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46 New Sounds 
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48 Free Will Astrology 
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SCOTT HARRIS 
// SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ell, that's that. On the second 

day of the Liberal Party of Cana 
da's caucus retreat in Sudbury, Liberal 
Leader Michael Ignatieff put an end to 
rampant speculation and hollow politi- 
cal talk on all sides about "principles" 
and “what's good for Canadians," tell- 
ing the assembled party faithful that 
he is ready to pull the plug on Stephen 
Harper's minority government when 
Parliament resumes. 

“After four years of drift, four years of 
denial, four years of division and dis- 
cord—Mr. Harper, your time is up,” Ig- 
natieff said to cheers during his speech at 
the three-day retreat. “The Liberal Party 
cannot support this government any fur- 
ther. We will hold it to account. We will 
oppose it in Parliament.” 

The strong talk from Ignatieff comes 
less than a year after the last federal elec- 
tion, and less than four since Stephen 
Harper first moved into 24 Sussex Drive 
following the 2006 contest. It also comes 
just a week after NDP Leader Jack Layton 
walked away from a brief and fruitless at- 
tempt at finding common ground with 
Harper, saying the NDP has a "very fun- 
damental difference with the direction 
that they are taking the country.” 


Better than summer 


What it all means is that barring any 
unforeseen movement—or, presum- 
ably, a series of disastrous new polls 
for one of the three main opposition 
parties—Canadians look headed for a 
not-entirely-unexpected fall election 
sometime in November. Of course, with 
coalition threats, hastened leadership 
contests and the Conservative's $70 bil- 
lion in vote-buying announcements 
since October, we've essentially been in 
an election cycle the entire time. 

There's no doubt that Canadians— 
even the 59 percent who bothered to 
show up last time—really don’t want 
another election, but what's more clear 
is that all parties in the House, especial- 
ly the governing party, need to reorient 
to the new reality of minority Parlia- 
ments lest the country stay trapped 
on this particular hamster wheel for a 
long time. It's not that minorities can't 
work—they do in countries around the 
world, and have in Canada—but they 
require parties to move in precisely the 
opposite direction from the increasing- 
ly cheap, attacking, partisan direction 
they've been drifting of late. Keeping 
any one party from having 100 percent 
of the power is clearly the desire of Ca- 
nadians, which means our “leaders” 
need to find a way to make it work. It's 
called democracy, boys. W 


AUCSEVO EAE PUES 


ISSUE N°. 724 // SEP 3 - SEP 9, 2009 // AVAILABLE AT OVER 1400 LOCATIONS 


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CONTRIBUTORS Mike Angus, Rob B ¢ Dyer, Michael 
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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 ~ SEP 9, 2009 


GRASDAL'S VUE 


es 
cn , 


TIME FOR CONCERN. 


THE NORWAY RAT 


Co: 


ease eeeeeeeeeees . 


Dyer Straight 


A FALL ELECTION 


TUTTLE LCL LECCE CE TLCS LCEOO LOO CLOT OT CUCOT UOT MEUTCLUNTTEOT OTTO NOUN EEO EU UO 


Letters 


: YOU'RE THE BUTTHEAD 


Ithough Scott Harris is quick to call 
@ person who discards cigarette 


: butts on public streets a "moron" below 
: the "mental capacity” of “the average 
: head of cattle," his own grasp of reality 
: appears somewhat tenuous ("No butts 
: aboutit," Aug 13 - Aug 19, 2009). Smok- 
: ersare more diverse than that label sug- 
: gests, but I imagine a lot of them share 


my motivations for not caring where 


; my cigarette butt ends up: treat me like 


an animal (or less than one), and I'll act 
like one. Does he actually think that 
his patronizing remarks will make the 


: practice less likely? My initial reaction 
: to his op-ed was to have a smoke and 
: throw my butt right ... um, actually, I 
: forget where it was. 


Years ago, Alberta decided to deal 


: with "the smoking program” in its 
: favourite soft-fascist fashion; by in- 
: voking the heavy hand of the law, but- 
: tressed by a bourgeois morality, an ide- 
: ology of healthism, and a strong dose 
: of Christian puritanism thrown in for 
: good measure. That this likely would 
: not achieve the official goal of reducing 
: smoking and would create other prob- 
: lems was expected by anyone familiar 


with the history of prohibition, espe- 


: cially considering that smoking is of- 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, whether critical or complimentary. Send your opinion by mail (Vue Weekly, 
10303 - 108 Street, Edmonton AB TsJ 117), by fax (780.426.2889) or by email (letters@vueweekly.com). Preference 
is given to feedback about articles in Vue Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. 


ten an act of rebellion in the first place. 
From the outset the accumulation of 
smoking-related litter on the streets 
was obvious to anyone who bothered to 
pay attention, but the moral right were 
seemingly too preoccupied devising 
additional prohibitionary measures to 
notice. Now the supposed solution is 
to devise still further laws that target 
smokers. That'll learn ‘em. 

Far from being an "easily enforceable 
bylaw," it could only have a substantial 
effect if we move 'closer to a panop- 
tic society, while largely ignoring the 
other officially estimated two-thirds 
of "small litter," not to mention all that 
"large litter.” (Is it just me, or does the 
city audit categorization seem tailor- 
made for government action on ciga- 
rette litter?) When this tactic funda- 
mentally fails, or creates still further 
problems and additional legal mea- 
sures ensue, count me as one who said 
I told you so. 

Incidentally, while every culture cer- 
tainly has norms of purity and pollu- 
tion, it’s doubtful that the specific ones 
Harris is concerned with are “univer- 
sally accepted." The mere fact that there 
are people who feel as I do suggests that 
they aren't even consensual on this par- 
ticular plot of the planet. Even a cow 
could figure that much out! 

Ted Hermary 


On behalf of the staff and 
writers, Vue Weekly would 
like to express its sincere 
condolences to the fam- 
ily and friends of Gordon 
Morash, who passed away 
on August 28. Thank you, 
Gordon, for your passionate 
writing and your enticing de- 
scriptions of this city's food 
scene. Your contributions 
will be sorely missed. 


oD hes 


has gobbled up and consolidated small 
4 farms, and drawn by the lure of 

educational and career oppor- 
tunities and a more cosmopolitan life- 
style, generations of Albertans have left 
behind life on the farm and headed to 
the bright lights of the city. 

Of the province's 3.3 million people 
more than 82 percent now live in cit- 
ies, according to 2006 Statistics Canada 
numbers. Of the remaining rural popu- 
lation fewer than 25 percent—just over 
155 000 Albertans—now live on farms, 
representing less than five percent of the 
total provincial population. It's a far cry 
from the heyday of the farming-domi- 
nated provincial economy which existed 
before oil was struck at Leduc No. 1 in 
1947. In 1931 more than half the province 
belonged to farming families, meaning 
that in a single lifetime the province has 
shifted from one in two Albertans living 
on farms to less than one in 20. Around 
half of those remaining no longer make 
their living producing food, choosing in- 

to work off-farm. 
But with increasing awareness about 
a range of pressing issues, from climate 
change to peak oil, pesticides to food 

- safety, more and more Albertans are be- 
ginning to ask themselves where their 
food comes from, how it is produced 
and are taking an interest in growing 
more of it themselves. Community gar- 
dens, farmers’ markets, community- 
supported agriculture programs and or- 
ganic foods are all soaring in popularity. 
Some young people are even starting to 
go against this decades-long trend ofthe 
grain drain by trading in their urban life- 
styles and heading back to rural Alberta 
to make their living producing food. 


It's an choice that appeals to Michael 
Hunter. After moving to Edmonton 
four years ago, doing what he calls "typ- 
ical living-in-the-city activities," the 
36-year-old and his wife, Beth, began 
making an effort to learn more about 
the food they were eating. 

"Beth and I were both getting increas- 
ingly concerned with issues of food secu- 
rity, reading and watching documentary 
films about food security,” he explains. 
“We were also making long-term plans 
for having a family and were realizing 
that the path we were on was not going 
to be a sustainable one to leave to the 
next generation. So we decided to start 
looking into changing our lifestyle." 

That exploration led the couple to 
discover a new pilot program in the 
province—the Alberta Sustainable 
Agriculture Apprenticeship Program 
(ASAAP)—that aims to connect young 
people like Hunter who are interested 
in sustainable agriculture with farms 
and farmers who are willing to offer 
them seasonal apprenticeship posi- 
tions to helpthemlearn the ropes. — 

"The underlying goal of the program, 


oni ticeship program gives city slickers first-hand 


really, is to provide people with the 
hands-on experiential knowledge that 
they need in order to make an educated 
decision as to whether they want to go 
into a form of sustainable agriculture as 
a career choice," explains Becky Lipton, 
the program's coordinator. "It got start- 
ed last winter because I saw that there 
was a lack of infrastructural support for 
people who were interested in getting 
into sustainable agriculture, whether 
it's someone who doesn't come from a 
farming background or someone who 
is interested in transitioning over from 
some type of conventional agriculture 
who didn't have a background in organ- 
ies or the high-value niche products.” 

Lipton's perceived need led to conversa- 
tions with some farmers she knew in the 
Edmonton and Peace regions who were 
focused on sustainable practices—organ- 
ic growing, free-range and grass fed live- 
stock, niche products, direct-to-market 
selling—and were willing to share their 
knowledge with a new generation of po- 
tential farmers. 

In the pilot season 10 farms signed up 
to take on apprentices for full-season 
placements—which Lipton stresses is 
necessary to really geta sense ofthe true 
experience of running a farm—and pay 
them a combination of a stipend and 
room and board in exchange for their 
labour. In the end five apprentices were 
placed in the Peace region and three 
near Edmonton, including Hunter. 

"Twas making plans about what I was 
going to do with my summer and this 
came up,” he says. "We decided that it 
was important enough that I'd make 
less money, but get some important 


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experience in learning how to grow 
food, essentially." 

Beginning in May Hunter started spend- 
ing three days a week at the Inspired Mar- 
ket Gardens, a small operation based on 
a 160-acre family farm near Carvel, just 
outside Stony Plain, which focuses on 
growing and marketing herbs and edible 
flowers. It has been, Hunter says, an eye- 
opening experience. 

"I was very overwhelmed when I 
first started. It was a very steep learn- 
ing curve for me just in terms of plant 
identification, never mind learning 
anything about how to grow them,” he 
laughs. "Things just seem to progress 
very, very quickly; I take a couple of 
days offand come back out here and see 
how fast things are growing, so just be- 
coming more aware very quickly of how 
much of an ongoing effort it is to run 
an operation. Someone has to be here 
all the time, there's always things that 
have to be observed and maintained. 

"I had an appreciation already, sort of 
conceptually, how hard itis to make a liv- 
ing growing food,” he continues, "but to 
actually have a hands-on experience of 
how quickly things change and how you 
have to be able to adapt to those changes 
really brought it home and made me real- 
ize why farmers are so tied to their land.” 

Despite the challenges of absorbing as 
much knowledge as he can and work- 
ing long hours, Hunter says there are 
many upsides, too. 

"Tye never felt more comfortable in 
any working environment,” he says. 
"The sounds, the smells, the sights— 
you just feel better about your place 
in the world, I think, when you're sur- 


wa - 


reenhouses //Supplied 


rounded by a more natural surround- 
ing and not having to breathe in fumes 
all day. So it's done very good things for 
my mental and physical health; I feel a 
lot more at peace with myself.” 

It's a sentiment that's echoed by 26- 
year-old Jordan Wilson, aself-confessed 
city boy who has been apprenticing on 
Sunworks Farm, a certified organic 
poultry and livestock farm north of 
Camrose, since mid-May in preparation 
to move with his fiancée Megan to her 
family's farm near Ardrossan 

"None of it has been particularly easy,” 
he admits. “It's been a huge shift for me 
because I grew up in Edmonton; for 25 
years I've been living there and sudden- 
ly moving out to a farm an hour away 
froma major city was a major change for 
me, but I've learned so much and grown 
so much that it’s been fabulous.” 

But, he admits, it's not easy. 

"The work is never done. There's always 
more to do out there. More than anything 
it's getting the stuff done in a day you 
have to do, and then once you've got that 
stuff done it’s a matter of seeing what is 
the other stuff, the other projects that 
we're working on and how much of that 
can I get done before I'm at a place where 
I can't work anymore,” he laughs. “But 
the work that you're doing out here is way 
more important than anything else that's 
going on, so you're focusing on the work 
and you want to be out there, because 
that's what's important. I didn’t have that 
before I went out to the farm." 


That appreciation of the intangibles 
that come from the hard but rewarding 
work of making a living off the land— 


experience of the farming lifestyle 


especially coming from urban-raised 
youth—thrills Gwen Simpson, who 
grew up on her family farm in BC and 
now owns Inspired Market Gardens 
with her sister and their spouses. 

"I think it's absolutely wonderful,” she 
enthuses. "In our community most of the 
farmers are the typical age, they're well 
over 55, there's not that many young folks 
around, they farm pretty conventionally. 

"L have a line taken from Wendell Ber- 
ry: ‘Who will love the land in the way it 
deserves and needs to be loved?’ I really 
believe that unless people live on the 
land, unless there are young people who 
live on the land, how will they under- 
stand how important it is? In my gener- 
ation everybody I knew either grew up 
on a farm or they knew someone who 
farmed, had relatives who farmed. And 
that's not the case anymore. Our gen- 
eration, the boomer generation, is the 
last generation like that. If we don't get 
some young people and their children 
to have a way of coming onto the farm 
then we're going to lose that.” 

And while Simpson is happy to share 
her lifetime of knowledge, and is glad 
the program is looking to learn from 
the experience of the first season and 
hopefully expand next year, she says it's 
been far from a one-way experience. 

"It has to be an exchange where they 
feel that they're not just going out to be a 
labourer on the farm, that they're going 
to actually learn how they can raise crops 
and the economics and the market and 
the soil prep and all of the things that go 
into it being a viable industry,” she says. 
“And Michael brings an urban perspective 
andayoung perspective. He'll say, Why do 
you do that?’ and he makes us think more 
carefully about what it is we're doing and 
why. So it's been a really good program." 

For Hunter, the experience with 
ASAAP and Simpson hasjust reinforced 
that the path he and his wife are on—to 
move to a rural eco-village where they 
can focus much of their time on food 
production—is the right one for them. 

"It hasn't made me feel any less appre- 
hensive about the workload,” he laughs, 
"but I'm more convinced than ever that 
there's a strong movement growing 
not just within agricultural communi- 
ties, but across the province, across the 
country. People are starting to realize 
that we can’t depend on our industrial 
food system to continue to supply us 
with safe food in the abundance that 
we're going to need it. 

"I often say to people that I'm not an 
alarmist, but there are water issues, cli- 
mate issues, fossil fuel issues, thatall will 
start to change how we view our food 
systems and our supply of food, and will, 
whether we like it or not, force more of 
us to learn how to work within the field 
of agriculture and grow more food more 
locally. SoI want to be on the forefront of 
that, I want to be prepared.” W 


The Alberta Sustainable Agriculture Ap- 
prenticeship Programis currently accepting 
applications for fall farm apprenticeships. 
ASAAP also organizes workshops and 
farm tours, a number of which take place 
in September. For more information visit 
startfarming.ca or contact Becky Lipton, 
ASAAP's coordinator, by email at becky.lip- 
ton@mail.megill.ca or at 780.271.1126: 


eee SSC 


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EP 3 —SEP 9, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


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CED sine) ais oe 


& 


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Gd Paul Dewar 
Al a workshop on best practices for reporting crimes 


THE PEOPLE | 


[J Rob Oliphant 

is ready, with the whole Liberal caucus, to let Canadians 
know that Mr. Harper's me is up. Ignatieff shone today and 
5 ready to take ... 


Joe Volpe 
Globe and Mall Editorial on High Speed Rail; discusses the 


Ujjal Dosanjh 
| am ai Sudbury airport, to fly to Van via TO. A greet caucus 
mocting. Greal speech by MI. The battle is on. #odnpoll 


pet Taal ya es ae ee or Se 
Prevention of Genocide. 


Zhe 


SWEET TWEET >> TweetCommons offers just one example of how to cenenew ni ayn to ek 


What do you find more engaging: read- 


ing an article in a newspaper, or Ca ‘ 
a conversation about it afterwards with : 
a friend? This is the question journalists, 5 
editors and media executives should be : 
asking themselves as they try to navi- : 


gate through the current'Crisis in 
journalism. If you're like me, 
you find the conversation 
about current events more 
interesting than the con- 
sumption of news 

It appears that the Internet 
is facilitating an increase in ex- 
pression, collaboration and con- 
versation. The pattern is dispersed 
and uneven, but unmistakable 


form of journalism. 


This is not just about new technologies : 
or online tools, but rather new forms of : 
journalism, and other practices, that are : 


enabled by new online tools 


Social media and "professional" jour : 
nalism are not mutually exclusive. I've : 
previously detailed how the crisis in : 
journalism is largely the result of big : 
media itself and of bad public policy. : 
journalism : 
and social media is like comparing the : 
sure the : 
phone hasn't enabled mass distribution : 
of content the way the Internet has, : 
but like social media, it is conversation- : 
based, participatory and dynamic. Like : 


Comparing “professional 


phone to broadcast news; 


The : 
current crisis in big business-supported : 
journalism, coupled with the explosion : 
of personal expression through online : 
media, are fundamentally transforming : 
journalism practices and giving way to : 
the emergence of a more participatory : 


the phone, social media should be con- 
sidered a tool that professional journal- 


This is exactly the approach the Huff- 


audience conversation through 
integration with Facebook. 


source, you can have your "au- 


broaden engagement with media par- 
ticipants 

Crowd sourcing allows user-produced 
Wikipedia to out-compete “profession- 
al" encyclopedias and open source soft- 


these domains can be reinvented, per- 
haps journalism is next 


am," short for professional and amateur. 
According to Rosen, 


controls.” 


: of professional journalism.” 
ington Post (huffingtonpost.com) took : 
when they developed their new Social : 
News project, which encourages : 
= ism by inviting people to read through 
: MP expense documents, normally con- 

Online tools enable mass- : 
distributed labour, which can : 
be very useful for journalism. : 
Rather than calling up one : 
; mation in journalism practices can be 
found in perhaps the most unlikely : 
of places: the Financial Post. The FP's 


To date, 23 376 people have reviewed 


dience" or "participants" help you : 

do the research and fact checking. : 
"Crowd sourcing" can widen the scope : 
and depth of newsgathering and can : 
: journalist Matt Hartley, was engaging, 
: interactive and timely, Hartley, both a : 
: skilled online discussion facilitator and 
: knowledgeable about the media and 
: telecommunications 
ware projects like Firefox to compete : 
with corporate giants like Microsoft. If : 
: join in the discussion. Hartley kept the 
: discussion open—all Twitter chats that 
; were appropriately tagged were auto- : 
NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen : 
calls this new form of journalism "pro- : 
: posted quickly. This openness made the 
"the pro-am ap- : 
proach looks for the hybrid forms that : 
combine substantial openness with some : 
Those controls come in the : 
form of journalists acting as facilitators : 
of collaborative crowd sourced journal- : 
ism. Rosen maintains that pro-am, or : 
participatory journalism, “won't replace : 
what traditional newsrooms do, but if : 


Karen Ruyter 
@petorbrad - let Us know where you will be in future too 
please. Thanics. 


sm 


Charles Dumont 
@jacciayton: hay jack, contition in the works? what's your 
take on M. ignattielf today in Sudbury? 


em 


Michael Krochter 

@M_\gnatieft you can count on one less vote trom me, if 
‘there is a lal election. The economy needs to be focused 
‘on, not an election. 


2ne 


gregory alan elliott 
@ToamMHF * Justin [Trudeau right after @M. jgnatiet 
peach: look on J's face says it" JT's face says ONCE 
IGGY LOSES, | WILL LEAD THE LPC! 


: taken seriously and seed weeaets this : 
; pro-am model has the potential to radi- 
ists use, rather than their competition. : 


cally extend the reach and effectiveness : 


In just one example, the Guardian news- 
paper harnessed their online community : 
to produce better professional journal- 


sidered a highly expensive initiative. 


204 477 pages for the Guardian. 
A Canadian example of this transfor- 


live blog coverage of the CRTC's traf- 
fic management hearing facilitated by : 


industry, added : 
value to the discussion by inviting peo- 


ple who presented at the hearing to i 


matically fed into the conversation and 
on-topic messages were moderated and 


content flexible to user habits and pre- 
ferred levels of engagement. 

The FP's coverage was successful : 
as a result of the following three ba- 
sic ingredients necessary for engaging : 
participatory journalism: 1) good facili- 
tation (skilled, respected, knowledge- 
able), 2) value (informative/relevant : 
content) and 3) openness (provides ac- : 


ee 


Wee 


: thing new together." 


cess via various points of entry). 


Participatory journalism need not be 


: ter of incorporating the conversation 


a ceveral crowd- 

es, aa its BC photo 
ing Flickr, the Tyee posts a se. 
lection of pictures taken and uploaded 
by BC residents, which has nearly 2500 
photos in the pool to date. The Tyee also 
ran a "Post-It" series that had them at- 
end public events in Vancouver and ask 


t residents to write on post-it notes how 
: public transit can be improved. They took 
: pictures of the answers, posted them on- 


line and used the citizen input for their 


: article on the subject. 


Rabble.ca's most recent participatory 


} journalism initiative is its "You Ask" pro- 
= gram, which invites participants to drive 


video interviews of newsmakers and so- 
cial movement leaders through posing 
questions via online video prior to inter- 


= views, or in real time through an online 


chat feature. , 
TVO's The Agenda: on the Road recently 


: rana series of discussion panels hosted in 
: local communities and focused on local 
: issues. The show went one step further 
> by allowing participants or "the audience" 
? to drive the direction of the discussions. 
: Through an “unconference" and social 
t media tools, the show collected and 
: acted on citizen input. According to Mark 
: Kuznicki, a social media and community 


: management consultant involved in the 
: series, "TVO is mixing the best of old and 
+ new media to stimulate a higher level of 
+ citizen engagement.” 

: . If properly resourced, the more demo- 
: cratically accountable, public and inde- 
! pendent media outlets will be the new 
: incubators of innovative forms of jour- 


: nalism. This is why it is still essential 
= to re-imagine how journalism can be 
: financially supported. 


: complicated; sometimes it's just a mat- + 


The public wants more participatory 


: forms of media, and we can't trust that 


that is already happening online. For : 


= example, when | was asked to go on the 
: Dave Brindle show to talk about the use 
; of Twitter in the uprising in Iran, | sent 
: a message to my Facebook and Twitter 
: network asking for input. The input | re- 
: ceived helped inform my comments on 
: the show, but more importantly, David 
: Brindle took note of the discussion and 


used the comments as conversation 


! points during his show. We therefore 
: had radio journalism that was crowd- 


sourced and integrated into a broader 


i discussion that was happening online. 


Another example of creating new me- 


: dia by tapping into existing discussions 
t can be found on two new websites: 
: PoliTwitter and TweetCommons. These 
: sites connect Canadians with their elect- 


ed representatives in government by 


! drawing in Twitter feeds and, therefore, 
: online conversations. 


Waiting for big corporations to become 


: purveyors of open, transparent and par- 
: ticipatory journalism will be a long wait 
: indeed. As media critic Jay Rosen put it 
: when talking about the current journal- : 
: ism system, “If you know how the old 


one fell apart, it's easier to put some- 
Keeping in mind 
that the greed of big medias largely re- 


: sponsible for the crisis in journalism, we 
: can focus squarely on new independent 
: and public projects. 


Here in Canada, TVO, Rabble, the Tyee 


large corporations, with their matrix of 


: commercial and ideological interests, 
: will be the curators of democratic dia- 

} logue. While some enlightened media 
! outlets have taken up the challenge 
‘ of reinventing journalism, apart from 
: the prematurely cancelled ZeD series 
: and Exposure, the CBC and many other 
: socially mandated media outlets have 
: yet to take full advantage of online 


media tools. 
Instead of considering media as static, 


; It's time to consider it as part of an on- 
: going conversation. The media outlets 
: that most effectively facilitate discus- 
: sion and free expression with a mix of 
open citizen engagement and profes- 
} sional journalism will capture audiences. 
: At first glance, social media tools and 
: the Web in general appear to facilitate 


this best, but local outlets and news- 


: based platforms also have a place in this 


new media ecology. The media terrain 
is in the process of being renegotiated 
and public service media organizations 


: should be at the forefront. W 


! Steve Anderson is the national coordi- 
: nator for the Campaign for Democratic 
: Media. He is a contributing author of 
: Censored 2008 and Battleground: The 
Media. Media Links is a monthly-syndi- 
> cated column on media issues supported 
: by CommonGround, The Tyee, Rabble.ca, 
: Vancovuer Observer and Vue Weekly. 


iN 


8 // UP FRONT 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 - SEP 9, 2009 


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SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY UP FRONT //9 


The Stony Plain 
6th Annuai 


Rotary Run 


for Life 
Sept 13, 2009 


Please help us to remember our friend Donations to the Rotary Run can be sent to 
and colleague Ross Moroz, who passed 
away Sept 26, 2007, by participating in 
the Rotary Run for Life or by making a 
donation. Money raised at the event will 
go towards suicide prevention programs 
in the Stony Plain area. 


Servus Credit Union 
4904 - 48 Street 
Stony Plain , AB 
7z 118 

Att'n: Wally Ress 


Please make cheques payable to: 
Rotary Club of Stony Plain - nessers Accomst 
For more information, or to register, 


For more information, please contact 
please go to rotaryrun.ca. 2 


Misha Moroz at 


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THE 


ial 


ED & % 


10 // UP FRONT 


ine is stalking Ethiopia again? 
The Ethiopian government is 
authoritarian, but it isn’t in- 
competent. It gives fertilizer 
to farmers and teaches best 
practices. By the late ‘90s the 
country was self-sufficient in 
food in good years, and the 
government had created a stra- 
tegic food reserve for the bad years. 


Ethiopians done wrong? 


babies. Ethiopia's population at the time of 


ulation, you are just spitting into the wind. 


from now, will hit a country of 100 million 


NSES: “GRGNES= 


TEPPAN-DINING 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 


A quarter-century after a million Ethiopians : 
died in the great hunger of 1984 — '85, the : 
country is heading into another famine. The : 
spring rains failed entirely, and the summer : 
rains were three weeks late. But why is fam- : 


So why are we back here again? Infant : 
deaths are already over two per 10 OOO : 
per day in Somali, the worst-hit region of : 
Ethiopia. (Four per day counts as full-scale : 
famine.) Country-wide, 20 percent of the : 
population already depends on the dwin- : 
dling flow of foreign food aid, and it will get : 
worse for many months yet. What have the : 
: is that an Ethiopia with sucha history would : 

The real answer (which everybody care- : 
fully avoids) is that they have had too many : 
: enough food for them all, it would just im- : 
the last famine was 40 million. Twenty-five : 
years later, it is 80 million. You can do ev- : 
erything else right—give your farmers new : 
tools and skills, fight erosion, create food : 
reserves—and if you don't control the pop- : 
: the population of Britain was just 7 million. It: 

itis so obvious that this should be the start ; 
of every conversation about the country. : 
Even if the coming famine in Ethiopia kills : 
a million people, the population will keep : 
growing. So the next famine, 10 or 15 years : 
: tion growth, they got away with It 
people, trying to make a living from farming : 


SEP 9, 2009 


H COMMENT >> FAMINE IN ETHIOPI 
eh ‘ 


on land where only 40 million faced star- : 
vation in the 1980s. It is going to get much : 
uglier in Ethiopia. : 

Yet it's practically taboo to say that The : 
whole question of population, instead of : 
being central to the debate about devel- : 
opment, about food, about climate 
change, has been put on ice. The : 
reason, | think, is that the rich : 
countries are secretly embar- : 
rassed, and the poor countries are : 
deeply resentful ; 
Suppose that Ethiopia had been : 
the first country to industrialize. Sup-. : 
pose some mechanical genius in Tigray : 
invented the world’s first steam engine : 
in T10. The first railways were spreading : 
across the country by the 1830s, and at the : 
same time Ethiopian entrepreneurs and im- : 
perialists spread all over Africa. By the end : 
of the 19th century, they controlled half of : 
Europe too. ; 

Never mind the improbabilities. The point : 


easily be rich enough to support 80 mil- : 
lion people now—and if it could not grow : 


port it. Just like Britain (where the industrial : 
revolution actually started) imports food. 
Money makes everything easy. : 

In T710, when Thomas Newcomen devised : 
the first practical steam engine in Devonshire, : 


is now 61 million, but they do not live in fear : 
of famine. In fact, they eat very well, even : 
though they currently import over a third of : 
their food. They got in first, so although they : 
never worried in the slightest about popula- : 


The problem is well understood. The : 


® 
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population of the rich countries has grown 
about tenfold since the earliest days of the 


: industrial revolution, but for the first half 


of that period it grew quite slowly. Many 
babies died, and there were no cures for 
most epidemic diseases. Later the death 
rate dropped, but by then, with people 
feeling more secure in their lives, the birth 
rate was dropping too. 

Whereas in most of the poor countries 
the population hardly grew at all until the 


? start of the 20th century. But once the 


population did start to grow, thanks to 
basic public health measures that cut the 
death rate, it grew faster than it ever did 
in the rich countries. 

Unfortunately, economies don't grow 
that fast, so these countries never 
achieved the level of comfort and security 
where most people will start to reduce 
their family size spontaneously. At the 


$ current rate of growth, Ethiopia's popu- 


lation will double again, to 160 million 
people, in just 32 years. 

You're thinking: that will never happen. 
Famine will become normal in Ethiopia well 
before that. No combination of wise domes- 
tic policies, and no amount of foreign aid, 


: can stop it. And you are right. 


History is unfair. Conversations between 
those who got lucky and those left hold- 
ing the other end of the stick are awkward. 
But we cannot go on ignoring the elephant 
in the room. We have to start talking about 
population again. W 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 


: published in 45 countries. His column ap- 


pears each week in Vue Weekly. 


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TECHNOLOGY LAW >> CELLPHONE PRICING 


Who killed the cellphone cost calculator? 


online tool to address it. 


After spending tens of thousands of : 
dollars creating and testing an online : 
calculator designed to help consumers : 
select their ideal wireless plan, Industry : 
Minister Tony Clement killed the project : 
weeks before it was scheduled to launch. : 


Last week | discussed the well-known : 
challenge faced by millions of Canadians : 
as they sort through a myriad of cell- : 
phone pricing plans in a marketplace still : 
lacking in robust competition. Previously : 
unreported, however, is that Industry : 
Canada officials identified the same prob- : 
lem and worked for years to develop an : 
; sumer interests, was the original source 
for "Which Cell Plan? A. Calculator." The : 
calculator asked consumers for detailed : 
information about their current or antici- : 
pated cellphone use and then provided : 


How telco lobbying quietly trumped consumer interests 


in 2008, the OCA paid Decima Re- : 
search almost $60 000 to con- : 
duct extensive usability testing. : 
The company conducted 12 : 
two-hour focus group sessions : 
: facing pressure to block the calculator, 
tréal that included cellphone : 
users as well as "cellphone : 
intenders"—those expecting to : 
: sands of dollars in taxpayer expense, the 
: creation of an effective tool and the obvi. 


eekly Oe in Halifax, Vancouver, and Mon- 


purchase a cellphone within a year. 
Decima Research's report noted “par- 


; ticipants felt being a consumer of cell- : 
: phones is frustrating and difficult. The : 
: service plans of different providers are 
: difficult to compare because they are : 
: all different ... Secondary frustrations : 
? and challenges included the length and A 
: limitations of contracts, billing inaccura- : 
: cies, and quality of service issues such as : 
: Industry Canada spokesperson, "techni- 


_ : dropped calls and coverage." 


Government records suggest intense : 
lobbying this spring by Canada's wireless : 
companies, who feared the service would : 
promote lower cost plans, played a key : 


role in the decision. 


The Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA), : 
a branch within Industry Canada with a : 
mandate to promote and protect con- : 


them with a detailed list of suitable plans 
from Canadian providers. 


Now that’s 
et the ph 
ess 


Koodomobile.com 


a great deal. 
one you want 


The focus groups’ response to the cell- : 
phone cost calculator was positive, with 
: mothballed project, the government should 
: now consider releasing the calculator's 
; source code to enable other groups to pick 


the vast majority of participants indicat: 
ing they would use the tool and encour: 
age friends and family to do the same. 


Yet just as Industry Canada was set to : 


launch the tool, the major wireless car. 
riers began lobbying against it. Accord 


ing to lobbyist registration records, the : 
: Canadian Wireless Telecommunications : 


Association and Bell Canada met with of. 
ficials from Clement's office on April 8, 
with the association listing telecommuni: 


cations regulation and consumer issues : 
: as the topics of discussion. Two weeks : 
: later, Telus also met with the same of- 


Ofter vaild until 
September 6th 


ficials to discuss consumer issues. 

The carriers were apparently concerned 
that the tool only covered voice services 
and that it was geared toward lower 
priced plans. Sensing that Clement was 


Canadian consumer groups wrote to the 
minister, urging him to stick with it, 
Despite months of preparation, thou. 


ous benefits for lower-income Canadians, 
Clement nevertheless killed the project 


: Given the tool's potential to encourage 


more Canadians to adopt wireless ser. 
vices, the decision ironically came just 
as Clement was meeting with technol- 
ogy executives in an effort to kick-start 
a national digital agenda. According to an 


cal limitations" were to blame. 
With public dollars having funded the 


up where the OCA left off. In the meantime, 
Industry Canada has posted a cellphone 


: checklist that asks consumers many of the 


same questions, but does not provide any 
information on carrier plans or pricing. W 


Michael Geist holds the Canada Research 
Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at 
the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law. 
He can reached at mgeist@uottawa.ca or 


: online at michaelgeist.ca. 


Red Deer 


Edmonton 
Edmonton City Centre Bower Place 
Kingsway 


BOB THE ANGRY FLOWER 


a 


story kicks in. 

Information we're being given 
‘on the coming vaccine is defi- 
nitely incomplete, fuzzy. and 
both confusing and soothing. 
Trust the trial and approval 
process, they tell us. But the 
shot could well end up containing 


squalene to ensure a strong and long- : 
lasting immune response on minimal viral : 


material, so I'm unwilling to trust. 


activating compound. 


our nervous systems. 


vaccine administered contained squalene 


as clear as day. 


: showing symptoms of Gulf War Syndrome 
+ had no antibodies to squalene. 


The risk of vaccine reaction is low, 


i though, | keep hearing, and surely they 
: won't use squalene, and surely theyll test 
= : the vaccine adequately before they roll it 
: out, and anyhow, risking the symptoms of 
in advance. It's just: 


autoimmune disease is preferable to risk- 


when we're only half-informed, my ing mass spread of the swine flu. OK, if 
nelief in our right to the whole you say so, but I'm not convinced. 


Accelerated vaccine approvals 
might be justifiable for a deadly 
virus, but the swine flu strain 
has so far been relatively mild, 
posing no more danger than 
the regular seasonal flu. 
But push the vaccine they will, 
from the safe perch of legal immu- 
nity for vaccine manufacturers. 
We're also stocking up with millions of 


: doses of the antiviral drug Tamiflu, chil- 
Squalene isn't currently approved for use : 
in vaccines, but approval can quickly be : 
in the case of an emergency such : 

as a pandemic. Squalene, a naturally occur- : 
ring antioxidant found in our bodies and : 
in foods like olive oil and natural health : 
products, is a good thing. The problem is : 
that although it is beneficial and innocuous : 
when ingested, it is anything but innocu- : 
ous when injected as part of an immune- : 


dren being the most recent on the list of 
those for whom the drug is approved, even 
though it had been linked to the deaths 
of children four or five years ago and the 
Canadian Medical Association Journal had 
issued a safety alert at that time saying it 
should not be given to children less than 
a year old. Has the drug become safer or 
more effective since then? 

To offer something besides negativity, we 


: do have some very safe immune-boosting 

in launching an immune response to the : 
viral component of the vaccine, we also ap- : 
pear to launch one to squalene in general, : 
attacking its essential role in the health of : 


measures available to us. Elderberry ex- 
tract has been shown to inhibit entry of the 
HIN1 virus into target cells, and vitamin D's 
impact on immune function has long been 


: known by those inclined toward alternative 

Where we discovered that squalene in : 
vaccines was problematic was with the : 
anthrax vaccine used with Persian Gulf : 
War military personnel Some lots of the : 


health—there is a clear and direct link be- 
tween low levels of vitamin D and problem- 
atic cold and flu infection, The Public Health 
Agency of Canada, currently conducting 


: research on vitamin D's potential with flu 
(a fact initially denied by the Department : 
of Defense, but later confirmed by the : 
FDA), and the link between the contami- : 
nated vaccines and Gulf War Syndrome is : 


viruses, now plans to expand the research 
to include the HINT swine flu virus. 

We've done the trust first, clean-up-the- 
mess-later thing before, and nowhere 


: more tragically than with pregnant women 

From the February 2000 issue of Ex- : 
perimental Molecular Pathology, we know : 
that of the deployed soldiers suffering with = 
Gulf War Syndrome, over 95 percent had : 
antibodies to squalene, and that of those : 
not deployed but immunized, 100 percent : 
had antibodies to squalene. Veterans not : 


and children. Remember thalidomide for 
morning sickness and DES (diethylstilbe- 
strol) for miscarriage prevention? With 
thalidomide we exchanged temporary nau- 
sea for permanent birth defects; with DES 
we traded risk of miscarriage for cancer in 
both mom and baby. W@ 


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780.413 
SKATESOARDS Le: 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 - SEP 9, z 


> LAST CHANCE 


# 


‘As summer falls away, our outdoor pur- : 
suits quickly change. It seems autumn is : 
purgatory for some; no snow for skis and : 
too cold for tires, so we tend to hide in- : 
doors prematurely. But fleeting fall is a : 
time for great seize-the-day hikes and : 
bikes, as long as you're prepared for the : 
: ing summer days is also on the minds : 
; of animals which hibernate. My friend 


season's little surprises. 


Cold shoulders 

Fall trips to mountain peaks and 
river valleys are breathtakingly 
awesome as trees explode 

into autumnal yellows and 

reds. Daytime temps can 

soar, fooling us into leaving 

the extra layers in the car as 
we get drunk on the final whiffs 
of summer. But because tempera- 


tures change so drastically from morning : 
: the thickening bush. 

The world was quiet except for the bear : 
bells on his bike. Caution crept onto my : 
= shoulders. | turned around. Ten metres ‘ 


to afternoon then plummet as the moon 


rises, prepping for outdoor adventures in : 
fall is perhaps more important than sum- : 


mer or winter. 


Injuries or losing your way happen when : 
you're not prepared, and outcomes are : tree gleamed in the sun. A loud snap : 
worsened with major temperature fluc- : i 


tuations. Always carry a sweater, a toque : 


and a source of fire. Should you sprain an 


ankle and you can't make it home before : 


roiding fall hangups 


Enjoy a safe, prolonged season with some basic precautions 


~~ et 


ws ee ee 


overnight in the woods—keeping warm : 


is your first priority. It's cold enough now 
to get hypothermia if you're wearing a 
sweaty singlet in the dark. 


Going on a bear hunt 
Trying to get the most out of the wan- 


and | were biking in the mountains 
on a late afternoon, the single 
track narrow amidst plump 
berry bushes, when | noticed 
a dark grey scar on a white 


nearly three metres up and 
slashed the tree wide open 


marks while my partner continued into 


away, a weeping, fresh gash on another 


broke my concentration. 


"Jay, let's get out of here!” | yelled, and 
‘ we hurried out of bear-ville, our trip : 
home considerably quicker than our : 


poplar. A bear had reached : 


several seasons ago. | paused : 
to inspect the swollen black claw : 


nightfall—or worse, you have to stay : route into the bush. 


wo ie de 


Bears are not to be trifled with at the 
: best of times—and they're especially 
: hungry in the fall as they prepare to 
: bed down for six months. The most im- 
: portant part of bear safety Is in not at- 
: tracting the bear in the first place. After 
: thoroughly cleaning your campsite and 
utensils, hang food and odorous things 
: at least three metres above the ground 
: and two metres from the tree trunk. 
: Bears love garbage and they are easily 
: habituated to trash, so do both of you 
: a favour: burn what you can and pack 
? everything out with you. 

Beyond food, bears are more likely to 
: attack if startled. Move loudly through 
: the trees with a bell on your pack or 
bike or by talking, singing or hooting— 
: make your presence known. Travelling 
: at dawn and dusk is riskier, as these 
: cooler times bring bears out to look 
: for food. Look for fur on rub trees, bear 
beds (large, flattened swaths of grass in 
tree shade), scat and tracks. If they're 
: fresh, you best leave the area before 
you're fresh meat. 


Make a conscious effort to respect the 
season and you might find that summer 
fun doesn't have to end on Labour Day. 
: Now get going. W 


OFILE >> KARINE BETTS 


Personal peaks 


WASKAHEGAN // ADVENTURES 


« 
Follow Jeremy Derksen as he treks over 300 km of foot-blistering trails 
vueweekly.com/waskahegan 


With 5 Peaks overall title on the line, 
oe power runner takes it in stride 


Salis ed ose eid GS fet: <dks Crichsne Like race, ie WSupgied 


Five kilometres Into 5 Peaks' eight-kilo- : 


metre "sport" race at Terwillegar Park, 
| emerge from the trees into a clearing 


cheers. Volunteers pass out an un- 
identified pink beverage in paper 
cups. As | chug on the run— 
mostly splashing it on my 
face and shirt—I hear Karine 
Betts loud and clear above 
the clamour, "C'mon Jeremy. 
Let's go!" 

At a toned and tanned 5'1" 
Betts may be petite and public- 


ity-shy, but she can sure dominate in a : 
crowd. After three of five races, Betts led : 
"enduro" category in the 5 : 
Peaks Northern Alberta 2009 race se- : 
ries, It's no small feat. Each enduro race : 
stretches 15 — 20 kilometres over steeps, : 
roots and dirt; top racers often finish in : 


the women's 


just over an hour. 


At Terwillegar, Betts is resting up from : 
a marathon, but she'll be back on course : 
at Cooking Lake on September 19 (the : 
last race of the season), vying for the : 
overall Northern Alberta women's title. : 
After that, she's set her sights on the : 
: ing above black sunglasses as the com- 


Boston Marathon. 


Yet talking to Betts, the focus quick- : 
> briefly across her face. "That's how you 
: get hooked," she says. W 

Betts’ close friend, is in third, putting ; ON THE WEB 

them neck and neck in the standings. : 
"| don't race to finish first. As long as : 
| see improvement that's enough for : 
me. You'll have a good race where : 
you'll beat someone, then the next ; 


race they'll beat you. | like the com- : The follow-up: Paul Manning-Hunter 


ly shifts away from her accomplish- 
ments. "You should interview Nadine,” 
she says at one point. Nadine Mueller, 


munity, the environment.” 


start thinking top 20. Not that there's a 


lot of time for adjusting goals as | ma- 


neouvre around roots and brush, down : 
: short of second place. 


loose dirt descents. 


"Running around your neighbourhood 


you can just tune out, you don't really 
: have to think," Betts explains 
Colourful MEC and Salomon flags flap in : 
the wind as a small but vociferous crowd ‘ 


[In trail 
running] you have to think, otherwise 
you're going to trip and fall It's very un- 

predictable—you could start out too 
fast then all of a sudden there's a 
huge hill or some scree." 

In this setting, a wrong 
step can quickly lead to 
trouble. "At Devon there 
was someone who went 
down in front of [me] so 
hard. It's just heartbreaking,” 
she cringes in empathy. The 5 
Peaks events embrace everyone from 
ultrarunners to weekend warriors 
from age 14 to 60-plus, but no mat- 
ter who you are, she says, "Everybody 
puts in the same amount of effort 
To have the last few minutes take it 
away from you ..." she trails off. 
After the race | catch up with Betts 
again as she passes out cups to the en- 
duro racers. "Well, how did you like it?” 
she asks 
1 enjoyed it, | admit, but in particular 
| got a rush from passing other racers. 
She smiles knowingly, one eyebrow arch- 


petitive streak of a winning racer flickers 


| envy that mentality. | enter the race : In July we featured Paul Manning-Hunter, 
with no other goal than to finish, but : 
after passing a few runners | get a feel : 


for the competition and that changes. | : 


whitewater kayak racer, as he pre- 

pared for the National/Pan-American 
an enwutir Slalom Championships set 
for Kananaskis River on July 29 — Aug 


3. He came In fourth at Nationals in 


a competitive field—just one second 


OUTDOOR ADVENTURES //15 


Ss 


EP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // VUEWEEKLY 


\\ Vib "3 aw: Su 


Restaurant 
Check out our comprehensive 
online database of Vue Weekly's 

restaurant reviews, searchable by 
location, price and type. 


Reviews 


‘0000 0 UE Pree coven eee CECE REECE EEREEREATNCFLLLLGAANHNHAN) 0 


PROFILE // LINO OLIVEIRA 


Deep pedigree 


Imagination and experience define the food at Sabor Divino 


SHARON YEO 
// SABRON@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ortuguese flavours were missing 

from Edmonton's culinary spec- 
trum, says chef Lino Oliveira. That 
is, until Sabor Divino opened up about 
eight months ago. 

Oliveira is proud to lead the kitchen, 
and draws from his lifetime of experi- 
ence eating and cooking Portuguese 
food. Originally from Portugal, Oliveira 
grew up in Edmonton. He started work- 
ing in the restaurant business at 14, 
gaining front-of-house experience at 
some of the city’s premiere establish- 
ments of the day, including La Boheme 
and the now-shuttered Victor's. In1993, 
he travelled to Portugal, and as Oliveira 
puts it, "What was supposed to be short 
holiday turned into 14 years.” 

He had owned a few different estab- 
lishments in a small coastal town (and 
continued working in front-of-house), 
but his final restaurant cemented his fu- 
ture in cooking. After the hired chef left, 
Oliveira stepped in. "I had always cooked, 
and I had always watched the kitchen be- 
cause I was always curious about it,” re- 
lates Oliveira. “Once I found the kitchen 
I didn't want to go back in front.” 

Inspired by fresh seafood and pro- 


duce, Oliveira learned through trial and 
error, with help from the locals. "When 
you cook food that is traditional, there's 
history behind it," says Oliveira. "So 
when you attempt to make a dish that is 
regional to the area and you don't make 
it right, there are customers that know 
and will tell you.” 

Although Oliveira would have been 
content to remain in Portugal, a down- 
turn in the economy made it difficult 
for him to keep up with rising costs. His 
family and friends had been encourag- 
ing him to return and opena place here, 
and in 2007 he relocated back to Ed- 
monton and with his childhood friend 
Christian Mena opened Sabor Divino. 

