON 


10355 Whyte Ave. Shop online at megatunes.com 434-6342 


MAR 19 - MAR 25, 2009 


IMUSIC 


GUNTHER / 45 ESS: 


PLANTS AND ANIMALS / 46 (iG mm 
BEND SINISTER /49 [gP\ ‘=A 


| 


—< 


bh 


Shake your body, baby 


Geoff Berner’s Klezmer Mongrels inspires conga lines 


CAROLYN NIKODYM / carolyn@vueweekly.com 


en Geoff Berner released 
Klezmer Mongrels in January, 
he neatly tied up a trilogy of 


albums that began with 2005's Whiskey 
Rabbis and continued with 2007's Wed- 
ding Dance of the Widow Bride. 
Contained within the bars of romp- 
ing accordion music is a thesis that 


gets played out at every gig, where © 


drinking, discussing and dancing are 
not only a release, but also a way to 
come to terms with our differences. 

“The third record is supposed to 
be: knowing what you know about 
the world, if you really care to be 
aware politically and stuff, and real- 
ly confront the moral, the conclu- 
sion you have to draw from being 
politically aware is how can you be 
happy?” Berner says from his Van- 
couver home. “The answer goes 
back to the initial theme of drinking 
and valuing human weakness. But, 
like, doing it in a way where we all 
come together. And all the weak, 
fucked up people get together and 
have drinks in order to somewhat 
anesthetize themselves enough to 
stay functional and also to get over 
their worries about what everyone 
thinks about them and stuff like 
that. Once we've done that we can 
connect to each other and mutually 
support each other through our 
tough times and the tough knowl- 
edge that we carry. That’s what the 
record is about.” 

And when Berner took the album 
to Toronto earlier this year, he experi- 
enced a clear case of life imitating 
art—his art. Right there in a bar in a 
city known for its aloof audiences, a 
conga line formed and the folks were 
off their heads. 

“No word of a lie, it actually hap- 
pened,” Berner says. “And it really 
felt like a career high, getting a stuck 
up, standoff-ish Toronto-and-really- 
from-Scarborough audience up 
That's the root of the standoffishness 
in Toronto. Everybody is a bit wor- 
ried that everyone else is going to 
see through them. But they’re all 
feeling the same way, so if you just 
get them fueled up in the right way 
... | feel like it’s a sign that the work 
that I’m doing is setting the right 
social tone. If | can do that, make 
people feel happy and free enough 
to do a conga line in Toronto, then I 
think I'm on the right track.” 


ANYONE WHO KNOWS pBemer's music, 


however, knows that Klezmer Mon- 
grels has a lot more to say than “Can't 


MUSIC 


SAT, MAR 21 (8 PM) 


iu 
— 
=, | GEOFF BERNER 
coc | WITH BOB WISEMAN, DOUG HOVER 
CL | THEARTERY, $10 (ADVANCE), $13 (000A) 
we all just get along?” There is also an 
attack on our notions of authenticity. 
“In any style of music, there's this 
ber set of rules that define it perfect- 
ly, whether it’s klezmer music or 
country or Celtic,” he says. “Purity is 
the enemy of good art.” 
With this trilogy wrapped up, work 
has begun on a klezmer punk musi- 


Suppliod 


cal, and Berner has designs on de! 

ing deeper into his klezmer expe"! 
ment. After all, it has been workins 
for him. 

“The key principle is not to 
boring,” he says. “You just kind of 
have to get out there and ge! the 
hang of it, and if that’s your P! 
mary rule—I will not be borne” 
then after awhile, you get the hans 
of it. There are also second?!’ 
goals, but first off, you have ® 
responsibility to the audience "° 
to bore them." v 


It's not the years, it’s the mileage 


Serena Ryder explores her contradictions on /s It OK 


EDEN MUNRO / eden@vueweekly.com 

erena Ryder's last album—If 

Your Memory Serves You Well, a 

collection of songs by artists 
who have influenced her, topped off 
by a trio of originals—was released in 
2006. Her latest, Is It OK, saw its 
release in 2008. A couple of years 
really isn’t all that much time between 
albums these days—plenty of musi- 
cians can mun that up to three or four 
years without much trouble—but on 
record it sounds as though Ryder has 
travelled a lot of miles between the 
two albums, which she has, of course, 
rolling down highway after highway, 
playing gigs along the way. And on Is 
It OK she comes across as being a lit- 
tle more weary and wom, her soulful 
voice packing an even heavier punch 
than it did just two years ago. ‘In 
short, she sounds older. 

“That's ‘cause I am,” Ryder laughs 
loudly over the phone. “That's 
because | am. Time doesn’t exist by 
any means. It’s amazing how 10, 15 
years can happen in a year, ina 
month, you know? Life happens very 
fast sometimes and the last couple of 
years it's been very fast for me. I've 
experienced a lot of things in a very 
short period of time. I've had my heart 
busted a billion times, I've had many 
people in my life pass away in the last 
year that I was very close to. 

"There was a lot that was going 
on," she continues. “There was a lot 
of very concentrated living that hap- 
pened just in the last couple of years. 
Concentrated living, concentrated 
Sadness, concentrated joy. It’s been 
amazing, It’s been nothing short of a 
movie, and thank fucking God I can 
write songs, because what the hell 
else would | do?” 

For Ryder, songwriting is an ongo- 
'ng evolution; she believes that every- 
thing she does, every song that she 
writes, is a dot on the map leading 
her to the present moment. . 

‘It’s like the first song that I ever 
wrote, | wouldn't have created what I 
create right now without that fucking 
shitty song, you know?” she explains. 

And I think {that first song] is just as 
'mportant. There are tinier pieces to the 
bigger puzzle that exist for a reason.” 


As | WE, MAR 25 (6:20 Pl) 
= | SERENA RYDER 
Ee | Rava wooo 

2x | HOROWITZ THEATRE SOLO OUT 


Still, she points out that she would 
never intentionally sit down and work 
on a song that she didn’t feel was 
worth it at the time. 

“When I’m writing music I won’t 
write a shitty song in the moment—I'll 
keep writing until I think it’s good,” 


she says. “I thought that song was 
good when I was 13 years old—I 
thought it was great and maybe 
someone who is in the same place in 
their life as 1 was when I wrote that 
song would think it was great too.” 


ON THE NEW RECORD, Ryder’s thoughts 


were on letting herself write a record 
full of songs that she felt at home 
with. 

One thing that she wasn’t worried 
about was presenting conflicting feel- 
ings throughout the 13 tracks. 

“It was important for me to 
explore myself by doing this record 
and explore all the different parts of 
myself,” she explains. “People like 
to say there’s one-way that they 
define themselves—‘I would never 
do that,’ or ‘This is the kind of per- 
son that I am’—What do you mean? 
You're everything all the time and 
you're gonna change your mind and 
all of a sudden you're going to be a 
hypocrite because you changed 
your mind. And then if you don't 
change your mind you're an ass- 
hole, so there were a lot of skips 
and jumps and starts that happened 
with this record, and a lot of contra- 
dictory writing and a lot of contra- 
dictory messages, things like that, 
but I was just realizing that’s what 
humans are.” v 


GGOFF.BERNER 
BOB WISEMAN 


MAINSTREAM SUCCESS TOUR 


with Doug Hoyer 
at theARTery 


9533 Josper Avenue - entrance on 10}a Avenue 
Tickets $13 at the door, $10 in advance 


SATURDAY 


eas 


(megotunes, blackbyrd, listen, tix on the square) 


Doors al Spm. Show starts at pm sharp! 