As expected, Oliveira's menu at Sa- 
bor Divino is strongly influenced by 
his time overseas. Dishes such as cod- 
fish, octopus and pork and clams are 
very.common in Portugal. Moreover, 
in Portuguese cooking, much of the 
seasoning (such as piri-piri, a distinct 
Portuguese chili blend) is inherent. 
"Our food is infused and cooked with 
the flavours,” states Oliveira. "We don't 
add sauces to them after.” 

Sabor also offers items typically 
found in adjacent regions, including 
France, Italy and Spain, and Oliveira 
does make a point to say the menu is 


influenced by Western Europe and the 
Mediterranean. "I have a good imagi- 
nation,” shares Oliveira. "I think I have 
a good hand and most of my dishes 
speak for themselves." 

However, Oliveira has found that he 
has had to adjust some of his dishes 
to cater to the Edmonton market. "In 
Portugal, people love to have their fish 
with bones, head and skin because it’s like 
cooking a piece of meat on a bone—it's a 
lot more flavourful,” states Oliveira. More- 
over, the freshness of a fish could be de- 
termined more easily when on the bone. 
"Being by the coast, you're more afraid of 
eating fish there than on the Prairies be- 
cause chances are it's never been frozen,” 
says Oliveira. "But when you just get a filet 
of fish on your plate, you don't know how 
long it was in the fridge.” 


When Sabor first opened, Oliveira at- 
tempted to bring an appreciation for 
fish and meats cooked on the bone, 
"L would prepare a whole bass for two 
people, come out and bone and skin it 
at the table,” recounts Oliveira. "But it 
wasn't well-received.” He has reverted 
to serving filets of fish, brought in fresh 
every other day. 

Oliveira says his seafood supplier pro- 
vides good quality and variety, so he 


isn't necessarily left yearning for the 
fish markets in Portugal. However, he 
does know that much of what he serves 
now is farmed, and that he needs to 
learn more about sustainable fisheries. 
"Right now price and availability are 
two factors," states Oliveira. "It is pricey 
unless everybody is offering it, and we 
would need more demand." 

The Edmonton market has also dic- 
tated Sabor's less formal vibe. “Our in- 
tention was to go fine dining when we 
opened,” recalls Oliveira, "but as we've 
progressed we're finding that we're get- 
ting more casual because that's what 
people want."" 

This includes their family-style dinners 
which have been more popular than set 
menus with large groups. "It becomes a 


social event because there's more inter- 
action with the whole table," conveys 
Oliveira. "If you have a table of 20, you 
might never talk to the people at the oth- 
er end, but all ofa sudden you're passing 
food around, and you get closer." 

As Oliveira discovered from cooking 
in Portugal, the restaurant business is 
never stagnant. That's a challenge he 
relishes, seizing the opportunity to be 
creative and continually striving to be 
better. "I hope by next year we'll be do 
ing a completely different menu," says 
Oliveira. "I don't want to get bored and | 
don't want the customers to get bored." 
Between his rich experience and pas 
sion for food, there's no doubt he will 
be highlighting Portuguese flavours in 
Edmonton for years to come. W 


UU LE CLL ULL CLO C TE LU CUCMT OL CEM CO CEEL LM LLCOT LC  LUT MCE MUU LLCO LCE CLOUT CLOT ULLRULCLEU COLE CLOUT LCLCM COUTURE LLU CLCOL CCL OCLC ECU LOOL EL 


REVUE // MILL CREEK CAFE 


Eating full time 


Lunch place keeps it casual on new dinner menu 


JAN HOSTYN 


Fo experience, | know that transi- 
tioning a breakfast/lunch restaurant 
into one that also serves dinner can be dif 
ficult, so when I heard Mill Creek Café, 
an unassuming breakfast/lunch place just 
east of the most annoying part of Whyte 
Ave, was leaving its doors unlocked until 
9 pm on Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
nights, I was more than a bit tentative. But 
curiosity got the better of me 


The café, tucked in the corner of a 
staid brown building, looked quiet and 
kind of dark. Bright yellow suns dot 
ted the windows, though, and gave it a 


of like an unofficial 


cheery edge, k 


welcoming committ 


Inside, the caf 2s comfortable, relax 
ing and unpretentious. The green-and- 
brown colour scheme see i like a nat- 
ural extension of the yell suns—kind 
of an earthy, back-to-nature vibe. There 
was a chalkboard listing the specials, a 


display case to provide t 
a drink cooler stuffec 
non-alcoholic beverag 

It looked like a place that serves break 
fast and lunch 


nptation and 


h the requisite 


We were greeted with a smile and a 
quick “sit wherever.” Two older ladies 
were swirling the remnants of their wine 
in one corner of the room and a couple 
was downing the last of their tea in anoth 
er corner. The rest of the room was filled 
with empty tables, some high, some low, 
and a few stools along a window ledge. 

We settled in at one of the tall tables. 
and our waitress sauntered over and 
dropped off menus 

Like the café, the dinner menu is very 


16 // DISH 


sandwiches, salads and pizzas. There 
are a few more ambitious offerings and 
a daily special but, overall, it's simple, 
lunch-y stuff. Stuff they're used to do- 
ing. Not, OK-let's-totally-reinvent-our 
selves-for-four-hours-a-night. 

Our waitress came back lugging a big 
carafe of water and four big plastic glasses. 
The thrill of having unlimited water at our 
disposal combined with a rather limited 
wine selection led us to order only two 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 


drinks, a help-yourself can of Tropical 
Temptation juice from the cooler ($1.50) 
and a bottle of Alexander Keith's ($4.75). 

We had no choice but to order the vege- 
tarian spring rolls ($4.75) for my daughter 
who relishes them, and almost as soon as 
she returned from fetching her juice, they 
arrived—hot, crispy and a tad burnt. Just 
a few of the corners, but still. The fight 
was on to grab the "good" pieces. The rolls 
were adequately filled with cabbage and 
carrots, and there were no visible puddles 
of oil. My daughter was enchanted. 

Our waitress removed the leftover bits 
of burnt spring rolls and plunked down 
four plates. Dinner was served. 

Most of our choices were fairly 
standard fare—a chicken quesadilla 
($10.75), a margharita pizza ($9.50) and 
a calzone ($8.50). | experimented a bit 
and chose the pan-seared salmon in a 
chili-lime sauce ($14.00). 

The experiment was a flop. Part of my 
pan-seared salmon was seared so much it 
was hard and rubbery, and part was squea- 
mishly raw while the sauce was sweet and 
gloppy and not-at-all limey. The salad it 
was served on looked good, though. 

The salmon went back to the kitchen 
and stayed there, and I decided to raid 
everyone else's plates. 

The quesadilla was a quesadilla, and the 
whole wheat tortilla it was made with 
went well with the whole earthy theme. 
It had lots of cheese, peppers and chicken 


and was sufficiently messy. Some fresh 
tasting salsa and a few multi-coloured tor- 
tilla chips filled up the rest of the plate. 

The pizza came on a hearty, chewy, 
nine-grain crust. Thin-crust pizza lov 
ers beware—this is one bready pizza 
I, with my love for grainy bread, quite 
liked it. The calzone was like the pizza 
only it was folded over and had mush 
rooms and calabrese salami added to 
the cheese and tomato sauce. It was 
quite the hit. 

A deceptively simple side salad served 
with the pizza turned out to be my fa- 
vourite dish of the night. It wasn't fancy 
or exotic, but everything my fork man 
aged to stab was pristinely fresh and 
perfectly dressed. 

Of course, we had to have dessert—a 
warm, gooey chocolate brownie, topped 
with vanilla ice cream, dark chocolate 
sauce, multi-coloured chocolate mor- 
sels and a dab of whipped cream. Simple 
yet sublime. 

Mill Creek Café isn't a let’s-dress-up- 
and-go-out-for-dinner kind of place but, 
then again, it doesn't pretend to be. It's 
casual, comfortable and, for the most 
part, quite edible. WV 


me vino veritas 


er up, you don't need to be an expert to enjoy this stuff 


~ 


When | was approached to start writ- 
ing about wine, | have to admit the task 
seemed daunting. Wine can be so in- 
timidating, even for cork dorks like me, 
because it seems like there's so much 
know, and there's always someone 
who'll know more than me. When 
people find out I'm a wine col- 
umnist, they often ask me, "So 
you must know a lot about 
wine then, huh?" My answer 

is, "Well, sort of." 
The only reason I'm able 
to admit this is because I've 
made my peace with wine. | 
don't let it intimidate me any- 
more. After years of serving in restau- 
rants and working in wine shops, I've 
learned that the biggest thing stopping 
people from simply enjoying wine is the 
intimidation factor. Wine lists with hard- 
to-pronounce titles and wine shelves 
brimming with seeming do-or-die choic- 
es make wine drinking seem like a se- 
cret society. And no one ever likes to 
feel dumb. Especially when you're out 
for dinner with friends or buying a gift 

for your boss. 

There are three steps to overcoming 
the wine fear factor. 

First, admit to yourself that, yes, there 
is a lot to know about wine. Volumes, in 
fact. Given its ties to history, literature, 
religion, geography, food science, et cet- 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 >> 


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DISH // 17 
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18 // DISH 


4éj 


<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 


era, it should come as no surprise that 
wine has been very well documented. 
Sommeliers and winemakers devote 


Keep track 
somewhere of wines 
you love and what 
you love about them, 
even if it's "smells 
like Fruit Loops." 


their careers to the art and science of 
wine because they love it. They are 
certainly to be respected for their dedi- 
cated knowledge of how it's made and 
what makes it great (or awful), but let's 
face it, there will always be someone 
who knows more about wine than you. 
Don't sweat it. Wine drinking shouldn't 
be a competition anyhow. 

Second, remember that, although you 
may be no expert in wines, you are an 
expert in what you like. Sure, you may 


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suaet 


SPER TT. 
a Bordeaux, 


but most people know if they prefer 
sweet fruit over austere soil, light and 
crisp over full-bodied and buttery. And 
the only way you'll learn this is to keep 
drinking. Try wines side by side to make 
the differences more apparent. Keep 
track somewhere of wines you love and 
what you love about them, even if it’s 
"smells like Fruit Loops." With practice, 
your confidence will grow. Don't be 
afraid to ask questions, either. Any wine 
merchant or server worth their salt (and 
your business) will be more than happy 
to help you navigate their selection. 
Lastly, remember why we drink wine. 
Every bottle of wine has a story to tell, 
whether it's where it came from, how 
it was crafted, or what occasion we're 
marking by uncorking it. We drink wine 
because it has the ability to capture a 
moment, to represent an event, like cel- 
ebrating an anniversary or the Eucharist 
Wine is relational. Like a meal, it brings 
people together. To quote a French 
proverb, “In water one sees one's own 
face; but in wine one beholds the heart 
of another." So drink up—you've got ab- 
solutely nothing to be afraid of. W 


ier than vodka and sake. They're still on 
roll, actually, and liquor stores are 
full of rows and rows of variet- 
ies and flavours of vodka while 
their selections of sake con- 
tinue to grow. 

Vodka's popularity is under- 
standable. It's subtle, easy to Wind 
mix and tastes okay even if it's 
rubbing-alcohol cheap. Of course, 
like anything popular, vodka's been 


poked and prodded almost out of recog- : 
nition, sold to us in almost infinite flavour : 
variations, most of which are as subtle as : 
a big stick. Vodka has become the base for : 
all kinds of achingly sweet, artificial tasting : 
concoctions, in flavours ranging from cherry : 
to vanilla to plain gross. An unfortunate : 
side-effect of the flavoured vodka trend : 
seems to be unpalatability—but | can't help : 
but hope. That's why when | saw a bottle : 
of Wokka Saki flavoured vodka on the shelf : 
{ thought | ought to give it a try. Wokka : 


Saki is a double gold medal winner at the 


San Francisco Spirits Competition. It's a UK : 
product that blends vodka with "fine Japa- : 
nese sake and subtle fusion of Asian fruit" : 


In past years, few liquors have been trend- : 


EXTREME seipir. 


This seemed like an easy Saettanter win, a 


capitalization on vodka's ubiquity with the : 


bonus of sake's whiff of the exotic. 


touches of sake, and a gently peachy, apri- 


coty type of fruitiness. Despite the fruit in : 
its flavour, there was no sweetness to the ; 
Wokka Saki. It tasted perfect to my anti- : 


sweet palate. 


Wokka Sakiis smoothanddeliciousenough : 
to be served chilled on its own. Taste it this : 
: way to get a good idea of its flavours. How- ; 
: ever, thanks to its low-profile deliciousness, : 
this flavoured vodka is easy to mix as well : 
Mix it with some tonic water for a fancied- : 
up vodka tonic if you want to keep it simple. : 


While the sake flavouring seemed : 
like a good’idea to me, | wasn't : 
totally sold on the fruit. | poured : 
my first taste of the spirit with : 
visions of blueberry vodka in my : 
head, The scent of the spirit reas- : 
sured me, though. It has a subtle : 
aroma, with hints of fruit behind a : 
rich sake scent. No hint of sweetness. : 
When | tasted my shot, | was sold. Again, : 
there was no hint of sweetness. Instead, : 
there was just the smooth, rich flavour of : 
good vodka, propped up with the winey : 


Sake-flavoured vodka is one sipped la that's worth it 


The sweetness of the tonic water brings out 


. the sweeter fruit flavours of the vodka. If 
: you'd like another highball-type drink, try 
: mixing up a variation on the Moscow Mule, 
% which traditionally combines vodka, lime 
: and ginger beer. The sake in Wokka Saki 
: makes a great buddy for a nice spicy ginger 
} beer. For a more classic cocktail, take advan- 
+ tage of the vodka's smoothness to mix up a 
: martini with just a splash of vermouth anda 
: couple dashes of bitters. 


Don't be turned away from this great 


; product by its buckets of trendiness. This 
: is high-quality product, not bargain base- 
: ment trendsploitation. W 


This is a recipe from Gary Regan, a 
cocktail legend. He recommends Mar- 
tini & Rossi dry vermouth as the best 
flavour match for Wokka Saki. 


_2-V2 ounces Wokka Saki 
ounce dry vermouth 
2 dashes cocktail bitters 
Lemon twist for garnish. 


Fill a cocktail shaker with ice, then 
pour in the Wokka Saki, vermouth and 
bitters. Stir, then strain into a chilled 
cocktail glass, Garnish with a lemon 
twist If you like. 


’ 


TOKYO MULE 


Use a nice spicy ginger beer for this 
recipe. | used "Old Tyme" brand, which 
1 found at Sobey’s. 


2 ounces Wokka Saki 

11/2 ounces lime juice 

6 ounces ginger beer (or just use 
enough to fill your glass) 


Fill a highball glass with ice, then add 
Wokka Saki and lime juice. Stir to com- 
bine, then top it up with ginger beer. Uv 


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— 


i OEIC UCL CCL 


| ARTS 


- COVER // THE DROWSY CHAPERONE 


Labour of love 


Originally written as a wedding gift, The Drowsy Chaperone skips 
parody and embraces musical theatre for its lavish escapism 


STEP BY STEP > The! Drowsy Chaperone 


DAVID BERRY 
// De 

‘ou canis = the cre- 
a of The Boake pene 
might have been a bit trepidacious to let 
their creation go. Thou 
an awful long way from its 
cluding, of course, a Tony-winning, 674 
show run on Broadway—the take-off of 
1920s vaudevillian musicals began as a 
pretty remarkably _—— project: the 
rio of Don McKellar, Lisa Lambert and 
Gregg Morrison originally put together 
che show as a wedding present for their 
friends Bob Martin and Janet Van De 
Graaf. Given its nature, it makes sense 
‘hat, no matter where the show went— 
xom the Toronto bar where it premiered 
through major theatres in the city, from 
3roadway to London's West End to a 30: 
tity tour of Canada and the US—the ori- 
znators had some hand in its production, 


t ice come 


roots—in 


takes 


an unabashed s' 


up to an including starring in it 
All that changed last year, when direc 


tor Max Reimer started puttin thera 


show for Vancouver's Playhouse Theatre 
Company, where he serves as both artistic 
lirector and general manager. Despite 
earlier statements to the contrary—MckK. 
ellar once told the CBC that he couldn't 
imagine anyone other than Martin tak- 
ing on the role of the Man in Chair, the 
character he created after he first saw 
his gift and the audience's guide to the 
eponymous, “long-forgotten” musical— 
they let Reimer take a swing. It would 
seem as ifthey couldn't have picked a bet- 
ter caretaker for their labour of love: Re- 
imer's show earned the same accolades 
The Drowsy Chaperone has become accus- 
tomed to, hailed by some as the finest of 
last year's Vancouver season. 

McKellar, Lambert and Morrison's 
boon has turned out to be Edmonton's, 
as well: with a few minor changes, it is 


20 // ARTS 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 


tance on musical theatre / 


PRP tee sess ae aes 


23 Where Do We 
Come From? 


Reimer's version of the hit musical that 
will be strutting across the Citadel stag- 
es this September, For his part, Reimer 
thinks the originators had little to worry 
about: as he tells it, The Drowsy Chaper- 
one is a pretty hard show to mess up. 

"What's really nice about a piece that's 
well-written and clever as this is that 
it really lends itself to interpretation," 
Reimer exclaims with a casual excite- 
ment during a break in rehearsal for 
the Citadel run. Not seeing any reason 
to blow up a good thing, Reimer’s major 
changes have come in the form of set 
design, replacing the original's clever- 
though-cramped dramatization of the 
Man in Chair's apartment to something 
a little more free-wheeling and befit- 
ting of a lavish musical. 

"The big difference is that, in the origi- 
nal, the man’s world was the set, and 
they tricked the set so that entranceways 
would come out of fridges, and a bed 


SEP 9, 2009 


vinta 


TTT TELL COL LUCE 


would come out of an ironing board,” 
he explains. "What I thought was that 
his imagination could be bigger, that it 
could transport us more completely. 
“There are still lots of aspects of his 
world, but when we actually go for 
the big ‘20s musical, we just go there,” 
he continues. "What we lose with the 
tricks, we gain with his perspective, 
because he wanders in like a ghost 
through his own world. To me, it feels 
very much like we're seeing it through 
his perspective: it's not just a narration, 
where he's sitting off to the side ex- 
plaining what's happening—he's in it.” 


For Reimer, the Man in Chair's immer- 
sion into the musical helps highlight the 
fact that The Drowsy Chaperone is, essen- 
tially, two plays intertwined: onea flashy 
though somewhat airheaded song-and- 
dance play, and the other a more sober, 
though still acutely observed and wry, 


Arts Reviews 
Find reviews of past theatre, 
dance and visual arts shows on 
our website. 


vueweekly.com 


OO TTT TTC Lo LLL LCL Eee 


play about a solitary man who finds 
some of his purest enjoyment in a bit 
ofsimple escapism. Through the Man's 
comments and asides—which range 
from sincere appreciation of the artistry 
on display to cynical summations of the 
actors’ careers to near-rants about the 
problems with intermissions and candy- 
wrapper crinkling at the theatre—we 
are taken as much through his head as 
through the cheesy musical he so thor- 
oughly enjoys. 

And it's crucial to Reimer that the au- 
dience understands that enjoyment. 
Though The Drowsy Chaperone came at 
a time when the reaction to lavish, big- 
budget musicals was in full force even on 
Broadway—witness the success of things 
like the parodic Spamalot, the cynical Av- 
enue Q, the campy, tongue-in-cheek Hair- 
spray—it is, as he explains, an entirely 
different beast. 

“It's not tongue-in-cheek parody,” Re- 


ae "While we had the big 

t and the backpush to it, right down the 
middle comes this one that says, ‘You know what, 
we can love this thing straight up.’ 

"This was created by people who know and love 
musical theatre,” Reimer continues. "A lot of 
times, I think, parody is done by people who are 
annoyed at musicals, or who know them but who 
are bored and tired of them. This isn't like that: 
this is more of a valentine than a parody. It's like 
when you have fun with family, your brothers 
and sisters or something: you're having fun with 
them, but there's a love under there that allows 
you to do all kinds of things." 

Ensuring that love comes across, then, is what Re- 
imer sees as the key to the play (he points out that 
one of the big problems in London, to date about 
the only place where The Drowsy Chaperone hasn't 
won raves, was that audiences and critics went 
in expecting a big, broad parody). The musical- 
within-the-play is an easy thing to look down on: 
a wedding narrative that trades in hammy Euro- 
pean stereotypes, punny gangsters, extended spit 
takes, a recurring monkey theme in the songs and 
plot twists that even the Man in Chair can't help 
but mock, it is in many ways the quintessential 
bad musical, a sitting duck for snide remarks. But 
for the wider play to work, the audience has to ap- 
preciate how much the Man—stand-in for the cre- 


at the peak of its powers when it’s doing some- 
thing more than just lionizing a particular genre: 
itis ultimately a love letter to theatre in general, 
and its power to move us. Man in Chair openly 
admits to wanting some escape, some chance to 
forget his drab apartment and quotidian life, and 
telish in spectacle. But this is nothing so simple 
as an encouragement to show up and tune out 
the rest of the world: the Man keeps polluting this 
fantasy world with real-life facts, keeps—despite 
his harsh words for anything that pulls us away 
from the illusion—reminding us that theatre 
does not exist in a vacuum, that itis given form by 
and gives form to the world aroundit, even if that 
world is as small as one apartment. 


"He's so transported by theatre," Reimer reflects 


lovingly. "You know, we talk about what theatre 
can do and what it does do. I believe it does two 
things: I believe that it can be transformative, but 
itcan also be conformational. There's a part of our 
social wiring that loves to have an experience ina 
group, and that's the power of theatre. 

"For him, it was a connection to his mother: he 
was given this record that he plays by his mother, 
and it's something he shares with her," Reimer 
continues. "That's a really interesting insight, how 
art is a great topic for human hearts-—that it's how 
we pull together. Ultimately, I think, it's just sort of 
how coming to something like Drowsy Chaperone 


ators as much as the audience themselves—truly and being confirmed is a great moment." V 
appreciates it, for all its ridiculous elements. sa eed 
“It's not a smarmy or slick or superior thing at —_ SAT, SEPS- SUN, OCT 4 

all," offers Reimer. "That's really hard to do, be- THE DROWSY CHAPERONE 

cause when you're delivering these lines,alotof  OIRECTED BY MAX REIMER 

them are melodramatic or especially naive. But BOOK BY BOB MARTIN, DON MCKELLAR 

if you can deliver them, as I've said, like you're —_ LYRICS & MUSIC BY LISALAMBERT, 

family, and you love this stuff, both aspects be- GREGG MORRISON 

come so much more fulfilling.” STARRING JAY BRAZEAU, SUSAN GILMOUR, DEBBIE 
TIMUSS, JOHN ULLYATT 

CITADEL THEATRE (9828 ~ 101A AVE), $60 ~ $95 


That's essential, because for all of Reimer's "val- 
entine to musicals” talk, The Drowsy Chaperone is 


original Toronto cast. It's roughly as successful as 
all its previous runs. 


her inauspicious beginnings. : 

es the course it took to CNd : eae 
in stages. : 2006 

i 4 : The Drowsy Chaperone opens on Broadway on 

: May 1, with the man for whom it was originally a 

*é : wedding gift, Bob Martin, in the role of the Man 

mainstays Don McKellar, : in the Chair. Coming with a high pedigree—be- 

id Greg Morrison initially de- : sides its previous success, it was nominated for 14 

wsy Chaperone as a wedding : New York Drama Desk Awards four days before it 

friends Janet Van De Graff and : even had its official opening on May 1—It would 

jething still reflected in the : play for 674 performances, closing on December 

-be-betrothed couple in : 30, 2007 after earning two Tonys, for score and 

t ay. Martin enjoyed : book, and four Drama Desk Awards, including 

: : outstanding musical, score, book and music. 


(ee eee RR ae 
2007 
: A little more than a year after it opened on 
: Broadway, The Drowsy Chaperone opens on Lon- 
: don's West End. This will mark the show's first 
: misstep, with tepid reviews and middling houses. 
it actually closes down in August, six months be- 
fore producers had initially planned to pull it. 
Slightly better news came in the form of a national 
{ tour, starting in Toronto in September and visiting 
+ more than 30 cities across the United States. 


ES 
: 2008 

Vancouver's Playhouse Theatre Company debuts 
: the first production of The Drowsy Chaperone 
: that did not involve the original creative team. 
. + This proves no impediment: Max Reimer's show 
}} once again draws rave reviews, and ends up as 
panyshistory 


+ ty 
si ¢ 


® 
® 
* 
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SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY ARTS //21 


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GIRL TALKERS >> A trio of local comediennes hoot Hey Ladi ‘ 


FAWNDA MITHRUSH 
// FRSIMDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


TO 


Wis. it's a sleepover, a frilly bridal 
: shower or a raunch-ridden stagette 
party, there's something rather funny 
that happens when women get together 
and indulge in their girlishness. The in- 
herent giggles could lie in the gossip, the 
silly games or in the phallic-shaped party 
treats, but most who've attended any of 
these gatherings knows that there's al- 
ways some sweetly flavoured booze being 
passed around which helps to get things 
rolling. That nectar, along witha few other 
girly indulgences, are what makes the Hey 
Ladies! night at the Roxy such a success. 

For those who have never been, Hey La- 
dies! is part of the Roxy Theatre's perfor- 
manice series. Now in their third season, 
the Ladies—that notorious gaggle of lo- 
cal comediennes Davina Stewart, Leona 
Brausen, and Cathleen Rootsaert—host a 
periodical Friday night variety show that 
features all sorts of news and goodies ca- 
tered to Edmonton women. 

"We call it a live info-tainment show," 
says Stewart. "We have guests who have 
businesses in Edmonton, but also artists 
and musicians. And we always have a fea- 


tured liquor oralcohol. A lot of people can 
only go out one night a month—in that 
one night they've got to get all the bases 
covered. So you get your bar moments, 
you get your shopping moments. It's not 
just for women, but our idea was that 
there weren't a lot of things just for ladies 
entertainment-wise, and that's who's usu- 
ally the person who's buying the tickets 
to the event and deciding which show to 
go see. So rather than dragging someone 
who doesn't want to go, this is a chance 
for people to go out with their girlfriends. 
It's become an all-ages event—girls will go 
with their moms and grandmothers, so it 
fills the whole generational gap too." (In 
the press release it's touted as a “comedy, 
gameshow, boozy, prize-filled hag fest!" Of 
course your Grandma will love it.) 


In addition to promoting upcoming 
arts events and news around town, each 
show also features a Dear Ladies segment 
("That's our Dear Abby moment," explains 
Stewart) and a live round of the Match 
Game. In the lobby at half-time there's 
shopping, booze and food sampling, and 
of course, lots of weird and imaginative 
prizes. This time the Ladies host their 
"Back To School, Back To Rule" show, 


featuring artist Spider Yardley Jones, Mr. 
Noel (a teacher), honorary Lady Donovan 
Workun, stylist Micheal Berard and musi- 
cal interludes with the Provincial Archive. 

"We have too much stuff for each show, 
we're always saving things for the next 
one,” says Stewart, noting that each Hey 
Ladies! is a unique one-off deal, and of- 
ten sells out. "We could do it almost ev- 
ery week. We get to talk and kind of be 
saucy about things—Leona is always the 
sauciest. I don't want to say it is The View 
because that's just a bunch of chickens 
talking. But there is something entertain- 
ing about girlfriends getting together, and 
we've made the audience another girl- 
friend at the bar." 

Gentlemen, be not afraid, she adds. 
"There's a lot of fellas who are figuring 
out that there's a whole room of ladies 
in here. There's a couple guys going 
‘hey, this is a place to meet them!" And 
their Grandmas, too. WV 


AA 


row 


FRI;SEP 4 (8PM) 
REY mee 


Seen LA LALLA LL LCL 


VISUAL ARTS // WHERE DO YOU COME FROM? 


Made in Edmonton 


Local artists are using posters to answer the 
titular question in Where Do You Come From? 


DAVID BERRY 
// ORVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Gris can bean odd thing, The 
Internet, with its globe-spanning 
communicative powers and seemingly 
endless opportunities for social net- 
working, unquestionably allows us to 
build some form of community, con- 
nected via data packets as it is. But that 
form of interconnection has almost 
equally unquestionably hurt our physi- 
cal communities, and all that comes 
with it: the incidental contact of a non- 
niche world, the sense of place, the idea 
ofa locally shared future. 

There are certainly some who don't 
See this as any great loss, but you 
couldn't count local designer Gabe 
Wong among them. His newest proj- 
ect, Poplar and Pine Press, has been 
founded with the expressed purpose 
of fostering a sense of connection, both 
between Edmonton and Canadian art- 
ists and the wider public, 

"Edmonton needs more representation 
of its arts culture. Anyone who looks 
can see a lot of stuff happening across 
the disciplines—theatre, visual art, 
dance, music—butit all sort of compart- 
mentalizes into their own fields," Wong 
explains, surprisingly animatedly, over 
coffee. "I want to try and bring that to- 
gether. To create a sense of space in an 
arts community is important: if we're 
always looking at the larger scene, we're 
not developing our own voice.” 


Though that ambition will take on vari- 
ous forms as Wong begins to stretch his 
legs—including a cookbook with local 
gourmand Julianna Mimande that will 
intersperse recipes with profiles of local 


food producers—its most immediate in- 
carnation is Where Do You Come From?, 
most simply described as a poster show. 
Wong tracked down graphic designers 
and illustrators from both Edmonton 
and abroad, including a healthy selec- 
tion of ex-pats, and asked them to create 


a poster design based on the eponymous 
question, taken from French post-im- 
Pressionist Paul Gaugin's statement/ 
title "Where Do We Come From? What 
Are We? Where Are We Going?" 

The theme of the show obviously 
dovetails nicely with Wong's current 
concerns—he points out that we can't 
really know where we're going until 


1 want to try and 
bring that together. 
To create a sense 

of space in an 

arts community is 
important: if we're 
always looking at the 
larger scene, we're 
not developing our 
own voice. 


we've discovered what we're made of— 
though the connections hardly end 
with the theme. For Wong, the choice 
of medium was quite deliberate, as the 
design of a poster both gave him a wide 
pool of talent to draw on and, he feels, 
makes the art much more accessible 
to the average citizen, both in terms of 
their message and their cost. 

"Posters are very deliberate in what 
they're saying; if you think of what they're 
usually used for, social events, they're say- 
ing things directly, where art can be alittle 
more free-form,” Wong explains. "Also, 
art should be affordable and accessible. I 
wanted people to feel like they could own 
a piece of art without it being really ex- 
pensive. It'd be nice for more people to be 
aware of the scene in Edmonton, and feel 
some ownership ofit." VW 

OPENS THU, SEP 3 

WHERE DO YOU COME FROM? 

PRESENTED BY POPLAR AND PINE 

THE ARTERY (9535 JASPER AVE) 


PYPTTPNUTDUD TD TILT TTVTDILINTL ETT EEEUTUUEOTEUUOQUUOQOU TOTO QOUONOO ONTO ONIN I OHIO TTI IIIT IIIT ITN MITINITTONTITNTTINTUOITUTOOTN TeMnUOUPONUOUNUOTU UNCOOL COTE TONITE LCLCLOLLCLOLO ee eUU UU UELECCOCOOO TTS TETEEELLLOUCULOO CTCL LUO EE LCCCLCLCCL LO LLL ccc LLL 


COMIC COMMENTARY // ARCHIE MARRIES VERONICA 


Forever 17 


A fantasy marriage storyline and updated look don't deliver any new maturity to unchanging Archie comics 


BRYAN BIRTLES 
// GRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


s comic books have become less 
the contraband stuffed under a 
camp mattress and more a treasure 
to be socked away in protective my- 
lar and read with white gloved hands, 
the tone and graphics of many comics 
have become more serious as well. In- 
stead of episodic one-offs to be picked 
up weekly or monthly for a few bucks, 
expensive miniseries and graphic nov- 
els take characters on a permanent arc 
that affects the whole canon, or at least 
specific timeline. 
Archie Andrews and his friends and 
neighbours in Riverdale are different— 
every month, Archie is still in Miss 


Grundy’s class at Riverdale High next to 
Jughead, who is dreaming about burg- 
ers. He's still got a date with Betty on 
Friday and Veronica on Saturday. He's 
still in detention being supervised by 
Mr. Weatherbee, and Dilton is still tutor- 
ing him in science. And once he gets out 
of detention, he'll be down at Pop Tate's 
chocolate shop with the whole gang. 
That's the point of Archie—his is an 
idyllic world where everyone is 17 for- 
ever. All the girls are pretty, all the lawns 
are green, everyone's parents are mar- 
ried. His presentis our imagined past—a 
place where the biggest problem facing 
the world isn’t pollution, AIDS, drugs, 
poverty or any host of other mind-bog- 
gling problems, but how Archie is go- 
ing to fix his jalopy before the big dance 


‘ 


down at the teen centre. 

This idealized world, created and rein- 
forced over the 65-year history of Archie 
Andrews, is part of the reason why the 


*recent experiments in the series haven't 


succeeded. Though the "new look” se- 
ries and the recent "Archie Marries Ve- 
ronica" storyline have no doubt been big 
sellers in addition to being big news, ar- 
tistically the stories are bankrupt—there 
is an esthetic and thematic disconnect 
that keeps the storylines from being 
anything but disappointing. 


Full of cop outs and easy answers, the 
special editions fail because they don't 
deliver on what they promised—name- 
ly, a more “mature” comic. Full of the 
esthetic hallmarks of the new breed of 


comics—continuity throughout a mini- 
series, grander themes and increas- 
ingly detailed artwork in the case of the 
"new look” series—but, in the end, they 
deliver nothing of the emotional punch 
readers might have been expecting and 
are, in effect, shallow imposters. 

Inthe first of the “new look" series, the 
dark tone of the artwork is undercut 
by the fact that the problem the gang 
faces is that Veronica is dating a "bad 
boy” whose worst sins are driving a 
motorcycle and cheating on tests—not 
particularly egregious, In the latest spe- 
cial edition, where Archie proposes to 
Veronica, the entire plot line is negated 
on the fourth page when it’s subtly re- 
vealed that what follows is a fantasy—a 
reveal that will no doubt come in handy 


at the end of the arc when everything 
goes back to normal. Without any 
consequences, the story means liter- 
ally nothing. Fans that are perturbed 
by Archie's decision can no doubt 
look forward to another cash-grabbing 
miniseries a year from now in which he 
"imagines" that he marries Betty. 
Putting characters in new situations 
is not necessarily a bad decision, but 
doing it the right way would make the 
ostensibly updated Archie comics more 
artistically appealing, not to mention 
more honest. W 
ARCHIE: THE PROPOSAL 
ARCHIE COMIC PUBLICATIONS 
24 PP, $2.50 


eS ae 
SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


ARTS // 23 


Dest 


TOP 30 FOR THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 3, 2009 

Sam Baker - Cotton (music road) 

Slaid Cleaves - Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away... (music road) 

Steve Earle ~ Townes (new west) 

Watermelon Slim — Escape From The Chicken Coop (northem blues) 

Christian Hansen & The Auttistics - Power Leopard (ch) 

Modest Mouse — No One's First, And You're Next (epic) 

Levon Helm — Electric Dirt (dirt farmer) 

Wilco — The Album (nonesuch) 

Raul Malo — Lucky One (concord) 

. The Dead Weather — Horehound (wamer) 

. Reverie Sound Review - S/T (boompa) 

Tinariwen —Imidiwan: Companions (outside) 

. Gurf Morlix - Last Exit Te Happyland (gurf moriix) 

. Black Mold -— Snow Blindness Is Crystal Antz (Flemish eye) 

. Joe Henry - Blood From Stars (anti) 

. Tommy Castro — Hard Believer (alligator) 

. The Low Anthem —Oh My God, Charlie Darwin (nonesuch) 

. Dan Mangan — Nice, Nice, Very Nice (fu:m) 

. Behemoth — Evangelion (metal blade) 

20. Lee Harvey Osmond —A Quiet Evil (atent) 

21. Various - Ribbon Of Highway, Endless Skyway: The Woody Guthrie 
Tribute (music road) 

22. Gwar -— Lust In Space (metal blade) 

23. Magnolia Electric Co. — Josephine (secretly canadian) 

24. Johnny Flynn—A Larum (vertigo) 

25. Neko Case — Middle Cyclone (anti) 

26. Trevor Tehir -Sky Locked Land (riverdale) 

27. The Wailin’ Jennys — Live At The Mauch Chunk Opera House (outside) 

28. Joe! Plaskett - Three (maplemusic) 

29. Neil Young — Fork In The Road (reprise) 

Bob Dylan - Together Through Life (columbia) 


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24. // 


_ Looking for an honest rejection 


Criticism isn't so bad, so long as you know who's doing it 


When it comes to feedback, be it on an : 
art show or a new haircut, there is always : 


an overwhelming pull to only hear the 
negative. Falling back on that tired clich 
that it’s just easier to believe the 
bad things in the world, those 
who want to make art simply 
need to grow a thicker skin. 
Art is meant to be shared in 
the public arena, and that 
means it will be scrutinized, 
speculated, celebrated and 
judged no matter what. 
Moving in-between fine lines of 
honesty and brutality, criticism and whin- 


ing, and previews and nepotism, when : 
there is a hint (or a smack) of rejection : 
or negativity, what should be profession- : 
al quickly slides into something personal. = 
As artists, often in the case of emerging : 
artists unsure of their own path, one diss : 
often turns into all that was needed to : 
second guess yourself, your capabilities : 
and quit your art for something safe from : 


the barbs of outside perception. 


But the context changes if rejection of : 
your work is coming down from an anon- : 
ymous source, a faceless voice, one that : 
doesn't even offer any context or back- : 
ground from which constructive criticism : 
: the article was prompted by the recent 


could be gleamed. 


All of this comes froma recent sit down : 
with local industrial designer and art- : 
ist Adriean Koleric, who wanted to talk : 
about criticism. Starting from his own : 


investigation into looking for honesty 
in reviews of his own work, Koleric was 
interested in talking about how | have 


handled criticism, in both dishing it, but 


mostly taking it. 


found on the Prairie Artsters 
blog, Koleric’s interest in how | 
deal with rejection is a fair one. 


ERS 


yourself out there, often seek- 
ing feedback, and in the realm of 
internet anonymity, can only brace 


: yourself for anything—so why keep doing 


it at all? 
A recent article by the New York Sun- 


Referring to the anonymous/ : 
\\ 3 moniker shielded remarks : 
: growing a garden in a patch of noxious 
: weeds. The bad chokes out the good, and 
: that simply cannot be ignored. 
As artists and writers, you put 
i real feedback should ever be dismissed, 
= but we should note that no feedback exists 
: without attachments to major self-esteem 
: or entitlement issues, which when mixed 
: with the distanciated communication of 
? the Internet, is almost always poisonous. 
day Times's Randy Cohen addresses this : 


: legitimate forums for anonymity (like 
: political dissent), while pinpointing that 
= a major problem of Internet anonymity 
: Is that the crude keeps everyone else 
; at bay. With no boundaries whatsoever, 


trying to maintain a healthy discourse 
with anonymous Internet users is akin to 


That said, | personally don't believe any 


A thousand "That's greats" are no equal 


a With no boundaries whatsoever, trying to maintain 
a healthy discourse with anonymous Internet users 

is akin to growing a garden in a patch of noxious 

weeds. The bad chokes out the good, and that 


simply cannot be ignored. 


exact issue. Arguing anonymous posting 
on the Internet has proved to be more 
toxic for than encouraging of free speech, 


court order put onto Google to divulge 
the identity of one of its users who was 


for further legal redress. Cohen outlines 


_ Admission: 
\ $2 (kids free) 


Handmade Mafia 


At two convenient locations in the heart of Strathcona 


Orange Hall 


> te 
RAYACOM VUE 


PRINT & DESIGN 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 - SEP 9, 200 


Savoy 


Peary 


: for just one "That sucks.” But as a believer 
: in calling-it-like-it-is, | am an advocate for 
: a difference of opinions so long as those 
: opinions are legitimately backed up by a 
: name, or research, and if we're all lucky, 
: a bit of social etiquette. WV 
anonymously defaming public personas : 

: Amy Fung is the editor of prairieartsters.com. 


ment« A 

Pee ae i idee ate Teen ove 
Scene: movie club for teens; ist and 3rd Thu every month 
(no movie on Oct 15; a screening for Teen Read Week on 


the Oct 22}; Spiderman; Sept 3 


AGNES BUGERA GALLERY « 12310 Jasper Ave, 
780.482.2854 + agnesbugeragallery.com » SOTTO VOCE: 
Paintings by Danitle Lemieux, Sept 12-24 « Opening recep- 
tion: Sat, Sept 12, 2-4pm. 

pons leat 
+ Discovery Gallery: WALLPAPER: New sculptural wor 
emerging glass artist Katrina Brodie; until Sept 12+ Lower 
Gallery: HITCHED: Couples in craft; until Oct 3 

ART BEAT GALLERY 26 St-Anne St, St Albert, 
780.499.3579 + artbeat.ab.ca + Artwalle Featuring artworks by 
Saeed Hajatti and Marina Bazos « Sept 3 

ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave « WHERE ARE YOU 
FROM?: Poster show featuring 29 visual creatives 
from Edmonton and beyond » Sept 3-mid Oct+ 


ening: Fri, Sept 4, 8pm; after party to follow at 
par) ee and DJ Campos 


DESIGN CELEBRATING HOPE: Visual communication 
Design students collaboration with members of U of A 


__ FRINGE GALLERY 10516 Whyte Ave, bsmt of the 


Paint + Artworks 
i Sah 7ee-aseexte by James Davies 


GALLERY AT MILNER Stanley A. Milner Library 

ain Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Square, 780.496.7030 
. LOOK AT AOTEAROA: Photographs by 
Chris Gavigan « Until Sept 30 
GALLERY IS-Red Deer Alexander Way, 5123-43 St, 
Red Deer, 403.342.4643 » Arlene Westen solo show « 
Until Sept 26 - Opening reception: Fri, Sept 4 
HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY 1215-102 St, 
780.426.4180 » Main Gallery: SPACES WITHIN | 
WITHIN SPACES: SKY VESSELS: Artworks by Jennifer 
Bowes, Sarah Alford and Shirley Wiebe + Front Room: 
Paintings by Jennifer Dorner « Sept 10-Oct 10 « Open- 
ing receptions: Sept 10, 7-10pm 
HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY-Red Deer Sun- 
works, 4924 Ross St, Red Deer, 403.346.8937 » DO 
NOT GO GENTLE: Paintings by Corinne Anderton - 
Until Sept 20 « Closing reception: Fri, Sept 18, 5-7pm 
(Alberta Arts Days) 
JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY Strathcona Place 
Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 780.433.5807 « 
‘Open: 11:30am-ipm; 3-4pm « TIP OF THE BRUSH: 
Featuring artworks by the instructors and students of 
Strathcona Place + Until Sept 25 


JOHNSON GALLERY . Southside: 7711-85 St, 
780.455.6171; New works by Ada Wong, Julie Drew, Ruth 
Vontobel-Brunner, Audrey Pfannmuller and Daniel 
Bagan. Blown glass by Sol Maya « Northside: 11817-80 
St, 780.479.8424; Artworks by Don Sharpe, Jim Painter, 
Dan Bagan. Historical photographs of Edmonton. 
Wood carvings by Adie. Pottery by Noboru Kubo 


KAMENA 5718 Calgary Tr S, 780.944.9497 * Mon-Wed, 
Fri 1oam-6pm; Thu 10am~-7pm; Sat 1oam-spm « Art- 
works by various artists 

KAASA GALLERY Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave 
+ OPEN PHOTO 2009; Presented by Visual Arts Alberta 
+ Until Sept 30 


LATITUDE 53 10248-106 St, 780.423.5353 « Main 
Space: PRIVATE PROPERTY—ACCESS DENIED: A 
series of security guards in a site-specific installation 
by Thomas Kneubuhler (Switzerland); until Sept 5+ 
ProjEx Room: ART PARAPHERNALIA FOR A MODERN 
WORLD; Stanton's store brings the shopping experi- 
ence into the gallery, investigating the roles of art and 
the gallery in society as an emblem of aesthetics, de- 
sign, lust, desire, wants, needs, and habits; until Sept 5 


LOFT GALLERY sco Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood 
Park, 780.922.6324 » Open every Thu s-9pm; Sat 10-4pm 
« FLORALS AND STILL LIFE: Sept 3-Oct 31 « Art Society 
of Strathcona County general meetings the 2nd Tue 
each month: Sept 8, 7pm 


MCMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, 8440-212 
St, 780.407.7152 « COLLECTING, COLLECTED, COLLEC- 
TIONS: The Women's Art Museum Society of Canada 
show featuring women’s collections « Until Oct 24+ 
Opening reception: Thu, Sept 3, 7-9pm 

MCPAG Multicultural Centre Public Art Gallery, 5421- 
51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.2777 » WILD EXCURSIONS: 
Travelling exhibition; until Sept 8 - Paintings by Carol 
Hama; Sept 11-Oct 7; opening reception; Sun, Sept 13 + 
Dining Room Gallery; New paintings; Until Sept 17 
MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE 
INSTITUTE 9 Mission Ave, St. Albert, 780.651.8176 + 
Aboriginal Veterans Display + Gift Shop » Finger weay- 
ing and sash display by Celina Loyer 

MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM < St. Anne St, St. 
Albert, 780. 459.1528 « DECOYS TO DECORATIVES: the 
History and Art of Decoy Painting + Sept 3-Nov 15 


MUTTART CONSERVATORY 9626-964 St, 780. 
496.875s » SERENDIPITY: Sculpture show + Until Sept 27 


ORTONA ARMOURY 9722-102 St « Open every Sat 
12-5pm, by appointment 780.423.2966/780.431.1737 « 
BACKWARDS STARE: Experimental Drawing Show: 
Works by Tim Rechner and Caitlin Sifin Richards » Sept 
10-Oct 3 » Opening reception: Thu, Sept 10, 7-10pm, 
music by Treejam 

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY 10183-1:2 St 

» Edmonton Contemporary Artists, Society's Seven- 
teenth Annual Exhibition featuring painting, sculpture 
and photography + Sept 8-25 » Opening reception: Fri, 
Sept 13, 7pm; music by the Jerrold Dubyk Quartet 


SCOTT 
"© * RuGUST GROUP 


‘Things, Concept Jewellery Design - Sept 3, 6-gpm 
— eo St, 780.488.3619 « 


canvas by Robert Sinclair; until Sept 8 - Artworks by 
Martha Cole; Sept 12-22 


SNAP GALLERY 10309-97 St, 780.423.1492 - Main 
Gallery: THE GOLEM PROJECT: series by Mark Reb- 
holz + Studio Gallery: Artworks by Anthea Black, SNAP’s 
Winter Artist in Residence; until Sept 5 + Main and 
Studio Gallery: SNAP Membership Exhibition curated 
by Belfast Print Workshop, Northern Ireland; Sept 10- 
‘Oct 17; opening reception: Thu, Sept 10 

SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY Melcor Cultural 
Centre, 45-5 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.0664 » Artworks 
by Margie Davidson; until Sept 5 » OPEN ART 
COMPETITION: Any artist in the province of Alberta, 
competition for beginner, intermediate, advanced and 
3-D; Sept 8-19; opening reception: Fri, Sept 11, 7pm 
STUDIO GALLERY 1: Perron Street, St. Albert 

+ LANDSCAPE INSPIRATIONS; Artworks by Pam 
Wilman + Sept 3-26 » Opening reception: Thu, Sept 3, 
6-9pm; artist in attendance 

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 1121-142 St, 
780.452.9100 » DA VINCI: THE GENIUS: Until Sept 7 + 
IMAX: VAN GOGH: BRUSH WITH GENIUS; until Sept? 