MARCH 21 


AIBTHE 
SA TALE 


APRIL 19 
STARLITE ROOM 


ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10AM 


@BELIVENATION.com 
icheonester (7a 51-2008 


1 cen se Lae prc nt ee ed en 
2 seen chee wt ad 


modem 
myspace.com/mothermotherspace (vena 


ES MONO BS SIN SHE 
\ O60 Wow 


OULL Wes YOO NIV: 


"1003 "F1 Hlli Old Wu BALLOW 


WUEWEEXLY aa] 


MAR.19 - MAR 25,2009 


10551- 32 Avenue {Upstairs!} 
730-432-5053 


MONA 


SATURDAY MARCH 21 


woor ay remap: 


SRD IPD AMON, 


MARMH 92 


AVENUE THEATRE Camifex. Blind 
Witness, The Last Felony, in The Midst 
of « Murder, all ages, 7pm (doort $10 
{adv} at Mead Hall or Avenue Theatre, 
780.477.2149/$15 (door} 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ with 
Ronnie After Work hosted by Ron Rault 
every Thu and Fri 4-69 

BLUE CHAIR CAFE The Highway 3 
Roots Revue with John Wort Hanem 
{sing/songwriter), and friends Dave 
McCann and Leeroy Stagger: $15 


BLUES ON WHYTE Super Stack 


CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB Open 
stage hosted by Alberta Crude; 6-10pm. 
COAST TO COAST PUB AND GRILL 
Open mie at the pubs hip hop open mic 
every Thursday night with host Yak 
Dollaz 


(CROWN AND ANCHOR Vigalante 
Typewriter, Jezibelle; no cover 


DRUID Guitar heres 


DUSTER'S PUB Thursday open jam 
hosted by The Assassins of youth 
(blues/rockl: Spm; no cover 

DVB Open mic Thursdays 

ECO CAFE-VILLAGE AT PIGEON 
LAKE Open Mie Nights 1st and 3rd Thu 
avery month: 830-8:30pre 
Dpenmyo@deadmansslog.com 


MAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Open jar 
6:30pm 


HULBERT'S Lois Mullen: 8pm: $10 
{door} 


JAMBRERS PUB Thursday open jam. 
7-11pm 
J AND B BAR AND GRALL Open 


stage with the Poster Boys 
(pop/rock/blues), 8-30)pm-12:30am 


LB°S PUB Open jam with Ken 
Skoreyko; Som 


LIVE WIRE BAR AND GRELL Open 
Stage Thursdays with Gary Thémas 
LUCKY 13 TV Rock 9pm 

NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by Wild 
Rose Old Time Fiddlers 


RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players; 8pm 1am 


RIVER CREE Christ Hiatt. Cold Shot 


{Stevie Ray Veughn tribute) 
‘SECOND CUP_VARSCOMA 
Peggy Donnelly {accoustic/folk): 7-2pm 


ive music every Thursday night 
between 7pm and Spe 


Thereday Merch 1th 


‘STARLITE ROOM The Midway Stato, 
Envy, Parachute Penguin, no minors: 
Spm (door $12.50 at Unionevents.com, 
TicketMaster, Blackbyrd 


URBAN LOUNGE Kokanee Froeride 
Battle of the Bands: Rattlesnake 
Romeo, September Stone, Hostile Hero; 
Spm, 


WILD WEST SALOON Trick Ryder 


\WUNDERBAR Sates on the Praine: 
DU Choonz, OJ Stic, 1LYF and guests: 


$s 
DJS 
THU MAR 19 03S 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Escapack 
Entertairenent 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Big Rock 
Thursdays: DJs on 3 levels~Topwise 
Soundsystem spin Dub & Reggae in 
The Underdog 


BUDDY'S Wet underwear contest with 
Mia Fellow, madnight, DU 
WestCoastBabyDaddy 


EMPIRE BALLROOM [.) Judge Jules, 
Darin Epsilon, Tripnotie, Brian 
Jemieson, Clarence Leung: no miners, 
Spm (doork, $20 (adv. more at door 


FILTHY MeHASTY'S Punk Rock Bingo. 
with DJ SWAG. 


FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 
Requests with OU Damian 


GAS PUMP Ladies Nite: Top 40/dance 
with DJ Christian 


GINGUR SKY Urban Substance 
Thursdays: Elephant Man Tour with 
Invineeabie, Spyce, Touch It, Capone 


HALO Thursdays Fo Sho: with Allout 
Dis DJ Degree, Junior Brown 


KAS BAR Urban House: with DJ Mark 
Stevens; Spm 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish Thursdays: 
funky house/techno with DJ Colin 
Hargreaves, house/breeks with DJ 
Krazy K hardstyle/techno with DJ 
Dect, tect trance/eleetro wath OU 
Savage Garret; no minors; no cover 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Bingo at 
$30m followed by Eleetroshock 
Therapy with Dervish Naz Nomad and 
Plan B (electro, retro) 


ON THE ROCKS Salsaholic Thursdays: 
Danos lessons at 8pm; Salsa DJ to fol- 
low 


OVERTIME SOUTH Ratro to New 
classic rock, R&B, urban and dance 
with DU Mikee: Spm-Zarre no cover 


PLANET INDIGO-ST. ALBERT Hit it 
Thursdays: breaks, electro house spun 
with PI residents 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Metal Thurzday 
with orgS86 
STARLITE ROOM Music 1st and The 
Techno Hippy Crew: Bassnectar, Kush 
Arora, Shamik and quests; 8pm 


STOLU'S Dancehall, hip hop with DU 
Footnotes hostid by Elle Diy and 
‘every Thur no cover 
WW. NOTonous-events com 
TEMPLE Tainted Thuredsys: Electro 
Pop, Indie Rock and Roll 
Judge Jules Afterparty Thurs March 
18th!" on Thursday, March 19 at 
11:55pm. 


Y AFTERHOURS Juxige Jules 
Afterparty, 11:55pm, 


FAl 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Jirimy 
Whiten 


AVENUE THEATRE The Mackiigans 
(CD release), Forever and Never (CO 
release). The Weekend Kids, Letters To 
Elise, Farwell To The Sunset, Hostile 
Hero; all ages: 6:30pm {doorl; $8 
(hetore 730pm\/$10 {after 7:30pm} 


AMIS CAFE Megan Callan 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ with 
Ronnie After Work hosted by ion Raut 
every Thu and Fri 4-Gpm. 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE House Kats (roots/ 
country): $10 


BLUE QUILL COMMUNITY CENTRE 
11304 -25 Avenue 

Andrea House and Chris Smith 

Magic by Bian Lehr 

Doxs @ 600 

Show 630 - 810 

Adults $15, Children $5 


An evening of Music and Magic in 
Support af Brite Beginnings Earty 
Learning and Childcare Centre's 
Summer Program 


BLUES ON WHYTE Wild T and the 
Spirit, Bending the Fender 


BRD BAR harden Sphere, Drum and 
Bell Tower, Electricheacy Spm (dork 
$10 (door) 


BROOKLYN'S Needles to Vinyl (CD 
release party), Yes Nice 


CAFFREY'S IRISH HOUSE Red House 
{blues/R&BI, Spm 


(CARROT Live music Fridays: 
Phyllis Sinclair (folkt all ages: 7:30- 
9:30pm: $5 {door} 


CASINO EDMONTON The Rum 
Brothers (shovtard) 


CASING YELLOWHEAD Souled Out 
{pop/rock} 


(CENTURY CASINO Trooper, 
‘$34. 5344.55 at TicketMaster 


COAST TO COAST Open Stage every 
Sopot Tet Lond Bioy at 


DVS TAVERN Live music every Fri, 
Some $S 


EDDIE SHORTS The Laker Band (origi 
‘nal rok “r rol)) 


EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Tali 
Kwali (hip hop): 8pm; $35.90 
ladult/$47.25 (sidestaga) at 
TickatMiaster 