ALLEYSCAPE STUDIO-Red Deer 4330 Ross St 
Alley, 403.597.9788 « THE ACCIDENTAL NATURE OF 
MUCH THAT APPEARS: Small Collages by Donna 
Herrick + Sept 4-Oct 10 


VAAA GALLERY ard Fi, 10215-1212 St, 780.421.1731 « 
Doing What Comes Naturally: Artworks by the mem- 
bership Hand Weavers, Spinners and Dyers of Alberta 
celebrating the United Nations Intemational Year of Fibre 
+ Sept 10-Oct 10 » Opening reception: Sept 10,7-9;3opm 


ee ee 


AUDREYS BOOKS 10702 Jasper Ave, 780.423 3487 « 
Poetry Nights and Fri each month 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE 9624-76 Ave, 780.469.8755 « Story 
Slam: every 3rd Wed of the month 


CARROT CAFE 9351-118 Ave, 780.752.4867 « Carrot 
Writing Circle « Every Tue, 7-9pm; A critique circle the 
ath Tue every month 

CITY ARTS CENTRE 10943-84 Ave, 780.932.4409 « 
talesstorytelling.com «TALES. Monthly Storytelling 
Circle: Tell stories or come to listen; and Fri each 
month « Until Jun, 8pm; $3 (free first time) 


LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR 1103-86 Ave, 
780.479.5382, www.levabar.com » Standing room only, 
poetry every 3rd Sun evening 


ROSIE'S 10475-80 Ave, 780.932.4409 talesstorytelling. 
com » TALES: Edmonton Storytelling Café: TALES. 
Alberta League Encouraging Storytelling open mic « 1st 
‘Thu each month, 7-9pm; Pay-What-You-Will (min $6) « 
Flying High: Festival Teaser: a preview of the TALES. 
Storytelling Festival at Fort Edmonton Park; Thu, Sept 
3, 7-9pm; Pay what you will ($6 minimum) 


ROUGE LOUNGE 1011-17 St, 780,902.s900 + Poetry 
‘Tuesday: Every Tue with Edmonton's local poets » 
8pm + No cover 


STORYTELLING FESTIVAL-FLYING HIGH Fort 
Edmonton Park, Whitemud Drive, Fox Dr , 780.496.8787 

+ fortedmontonpark-ca « freenetedmonton.ab.ca/-tales « 
Fort Edmonton Park and TALES, celebrate the 2oth An- 
niversary featuring special guest teller Norma Cameron. 
Storytellers situated throughout the Park will share 
fictional and true tales; Sept 6-7 + Egge's Barn: Sunday 
Evening Festival Concert: featuring Norma Cameron and 
Cat Thom, Renée Englot, Pearl-Ann Gooding, Bethany 


= 


When: sunday, september 20,2009 


Registration at 11:00 am 
Walk at (:00 pm 


Ellis and Marie Anne McLean, music by Maria Dunn: Sept 
6, 8pm; Sis (adv at TALES. 780.932.4400)/$16 (door) 
UPPER CRUST CAFE 10909-86 Ave, 780.422.8174 +The 
Poets’ Haven: Monday Night reading series presenited by 
Stroll of Poets « Every Mon,7pm « $5 door 


= 


DIE-NASTY SOAP-A-THON Varscona Thestre 
10329-83 Ave, 780.433.3399 « An entire weekend of 
improv madness starring the cast of Die-Nasty plus 
members of Rapid Fire Theatre. Directed by Dana 
Andersen with music by Paul Morg:n Donald - Fri 
Sept 11, 6pm continuously until 1pm on Sun, Sept.a3 - 
Tickets and weekend passes available at the door 


THE DROWSY CHAPERONE Citadel Shoctor Theatre 
9828-101A Ave , 780.426 481 « Main Stage Series: A toe- 
tapping tribute to the golden age of musical theztre. Book 
by Bob Martin and Don McKellar, music and lyrics by Lisa 
Lambert and Greg Morrison « Sept 5-Oct 4 


HEY LADIES! Roxy, Theatre Network « Comedy, 
variety, game, therapy, alibi, dame fest. Learn, laugh 
and tipple with Davina Stewart, Cathleen Rootsaert 
and Leona Brausen as they host special guests « Pri 
Sept 4 » $a1 at TIX on the Square 


NASHVILLE ICONS Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 
Ave, 780.4834051/1-877-529-7829 (Toll Free) » Mayfieldthe- 
atre.ca + By Tracey Power and Will Marks, celebrating the 
evolution of Country Music, from its early days with Hank 
‘Williams, to modern day superstars Garth Brooks and Sha- 
nia Twain « Until Nov 1 « Buffet and Show from $55.99 


STRUT AND JIVE THE NIGHT AWAY Jubilations 
Dinner Theatre, 8882-170 St, Phase Il WEM, Upper Level, 
780.484.2424/1877-214 2424 (Toll Free) jubilations.ca « 
Hustle back to the ‘70s, featuring the funkiest hits of the 
flashiest decade in history » Until Oct 25 


AIDS WALK FORLIFE 


The Walk will do us good. 


VG ES: Tho 5 km event begins at Chorehill Square, winds through 


y nd returns te the start. 
PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, St Edmonton's downtown core ai 


Albert, 780.460.4310 « GUILDED: St. Albert Place Visual ws 00 participants wet ‘ ee 
eae Leas pone BIBS SS Malle SDI SEEE event day. Participants con walk as individuals or as part ofatoam. 
a ee Wikat: 00 event day, partictpants will walk the Slum course and retura to 


i Churehétl Square for food, live music and entertainmest for the whole family. 
Roper Rd, 780.427.1750 * culture.alberta.ca/archives « 


Open Tue-Sat 9am-430pm; Wed gam-gpm + ALBERTA leais: 
WOMEN'S INSTITUTES 100 YEARS OF COMMUNITY 
SERVICE: Celebrating the contributions of the Alberta 


$50,000 in corporate 
Women’s Institutes over the last 100 years - Until Oct 
32 + Free admission 


LOG ON TO RIVE | 
ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave, 


780.453.9186 « royalalbertamuseum.ca « WILDLIFE ee eB ; | fe! 
PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: Photographs featur- | " 
ing a variety of wildlife - Until Sept 13 ae | | 


$120,000 te bs achioved by participants, with am additional 
sponsorship. 


AND 


Artist Society of Alberta = Until Oct 5+ Meet the artists: | _ paRTNERSHIP PROJECT OF raveorvas LOEWE Tie 
Thu, Sept 3, 6:30-9p : Hi 


), HIVE! WUEWEEKLY 
ST ALBERT ART WALK Wares, Meese Clothing, \ 


n by various artists ‘i ITY. 
LDING G q FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH AND AFFECTED BY HIV/AIDS IN YOUR COMMUN! 
FINE ARTS BUILDING UofA Rmi, cANapiax ff) socréré ALL AIDS WALK FOR LIFE PROCEEDS SUPPORT DIRECT SERVICES 
na —tsig nae iptures by eset Rest liSy ee eee AIDS / CANADIENWE 2008 IMAGE BY ACCLAIMED CANADIAN HIV-POSITIVE ARTIST DON SHORT. 
Chloe er operatic Sepp pocpe= lery, Bookstore Perron, Crimson Quill, Roche's Fine citemaate | 


rs ARTS // 25 
SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


- : 


STS TTL LLL LLC CCL COLL LL CC LCL Cc CC LLL Loco CCL 


COMEDY // EXTRACT 


Extracting manliness 


Mike Judge's latest comedy examines emasculated males and the workplace hierarchy 


JOSEF BRAUN 
/? \OSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


e blue collar cousin to his 1999 cult 
film Office Space, Mike Judge's Extract 
examines the ironies of hierarchies in the 
workplace. Joel (Jason Bateman, perfectly 
cast) built his company from the ground 
up. His patented flavourings and the small 
company that produces them have helped 
Joel ease his way intoa big suburban house, 
a big pool, a big car and other middle-class 
comforts that are slowly transforming 
him into a depressive eunuch, unloved by 
his bored wife Suzie (Kristen Wiig), unap- 
preciated by his resentful employees, left 
with nothing to doin his spare time except 
masturbate in one of his three bathrooms 
while Suzie watches Dancing with the Stars 
or get drunk with his New Age dope-fiend 
barkeep buddy Dean (Ben Affleck, alarm- 
ingly convincing). 

A thread of emasculation runs through 
Extract, whether it’s Joel's dwindling sex 
life or the literal testicular injury suffered 
by staffer Step (Clifton Collins Jr.). The only 
sexually satisfied male character in the 
movie is a supremely dimwitted young 
stud-for-hire, and in his case that's all he 
has going for him. Genuine empower- 
ment is enjoyed only by Cindy (Mila Ku- 
nis), a small-time grifter hoping to make a 
bigscore by convincing Step to sue Joel and 
the ultra-manic bus stop ad lawyer played 
by Gene Simmons, groomed here to most 
closely resemble a rabid poodle. Joe! will 


make numerous attempts to break out 
of his rut, including selling his company, 
having an affair and smoking a bong the 
size of a lamppost. But in the end he may 
find his greatest consolation in Step, who 
for all his flaws is truly proud to consider 
himself "just a working man.” 

Extract is unusual among mainstream 
comedies in that Judge conveys affection 
for his characters while at the same time 
refraining from sentimentalizing them. In 
the case of one of the film's most memo- 
rable supporting bits, amusingly embod- 
ied by Beth Grant, he doesn't shy away 
from making her a flat-out racist. When I 
spoke with Judge he recalled how a friend 
once described to him the real-life model 


for Grant's character, listing all her exter- 
nal traits. Judge felt like without having 
met the woman in question he absolutely 
knew her as a type. And perhaps herein 
lies some of the problems with the charac- 
ters in Extract, So many of them feel much 
more like types than people. There are 
times you can'thelp but wonder ifit would 
all come off better as a cartoon, like Judge's 
greatest successes, his television shows 
Beavis and Butthead and King of the Hill. 
To be sure, there are a lot of funny scenes 
in Extract, but some of them are so broad 
and familiar it’s hard to feel completely in- 
vested in them. 

I can't say the same for my experience of 
meeting Judge. His demeanor was som- 


Onlineatvueweekly.com 


eaneennee errs rere rrr rerrrrrres 


Multiple Perspectives 
by Brian Gibson 
Brian Gibson examines how film rarely 


explores more than one perspective in our 
weekly SideVue column 


bre, yet his responses to my questions 
were never less than playful, bouncing 
improbably from his admiration for both 
Badlands and The Big Lebowski—"the kind 
of comedy you can meditate on"—to the 
unlikely kinship between Bob Newhart 
and crime novelist Jim Thompson. 


VUE WEEKLY: When you have an idea 
do you know right away if it's a television 
show or a movie? 

MIKE JUDGE: There were moments when 
I was working on Office Space where I 
thought maybe it should've been a TV 
show. I'd be doing scenes with Gary Cole 
and Ron Livingston, or Gary Cole and Ste- 
phen Root, and thinking how fun it would 
be to just keep writing stuff for these guys 
and see where it goes, But for the most 
part the stuff I've made were things that 
always knew what they wanted to be from 
the beginning. 


VW: It must be tempting to turn any 
idea into television because then, in 
theory at least, you have an opportunity 
to build an audience. 

Mk: At one point Fox did want to make a 
TV show out of Office Space. This was be- 
fore the British version of The Office came 
out, much less the American one. Now I 
feel like we've had two great shows about 
offices and we don't need another one. 


VW: Has your idea of what makes good TV 
or good movies changed since you started 


out, given that the industry has changed 
so much? 

Mf: | think it’s the same. I always think in 
terms of classic TV, Ihaven'treally watched 
prime time TV since I started in this busi- 
ness. I watch a lot of TV but mostly late at 
night, sol tend to see reruns of old shows. 
And reality shows. I was actually hooked 
on American Idol for several seasons. | 
think in a way that’s a sort of classic. It 
could have been on in the 1950s. 


VW: Are there shows that were on when 
you were coming up that still feed you cre 
atively when you see them now? 

MJ: Oh yeah. I saw an old Bob Newhart 
episode about a year ago and it was just 
brilliant. That character Carlin, his whole 
thing was genius. It was that episode 
where Carlin ends up buying the building 
that Bob Newhart lives in, so during his 
therapy session Bob has to explain to his 
patient about the heater not working and 
so on, trying to tell the guy he'sa tightwad 
and a bad landlord. You know there's this 
Jim Thompson novel called The Alcoholics 
Seeing that episode of Bob Newhart made 
me think that The Alcoholics could make a 
good movie. 


VW: Really? 

MJ: It's about a guy a guy who runs a 
treatment centre. He's kind of a Bob Ne- 
whart-like character. 


CONTINUED ON PAGE 3: >> 


TULL CL LO CL LCT CU LLL MS CL LLCO LCM EO ETL LO LEDUC CLUDE PELL CUCL MO MOO TREMOLO COLO CU CCL 


Noir for your money | 


Nikkatsu Noir showcases the fascinating fun of Japanese film noir 


Nikkatsu Noir, Eclipse’s new box set of : 
mukokuseki, or borderless crime thrillers, : 
does indeed convey a persuasive sense of : 
the trans-Pacific kinship alluded to in its : 


title. By 1957, film noir, having been brew- ; 


ing in American studios for more 
than 15 years, had been given a 
name. The films in Nikkatsu 
Noir prove that postwar Japa- 
nese filmmakers were taking 

notes. Noir lurks in the open- 

ing credits rolling over head- 

lights on unspooling pavement, 
in the voice-overs, flashbacks 
and jazz-hued scores, in the haunted 


antiheroes, loose women and well-heeled : 
heavies, in the urban milieu. Yet for all : 
that these films remain deeply Japanese in 4 
their formal exactitude, moral codes, and : 
especially in their social concerns during : 


an era of seismic upheaval 


Set along the Yokohama waterfront, | : 
Am Waiting re-teamed heartthrob Yujiro : 
Ishihara and siren Mie Kitahara after their : 


26 // FILM 


collaboration on the incendiary hit Crazed : 
Fruit. They meet one foggy night after Ishi- : 
hara's ex-pugilist closes down his dockside : 
restaurant to post a letter to his brother : 
in Brazil The image of their figures iso- : 
lated within the gloom of night water : 
will later be elegantly contrasted : 
by a tender scene in which the : 
shadowy stars are silhouetted : 
against the sunlit surface of : 
that same water in the late af- : 
ternoon. The two are bonded : 
by their longing for escape from : 
a Japan that offers them nothing, : 
by preternatural brushes with vio- : 
lence, and a connection to the Yokohama ; 


underworld they'll have to fight to sever. 


Ishihara returns in Rusty Knife, once : 
more running a humble business, once ; 
more trying to wash blood from his : 
: hands, once more giving a riveting, rather 
hammy performance. Kitahara returns : 
too, though this time as a noble innocent ‘ 
untainted by the surrounding corruption. : 


Ishihara’s girlfriend was raped and suicid- : 
ed. He did five years for killing her assail- : 
ant. Kitahara's father also suicided, though : 
it comes to light early in Rusty Knife that : 
the suicide was staged by his enemies. As : 
in | Am Waiting, their enemies turn out to : 
be the same yakuza gleefully capitalizing : 
on Japan's economic miracle. Highlights : 
include French-speaking gangsters and a : 
sequence where a reckless kid takes his : 
girlfriend for one crazy motorcycle ride. 


tack on the police van that results in : 
two deaths and one six-month suspen- : 
sion for supervising officer Daijiro Tamon : 
(Michitaro Mizushima). He doesn't mind : 
the time off so much as the ambiguity as : 
to who staged the attack, and why. Ta- : 
mon turns self-appointed detective, fol- ; 
lowing a trail littered with naked archery = 
murders, suspicious women and this one : 
thug who's always getting disarmed or : 
: gunfire to a car starting, from wide shots 


spilling drinks all over himself. Sharing 


something with the kinetic style of Sam ; 
Fuller, Suzuki's camera often seems on : 
the verge of doing gymnastics. Take Aim : 
at the Police Van is over before you know : 
ner Shun are to destroy the evidence, 


it, leaving you confused, and dazzled. 


Giant-cheeked Joe Shishido gets thrown : 
: The film turns out to be about just how 


: off train in the first 15 minutes of Rusty 


Things get even crazier with Seijun Su- : 
zuki's Take Aim at the Police Van (‘60). : 
The images, shards of exposition and : 
fragments of almost Godardian text- : 
: cues pile up in quick succession—a hand : 
lovingly stroking a rifle, a series of road : 
signs that ominously read "IN THIS AREA : 
HAVE OCCURRED MANY ACCIDENTS,” : 
a guy in a bus drawing the symbol for : 
"Aki" with his finger on a steamy window, : 
2 woman waiting alone under a freeway : 
overpass—and then it happens, the at- : 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 


Knife, but he's back with a vengeance in : 
Cruel Gun Story. Guy looks like he's got : 
the mumps but still comes off tough as : 
Lee Marvin, here playing a convict let out : 
of the pen early under the auspices of : 
some big-time yakuza who want him to : 
lead a heist involving a truckload of gam- : 
bling receipts, one cold-blooded junky, a : 
disabled lawyer, a climax brimming with : 
gunfire and dynamite, and a staggering : 
: film, but to Eclipse's fascinating and very 


body count. Anybody offering spectacu- 


lar death workshops to movie actors in : 


Japan in 1964 must have made a killing. 
"Morals or money, what will it be?" a 
flabby old yakuza boss asks his massage 
therapist. We know what her answer 
will be, but with Shishido’s hitman Shuji 
Kamimura it's a little trickier. Takashi No- 
mura’s A Colt is My Passport opens with 
Kamimura's execution of a major crime 
boss. We're disoriented with quick, jazzy 
cuts from one setting to another, from 


to close-ups, the contrast reflecting the 
eerie disconnect between an assassin's 
rifle and his distant, silent target. After 
the killing Kamimura and his young part- 


take their earnings, and flee the country. 


difficult this last part can be. 

Kamimura and Shun wind up at a sea- 
side inn full of rough truckers and a 
waitress with whom everyone seems to 
fall in love. Shun will sing a pretty song 
and get beaten to a pulp, while Kamimu- 
ra will have to make tough choices fast, 
and take a stand against an avalanche of 
thugs hot for his blood in a surprisingly 
rich and elegiac climax, not only to this 


fun little cinematic showcase. ¥ 


a HHT TOURETTE 


masterful Rashomon gives four 
g takes on the same bloody event 


if bila. a COM 
hers off the edges, crashes torah 
e holes where the roof has fallen in, 
stabs into the puddles and washes across 
the wholescenein great silvery sheets. The 
torrential rain at the start of Rashomon 
(1950) feels nearly apocalyptic, and the 
jose wreck of a city gate where it all 
takes place.does nothing to break up the 
forboding gloom. A young priest (Minoru 
Chiaki) and a middle-aged woodcutter 
{Takashi Shimura) take shelter there, 
seated together, not conversing, though 
through those thick lips encircled by an 
unkempt beard the woodcutter keeps 
muttering, "I don't understand." A third 
man (Kichijiro Ueda), some guy just try- 
ing to get out of the downpour, barges in, 
startsa fire, gets them talking. He wants to 
hear a good story, and winds up with four 
of them, all variations on the same event, 
none ofthem matching up. 

That's Rashomon, a film so persuasive 
in its perplexity it's become an adjective. 
[t won an Oscar, and the Golden Lion at 
Venice. It introduced Akira Kurosawa to 
the world—the West especially—and the 
world watched in fascination despite the 
film's refusal to elucidate its central mys- 
teries. It ensured us that our memories 
are incompatible, but through the movies 
at least each of them could be true for the 
time it takes to tell them. 

Rashomon has been in a 
newly restored print. Ithits Metro Cinema 
this weekend, a place where Kurosawa's 
oeuvre has always found awelcome home 
over the years and hopefully will for years 
to come. I've seen it more times than 
almost any other film, and its singular 
mood never fails to captivate me. An in- 


spired of two short stories 
by perc. vce (Rashomon 


and ‘In @ Grove’), the narrative is a sort 
of labyrinth, a web of flashbacks within 


So the woodcutter journeys deep into a 
sun-dappled grove. Just how deep we get 
® strong sense of from the multitude of 


the trees and shrubs and even pointed the 
camera straight at the sun, a move which 
dazzled all his contemporaries anxious 
to find mules to break. Somewhere in this 
grove the woodcutter finds a lady's hat, and 
then a dead body. There's a trial, where a 
judge never seen or heard elicits testimo- 
nies from those connected to the incident, 
including the alleged killer, a known ban- 
dit (Toshiro Mifune, first seen staring into 
the clouds like a sick animal), the wife of 
the dead man (Machiko Kyo), and, in an 
especially chilling sequence, the dead 
man himself (Masayuki Mori), speaking 
through a medium and giving no comfort- 
ing reports from the afterlife. The bandit 
meets the couple in the woods, tricks the 
husband, ties him up, and ravishes the 
wife. This much is basically clear. But what 
were the circumstances of the husband's 
death? A fight? A killing? A suicide? 

The performances are each compelling, 
varying wildly in tone—Mifune almost 
hysterical in his braggadocio; Kyo wound- 
ed, maybe conniving, sliding seamlessly 
between femme fatale and helpless victim; 
Mori stoic, pathetic, and in death harrow- 
ingly lonely—but united in their synchro- 
nized ambiguity. A fourth variation is giv- 
en that might resolve the contradictions, 
but even this becomes suspect. The cry of 
an abandoned baby eventually brings a 
close to the string of irresolvable storytell- 
ing. Some find the baby’s eleventh-hour 
intervention is sentimental, but it strikes 
me above all as Kurosawa's way of impart- 
ing that life simply goes on, even when the 
only thing certain is infinite uncertainty. It 
finally doesn't matter to us what really hap- 
pened in the grove that day, and howjustice 
is finally meted out isn't even mentioned. 
Maybe the truth lies somewhere in the 
collective crannies of each of the stories. 
Everyone has their reasons for telling what 
they do, so it's hard to say who to should 
trust. But if I had to, I'd put my money on 


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a FILM REVIEWS 


= 


Opening this week 

eS ee SS 
9 

Directed by Shane Acker 

Written by Pamela Pettler 

Starring Elijah Wood, Jennifer Connelly 
John C Reilly, Crispin Glover 

kkk 


It's an appropriate time for 9 to be 
released. Not only is it coming out on 
theeainth day of the ninth month of 
the ninth year of the millennium, it's 
doing so in a time when most people 
are feeling strangled by recession and 
entrenched in increasingly hostile and 
embittered political disputes. Audienc- 
es may consequentially be more open 
than usual to an animated family film 
that's outwardly very bleak, but ripe 


28 7/ FILM 


with undertones of hope. 

That may sound more than a little 
silly given the basic premise: a handful 
of living stitched dolls work together 
to survive attacks from murderous 
machines after the human species has 
been wiped out. But it's so beautiful 
to look at, it's easy to take seriously. 
Even though post-apocalyptic land- 
scapes have become a familiar staple 
in Hollywood films, this imagining is 
made unique by a mid-20th century 
European steam-punk atmosphere in 
an end-of-the world scenario predating 
computer technology. The sky is con- 
cealed by thick black smog, the ground 
is littered with rubble inherited from 
mankind, and the climactic showdown 
takes place in a coal-burning factory 
that could have been pulled from the 


= 


cover of Pink Floyd's Animals. Its Rube 
Goldberg-inspired action sequences are 
also eye candy, forgoing the currently 
omnipresent, incomprehensible manic 
fights in favour of inventive and metic- 
ulously choreographed skirmishes. 

The style alone warrants a viewing, 
but the overall product isn't as fleshed 
out as it could have been. With a run- 
ning time of under 90 minutes and 
virtually no character development, it 
doesn't quite feel like a feature film in 
terms of scope. It's based on an Oscar- 
nominated 2005 short of the same 
name that featured no dialogue, and 
in which the nature of the setting and 
characters wasn't made explicit. By vir- 
tue of this, the emphasis was on the 
visual artistry. Although a feature film 
without dialogue would likely be com- 
mercial suicide, it doesn't help that the 
conversation is so stilted and exposi- 
tive. It only serves as a reminder that 
it was written for the express purpose 
of extending upon and explaining the 
source material. 


that full eali 


"characters are representative of 


ferent roles within so there's the 
leader, the soldier, the intellectual, the 
everyman and others. To some extent, 
it functions as a critique of the bound- 
aries of authority in society. But appre- 
clating it on this level is difficult, as this 
subtext is underdeveloped considering 
how blatant some of the symbolism is 
that seeks to draw attention to it. 

In order to be properly enjoyed, it 
has to be approached in terms of style 
rather than substance, But there's cer- 
tainly something to be said for style 
when the dreary atmosphere it creates 
is successful enough to make you to be 
emotionally invested in the plight of a 
supernatural doll creature. The visceral 
response it evokes will satisfy kids of 
all ages, and its originality more than 
makes up for its shortcomings. 

CODY CIVIERO 
JT CODY@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Is Anybody There? 
Directed by John Crowley 

Written by Peter Harness 

Starring Bill Milner, Michael Caine 
kkk 


Are all only children this endearingly 
morbid? The kid lives with his folks 
in their run-down family-run old folks 
home somewhere in rural England, cir- 
ca 1987. Surrounded by so many souls 
ambling around death's threshold, he 
gets the idea to set up a tape recorder 
to try and capture the nocturnal rattle 


With well over 63,000 members, AUPE is Alberta's Largest Union. 
AUPE represents more than 7,500 support staff members at 14 Alberta post-secondary institutions and 3 school districts. 


‘waril sill MW 


yrs 

josts who haven't oui: 
ep So 10-year-old £,, 
( ner) sets out one mo, 
ing with his headphones on, hoping .. 
hear transmissions from the lang . 
the dead. He nearly gets his wis 
the Amazing Clarence (Michael c;,,.. 
narrowly avoids running him over , 
his magic van. 

The encounter constitutes 4 . 
generational meet-cute betwee, 
precocious oddball fixated on spirity; 
ism and this ornery widower, a 
philanderer and retired stage magi: 
driven to suicide by guilt and lonelin. 

It doesn't take a psychic to see that ¢); 
pair will become ostensibly unlike), 
pals over the course of Is Anybody 
There? Edward's bored and desp 

for some paranormal action—who 
gonna call? Clarence needs someon. 
to help redeem his tainted memori 
and confirm his talents, and nothinc 
fits the bill like a young innocent 

ily impressed by card tricks or a p 
séance. (Clarence also needs som 

to give him a reason for grooming 
shaven and under-slept, Caine |: 
like a werewolf suffering from 
loss.) It's obvious these two were 

for each other. 

Edward's parents, however, are 3 
other story. His mum (Anne-Maric 
Duff) works her fingers to the bo 
to keep their place in runnin 
while dad (David Morrissey) becon 
increasingly negligent thanks to 
onset of midlife crisis. He comes ho 
one day with a designer mullet to | 
perfect his I'm-the-next-drumme 
Maiden look. He's aching to win th 
affection of their teenage employee 


but. mostly Just manages to embarrass 
himself and everyone else. 

There's a lot going on in Is Anybody 
There?, though rest assured every- 
thing fits all too neatly into the the- 
matic thrust of Peter Harness’ script, 
which tries to balance the macabre 
with saccharine whimsy, though the 
latter wins out by a long shot. It's 
cheerier territory for Boy A director 
John Crowley, but his approach sim- 
ply feels more generic. The saving 
grace is the cast, and Caine’s elderly 
Alfie does have his moments, such as 
the lovely little scene where the old 


atheist whispers his dead wife's name 


in the mirror with the sad flicker of a 
hope that she might answer. Milner's 
not excessively ingratiating, yet he's 
saddled with a character whose jour- 
ney isn't as compelling as his starting 
point, which is simply to say he was 
more interesting when he was just a 
troubled tyke and not the prop of an 
over-eager screenwriter. Both Duff 
and Morrissey shine in their surpris- 
ingly well-drawn supporting «charac- 
ters, yet here too, their happy end- 


ing feels annoyingly pushy. Only the’ 


quirky collection of aged residents 
is overwhelmingly tough to bear, 
though even here | blame the material 
over the actors. The sort of dottiness 
and sentimentality on display in their 
scenes careens between flabby farce 
and the sort of sap you'd expect from 
religious programming. 

JOSEF BRAUN 

// }OSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


MICHAEL C. WAS 


O'Horten 

Written and directed by 
Bent Hamer 

Starring Bard Owe 

kk KIO 


Every one of us is charged with finding 
our own private balance between stay- 
ing on track and surrendering to the 
call of diversion. When we look back, 
which of these things will have ruled 
us? Which granted us that thing that 
we ultimately lived for? The thing 
about Odd Horten (Bard Owe), the 
thing that makes him such a wonder- 
ful character for a charming little 
film like the one named after him, is 
that he actually took as his vocation 
a commitment to traversing the same 
route over and over, taking pride in 
sliding back and forth with maximum 
efficiency and minimum discomfort. 
He was a railway engineer, cultivat- 
ing the Oslo-Bergen line for 40 years. 
When we meet him he's retiring at 
the age of 67. They give him a party 
and a little commemorative train as 
a parting gift. A bachelor, he seems 
to have nothing to do now save the 
maintenance of his simple pleasures, 
his pipe and his beer. But without ex- 
plicitly indicating some inner urge to- 
ward adventure—our hero is a man of 
few words—he'll use his retirement 
to quietly cede his destiny to the dic- 
tates of chance. 

O'Horten is the third feature from 
Norwegian writer/director Bent 
Hamer. Like his period piece Kitchen 
Stories, in which social scientists ex- 
amined the habits of bachelors, and 


Factotum, the melancholy comedy of 
dreary day jobs and career drinking 
based on Charles Bukowski's novel 
of the same name, O'Horten moves 
to its own quirky and subtle sense 
of comic propulsion. | enjoyed the 
film very much. Still, after watching 
it | caught myself and wondered if it 
maybe wasn't all a bit too slight—but 
that's a self-conscious film critic talk- 
ing. Hamer's style is unassuming. His 
story seems threaded so loosely as to 
tear with the slightest force. Yet upon 
scrutinizing my memories of O'Horten 
some weeks later, | found that so many 
individual moments were still with 
me and giving me pleasure, moments 
that remain vivid, curious, warm, rich 
in detail, and finally adding up to a 
lot more than it might first seem. A 
quieter variation on About Schmidt, 
it's a portrait of life a little frayed and 
grey but still chugging ahead, still be- 
ing explored however one can still 
manage. And it conveys an optimism 
that's pretty rare in movies this per- 
sonal or this artful. 

Shot by John Christian Rosenlund, 
who also shot Factotum as well as 
The Bothersome Man, another, even 
more pecullar Norwegian comedy, 
O'Horten is filled with wintry cold 
nights that feel strangely warm, es- 
pecially in sequences like that where 
Odd exits a favoured watering hole to 
find people sliding home down newly 
iced-over streets. The nearly silent 
nights imbue Odd's wanderings—into 
a strange child's bedroom where he's 
forced to spend the night, into the 
home of an eccentric old tippler, into 
a car with a blindfolded driver—with 


MY FAVOURITE COMEDY OF 2005! 


It’s original and funny.” 


-AINT IT COOL NEWS 


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‘JASON BATEMAN 


a pointed sense of possibility Things 
do get precariously absurd, yet Owe, 
with his soft, handsome blue eyes and 
that mouth that burrows into mong- 
tached, rumpled cheeks whenever he 
smiles, makes it all seems more or 
less reasonable. Maybe this is how 
you get after four decades of train 
travel and dutiful service, perfectly 
calm and composed, and ready to go 
completely off the rails. 


JOSEF BRAUN 
//JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
Now Playing 


SESS aS 
The Final Destination 3-D 
Directed by David Ellis 

Written by Eric Bress 

Starring Bobby Campo, Shantel VanSan- 
ton, Mykelti Williamson 

kit 


If the 3-D movie event is a phallic ex- 
perience—which it is—then The Final 
Destination 3-D is maybe a little too 
fixated on the penetrating effect of im- 
paling objects, to an extent that it ram- 
bles on and on about it, making all the 
other 3-D films at the table nervously 
raise their eyebrows when he's not look- 
ing. One scene after another sees things 
fly through the screen after or before 
killing whoever Is in Its path, in turn the 
blood and gore as a result of the impale- 
ment flying out toward the audience. It's 
enough to say, "Enough already’—which 
all depends on how forward one might 
feel in accusing a film of being a little 
too obsessed with Mommy's penis, or 
whatever Freudian diagnosis might be 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 30 >> 


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<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 


applied here. | don't know—! would 
rather not say anything. 

The plot, almost identical to the not 
half-bad 2000 kick-off of the Final Des- 
tination series, sees four fresh-faced 
twentysomethings escape their pre-des- 
tined deaths at a race car rally, in which 
a series of unrelated catastrophes kills 
almost everyone else in attendance. 
Nick (Bobby Campo) has a vision prior 
to the event, with every detail falling 
into place once they actually start to 
happen; he is hence cued to convince 
his friends to exit, and promptly save 
their hides. But the cookie continues 
to crumble, placing one survivor after 
another in a horrific death scenario in 
the order in which they were originally 
supposed to die. Nick gains the trust of 
his girlfriend Lori (Shantel VanSanten) 
and the arena's security guard George 
(Mykelti Williamson); they do what 
they can to thwart what is described 
as "fate," but is that even possible? 

The characters are dumb, the acting is 
bad, and the storyline hardly deserves 
to be defined as such; that being said, | 
admit my compulsion to experience the 
3-D technology with hopes that it fulfills 
its potential It doesn't, instead overusing 
the same technique of testing how many 
nails, knives and flying hockey pucks can 
leap out of the sealed reality of the film 
until Jonathan has to break out the Advil. 
A few moments reveal the potential for 
the innovative technique, most of which 
are subtle stationary pieces of gore (for 


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instance, when a bitchy girl gets her 
head lopped off by a flaming tire, and 
her corpse writhes on the ground like 
the inside-out baboon in David Cronen- 
berg’s The Fly). But there's no reason to 
venture outside of the first three films 
to explore our torturous outcome as it 
might be scripted by some fickle divine 
hand —who | imagine looks like Paris Hil- 
ton, her tongue wagging as she wields a 
glass dildo in place of a sceptre. 
JONATHAN BUSCH 
//)ONATHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Halloween Il 

Written & directed by.Rob Zombie 
Starring Scout-Taylor Compton, Malcolm 
McDowell, Taylor Mane 

kkk Ke 


What is particularly striking about Rob 
Zombie's sequel to his lame remake 
of John Carpenter's Halloween is how 
smooth the transition that the metal- 
mogul-turned-director makes from 
paying the franchise a sloppy tribute 
to crafting a kind of unforeseen vision. 
"Bad" directors like Ed Wood, Russ 
Meyer and Herschel Gordon Lewis 
found a voice in their consistency to 
drive up profit margins from the lowest 
of production budgets, churning out 
film after film until a creatively skewed 
mindset began to take shape. Zombie, 
granted more money (though not that 
much by comparison to the big guys), 
makes cult films for the multiplex gen- 
eration, albeit self-conscious ones that 
remix the originals that drive his pre- 
tentious passion. 

Zombie's Halloween left off with Laurie 
(Scout-Taylor Compton) supposedly ic- 
ing killer Michael Myers (Saskatchewan- 
born WCW vet Taylor Mane), who in 
turn had presumably knocked off his psy- 
chological caregiver Dr. Samuel Loomis 
(Malcolm McDowell). But everyone lives 
on for the sequel—Myers' body is never 
found, while Loomis hangs on to notor- 
ize his public image by sharing the expe- 
rience in a true crime bestseller. Critics 
of the book include families of Myers’ 15 
victims, who blame Loomis for raising a 
monster to benefit from the juicy real-life 
massacre. Laurie, having since moved in 
with a gal pal and her single police chief 
father (Brad Dourif), is the most haunted, 
hiding the ill-fated secret revealed during 
the incident that she is Myers’ sister. On 
cue, big brother Michael returns donning 
his signature mask (and a Zombie-like 
beard), killing everything in his path to 
reunite with Laurie. 

The real drag about Halloween was its 
display of Zombie's cinematic inexperi- 
ence, as he played up the gritty goofi- 
ness of his previous projects in the path 
of Carpenter's skillfulness. This time 
around, instead of resorting to mimicry, 
Halloween Il is a test of its own per- 
sonal indulgence, daring enough to axe 
itself from the franchise and derail the 


storyline into an auteurist territory 
character and aesthetic. McDowell’: 5 
Loomis flourishes in an internal -\,- 
of morals, while Laurie's day-to-day, |) 
is a feast of sexy white-trash delic=c\.- 
including a messy, garbage-ridden be 
room, a troupe of MCS-loving co-wor 
ers, and Margot Kidder as—get ¢| 
her therapist. Zombie's fright antics ca, 
and sample from a variety of influenc 
from Dario Argento to Eli Roth to at. 
1990s music videos of Floria Sigismond 
Fortunately, almost every one of th. 
cards is played right on the money 
JONATHAN BUSCH 

J/ \ONATHAN@VUEWEEKLY COM 


eS 
Valentino: The Last Emperor 
Written & directed by Matt Tyrnaue: 
Featuring Valentino Garavani, Giancart: 
Giammetti 


kk 


At a certain point in Valentino: The 
Last Emperor, a reporter points 5ut 
that the then-upcoming 45th annive: 
sary celebration for eponymous desizn 
er Valentino Garavani is "fit for the 
King." The more appropriate Fre.c| 
regal metaphor for the man portrayed 
through these 96 minutes is probab| 
actually Louis XVI: a clueless and some 
times openly cruel monarch who 
only real experience of the world 
around him is being sucked up to and 
honoured. Even Giancarlo Giammetti, 
Valentino's longtime boyfriend and 
business partner, very openly admit 
that being around Valentino require 
an awful lot of patience, somethin; 
the adept eggshell-walker must ta! 
performance-enhancing drugs for 

Just so we're clear, here, this is more 
a fault of the documentary than Val 
entino himself. Granted, the latter i 
a petulant and moody man-child, th: 
kind of person who employs people t« 
brush the teeth of his gaggle of pug 
and will throw a fit if his opinion is 
even mildly contradicted. But peopl: 
at least those not born regal, don't just 
pop into the world like this: Valentin: 
allowed to act like an entitled ass be 
cause he's spent most of his 45 years ir 
fashion as one of the world's most fa 
mous fashion designers. And while T/ 
Last Emperor gives you a smattering 0! 
how that happened—his past in Rom: 
dressing Jackie Kennedy, etc.—in ne 
really bothers to examine why. 

It's entirely possible that Valentin 
himself was a stumbling block in fig 
uring this out—about the only thir 
he can offer in explanation of his con 
cerns and designs Is, "I like beauty” 
but nevertheless, without some kind o 
context, Valentino: The Last Empero’ 
doesn't rise much above an MTV rea 
ity show: watching a rich person 
foolishly. 

DAVID BERRY 
Jf DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


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KISAAN (Hindi W/ES-T) (144, violence) 12 she ep a s ia subject Daily 745 9:05: Sat, Sun Thu 215 GIJOE THE RISE OF COBRA (A) 
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ape on 1 4:35 TL, 9:40 Daily 730; Sat, Sun, Thu 1:45 DISTRICT 9 (4A, gory violence, brutal violence, coarse 
ae os G1. JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA (4A) HALLOWEEN 2 : language) 
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4 JUUE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) SHORTS (G) 
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ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 


contentlanguage may 
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content) 


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Daily 110, 4:00, 6:50, 9:50 HARRY “ 
MY SISTERS KEEPER (4A mare thee) Valens tighengees) TN NMEPS —THERWALOESTINATION (Bh gu vile) CL ao | 
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Cindy steals this guitar. S cc amen cae SHORTS (6) : 
Cindy steals this guitar. Some- | year one (4d, cue content) Sataxzoo Fri 430,645 Sit-Mon 1x00, 235 430,645 Tue-Thu 6 ce 
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to go with it. At 


ar woman he's talking about but I've 
n her a hundred times." He had this 


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int of | This friend of mine had ; ee SHORTS (6) 
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Be 40s he got a job in this parts ware- HALLOWEEN I (18A, brutal violence, gory scenes) THEUGLY TRUTH (4A an me Fri-Mon 12:00, 3:20, 6:49, 10:15, Tue-Thu 2:00, 6:40, 10:15 
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JULIE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) 


e line of hers that he'd repeat. "I'm | Paly1245 330,640, 9:20 6:50, 9330 ae Daily 22:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:20 
gonna sit here." So I just started HALLOWEEN fi (:8A, brutal violence, gory scenes) ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) violence, frightening ) ea HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
agining all these Daily 210, 510, 7:50, 10315 Stadium seating, DTS Digital Daily 12°30, 3:30, 7210, 9:50 Daily 85 violence, frightening scenes) 
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CLAREVIEW 10 


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content) 
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content) 


1:30, 4110, 6:40, 9:25 
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Dally 240; 4'00,7290, 959 Pri, Tue-Thu 4215, 7209, 9-40; Sat-Mon 1:40, 4215,7:00, 40 Daily 6:45, 9:45; Sat, Sun, Mon 12:45, 3:45 
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‘Sun 4:00; part of Films of Quentin Tarantino series 


SEP 3 - SEP 9, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY, .,_ .- 


THE GOODS: LIVE HARD SELL HARD (184) Daily 930 


suomi HTN AHHOKMQu Runa v4 


FILM // 31 


SUECN YO UAP ETERS UC EAA CUES EY MR nen NON PRN erSA NAH ENRLANNOYY 


PREVUE // SONIC BOOM 


Whooooooosh 


~Sonic Boom brings indie luminaries to Edmonton 


BRYAN BIRTLES 
// BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


S a city geared towards music festi- 

vals, Edmonton has long had a blank 
space where a big time youth-oriented 
fest could slip right in. Ever since Edgef- 
est stopped rolling through—and because 
Warped Tour has been sticking with those 
cowboys down south all these years— 
Edmonton has been waiting for some sort 
of alternative rock festival to step up to the 
plate and it appears that Sonic Boom may 
be just the festival to do so. 

*» Gathering together indie luminaries 
such as Metric and Franz Ferdinand to 
Northlands, Sonic Boom will no doubt 
be the highlight of the festival season for 
a certain segment of the population— 
like the kids who enjoy going to Folk 
Fest, but only to hang out at the top of 
the hill and talk about the bands they 
wish they were seeing. 

Ash Bucholz, one half of Toronto duo 
Ubiquitous Synergy Seeker or USS, is ex- 
cited to talk about coming to Edmonton 
for the inaugural Sonic Boom festival—in 
fact, he seems excited to talk about any- 
thing. Having recently completed a10-day 
silent meditation in rural Illinois, Bucholz 
says that the experience—one he's done a 


couple of times before—reaffirms his feel- 
ings of wanting to share his unique vision 
with the world. 

“It's the idea that every great sage in his- 
tory has said—know thyself," he explains. 
"To have an experience where there's no 
reading, no writing, no books, no TV, no 
communication, no stimulus ... that is 
the only true way to take their advice and 
know thyself. When you take that all away 


PREVUE // DANIEL JOHNSTON 


No sympathy for the Devil 


Appreciating Daniel Johnston on his own terms 


DAVID BERRY 

/ DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 

ny: f = Started thinking: t in el- 

ementary school how when 
people get out of school or college they 
have to go get a real job. I wanted to be 
an artist, and I thought, ‘I gotta get out 
of this.’ I figured if I got famous and 
I could do it.” 

Daniel Johnston speaks in an odd 
creak, two decades of singing and cig- 
arettes adding a slight husk to what 
®) ise sounds like a child who's 
yelled himself hoarse. It’s probably the 
ng—and certainly for fans of 
most recognizable—feature 
10, even if he hadn't got fa 
and rich—well, rich enough to 
have "a house and a cat, so I'm doing 
pretty good"—would hardly have lived 
a life so ordinary. Though there was 
a time when he was most famous for 
basement-recorded, often-harrowing 
pop ditties, collaborations with indie 
stalwarts like Yo La Tengo and having 
Kurt Cobain wear his band shirt, John- 
ston’s current place in the pop cultural 
conscience owes a lot to the 2005 docu- 


rich, 


most t 
his mu 
of a man wh 


mous 


mentary The Devil and Daniel Johnston, 
which chronicled the singer-songwrit- 
er's career and, especially, battles with 
mental illness. 

“Every major problem that I had was 


in the movie," Johnston jokes. "But I 
just think it's kind of funny, because it 
just goes on and on.” 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 


Wind Whistles 


41 


there's an immaculate opportunity to get 
to the core of what on Earth is going on. 
For me it just means so much because 
that's what I write about in our music and 
that's what I express." 

Sonic Boom won't be the first show 
the group has played since Bucholz’s 
retreat, but hopefully it will leave a sim- 
ilar impression 

"| went straight from 10 days of silence, 


ais vvvvveevsneensvvnensvevsvevarvenvenecnveuesetnesaneeu enn ee 


Nevertheless, it has put Johnstoni inan 
odd place: specifically, one where that 
illness often seems to overshadow his 
work. Though you might not be able to 
call his records—even the more recent, 
slickly produced albums that remove 
much of the lo-fi fuzz of his earliest or- 
gan-and-a-tape-recorder offerings—of 


— SEP 9, 2009 


got picked up at the airport and went 
straight to a show—it was by far the most 
bizarre experience of my entire life,” he 
laughs. "I think I cried like five times while 
we were playing. When you truly realize 
how much things mean to you and I'm 
standing there realizing what I just experi- 
enced over the course of 10 days and what 
I'm expressing and what I'm sharing, [just 
got so overwhelmed.” 


While seemingly endless silence hasn't 
been a part of life for Wade MacNeil 
lately, airplanes have been a big factor 
for the Alexisonfire guitarist—in order 
to warm up for the band's appearance at 
Sonic Boom, the group took a little jaunt 
over to England to play in a couple of 
little festivals over there called Reading 
and Leeds. Playing the mainstage for the 
second year in a row at two of England's 
premiere festivals was something the 
group thought would easily fit into its 
schedule—five months ago. 