FESTIVAL PLACE Tiller’s Folly (Coltic, 
acoustic roots 7:30pm; Cabaret 
Seating: $36 (tableV$34 (bax) /S30(tha? 
‘atre) at Festival Place box office 


FRESH START CAFE Live music 
Fridays: Randall MacDonald and Charlo 
Austin: Spc $5 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Neil Young 
Tritute: Kit Johnson: 8pm, 


HULBERT'S Mike Sadava, 8pm; $10 
(door) 


HYDEAWAY All ages ant space: Kisses 
ot Fire (CD retease), Thighs, Seaverse, 
Likewise Vultures; 7:30pm 


IRISH CLUB Jam session: 8pm; no 
cover 


IVORY CLUB Duelling piano show 
with Jesse, Shana, Tiffany and Erik and 


Quests 
SEFFREY'S Krystle Dos Santos (R&B 
Singer) and her band; $15 


JEXYLL AND HYDE (PUB) Every 
Friday: Headwind (classic pop/rock: 
Spx no cover 


KINGSWAY LEGION Sidestep 


(LBS PUB Simon Fisk's Stuctures 
Ensemble; }0pm-Tariy $10 


LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR Ariane 
Mahryke Lemire {listening party 9- 
10pm 

NAKED ON JASPER The Busker’s 
Balk: The Andy Northrup Trio, Thus Enc 
Johnson Band, Emie Gambler, Torn 
loschkoy, Kelly Pilaula. Daniel Moir, Roby 
Taylor, Bill Carley, Lex Mekie (MC) the 
Busker's Ball art gallery; 6:30pm, bene- 
fit for the Parkand Institute, 

www buskersball.ca 


NORWOOD LEGION Uptown Folk 
Club: Open stage; 7pm (door), 7:20pm 
(music): $4 {door non-member\/free 
{member} 


ON THE ROCKS The Mishaps 
180 DEGREES Sexy Friday nightevery 
Friday 


PALACE CASINO (WEM) Slowbum 
(blues/roots); Spm-Tam 


PAWN SHOP Subcity Dwallers, 40 
Thieves, The Old Wives; Spm 


RED PIANO-PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the Red 
Piano Players; Spm-2am. 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Quietus. Evilosity, 
Death Toll Rising 


RIVER CREE Christ Hiatt, Cold Shot 


(Stevie Ray Vaughn tritute) 


‘STARLITE ROOM Pin, 
Raptors, Spm (door) $14 wt 6 
Listen, TicketMaster, unicnevent 


nd Ani 


STEEPS—-OLD GLENORA 
Mase Friday Kristin): os 
TMpen 


8:3010:30pm, aa 


TOWERS-GRANT 
CAMPUS PUB Miusx | 
Weekentt Souljah Fyan 
$10 [advV/S12 (door) 


URBAN LOUNGE Clos 11 
Spe $5 


WHISTLESTOP Nr (ci 
{blues/roots| 9:30pm 1 
WILD WEST SALOON jj). 
WUNDERBAR As the loo Mos 
Axss Group, Mike Evers, Ey 


Himikn, Gautam Karnik, Dorwo } 
Everything Nicks. Cory Sman 2 


John Speam, quests {electro sco.: 


folk Toots Caltic Canadians: ror) 


{door procaeds to Amnesty 
Intemational 


YARDBIRD SUITE Hor A\: 
Tommy Basis: Bor (doory/9ern | 
$20 {member/$24 (quest) at 
TicketMaster 


== 
FALMAR 29 CLASSICAL 


MUTTART BALL Chora)ti 
Spotlight Concert: 72m. § 


720 488.7454, dore 
: CHURCH 


McDOUGALL UNITED 
Choratfest Jace The Alberta ( 
Federation, Sith Wave. !-2crr 
{agunYS15 (student/senior) at 
the Square 

WINSPEAR CENTRE fi 
Cirque de la Symphonie: Erno 
Symphony Orchestra; 8pm: § 
Winspear box office: Fri 

Grant Masckwan Jazz Combo 
performing in the lobby, 7:1 


DUS 
—. 
BANK ULTRA LOUNGE ( 


Fridays: 91.7 The Bounce 
Delano, Luke Morrison 


BAR-B-BAR DJ James: 
BAR WILD Bar Wild Frc: 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE |; 
Spin Wooftop and Main Flor 
Jpms with Nevine~indie, sc 
new wave, electro: Underd: 
Perverted Fridays: Punk and St 
the ‘60s 70s and % 
BOOTS Retro Diso 


BUDOY'S We made ‘em far 
Exidy Toonflash, come early « 
Tineup, no cover before 10¢ 


CHROME LOUNGE Piatinu 
Fridays 

EMPIRE BALLROOM fcc. | 
house, mash up; no minor 


ESMERELDA'S Ezies Freakin 
Fridays: Pfaying the best in o 


Nestr 


FUNKY BUDDHA (WHYTE AVE) 


tracks, rock, retro with DD 


GAS PUMP Top 4/dance wt 
Christian 


HALD Mod Chub: indie rock 
Brit pop, and "60s soul with DJ 
Jay, DU Travy D; no cover bef 


WEM Phase lit 


St Wet 


10081 Jasper Ave, 780.969. 


COACH/TOUCH OF CLASS 11727 Kingowe 
TO COAST PUB AND GRILL 5552 Calc: 


780,990,0680 * FRESH START CAFE Ri 
780,913.4312/780.953.3806 * HALO 105. 


VENUE GUIDE 


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erbend Sq. 780.433.9623 * FUNKY BUDDHA 1024-82 Ave, 780.433.9676 * GAS PUMP 1016-114 St, 780.488.4841 * GINGUR SKY 15505-118 Ave 
423,HALO * HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 151204 (basement), Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.6010 * HILLTOP. PUB 220-106 Ave, 

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106 16-82 Awe, 780.414.6766 © 180 DEGREES 10730-107 St, 780.414.0233 * ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Avo, 780.482.4767 * OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 10304-11) St, 780.423.1643 * 
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fwe * SAWMILL BANQUET CENTRE 2840-76 Ave * SECOND CUP-STANLEY MILNER UBRARY 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq * SECOND CUP 12336-102nd Ave » SECOND CUP-124 STREET 
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Ae, SUAIbert, 780.458.0860 * UNION HALL Argyil 99 St, 780.702.2582 * URIBAN LOUNGE 10544-52 Ave, 780.4377699 * WHISTLESTOP 12416-132 Ave, 780.451 5508 « WHITEMUD 
CROSSING LIBRARY 4211-106 Si, 780.496.1822 « WILD WEST SALOON 1251250 St. 780.476.3383 * WUNDERBAR 6120-101 St, 780.496.2286 * K WRECKS 93 Ave, SO St, 780 466 806° 
* Y AFTERHOURS 10078-102 St. 780.994.3256, www.yatterhours.com * VESTERDAYS PUB 112. 205 Camegw Dr St Albert, 780.459.0295 


Jasper Ave, 7 


* ALBERTA AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTRE 9210-118 Ave * ARTERY 9535 Jesper Ave * ATLANTIC TRAP 
AND GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611 * AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 + BANK 
ULTRA LOUNGE 107685 Jasper Ave, 780 420.9088 = BERNARD SNELL AUDITORIUM Foyer, Walter 
Mackenzie, Health Sciences Centre, U'of A * BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Continental inn, 16625 Stony Pian Ro. 
780.484.7751 * BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 « BLUE CHAIR CAFE 962-75 


SNenay Waid. 


ae -5. 4m 


MAR 25, 2009 


MUSIC 


MALEW i 


Is that a Carrot in your pocket? 