"It's definitely not something I ever 
complain about, but things seem a lot 
easier to do when you book them five 
months in advance,” MacNeil laughs 
from somewhere in Ontario, where he's 
furiously running errands in advance of 
hopping a plane to Edmonton. “You're 


being easily accessible, there is a pretty 
undeniable pop genius to his work. 
Openly picking emotional scabs, his 
simple arrangements match his open 
heart, and his songs alternately burst 
with joy and get crushed under bleak 
depression. They're catchy, emotional 
wringers that are occasionally frighten- 
ing in their directness. 


That intricate popiness is something 
that's struck Eamon McGrath especially 
strongly this past month. A local stal- 
wart of more bands than even he can 
probably keep track off, McGrath got 
the special honour of not only open- 
ing for Johnston, but putting together 
his backing band for the evening. He 
was given a list of songs, which he and 
his latest band, the Peacemakers, have 
been practicing for the last while. It 
has, McGrath says, given him a new ap- 
preciation of Johnston as an artist. 

“He's kind of one of those people 
who's more heard-of than heard, and 
I think that happens because people 
kind of write him off because he's a nut 
or something,” McGrath explains in his 
usual, bluntly thoughtful way. “His mu- 
sic and his lyrics and intertwined in this 
really tight way—it's reminiscent of Dy- 
lan, actually, When you get to the root 
of his songs, they're really just classic, 
heart-wrenching pop songs.” 

“People always focus on this mental 


= WNew Sounds online 


More album reviews online, Monday to F,, 


Vuefinder 
Live show slide shows. This week: AC/DC ang 
Atlas Shrug. 


MINTO NTMI COROT MET POO LLU ROOTS LS LOO LCL ULL LULCUUCL CCL Locco CCC 


ay 


UAL 


like, ‘Oh yeah, we'll play two shows a da 
{in England), then fly straight back an 
then fly straight to Edmonton!" 
Playing a big outdoor festival like Soni 
Boom is miles away from playing a sma 
club, so the set list and the performance: 
have to change, MacNeil explains. and 
though some of the intimacy of an Aley 
isonfire club show might be lost, fan: 
can look forward to increased ferocit 
"There are certain things that are lo: 
on such a grand scale so you definite} 
do play the show alittle differently,” Viac 
Neil says. "For a larger thing we don 
to make the set overly complicated. it! 
justall fucking barn burners—we do ou! 
bestto play as hard as we possibly can fa! 
half an hour or 45 minutes and don't 
up on people at all. I don't think we'll b 
playing any of the el ones—not thaf 
we've got very many.” 
\nreoeramauerneaneyenmo mam rset 0) 
SAT, SEP 5 (10 AM) 

SONIC BOOM 

FEATURING ALEXISONFIRE, USS, METRIC, 
FRANZ FERDINAND, BILLY TALENT, Wer 
SECRETS, GIRL TALK, TAKING BACK SUNDAY, IL 
"SCARLETT, JASON MEWES 
NORTHLAND éés EovS102.20 


illness thing and it really kind of pissq 
me off,” he continues. "It's not like, yol 
know, despite that, he's a great artist 
he's a great artist, bottom line 

McGrath has a point, but it dc 
to at least partly overlook the hig 
his struggles, though hardly the onj 
thing worth paying attention to, 
informed Johnston's work in an um 
tant way. Keeping with his musi« 
kedness, he’s always been open a‘ 
his struggles, and no small part of (n 
honesty is due to the raw emotione!! 
and almost childlike vigor with whic 
he's thrown himself into the wots 
Perhaps the best approach to Johnstof 
may be simply to appreciate thal h 
an artist willing to deal with his 
demons, a rare and unique indivi 
with the talent to allow us to conne 
with his life. 

For his part, though, Johnston sect 
fairly unconcerned about how we re 8% 
ing to deal with him beyond appreci4 
ing his songwriting. 

“Most of my songs are autobiograp! 
cal," Johnston offers with a 145i 
chuckle. "I was dumb enough no! 
worry about it, I guess.” W 


"% ie 4 
4 y 


ae 


reel 
> | 
‘ 


‘N MUNRO 
(@VUEWEERLY.COM 
herging from the creative swirl that 
Black Mountain, Lightning Dust 
e up of Amber Webber and 
Wells. Set to head out on tour in 
port of the band's second album, 
nite Light—a hypnotic gem of a re- 
Webber spoke with Vue Weekly 
ently about the birth of the band, the 
ation of the new album and fleshing 
lineup outon tour. 


£ WEEKLY: You've described the new 
bum as being more of a pop record 

n he first one. Was that intentidnal 

you began working on it? 

BER WEBBER: When Josh and I are 
iting songs, we're just constantly 
ge songs and we never think con- 

usly about what kind of record we 

ni to make. It just kind of came out 

#' “ay, and I guess after a few of the 

bre upbeat songs it’s like, "Oh, shit, 

gonna be more of an uplifting re- 
7°." and we kind of rolled with it. 


* Despite both you and Josh play- 


‘1 Black Mountain, there's a 


siderable distance between the 
nds of that band and what you do 
i ightning Dust. 
| don't think Lightning Dust could 
* sound like Black Mountain be- 
use Lightning Dust is just the two of 
and Black Mountain has five strong 
‘ers—Steve McBean writes most of 
Songs and the arrangements are 
snitely the five of us working to- 
er bard on them. Lightning Dust 
doesn't have that. Josh and I, in 
‘ning Dust we're both using in- 
‘ents that are not totally new to 
ou are definitely sort of out of our 
wort zone, like playing guitar for 
= Playing piano for Josh, when 
St Started Lightning Dust was sort 
© challenge. I was never playing an 


eSATA LL LLL 


‘DUST 


tage e ® 

ig strikes twice 

an ain offshoot returns with its sophomore release 
ss Sr gE 


instrument [in Black Mountain] and 
was singing, and he was always on the 
drums, so it's definitely a challenge for 
us whereas Black Mountain is sort of 
our first-nature band. 


VW: When did you decide to do Light- 
ning Dust as a band? 

AW: I can’t remember what year it was 
but a few years ago we recorded on 
Josh's cassette eight-track six of the 
songs that were on the first album, and 
we recorded them just for friends as a 
little fun project during the fall and 
winter and then we just made a cover 
for it and sent it to some friends, and 
we sent one to Jagjaguwar and they 
were like “You should put this out, you 
should re-record it and put it out.” So 
we did and by that time we had so many 
songs anyway, so that was how the first 
Lightning Dust started—"Oh, well, we 
may not have time to tour this or do 
anything but somebody wants to put it 
out so why wouldn't we, you know?” 


VW: Was there a point where you had 
a bunch of songs and you said that it's 
time for another album? 

AW: Yeah. For the second album it's 
probably 50-50 where I wrote half 
of the songs. Josh and I never really 
worked together from the start, I'd just 
write, say, half of the songs and the 
vocals, and then I'll do some rough re- 
cording to show him and then he goes 
into his little room, because he has this 
little studio room, and he'll put every- 
thing on the track or write a bridge or 
add something to it and then bring it 
back to me and we sort of work on the 
rest together. And if he writes a song 
on the piano or organ or whatever he'll 
just bring it to me and then I'll write 
lyrics and all these little parts, so that's 
how we work. We don't really jam, be- 
cause it's kind of fun to just do that for 
a change. For me, I wrote about seven 
songs that I wanted to be on the al- 


OT TTT LLL ELLE EEO TT 


bum—and of course they don't all work 
out—and he wrote a bunch of songs. 


VW: This is a very collaborative process 
for the two of you, but it's not two peo- 
ple sitting in a room together. 

AW: Llikeit, it's exciting to give something 
to him and see what he brings back. 


VW: What is the recording process 
like—the band is a duo, but the albums 
don't really sound like it. There a lot of 
things on there, but it's pretty much 
just you two and a few guests? 

AW: Yeah, we had our friends Colin 
MeKill and Cris Derkson come in and 
play violin and cello, but other than 
that we just do all the instruments. 
We've had a challenge trying to get 
the live band together, so now we have 
our friend Ryan Peters playing drums 
with us, and I have a twin sister, Ash- 
ley, and she's coming along with us 
playing bass and singing. On the last 
tour we did they were along, too, and 
it worked out good. And even with 
adding two extra people there still 
could be another person doing odds 
and ends, but we don't really have the 
funds to do that. : 


VW: It's nice to hear live music that's not 
a direct copy of the record, though. You 
have to make do with what you've got. 
AW: Yeah, totally, Itbecomes something 
different. We did the tour with Bon- 
nie Prince Billy recently and they're so 
good at doing that—none of the songs 
sound like any of the album versions 
but they're so beautiful in a new way 
and it makes it exciting for them, and 
I think it's better for the audience. It's 
so fun watching them, and even night 
to night it was never the same. V 


SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


DEPARTMENT OF 
GMUSIC 
Music ATConvocation Hair Series 

September 13 at 2 pm 
An Afternoon of Avant GardelMusic 
William Street, Saxophone 
RogetAdmiral, piano 


Monpay NoonMusie 
September 28 at 12 pm 


Shelley Younge, flute 
Janet Scott Hoyt, piano 
ree admission 


CONVOCATION Haut, Arts Bun DING, UNiversrry OF ALBERTA 
StibseFiption package for Music at Convocation Hall series and 
Tickets for Events (cash Only) are available at the door or in advance 
through the University of Alberta Students’ Union InfoLink desks located 
HUB, SUB, CAB and ETLC 


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Qwitter,com/conyohall 


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in 


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BLUE CHAIR CAFE Rockin’ 
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CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY PUB 
Open stage hosted by Alberta 
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COAST TO COAST PUB Open 
mic at the pub: hip hop open 
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CROWN PUB Bass Head 
Thursday: Drum and Bass, 
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DRUID Guitar heroes 


DUSTER'S PUB Thursday open 
jam hosted by The Assassins 

of youth (blues/rock}; gpm; 

no cover 

DVB Open mic Thursdays 
ENCORE CLUB Industry Music 
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HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Open 
jam at 6:30pm; Steven Bowers 
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IVORY CLUB Kyler Schogen 
Band (blues/classic rock}; 

gpm; $6 

JAMMERS PUB Thursday open 
jam; 7pm 
JULIAN'S—Chatesu Louis 
Graham Lawrene (jazz piano} 
8pm 

B'S PUB Open jam with Ken 
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LIVE WIRE BAR Open Stage 
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NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Secret Fires (reunion show), 
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NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam 
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PAWN SHOP Immaculate 
Machine, Hector Fector, 


‘The Secretaries; no minors; 
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dueling piano show featuring 
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‘SECOND CUP—Varscona Live 


music every Thursday night 
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Big Rock Thursdays: DJs on 3 
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Spin Dub & Reggae in The 
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BUDDY'S DJ Bobby Beatz; gpm; 
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FLUID LOUNGE Girls Night out 


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HALO Thursdays Fo Sho: with 
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KAS BAR Urban House: with Dj 
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LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Dish 
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(Brass) $54 (child res 
Fri tickets: $27 (adult 
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atthe Winspear Centr b. 


ree (¢: 


Fernando; 9pm (door) $5 (cover) 


AXIS CAFE DJ Sugakane 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Heather 
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BRIXX BAR Left Spine Down 
(Van), Psyldle, Chaos Theory with 
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9-30pm; $5 (door) 

CASINO EDMONTON Robin 
Kelly (Elivis tribute) 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD 
TheCounterfitz (funk) 

COAST TO COAST Open Stage 
every Friday night with host 
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DVB TAVERN Live music every 
Fri: gpm; $5 

EARLY STAGE SALOON Kyler 
Schogen Band (guitar player 
from Slowburn} 8pm; no cover 
EDDIE SHORTS Despite the 


Blindnessm Warning to Avoid 
(original rock); no cover 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
7 &7 Is (last show ever) The Mitts 


NEW CITY SUBURBS | Love 
‘Bos Danceparty, Back to School 
Edition 

ON THE ROCKS Mourning 
‘Wood; gpm 

180 DEGREES Sexy Friday night 
PAWN SHOP Blacklight, 
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RED PIANO BAR Hottest 
dueling piano show featuring the 
Red Piano Players; 9pe-2arn 
(Captain Tractor 


SSAWMILL BANQUET CENTRE 
The Classics; 7pm (door) 8-12 
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7eo468.4u5 

‘STARLITE ROOM Benefit of A 
Doubt, The London, Letters to 
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STEEPS-Old Glenora Live 
Music Fridays: Rob Taylor; 8:30- 
1o30pm; free 

TOUCH OF CLASS—Chateau 
Louis Lyle Hobbs (pop/rock; 


Papi and Dj Latin Ser: 


BANK ULTRA LOUNGE 
Connected Fridays: 51.77) 
Bounce, Nestor Delano, 111 
Morrison 


BAR-B-BAR DJ james; », 
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Friday DJs spin Wootto; 
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Nevine-indie, soul, moto 
new wave, electro; Underdog: 


ESMERELDA'S Ervics F 
Frenzy Padays Playing the | 
in country 


FUNKY BUDDHA-Whyte Ave 
Top tracks, rock, retro with DJ 
Damian 


GAS PUMP Top 4o/dance wi 
DJ Christian 


GINGUR Flssin’ Frida’ 
Bomb Squad, DJ Solja, w 
guest DJs 
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House, dance mix with DJ 
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nn nnn er nnn 


Millbourne 


102 
Capital Place, 101, 9707-2 
? LOUNGE 1:845 Wayne Gr 


780.474.5554 * DVB TAVERN & 
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CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780 424 9467 » CHATEAU LOUIS-Julian’s/Royal Coach/Touch of Class 11727 Kingsway, 780 452 7770 - CHRISTOPHER'S PARTY 

il « COAST TO COAST PUB 5552 Calgary Trall, 780.439.3675 - COPPERPOT RESTAURAD 

wns Rd, 780.472.7696 » CROWN PUB 10709-109 St, 720.428.9628 » DIESEL ULTRA 

CLUB « DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave » DRUID 1:06 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 « DUSTER'S PUB 6402-128 Ave 

»ny Plain » EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM Phase II 

485.9494, empireballroom.ca « ENCORE CLUB 957 Fir St, Sherwood Park, 780.417.0231 « ENTERPRISE SQUARE 


West, 780.462.6565 » 


Drive, 7 


307-99 St; DV 


+ ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave » ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4633 « AVENUE 
THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 * AXIS CAFE 10349 Jasper Ave, 780.990.0031 - BANK ULTRA LOUNGE 107: 
Jasper Ave, 780.420.9098 + BILLY BOB'S Continental Inn, 1665 Stony Plain Rd, 780.484.7751 » BEAUMONT BLUES 
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102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 « BUDDY’S 1172sP Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 - CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argyll! Rd, 780.453.94 


WEM, 


CHROME LOUNGE 132 Ave, Vict 
>0 » CROWN AND ANCHOR is 


TAVERN.com + EARLY STAGE SALOON 401: 


sa Ave, St 


UB 


ATRIUM 10230 Jasper Ave - FIDDLER'S ROOST 8906-99 St - FILTHY MCNASTY'S 1052-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 » FLOW LOUNGE 11815 Wayne Gretzky Dr, 780.604. A 


} «FLUID LOUNGE 10105-109 St, 780.429 
Ave, 780.433.9676 « GAS PUMP 10166-1214 
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= JAMMERS PUB 11948-227 Ave, 780.451.8779 «| AND R 4003-10 


20-106 Ave 


St, 780.423 


3 102 


i Ave» SECOND CUP~Stanley Milner Library 7 
2 gpyy Jasper Ave » SIDELINERS PUB 110:8-227 St, 453 


+ edmontonsymphony.c 


Ave » SOBEYS—College Plara 822 


£ 780.437.2293 « SUEDE LOUNGE 1806 Jas 


2 Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 « LEGENDS PUB 6: 
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2 Ave, 780.989.9066 + NIKKI DIAMONDS 8130 Gateway Bivd 
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80.483.484 


pub 
80.483 


Albert, 78 


170 St, 760.486.72 


y00 « FOXX DEN 205 Carnegi Drive, St Alb 


ert « 180 DEGREES 10730-107 St 
1643 + OVERTIME SOUTH Whitemud Crossing, 421: 
pruce Grove, 780. 960.6871 + PAWN SHOP 
Albert « PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10220-1« 
? BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 882 


51-82 Ave irs 


er Ave, 780.482.0707 * TAPHOUSE 9020 


FRESH START CAFE Riverbend Sq, 780.433.9623 » FUNKY BUDDHA 10: 
GINGUR SKY 15506-128 Ave, 780.913.4312/780.953.3606 « HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 780,423.HALO « HARVESTING 
ke; Harvestinghell.com» HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 15.20A (basement), Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.6010 + HILL TOP 
52.1168 + HYDEAWAY-ALL Ages Art Space 16209-100 Ave « IVORY CLUB 2940 Calgary Trail South - 
780.436.4403 + FEFFREY'S CAFE o£40 142 St, 780.451.8890 - JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB AND RESTAURA 
429.508: (rest) » JET NIGHTCLUB 9221-34 Ave, 780.466.6552 » KAS BAR 10444-82 Ave, 780-433-6768 - LB'S PUB > 
+ LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 « LIVE WIRE 1:07 Knotwood Rd. E> 
2 « MORANGO'S TEK CAFE :0228-79 St - NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 + NEW, CITY 1008: ja 
780.439.8006 » WORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-1094 Ave 
780.414.0233 « ON THE ROCKS 1730 Jasper Ave, 
6 St, 780.485.1777 « PALACE CASINO-WEM 8822 
180.432.0814 « PLANET INDIGO-jesper Ave 11607 Jasper Ave - PLANET INDIGO~St Albert 812 Liber: 
+ PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave + PROHIBITION 21026 Jasper Ave, 780.420.0448 - RED PIANO. PIANO) 
- RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 « RENDEZVOUS PUB 10108-149 St - ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 
12-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 1025-10) St » SECOND CUP-Mountain Equipment 12336-2102 Ave, 780.452.7574 + SAWMILL BANQUET CENTRE 384°-7° 
: Winston Churchill Sq » SECOND CUP-Varscons Varscona Hotel, 106 St, Whyte Ave - SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE 
cob + SOBEYS SYMPHONY UNDER THE SKY Heritage Amphitheatre, Hawrelak Park, 780.428.2414, 2£00.993-5 
om + SONIC BOOM ROCK FESTIVAL Northlands, sonicboomfestival.ce, unionevents.com, sonieiozg.com - SOBEYS-Jasper Ave 0404 Jasper 
SPORTSWORLD 3710-104 St » SORRENTINOS-South 4208 CalgaryTR S, 780.434.7607 - STARLITE ROOM 20030 
780.428.1099 « STEEPS~Old Glenora 1241: Stony Plain Rd, 780.488.1505 » STEEPS TEA LOUNGE-College Plaza 111:6-82 Ave, 780.988.8105 - STOLL!'S and #1, 10 
; ficKenney Ave, St Albert, 780.458.0860 « UMION HALL Argyll, 99 St, qBazox.2562 
LOUNGE 1054-82 Ave, 780.437:7699 * WHISTLESTOP LOUNGE 1n416-132 Ave, 780. 451.5506 » WILD WEST SALOON 12612-so St, 780.476.3388 » WUNDERBAR 5:2 
; ethours.com « YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Camegle Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0395 


+ O'BYRNE'S 1016-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 - O"MAILLES 
780.482.4768) « OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 10304- 
170 St, 780-444-2122 « PARKLAND GRILL 53222, RR 


08 


102 St 
368-82 
~ urs 


Pus 


t 


sarchy Adam (Punk) 
OVERTIME SOUTH Retro to 
poow: dassic rock R&B, urban and 
dence with DJ Mikee; gpm-2am; 
op cover 
PLAY NIGHTCLUB The first 
bur for the queer community to 
ceen in a decade with DY's Alexx 
Brown and Eddie Toonflash; 9pm. 
jooory: $5 
RED STAR Movin! on Up Fridays: 
indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop 
with DJ Gatto, Dj Mega Wattson 
ROUGE LOUNGE Solice Fridays 
SPORTSWORLD Top 4o Request 
with a mix off Retro and Disco; 
73030pm 
STOLLI'S Top 40, RAB, house 
with People’s DB} 
STONEHOUSE PUB Top 4o with 
ip) Tysin 
SUEDE LOUNGE DJ Nic-E 
Remixed every Friday 
TEMPLE T.GI Paydays; Skirts 
jand Slacks Schools Back with Cpt. 
Molemand and Wub Deez; 9pm. 
WUNDERBAR Fridays with the 
Girls, D) Avinder and DJ 


no cover 


'Y AFTERHOURS Foundation 


Fridays 


bc Awescmes (LP release), 
Sheaths, Moby Dicks, 


ei 


Harwill; 30pm (sign-up), every 
Sul, a-spm. 


DVB TAVERN Live music every 


HYDEAWAY-All Ages Art 
‘Space Lightning Dust (members 
of Black Mountain), Toy Singers; 
all ages; 8-1pm; S10 (door) 
IVORY CLUB Duelling piano 
show with Jesse, Shane, Tiffany 
and Erik and guests 

JAMMERS PUB Saturday open 
jam, 3-7-30pm; country/rock band 
gpm-2am. 

JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB 
Headwind (classic pop/rock}, 
9pm; no cover 

JET NIGHTCLUB Greg Wood, 
HaleHale and Guardians of 
Power; 8pm; Siu (door) 


JUUAN'S-Chateau Louis Petro 
Polujin (classical guitar); 8pm 
1L&’S PUB Molsons Saturday 


‘open stage every Saturday 
afternoon hosted by Gord 
Macdonald; ¢-30-9pm 


180 DEGREES Dancehall and 
Reggae night every Saturday 

(ON THE ROCKS Mourning 
‘Wood; gpm. 

PAWN SHOP SONIC Presents 
(rodk, Indie, punk, rock, dance, 
retro, rock}; 8pm (door); Sonic 
Boor official afterparty 

RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling 


REVUE / WED, AUG 26 / AC/DC / OMMONWEAETH STADIUM 


Jazz Series: Peter Belec Trio; 8pm; 
no cover 

TOUCH OF CLASS~Chateau 
Louls Lyle Hobbs (pop/rock; 
830pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Bonafide 


SOBEYS SYMPHONY UNDER 
THE SKY Edmonton Symphony 
Orchestra, Bob Bernhardt (con- 
ductor), Operamania: Kathleen 
Brett (Soprano) 2pm matinee con- 
cert; Hollywood Adventures and 
Romances—movie night at 7pm; 
tickets available at the Winspear 
Centre box office 


Djs 
AZUCAR PICANTE Every Sat: DJ 
Touch It, hosted by DJ Papi 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Saturday DJs on three levels. 
Main Floor; Menace Sessions: 
alt rock/electro/trash with Miss 
Mannered 

BUDDY'S DJ Earth Shiver ‘n' 
Quake; 8pm; no cover before 
opm 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock, hip 
hop, house, mash up 
ESMERALDA'S Super Parties 
Every Sata different theme 
FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays Gone 
Gold Mash-Up: with Harmen B 
and DJ Kwake 


FUNKY BUDDHA-Whyte Ave 
‘Top tracks, rock, retro with DJ 
Damian 

GINGUR SKY Soulout Saturdays: 
Labour Day celebration with 
Gunz N Rozez, Invinceable, Spyce, 
Capone 

HALO For Those Who Know: 
house every Sat with DJ Junior 
Brown, Luke Morrison, Nestor 
Delano, Ari Rhodes 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizzle 
Saturday: DJ Groovy Cuyy and 
guests 

NEWCASTLE PUB Saturdays: 
‘Top 40, requests with DJ Sheri 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Punk Rawk Saturdays with Todd 
and Alex 


NEW CITY SUBURBS Saturdays 
Suck with Greg Gory and BlueJay 
PAWN SHOP SONIC Presents 
Live On Site! Anti-Club Saturdays: 
rock, indie, punk, rock, dance, 


electro house with PI residents 
RED STAR Saturdays indie rock, 
hip hop, and electro with Dj Hot 
Philly and guests 
RENDEZVOUS Survival metal 


SUEDE LOUNGE The Finest 
Underground House with DJ 
Nic-E every Saturday 
TEMPLE Oh Snap!: Every 
Saturday, Cobra Commander 
and guests with Degree, Cobra 
Commander and Battery; 9pm 
(door); $5 (door) 


WUNDERBAR Featured DJ and 
local bands 


Y AFTERHOURS Release 
Saturday 


BEAUMONT BLUES FESTIVAL 
Line-Up Includes: Bobby 
‘Cameron, Johnny V. Bill Bourne 
And Madagascar Slim, Eve 

Hell And The Razors, Erin And 
Adam, The Flying Crawdads, 

The Hardline Blues Band, 

Jodie Leslie, Lindsey Walker 

And Drew Malcolm, Marshall 
Lawrence, Pascal Lecours, Raygun 
Cowboys, Red House, Ric Proctor, 
Souththunderbird, And More; $35 
(adult/day)/Sas (student/senior/ 
day)/$6o (weekend pass at TIX on 
the Square) 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 

Best in Show 3-mini-music 
festival: Slates, Colleen Brown 
Band, 40 Thieves, Thea vs. Loki, 
Manraygun, Michael Rault, Doug 
Hoyer; 2pm; no cover 


BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT 
Jazz on the Side Sundays: Bobby 
Caims 

BLUES ON WHYTE Deadly 
Pretty 

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Celtic 


Music Session, hosted by Keri- 
Lynne Zwicker, 47pm 


EDDIE SHORTS Sunday acoustic 
oriented open stage hosted by 
Unde Jimmy; all gear provided; 
pmo-1am 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Long 
Weekend: 7 Deadly Sins Party 
Featuring DJ Jonnie Spinns, 
School of Evil; 9pm (door); $10 


HARVESTING HELL FESTIVAL 
Metal Open Air Alberta Music 
Festival: Featuring metal bands; 
all ages 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Bluebird 
North: Where Writers Sing and 
‘Tell: Featuring Colleen Brown, 
Carrie Catherine, Mark Davis, and 
Matt Epp, hosted by Ann Vriend; 
70pm; $12 (door, adv at TIX on 
the Square)/Sio (SAC members) 


HYDEAWAY-All Ages Art 
‘Space Blazing Violets; 8pm. 
LR. BAR Open jam/stage every 
Sunday hosted by Me Next and 
the Have-Nots; 37pm. 

LOOP LOUNGE Jam hosted by 
J), Lenny B and the Cats; 4-30pm. 
‘tl whenever 


NEWCASTLE PUB Sunday 
acoustic open stage with Willy 
James and Crawdad; 3-6pm. 
NEW CITY Open Mic Sunday 
hosted by Ben Disaster; gpm 
(sign-up, no cover 

Robb Angus (the Wheat Pool) 


ON THE ROCKS Shocker 
Sundays with Mobasdass; 9pm 


ORLANDO'S 2 PUB Sundays 
Open Stage Jam hosted by The 
Vindleators (blues/rock); 3-8pm 
PAWN SHOP Sights and Sounds, 
No Heat Tomorrow, Define the 
Line; 8prn (door); $10 (door) adv 
tickets at Blackbyrd, Pawn Shop 
ROYAL COACH-Chateau Louis 
Petro Polujin (classical guitar); 
spm 

SECOND CUP—Mountain 
Equipment Co-op Live music 
every Sun; 2-4pm Sundays 


STARLITE ROOM Datta Rock, 
Esser, DJ Degree vs. Warrior 
Music; gpm (door); Sis at 
TicketMaster, Blackbyrd, FOOSH, 
Unionevents com 


STANLEY A MILNER LIBRARY 
THEATRE Edmonton Raga- 
Mala Music Society: Samaresh 
Chawdhury (Indian classical 
vocalist) with Ramesh Misra and 
Pradyut Ray (tabla); 7pm; $20/$15 
(enior/student) at door ; Raga- 
Mala info line 780.4457. 


SOBEYS SYMPHONY UNDER 
THE SKY Edmonton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Bob Bernhardt 
(conductor), The Hi-Lo Big Top 
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alty cheques here : 
one, yes, it was a 
yt Since then, they 
ust part of the 
But, to get my first roy-- 
' -in a new 


as a , the — thrill 
is back. This week, my 
Junecore account moved 
from zero to 13 whole cents. . 
(That's US currency, so maybe, : 
like 14 cents Canadian!). Now, all | : 
need to do is make another $52.29 and : 
my album project will break even. : 
Regular readers of this column (hi, 
Mom) know that, in June, after doing 
a series of stories about Tunecore— : 
one of a new cottage industry's worth 
of new companies that distribute the 


played with in GarageBand, 


the stores, and my wife tells 
me | can't put any more money 


album breaks even. 


| have been promoting myself using : 
: traditional channels, sending out discs 
: to radio stations—mainly Canadian : between sales and the reporting of : 
university stations, that is—putting up : sales, | am only getting June results in : 
: the middle of August. The album went 


: online in late June. so | wasn't expect- 


: posters here in Toronto and maintaining 
: Twitter, iLike and MySpace accounts. 


work of independent musicians to on- : 
i line retailers such as iTunes, Amazon, : 
= eMusic, Napster and Rhapsody—i : 
decided to take a series of : 
electronic-music tracks | had : 
bundle them together with : ad 
some album art, and release : 
a 14-song album. It cost me : 
$52.42 to get the album in : 


: ble. I don't want to give the album extra : 


monthly; no cover $2650 at Ticketmaster, Unioneventz. © Naomi 
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In this space, | haven't divulged the 


: name which | recorded under, as | want 


this experiment to be as honest as possi- 


; those 13 plays only come from the 


I should eclipse the $1 mark in royalties! I figure, at 
this rate, the album should break even in about 50 


months, or a little over four years! 


: promotion in this space. | have to work : 
into this nutty experiment until this : the promotional angles the same as any 
? other struggling musician would. : 
Back to the royalties. Because there : 


: is a lag time of almost two months : 


: in the United States—in the space of 


: bad. | don't know. 
: More is coming. | know through re- 
: ports that | have sold at least one, count 


+ through Tunecore and have no middle 
: man to pay, | will see 100 percent o' 
: the royalties on that 99-cent sale, af 
: ter Apple takes its cut. And I've noticed 


: Ing much. So far, | have only received a : that | have got some plays on eMusic, so 


: report back from Rhapsody; my music : there should be some cents there. Soon, 


> was streamed 13 times, and artists get : | should eclipse the $1 mark in royalties! 
: a penny per play. But, with reporting : 


: times lagging by a month and a half, : break even in about SO months, or alittle 


: over four years! Man, | have to start re- 
: final week of June, and don't reflect : 


: any potential streams from July and : 
August. Really, 13 plays—all of them : 


: and eMusic and the like. It's easy when 
: you only have two dozen fans on MyS- 
i pace, 23 Twitter followers or a handful of 
: fans on iLike. Bands that have millions of 
: fans can't track them all. | can tell you ev- 
+ erything about my album's sales perfor- 
+ mance because it isn't like the nunters 


= are changing on a daily basis. And, | can 
: about one week might not be all that : 


| figure, at this rate, the album sl¥guld 


cording again, and get the tracks ready 
for the follow-up album. 
Yes, | have been following up on iTunes 


monitor pretty well every fan's post or 


: status update. | sweat that | might actu- 
: ally lose a fan, that someone will divorce 


: me on Twitter. | think that, maybe, it's 
: it, one song through iTunes. As | did this : 


more stressful to have 20 fans than it is 
to have 20 000. 

As for the 13 cents, | don't think | will 
withdraw it from my artist's account 


: just yet. W 


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MUSIC // 37 


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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3 


RA UrNAHE nines rN NANNY 
POPBUNANAY eH ats 


PREVUE // DATAROCK 


Old school 


Datarock's newest takes up the challenge of using pre-1984 equipment 


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GROWN UPS >>I finally figured out what became of those two kids in Royal Tenenbaums // supplied 


CAROLYN NIKODYM 
// CAROLYN@\V/UEWEEKLY.COM 


IRS is a oo full of connota- 
tions. It can mean both anger 
and love, and before the "Axis of Evil” 
there was the "Red Menace.” Norway's 
Datarock might have been thinking 
those things when the band took the 
word for the name of its latest album, 
but it's more than likely not that deep. 
Red is also the colour of the band's 
trademark tracksuits, the ones they 
wear on stage in an unabashed hom- 
age to the early ‘80s. 

If you have a soft spot in your heart 
for Jane Fonda's aerobics videos and 
have spent evenings over wine dis- 
cussing the meaning behind Devo's 
"Whip It," you won't need to ask why 
After all, Datarock co-founder-guitar- 
ist-vocalist-drummer-producer Fredrik 
Saroea didn't 

When Saroea and his partner-in- 
crime Ket-Il1 (aka Ketil Mosnes) got 
together with a whole host of friends 
as Datarock, the pair's respective love 
for thrash metal and Guided By Voic- 
es was overshadowed by even earlier 
influences—like the Commodore 64 
and The Breakfast Club. Were they sur- 
prised by the bleepy-beat sounds that 
came out of them? 

"Our thoughts about the band, from 
the very beginning, was to sort of pay 
tribute to a variety of very different 


- SEP 9, 2009 


bands that we love. We didn't really 
think about ourselves as a band or 
anything. We were more like .,. almost 
like a DJ or something," Saroea laughs 
deeply, "playing other people's mu- 
sic. We don't know how to play cover 
songs; we just have to make our own 
cover songs. We just fooled around 
and made funny, stupid songs.” 

You could argue that Saroea is being 
self-deprecating. The band’s simple 
songs mix its love of Talking Heads 
with Revenge of the Nerds and turn 
it into a little slice of genius. That, 
and there is an awful lot of work put 
into the whole experience that is 
Datarock. Its first EP, for instance, 
was only pressed 400 times, but the 
five-inch CD included a video game 
the band wrote. And Red takes on the 
challenge of using pre-1984 analog 
equipment, as well as using live in- 
strumentation as a template for what 
happens electronically. 

"It didn't start off as a dogma or 
anything; it just happened to be so,” 
Saroea says. "We wanted to make 
it the way that if you end up listen- 
ing to the album a couple of times or 
many times, every time you listen to 
it, you're supposed to be able to pick 
up something new in the production 
There's a lot of layers, with small stuff, 
that you won't hear the first time you 
play it, but then eventually you'll pick 
it up—wow, there's something fun go- 


A ——— 


ing on over there; oh wow, it's actual- 
ly live percussion in the background 
here and there.” 


What did take Datarock by surprise, 
however, was the reception its nerdy, 
BMxX-is-better-than-sex music got 
The band's aforementioned small 
run, first EP led to a gig on the mai 
stage at the prestigious Sonar Festival 
in Barcelona in 2003, where it got 4 
hearty nod from BBC Radio One's leg 
endary DJ, announcer and tastemake 
John Peel. And since then, Datarock 
has played hundreds of high-octane 
shows. The band simply didn’t expect 
its “funny, stupid songs” to resonate 
so loudly with people. Sure, there 
nostalgia in leaning heavily on ce! 
tain cultural references, and when 
you capture it just right, that can gral 
an audience. 

But Saroea has commented on the 
magic of the band’s matching red 
tracksuits, and they just may be the 
key to Datarock's success. After all, 
when you dress up like that to get uP 
on stage, it's more like you're pretend 
ing to be a band—and that’s some: 
thing that we've all done. W 


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SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY Music //39 


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PREVUE // BAND OF SKULLS 


Stir it up 


BRYAN BIRTLES 


Fo England's Band of Skulls, 
a name change coupled with a 
change in attitude became the kick 
in the pants the band needed to put 
its career on track. After first getting 
together in London under the name 
Fleeing New York, the band played in 
clubs around town but never found a 
way to take the next step, until final- 
ly the members decided to reinvent 
themselves and take the whole thing 
more seriously, After that, explains 
guitarist and singer Russel Marsden, 
it wouldn't have felt right to leave the 
band under the old moniker. 

‘We went through this period of 
reinvention, so when it came time 
to make another record it just didn't 
feel right for us to be called the same 
thing, it felt very strange,” he ex 
plains over the phone. “The day we 
did it we were just happier and more 
productive; it was just great. It felt 
it gave us the 


very natural to do it 
freedom to be creative again.” 

That freedom to be creative led to 4 
sharpening of the band’s sound into 
what it is today. The group's debut al- 
bum, entitled Baby Darling Doll Face 
Honey, blasts open with classic rock 
attitude of a decidedly British bent— 
think Cream, Zeppelin—but halfway 
through shifts in tone to become more 
expansive, leaving plenty of space 
between notes. As Marsden explains, 
Band of Skulls spent about a year not 
playing shows, simply working on 
honing that sound, before emerging to 


ok Band of Skulls mixes heavy British 
| blues with ethereality 


make a record and head out on tour 

"It was almost a sort of closing ir 
on the real sound of our band and 
trusting our gut a little bit more 
explains. “Sometimes the gut 
ing, that sticking to your guns an 
doing what you do best ... as soon a 
we stopped worrying about wha 
were sounding like and sounde 
like we sounded we were in a muc! 
better place.” 

Not only did the band seques 
itself away to work on honing th 
sound, but they enlisted the help o! 
Ian Davenport (who's worked wit! 
Supergrass and Badly Drawn Boy) 
assist them. As Marsden explair 
Davenport was exactly the right foi! 
the band needed to help take it 
different level. 

"I think sometimes you need some 
one else's ears ot someone els 
perspective on what you do to 
the best part of yourself,” h 
"He just let us free when we ne« 
to be free and held us back when 
needed to be held back and that 
we needed. I think the result spe! 
for itself actually, the record sounc 
really good and it translates ree!! 
well. | hope when people see us lv’ 
they won't think it's that different—° 
little bit more feisty perhaps, bu! 
they're the same songs. We're really 
proud of what we've achieved,” W 


© 


pRevuE //THEWINDWHISTLES === nnn" 
| // THE WIND WHISTLES 


Whistlestop tour 


Duo formed musical partnership to complement romantic one 


FAWNOA MITHRUSH 
// SAWRDAGVUEWEEKLY.COM 


are lots of examples of couples 
who make music together—too 
ee really. Oftentimes these re- 
iationships are associated with a band's 
demise (Fleetwood Mac, anyone?), but 
for Vancouver folkies Liza Moser and 
Jom Prilesky, coupledom is what al- 
lows them to tour the world in the way 
they've always wanted. 


"Our six-year anniversary is next’ 


month. We met at a place that used to 
have shows all the time in Vancouver 
called the Picadilly Pub,” explains Mo- 
ser. “L was in college at the time. I went 
to a show to see a friend's band, it hap- 
pened to be their last show. I ran into 
another friend who introduced me to 
his friends, and one of them was Tom." 

The two hit if off after a late night ren- 
dezvous at Denny's, and started hatch- 
ing escape plans. “Since then we've 
gone on one trip to Europe together 
that was non-music related, that was 
just backpacking. When we got back we 
moved in together and since we've lived 
together we've made music all along 
the way,” she says. 

Their progression into the band didn't 
exactly happen overnight. The simple, 
artsy sound of the Wind Whistles hap- 
pened to be a big departure from their 
musieal track records. "We both came 


from heavier backgrounds of music at 
the time we started Wind Whistles,” 
Moser says. "Tom was in a band called 
the Nature of Things which was kind 
of technical, spazzy punk stuff and 
really noisy. He was screaming a lot 
and he kind of felt the need to coun- 
ter it in a way. When when we came 
back from Europe on that backpacking 
trip we were kind of feeling bummed 
out, going back to jobs and missing 
Europe. He ended up writing our first 
song which was about coming back 
and howit's asad thing. That ended up 
being a really folky song.” 

This stripped-down, indie sound com- 
bined with their pining for more over- 


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seas exploits to give them a novel idea. 
“We thought, "Hey, maybe we can write 
songs that can hold the weight ofaband 
with just two acoustic instruments, 
that way we can tour Europe together 
and we don't need to rely on bringing 
a drummer and a full band with us.’ I 
got into playing acoustic bass and that's 
how the Wind Whistles started." 

Since shacking up, so to speak, the 
pair have released two full-length al- 
bums and one "secret" album, available 
by download only to those who purchase 
either of their previous two releases. 
Window Sills came out on aaahh Records 
in Spring of 2008, an album of delicate, 
jaunty folk tunes. They followed that 


OEBUT ALBUM 


In Stores September 1st, 2009 


a TTT TUITION Ca MEU 


earlier this summer with Animals Are 
People Too (and yes, Moser is a vegetar- 
ian), which saw them leaning back—just 
a little—on their rockish pasts. 

"Our newest album, most of it was 
written on tour last year in Europe and 
in Canada. At that point we were over- 
saturated in folk. Animals is still folky, 
butit's a bit poppier. There's a few more 
driven songs with a bit of electric gui- 
tar and stuff because of that same need 
but opposite, of wanting to get back 
into something a bit heavier. I'm actu- 
ally now back in a heavy band, a kind of 
grunge band called Bad Fate, and Tomis 
hoping to start something again soon.” 

Not that the cutesy album art on Ani- 
mals points to any indication of a hard- 
er sound (it looks a bit like the creatures 
from The Wind in the Willows meeting 
an urbane version of some Maurice 
Sendak characters). Still, you can't help 
but enjoy the weird, comforting hooks 
of tunes like "Turtle" and "Spooks." 

Now recuperating in Vancouver from 
the last European tour—which Wind 
Whistles returned from last month— 
the band is gearing up for another two 
months of shows across Canada. The 
plan is to appear in Edmonton twice: 
once this Friday at Naked, and again 
after the band loops around Ontario 
and heads back west which means 
you can also catch the duo in October 
at the Hydeaway. V 


nae UsERELONAINeLLAIN) 
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MUSIC // 41 


With Guests 
TOY SINGERS 


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PREVUE // BLUEBIRD NORTH 


aTATLALESTENN) 


Northern showcase 


Bluebird North lets singers and songwriters shine 


SONGBIRD >> Saskatoon’s Carrie Catherine will be 
in town for Bluebird North 1 Hf Suppled 


I: 1982 in Nashville, the Bluebird Café apeheth 
as a restaurant that occasionally hosted mu- 
sicians. Over 25 years later, it has become an 
institution for singer/songwriters, and its suc- 
cess has propelled it beyond Nashville. The 
Songwriters Association of Canada (SAC) has 
already successfully partnered with Bluebird 


to bring its "sing-and-tell" showcase to Canaq, 
an cities like Ottawa and Vancouver, and y 
SAC has asked local singer/songwriter An; 
iend to help bring it to Edmonton 

"It's funny, | went to Nashville and met th 
president of SAC, Eddie Shwartz, throush 
friend," laughs Vriend. "When I mentioneg | 
was from Edmonton, he said, ‘We need son 
one [to curate Bluebird North] in Edmont: 
Do you wanna expand there?” 

Four times a year, Vriend will be hand-p 
ing a group of musicians to share the stag: 

a “songwriters-in-the-round" series, where 
ists showcase their own songs while contribut 
ing to each others’. Often the goal is to see h 
spontaneity and creativity flows between - 
ists who've never played together before 

"I want to get artists who usually don't p! 
together and see what happens. I find that 
way more exciting,” she explains. "My goal 
to pick people from different genres and bz 
ance it with young and old, shake it u 
Get people who normally play in bands to p! 
solo, for example. And not just people fro 
Edmonton; I want to get artists who are cx 
ing through town, too.” 

This weekend's first showcase sees Edmont« 
nians Colleen Brown and Mark Davis along 
Carrie Catherine of Saskatoon and Matt 5; 
of Manitoba, already a tidy blend of accon 
plished artists and young blood. Besides j 
the performance, audience members will hay 
an opportunity to engage the musicians in 
Q&A about aspects of songwriting 

"It's to encourage songwriters and the pub 
lic to experience the songwriting process 
gether, so people can get the inside scooy 
see what songwriting’s all about. It's als 
increase the profile of SAC.” 

The SAC’s goal is to advocate, educate and bui! 
community on behalf of Canadian songwriter 
For more information, visit songwriters.ca 

SUN, SEP 6.(7 PM) 

BLUEBIRD NORTH 

HOSTED BY ANN VRIEND 

FEATURING COLLEEN BROWN, MATT EPP, CARRIE CATHERI!( 

MARK DAVIS 

THE HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 

$12, $10 FOR SAC MEMBERS. 


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MUSIC // 43 
SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY 


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ALBUM REVIEWS 


New Sounds 


Cave Singers 


deri § Joy 
Matador) 


Kak 


DAVID BERRY 
// DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
Ihe Cave Singers don't take long 
to mark a shift in mood on their 
newest full-length from Matador, 
Welcome Joy. Though their debut full- 
length, Invitation Songs, was hardly a 
dark, brooding affair, its occasional 
undertones of failure, loss and a very 
genre-appropriate fear of the divine 
are largely stripped away here, in fa- 
vour of a decidedly more optimistic 
bent. Where Invitation’s opener found 
the band thinking of heaven on “Seeds 
of Night,” here they openly exult about 
finding a way home and sing about 
doing our best to carry on the much 
brighter "Summer Light." Welcome Joy, 
as could be expected, is very frequently 
an album about taking pleasure in 
small, quiet things, finding the sun in 
things even if it's only a reflection 
The slight tonal shift isn't the band’s 
only change. Perhaps its most wel- 
come shift is the maturation of singer 
Pete Quirk's voice. With a timbre and 
tone that befits his last name, as well 
as a tendency to mumble out his lines 
like he's lying down after a long day, 
Quirk could occasionally grate, sound- 
ing far closer to an indie rock Carol 
Channing than is welcome or neces- 
sary. Here, though, he has taken cues 
from his finest moments, clearing 


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his elocution more often, exchang- : 
ing some of his whine for a rasp, but : 
still maintaining his trademark tics : 
and inflections. The result is one of ‘ 


the more interesting voices in indie, a 


voice that’s truly another instrument : 
in a genre where too often it’s an after- : 
thought, or at least counted on to be : 


good enough and that’s all. 
Its importance to the Cave Singers 


: vicinity ofPortland and Seattle. Yes 
: Colin Meloy, out of fey sea shanty m 


can't be overstated. Though the band = 


rarely missteps, they have a defi- 


: track, backed by sunnily = I 


nite tendency towards the easy and : 


established, and Quirk frequently 


: yes, those textures of strings and per 


elevates them beyond the run-of- 3 


the-mill. 


It's his self-harmonizing : 


and quiet confidence that pushes : 


"Leap" beyond its upbeat but pretty 
standard hootenanny feel. It’s his lilt 


: Buck production. You'll also re 
: the references masterfully woven ini 


that holds together the innocuously : 
pretty strums and galloping sticks of : 


a song like "Hen of the Woods,” 
the genuine joy in a line like "Eve- 


and : 
: great American novel: swampy Souther 


ning comes, and manisit short" that : 


earns 


the rambunctious (though : 


predictable) ending. And it's Quirk's : 


singing, 


distant and near-broken, : 


that pushes the -finger-picking of : 


closer “Bramble” 


into something : 


more touching than your average : 


genre exercise 
There are moments here, though, 


"Beach House," 


: precisely crafted. 