\'m not a social engineer. | believe in the 
carrot over the stick. | believe that 
rewarding people for good behaviour 


And the great majority had second jobs 
‘Musician’ is quickly becoming less than a 
profession; it is becoming a hobby.” 
Finkelstein: “Canadians are among the 
most egregious offenders when it comes 
to downloading unauthorized materials 
from the Internet. For each file purchased 
online, at least 20 are downloaded from 
unauthorized sources. This means that lit- 


how an agency can regulate a global net- 
work with no physical boundaries—all 
within a shrinking government budget— 
I'l be impressed. Maybe there's magic 
involved. 

So, how do we entice a generation of 
kids, who have become used to file-shar- 
ing? And, remember that the older offend- 
ers see their indiscretions as just desserts 


works better than punishing them forbad erally billions of files fly around the Cana- _for a record industry that used to charge 
behaviour. dian internet annually, eroding the more than $20 a CD. We all remember 
This week, | had the chance to peruse legitimate sales base by flooding the _ paying more than $30 for an import disc, or 


a presentation that Duncan McKie, Presi- 
dent and CEO of the Canadian Indepen- 
dent Record Production Association, and 
Bernie Finkelstein, Chair of CIRPA, recent- 
\y gave to CRTC in Gatineau, OC. 
Basically, the discussion had to do 
with Canadians, the music industry and 
new media. But, in their presentation, the 
pair gave up some factoids that make for 
some interesting food for thought. 
Finkelstein: “Our domestic company 
revenues in Canada have dropped from 
20 per cent of a $1.5 billion market 10 
years ago to 25 per of a $600 million mar- 
ket taday, a net loss of approximately 
$150 million per year, despite the small 
five per cent gain in market share.” 
McKie: “Shockingly, it was found that 
among unionized musicians less than 10 per 
cent had 30 hours of work in a typical week, 
and the net annual earnings from music of 
Canadian musicians were just over $18 000. 
One third had no work at all as musicians. 


market with free files.” 


SO, IF CANADIANS are such brutal 
offenders, what can be done? | under- 
Stand government is quickly running out 
of money, so finding the means to enforce 
file-sharing bans is, well, realistically 
unworkable. 

What needs to be done is a targeting 
of the worst offenders—and not with 
promises of tougher punishments and 
new, stiffer regulations. 

According to a 2005 Pollara survey, 
Canadians between 12 - 24 years of age 
are responsible for 78 per cent of the ille- 
gal downloads in the country. 

Prosecuting teens is pointless; after 
all, there are laws in place to protect 
those under 18 from being tried in adult 
court. The industry needs carrots. 

As for the CRTC, regulating the Inter- 
net is, well, pointless. When you get back 
to me with some kind of framework on 


seeing a $22.99 tag on a new disc. While 
those days are over, there's still a feeling 
out there that people are getting payback 
for the prices paid before. 

Box sets with cool packaging aren't 
enough. How about real loyalty pro- 
grams? If Users download enough tracks 
through iTunes or other legitimate 
sources from the same record label or 
artist, why not give them free downloads, 
access to cheaper concert tickets and 
merch? 

Other businesses in these bad times 
are finding more and more ways to add 
value to their products, and to make con- 
sumers’ dollars go further. Instead of get- 
ting mad, labels need to do more than 
simply tell downloaders to take the moral 
high ground. It needs more carrots. w 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chief 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and author 
living in Toronto. 


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ARTERY Geoff Barner, Bob Wiseman, | by Sally Krackers: 3pm fa ray ee ret 
Boug Hoyer; 8pm (door), 9pm (show): ‘STARLITE ROOM Local Showcase aturdays with To 

$13 (door/S10 (ach) at Megatunes, eet ee with Keep 6, Laoswing, Taking SEWuit sammtnaie 
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‘Cleanse Kill, Questions for the Sniper, 
‘Shattered Suns, Desecrate the Gods: 


featuring jazz ios the Ist Saturday 
each monty: this morith: The Don 


{blues/roots) 9:30pm-1:30am, no cover 


RED STAR Ssturiays indie rock. hip 


Urban 


lounge 


THU //MIAR 19) MOKANEE FREERIDE BATTLE OF THE BANDS, Wi 


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