> MARY CHRISTA O'KEEFE 
when the entire band comes together. : : 
wisely released by : 


Matador in advance ofthealbum, isan : 


ideal end-of-summer song, about es- 
caping troubles into an easy summer 


night. Easy tamborines and bongos : 


mix with a slick little guitar line, and 


: (Hear Music) 


Quirk drives the mood home with the ; 
lines "Oh, love, let's prove them wrong : 


/ Time ain't wasted on us,” 


which : 


would be downright comforting if it : 


wasn't so damn uplifiting. They follow ; 


that up with the similar-in-mood "Vv," 


which finds peace in dancing and : 


singing on lawns. 


Overall, though, Welcome Joy is a : 
: over a delicate throwback mix of furl 


document of a band that's still find- 
ing its legs. 


pleasant evening. V 


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Provided they mature : 
with their singer, though, the Cave : 
Singers are well on their way to indie : 
folk that does much more than passa : 
: the sound of steaming milk—and di 
: covers some genttine emotion, soundi§ 


: tualrelationships instead of the bowels 
: acash-hungry second-source songwit¢ 
: That being said, Anjulie is a fre 
: opened bag of multi-coloured marshn 
: lows that won't necessarily rot y 
: teeth. 

: JONATHAN BUSCH 


: Rubik 

: Dada Bandits 
: (Fullsteam) 

S tekotok tr 


Killingsworth 


If anythin, 
ingsworth 

Vaguely fa. 
probably | 
is: the Minus 
ultimate 
ers Supergrou 
constantly recruiting talent from +) 
cream of the alterative music crop 


tasten 


tha 


singing about Scott Walker on a midd/ 


channeled from the very early ’ 


sion embedded in a tapestry of in 
mentation as deep and heavy as a 
mer evening are reminiscent of 


solid songs by Minus 5 lifeb’ 
McCaughey, melodic, superbly 
and etched with lyrics as literary 2 


Gothicism, ‘60s power pop, poignant 

lonesome balladry and a straight-a!i 
Jesus country song that wryly quot 
apocalypticisms. Driven by (mostly) MM 
Caughey’s lovely urgent voice and deft 
ornamented by a chorus of golde 
throated honeys, it’s a long meaty alb 


|} MARYCHRISTAGVUEW 


Anjulie 
Anjulie 


keke 


Daintier th 
togold and 
ical than Lily Alle 
Toronto-born Inc 
an-Guyanese ch 
teuse Anjulie pou 
her guarded hed 


soul-pop. She hits almost every m 
she seems to aim for—the happ 
bucks groove that, for some p 
blends into coffeehouse ambien 


as though it stems from the singer's 


JOMATHAN@VUEWEEX 


At times sp 
artistic, confus! 
and self-awa 
Finnish band R 

delivers on the 
of the groups 

Bond full lens 


: and—though Dada itself somet™ 


07. king of jeans pissed jeans 
08. lemans ty segall 

09. s/t daceh 

floaded ark espvail/batoh 


02. pleasure is the headlight spiral joy band 
03. lucifer rising bobby beausotell 

ight six organs of admittance 
nce om 10. ove: 


: gets mired in its own obfusca' 
> this album is totally listenable 


> BRYAN BIRTLES 
/{ BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY COM 


04, luminous 
05. live conte 


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46 // MUSIC WUEWEEKLY // SEP 3, 2009 


ma machines. 
VD BERRY 
} 0 oviD@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


defies any sort of ge- 


getically 


Blood—while Adeney coos softly over 


itching listen from the very first spin. 
AWNDA MITHRUSH 
(0 A@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


work's vocalists— 


Chris 


‘ty of influences can be considered 


adness orthe Eurythmics. 
'STINA DE GUZMAN 
"INA@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


*t Gire) 


oulre a pocket / I'm a sleeve" or the : 
sjecto-pop-funk of standout "Wander- : 
ng Heart” especially—these Kissers : 
sow how to rock a dance floor. Overall, : 
ys a welcome hit of up-tempo pop for : 
yone who can appreciate the moodi- : 
ness Of undisguised electronics and : 


: Wait too long 


neric music catego- : 
rization. Unapolo- : 
dramatic : 

d somewhat morbid in his poetry, Ad- : 
ney’s raspy drone comes across like the : 
harming lovechild of Tom Waits and : 
#60) Wiseman. Saxon is more toned : 
lown than Wax'sprevioustworock-style = 

leases, and it's a very welcome shift to : 
Whe soft-seat side. “Treading Water" isthe : 
fandout ballad, short but dark and wist- : 
|. It's followed by an emotive cover of : 
beoff Berner's “Voleano God.” The gui- : 
a: churns emotive tinklesthroughout— : 
e solemn, folky sound rounded out : 
ith the help of the back-up band, Black : 


One of the Frame- : 


Ryan Isojima and : 
Graham : 
sound so much : 
alike it’shardtotell : 
them apart—sums : 
"p perfectly when he sings, “It’s all 
Fen done before.” Had this band ex- : 
eda decade or two earlier, it would : 
pve fitrightin. That's notto saythere's : 

originality to be found here—if the ; 
ity to take bits and pieces fromava- : 
: (Centrediscs) 
Sinal, that is. “Turn off the World,” : 
eushly resembles U2 moulded with : 


| ALBUM REVIEWS 


: Talking Heads 
: More Songs About Build- 
: ings and Food 


: Originally released: 1978 


: The sophomore slump is a 
! near mythical predicament 
: faced by bands 
: ofallstripes that 
: find that after 
: having nearly a 
: lifetime to write 
: enough material 
: fora first album, 
: churning out a 
t second album 
within the short 
period of time 
demanded by 
record company 
execs—in order | iam 

to keep up the : 
hype and sat- P x 
: isfy fans—can 
: be challenging. 


: and you risk losing your audience. Rush 
: job it with a tepid and ill-defined second 
: barrage and you risk your credibility. 


Talking Heads' 1978 release More : 


: Songs About Buildings and Food rests 
: comfortably in the third category of 


the songs off the group's first album— 
1977's aptly named 77—More Songs 


group—and his contributions changed 


the white-funk all-stars that sold out 


be considered a transitional record. 


> RickWhiteAlbum 
: 137 
: (Blue Fog) 


: The best of the year! 
: Toronto's bone-rack Jesus 
= psych rock masterpiece 


: Amanda Blank 
| Love You 
(Downtown) 


Sexed-up synth workout 
or a synthed-up sex workout 
Either way, boners! 


Toca Loca 
p*p 


Sweet avant-garde "jazz" 


? with Tourette's syndrome “vocals” 
: and piano "playing* 


SEP 3 


Most of the songs were already 
completed by the time Eno got 
his hands on them—Talking 
Heads had been together 
since 1975, while drummer 
Chris Frantz and frontman 
David Byrne previously 
played together in a band 
called the Artis- 
tics when both 
attended the 
Rhode Island 
School of De- 
sign, and the 
Heads long re- 
sisted advances 
made by Sire 
Records until 
the members 
felt they had 
enough — good 
songs to justify a 
record deal—so 
it wasn't as if he 


CHEESE >> The album's cover is aphoto-| Was helping to 
‘mosaic of thousands of close-up polaroids 


write the mate- 
rial the way he 


: would on later albums. Still, his fin- 
> gerprints are all over the record. 


With the very first song, it's clear 
that Talking Heads have grown from 


: its twitchy beginnings. "Thank You 
: for Sending Me and Angel" is a funk 
: being a record that, instead of falling : 
: flat with warmed-over imitations of : 
Known to his moth- : 
er as Chris Adeney, : 
Wax Mannequin : 


groove repeated over and over, though 
one that is distinctly Talking Heads in 


: that, while the band is more than will- 
: ing to borrow ideas from funk, it never 
About Buildings and Food in many ways : 
: outdoes the Heads' debut. Part of the : 
: credit for that belongs to producer : 
Brian Eno—More Songs was the first : 
of three albums Eno produced for the : 


pretends to be anything that it isn't. 
Byrne's hyperactive vocals overtop, 
coupled with the thin and trebley tone 
of Tina Weymouth's bass ensures that 
no one is mistaking this white-boy funk 


; for the likes of George Clinton. 
the face of the band from the twitchy : 
and artistic group that complicated the : 
face of the New York punk scene into : 


As the album moves on, it's this new 
way of thinking about songs that de- 
fines the record almost as much as the 


: esoteric subject matter of the lyrics— 
stadiums. In More Songs, Eno's con- : 
tributions are more subtle than they : 
would be on future releases, such as : 
Fear of Music and especially Remain : 
in Light, which takes a decidedly Af- : 
rican turn both in its rhythms and in : 
the band's new collective method of : 
writing. In some ways, in fact, More : 
: Songs About Buildings and Food could : 
@ghtly woven metaphors. A clever, be- : 


long the focus of any writing about the 
band. The ideas that Eno brought to the 
table, coupled with the already defined 
esthetic of the band, became the tem- 
plate for the group's future success; in 
More Songs About Buildings and Food, 
Talking Heads can be heard making its 
first foray into the mixture of pop, Af- 
rican polyrhythm and punk that would 


* define the group's career. W 


The Maccabees 
Wall of Arms 
(Damino) 


Morissey worship 
All Brits do it or face the 


: Arcade Fire-ing squad 


La Coka Nostra 
: A Brand You Can Trust 
: (Suburban Noize) 


White guy gangsta rap 
: What's that whirring sound you hear? 
: World-wide eye-rolling 


; The Antlers 
: Hospice 
: (Independent) 


: Dainty guy vocals 
: To enjoy it you will need 
: Whisper 2000 


~ SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


LONG WEEKEND BACK TO SCHOOL BASH 
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“ 


DANIE SYRE 


PREVUE // 


Seeing the music 


Danie Syre sees the music first, hears it second 


JAMES STEWART 
// {STEWART @VUEWEEKLY.COM 


hen it came time to record her 

second album, Time For the Truth, 
Danie Syre sought out familiar faces. 
After having worked with Chris Wyn- 
ters and James Murdoch on 2007's The 
Journey, Syre had a clear idea of what 
to expect from the experience, and 
how her songs would be embellished 
and honed under the guidance of the 
two experienced helmsmen. 

"They were so awesome to work 
with,” Syre says. "With this being the 
second album that I've recorded with 
them, I had a much clearer idea of 
what to expect from the entire pro- 
cess. I'm more pleased with how this 
record turned out—I feel that the 
songs are better on the whole, and I 
feel much stronger vocally.” 

Spending her formative years sing- 
ing for a cover band, Syre's musical 
world changed dramatically when 
she inherited her father's prized 1969 
Martin acoustic guitar. No longer 
content to learn the songs of other 
bands, Syre began to create her own 
songs, becoming more familiar with 
the instrument as she went. 

"I wanted to write and have this 
creative outlet, even though I could 
barely play,” Syre laughs. "Yeah, and 
I'm still not great. But Chris and 


HOROSCOPE 


ARIES (Mar 21- Apr 19) 


Your assignment is to get angry in the : 
most unique, brilliant and constructive : 
way possible. Merely being annoyed : 
afid muttering generic curses will defi- : 


nitely not be sufficient. Nor will it 
work for you to get consumed 
in knee-jerk rage or to be 
peeved about the same old 
boring targets that everyone 
reacts to. What the cosmos 
needs from you this week, 
Aries, is a controlled explo- 
sion of liberated, compassionate, 
laser-sharp fury that will fuel your 


ingenious drive to change everything for ; 


the better 


TAURUS (Apr 20 — May 20) 


Are you having intense cravings for can- ; 
? Do you find yourself leaning in the : 
direction of sappy emotions and syrupy : 
words? That's what my astrological pro- : 
jections suggest. And if that's indeed the : 
case, I'd like to steer you in a different 3 
? honest questions. Dig deeper, please 


direction. It's not that an extravagant in- 
volvement in chocolate and sentimental 


ity is wrong or bad. But what you truly : 
need, in my opinion, is a more muscular, : LEO (Jul 23 - Aug 22) 
provocative sweetness. A wilder, more ; 


A sweetness that can : 


sweetne 


s and incite high magic 


vibrant 
smash obstacle 


GEMINI (May 21 — Jun 20) 


Lawon't protest if you try to conceal your- ; 
self from bullies or gossips or critics or : 
sists. You have cosmic permission to ; 
r down and keep a low profile. But : 


> don't hide from yourself. In fact, 


plea 


| encourage you to make yourself extra : 
available to yourself. Listen respectfully : 
to the questions and comments that your : 


: shadow murmurs in your inner ear. Be ea- 


ger to tune in to the messages your body 


soul could be substantial 


be revealed, the uncertainties to 


formulated questions; 


Open wider. Think fatter. 


No one knew there was coal in the Unit 


ed States until 1790. A hunter who was : 
: wandering near Pennsylvania's Broad : 
: Mountain stumbled upon it accidentally : 
> when his campfire lit up an outcropping : 
of pure anthracite. That discovery was ; 
> SCORPIO (Oct 23 — Nov 21) 
: Let's take inventory of your harvest, : 
Scorpio. What blossomed for you these : 


both a blessing and a curse; since then, 
the mining of coal has yielded abundant 


energy but also environmental degrada- : 


: tion. | predict a metaphorically similar : 
: planted last March and April sprouted 


: into ripe, succulent blossoms? Which 


event for you in the coming days, Leo 
You will inadvertently find a potentially 


enormous source of valuable fuel that : 


48 // 


CANCER (Jun 21 — Jul 22) : 
| have tuned in to your yearn- : 
ing for resolution, O Seeker. : 
| know that your heart fer--: 
vently wants the riddles to run : 
their course, the mysteries to : 


be quelled. And | have ransacked my : 
imagination in search of what consolation : 
: | might provide to appease your quest for : 
> neat, simple truths. But what | have con- : 
: cluded, O In-Between One, is that any so- : 
lutions | might try to offer you would not ; 
only be fake, but also counterproductive. : 
What you actually need, | suspect, are not : 
answers to your urgent questions, but : 
rather, better questions; more precisely : 
more ruthlessly : 
: She chose the latter path, completing an 
: 30-kilometre bike ride that tested her : 
> endurance and drove her into the heights : 
: of exhilaration. As she pedalled, she 
: drove herself onward with the throbbing : 
thought that this was a perfect way to : 
silence the self-destructive voice within : 
: path Is different. | don't indulge in marijua- 
: na, LSD, ayahuasca or psilocybin. However, 

my many years of doing meditation, dream = 
: work and various spiritual practices have 
nevertheless transformed me into a radi- : 
cal mystic with some of the same knowl- : lost its power to educate you. As * 
edge that the psychedelic experimenters : ous as these wistful breakthrough 

have. Keep that disclaimer in mind as you : 
> ruminate on my advice for you, which is : 
> this: Blow your own mind, baby. Raise your : 


: will, like coal, present you with both rich 
: opportunities and knotty dilemmas 

is longing to tell you, These communica- : 
tions might sometimes be a minor pain in : 
the ego, but the long-term benefits to your : 
: said no to in the past. | double dare you 
to try an impossible thing before lunch : 
each day. | triple dare you to imagine : SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 - Dec 21) 
: Before she became a rock goddess, Gwen : 
: Stefani cleaned the floors at an ice cream : 
parlour. Prior to ascending to stardom, : 
: Ellen DeGeneres was an oyster shucker, : 
Keanu Reeves worked a janitor and Brad : 
> yards. A rusty mustard-yellow 1977 Cadi 


VIRGO (Aug 23 — Sep 22) 


| dare you to say yes to a possibility you've E 
: cultivate your seeds in the next cycle? 


you're a genius at inspiring people to like 
you and help you. | quadruple dare you 


to drive overly stable people crazy for all 2 


the right reasons. | quintuple dare you to 


fantasize that your so-called delusions : 
: of grandeur have begun to contain more : 
: As for me, my gig as an internationally syn- : 
: dicated astrologer was not my first Among : 
= many other things, | washed enough pots : 
and pans in cheap restaurants to fulfill - 
going through an especially vivid phase : my dishwashing karma for my next five : 
of living on the edge between yes and no. : 
: to inspire you, Sagittarius. Even during the 
down economy, the next six months will : 
provide you with ripe astrological condi- : 
tions for upgrading your job. And the com- : in places like this in the coming weeks 
: where diversity rules, where the pize0" 
} holes are exploded, where variety « °° 
: just the spice of life but the main cou’* 


than a few grains of truth. 


LIBRA (Sep 23 — Oct 22) 


| know a 19-year-old woman who has been : 


She told me that yesterday morning she 


woke up with the feeling that in the next : 
12 hours she could either commit suicide ; 
or else perform some epic deed in which : 
she surpassed all of her previous limits. : 
: about how to go about it. 


her. | offer her victory to you, Libra, as 
being worthy of imitation 


past months? Which of the seeds you 


seeds grew into hard, spiky clumps? And 


WUEWEEKLY // 


James were able to take what I wrote 
and embellish it. It can be hard to 
hand your songs over to someone 
else—those are my babies! But the 
songs turned out really well, and I had 
a great time working with those two.” 

Not just a CD release show, the Ha- 
ven will also be displaying Syre’s art- 
work, which also graces the cover of 
both her albums. Sharing an equal 
passion for her art and her music, 
Syre finds inspiration for her paint- 
ings in her songs, and uses her strong 
visual responses from music to create 
and capture the images on canvas. 

“I've been a visual artist since I was 
three years old. I find the two—music 
and painting—just seem to go togeth- 
er,” Syre explains. “I've always painted 
and I've always sang. When I write a 
song! get a really strong visual picture. 
It's like watching a movie in my head, 
and then taking certain images from 
that movie, and those are the paintings 
that I do. I've been contacted a couple 
times about having my music licensed 
for some actual movies, and that would 
be amazing. But I just want to keep 
writing, and to keep painting. I've never 
been happier." V 
erases acanlnetacen ene REA 

THU, SEP 10 (7:30 PM) 

DANIE SYRE 

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB, $15 


: what about weeds, pests and predators? : 
: Were you tireless about keeping them : 
: away from your beauties? Finally, what : 
: did you learn about growing things that : 
could give you a green thumb when you : 
: AQUARIUS (Jan 20 - Feb 18) 

: I love the new neighborhood | just move! 
= to. It’s insanely eclectic: Modern subury 


Pitt performed as a giant chicken mascot. 


incarnations. | hope these examples serve 


ing weeks will be prime time to brainstorm 


CAPRICORN (Dec 22 — Jan 19) 


: [know some brave pioneers who make re- 
: sponsible use of psychotropic drugs asthey : 


map out the borderlands of consciousness. 


I'm glad they're doing that work, but my : 
: have had you received it earlier. You © 


BORROWED >> Syre's guitar, appar 
ently lent to her by a friend named 
Martin // Supplied 


expectations, supercharge your fantas 
and make forays out into the frontier 
high in ways that are appropriate to yout 
ethical code. 


ban-like Homes with impeccable emerald 
green lawns stand right next door to be 
draggled 1950s-style ranch houses wit 

unfinished plywood for garage doors and 
high brown weeds blanketing the fron 


lac Seville sporting a McCain-Palin bum 
per sticker is parked on the street nex 
to a shiny'2007 Volvo with a sticker that 
advises, "Be the change you want to seq 
in the world.” Aging rednecks with fist 


: ing gear scattered in the driveway |v 
: next door to hipster musicians who blas 
> psychedelic folk songs from their g2'8 


rehearsal space. | urge you to hang > 


PISCES (Feb 19 — Mar 20) 

The month of August brought you 5°" 
peculiar advances. You got a reward tha 
didn't mean as much to you as it me 


grew an enigma that had puzzled 2 
frustrated you forever. And you fir 
wriggled free of a shadowy game 


you had been attached to long att 


been, they are prologue to what's h« 
your way. Get ready to solve a pro” 
you didn't even know you loved. * 


ee eee eee 


* presenting with Gerald St 


(A 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP Braeside 
Church basement, N. door, 6 
anal Bishop St, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
<:. Albert « For adult children of alcoholic and 
nal families « Meet Mondays including 


Retest sedge colecton xt 

# for col n at no cost. 
Der Meatveresretercance accoted 
bot 12-13 at Millwoods Town Centre, 23 Ave, 66 St 


IST PRACTICE 10502-70 Ave, 
lling.ca » Karma Tashi Ling: Tranquil- 


Wed, 7pm + DVD's and discussion: 
=e paedlae welcome 


DIAN MENTAL HEALTH 
JOCIATION Suite 800, 10045-111 St, f 
6321 « Family support drop-in group for 
dividuals who are supporting an adult family 
mber who is living with a mental illness « 
etry Wed, 6:30-8:30pm 


HESS CLUB 720.474.2318 - Learn to play chess; 
bpportunities for all ages including classes, school 
programs and tournaments + rovingchessnuts@ 
haw.ca 


ORN FEST Prairie Gardens and Greenhouses, 
&6307 Lily Lake Rd, Bon Accord, 780.921.2272 + 
brairiegardens.org = Sept 5-7 


OUNTRY SOUL STROLL - 
dmontonscountryside.com + Self-guided driving 
our of Sturgeon County and the northern region 
bf Edmonton's countryside + Until Sept 7 


REE LANGUAGE Stanley A. Milner Library, 
entennial Room (lower level) « Introduction to 
basic conversational Cree « Tue, Sept 15-Nov 24; 
Wed, Sept 16-Nov 25; Thu, Sept 27-Nov 26, 6pm + 
pre-register at 780.496.7020 for Tue or Wed; info: 
ura Morin at 780.496.1968 or lmorin@epl.ca 


iDMONTON BICYCLE COMMUTERS’ 
OCIETY 10047-Bo Ave, back alley entrance, 
£0.433.2453 « edmontonbikes.ca « Basic Bicycle 
chanic: « Every Tue and Pri, 6pm + Free 
member)/$i0 (non-member; pre-register 


EDMONTON ESPERANTO SOCIETY km 
12, 10025-2024 Ave, 780,702.5127 » Fri, noon-ipm + 
ghn@sewardconsulting.com 


(OME-ENERGISING SPIRITUAL 
FOMMUNITY FOR PASSIONATE LIVING 
puneau/Ashbourne Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 
re « Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and 
bilection on sacred texts to energise you for 
Basionate living « Every Sun 3-spm 


EDITATION ORIENTATION SESSION 
Willpower Institute Edmonton, 12520-2135 Ave, 
-459-0470/780.451.9535 « willpowerinstitute. 
bm - Wed, Sept 9, 7-9pm; evening class starts 
pt io, 7-9pm + Free 


BUGARSWING DANCE CLUB Orange 

Ball, 1035-84 Ave, 780.604.757a « sugarswing. 

bm » Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: no 
‘Penience needed, beginner lesson followed by 
Nice every Sat, 8pm (door) 


AINABLE AGRICULTURE DEVELOP- 
Myer Horowitz Theater, and Fl, Students’ 
on Suilding, U of A « Dr. Rene Van Acker, 
pfessor and Chair, Department of Plant Agricul- 

Es. University of Guelph talk on how agriculture 

2 m industrial to a multifunctional 


AE! 


OIST TAI CHI SOCIETY « six Wilbur 
ntyre Garebo, 103 St, 83 Ave « Demonstartions 
0st Tai Chi; Sat, Sept 12, 10-11:30am « 


VEGAN/VEGETARIAN POTLUCK Riverdale 
Community Hall, 9231-100 Ave « Bring a home- 
made vegetarian, vegan or raw vegan dish for 6 
people, plate, utensils, mug, copy of recipe « Sun, 
Sept 13, 5:30-7pm 


WOMEN IN BLACK tn Front of the Old Strath- 
cona Farmers’ Market Silent vigil the ist and 3rd 
Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a 
world without violence 


em 


CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.481.9857 
+ Shows start at 8pm Thu-Sat and late show at 
10:30pm on Fri-Sat; $12 (Thu)/$19 (Fri/Sat) 


COMEDY FACTORY Gateway Entertainment 
Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Trail « Thu, 8:30pm; Sat, 
8pm and 10pm « Bob Angeli; Sept 4-5 » Danny 
Accapella; Sept 11-12 


COMIC STRIP Bourbon St, WEM, 780.483.5999 
+» Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm + Dave 
Stawnichy; Sept 4-5 « Brian Work from Saska- 
toon; Sept 11-12 


DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.710.2119 « Comedy 
Night: Hosted by Lars Callieou « Every Sun, gpm 


LAUGH SHOP-Whyte and Fl, 10368-82 Ave, 
780.476.1010 « thelaughshop.ca + Mike Dambra; 
until Sept 6 « Amateur Night hosted by Lori 
Ferguson-Ford; Sept 9, 8pm « Harry Doupe 
Wed-Sun, Sept 9-13 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-Red Deer sun- 
nybrook United Church, Red Deer, 403.347.6073 
+ Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their 
friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 
7pm, each month 


BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP . 
A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women 
every and Tue of the month, 8pm « groupsyahoo. 
corn/group/bwedmonton 


BOOTS BAR AND LOUNGE 10242-106 St, 
780.423.5014 » bootsbar.ca + and Thu: Illusions Social 
Club + 3rd Wed: Edmonton O Society « 2nd Tue: 
Edmonton Rainbow Business Association + Every 
Fri: Philosophy Café » Fri and Sat DJ SeXXXy Sean 
10-3 + Long Weekend Sundays feature the Stardust 
Lounge with Miss Bianca and Vanity Fair 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB iiyasB Jasper Ave, 
780.483.7736 « DJ Dust 'n' Time; Mon gpm « DJ 
Arrow Chaser; Tue 9pm + DJ Dust 'n' Time; Wed 
9pm; no cover before 10pm « DJ Arrow Chaser; 
Fri 8pm; no cover before 10pm « Dj Earth Shiver 
‘n’ Quake; Sat 8pm; no cover before 10pm « DJ 
Bobby Beatz; Sun 9pm + Drag Queen Perfor- 
mance Show; Sun; no cover before 1opm 


EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) Unitar- 
jan Church of Edmonton, 10804-119 St- A group 

of older gay men and their admirers who have 
common interests meet the 2nd Sun, 2:30pm, most 
months for a social period, short meeting and guest 
speaker, discussion panel or potluck supper. Special 
interest groups meet for other social activities 
throughout the month. E; edmontonpt@yahoo.ca + 
primetimersww.org/edmonton 


GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION - 
teamedmonton.ca « Women’s Drop-In Recre- 
ational Badminton; Oliver School Gym, 10227-118 
Sti780.465.3620; Wed, 6-7:30pm + Bootcamp; Lyn- 
nwood Elementary School at 15451-84 Ave; Mon, 
7-8:1spm; bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca « Bowling: 
Gateway Lanes, 100, 3414 Gateway Blvd; Sat, s-7pm; 
bowling@teamedmonton.ca + Curling: Mon, 7:15- 
9:19pm), Granite Curling Club; 780.463.5942 » Run- 
ning: Sun, Tue, Thu; running@teamedmonton.ca 

» Swimming: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; Tue, 8-9pm, 
Thu, 7:30-8:30pm; swimming@teamedmonton. 

ca « Volleyball: Tue Recreational: Mother Teresa 
Elementary School at 9008-105A, 8-10pm; Thu 
intermediate: Amiskiwaciy Academy, 101 Airport 
Rd, 8-10pm; recyolleyball@teamedmonton.ca; 
volleyball@teamedmonton.ca « YOGA (Hatha): Free 
Yoga every Sun, 2-3:30pm; Korezone Fitness, 203, 
10575-115 St, yoga@teamedmonton.ca 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB: 
CROSSDRESSERS 780.387.3343 « meet 
monthly « For info go to groups.yahoo.com/ 
group/edmonton_illusions/ 


INSIDE/OUT U of A Campus « Campus-based 
organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-iden- 
tified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, 
academic, straight allies and support staff « ard Thu 
each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. 
Contact Kris (kwells@ualberta.ca) 


LIVING POSITIVE 404, 10408-124 St « edm- 
livingpositive.ca, 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 + 

Providing confidential peer support to people 
living with HIV - Tue, 7-9pm: Support group « 
Daily drop-in, peer counselling 


MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB . 
gcocities.com/makingwaves_edm « Recreational/ 
competitive swimming. Socializing after practices 
+ Every Tue, Thu 


PLAY NIGHTCLUB 10220-103 St - playnight- 
club.ca « Open Thu, Fri, Sat » The first bar for the 
queer community to open in a decade with Djs 
Alexx Brown and Eddie Toonflash 


PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON 9540-22 
Ave, 780.488.3234 « pridecentreofedmonton.org 

+ Open Tue-Fri 1-10pm, Sat 2-6:30pm + LGBT 
Seniors Drop-in: Every Tue/Thu, 2-4pm + CA: Thu 
(7pm) « Suit Up and Show Up: AA big book study 
group every Sat, noon « Youth Understanding 
Youth: Up to 2s years, support and social group 
every Sat, 7-9pm; yuy@shaw.ca + Womonspace: 
Board meeting ist Sun every month, 10:30am-12- 
30pm + Trans Education/Support Group: Meet the 
ist and 3rd Sun, 2-4pm, every month; albertatrans. 
org + Men Talking with Pride: Sun 7pm; facilita- 
tor: Rob Wells robwells780@hotmail.com + HIV 
Support Group: and Mon every month, 7pm 

+ Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex and Question- 
ing (TT1Q) Alliance: Support meeting and Tue 
every month, 7:30pm + Transgender, Transsexual, 
Intersex and Questioning. Education, advocacy and 
support for men, women and youth « Free short- 
term, solution-focused drop-in counseling; Wed, 
7-0pm  YouthSpace: drop-in for LGBTQ for youth 
up to 25; Tue-Sat, 3-7pm 


PRISM BAR 10524-101 St, 780.990.0038 + Wed: 
Free Pool; Karaoke, 9pm-midnight « Thu: Prism 

Pool League; 7-11:30pm « Fri: Steak Nites; 5-9pm} 
DJ at 9:30pm 


Stee UPCOMING:-UPCOMING:UPCOMING 


NOOOHS APH NO LOS 


KULLY< \" 
“H POCRITES . 


THE 


INTEN 


ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 
10209-2123 St, 780.482.1587 « Soul OUTing: an LGBT- 
focused alternative worship « and Sun every month, 
7PM; worship Sun, 10:30am; people of all sexual 
orientations welcome. LGBT monthly book club 
and film night. E: jravenscroft@rwuc.org 


ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH 1526-76 Ave, 
780.436.1555 * People of all sexual orientations are 
lcome + Every Sun (10am worship) 


WOMONSPACE 780.482.1794 + womonspace.ca, 
Womonspace@gmail.com « A Non-profit lesbian 
social organization for Edmonton and surrounding 
area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates 
included with membership. Confidentiality assured 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6557 * Kara- 
oke with Nathan; Mon 8pm - Martini Mondays; 
3pm + You Don't Know Game Show with Patrick 
and Nathan; Thu 9pm « Long Island Iced Tea; Thu 
3pm « Karaoke with Morgan; Wed 7pm « Karaoke 
with Kevin; Sun 8pm 


YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH . 
yuyedm.ca » Meets every Sat, 7-9pm « Contact Scott 
for info email: info@yuyedm.ca, T: 780.248.1971 


Se 


CORNFEST AND FAMILY FUN DAY 
Callingwood south parking lot, 69 Ave, x78 St « call- 
ingwoodmarketplace.com + Support the Firefighters 
Burn Treatment Society featuring Corn, entertain- 
ment and family activities + Sat, Sept 1a, noon-spm 


al 


Oil : 


BACK 10 SCHOOL BH" = 


\ 


ne 


EDMONTON COMPETITIVE DANC- 
ESPORT TEAM St. John’s Cultural Centre, 
10611-110 Ave « dancesportfundraiser.ca + Gala and 
fundraiser featuring show dances from Jim Deglau 
and Elena Sinelnikova and a free introductory 
ballroom lesson, social dancing, a silent auction, 
hors d'oeuvres, and a dessert buffet » Sat, Sept 12, 
6:30pm « $20 (adult)/$i0 (youth 3-15); infants under 
two are free; tickets at TIX on the Square ? 


LABOUR DAY BARBECUE FOR THE 
UNEMPLOYED Giovanni Caboto Park, 95 St, 108A 
Ave + Featuring music by Finding February and other 
bands; presented by the Edmonton and District La- 
bour Council (EDLC) + Mon, Sept 7, n30am-330pm 


SOBEYS SYMPHONY UNDER THE 

SKY Heritage Amphitheatre, Hawrelak Park, 
780.428.1414, 1800,563.5082 « edmontonsymphony. 
com + Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, Bob 
Bernhardt (conductor) + Sept 4-7 + Tickets available 
at the Winspear Centre box office 


STORYTELLING FESTIVAL Fort Edmonton 
Park, 780.932.4409 + ecn.ab.ca/-tales/ « TALES 
Edmonton + Sept 6-7 « Egge's Barn, Fort Edmonton; 
Sunday Concert featuring Maria Dunn with 
Norma Cameron and Cathleen Thom; Marie- 
Anne McLean, Renee Englot, Bethany Ellis and 
Pearl-Ann Gooding; Sept 6, 8pm; tickets $15 (adv at 
780.932-4409)/$16 (door) 


GADEN SAMTEN LING'S TIBETAN 
BAZAAR Alberta Avenue Hall, 9210-118 Ave, 
780.418.8340 « gasamling.ca « Jewellery, clothing, 
and arts and crafts from Tibet, Nepal and India, 
books and informative presentations, and Tibetan 
food + Sept 12-13, 1oam-spm « $5, child under 12 free 


FOR ALL THINGS NEW CITY INCLUDING GUANA BATZ, THE FAINT, THE CREEPSHOW, 
D.0.A., APOPTYGMA BERZERK, THE MATADORS, THE BRAINS, AND SQ MUCH MORE! 
PLEASE VISIT www.newcitycompound.com. 


SEP 3 — SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


BACK //49 


q} 
f 


LGBT >> PUB 


The trees are alive 


“A cool wind was breezing up Yonge : 
Street from Lake Ontario, relieving me : 


from the urban heat still trapped be- 
tween the buildings. It was after 
midnight and | was looking for 
public sex in Toronto, resolved 
not to use the Internet to find 
the cruising park I've been 
told exists downtown. At the 
time | had been thinking a lot 
about how online hook up sites 
_like Manhunt were changing the 
geography of desire. Had everyone 


abandoned the physical for the virtual? : 
Was the thrill of happenstance encoun- : 
ters being replaced by online browsing : 


and choosing? 


| called a bathhouse listed in the free 
queer paper, worried the person on the : 
other end wouldn't want to give me di- : 
rections to the park lest it take away : 
from his business. Instead he responded : 
wistfully, as if he too would rather be : 


EER 


outside playing. 


fe} 


where | was; rather he orient- 


my location or my knowledge of 
geography with my desires. 


like | know what I'm seeing or doing. 


At first | felt disappointedly vindicated. : 
The park looked empty save for the men : 


ed me as if | was standing at : 
ground zero in Toronto's gay : 
ghetto. He, ina way, assimilated : 


As | entered the park | started to have : 
second thoughts, worried about getting : 
arrested, that there would be no action or : 
that the action would be more than | was : 
: prepared to see. For all my thinking about : 
queerness and sex | still find myself easily f 
shocked, jarred and sometimes under-ex- : 
perienced, fumbling in an attempt to look : 


? who had found benches and picnic tables : 
? and converted them into homes, shop- : 
: ping carts parked where a garage would 
: be. | had been thinking that maybe cruis- 
= ing parks—historically important places 
The bathhouse | had called was off the : 
: beaten path, and what was interesting : 
about the directions he gave me : 
was that they weren't based on : 
where he was, nor did he ask : 
: that began to surface. | felt fora moment : 
: themselves in the park and were trying to : 
> figure out what was going on. : 


for men who want to have sex with men 


to meet—were becoming less relevant, a = 
place only for those who did not have or : 
: happened to others. Some guys just saun- 
: tered around as if they weren't in a cruis 


chose not to use the Internet. As my eyes 
adjusted to the dark it was older bodies 


like a pompous anthropologist who just 
had his life's work validated. My phone 


vibrated. It was a friend. | began speak- : 
? Ing with her as | walked around the park, : 
: thinking that my adventure was over. 

The park, which is basically a large traf- : 
fic circle perimetered with streetlights : 
and trees, is divided into quadrants by a : 
big heroic statue in the middle. As | left : 
the quadrant | began in and enter on to : 
the other side, the population of the park : 
began to change. Soon a plethora of bod- E 
ies were emerging from the trees andthe : 
> shadows. | cut my friend short, put my : 
: few years the city cuts down some trees or 


phone away and joined them. 


At first it was comical, yet unnerving. = 


: collected guys sat to watch the action, and 


All these men cruising around loaded = 
‘ = He laughed as he said this and th h 
: anything. Some guys leaned against the = =a 
= trees, waiting for someone they liked 
} to approach them; avoiding eye contact : 
: with those they weren't interest in. Other 


with curiosity and sex but no one doing 


guys just hovered near the trees, hoping, 4 
think, to live vicariously through whatever 


ing park, as if they had somehow found 


In between the trees are benches. ft 


seemed to me this was were the cool and : 
: blow jobs and talk with other guys w/ 
: liked to have sex with men. He calls it Em 
: erald Island, and it is his favourite pla 
: the city. Sitting there with him, the w 
: noise of the city muffled by the rustling 3 
> trees, breathing and sighs of anxiety ar4 
: ecstasy, | realized that the Internet and al 
> that it offers for dudes who want to hoo 


then acted accordingly. | wanted to be in 
this crowd so | sat down. It was from this 
vantage point that | began to see how beau- 
tiful the physical space of the park was. We 
were basically in a grove of trees that cre- 
ated a frame of the night sky, ablaze with 
stars. The ground was Lush with grass and 


the occasional texture of roots. The guy : 
> It's just another plain on which men 
: find each other and explore. There 
: either/or, there is just more. W 


beside me started telling me that every 


puts up more lights in an effort to curb the 


CLASSIFIEDS 


“PAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 
OR EMAIL LISTINGS@ VUEWEEKLY.COM 
DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM 


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WUEWEEKLY If SEP 3 


Have You Had 
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MODAL MUSIC INC. 780.221.3716 
Quality music instruction since 1981. 
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Want someone to jam with? Place up to 20 words 
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than 20 words subject to regular price or cruel 


= time, the queens just smash the bulbs ° 


: circled the park cut through the tre = 
: and illuminated details and faces. | cout 
: see for a flash that the guy beside m- 
: was in his early 30s. The movement 0 
: his face and his voice younger than ho., 
: his face looked. 


: the park since he was 16, since before | 
: lived his life as a gay man. It was in : 


use of the park as an outdoor sex spa... 
boastful grin said, "They are wasting + 


Sometimes the lights from cars 


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park where he learned to give hand jol 


up poses no threat to the lure of nature 


editing, Pree ads must be submitted in writing. in 

person or by fax. Free ads will run for four we: 

if you want to renew or cancel please phone ( 

nys at 780.426.1996/fax 780.426.2889/e-mn office i 
yueweekly.com or drop it off at 10303-108 ‘ 

Deadline is noon the Tuesday before publicatior 
Placement will depend upon available space 


Gallery at Milner: Call for Submissions; Deadlir 
Oct 15, Inquiries/applications: Art Selection 
Committee, Centre for Reading and th 
Stanley A. Milner Library 7 Sir Winston C! , 
Sq, Edmonton AB T§J 21/4; T: 780.496.7030; ! 
cragalleries€displays@epL.ca 


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_ when I feel the person on the end of 


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he'd say, "Ooh, sounds ... wet." If | said 


"Ooh, hard!" It was like that with ev- : 


erything! He was not some 20-year-old 


ARTIST TO ARTIST 
‘ART TALK: Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre 
- (owmstairs),7 Sir Winston Chi Sq; ASA 


with the EPL present a free art talk with Gerald 
St. Maur (artist and poet); Thu, Sept 17, 7-30pm 


Art from the Unknown. Emerging artists call 
780.414.0702 for submission package 


sangy Dipl tr alee oteert a 
si ‘Wo! 
ow gs ere market wanted 


also. Contact aota_artists@yahoo.ca for details 


The Edmonton Columbian a ae 
tions: Tue, Sept 8, espe at St. Josep! 
Catholic High School. Info: Brenda Chelvam 
780.760. , brenada@shaw.ca; Heather 
Bedford-Clooney 780.484.8325, hbedford@ 
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Submit exhibits for consideration in the fol- 
owing categories: Environmental Site Specific 
lnstallation; Curated Group Exhibit, Individual 

cr Two Artist Exhibit, and Community Pro- 
grams are invited to participate in 2010 at The 
Works Art Market and Food Street (deadline 
Feb, 15, 2010) and Street Stage ( Mar, 
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a guy who wanted to do it about as : larly, but four times a year is pretty : 


Dear Day: 


: A happy medium in your case would 
: require something like the matter- 
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and Mr. Every Three Months in the : 


: other and zap them back and forth in 


Heavy rock band seeks bass player. Songs 
written, demo available, pro gear a must, 
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780.233.4269 


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WANTED: JAMMERS for open public monthly 
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a ee eel 
VOLUNTEER 
The Learning Centre Literacy Association is 
seeking volunteer tutors to help adults develop 
reading, writing and/or math skills. Volunteers 
participate in learning, tutor one-to-one, 
or assist dageleiere Skills and Experience: 
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skills Contact: Denis Lapierre, 780-429-0675, 
i tre@shaw.ca 


CA 


180-223-0699 


broke up. Then | fell in love with : 
) his polar opposite. We've been : often as you do, with some room in : 


together a couple years and : there for negotiation. Un-ideally, of : 


our sex life has gone down- : course, you could make yourself a 


hill rapidly, from two or three : boyfriend who never wants to have : 


times a week to maybe once : sex but does like to make a whole lot : 


every three months. I've tried : of immature, sniggery jokes about it. 


to initiate it, but | get nowhere. : On second thought, maybe this isn't 


It only happens when he wants to. | : the best plan. 
really love this guy and! want to marry = 
: him. | just need to figure out how to find : 
: a happy medium. 

: Love, Opposite Day 
the line is waiting. But, that's not why : 

he's my ex. He was rather immature. He : 


_- SEP 3 ~ SEP 9, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


: surprised you stuck it out with him as : you were saying, “We only do it every : 


: long (ooh, long) as you did. It must : 


; have been hard to ... | mean you had ! with that," I'd dance at your wedding : 


? to have been open to ... | mean on top : 
: of—oh, never mind. It must have been 
: like living with Michael Scott with a : ing on your marriage's grave and while 
: few drinks in him: "That's what she : 


: sald!" Awful. You have my sympathy. 


The new guy is a harder nut (oh, shut 


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: has gone and why, or is there a chance : 
: that you do know what's up (shut up) : 
: with him but don't want to admit it? | : 
: don't think it's abnormal to experience : 


: slim pickings. As a mere stripling of 31 : 
: | would be very cautious, in your place, : 
: about signing any long-term contracts : 
: under those conditions. At the very : 
: least you ought to know what's going : 
= on with him (and with your relation- : 


: one who frankly isn't going to satisfy : 


The first guy sounds unbearable. I'm : you. It would be a different story if : 


: then. The way you're talking about it : 
: though, I'd feel more like | was danc 


: I've always liked Nick Cave and stuff : 
: I'm just not that goth. Sorry. It ain't 


} going to work. 
: up) to crack, Are you really as mysti- : 


: fied as you sound as to where the sex : 


: nearly everybody needs at some point. 
: This is no time to ask him what's wrong 
: with him or to suggest that maybe He's 
: just not man enough for you, not if you 
: actually like him, anyway. It is time to 
: find out what's going on with him all 
: those times you initiate and you “get 
: nowhere.” Is it possible he's missing 
=! your cues? Is there a better time or a 
: better approach? A different act? If no, 
no, no and no and this is just who he 
: is, a guy who's interested in sex four 
ship) before you agree to marry some- ; times a year and anything extra just 
seems unnecessary or unappealing, 
: then you're going to have to figur@®ut 
: if there's some way you can get your 
hree months and we're both happy : itches scratched. Maybe he'd be happy 
just holding you while you take care of 
: things for yourself. Maybe he'd be OK 
f you had a “friend.” Maybe he needs 
: a check-up and a meds adjustment and 


: all will be well after that. You're going 
: to have to find out, is all. | don't care if 
} it's hard. And that's not what she said, 


You're going to have to have one of : or sol hear. 
: those sit-downs that nobody wants but : Love, Andrea 
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4 // UP FRONT WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 


ns TN al = 


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52 Enter Sandor : : 
66 New Sounds : cy Sex in the City // Vue's annual peek at what's going 
67 Old Sounds : ; on in the world of getting it on 


67 Quickspins 


BACK // 68 . UP FRONT 
68 Free Will Astrology : 


70 Queermonton 
“71 Alt.Sex.Column 


42 Arts 
47 Film 
50 Music 
69 Events 


EDMONTON’ YOGA STUDIO 


Hatha lyengar Ashtang 
12039 a 27, Street 
www.edmontonyogostudio.com 


tel 451:8131 


‘Never mind the mallets, : Former Iron Maiden vocalist ( 
here's bike polo. : Paul Di'‘Anno storms into town. 


ARTS // REVUE 
: Fawnda Mithrush reviews the dance 
: show Cabane. 


} FILM//SIDEVUE 
: Brian Gibson examines how few war flicks dare to examine the true 
: atrocities of the Second World War. 


listening, so let's talk, Join the conversation on Facebook. pe 
Join our Vue Weekly Facebook group. alternative a 


hy not-so-retro 


L 


: DISH // DISHWEEKLY.CA 
: Restaurant reviews, features, searchable and easy to use. 
: dishweekly.ca 


_ be ap gee r 
Septembemld. 


SEP 10 ~ SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY UP FRONT 


SCOTT HARRIS 
/{ SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


t's hardly the way anyone would 

choose to spend Labour Day, the lazy 
end-of-summer holiday ostensibly set 
aside by the government to celebrate the 
collective gains made over the years by 
workers. But against the recommenda- 
tion of their union's bargaining commit-~ 
tee over 70 percent of the 350 workers at 
Safeway's main distribution centre and 
the Lucerne Foods ice cream plant in 
Edmonton voted against the company’s 
latest offer, setting in motion a lockout/ 
strike which sent workers to the picket 
lines early Monday morning for what 
United Food and Commercial Workers 
(UFCW) 401 president Doug O'Halloran 
warns could be a months-long strike. 

The workers, who have been without 
a contract since December 2008, say 
they are concerned about company 
plans to bump full-time workers from 
the current 37 hours a week to 40 hours 
a week, saying the company wants to 
implement the move so that it can lay 
off workers in the future, a not-entirely 
implausible scenario. 

The decision to go on strike is never 
an easy one—much less so during an 
economic downturn—which is one of 
the reasons that despite the popular 
notion of unions as strike-happy, some 


abour Day 


95 percent of agreements are negoti- 
ated without a strike occurring. 

But, ultimately, the only real bargain- 
ing chip workers have against employ- 
ers is to refuse to work. The right to 
strike when absolutely necessary is, 
ironically, responsible for the gains sup- 
posedly celebrated on Labour Day. But 
in a province like Alberta, with labour 
laws that are hopelessly slanted against 
workers, and which get worse each time 
the government amends labour legisla- 
tion, the strike as an effective tool has 
been eroded significantly. 

Immediately upon locking outits work- 
ers Safeway began the process of hiring 
replacement workers, some of whom 
will be receiving higher wages than the 
workers they are replacing. At the same 
time, a Labour Relations Board decision 
handed down on Monday prevents pick- 
eters from doing anything more than 
telling trucks entering the facility about 
the situation, preventing them from 
otherwise disrupting operations. 

What it all means, of course, is that 
Safeway has absolutely no reason to re- 
turn to the bargaining table in good faith, 
leaving the workers with few options to 
secure better working conditions, save to 
count on the support of enough consum- 
ers to, as they have done before, boycott 
Safeway for the duration of the dispute. 

Happy Labour Day, indeed. W 


ANUUL ANY EVO EUAN UATE UATE ECP 


ISSUE N°. 725 // SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 // AVAILABLE AT OVER 1400 LOCATIONS 


WUEWEEKLY 


10303 - 108 STREET, EDMONTON, AB TS} 1L7 


T: 780.426.1996 © 780.426.2889 


EDITOR / PUBLISHER 

NEWS EDITOR 

ARTS / FILM EDITOR 

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CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER 
PRODUCTION 

ART DIRECTOR 

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LISTINGS 


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PRINTING 
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// rob@vueweekly.com 
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€ GARTH michae 
{ON GETZ // aaron@vuev 


rdo Acufia, Mike Angus, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Jonathar 
h, Cody Civiero, Kristina de Guzman, Gwynne Dyer, Jason Fos 
st, Brian Gibson, Tamara Gorzalka, James Grasdal 
nitey Houston, Connie Howard, 
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even Sandor, James 


ter, Michael Ge 

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wart, Adam Waldron-Blain 


Edmonton Sun 


Barrett DeLaBarre, Alan Ching, Raul Gurdian, Dale Steinke, Zackery 


Audit Bureau 
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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 


UP FRONT 


Dyer Straight 


PM MT ET TACT CEO ECU COLO CUCL CRC CLC CLL CLL LC UCLE CLS CLOLEe UCL LCCC LLU CORO ULL CLL 


Letters 


: PUBLIC NEEDS ALL INFORMATION 


; Dp: "better safe than sorry" apply more 


to joining the mass inoculation being 


: planned against the HiNi virus or choos- 
: ing not to because of dangers in doing so 
: ('Trustand risk,” Sep 3- Sep 9, 2009). 


At latest report 72 deaths have been 


: attributed to this flu. A small number 
: when compared with the little broadcast 
: fact that "influenza results in an average 


of 20 000 hospitalizations and 4000 


: deaths each year." 


The federal government's purchase of 


50.4 million doses of vaccine from Glaxo- 
> SmithKline Plc is a concern, Adjuvants in- 


gredients have had harmful effects in the 


: pastand “while Glaxo has said its adjuvant 


has proven safe and effective in clinical tri- 


: als with 39 000 people, the additive isn't 
: yet approved in the US.” 


Unlike previous experiences with gov 
ernments' pandemic panic reactions, this 


: time all potential dangers must be clearly 
: laid before the public. Advertising must 
: be of the positive steps that can be taken 
: in everyday living to avoid catching all in- 
: fluenzas and transmitting them to others, 
: rather than scare tactics that have been 
: used in the past. Positive steps can be tak- 
: en immediately in hospitals and schools 
> to make alcohol-based sanitizer not only 
: available, as has been done in hospitals, 
: but obligatory upon entering the facility. 


SEP 16, 2009 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, whether critical or complimentary. Send your opinion by mail (Vue Weekly, 
10303 - 108 Street, Edmonton AB TsJ 117), by fax (780.426.2889) or by email (letters@vueweekly.com). Preference 
is given to feedback about articles in Vue Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity 


Which risk is the greater, catching this 
flu or suffering debilitating effects from 
a hurriedly prepared vaccine said to 
contain dangerous ingredients? Govern- 
ments must be pressed to provide all the 
data available so individuals can make 
informed decisions for themselves and 
their families. 

Joe Hueglin 


SS 
A TAX BY ANY OTHER NAME 


It is interesting that in these tough bud- 
getary economic times Albertans are 
being told to expect significant cuts in 
health care, education and a long list of 
other government services. Yet at the 
same time Albertans are being told that 
they will need to pay for an estimated 
$14 billion in electricity transmission 
upgrades that may not be needed. If gov- 
ernment-projected costs are consistent 
with past estimates, the public can ex- 
pect to pay in excess of $22 billion dollars 
for transmission upgrades after Bill 50 is 
passed this October. 

Ask a health-care official or a school 
board member what they need for re- 
sources, and they can produce a docu- 
mented, prioritized list with facts and 
figures to accommodate and justify a 
request for additional funds in an effort 
to maintain basic services. Ask Alberta 
Energy to produce a prioritized list with 


facts and figures to prove what is needed 
for the public, and they cannot produce 
any such documentation. Alberta Ener 

gy admits they have never done a cost/ 
benefit analysis to prove what is in the 
public's interest. 

Bill 50, when passed, guarantees that 
Alberta Energy will not have to justif; 
a need for spending taxpayer's money. 
Alberta Energy is quick to point out 
that Albertans will not pay for this with 
a tax increase; they say Albertans will 
pay for these upgrades with an electric- 
ity rate increase. But a tax increase by 
any other name is still a tax increase 
Bill 50 is a wolf in sheep's clothing; 
it eliminates the regulatory process 
once required to justify these kinds of 
expenditures. Bill 50 is the largest tax 
increase proposed in over 50 years, and 
may just be the largest ever proposed in 
the history of Alberta. 

One can only wonder how much of our 
health-care services affecting the elderly 
and our schoo! programs affecting our 
children would improve if even a portion 
of these funds were diverted to accom- 
modate their needs. Such a diversion 
would elevate the needs of our elderly 
and children above that of industry. Un- 
fortunately, such a diversion would be 
called a tax increase and Mr. Stelmach 
says a tax increase is unacceptable. 

Joe Anglin 
Lavesta Area Group 


swinging a homemade 
ed from a ski pole and 
of plastic pipe at a tat- 
ange street hockey ball. Most of 
h are fixed-gears—many with- 
mut bi ‘their wheels covered with 
colourfully decorated chloroplast to pro- 
tect the spokes from wayward mallets. 
After some jostling in the corner the 
ball pops loose of a crowd of players, and 
one of them directs it with her mallet as 
she circles around and heads toward the 
opposite net. A defender leans forward 
and locks the rear wheel of his bike af- 
ter a short high-speed pursuit down the 
length of the rink to make a controlled 
skid into the path of the attacker, who is 
crouched low over the handlebars as she 
pushes the ball towards the goal. Wheels 
collide, sending riders and bikes alike 
careening to the ground. Cheers and 
jeers erupt from both teams, and from 
the spectators on the other side of the 
boards, as they pick themselves up, col- 
lect their mallets and exchange a smile 
and a quick "You OK?" before hopping 
back onto their bikes to make a mad 
dash to the red line. 

Welcome to hardcourt bike polo, the 
rough, very DIY urban equivalent of the 
ancient game of kings, which in recent 
years has enjoyed an explosion of popu- 
larity in cities around the world, includ- 
ing Edmonton. 

“The rules are very loose,” explains 
Chris Dunbar, a lanky Nova Scotia na- 
tive and one of a group of four cycling 
enthusiasts who started organizing 
games of bike polo in the city back in 
June. "Basically, you've got to put the 
ball in the net. Anytime you put a foot 
down you have to go tag out at centre 
before you can come back into the play. 
You can push the ball down the court, 


TECHNOLOGY LAW >> DIGITIZATION STRATEGY ; 


Bike Polo game //Trevor Kjorlien 


but anytime you score you have to score 
on the end of your mallet. Whoever gets 
to five first takes the cake." 

"Body to body, bike to bike, mallet to 
mallet is the contact," adds Ted Cot- 
tingham, another of the pioneers of the 
game in Edmonton. "And you only do 
things you'd want done to you." 

But while collisions might at times 
seem almost as frequent as goals—and 
are occasionally spectacular—success 
in the game is more about bike control, 
ball-handling and teamwork. Injuries be- 
yond minor bruises and scrapes are rare, 
according to Neil Macdonald, a Halifax 
expat also involved in getting the game 
off the ground here, especially for players 
who are new to the game. 

"As we're getting better it seems to be 
getting a little bit rougher and we're 
seeing a little more contact with riders. 
It's something that the more experi- 
enced riders like—they'll go chase af- 
ter the ball when another experienced 
rider has it. But if it's someone new 
playing we tend not to gang up onthem 


iT Pee bebe 
: ; ‘ 


. = ; 
two-one polo! 
eague joins the fast-growing ranks of bike polo enthusiasts 


Tn TT TTT MMT TTT 
OY OOPRUUUCTOCCOCV AALAND AAO Neca 
: eee SI TSS ISS TTA TCO UOMO EEOC EEC MEUM 


ONLY HIS PRIDE IS HURT >> Chris Dunbar takes a spill during a recent Edmonton 


or be aggressive to them," Macdonald 
says, reassuringly. "We let them get bet- 
ter and let them enjoy the game. We're 
always open to new players, and if six 
new people show up we'd have a whole 
new-person game and just let them ride 
and not have that intimidation factor of 
someone that's been playing for a bit.” 

It's that laid-back friendliness, com- 
bined with an ethic that often sees 
players offering to take a seat while 
they hand their mallet and bike over to 
a curious onlooker, which has led to a 
rapid increase in the number of play- 
ers making it out to regular Thursday 
evening games or to the numerous last- 
minute contests that frequently crop up 
throughout the week. Starting with just 
four players in late June, the group has 
ballooned to over 40 members, with up- 
wards ofa dozen sometimes coming out 
on any given night. Two teams of play- 
ers are even planning a trip to Vancou- 
ver in a couple weeks’ time to take part 
in the East Van Crown tournament. 

"It's certainly kind of its own culture 


Stuck at the starting gate 


While other countries move ahead, Canada's national digitization strategy remains MIA 


Digitization of books has become synony- : 
mous over the past year with the Google 


Book Search project and the class ac- 
tion lawsuit launched in response 
to the search giant's efforts to 
create an Internet-based li- 
brary consisting of millions 

of books. While the digitizing 

continues, the legal drama 

reached an important stage this 
week when a court in New York 
closed third-party submissions sup- 
Porting or criticizing the settlement. 


The attention on Google Book Search is : 
ale, yet it has distracted from : 

the broader question of government-sup- : 
Ported digitization efforts. Many coun- : 


tries have not been content to leave th 


digitization of their culture and heritage : : 
to Google, instead embarking on plans to : million digitized books, newspapers, film : 


create their own digital libraries. 


Canada was once thought to be part : 


of this group—national digitization 
working groups were estab 


the delete key on the pros- 


nadian digital library. 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


lished and a strategy seemed : 
imminent—yet plans have : 
languished to the point that : 
it feels as if someone has hit : 


pect of a comprehensive Ca- : 


: Canada's failure to keep pace was : 
: made readily apparent by the release late : 
last month of a European consultation 3 
document on its digitization efforts. In Sep- : 
tember 2005, the European Union launched : 
12010, a digitization action plan. Several : 
: years later, Europeana debuted, a website ; 
that provides direct access to more than 4.6 = 


: clips, maps, photographs and documents : 
from across Europe. The site plans to host : 
= 10 million objects by the end of next year. = 

The majority of the materials included : 
to date are in the public domain, meaning : 
they are no longer covered by copyright : 
and can be used and accessed by all. In : 
fact, the European Commission has em- : 
phasized "works in the public domain : 
should stay there once digitized and be : 
: made accessible through the Internet.” It : 
acknowledges, however, that this is not : 
always the case since some groups claim : 
rights to digitized copies of public domain : 


works or charge for downloads. 


The European consultation document : 
grapples with difficult issues such as guar- : 
anteeing access to public domain works : 
and identifying ways to improve access to : 
works that are still subject to copyright : 


right now,” says Joshua Kupsch, who 
rounds out the original four. "I think 
through the relations of the polo play- 
ers in Edmonton with other aspects 
of cycling—through the couriers or 
through the fixed-gear riders, through 
the commuters, through the track rid- 
ers and road racers—it's beginning to 
grow and the word is kind of getting 
around. Right now the most important 
thing for the sport to grow in Edmon- 
ton is to improve the awareness of what 
it is, to kind of have it recognized as a 
sport that people play." 


While the hardcourt variety of the sport 
is only a few months old in Edmonton, 
playing polo on bikes has a history dat- 
ing back more than a century. Irishman 
Richard J. Mecredy is credited with in- 
venting the game of bike polo in 1891, in 
a six-to-a-side iteration played on grass 
using a larger ball and strictly eschew- 
ing contact between riders. Grass bike 
polo was even a demonstration sport at 
the 1908 London Olympics, and enjoyed 
widespread popularity until it waned 
following the Second World War. With 
the advent of the mountain bike the 
grass-based version has enjoyed some- 
thing of a resurgence in popularity, with 
international competitions resurfacing 
in the '90s and into the new century. 

While versions of the hardcourt 
game were also played in the early part 
of last century, the direct roots of the 
contemporary three-on-three version 
now gaining popularity date back to 
the winter of 1999 ~ 2000, according 
to Kevin Walsh, a Toronto native who 
got hooked on the sport while pur- 
suing a master's degree in Madison, 
Wisconsin. Last year he created the in- 
ternational website bikepolo.ca—self- 
described as being "where people take 
bike polo way too seriously"—to give 
the burgeoning international commu- 
nity a way to better connect and orga- 
nize tournaments. 

"(Hardcourt bike polo] has probably 
been reinvented dozens of times, but 
the hardcourt bike polo style that we're 


protection but are out of print, or for which : 
: for the creation of "a modem set of Euro- 


the copyright owner cannot be located. 


By comparison, Canada seems stuck at : 
the digitization starting gate. Library and : 
Archives Canada was given responsibility : 
for the issue but was unable to muster : 
the necessary support for a comprehen- : 
= term of copyright or providing overbroad 


sive plan. The Department of Canadian 


Heritage, which would seem like a natu- 
ral fit for a strategy designed to foster : 
access to Canadian works, has funded a : 
handful of small digitization efforts but .: 
t every Canadian book ever published. 
= Years later, they are still dreaming. W 
Digitization law and policies have also : 
gone missing-in-action. The national : 
copyright consultation wraps up next : 
week, but the digitization issue has : 
= He can reached at mgeist@uottawa.ca or 


has shown little interest in crafting a vi- 
sion similar to Europeana 


scarcely been raised. 


European Commissioner for Information : 


playing are the rules that came out of 
Seattle and then Portland,” he says. "The 
big thing is the perpendicular mallets 
where you have to score off the busi- 
ness end and a fairly small hockey ball. 
Those are the two big things that they 
brought into the bike polo history.” 

As in Edmonton, bike polo has spread 
quickly from its beginnings in the Pa- 
cific Northwest through bike messen- 
ger and fixed-gear cycling communities 
around the world. Walsh says there are 
now about 140 clubs or cities registered 
on the site, most of them in the US and 
Europe, but also including locales as 
diverse as Santiago, Chile, Seoul, South 
Korea and Shanghai, China. Canada 
now has hardcourt leagues up and run- 
ning in almost a dozen cities from Mon- 
tréal to Victoria. 

The number of clubs and players has 
driven an increase in the number of 
regional and national tournaments in 
recent years, and the Labour Day long 
weekend saw 48 teams, including teams 
from Paris, London, Geneva and Berlin, 
compete in the Hardcourt Bicycle Polo 
World Championships in Philadelphia. 
The team from Seattle, somewhat ap- 
propriately, came out on top. 

The future growth in the sport, Walsh 
speculates, largely depends on whether 
cycling in general continues to grow in 
popularity, as it has in recent years 

"I think it depends on the health of 
cycling itself. There's two big barriers 
to entry to polo. One is the willingness 
to fall off your bike, which not every- 
body has, and two is the willingness to 
break and fix your bike, to put together 
a new bike for polo and so on," he says. 
"With both of those barriers to entry, 
the healthier biking is the lower those 
barriers are going to seem for people. 
So if biking keeps on growing the way it 
is right now, I don't see any reason why 
bike polo will stop." 


Interested players can find out about 
upcoming games through Facebook by 
searching “Edmonton Bike Polo” or at ed- 
montonbikepolo.com. 


Society and Media Vivian Reding has called 


pean rules that encourage the digitization 
of books." Yet in Canada, few have placed 
the spotlight on the legal barriers to creat- 
ing a national digital library. These include 
the danger associated with extending the 


legal protection for digital locks that could 

render Canadian culture inaccessible. 
Supporters once talked about the dream 

of a national digital library comprised of 


Michael Geist holds the Canada Research 
Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at 
the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law. 


online at michaelgeist.ca. 


UP FRONT //7 


COMMENT >> EDUCATION 


Issues is a forum for individuals and organizations to comment on current events and broader 
issues of importance to the community. Their commentary is not necessarily the opinion of the 


organizations they represent or of Vue Weekly. 


Back-to-school blues 


Stories from teachers, parents reveal serious problems with the education system in Alberta 


RICARDO ACURA 
// UALBERTA.CA/PARKLAND 


Talk to any parent or teacher for long 
enough this time of year, and you're bound 
to eventually start hearing back-to-school 
stories. Whether it's battles over shopping 
for school supplies, stress over just the right 
outfit for the first day back, or simply excited 
kids bouncing off the walls in the last week 
of holidays, everyone has their story. 

My family’s story this year, however, has 
been more punctuated by shock and frus- 
tration than ever before. My 12 year-old 
twins last week started Grade 7 French 
immersion at McKernan School, but our 
back-to-school story actually started the 
week before. While in the midst of spend- 
ing hundreds of dollars to purchase all of 
the supplies on the list provided by the 
school, and spending hundreds more on 
new clothes and shoes that we know will 
no longer fit come December, we received 
the annual notice from the school outlin- 
ing what our fees will be for this year. 

At the bottom of each fee sheet In bold- 
ed font was the number $560. My brain 
could simply not process how in a prov- 
ince where education's still supposed'to 
be public, universal and free, | was being 
asked to cut a cheque for $1120 so my 
kids could go to school. 

One of the first questions that ran 
through my mind upon seeing the total 
was, "What happens to parents who sim- 
ply cannot afford to pay the fees?” The 
answer, luckily, was written in large let- 
ters at the bottom of the fee schedule: 
"All fees must be paid in full by Septem- 
ber 30 unless other arrangements have 
been made.” In other words, if you can- 
not afford the fees, it is up to you to suck 
up your pride and beg the school to give 
you a break, and even then the best you 
can expect is to be put on some sort of 
monthly payment plan for the fees. 

| was still not entirely over the shock 


ee 
LIKE SARDINES >> Cramped clas 
Alberta classrooms //rie 


of the fees when, after the first day of 
school, my partner and | sat down to ask 
our kids about their new class and teach- 
er. The first thing out of their mouths was 
concern about the fact that there are 37 
students in their class. That's not just their 
homeroom class; they will travel with 
those same 37 students to all of their core 
subjects, Anyone who has ever spent any 
time with a 12-year-old knows full well 
the impossibility of not only keeping 37 
of them in control, but also of being able 
to collectively teach them something. 
There's a reason that the Alberta Learning 
Commission recommended a maximum 
class size for junior high of 25 students— 
having more than that does damage to 
both the students and the teacher. 

A line of angry and concerned parents 
immediately formed outside the prin- 
cipal’s office at the school, but these 
parents’ concerns were met with the 
response that nothing could be done, 
and with vague platitudes about how 
bright the students were and how good 
the teachers were and that it should not 


srooms and high fees are the unfortunate reality in 


be a problem. Even if extra funding was 
found, explained the principal, the prior- 
ity would be to split up the kindergarten 
class at the school—which currently has 
30. students—not the Grade 7 class. 

In my frustration, | began asking other par- 
ents and teachers for their back-to-school 
stories, and | quickly discovered that ours 
is not an isolated or extreme case. | heard 
from a high school English teacher who 
currently has 38 students in her class, and 
only 35 desks. | heard from the parent of a 
special needs student who had to fight up 
the entire bureaucracy all the way to the 
superintendent to secure a classroom aid 
for his child. And the parent in southern 
Alberta who was told, essentially, that the 
only acceptable diagnosis and treatment 
for her child was ADHD and medications, 
and subsequently had to spend thousands 
of dollars outside the school system to 
obtain specialized support for her child's 
severe reading disability. Or the teacher in 
Edmonton who actually had an administra- 
tor go in and arbitrarily alter her marks af- 
ter she had submitted them. 


The stories go on and on, but they give 
a very clear sense of a system that is 
broken and badly in need of repair. For 
all of the government's rhetoric about 
prioritizing the education of children, 
the reality is very different. It has been 
six years since the Alberta Commission 
on Learning reported back to the govern- 
ment with a series of recommendations 
on kindergarten, funding, class size and 
numerous other issues, and the reality is 
that all of those recommendations con- 
tinue to gather dust on the shelves. 

At the same time the provincial govern- 
ment has just undergone a province-wide 
"conversation" with Albertans about what 
our education system will Look like in the 
future. The problem, however, is that the 
minister made it very clear that there was 
to be no discussion at all in this "conver- 
sation" about what the system looks like 
today. The government knows that the 
system is in disarray, and they are pur- 
posefully choosing to look the other way. 

The truly sad and frustrating part is 
that things are in the process of getting 
worse. As bad as things are today, Alber- 
ta Education announced the week before 
school started that they would be claw- 
ing back some $44 million in accumutat- 
ed surpluses from school boards around 
the province. That same week he asked 
all school boards in Alberta to "trim" one 
percent from their operating budgets 
for the 2009 — 2010 school year, which 
would mean another $56 million in cuts. 

Now Education Minister David Hancotk 
has issued notice to school boards that, 
there will be even bigger budget cuts 
coming next year. In other words, as bad 
as things are today—and have been for 
the last five years—they are about to 
get much, much worse. Teachers will lose 
jobs, class sizes will continue to grow, 
supports for special needs students will 
disappear, school fees will increase ex- 
ponentially, infrastructure will literally 


crumble and our children's education will 
suffer greatly as a result. 


The rationale from the government, of 
course, is the same as that given to me by 
my kids’ principal—we have no options 
we have no money. This may be true for 
the principal but it certainly isn't for the 
provincial government. This is, after all, 
the same government that has managed 
to find $2 billion for carbon capture and 
storage, over $5 billion in royalty breaks 
to the oil and gas industry and over $22 
million in severance payouts for fired 
health managers. It’s not about a lack of 
money, it’s about priorities, 

And we as parents make It easier for them 
to ignore the needs of the education sys- 
tem because we don't complain—we suck 
it up and do what's necessary for our kids 
to succeed despite the system. Teachers 
do likewise—suck it up and do whatever 
it takes to educate and nurture despite a 
system that seems designed to keep that 
from happening. When we do complain 
and speak up as parents and teachers, we 
tend to make targets out of each other, 
rather than out of the government that is 
ultimately responsible for this mess. 

If we truly value education, and truly 
value our children’s well-being, then it's 
time to stand up and be heard. Call your 
school board reps. Call your MLA. Call 
Ed Stelmach and Dave Hancock. Orga 
nize other concerned parents at your 
children's school. Rally in front of their 
offices, or at the legislature. Take action 
and demand that our education system 
be prioritized—with funding and with a 
structure that works. If we don't, then we 
stand to lose what little is left of our pub- 
lic education system in this province. W 


Ricardo Acufia is executive director of the 
Parkland Institute, a non-partisan public 
policy research institute housed at the 
University of Alberta. 


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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 


SEP 16, 2009 


>> THE WAR ON DRUGS 


The longest war 


‘Tide is turning globally 
; * 5 1 
US's foolish, failed ‘war 
{t's too early to say that there isa general : 
revolt against the “war on drugs" that the 
United States has been waging for the : 
past 39 years, but something significant 
is happening. European countries have 
been quietly defecting from the war for 
years, decriminalizing personal consump- 
tion of some or all of the banned drugs 
in order to minimize harm to their own 
people, but it’s different when countries 
like Argentina and Mexico do it. 
Latin American countries are 
much more in the firing line. 
The United States can hurt 
them a lot if it is angered 
by their actions, and it has 
a long history of doing just 
that. But from Argentina to 
Mexico, they are fed up to the 
back teeth with the violent and 
dogmatic US policy on drugs, and they 

are starting to do something about it. 

in mid-August, the Mexican govern- 
ment declared that it will no longer be a 
punishable offence to possess up to half : 


sTRAl 


ewe 


a gram of cocaine (about four lines), five : 
grams of marijuana (around four joints), : 
50 milligrams of heroin or 40 milligrams = 
of methamphetamine. : 

At the end of August, Argentina's su- 
preme court did something even bolder: : 
it ruled that, under the Argentine con- : 
stitution, "Each adult is free to make : 
lifestyle decisions without the interven- 
tion of the state," and dismissed a case : 
against youths who had been arrested 
for possessing a few joints. 

In an ideal world, this ruling would 
have a powerful resonance in the United 
States, whose constitution also restricts 
the right of the federal government to : 
meddle in citizens’ private affairs. It took 
a constitutional amendment to enable 
the US Congress to prohibit alcohol in 
1919 (and another amendment to end 
alcohol Prohibition in 1933), so who 
gave Congress the right to criminalize 
other recreational drugs nationwide by : 
the Controlled Substances Act of 1970? 
Nobody—and the US Supreme Court 
has yet to rule on the issue. 

A million Americans a year go to jail 
for "crimes* that hurt nobody but them- 
selves. A vast criminal empire has grown 
up to service the American demand for 
drugs. Over the decades hundreds of 
thousands of people have been killed : 
in the turf wars between the gangs, the 
police-dealer shoot-outs and the daily 
thousands of muggings and burglaries 
committed by addicts trying to raise 
money to pay the hugely inflated prices 
that prohibition makes possible. 

Most users of illegal drugs are not : 
addicts, let alone dangerous criminals. 
Legalization and regulation, on the pat- 
tern of alcohol and tobacco, would avoid 
thousands of violent deaths each month : 
and millions of needlessly ruined lives ; 
each year, although psychoactive drug : 
use would still take its toll from the vul- : 
nerable and the unlucky, just as alcohol 
and tobacco do. : 

But there is little chance that American : 
voters will choose to end this longest of : 
all American wars any time soon, even ! 
though its casualties far exceed those of : 
any other American war since 1945. The 
war on drugs* will not end in the United : 


werk COT 


against the 
on drugs’ 


: States until a very different generation 
> comes to power. 


: Elsewhere, however, it is coming to an 
: end much sooner, and one can imagine a 
; time when the job of the history books 
: will be to explain how this berserk aber- 
: ration ever came about. A large part of 
: the explanation will then focus on the 
: man who started the war, Richard Nix- 


pYER 


on—so let us get ahead of the mob 
and focus on him now. 

We can do that because of 
the famous Nixon tapes that 
recorded almost every word 
of his presidency. It turns 
out that he started the war 
on drugs because he believed 
that they were a Jewish plot. We 
know this because researcher Doug 


GHT 


: McVay from Common Sense on Drug 
: Policy, a Washington-based NGO, went 
: through the last batch of tapes when 
: they became available in 2002 and found 


2 Uma oTOn EN ORNU TOMA ANUEANKRUHNTRIREGLDAMHASHENTEEHHMBLLNN 


: q A million Americans 


a year go to jail 
for "crimes" that 
hurt nobody but 
themselves. 


: Nixon speaking to his aides as follows: 


“You know, it's a funny thing, every one 


: of the bastards that are out for legaliz- 
+ ing marijuana is Jewish. What the Christ 
+ is the matter with the Jews, Bob? What 
: is the matter with them? | suppose it is 
: because most of them are psychiatrists.” 


Nixon had much more to say about 


+ this, but one should not conclude that 
: he was a single-minded anti-Semite. He 
= was an equal-opportunity paranoid who 
: believed that homosexuals, Communists 
: and Catholics were also plotting to un- 
+ dermine America by pushing drugs at it. 


"Do you know what happened to the 


: Romans? The last six Roman emperors 
: were fags. ... You know what happened 
: to the popes? It's all right that popes 
: were laying the nuns, that's been going 
: on for years, centuries. But when the 
= popes, when the Catholic Church went 
: to hell in, | don't know, three or four cen- 
: turies ago, it was homosexual. 


"Dope? Do you think the Russians al- 


: low dope? Hell no ... You see, homosex- 
¢ uality, dope, uh, immorality in general: 
: these are the enemies of strong societ- 
: ies. That's why the Communists and the 
: left-wingers are pushing it. They're try- 
: ing to destroy us." 


The reason for this 39-year war, in 


3 other words, is that President Richard 
: Nixon believed that he was facing a 
? "lew-homo-doper-Commie-shrink-lefty- 


pope” conspiracy, as Washington Post 


: writer Gene Weingarten put it ina glori- 


ously deadpan article in 2002. But that 
is just plain wrong. As subsequent de- 


: velopments have shown, it is actually a 
= Jew-homo-doper-Commie-shrink-lefty- 


pope-Latino conspiracy. W 


Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
pendent journalist whose articles are 


t published in 45 countries. His column ap- 


pears each week in Vue Weekly. 


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- SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


AAMT RNHNARHNHNT ANNU cu 


PREVUE//DERRICKJENSEN = sss— ous sdi vetted 


Forget shorter showers 
Why personal change 5 not “1 sagen Sapee. 


DERRICK JENSEN 
// DERRICKJENSEN.ORG 


A much-acclaimed author and activist, 

ick Jensen has been dubbed the 
“philosopher poet" of the ecological move- 
ment. His deeply personal and challeng- 
ing works—including A Language Older 
Than Words, Endgame and this year's 
Songs of the Dead—explore the violence 
and unsustainability at the heart of indus- 
trial civilization and the radical solutions 
Jensen sees as being proportionate to the 
scale of the crisis we face. While Jensen's 
ideas have attracted as many detractors as 
admirers, there is no denying the power of 
his writing and the challenge his ideas of- 
fer to the dominant worldview. 

Jensen will be speaking and taking ques- 
tions at the University of Alberta on Sep- 
tember 16 via webcam—a medium he of- 
ten uses to reduce the ecological impact of 
speaking to audiences around the world. 
The event's title, Forget Shorter Showers, 
is taken from an article of the same name 
which Jensen penned for the July/August 
issue of Orion magazine. In advance of his 
talk in Edmonton, Vue Weekly offers up 
Jensen's article as food for thought. 


We any sane person think dump- 
ster diving would have stopped 
Hitler, or that composting would have 
ended slavery or brought about the 
eight-hour workday, or that chopping 
wood and carrying water would have 
gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or 
that dancing naked around a fire would 
have helped put in place the Voting 
Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights 
Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the 
world at stake, do so many people retreat 
into these entirely personal "solutions"? 

Part of the problem is that we've been 
victims of a campaign of systematic 
misdirection. Consumer culture and the 
capitalist mindset have taught us to sub- 
stitute acts of personal consumption (or 
enlightenment) for organized political 
resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped 
raise consciousness about globel warm- 
ing, but did you notice that all of the solu- 
tions presented had to do with personal 
consumption—changing light bulbs, 
inflating tires, driving halfas much—and 
had nothing to do with shifting power 
away from corporations, or stopping the 
growth economy that is destroying the 
planet? Even if every person in the United 
States did everything the movie sug- 
gested, US carbon emissions would fall 
by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus 
is that emissions must be reduced by at 
least 75 percent worldwide. 

Or let's talk water. We so often hear that 
the world is running out of water. People 
are dying from lack of water. Rivers are 


dewatered from lack of water. Because 
of this we need to take shorter showers. 
See the disconnect? Because I take show- 
ers, I'm responsible for drawing down 
aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent 
of the water used by humans is used by 
agriculture and industry. The remaining 
10 percent is split between municipali- 
ties and actual living breathing individ- 
ual humans, Collectively, municipal golf 
courses use as much water as municipal 
human beings. People (both human peo- 
ple and fish people) aren't dying because 
the world is running out of water. They're 
dying because the water is being stolen. 
Or let's talk energy. Kirkpatrick Sale 
summarized it well: "For the past 15 
years the story has been the same ev- 
ery year: individual consumption— 
residential, by private car and so on— 
is never more than about a quarter of 
all consumption; the vast majority is 
commercial, industrial, corporate, by 
agribusiness and government [he for- 
got military]. So, even if we all took up 
cycling and wood stoves it would have a 
negligible impact on energy use, global 
warming and atmospheric pollution.” 
Or let's talk waste. In 2005, per-capita 
municipal waste production (basically 
everything that’s put out at the curb) in 
the US was about 1660 pounds. Let's say 
you're a die-hard simple-living activist, 
and you reduce this to zero. You recycle 
everything, You bring cloth bags shop- 
ping. You fix your toaster. Your toes poke 
out of old tennis shoes. You're not done 
yet, though. Since municipal waste in- 
cludes not just residential waste, but also 
waste from government offices and busi- 


TEPPAN-DINING 


nesses, you march to those offices, waste 
reduction pamphlets in hand, and con- 
vince them to cut down on their waste 
enough to eliminate your share of it. Uh, 
I've got some bad news. Municipal waste 
accounts for only three percent of total 
waste production in the United States. 


1 want to be clear. I'm not saying we 
shouldn't live simply. I live reasonably 
simply myself, but I don't pretend that not 
buying much (or not driving much, or not 
having kids) is a powerful political act, or 
that it's deeply revolutionary. It’s not. Per- 
sonal change doesn't equal social change. 
So how, then, and especially with all 
the world at stake, have we come to ac- 
cept these utterly insufficient responses? 
I think part of it is that we're in a double 
bind. A double bind is where you're given 
multiple options, but no matter what op- 
tion you choose, you lose, and withdrawal 
isnotan option. Atthis point, it should be 
pretty easy to recognize that every action 
involving the industrial economy is de- 
structive (and we shouldn't pretend that 
solar photovoltaics, for example, exempt 
us from this: they still require mining 
and transportation infrastructures at ev- 
ery point in the production processes; the 
same can be said for every other so-called 
green technology). So ifwe choose option 
one—if we avidly participate in the in- 
dustrial economy—we may in the short 
term think we win because we may accu- 
mulate wealth, the marker of “success” in 
this culture. But we lose, because in doing 
so we give up our empathy, our animal 
humanity. And we really lose because 
industrial civilization is killing the plan- 


Ta 


et, which means everyone loses. If-we 
choose the "alternative" option of living 
more simply, thus causing less harm, but 
still not stopping the industrial economy 
from killing the planet, we may in the 
short term think we win because we get 
to feel pure, and we didn't even have to 
give up all of our empathy {just enough 
to justify not stopping the horrors), but 
once again we really lose because indus- 
trial civilization is still killing the planet, 
which means everyone still loses. The 
third option, acting decisively to stop 
the industrial economy, is very scary for 
a number of reasons, including but not 
restricted to the fact that we'd lose some 
of the luxuries (like electricity) to which 
we've grown accustomed, and the fact 
that those in power might try to kill us 
if we seriously impede their ability to 
exploit the world—none of which alters 
the fact that it's a better option than a 
dead planet. Any option is a better op- 
tion than a dead planet. 

Besides being ineffective at causing the 
sorts of changes necessary to stop this 
culture from killing the planet, there 
are at least four other problems with 
perceiving simple living as a political 
act (as opposed to living simply because 
that's what you want to do). The first is 
that it's predicated on the flawed no- 
tion that humans inevitably harm their 
landbase. Simple living as a political 
act consists solely of harm reduction, 
ignoring the fact that humans can help 
the Earth as well as harm it. We can 
rehabilitate streams, we can get rid of 
noxious invasives, we can remove dams, 
we can disrupt a political system tilted 


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at: 


toward the rich as well as an extractive 
economic system, we can destroy the in- 
dustrial economy that is destroying the 
real, physical world. 

The second problem—and this is anoth 
er big one—is that it incorrectly assigns 
blame to the individual (and most espe- 
cially to individuals who are particularly 
powerless) instead of to those who actu 
ally wield power in this system and to the 
system itself. Kirkpatrick Sale again: "The 
whole individualist what-you-can-do-to- 
save-the-Earth guilt trip is a myth. We, 
as individuals, are not creating the crises, 
and we can't solve them.” 

The third problem is that it accepts 
capitalism's redefinition of us from cit- 
izens to consumers. By accepting this 
redefinition, we reduce our potential 
forms of resistance to Consuming and 
not consuming. Citizens have a much 
wider range of available resistance tac- 
tics, including voting, not voting, run 
ning for office, pamphleting, boycot 
ting, organizing, lobbying, protesting 
and, when a government becomes de- 
structive of life, liberty and the pursuit 
of happiness, we have the right to alter 
or abolish it. 

The fourth problem is that the end- 
point of the logic behind simple living 
as a political act is suicide. If every act 
within an industrial economy is de- 
structive, and if we want to stop this 
destruction, and if we are unwilling (or 
unable) to question (much less destroy) 
the intellectual, moral, economic, and 
physical infrastructures that cause ev- 
ery act within an industrial economy to 
be destructive, then we can easily come 
to believe that we will cause the least 
destruction possible if we are dead. 

The good news is that there are other 
options. We can follow the examples of 
brave activists who lived through the 
difficult times I mentioned—Nazi Ger- 
many, Tsarist Russia, antebellum United 

States—who did far more than manifest 
a form of moral purity; they actively op- 
posed the injustices that surrounded 
them. We can follow the example of 
those who remembered that the role of 
an activist is not to navigate systems of 
oppressive power with as much integrity 
as possible, but rather to confront and 
take down those systems. W 


This is o 
\dary 
Teppan Grill 


780.422.6083 
10238 104St 


aa DOCCCONCNH 


10 // UP FRONT 


Vv 


UWEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 


a 


of Alberta Hos- 


living in the community are well 
enough to do so, and when commu- 
nity support and housing needs are met. 

We're being reassured that the appropri- 


ate community supports will be in place : with the normal services of emergency 


: shelters and counselling. 


before the beds are closed, of course, but 


homes and drugs 


weeks, three related : population of our city, : 
were in the news. First, : The second related news item is an an- 


weve heard that before, the last time beds : 
were cut, and the community supports cur- : 


rently available are anything but sufficient. 
Cost cutting in mental health, those on the 


= less is not only the right thing to do from 


: a humanitarian perspective, but also froma : 
inside say, usually results in bedlam on the : 


streets. It's a shortsighted move, one that : 


will only add to the heartbreaking homeless : There'll be those who see it as a risky ex- 


Please help us to remember our friend 
and colleague Ross Moroz, who passed 
away Sept 26, 2007, by participating in 
the Rotary Run for Life or by making a 
donation. Money raised at the event will 
go towards suicide prevention programs 
in the Stony Plain area. 


For more information, or to register, 
please go to rotaryrun.ca. 


SOs. 


Haina lyengar Ashtanga 
tel 451.8131 
12039 — 127 Street 


= on services for those given both housing : alHealth Authority concluded that the data : 
: and other support to those provided only : 


: periment, even though the provision of 


? housing for those with mental health and 
nouncement of a federally-funded : 


Project that will give 1325 homeless : 
Canadians in Moncton, Montréal, ? to the science, a clear and positive impact 
Toronto, Vancouver and Winni- : on psychiatric symptoms and substance 

Peg a place to live, along with : abuse disorders. 

psychological and social sup- 

Ports for a period of four years. 
The Mental Health Commission : 
of Canada study will compare how : 
much money the government spends : 


: shows "no observable relationship between 
: residential recovery homes and either prop- 


: erty values or crime rates," and that "this 
Im predicting itll be $110 million well : 


spent, affirming that homes for the home- 
t which they are sited." 


But you can't really talk about homeless- 
fiscally responsible one. : ness and mental health issues without talk- 
But the project will have its detractors. : 


GRENDEL 
BURNED BY 
HONOURED 


The Stony Piain 
6th Annual 


Rotary Run 


for Life 
Sept 13, 2009 


Donations to the Rotary Run can be sent to: 


Servus Credit Union 
4904 - 48 Street 
Stony Plain , AB 
T7Z 1L8 

Att'n: Wally Ross 


Please make cheques payable to: 
Rotary Club of Stony Plain - Runners Account 


For- more information, please contact 
Misha Moroz at mishamoroz@gmail.com 


Here’s your opportunity | 
to save lives. } 
Edmonton 


Donor Clinic 
8249 - 114 Street 
Monday - Friday 
9:00 am - 1:00 pm 
3:30 pm - 7:30 pm 


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8:30 am - 2:30 pm 


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ol oedd dad 


SEP 10 ~ SEP 16, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY 


; treatment—heroin by prescription—reduc- 
: es drug use, overdose rates, prostitution and 
} crime among addicts who have not benefit- 
: ed from other treatment options, a study 
: by the North American Opiate Medication 


: Initiative (NAOMI) has found. The research, 
: addiction issues is neither risky nor experi- : published in the New England Journal of 
mental—supported housing has, according : Medicine in August, supports other research 


: of its kind that has found heroin mainte. 
> nance to work, and to cost less per person 


: ($7500 per year as opposed to the estimated 
There'll be those who say OK fine, just not : $55 000 per year for an untreated addict). 
in my backyard, even though a review of the : 


: relevant literature done by the Centre for : though, at least in my experience, and youll 
Applied Research on Mental Health and Ad- : meet with some resistance and raised eye- 
diction (CARMHA) for the Vancouver Coast- : brows. Maintenance, whatever kind works 


O f7, 
Gi 
Zz il 


WG 


HOW I SAVED THE GEATS' 


Mention this in conversation with friends 


> best, is humane and logical. But it is still, to 
; many, simply wrong to keep addiction going, 
+ a condoning of something harmful, a relin- 


: quishing of our idealism and superiority. 
: type of housing can havea minimal (or even : 


= positive) impact on the neighbourhoods in : on drugs to manage what ails us, it's just 


: that most of us depend on drugs that are 
: legal and whose purity and concentration 


: are regulated and controlled. And though 
: Ing about addiction, which brings me to the : 


: third related news item: heroin maintenance : fects, the biggest risks come with illicit use 


Thin superiority, mind you. We all depend 


heroin comes with serious risks and side ef- 


q 


resulting from untreated addiction—with 
contaminants found in street drugs, high 
overdose potential, non-sterile injection 
Practices and addiction-related crime. 

Heroin, a serni-synthetic derivative of mor- 
phine, was first brought to us by Bayer and 
used legally and very effectively to relieve 
pain and fever in lower doses and with few- 
er side effects than morphine. Because of its 
highly addictive nature, it has mostly fallen 
from approved use, though it is still used in 
the UK (under the name diamorphine) as 
Maintenance treatment and for a number of 
general medical conditions 

Aswith all drugs, potent effect comes with 
a dark side. Clearly, addiction of any kind is 
not a happy thing, but progressive societies 
let the data inform their medical practice. 

Progressive societies also let the data in- 
form their public program spending, their 
approach to the addicted, the ill, the home- 
less. They refuse to play the short-sighted 
game of cutting costs when lives are at 
risk. And they take into account the wis- 
dom of those who've learned from being in 
the trenches, those who know from experi- 
ence what works. 


IF ANYTHING 175 THE 
STORY OF HOW YoU 
GOT THAT GIRL KILLED/ 


UP FRONT // 11 


(SUEUR TENA C ANCE PeeN ENCUENTRA 


PROFILE // BELLE VALLEY FARMS 


Not quite like beef 


At its best—and worst—Alpaca meat has its own style 


JAN HOSTYN 

// \AN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 

Ss” you're sitting around talking 

and the conversation turns to al- 
pacas. You know, those kind-of-cute, 
furry creatures that are known for 
their soft wool and funny-looking 
appearance. I'm guessing the first 
thought that crosses your mind isn't 
going to be "Yum." 

Michael Lutz, one of three broth- 
ers who raise alpacas on Belle Valley 
Farms, is out to change that thought. 
"Alpaca meat is really quite delicious. 
If I had to describe it, I would say the 
taste of it lies somewhere between 
beef and bison. A sweeter beef, | guess 
you could say." 

Nutritionally, alpaca is similar to bi- 
son. It's a very lean meat that's high 
in protein and low in cholesterol. It's 
also extremely high in iron. “If you 
need to bump up your iron levels, 
eating alpaca is a good way to do it," 
explains Lutz. "It's almost the same as 
eating beef liver, just without having 
to endure the taste of liver." 

Belle Valley Farms, in the cattle busi- 
ness since the late 1800s, decided to 
test out alpacas back in 1997. The orig- 
inal plan didn’t include alpaca meat, 
however. They were more interested 
in the wool. But, after seven years of 
trying, things simply weren't working 
out. "The market just wasn't there. 
Sweaters made with alpaca wool cost 
too much.” 

Lutz and his brothers had 25 alpacas 
and no market for them. "I sat back, 


(n.0cm BeeeReNEMANI NIN OE 


TIN LEE LCCOE LOCOCO CCCCE COL 


SNe | 


3 
? 


oo 


CUTE AND TASTY >> Michael Lutz holds a small alpaca //Jan Hostyn 


gazed out the window and watched 
the alpacas grazing. And I wondered, 
what now? 

"Alpacas are animals, just like cows 
and pigs. And animals are meat.” So 
Belle Valley Farms switched gears. 


PROFILE // LUZZARA COFFEE BAR 


Viva Luzzara 


Southside scooter shop houses lunch delicacies 


SHARMAN HNATIUK 


/ SHARMAN @VUEWEEKLY.COM 


‘ve beenon the hunt for net dials 

for the past few months now, and 
while the recession hasn't stopped me 
from eating out, I have tried to make 
a conscious effort to keep my midday 
meal spending down. Thankfully I've 
found myself a recession deal that is 
dirt cheap and delicious; $5 for a pa- 
nini and soup at Luzzara Coffee Bar 
on Whyte Ave 

This little coffee bar is connected to 
Top Gear Scooters, a local source for 
Italy's Vespa scooter. Luzzara, a town 
in northern Italy, was the inspiration 
behind the local Italian coffee bar. On 
awork trip to Italy, one of the Top Gear 


owners thought that incorporating an 
authentic coffee bar would compliment 
the Vespa experience in Edmonton. 

Luzzara has officially been open since 
April 1 and is managed under the care 
and creativity of Sasha La. Her pas- 
sion for food and Italian heritage has 
helped to create a simple menu that 
focuses on ingredients and flavour. 

I was introduced to Luzzara dur- 
ing a hair appointment at the Beauty 
Parlour, a hair salon that is above the 
coffee bar and integrated into the Top 
Gear building design. Coffee is sup- 
plied with your hair service, and if 
clients are hungry food can be ordered 
for upstairs. I had arrived a few min- 
utes early for my appointment so I de- 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 >> 


Why not test out the market for al- 
paca meat? It has traditionally been 
eaten in Peru and South America, but 
it was a new concept for our part of 
the world. 

There were no problems getting cer- 


Online 


tified to sell alpaca meat. "As long as 
you go through the proper system, it's 
not a problem. You can even sell rab- 
bit meat." The only requirements are 
that all meat needs to be provincially 
inspected—which means it has to be 


BUON APPETITO >> Sasha La shows off some of Luzzara's offerings ///starman Hratuk 


vueweekly.com 


Check out our comprehensive 
online database of Vue Weekly's 
restaurant reviews, searchable by 
location, price and type. 


AERA UAV UAE EUCLA AYER CREED FECHA EHSAN HKRELNLGHy 


slaughtered in a registered slaughter- 
house—and you need to have a food- 
handling permit. 

The problem was (and still is) with 
us, the consumers. Weseem to bea bit 
hesitant to give alpaca meat a try. 

Lutz admits that raising alpacas fo: 
meat has had more than its share of 
challenges. In the beginning, the ac 
tual taste of the meat was one of thos¢ 
challenges. Its flavour and tenderness 
are highly dependent on what alpacas 
eat. So before they could sell the meat, 
they had to figure out what to feed the 
alpacas—and what not to feed them 
That took time and involved more 
than a bit of trial and error. 

"Over the first four years, our dogs 
were fed very well. We'd butcher an 
alpaca and, if we didn’t like the taste, 
we'd feed it to the dogs. It was very ex- 
pensive dog food. But it gave us anidea 
of what to do and what not to do.” 

They also began designing their own 
recipes that were suited to alpaca 
meat. Lutz's wife is from Brazil, so 
whenever they came back from visit 
ing the country, they brought back 
cookbooks. The cookbooks didn't 
have recipes that used alpaca meat per 
se, but they did have recipes that used 
similar meat we're not used to eating 
here. They took some of those reci- 
pes and adapted them. “My mother- 
in-law is a great cook, and she really 
helped. She's just one of those people 
who can make something from practi- 
cally nothing.” 


CONTINUED ON PAGE 23 >> 


MMMM 


12 // DISH 


Vv 


WEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - 


SEP 16, 2009 


eee 
A really good year 


Naming your beer 1516 creates lofty expectations 


BELLE VALLEY FARMS 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 


Not only does Belle Valley Farms offer 
traditional cuts of meat like steaks, 
roasts and ribs, but they've also de- 
veloped their own pepperoni sticks, 
smokies and jerky. 

When you try alpaca for the first 
time, Lutz recommends starting with 
the ground kind. "You can't really 
mess up ground alpaca. If you made 
something like a burger, it would give 
you the taste of the meat, but you can 
also throw it in a pot of chili.” 

Steaks are a bit more of a challenge. 
They need to be cooked quickly, and 
should never be done beyond rare to 
medium-rare. Alpaca is so lean that 
if it's overcooked, you end up with a 
very tough piece of meat. Marinating 
the steaks first also helps keep them 
tender. "But really, beef and bison are 
the same. They all get tough if you 
cook them too much.” 

Lutz describes the animals them- 


) (Produces, they eat far less, Eight al- 


pacas eat about as much as one steer. 
"If you put a bale of hay in front of 50 
alpacas, it'll last about 3 weeks. Put a 
bale of hay in front of so steers and 
it’s gone in less than a day.” 

Cattle, because of their hard hooves, 
do a pretty good job of tramping down 
the land, But alpacas don't really have 
hooves like cows do. Instead, they 
have pads at the bottom of their feet, 
which cause much less wear-and-tear 
on the land and the environment. 

But raising alpacas isn’t all good; they 
spit. That doesn't seem so bad, but evi- 
dently thatspitdoesn'tjust smell, itstinks 
‘It's a defence mechanism," laughs Lutz 
"Skunks pee, and alpacas spit.” 

The spitting discovery was also part 
of the whole learning curve. "If you 
butcher alpacas at a certain age, you get 
a tinge of that smell in the meat. And 
trust me, even a tinge is too much 

BELLE VALLEY FARMS 

MICHAEL, WAYNE & DANNY LUTZ 


Dm to follow Bavaria's Beer Purity Law Wecrnyrate (CO 


1516 BAVARIAN LAGER 


ING, VERNON, BC 
$12.50 FOR SIX PACK 


the beer world. It marks the date that 
the world's first consumer pro- 
tection law came into effect. In 
1516, Duke Wilhelm IV of Ba- 
varia passed the Reinheitsge- 

bot, which also goes by the 

less intimidating "Beer Purity 

Law," which stated that beer 
brewed and sold in Bavaria 
could only contain three ingre- 
dients; water, barley and hops (this 
was long before yeast was discovered). 


It is a strict law, forbidding any other : 
addition, even carbon dioxide, requiring : 
? sweetness and no hop nose. The taste 
? starts off a bit sharp and grainy with 


brewers to use a delicate method (called 
Krausening) to carbonate their beer. 

The law was passed for two reasons. 
First, it was to prevent brewers from 


Second, and more importantly, it was 


cost of production. Such contaminants 


the world's best brewers. 
The 


_|he Reinheitsgebot survived until the 
‘ste 1980s, when EU rules struck it 
“own. Yet even today the Purity Law : 


: isin beer circles a revered concept, and 


OKANAGAN SPRING BREW- : 


the best brewers still attempt to abide 


; by it, especially in Germany. 


Which brings us to Canada. Okanagan 


: Spring—one of Canada's oldest craft 
The year 1516 was an important one in : 


brewers, now owned by Sapporo of 


japan—markets its 1516 Bavarian Lager, 


suggesting it is in honour of this his- 
torical law. The brewery claims 
to abide by its rules, which is 
only partially true—its car- 
bonation process would fail 
the test. But the ingredients 
are pure. A beer with such a 
name has a challenging task to 
prove its mettle. 
The beer pours a brilliant, bright 
yellow with a decent white head that 
doesn't stick around long. The aroma is 
subdued, showing only a touch of malt 


a light grassy hop. The middle softens 


: Up and the beer ends with a balanced, 
scooping up rye and wheat for their : 
brewing, as those two grains were : 
needed for the production of bread. : 
: very bitter but has other hop qualities, 
to push out scurrilous brewers who : 
adulterated their beer with all sorts of : 
'Nappropriate additions to lower the : 
= but overall pleasant. | wouldn't turn 
included tree bark, fruit, eggs, fish : 
bladders and even toxic substances. By : 

| controlling the ingredients, the Duke : 
knew he could improve the quality : 

Of beer. Penalties were harsh, and in : 
short order Bavarian brewers learned : 

to make “real" i me = 
eal" beer and quickly became Sreachihg, 1516 |s a Ukeable biker. 2hat 


almost fruity finish. In the lingering af- 
tertaste | pick up some grain harshness 
and a touch of hops. The beer is not 


which is unusual. 
If | measure the beer for its drinkabili- 
ty, it scores fairly well. It is a bit boring, 


down a pint. However, comparing it to 
German light lagers (called Helles), it 
pales, | am afraid. It lacks the crispness 
and nuance of a German lager. 
Therefore as a beer attempting to 
honour the Reinheltsgebot, it falls 
short. Chalk this up to a case of over- 


would be more acceptable if it didn't 
try to conjure up images of German ar- 
tisans and historic beer laws. W 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


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enjoy food from other cultures—a lot. 

I'm the kind of person who prefers to 
head down to places like Chinatown, 
118 Avenue or 107 Avenue in search 
of some good, authentic cuisine from 
around the world. 

Karmel Café and Restaurant serves 
food from East Africa, namely Ethiopia, 
Somalia and Kenya. We arrive shortly 
after 8:30 pm—during the month of 
Ramadan, the dining room opens at 
this time—and a server greets us at 
the door and seats us at a table for two. 
Many of the other tables are full—it's 
Sunday evening, and the place is hop- 
ping. A good sign. 

Karmel's warmth—both in tempera- 
ture and décor—becomes apparent 
immediately. The dining room feels 
quite warm, but not uncomfortably so. 
The walls are painted in large geomet- 
ric patterns, using bright colours like 
reds and greens. Large posters and wall 
hangings cover the walls; burgundy 
tablecloths with golden, elephant- 
patterned embroidery decorate the 
tables. The lighting itself is soft, and a 
little oasis of trees rests to my immedi- 
ate right. It's the kind of eclectic and 
homey atmosphere that's common in 
family-run establishments, one that 
gives a place its specific and unique 
feel. Throughout our meal, we notice 
that many of the people who enter the 
place, and those who work there, seem 
to know each other; greetings and con- 
versations surround us, suggesting a 
kind of community. All of this adds to 
the warmth that we feel here. 

The server takes our drink order. The 
banana and mango shakes ($2) that we 
initially request are not available to- 
night, so we both ask for some mango 
juice ($2) instead. Mango juice is a bit 
thicker than orange juice, and tastes 
creamier and less acidic. It goes down 
very well. 

We look at the menu, There is one 
page for breakfast, one for lunch and 
one for supper. Although it's an East 
African place, the menu has one col- 
umn for North American dishes, and 
one column for food from the African 
cultures. Between the two columns, the 
supper menu has about 10 options; the 


entire menu is Halal. 

I order the beef suqaar ($10), which 
beefcubes cookedina soup broth. Fro: 
the options of sides, I select muufo 
thick, fluffy bread. My companion o: 
ders the chicken suqaar ($10), selectin; 
chapati, a thinner, flatter bread, as th 
side, after hearing the server's explana 
tion about these two menu items. The 
server, a soft-spoken man, answers ou 
questions about the restaurant a 
the food, and attends to us very wel! 
In talking with him, we learn that thi 
place opened on Canada Day. 

We both enjoy our meals. The bee! 
suqaar has a nice, spicy zing to it 
which seeps even into the vegetab! 
found in the sauce. The meat itself i 
tender and pleasant to eat. I'm also 
big fan of the muufo—because it’s 
fluffy it just soaks up the beef sauce 
The texture reminds me a bit of 2 
muffin; together with the beef sauce 
the muufo is a winner. The salad has 
a tangier, more citrus-like dressing 
so I'm probably using each one of my 
taste buds for all the flavours that are 
happening on this plate. 

The poultry is as pleasing as the 
vine dish. No less spicy, the chicke 
also entices with its strong fle 
and gentle texture. The chapati, mu 
like the muufo, win both of us 0 
too. It's like a pancake, flat and a bit 
sweet. Cut into triangles, and heape 
on the plate, the chapati allows 
the quickest possible pick-up, wra 
ping and eating action of the chick 
and veggies. Being the kind of perso! 
who can never finish everything th 
she orders, and because the portio! 
sizes are generous, | take half of m 
meal home. 

Both of us are stuffed when we leav« 
but we're happy. The food was de! 
cious, and the prices just as reasonab! 
And we're both happy to know that 
we want good East African food, 
don't have to wait around for Heritage 
Days to roll around in a year. V 


14 // 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - SEP 16 


009 


hind the till. All of the paninis, andthe | 
meats and vegetables that fill them, are 
grilled on the one grill press she has on 
ep- the counter. While I could taste that her 
ite soups are from scratch, I was surprised 
_ to find out that she doesn't make them at 
home first. “Thave one burner that I start 
the soups on, and then J usually transfer 
it to the crock pot,” Sasha explained. She 
~ has one filled with today's soup, and the 
other already simmering for tomorrow. 
We were treated to a bow! of fagioli soup, 
a simple combination of chickpeas and 
bowtie pasta in tasty broth. 

Eventhough we were both stuffed, [was 
overjoyed with the last panini that graced 
our table. The Nutty for You is a dessert 
or breakfast croissant grilled with nutella 
and seasonal fruit. Today's treat included 
Strawberries which were unbelievable 
when paired with nutella and the buttery 
taste of the grilled croissant ($5). 

What I like is that each visit to Luzzara 
results ina different menu option. "I try 
to buy fruits and vegetables that are in 
season. I just bought a lot of yellow zuc- 
chini so you'll probably see a lot of that 
in the soups and paninis for the next 
few days" laughs Sasha. The stand-up 
cooler is stocked with an assortment 
of beverages, including Bob's favourite 
limonata, as well as her ingredients for 
the next few days. Everything is fresh 


is enough for an 
can be ordered 


p was the Rise and Shine break- 
a buttery croissant toast- 


visit to ears 
ts In a different 


are in season. | just and her menu choices are supportive of 
bought a lot of an authentic Italian experience—sim- 
ple flavour combinations made from 

yellow zucchini so fatihereaiants 
you'll probably see Even though business has been slow 
a lot of that in the to Pee eB ae a ep a ere: 
ie, . in icona. More and more o} ie 
soups and paninis for surrounding business owners and staff 
_ the next few days are popping in for a coffee and breakfast 
laughs Sasha. sandwich in the morning. An authentic 


Italian coffee bar is a great concept, but it 


ed with a poached egg, back bacon, 
cheddar and sliced tomato ($5). Bob's 
half of the tasty back bacon breakfast 
croissant was gone before I could even 
take a sip of my chailatte ($4.25). 

Next panini up was an assortment 
of spicy meats and cheese grilled on a 
ciabatta bun ($5) and the Southern Bell 
stuffed with roasted bell peppers, egg- 
plant, zucchini, spinach and Sasha's 


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What surprised me was that Sasha does and is non-refundable. Taxes not included. Other conditian 
all of the cooking in the small space be- may apply. 


doesn't translate for everyone who is used 
to a quick Starbucks fix or a drive-thru 
Tim Hortons coffee and doughnut. North 
American culture has grown accustomed 
to super-sized coffees and meals, buta vis- 
it to Luzzara can show you that the quality 
ofa good espresso and panini tastes much 
better than the quantity found at the 
drive-thru. For $51 will certainly be back— 


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EXPERIENCED FOOD WRITERS NEEDED 
Vue Weekly is looking for a few experienced writers whose love 
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SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY 


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=X IN THE CITY //17 


SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


SEP 10 - 


Welcome, once again, to Vue Weekly's annual Sex in the City issue. This time, instead r 
of printing the responses to every question asked in our annual sex survey, we've 
decided to highlight a few choice cuts, and put everything up on our website. So 
if you're looking for the full results, please check out vueweekly.com, where you'll 
find them, as well as the results of all of our past surveys. You also may notice 
that this year's issue is full of sexy artwork by local artists. All of this artwork will 
be available by silent auction at the super-sexy issue launch party we're throwing 
on September 12 at the Artery. Please come on down to check out the Secretaries, 
Capital City Burlesque, Sans AIDS and to bid on some of the fine pieces contained 


within these pages. 


How many 
25 tabs | _ 3 partners have 
hoe <iR you had in : 
atten > ~—stthe last year: 
d [be oo it 


A. 25 tojag | a 


| Porta. nb 
d snails eae a in 5-10 6% 1 1+ 4% 
uertski ‘sie 
See ae Me: 
two an nt twe ve Phe 


BNE S220 wei eh 6% 150% 2.434% 


EP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 


WUEWEEKLY //S 


18 // SE 


4E CITY >> SURVEY RESULTS 


Dithe last month, 


how many times have you had sex? | 


- O° pll-20 (18%) 
pi-4 (24%) p 21-30 (11%) 


In the last month, how many 
times have you masturbated? 


e F ae é 


of all respondents would 


consider having a threesome 


Dee:...-...23 70 
Se igicccssseree 2270. 


TI eiaccasscejen-- 2370. 
21-30 Pe sons... 1370 of 29 women said (2) of hetero men said 


3tecssssnee12% NEVER NO WAY 


SEX IN THE CITY //19 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


Tom Dredge Residential Aide 
@yel-te-halelemaalclaleeiell me iseliolemeiela lia 


We provide a safe alelsei= 
for the homeless, the 
mentally ill, and people 
NL egmelelolianalolacrm iam arene 
S17 [oLemeem le dzge, but to 
Mae sure our residents 
are cared for and havea 
roof over their heads. 


afé communitie 


d 
f 
_ i] 
) | 


t’s how we ali strong, 


WORK FOR ¥' 
a 


Coanachin Unio 
of Pubic f rniphoytes 


20 // SEX IN THE CITY 


ar 


=< | 
ee 
5s >) |Peéari Det Boris Gharest Monk 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 


Studio's Open Weekend 


September 19th & 20th, 2009 
Saturday & Sunday 


loin us for a weekend of art. Phe following artists invite you fo Vis 
chem in their studios to wateh them at work. 12:00pm - 5:00pm 


Laura Watreugh 


- 
- hey, 
‘| 
y | 
wo 


ae 
4 
I 
> 


Reata red Artists 


Jeannette Sommers 
Laura Watmough 
June Haring 

Pearl Der 


Spotlight Gallery #107, 
25 Chisholm Ave. 
St. Albert, AB « P: 780.419.2055 


66 Estate Way West, 
MONK Summerbrook Estates 
St. Albert, AB « P: 780.973.6771 


19 Glen Meadow Cres. 


Laraine Weaver St. Albert, AB « P: 780.418.1192 


Big Lake Artists Studio 
32 Rayborn Cres. 
St. Albert, AB » P: 780.458.3951 


Doris Charest 


Studio Gallery 11 Perron Street 


Pat Wagensveld St. Albert, AB » P: 780.460.5993 


Surgeon Sf Allbert 


SEP 16, 2009 


exercise in : 


not delivered forthrightly. 


ward to participate, but four were will- 
ing, and their responses are below. 


if DAVID BERRY'S DUMB IDEA 


ieath the sheets 


fpar the unthinkable—calls his ex-girlfriends while sober | 


: it’s entirely possible this also reflects 
; some sort of latent political fetish I've 
= yet to be honest with myself about. 


terribly con- : 
to say that there : 
onesty surround- : 
in our society, on : 
or macro levels. So, : 
avariety of reasons why : 
t sexual partners to rate : 
-Imake my living cri- : 
and thought it was only : 
myselfto one, [thoughtit : 
be funny—essentially I : 
g what it would be like to : 
honest and unfettered opinion : 
that’s fairly personal and ‘ 


me. Some rejected me outright (I quote: = 
"This is the first time we've talked since : 
it ended. Fuck off."), some felt too awk- : 


Keeping in the spirit 
of anonymity, I've 
also tried to keep the 
descriptions of our 
relationship pur- 
posely vague. 


ZOE LAURIER 


Zoé and I dated for 


more than six months. My general : 
impression was that the sex was ab- 
solutely fine but nothing particularly : 
special, aside from a particularly fun : 


; MARGARET TRUDEAU 


stretch that happened after we techni- 


usually : cally broke up. 
To that end, I asked several former lov- . 

ers, from a variety of circumstances, to : 

tell me how I did. I encouraged them to : 

beashonestas possible, andthenIasked : 

them a few follow-up questions about : 

anything in their review that intrigued : 


ZOE'S REVIEW 


To be perfectly honest, I don't recall 
the details of our sex life, which I sup- 


i Margaret was an odd case, in that I : 
: was cheating on a girlfriend at the : 
: time (I'm going to forgo trying to jus- : 
: tify myself here). It was also the best : 
; sex I've ever had in my life, the impli- : 


pose says something in and of itself. = 


When I think of our relationship, 


the good sexual moments and the 


; bad, but not too much in-between. I 
: maintain that you are a sensitive and 

To preserve their anonymity—no : 
sense dragging their good names : 
into my dumb idea—I've named : 
them after former prime minister's : 
wives, assigned at random—though : 


timid lover, which I initially thought 
to be endearing, but also rather bor- 
ing. Though off to an awkward start, 
the sex became comfortable, but was 
rarely exciting—until we broke up. | 


“All be: 


> enjoyed the sex exponentially more : 
after this, perhaps because of the : 
: heightened naughty factor, : 


You wear a lot of scarves and 
hats, and I think you're more 
comfortable i in those than in 


your own skin. 


Zoé didn't reply with her responses in 


time for the publication deadline. 


cations of which could probably take : 


= up a whole other essay. 
sex wasn't the highlight. I remember : 


pecapreeneeetiiits 


MARGARET'S REVIEW 


with you, it would be "passionate." 
And I don't mean passionate in that 
icky, hold-my-chin-and-gaze-into- 


my-eyes-while-we-make-love kind of : 


way. | mean doing-it-in-the-hallway- 


If you can ppread a pas" 


little bit 
the pecs 
eavtie a 


EEve 


\¥7 
VV I 
Fi 
i 


SEX. 


1enever you 


LT baal diablbidbel i Tu 
Yt a av ges Ne ee LE MESA a A A OTN HH KHFOUMHOHUNNHANMNTMTONNANMNNMAMNRAN 


fe & 

Di fh 
Medi 
(shes 


: because-we-couldn't-even-wait-to- : 
: get-into-the-apartment kind of pas- 
: sion. Generally it was fast and intense 
If had to use one word to describe sex : 


and fun. Oh, and I really liked the fact 


+ you were up for absolutely anything. I : 
: had a fetish that had gone unfulfilled, : 
but that wasn't anissue with you. And : 
the sex was such that I didn’t mind : 
; you expecting the same in return. ; 


de with 


ay 7 
i 


ry 
ace Y 


4 


the above. 


DB: Has your fetish still gone unful- 
filled outside our relationship? What 
was it about me that made you feel 
alright to divulge it? 


MT; Yes, it has. It's hard to say what it 
was that made me okay with telling 
you about it, I think you give off the 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 >> 


starts with 
a cigarette. 
ae gar female interact. 


SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


SEX IN THE CITY // 21 


eo CT 


SEX IN THE CITY // SEX AND COMICS 


Comixxx 


How do comic books deal — 


our sexual desires? 


BRIAN GIBSON 
// BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


something just too crude and reductive 


as nastily fascist as the world the series : 
is criticizing, about a woman falling in : 
: Dunst in the first movie adaptation, Pe- 


love with her rapist. 


Maybe that’s because Watchmen focus- : 
es on men. Even the love-making scene : 
between Nite Owland Silk Specterinthe : 
film version, as Peter Birkemoe, owner : 
of Toronto comic store The Beguiling : 
notes, "caused quite a bit of disdain and/ : 
or laughter inthe audience familiarwith : 
since the series : 
isn't erotic. But women tend to come up : 
short in comics—usually short-skirted - 
or skimpy-topped. As Birkemoe says, : 
: quisition of Marvel for $4-billion, a deal 
think of comics, sadly they do think of : 
sexism—the ridiculous super-heroine : 
costumes, fighting crime in high-heels : 
and spilling out of your top. More of- : 
ten than not, these criticisms are sadly : 
justified.” And sex in superhero books : 
often seems to involve dehumaniza- : 


the source material,” 


"If people don't think of sex when they 


: tion of women. There's a website listing 
: the victims of "Women in Refrigerator 
+ Syndrome"—all the females in male su- 

o there's this great comic-book lim- : 

ited series. And it's dressed up with : 
a plot about super-heroes saving the : 
world but includes mixed media and : 
stories-within-stories, takes on Cold War : 
politics, metaphysics, even the nature of : 
time itself, and it’s ticking along, until : 
--- Sex comes into the picture. There's : 


perhero books who've been brutalized 
or killed as a plot device. 

Even though psychologist William 
Moulton Marston and his wife Eliza- 
beth conceived of Wonder Woman as 
a feminist role model in the 1940s, the 
Amazon princess and her successors 
on the panelled page have usually been 
pneumatically, but not psychologically, 
enhanced. Take Mary Jane Watson. Be- 
fore and after a wet T-shirted Kirsten 


ter Parker's favourite redhead has been 
super-sexed up. In 2007, there was some 
criticism when a new collectible figu- 
rine of Mrs. Parker was released, show- 
ing her bent over, thong showing, while 
washing her husband's costume. Last 
month, two Spider-Man covers looked 
like Mary Jane centrefolds. And Marvel 
is now issuing a Models Inc. comic series 
to show off more leggy ladies. Such im- 
ages are sure to make Disney's recent ac- 


made in large part to enchant the Magic 
Kingdom's elusive tween and teen boy 
demographic, sex-cessful. 

Dig deeper in the comic-store shelves, 
though, and some intelligent, three- 
dimensional explorations of sex do 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 >> 


SEX IN THE CITY >> SURVEY RESULTS 


22 // i THE CITY 


of respondents have used 
sex toys in the bedroom 


OH MARY JANE >> Clearly her laundry skills are sub par because all her clothes have shrunk //Fite 


U Lsa Rezanvot 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 


i ee er Lk el 


SEX IN THE CITY >> SURVEY RESULTS 


: a i 
-COtIUS habits? 


Just mush-talk and cuddling, and that's just fine by me. 


Holding his toes in-between mine. It's oddly comforting! water! whoever is up must get water for us both 


Gots to gO poop. Feeling guilty anytime I ejaculate. God damn Catholic block! 
Vomiting? Getting the sex munchies. Insomnia. Shower to gether 


I walk around naked or smoke. 
Sleeping. I prefer to be alone, get cleaned up and not see you for awhile, I pee to prevent UTIs. 
Ihave to make sure the condom is disposed of in the garbage. Get dressed and run I 


Feelings of inadequacy. Smoked oysters and crackers in bed? 


Requesting my lover to make me a ham sandwich. He generally doesn't oblige. 


Giggling like a school girl. Eating. Watch Family Channel. So wholesome. 


Smoke weed. 


Interesting 


When there’s an orgasm, I just start laughing like an idiot. 
Walking off leg cramps. I just like to be held. Kinda vanilla, but nice. 


1 love playing with her nipples, licking and sucking ... always looking for another round, I guess. 


Laughing. Mopping the sweat off? Cigarette, maybe? 


I like to shower with my partner after sex. It feels so nice to be naked and relaxed in a hot steamy shower. 
Ewww, I'm gay. I love me an Iced Capp from Tim's right after. 
; A 


| Feigning seizures so my partner would leave. 
Smoke. Spooning: Peeing and then going to bed. 
Extended toe-cracking. Sleeping. Playfully arguing over who gets the wet spot. 


Typically we lie there in blissful silence for a while, then talk about whatever is on our minds. 
As a woman, it's hard to resist visiting the bathroom and cleaning up a bit. Just a glass of water. 


7 fall asleep within 25 second = Wiping each other off with a washcloth. 


The craving for Tim's usually sets in shortly after ~~ if that can be considered interesting. 
Snacks ... gotta eat something to get the blood sugar back up. 


Nope, usually just sleep it off or get up and shower to start the day. I get the shakes after I orgasm. 


I'll wash off after if she is at that time of the month. 


T always have to go to the washroom after. None of this basking the in the glow crap, I want to go clean up. 


SEP 10 ~ SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY SEX IN THE CiTY // 23 


DAVID BERRY'S DUMB IDEA 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 


impression that you're up for pretty : 
much anything, sol knew you wouldn't : 
be shocked or horrified. [must admit, : 
wasa little surprised—in a good way— : 
when you told me you were willing to : 
: erything. What I had really enjoyed : 
relationship was the : 


act on it, though. 


cheating at the time)? 


definitely isn’t typical. 


: about 
DB: Obviously ours was not a typical : 
affair. Do you think the fact it was : 
illicit to begin with influenced how : 
we approached it (i.e. do you think : 
we were a bit more free and willing : 
with our sex because I happened to be : 
: nothing good enough to tell your gal : 
: pals about. Was there anything bad : CONCLUSIONS 
MT: Yes, there's no question. The fact : 
that we were sneaking around forced : 
us to do it wherever we could when- : 
ever we could, and this lent a sense of : 
excitement and adventure to it that : 
: ity, or conversations we had, or weird, : 


; and therefore we never really reached : 
: any momentous occasions. 


DB: We didn't date very long. How much 
ofa factor in that was the sex? 


MP: I think of course sex has a fac- : 
tor in everything, but it wasn't ev- : 


the 


dialogue between us, and the rela- : 
tionship seemed to be heading in a : 
friendlier direction—more friendlier : 


than romantic. 


DB: You mentioned that there was : 


enough to rate a mention, or wasitjust : 


not very noteworthy in general? 


MP: I think what I mentioned to gal : 
pals was more about your personal- : 


; over-the-top sarcastic remarks you : 


MARYON PEARSON 


: may have made, or I made to you. So : 


: I guess I found your personality more : 
interesting than what happened be- : 


Maryon and I dated for a fairly short : 
amount of time (in the neighbour- : 
hood of a month or so). Of the people : 
who were willing to respond, she was : ALINE CHRETIEN 
the one I was expecting the worst : 


marks from. Notwithstanding a few : 


choice encounters, sex for the most : 
part was awkward. 


MARYON'S REVIEW 


Most of our sexual encounters were : 
catalyzed by the intake of alcohol. : 
From my sketchy rememberings, the : 
sex when we were drunk was fun and : 
somewhat aggressive, though not : 
necessarily a ribbon winner, meaning : 
I don't think either of us orgasmed : 
at any euphoric level. I’m also one of : 
those girls who thinks making out : 
is the greatest and really important, : 
and again here when we were drunk : 
I remember it being fun and when we : 
were sober I remember it being some- : 
what awkward and stilted. In general, : 
I think you're slightly uptight—you : 
wear a lot of scarves and hats, and : 
I think you're more comfortable in : 
those than in your own skin—though : 
you relaxed a lot when drunk, so the : 
sex was better when we were drunk 
However, in being drunk sometimes : 
the details and staying power lacks, : 


tween us in the bedroom. 


Aline and I had a drunken one-night : 
stand. I haven't had enough one-night : 


jections to a two-plus-night stand. 


: ALINE'S REVIEW 


: stands to knowifthey're generally this : 
: loose and free or there was something : 
: particularly good about this one, but! : 
: do know that I would have had no ob- : 
> dance, anyway. 


Well, I did have a lot to drink that : 
night, but I do remember it being a : 
very, very good experience. You were : 


really attentive and sensual in your ; 
approach. [also remember you being ‘ 


a really good kisser. Basically, it was : 


a lot of fun. 


that it was usually better when I had : 
been drinking. Do you think the fact we : 


were both drunk helped? 


AC: Drinking always loosens things up, ; 
but I have a feeling that that attentive : 


> nature is just who you are 


DB: I don't have a lot of experience : 


FEATURING THESE GREAT PES. 


INCLUDING A f 
AND-GREET witt 


LIL JON $ BI NA 


with one-night stands. Do you? If so, 
do you find it generally better or worse 
than longer-term things, and why? 


AC: I have a bit of exerience with one 
night stands. They always seem to 
happen when you have had too much 
to drink; therefore, that “inhibition” 
is more free. I wouldn't say one or the 
other is better: I think there's just a 
difference between the two. One night 
stands, I find, are just these fun things 
where you let loose and it's about the 


: pure fun factor. But the more long 
: time thing, it's more about love, pas- 


sion, pleasing and all those things. 


: For the most part, the reviews were 
: generally what I expected, which is 


slightly surprising in and of itself: 
I've occasionally thought that, for 
instance, someone else was enjoy- 
ing it a tad more than I was, or that I 
was more into it than my partner, but 
it would seem that, for the most part, 
how things are going is fairly obvious 


: to both partners. That's some informa- 
: tion that would have come in handy. 


That said, I was really surprised by 


: how much everyone's response (and 


my recollections) basically served as 
a microcosm for the relationship in 
general. I don't know if sex is just a 
great metaphor for relationships or 
our memory just tends to conflate 
things, but it's an interesting concor- 


Less surprising, but a good reminder 


: anyway, was how much a factor open- 
> ness and a lack of inhibition factored 


into the experience, whether it was 
natural or chemically induced. Also, 
eagerness seems to count for a lot: 
I'm sure talent, as it were, factors in 
somewhere, but at least half the battle 
seems to be making someone feel de- 


: sired, etc, since almost everyone men- 
: tioned it in some oblique way. 
DB: [ actually had another girl tell me : 


The last interesting thing will be 
the response to this article. | think 
it's safe to say that this level of forth- 


: rightness on this particular subject is 
: rare even among friends and family, 


let alone the general public. I hope 
it encourages people to be a bit more 


: forthcoming in their own experience, 
: and not just several months worth of 


jokes at my expense. W 


te win Ge fo VAEWEEELULCBAA ANT 
cunk tHe BACETOSCHEOL autten 


SEXANDCOMICS ~~: 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23 : 


pop up. This may be because of the : 
rise of female writers and illustrators, : 
Birkemoe notes. Alan Moore, Watch- : 
men writer, recently collaborated with : 
his wife Melinda Gebbie on Lost Girls, : 
an erotic reimagining of children’s book 
characters Alice, Dorothy and Wendy. 
And, Birkemoe explains, "Comics with : 
sexuality as central themes are increas- : 
ingly popular, even if many of these : 
works would not be considered erotic. : 
Best-selling recent works like Fun Home : 
(by Alison Bechdel) and Skim (written by : 
Toronto's Mariko Tamaki and illustrated : 
by her Alberta-born cousin Jillian) are = 
excellent examples that have sex at : 
their core with hardly any explicit de- : 
piction. On the pom side, Ihave noticed : 


both men and women becoming more :_ 


open about including out-and-out porn : 
in their purchases.” : 

Jay Bardyla, owner of Edmonton's : 
Happy Harbor comics, says that, "These : 
days we sell as much sexual material to : 
women as we do men.” 

Pornographic comics still aren't nearly : 
as big over here as in Europe or Japan, : 
but then North America doesn’t have : 
as popular or transgressive a comic cul- : 
ture. As Bardyla explains, "Forstarters, : 
it was, and somewhat still is, generally : 
more difficult to obtain that type of : 
material in North America than over- = 
seas ... Frequently creators and, more : 
often, retailers are imprisoned in the : 
US for (legally) creating, distributing : 
and possessing ‘adult’ material. That's ‘ 
why the industry had to create the : 
Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, to al- : 
low people to properly express them- - 
selves in a free society without fear of : 
litigation or incarceration.” : 

Japanese manga, a popular art form : 
with its origins in traditional Japanese : 
art, has its own pornographic offshoot : 
that, inside the covers, cango far beyond : 
the outside world's legal lines. Hentai : 
publications present all sorts of fetishes : 
and perversions (Bondage Fairies is one : 
self-explanatory title), and has many : 
subgenres, including yaoi (male-male : 


sex for female readers) and bear porn : 


(burly, hairy men for gay male readers). 


gender porn iss surprisingly i popular in 


: comics form, making up what I have to 


imagine is a much higher percentag- 
of total porn than in any other format. | 
theorize,” Birkemoe says.."This is mostiy, 
because with pen and ink you can create 
the transgendered body of your fantasy 
much more easily than you can find an 


i actor with those traits, if such a person 
: even exists.” 


In North America, Birkemoe's noticed 
"LGBT themes in comics sell very wel! 
in comics form, but much more so in . 


? personal works by LGBT authors than 


by some token reference in a superherc 
book.” There can bea greater part-of-life 
honesty to graphic novels, Bardyla says 
"If you examine the more alternative 
and independent comic sector, the vast 
majority of those stories are auto- or 
quasi-biographical and therefore lend 
themselves to discussing most people's 
biggest hang up: sex.” 

And in some graphic novels, where 
adult male characters harbour an ado- 
lescent frustration with women, honesty 
can be the best policy. Birkemoe's found, 


: forinstance, "Joe Matt's honest depiction 


of his own rather pathetic relationship 
with porn has won him just as many fans 
with women as with men, perhaps be- 
cause he confirms their worst fears.” 
Even in the simpler world of super 

hero comics, there's now more of the 
men for straight women readers and gay 
male readers to ogle. "The male bulge is 
making a strong comeback,” notes Bar- 
dyla, and men's "excessive musculature 
has always been present." A recent issue 
of X-Factor showed a kiss between Ric- 
tor and Shatterstar, a revision of their 
sexuality that character co-creator Rob 


> Liefeld objected to. 


"So many characters have been around 


= for decades and to decide which are no 


longer hetero requires some finesse," 
Bardyla says of today’s comics, increas- 
ingly reflecting our more sexually com- 
plex and open society. "In the case of the 
Rictor/Shatterstar relationship, had one 
of the original co-creators not publicly 
said a bunch of silly things, the kiss may 
have gone largely unnoticed except by 
the people who actually read X-Factor." 
But even during an economic downturn, 


: in any industry, even the industry that 
: was, just a few decades ago, mostly kids’ 
And maybe comics can offer more ofa : 
projection-screen for the sexual imagi- : 
nation than a video or film. "Trans- : 


books selling for a dollar at the corer 
store's revolving wire-rack, talking about 
sex sells as well as sexy images do. VW 


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EP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


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usic and sex seem to go hand in 
lhand—not only do rock stars get 
all the action they could ever handle, but 


putting on a sexy record can certainly aid 
in the move-making process, as long as 
your moves don't seem choreographed. 
Picking out sexy album covers is difficult 
because sex sells and everyone wants to 


sell records, so there are plenty to choose 
from. The list presented here is not ex- 
haustive, isn't presented in any order and 
inalot of cases has less to do with objective 
sexiness and more to do with hilarity. 


COUNTRY LIFE 
Roxy Music 
(Island) 

1974 


Unlike plenty of covers that feature partial nudity or sexy ladies, Roxy Music's 
Country Life is especially sexy because it’s so nonchalant. Like these girls were just 
kind of standing around near some trees and Bryan Ferry kind of happened by and 
said, "Hey, what's up—you girls want to be on a record cover?" From 1975 - 1980, 
the only copy of Country Life available in the United States was one that featured an 


image of just the trees in the background on the cover as this album was deemed 
too controversial and worthy of censor. 


STICKY FINGERS 
Rolling Stones 
(Atlantic) 

1971 


Conceived by Andy Warhol, 1971's Sticky Fingers puts the purchaser right into the 
action by including a working zipper right on the front of the album which, when 
unzipped, reveals a pair of white briefs with a requisite bulge. Not only was the zip- 
per cover sexy, but it was also tough, damaging records placed nearby in any col- 
lection and becoming a nightmare to ship. The cover was too sexy for the Spanish 
government, however, who banned it in 1971, forcing the Stones to come up with 
an alternate cover which featured severed human fingers swimming in molasses 
Clearly less sexy but how it’s less offensive is anyone's guess. 


MUSIC TO MAKE LOVE TO YOUR OLD LADY BY 
Lovage 

(75 Ark Records) 

2001 


An homage to the cover of Serge Gainsbourg's second album, Music to Make Love to 
Your Old Lady By features a sexy image of aman at a piano with a bouquet of roses, 
eager to seduce his partner with song. Though the entire album, from the cover 
to the music, is tongue in cheek, it is downright sexy in its own way—I was once 
reprimanded for playing it at a coffee shop I worked at because, although it was 
certainly mellow enough for the laid back atmosphere of the place, some custom- 
ers felt the themes were a bit racy. But I'm not bitter, it gave me an opportunity to 
listen to it more at home. 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


A-TOM-IC JONES 
Tom Jones 
(Decca) 

1966 


I'm not going to sit here and pretend that I know what's sexy about Tom Jones—the 
curly-haired-blue-eyed-soul-singing Brit has never really done it for me—but the 
guy's been knee deep in babes for over half a century, many of whom bring extra 
panties to his concerts just so they can have the pleasure of throwing more at him. 
If you could still pull in that much action while approaching 70 years old, you'd be 
on this list too. 


WHIPPED CREAM & OTHER DELIGHTS 
Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass 

(A & M) 

1965 


A classic in pop-culture iconography, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass's Whipped 
Cream & Other Delights was the greatest discovery any 13-year-old boy could make 
in his parent's record collection. Parodied numerous times by other artists, the 
cover has been recreated using clam dip by Soul Asylum, spaghetti sauce by co- 
median Pat Cooper and even sour cream by the Frivolous Five. The record that 
launched an interest in jazz amongst the junior high set, Whipped Cream & Other 
Delights remains Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass's most popular album—and I 
hear that the group made some pretty good music too! Vv 


SEX IN THE CITY // 29 


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WALK FOR LIFE 


The Walk will do us good. 


20, 2009 
Rogistration at {1:00 am 
Walk at (:00 pm 


Thursday, September 24, 2009 
Axe Music, 11931 Wayne Gretzky Dr, Edmonton, AB 


6:00 pm — 10:00 pm 
Edmvatons Bet Roel 100.3 fm 


«BEAR WUEWEEKLY 


‘The 5 km event begins at Charchili Square, winds throegh 
‘3 Gewntewn core and returns fe the start. 


500 participants wif collect pledges between mow and 
erent day. Participants can walk as individuals er as part of a team. 


On overt day, participants will walk the Skm course and reters to 
Charehill Square ter food, live mesic and entertainment fer the whole family. 


$120,000 to be achieved by participants, with an additional 
830,000 in corporate cpansership. 


in CANAD p1AN oc Soogetiecs G SOCAN LOG ON TO AND 
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scours WF po tba 2009 IMAGE BY ACCLAIMED CANADIAN HIV-POSITIVE ARTIST DON SHORT 


CKUA Celebrates Arts Days! Alberto 


Freedoms Fo Crmate part Te Acre 


September 18th 
12pm to 3pm 


Royal Alberta Museum 
12845-102nd Avenue 


Join Monica Miller, for a special, How / Hear It, in 
celebration of Alberta Arts Days. 


Special Guests: 
+ Karla Anderson performing from her new CD Brand New Day 
+ U22 sensation Lindsay Ell 
+ Edmonton's first poet laureate, Alice Major 
+ local indie latin/experiemental band Aroot’s Bazaar 


AlbertaArts Days 


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HIV EDMONTON WILL COMPETE 
IN THE 2ND ANNUAL ALBERTA 
THROWDOWN 


Agencies to compete for top fundraising for | 
the 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life EXTRA MILE CLUB 


Edmonton — HIV Edmonton announced the 2nd Annual Alberta Throwdown at an event August 


19, 2009 in Hawrelak Park. For the second year, HIV Edmonton is competing against AIDS New for 2009, walkers that raise 
Calgary to see which agency can raise the most money. AIDS Calgary won this competition $1,000 or more receive membership 
last year and Debra Jakubec, HIV Edmonton Executive Director, will serve clients lunch at AIDS in the Extra Mile Club 


Calgary wearing Calgary Flames memorabilia. 
HIV Edmonton hosted a Kick Off Event August 19, Benen Oa oe eee 


2009 to announce the one month countdown to the _« Invitation to an exclusive VIP 
Walk and Jakubec was forced to wear the Calgary reception at the Sutton Place 

t ja. 4 3 
i nh i ea September 17, hosted by Mile High 
“Last year, AIDS Calgary participants raised more Marshall Nick Lees 


funds then we did,” says Debra Jakubec, HIV , : 
Edmonton Executive Director. “I know we can win - Express registration at the Walk 


this year - everyone loves the ‘underdog’ so I hope for Life 
to have their Executive Director, Susan Cress here 
serving our clients next year.” 


- One free one hour massage, 


: . : courtesy of Prana Holistic 
All funds raised from the Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life stay right here in Edmonton. 


On September 20, 2009, Edmontonians are invited to gather at Churchill Square to walk to raise 
funds and awareness for HIV/AIDS programs and services. Join us for the Edmonton debut of 
The Blue Montegos for a Post-Walk Concert. The 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life: Alberta 
Throwdown is the largest annual fundraiser for HIV Edmonton. Pledges can be made online at ’. 
wwwihivedmonton.com or directly with individual walkers or team captains. Raise $1,000 or 
more to become a member of the first ever Extra Mile Club. 


EDMONTON ESKIMOS PARTNER WITH HIV 
EDMONTON FOR THE EARLY BIRD PRIZE 


Participants must turn in pledges by September 11 to be eligible 
to win the early bird draw, announced by Edmonton Eskimos 


running back, Jesse Lumsden 


This year marks a rematch of the Alberta Throwdown against AIDS Calgary. Last year's completion saw AIDS Calgary 
reigning victorious over HIV Edmonton (see picture above of Executive Director Debra Jakubed being humiliated). As 


of September 1, AIDS Calgary is beating HIV Edmonton by almost a 2:1 ratio. 


hh pak Whee 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 


32 // SEX IN THE CITY 


'~ HIV Edmonton is proud to announce an exciting new 

nership with WestJet for our inaugural “Destination for Two Raffle”. 

T are on sale now for just $5. Winners will be announced during a live 
draw held during the 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life at Sir Winston 


Churchill Square September 20, 2009. 


Grand Prize: Return tickets for 2 to any WestJet destination 
Second Prize: $250 Eveline Charles Gift Certificate 

= - 
Third Prize: One night stay and breakf. ‘ro at 


the Coast Edmonton Plaza Hotel 


Tickets may be purchased by contacting: 
Joyce LaBriola, Fund Development Coordinator 
joyce 1@hivedmonton.com or 780-488-5742 ext. 230 


All funds raised from events such as this raffle or the 2009 Scotiabank AIDS - 


Walk for Life stay here in Alberta and are used for HIV/AIDS prevention, 
education, and support and outreach programs in the Edmonton 
metropolitan area. To register for the 2009 Walk for Life, log onto 
www.hivedmonton,com. 


= ———— 


“TOP WALKER” IS GOING TO NYC 


Top fundraiser to win a trip for two to 


AIDS Walk New York in May 2010 


paricipate 


y 


Edmonton - HIV Edmonton has partnered with AIDS Walk New York and is 
proud to announce the incentive prize for the 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk 
for Life “Top Walker”. The walker that raises the most money for the 2009 
event will win a trip for two to NYC to participate in the 2010 AIDS Walk 
New York, as well as all corresponding celebrity and hospitality events. 


AIDS Walk New York started in 1986 and is the largest AIDS Walk in the 
world, The 2009 AIDS Walk New York saw more than 45,000 walkers on the 
io km route through Central Park and raised $5.6M. 


HIV Edmonton has also partnered with Travel With Us, an Edmonton 
based travel agency, to make this incentive prize package possible. The 
Edmonton Walk for Life’Top Walker’ will receive airfare for two, hotel 
accommodations in NYC and will be invited to attend the VIP Breakfast at 
the historic Tavern on the Green in Central Park. 


“We are so grateful to AIDS Walk New York and Travel With Us for 
partnering with us on such an amazing incentive prize,” said Debra Jakubec, 
HIV Edmonton Executive Director. “Our walkers are so passionate and 
Supportive and we look forward to awarding this package to our most 
successful and hard working Top Walker.” 


On September 20, 2009, Edmontonians are invited to gather at Churchill 
Square to walk to raise funds and awareness for HIV/AIDS programs and 
Services, Join us for the Edmonton debut of The Blue Montegos for a post- 
walk concert, The 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life: Alberta Throwdown 
is the largest annual fundraiser for HIV Edmonton and ft will be a head- 
to-head fundraising competition with AIDS Calgary. Pledges can be made 
online at www.hivedmonton.com or directly with individual walkers or 
team captains. Raise $1,000 or more to become a member of the first ever 
Extra Mile Club. 


IMONTO 


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(Follow-up) 


TELL ME YOUR STORY 


HIV Edmonton has worked with People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) for 
over 20years to provide a unique education service to Edmontonians and 
surrounding communities -the story of living with HIV. It takes a unique 
person to fulfill this responsibility. First, a person must be infected or 
affected by the virus. Second, and perhaps the more difficult part for many 
individuals, is to be able to speak about the personal journey of HIV - from 
becoming infected, to dealing with a diagnosis, to sharing one’s current state 
of physical, emotional or spiritual health. Often, speakers share information 
from their past — where they grew up, or the factors they believe led them 
to arisky situation. The speakers also share their perceptions of stigma and 
discrimination, and what it is like to disclose their status to their families 
or partners. Throughout the year, HIV Edmonton educators and speakers 
visit schools, organizations and centres in Edmonton and rural areas to tum 
lived experiences into messages aimed at educating others about HIV and 
enhancing supportive environments for PWHAs. 


One way in which HIV Edmonton supports GIPA (the Global Inclusion of 
People Living with HIV/AIDS), is to work with Positive individuals to provide 
services for PLWHA whenever possible. HIV Edmonton worked with advocate, 
educator and counselor Stephen Alexander, of the Canadian AIDS Society, 
to provide a Speakers Training workshop titled “Tell Me Your Story” on May 
21-22. Speaker trainees learned about their roles, rights and responsibilities, 
using their voices effectively, presentation tips, and HIV 101 through 
presentations, exercises and hands-on experience. Since their training, the 
Speakers have become received certificates of completion, become registered 
HIV Edmonton volunteers, and completed over 10 speaking engagements. 


If you would like to become a Speaker with HIV Edmonton, please contact 
Volunteer Coordinator Helen Larson to find out about current opportunities. 


helen.s@hivedmonton.com or 780-488-5742. 


780-488-5742 © WWW.HIVEDMONTON.COM EDMONTON 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY SEX IN THE CITY //33 


SEX IN THE CITY >> SURVEY RESULTS 


34 // 


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5 hi Tones you 
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What's the most interesting request 
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Spanking ... too weird for me. 
To "freeze" like I'm frozen in time, !vemetalotof chokers in my life. 
To piss in a guy’s ass. F oot ob. A receipt. 


Can we barf on each other's cocks? 
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Lick My | Anal. "Talk like ey 
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“Every once in a while I witness something that fully captures my ows Call me Daddy! ( declined) 


emotions I have never felt such a iuning-fork hum in my political i 
spint as when that bad-ass. truth telling, Iraqi journalist threw both of E For someone to il my ass. 
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" . " 
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Probably the first time he suggested we try “the back door" entry! I'm glad we did. 
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To let her rape me in my sleep. To watch partner perform with another woman. 
69 and pissing are not strange to some, but I find it indefinitely disgusting. 


Just a guy asking me to bite on his nipples. Really hard ... over and over again. 
Wear a bunny outfit. Aaaaaawkward 


To use a white candle to fuck her in the ass while we were having intercourse. 


Une Rieee a ae play. Walked maa out. 


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iy, COMER one of our city's fore- 
most spoken-word artists, is head- 
ing south. In fact, the sharp, witty 
purveyor of “fucked-up femininity,” 
as she puts it, has already packed up 
her books and shipped them off to the 
University of Calgary, where she’s been 
placed as the Killam Post-Doctoral Fel- 


(/ ADARAWBBUUEWEEKLY.COM 


"Fhe central issue of Design Celebrat- 
& ing Hope is one of uncertain pur- 
pose. Its main role, and the reason that 
s in FAB Gallery, is that it is a show- 
eee ces students at 


lol ‘epacheprary it seems like 
awful lot of time and space spent 
ring an incomplete presentation of 
student's work. 
ie best way to view the real content of 
gn Celebrating Hope would be to al- 


REDOTOCREESODTORT TT TTEiGitt” . 


ia 


Lae ME? >> Spoken word artist T.L. Cowan bids Edmonton fuera at VisualEyez // supplied 


low for the upcoming school year. 

"This, in some ways may be her last 
performance in the city," explains Lati- 
tude’s executive director Todd Janes. 
"She is presenting the Twisted She se- 
ries, it's a series that developed very 
much throughout VisualEyez over a 
number of years.” 

VisualEyez, now in its 10th incarna- 
tion, started out as a unique opportu- 
nity for local audiences to catch artists 


low us to see, or better yet to han , the 
cD that they have developed. 
I've already written here about the diffi- 
culties of showing student design work 
in the gallery, and while this collection 


_doesn't-seem~as overwhelming as the 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


working the national and interna- 
tional performance art circuits—this 
year we'll see the likes of Reona Brass 
of Saskatchewan, Michael Fernandes 
of Nova Scotia, and Toronto-based 
Rita Kamacho. Over the past decade 
running the festival, Janes notes that 
there's been a growing contingent of 
Edmonton artists getting involved. 
This year many responded to the fes- 
tival's theme: water. IdeaAssassins, for 


graduation shows which are packed with 
overflowing tables full of random proj- 
ects, it still suffers for its presentation. 
We can only see a few parts of each proj- 
ect, and the onesthat receive more space 
seem random. Plenty of them are over- 


instance, elected to present their proj- 
ect in the outdoor Strathcona pool. 

"Artists always surprise you a little 
bit, maybe sometimes in a positive way 
and sometimes not,” Janes says. "I was 
surprised how literal some people took 
{the theme]. But the people I collected 
were for a few different reasons: I want- 
ed there to be a fair bit of diversity.” 

Taking centre stage this year with 
Twisted She, Cowan adds that it's a tri- 
umphant but bittersweet mark on her 
artistic resumé. "My academic career 
is taking me away from Edmonton 
but I'm totally thrilled that I get to 
do this performance and installation 
because Latitude 53, and VisualEyez 
specifically, have been so important to 
me throughout the last seven years of 
being here,” she explains. Since arriv- 
ing here in 2002 to finish her Masters 
degree at the U of A, Cowan has made 
regular appearances at the festival, 
usually performing in the opening sa- 
lon or closing night gala. 

"My first year in Edmonton the festi- 
val happened at the end of May. Victo- 
ria Stanton was doing this installation 
in the store window of Colourblind 
on Whyte Ave.," Cowan remembers. 
"It was a nude tableau vivant; this was 
my first involvement in VisualEyez, be- 
ing naked on Whyte Ave. and doing 
this really amazing performance that 
involved three women, three men, a re- 
ally big cake and some toy SUVs. Since 
then Iwas like, '[love this festival! What 
else can I do?" 


This time, she's had a bit of grant 
money at her disposal to recruit col- 
laborative artists. Working with kel- 
leY bolen, Kristen Hutchinson, Jan 


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\ ISUAL ARTS // DESIGN CELEBRATING HOPE 


ertain celebrations 
yn Celebrating Hope suffers from the ns ON of the works it presents 


flowing with roughed-up photographic 
imagery and grungy or scribbly type, 
with a few more graphic and geometric 
designs standing out. Most of them have 
a paper cutout of a CD and some of them 
have pages from their booklet mounted 
on foam-core, but these items suffer 
from a poor production value, notably 
in poorly-cut CD stand-ins and under- 
Saturated reproductions that lack the 
gloss and high production value that we 
expect in the final product. It makes the 
design look cheap, especially in the lon- 
ger selections from the design selected 
for production. 


More frustrating, however, is that 
roughly two-thirds of the wall space is 
given over to snatches of writing from 
various people involved in the project 
and descriptions and photographs of 
what the designers, musicologists, ref- 
ugees and others have been involved 


) Sntinestvusweekily.com 


Arts Reviews 
Find reviews of past theatre, 


dance and visual arts shows on 
our website. 


Olesen, Mickey Vallee, and. Elaine 
Wannechko, the Twisted She cycle 
evolved into a tripartite project, each 
section to be featured on a different 
day of the festival. First is an installed 
exhibition, where all the ingredients 
of the live show will be on display— 
though not in any particular schema 
or order. Then comes the live perfor- 
mance, where the audience gets to 
see how all the pieces were organized 
by the artists. Finally, the third part 
will be a workshop-like debriefing of 
the previous two events, allowing the 
viewers and artists to share their re- 
sponses to the cycle. 

"We decided to do the installation to 
showcase some of the work that the 
collaborative artists have done, but 
also to dislodge the idea of live perfor- 
mance as a surprise. It's not like I have 
to pop out of a cake, or this only works 
if you don't know the punchline—it's 
rather to start thinking about the per- 
formance as a collaboration between 
the artists and the audience,” Cowan 
explains. "I'm hoping that people give 
us some real critical feedback, and also 
be able to experiment with that my- 
self as an artist. It'll be like reading a 
review of your work in the newspaper 
in front of an audience,” she laughs. 
"It's totally terrifying yes, but that's 
the idea. Doing something that's kind 
of terrifying: that's what VisualEyez 
thrives on. Why not do something that 
scares the shit out of me?"W 

SEP 16-27 

VISUALEYEZ 

LATITUDE 53 & VARIOUS LOCATIONS 

ALL EVENTS 8Y DONATION/PWYC 


in for the past few years. It's informa- 
tive, perhaps, but I didn't find myself 
strongly compelled to read it. It’s a 
presentation. The student design has 
a vibrancy coming from its nature as 
a disparate collection of ideas, some 
strongly portrayed, about what the 
project looks like, and also coming 
from the audio material at its core— 
some of which is played accompany- 
ing a fairly predictable slide-show and 
low-resolution video projected on one 
wall. The didactic presentation of in- 
terviews and background on the walls 
undermines this colour. It doesn't help 
that this is the second time that essen- 
tially the same show has been present- 
ed this year at FAB, since much of this 
material was displayed in the spring. 
This time they are releasing the final 
product, but it doesn’t seem to justify 
the exhibit as it stands. W 

cance roseascsnagAey TANASE 
UNTIL SAT, SEP 26 

DESIGN CELEBRATING HOPE: 

AN EXHIBITION OF STUDENT DESIGN WORK 
FOR THE BUDUBURAM CO PROJECT 

AB GALLERY (87 AVE ~ 112 ST) 


ARTS //39 


“a 


(Fee Ure een earn ee 
PT TATA fff fff NNN HA 


VISUAL ARTS // ANGLES 


Unfinished Angles 


Christopher Berry's sculptures make up a one-sided collection 


ADAM WALDRON-BLAIN 
// ADAMWB@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


e best thing about Christopher 
Berry's collection of steel sculptures 
in FAB Gallery this month is something 
you can appreciate as soon as you walk 
into the room. His sculptures, domi- 
nated by diagonal slaps of metal, make a 
striking image against the clean gallery 
walls and right-angle lines of the space. 
As images, each room is animated by a 
sense of considered design and a lively 
sense of motion. 

The strongest work is in the front 
room, directly to the left of the entrance. 
These works are lower and more trian- 
gular than the skyscrapers in the rest 
of the gallery, and probably sit the best 
in their space. Even when you are close, 
they don't lose this appeal, as this, the 
most rectangular of the FAB Gallery 
spaces keeps them strongly in focus. Of 
all of the works in the show, these are 

, least formulaic—the others tend to be 
roughly rectangular towers with some 
step-like complications appearing about 
a third of the way from the top and a 
slightly more complicated base—and 
hold up the best to close examination. 

In the other rooms, approaching Ber- 
ty's sculptures strips them of a part of 
their magic. The striking diagonal lines 
aren't as impressive up close, but more 


importantly the sculptures themselves 
are disappointing. Berry says that he 
wants to entice and reward viewers to 
examine the sculptures from all sides, 
but his exhibition argues with this stated 
aim: all of the works have clear front and 
back sides, and are arranged to display 
the worked side as you enter each space. 
It's telling that the big FAB Gallery win- 
dows are covered, as viewing the sculp- 
tures in the front room, and throughout 
the show, from behind reveals an empty, 
unfinished set of surfaces which seem 
unconsidered. 

Perhaps the unfinished reverses of 
these sculptures are intended as a kind 
of game, an intentional technique in a 
different set of work, but there seems to 
be little evidence of that here. In fact, in 
some ways it seems like cheating: Berry 
writes in his statement about an athletic 
struggle sometimes involved in creat- 
ing the works as he struggles with the 
weight of the material, and their reach- 
ing heights also suggest a straightfor- 
ward process of physical striving. That 
might not be the most exciting thesis 
for the show, but it doesn't even seem to 
be followed-through, especially with the 
disagreement between the clear two-di- 
mensional staging and his writing. 


Other aspects of the show seem also 
to be done by rote, without a critical 


. 


engagement: these issues throw the 
material nature of the sculptures them- 
selves into question, as Berry's carefully 
maintained even patina of rust and de- 
liberately careless welding do little to 
distinguish themselves from the col- 
lection of work abandoned outdoors 
on the west side of the Fine Arts Build- 
ing, or from any of the steel sculptures 
produced by numerous students at 
the U of A. In some ways, their phallic 
heights seem almost like a caricature 
of an idea of the modernist-descended 
steel sculpture beloved in Edmonton, 
even though they abandon attempts 
to render them complete objects with 
their empty spaces and unfinished 
backsides, but it seems a stretch to give 
them that much credit. 

The name of the collection, Angles 
is in itself non-committal and that’s a 
fair description of the show as a whole. 
Christopher Berry has either too many 
ideas floating around in his ostensibly 
unplanned sculpture, or too few. His 
writing seems to lean towards the latter, 
but whatever the cause, these sculptures 
don't seem to be about anything. V 


UNTIL SAT, SEP 26 . 
ANGLES 

WORKSBY C OPHER BERRY 
FAB GAL! /ERNZST) 


NOT QUITE CORNERED >> Chris Berry's angular sculptures are disappointing / sup, 


Following in his footsteps 


Bigfoot: The Life and Times of a Legend trails the skeptics, believers and culture surrounding the infamous creature 


The titles or authors | can't recall, the : 
content only barely, but the photos in my : 
elementary school's surprisingly bounti- : 
ful selection of Bigfoot books spring back : 
into memory as though only days, rather : 


than decades, have passed. The thing lived 
on the peripheries of the visible, so natu- 
rally it was the images that really 
mattered. The elusiveness of 
the creature could not have 
seemed more carefully de- 
signed. The iconic, infinitely 
reproduced stills from the 
1967 Roger Patterson film, 
sensuously grainy, as though 
the creature's fur were mottled 
with blur, and that pose, looking back 


bidding a 


al 


why 


anyone would want to alter its al- 


nadian term—would only ever be Bigfoot : 
so Long as it remained in the shadows, off : 
: stories taking place over two continents 


: and the better part of a century. There : 
are countless terrific anecdotes: the man : 


the grid, never quite seen by prying eyes 


Much to the chagrin of those determined : 


to usher the creature into the annals of : 


legitimate science, Bigfoot lends himself : who shot Bigfoot and listened to him tell : 


quite nicely to being placed within the : his life story as he lay dying; a guy being = 


universal myth of the wild man, a potent : kidnapped by a Bigfoot and held captive : 


40 // Al 


dramatic farewell, fascinated : 
me like it did millions of other kids, and, | : 
guess, almost as many adults. Bigfoot was : 
ady so perfect, | couldn't understand : 
: while remaining respectful of true believ- : 
: "What accounts for Bigfoot's popular- 


lure by trying to prove its existence, or by, : ers, makes clear from the outset that he's : 


most appallingly, trying to hunt it down : 
and kill it. Bigfoot—or Sasquatch, to use : 
the more noble-sounding and proudly Ca- : 
: thrive. Buhs tells a great story by weav- 
ing together a multitude of interrelated : 


symbol of our primal conscience. If he : 
does exist, would Bigfoot be the product : 
of nature, or would be some manifestation : 
: ter; Jimmy Stewart agreeing to smuggle a : 
Yeti paw from Nepal to England. Bigfoot : 


of the collective unconscious, a shared 


desire to believe that something almost : 
: human could persevere uncorrupted by : 
: the domesticating and soul-deadening ef- 
° fects of civilization, a Frankenstein's : 
monster built not of disparate : 
body parts but of fragments : 
from our vast cultural swamp? : 
: formation is one of the book's highlights. 
diculous the subject matter : 

might seem to some, can yield : , 
complex and revealing answers, : 

and | can't imagine anyone provid- : 

ing better ones that Joshua Blu Buhs : 

over its shoulder like a wounded lover : does in his engrossing read Bigfoot: The : 
: Life and Times of a Legend (The Univer- : 
sity of Chicago Press, $34.95). The book : 
is a biography of a figure whose existence : 


Such questions, however rti- 


is extremely dubious at best—and Buhs, 


not among them—and is thus in essence : 


a biography of the conditions under which : 
this figure was cultivated and came to : world was not yet fully explored, that : 
: there was still room for man to test his : 


: and the paranormal. As Buhs traces the 


: the false front of consumer goods and : development of Bigfoot iconography a : 
: compelling case is built around the crea- : 
ern man—and we are talking mostly : ture fulfilling a deep need, becoming a 
: about males here—alienated by an in- : figure of authenticity in a world where : 


: so much of what constitutes daily life : 


or reductive culture lies at the heart of ; is composed of the overtly phony, and : 


WUEWEEKLY // 5 


in a cave with an entire Bigfoot family, the 
implication being that he was destined to 
become the boyfriend of Bigfoot's daugh- 


spawned a lot of things, among them 


: great stories, heated arguments, and a 


hugely profitable industry. But along the 


fits, some passionate and articulate, some : 
cynical, some cracked. The story of their f 
: of the creature, such as hair, feces and, 
: most famously, footprints, began to ac- : 
saascscmeantonimgeraneniumimrosieatueteemamnomee 7 euddlyra pestimend to the Hendersor 

+ He would be the poster monster for en 
: vironmentalists, and a sort of prototyp® 
: for the teachings of Iron John and Wome" 
: Who Run With the Wolves. The creature 


(now inh adnan ennaseR ONY 


: Buhs' thesis. The men who made Bigfoot : 
: what he is were mostly white, working- : 
: class and rural, loggers, hunters, small : 
town reporters, disgruntled scientists : 
and more than a few outright con men, : 
: Patterson, as most reports attest, being : 
: one of them. Following the emergence : 
: of sensational Yeti reports in the Hima- 
way he also spawned a community of mis- : layas, sightings of Bigfoot in the Pacific : 
= Northwest and of Sasquatch in British : 
3 and Kokanee—like a good many back 

: woodsmen, Bigfoot, it seems, is a heavy 
: drinker. He would with time become sale 


Columbia, as well as reports of traces 


As Buhs ices the ditidcegrnaist of Bigfoot 
iconography a compelling case is built around the 


creature fulfilling a deep need, becoming a figure 
of authenticity in a world where so much of what 
constitutes daily life is composed of the overtly 
phony, and mass produced. 


: ity?" Buhs asks. Because the possibility : 
of its existence "was evidence that the : 
: it turning up in magazines devoted to a 


mettle, to touch the really real behind 


scientific arrogance." This angle, of mod- 


tellectualized, feminized, materialistic 


EP 10 — SEP 16 


2009 


: blend of traditional masculine interests 


mass produced. 

Yet from almost the very beginning 8 
foot seemed ready to be co-opted. | 
creature represented a tireless resistar 
against consumerism within the very cu! 
ture in which consumerism was born, yé 
this same creature was all too adaptable 


: not only to the dictates of literature arc 


movies, but to New Age ideologues and 
people trying to sell more Canadian Club 


: has never been captured, but he has bee 
: stuffed with fire-repellant materials 21° 
: can be frequently found enjoying 2 ¥'\° 
: ride at Disneyland. By taking a closer lo 
: at the cultural history, Buhs suge 
: cumulate in the 1950s, leading to an : 
explosion of Bigfoot related material in : 
the '6Os, the overwhelming majority of : hip, fully tamed one, we can trace som 
: sort of gradual surrender to the unstoP 
: pable juggernaut of modern artificial 

: The stalwarts, meanwhile, have not giv" 


that with the demise of the primi: 
Bigfoot and the ascendance of the "¢" 


up their vigil. The creature may st! IL 
out there, immune to polluted stree 


: and deforestation, smacking his feet int 


some soft earth as a way to say | * pe 
here," and laughing at us as he return? © 
his cave to watch free cable. W 


a 


PAUL BLINOV 
// PRUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ver 17 years, the improvised Die- 

Nasty Soap-A-Thon has become 
not just a fundraiser for the regular 
Die-Nasty improv season, but a sta- 
ple theatre event unto itself. Span- 
ning an entire weekend—this time 
scaled down to 50 straight hours of 
improvising from the usual 53—it's 
as much of a challenge for the au- 
diences—a few of whom each year 
brave the entire weekend—as it is for 
the improvisers who attempt to per- 
form the whole time without sleep. 
Some of them succeed, though, on 
both ends. 

This time around, the theme (a loose 
scenario to scaffold the weekend's im- 
prov) is a high school reunion, a sce- 
nario that seems particularly fitting 
for Patti Stiles: the weekend marks 
not just a lengthy performance for 
her, but an Edmonton homecoming. 

Now living and working in Austra- 
lia (where she's the Artistic Director 
of Impro Melbourne), Stiles was a 
founding member of the Die Nasty 
troupe and holds the record as the 
first female to perform the entire 
weekend without sleep. While the 
thought of performing from Friday 
to Sunday without sleeping might, 
provoke more gawks than copycat 
attempts, she still seems gung-ho 
about trading her 40 winks for the 
extra stagetime. 

“It sounds insane that you would 
be awake that long,” she explains, 
“but it's really not that hard. There 
are chunks of time that are incredi- 
bly difficult, but the majority of time 
is fun. And where you brain goes in 
the impro, and the intensity of the 
reality of the environment and the 
characters that have been created. 
Actors desperately search for, and 
train towards, living their charac- 
ters in the moment, be it impro or 
Script. And when you're improvising 
for that amount of time, that's what 


asty revisits set school in a sleepless weekend //Supplied 


aq 
Le 


you're doing, because it becomes 
the reality. You live that life for that 
many hours.” 

The distance of her new home, plus 
teaching and performing opportuni- 
ties in Europe and elsewhere have 


mobile 3 


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THIS WEEK'S 


kept Stiles away from the Soap-A- 
Thon for the last few years, but “this 
year, it just worked perfectly, in that I 
was invited to both of these other fes- 
tivals, [in] Calgary and Austin, which 
fall on either side of the Soap-A- 
Thon. I could not say no. And it made 
me happy dance around the room,” 
she laughs. 

As for the high school reunion 
theme, Stiles thinks the idea contains 
more than enough possibility to fuel 
a weekend of improvisation. 

“We're all crazy in high school. We 
don’t know who we are, really. We're 
trying to fit in with people who don't 
know who they are, really. We're all 
trying to figure out how to date, how 
to meet, who we're going to be, who 
we are, where we're going. There's 


Open 


SATURDAY, SEPT 19, 2009 
1:00 Pm - 


9828 +101 A Ave, Edmonton 


FREE Backstage Tours, 
Presentations, Displays and Contes 


A PART OF ALBERTA ARTS DAYS ; 


THE CITADEL THEATRE 


so much interpersonal dynamics 
to happen in that time,” she points 
out. “And then to go back and see 
those people after you spent a chunk 
of life figuring it out. That to me is 
just really rich in story. To go back 
and see the guy that you were des- 
perately in love with for three years 
... is this someone that you would've 
wanted to be with, or, is it the mo- 
ment missed? Is it the bullet dodged 
or the moment missed?” 


Soap-A-Thon mainstay Mark Meer has 
his own hopes for what high school 
pastimes get revisited onstage. 
“Personally I hope to see some Dun- 
geons & Dragons being played, as that 
was the extent of my high school 
memories,” he jokes (maybe). 


House 


{ 


4:00 PM 


ee 


SPOUSE COT weer 
Reo o OR eM RN REAR NOHATAMARIMIMAERMSEMOAARRNN NYAeUNn, 


p till Sunday 


Nasty once again trade their beds for the stage, all weekend long 


The reason for this year's shorter 
than normal run, he Says, is actu- 
ally for the audience: Sunday night 
seems to run a little late for them 
And besides, at this point, Meer 
points out that they don’t have any- 
thing to prove by clinging to those 
extra three hours. He himself is 
all but unphased by his now yearly 
weekend-long performances. 

“I haven't gotten the hallucinations 
in years,” he says. “I miss them.” 


FRI, SEP 11 (7PM) UNTIL SUN, SEP 13 (9PM) 
DIE-NASTY SOAP-A-THON 

FEATURING THE CAST OF DIE-NASTY 
VARSCONA THEATRE, (10329-83 AVENUE), 
$15 FROM 7PM = 1AM, $12 ALL OTHER TIMES, 
OR $40 FOR A WEEKEND PASS 


~ 


‘a 
> 


Ss 


EP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


ARTS // 41 


1. 


2. Slaid Cleaves - Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away... (music road) 


SLMPNOAAD w 


1 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 


my 


20. 
74 3 
22. 
23. 
24, 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 


30. 


KO 
LET'S BLAZE 


TOP 30 FOR THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 10, 2009 | 


Sam Baker — Cotton (music road) 


Steve Earle - Townes (new west) 

Watermelon Slim — Escape From The Chicken Coop (northern blues) 
Christian Hansen & The Autistics - Power Leopard (ch) 
Modest Mouse — No One's First, And You're Next (epic) 
Levon Helm — Electric Dirt (dirt farmer) 

Delbert McCiinton — Dick50 (new west) 

Raul Malo— Lucky One (concord) 

The Dead Weather - Horehound (wamer) 

The Cave Singers ~ Welcome Joy (matador) 

Tinanwen — Imidiwan: Companions (outside) 

Gurf Morlix — Last Exit To Happyland (gurf morlix) 

Dustin Bentall — Six Shooter (impala) 

John Fogerty & The Blue Ridge Rangers — Rides Again (verve) 
The Black Crowes - Before The Frost... (silver arrow) 

Black Mold — Snow Blindness Is Crystal Antz (Flemish eye) 
Dan Mangan — Nice, Nice, Very Nice (fu:m) 
Behemoth — Evangelion (metal blade) 


. The Wooden Sky - If! Don't Come Home You'll Know I'm Gone (bbr) 


Joe Henry ~ Blood From Stars (anti) 
Wilco — The Album (nonesuch) 
Tommy Castro — Hard Believer (alligator) 

Johnny Flynn — A Larum (vertigo) 

Reverie Sound Review — S/T (boompa) 

Trevor Tehir - Sky Locked Land (riverdale) 

Lee Harvey Osmond - A Quiet Evil (latent) 

The Low Anthem -Oh My God, Charlie Darwin (nonesuch) 

Various - Ribbon Of Highway, Endless Skyway: The Woody Guthrie 
Tribute (music road) 

Neko Case ~ Middle Cyclone (anti) 


KO, a popular live draw in Toronto's Kensington Market, 


spread his wings over the last year criss crossing the country 


with his guitar and beats. In addition to showcase slots at 


JunoFest, Canadian Music Week and NXNE; KO has shared 
the stage with the likes of Daniel Wesley and III Scarlett. The 
songs on KO's full length debut, “Let's Blaze" reflect heavily 


on the artists storied youth. "I'm living a dream now, but | 


was 


most definitely living a nightmare when | was younger.” 


IM/MEGATUNESEDP 


AL 


ETO FRIEND US at 


10355 Whyte Ave. Shop online at megatunes.com 434-6342 


42 // ARTS 


‘ARTS ey 


FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 


OR EMAIL (LOM 
DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM 
STEER LLL LLL TE LEC CL CLC CL COO 


(MYSTIC EAST-SUFI MUSIC WITH KATHAK DANCE - 
Stanley A Milner Library Theatre, 7 Sir Winston Churchill 
Sq» Transcend the Material World: Deewangi with Kathak 
dancer Maulik Shah from India, an Usha Kala Niketan 
Dance production » Sat, Sept 12, 7pm; Sun, Sept 13, 3pm + 
‘$:8/Si2 (students) at the door, TIX on the Square 
TRIPTICO-FLAMENCO SHOW -'B Scene Studios, 
8212-104 St - 780.459.5643 « triptico-show.blogspot.com + 
Calgary and Edmonton flamenco artists featuring flamenco 
song, darice, violin and guitar « Sept 18-19, 7-30pm (door) 


CINEMA AT THE CENTRE « Library Theatre, Stanley A. 
Milner Library +7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq + Centre for 
Reading and the Arts showcases little-known films every 
month. Titles to be announced. 


FAVA-FRESHWORKS - Metro Cinema, 9828-1014 

Ave Zeidler Hall - 780.429.1671 + Pushing Borders: FAVA 
Freshworks Screening: Showcasing 5 local artists and 7 
original and new works « Sept 17, 7pm « Tickets: $8 (FAVA 
members)/Si0 (general) 


NFB FILM CLUB . Library Theatre, Stanley A. Milner 
Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq + Free monthly film 
series shows the best in animated and documentary film 
from the National Film Board of Canada Titles to be 
announced « Sun, Sept 20, 2pm 


‘STANLEY A. MILNER LIBRARY -7 Sir Winston Churchill 
Sq + Centre for Reading and the Arts Department « epLea 

« From Books to Film: Weekly showings of films adapted 

from books; every Fri at apm «Teen Movie Scene: movie 

club for teens; ast and yrd Thu every month (no movie on 
Oct 15; @ screening for Teen Read Week on the Oct 22) 


SSE ee Se me 
GALLERIES + MUSEUMS 


AGNES BUGERA GALLERY + 12310 Jasper Ave « 
780.482.2854 » » SOTTO VOCE: 
Paintings by Danible + Sept 12-24 « Opening recep- 
tion: Sat, Sept 12, 24pm : 
ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL - 10186-106 St « 780.488.6612 

+ Discovery Gallery: WALLPAPER: New sculptural work by 
emerging glass artist Katrina Brodie; until Sept 12+ Lower 
Gallery: HITCHED; Couples in craft; until Oct 3 
ALLEYSCAPE STUDIO-Red Deer + 4930 Ross St Alley, 
403.597.9788 « THE ACCIDENTAL NATURE OF MUCH 
THAT APPEARS: Small collages by Donna Herrick » 
Until Octio 


ARTERY + 9535 Jasper Ave + WHERE ARE YOU FROM?: 
Poster show featuring 29 visual creatives from Edmonton 
and beyond + Until mid Oct 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA « Enterprise Sq, 100, 10230 
Jasper Ave + 780.422.6223 » MUSEUMS IN THE 21ST 
CENTURY; Presenting the world’s leading museum build- 
ing projects conceived in the aist century; Sept 19-Deo13; 
opening reception: Sept 18 (AGA members and invited 
guests only) « CANADIAN MUSEUMS NOW: Contributions 
from the Art Gallery of Ontano, Royal Ontario Museum, 
Gardiner Museum in Toronto; Canadian War Museum in 
Ottawa and the new Canadian Museum of Human Rights 
in Winnipeg; Sept 19-Dec 13 « THE NEW FLANEURS: 
‘Contemporary Urban Practice and the Picturesque: A selec 
tion of picturesque works of art from the AGA collection. 
Featuring Don Gilk until Dec 13; opening reception; Sept 18 
(for invited guests and AGA members only) - BUILDING A 
VISION: Art Gallery of Alberta and Randall Stout Architects: 
Compare building sketches, photographs, diagrams and 
plans with the final model of the new Art Gallery of Alberta, 
charting the design and construction of Randall Stout 
Architects’ new Art Gallery of Alberta; until Dec 13; opening 
reception: Fri, Sept 18, 7-9pm (AGA members and invited 
guests only) « Lecture: Randall Stout Presents: The New Art 
Gallery of Alberta; Sat, Sept 19 at the Winspear Centre; $10 

+ Tour: Walking on Water; A Walking Tour of Edmonton's 
Water Features conducted by Renato Vitic in celebration 

of Alberta Arts Days; Sun, Sept 20, 13pm « Art for Lunch: 
Enterprise Square Atrium; free on the last Thu each month, 
1210-2:s0pm « Manhuntillll: Led by Adam Waldron- 
Blain; meeting point: Art Gallery of Alberta, Enterprise 
Square; Wed, Sept 16, 7-8pm + Free (member}/Si0 
(adult)/$7 (senior/student); $5 (6-2ayrs)/free (syrs and 
under\/$20 (family); Pay-What-You- May, Thu, 4-8pm 


BILTON CONTEMPORARY ART-Red Deer « 4b-5809-5: 
Ave, Red Deer, 403.343.3933 * AN ACT OF CHOICE: A 
group photography exhibit « Until Septa2 


CALGARY AND EDMONTON RAILWAY MUSEUM - 
10447-86 Ave + 780.433.9739 « Edmonton's first railway 
station, 289. Open through Sept, Tue-Sat, 1cam-4pm + 
$2 (ind local rail history book) 

CENTRE D'ARTS VISUELS DE L'ALBERTA + 9103-95 Ave 
« WINDOW ON...: Artworks by Denise Parent, Jeannine 
Chalifoux, Sylvie Pinard, Alain Favre, and Andreas 

K. Hellum « Sept 11-22 + Opening reception: Sept 12, 
7-8:30-m, artists in attendance 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621-82 Ave 
780.498.2984 » FALL SALON AT RED: Christ's paintings 
from the past + Until Oct a 

CROOKED POT GALLERY « 4912-5 Ave, Stony Plain 

+ 780,963-9573 + Open Tue-Sat 10am-gum « SMALL 
PACKAGES: Pottery by Carol Hartwell - Through Sept 
ELECTRUM GALLERY « 12429 Stony Plain Rd - 7Bo.gS2s4o2 
+ Gold and silver jewellery by Wayne Mackenzie, and 
artworks by various artists 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 


Fi, Sir Winston Churchill Sq « 780.496.7030 » A CLOSER 
Coe ee ee 
. 30 


GALLERY IS-Red Deer « Alexander Way, 5123-48 St, 
Red Deer, 403.242.4641 « FIFTY-so: Collages by Arlene 
Westen » Until Sept 26 


‘Bowes, Sarah Alford and 
Sept 10-Oct 10 » Opening receptions: Sept 10, 7-10pm 


reception: Fri, Sept a8, 5-7pm (Alberta Arts Days) 

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY « Strathcona Place Senior 
‘Centre, 10831 University Ave + 780.433.5807 + Oper: 1a30am~- 
apm; 3-4pm « TIP OF THE BRUSH: Artworks by the instruc- 
tors and students of Strathcona Place « Until Sept 25 
JOHNSON GALLERY « Southside: 7711-85 St + 
780.465.6172; New works by Ada Wong, Julie Drew, Ruth 
Vontobel-Brunner, Audrey Pfannmuller and Daniel 
Bagan. Blown glass by Sol Maya - Northside: 113:7-80 
St «780.479.8424; Artworks by Don Sharpe, Jim Painter, 
Dan Bagan. Historical photographs of Edmonton. Wood 
carvings by Adie Pottery by Noboru Kubo 

KAASA GALLERY - Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave « 
OPEN PHOTO 2009: Presented by Visual Arts Alberta 

+ Until Sept 30 

LATITUDE 53 « 10248-106 St - 780.423.5353 + Visualeyex 
Festival 2009: Festival of performance art « Sept 16-21 
LOFT GALLERY - s90 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park « 
780.922.6324 » Open every Thu s-9pm; Sat 10-4pm « FLO- 
RALSAND STILL LIFE: until Oct 31 « Art Society of Strath- 
cona County general meetings the and Tue each month 
MANULIFE PLACE - 1018-101 St, first and second levels « 
COLOUR FIX: Paintings by Jeri Lynn Ing « Sept 6-27 
MCMULLEN GALLERY - U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St + 
780.407.7152 » COLLECTING, COLLECTED, COLLECTIONS: 
‘The Women's Art Museurn Society of Canada show featur- 
ing women's collections + Until Oct 24 

MCPAG - Multicultural Centre Public Art Gallery, 541-31 
St, Stony Plain « 780.963.2777 « Alberta landscape paint- 
ings by Carol Hama and Sharon Hazen; Sept 11-Oct 

7; opening: Sun, Sept 13 + Dining Room Gallery: New 
paintings; until Sept 17 

MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE INSTI- 
TUTE - 9 Mission Ave, St Albert + 780.651.8176 + Aborigi- 
nal Veterans Display « Gift Shop « Finger weaving and 
sash display by Celina Loyer 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM -s St Anne St, St Albert - 


780. 459.1528 » DECOYS TO DECORATIVES: the History and - 


Art of Decoy Painting « Until Nov a5 


MUTTART CONSERVATORY - 9625-964 St » 780. 496.8755 « 
SERENDIPITY: Sculpture show « Until Sept 27 


ORTONA ARMOURY « 9722-102 St « Open every Sat 
12-sprn, by appointment 780.423-2966/780.431.3737 « BACK- 
WARDS STARE: : Show: Tim Rechner 
and Caitlin Sian Richards « Sept 10-Oct 3 « Opening recep- 
tiore Thu, Sept 10,7-10pm, music by Treejam 

PICTURE THIS GALLERY « 959 Ordze Rd, Sherwood Park 

+ 780.457.3038 « PictureThisgallery.com + CANADA SCAPES 
AND SPACES FROM LANDSCAPES TO SEASCAPES: 
Artworks by Gregg Johnson, Brent Heighton, Dean Mcleod, 
Jonn Einerssen, Audrey Pfannmuller, Roger D. Arndt, Bi 
Yuan Cheng, and Murray Phillips + Until Sept 19 

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY + 10183-2112 St - Edmon- 
ton Contemporary Artists, Society's Seventeenth Annual 
Exhibition featuring painting, sculpture and photography 
+ Until Sept 25 - Opening reception: Fri, Sept 11, 7pm; 
music by the Jerrold Dubyk Quartet 
PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY « 19 Perron St, St 
Albert + 780.460.4310 « GUILDED: St Albert Place Visual 
Arts Council + Until Sept 26 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA - 855s Roper Rd 

+ 780.427.1750 + culture.alberta.ca/archives + Open Tue-Sat 
gam-430pm; Wed gam-gpm + ALBERTA WOMEN'S INST'T- 
TUTES 100 YEARS OF COMMUNTIY SERVICE: Celebrating 
the contributions of the Alberta Wornen’s Institutes over 
the last 200 years « Until Oct 31 « Free admission 


ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM .« 12845-102Ave + 
780.453.9186 » royalalbertammuseum.ca « WILDLIFE 
PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: Photographs featuring 
a variety of wildlife » Until Sept 13 


ROYAL ALEX HOSPITAL - Food Court, 10240 Kingsway 
+ Artworks by the members of the Emerging Artist 
Society of Alberta « Until Oct 5 


SCOTIA PLACE - Jasper Ave, Main Floor + 780.469.7343 « 
New and old photos of Edmonton landscapes and build- 
ings by David Aaron « Until Sept 30 


SCOTT GALLERY « 1041-224 St « 780.488.3619 Artworks 
by Martha Cole - Sept 12-22 

SNAP GALLERY + 10309-97 St - 780.423.2492 + Main and 
Studio Gallery: SNAP Exhibition curated by 
Belfast Print Workshop, Northem Ireland «Sept 10-Oct 17 + 
Opening reception: Thu, Sept 10 

SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY « Melcor Qulnural 
Centre, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove + 780.962.0664 « OPEN ART 
COMPETITION: Any artist in the province of Alberta, 
competition for beginners, intermediate, advanced and 3-D; 
unti] Sept 19; opening reception: Fri, Sept 11, 7pm + 2009 
SENIOR'S SHOW: Artworks by Albertan artists over 55; Sept 
21-Oct 10; opening reception: Sat, Sept 26, 1-4pm 

‘STUDIO GALLERY « 1: Perron Street, St Albert « 


WEST END GALLERY « 12308 Jasper Ave «780.428 43, 
a * artworks EGalrie 
Lambert Sept-Oct» Opening reception So” 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE « 0624-76 Ave « 780.460.875¢ - Stor 
Slam: every 3rd Wed of the month = 
CARROT CAFE « 9351-118 Ave «780.752.4867 « Carrot 
Writing Circle - Every Tue, 7-9pm; A critique iil the 
4th Tue every month 

CITY ARTS CENTRE + 10943-84 Ave « 780.932.4409 + 
talesstorytelling.com « T.A.L.ES. Monthly Storytel)- 
ing Circle: Tell stories or come to listen; and Fri eac} 
month + Until Jun, 8pm; $3 (free first time) 


" Mike Gravel MC; in celebrancr 
of Alberta Arts Days » Fri, Sept 28, 7pm - Free 
LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR - 1053-86 Ave « 780.470 5.5 
www.levabar.com « Standing room only, poetry ever, 
grd Sun evening 

ROSIE'S « 10475-B0 Ave + 780.932.4409 « talesstorytelling 
com = TALES: Edmonton Storytelling Café: TALES. 
Alberta League Encouraging Storytelling open mic + 1st 7) 
ach month, 7-9pm; Pay-What-You-Will (main $5) 
ROUGE LOUNGE - 1011-117 St « 780.902.5900 « Poctr 
‘Tuesday: Every Tue with Edmonton's local poets - 8p: 
+ No cover 


RUTHERFORD HOUSE « 11:63 Saskatchewan Dr, U 
of A= Book launch for Diane Wishart’s new book The 
rose that grew from concrete: Teaching and learning wit! 
disenfranchised youth » Thu, Sept 27, =30-7pm; info at 
diane.wishart@ualberta.ca 


UPPER CRUST CAFE « 10909-86 Ave «780.422.8174 - The 
Poets’ Haven: Monday Night reading series presented by 
Stroll of Poets « Every Mon, 7pm « $5 door 


BEWARE THE QUICKLY WHO - Shell Theatre-Dow 
Centennial Centre, 8700-84 St, Fort Saskatchewan - 
‘780.992.6400 « fortsask.ca « By Eric Nichol; Rare Form 
Theatre's all-ages tion « Fri, Sept 18, 8pm + Tick 
ets: $is (adult)/$i0 (senior/student)/$s eyeGO available 
the Dow Centre ticket outlet, and TicketMaster 


‘CHIMPROV - Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave + 720.433.339 
+ rapidfiretheatre.com + Rapid Fire Theatre's improv show 
featuring some of Edmonton's hottest comedy troupes 
every Sat, upm, except for the last Sat of each month - Sep 
19-June 12 « $10 (door); adv at TIX on the Square 


DIE-NASTY SOAP-A-THON « Varscona Theatre, 10325 
83 Ave + 780.433.3399 « An entire weekend of improv 
madness starring the cast of Die-Nasty plus member: 
of Rapid Fire Theatre. Directed by Dana Andersen 
with music by Paul Morgan Donald « Fri, Sept 11, 6pm 
continuously until 1apm on Sun, Sept 13 « Tickets and 
weekend passes available at the door 


THE DROWSY CHAPERONE - Citadel Shoctor Theatre 
9828-101A Ave + 780.426.4811 « Main Stage Series: A toc- 
tapping tribute to the golden age of musical theatre. Boo! 
by Bob Martin and Don McKellar, music and lyrics by Li: 
Lambert and Greg Morrison « Sept s-Oct 4 
EVERYMAN, WHO WILL YOU BE TODAY - Catal: 


Theatre, 8529 Gateway Boulevard, 780.431.1750 « Catch th 
Keys Productions (Workshop series) « Until Sept 22 


Shania Twain « Until Nov 1 « Buffet and Show from $55.59 


‘STRUT AND JIVE THE NIGHT AWAY « jubilations 
Dinner Theatre, 8882-170 St, Phase Il WEM, Upper Leve: 


THEATRESPORTS « Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave « 
780.433.3399 + rapidfiretheatre.com + Rapid Fire Theatre 
presents the 3oth season of Theatresports every Fr’ 

night at apm + Sept 18-July 30 « $1 (door); adv at TX 

on the Square 

TIDELINE - Studio Theatre, Timms Centre fer the Ar 

U of A, 87 Ave, 122 St lotheatre- 

cfm + By Wajdi Mouawad, translation by ‘Tep- 


show Sun, Sept preview Wed/Septas - Tickets 
Soe ene tates bes ce coe Dour beim 
performance; ady tickets at TIX on the Square 


VICTORIA MARTIN: MATH TEAM QUEEN - Varcom 
Theatre, 1039-83 Ave + 780.471.1586 + 
ee ee iawanen ee oe” 
Kathryn Walat, developed by’ oe 
(preview) Sept 28-27, 7-30pm; Sat pay-what-you-can matn-* 


SMOOTH, RICH TASTE - 
WORTHY GF THE BELMONT NAME 


WHERE|THERE:S 

SMOKE THERES ya CONVENIENCE - 
HYDROGEN 4% SMALLER 

CYANIDE 


THAN YOUR AVERAGE KING SIZE Pack 


Tob 


L 
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WwW 
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2¢ 
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NOTHING TASTES QUITE LIKE A ... 


BELMONT 


WARNING 
YOU'RE NOT THE ONLY ONE SMOKING THIS CIGARETTE 


The smoke from a cigarette is not just inhaled by the smoker. It becomes second-hand smoke, 
which contains more than 50 cancer-causing agents. 


Health Canada 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY ARTS // 43 


Missing in Action 
by Brian Gibson 


Brian Gibson examines how few war flicks dare t. 
examine the true atrocities of the Second Woric 
War in our weekly SideVue column. 


a CC ccc LCL LC LC ECCT ECU CULO et 
stn 


DRAMA // LITTLE ASHES 


Ashes to ashes 


Little Ashes sticks to safe biography and superficial depictions when exploring 3 
three legendary artists' shared moments of youth 


JOSEF BRAUN 
// \OSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
In 1933, while visiting Buenos Aires, the 
Spanish poet and playwright Federico 
Garcia Lorca gave a lecture on the aes- 
thetic properties of duende, a force that 
can be located in certain works of art or 
folkloric traditions, such as flamenco, 
yet resists clean, orderly explanation. It 
has something to do with the abyss, with 
a deeper sadness that speaks from expe- 
rience, with a strangeness that shakes 
loose unexamined fragments from the 
firmament of the unconscious, with an 
inescapable connection to one's roots, 
with a sensuality never entirely dis- 
tanced from the diabolical, with earthi- 
ness and desire and death. (Trying to 
define duende can be a bit like trying to 
define film noir; sometimes it’s simply 
what makes something otherwise rou- 
tine, such as a crime drama, or a poem 
mediating on loss, into something rich, 
chilling, and mysterious in ways that ex- 
tend far beyond the solving ofa mystery.) 
Little Ashes is a movie about Garcia Lor- 
ca as his formative youthful encounters 
with filmmaker Luis Bunuel and painter 
Salvador Dali, and, let me tell you, does it 
aver not have even a drop of duende. 
Though made, perhaps, with com- 
mendable intentions, Little Ashes, writ- 
ten by Philippa Goslett and directed by 


Paul Morrison (Solomon and Gaenor), 
effectively takes three of the 20th cen- 
tury’s more incendiary artists and tames 
their shared youthful reveries into 
something grotesquely bland and safe, 
an assembly of biographical conjecture 
in which the term “outrageous” is most 
firmly kept within quotation marks, and 
annoying affection, rather than artis- 
tic revelation, is celebrated. It’s like the 
worst thing Christopher Hampton never 
wrote. More earnest and awkwardly 


acted even than the Hampton-scripted 
Arthur Rimbaud-Paul Verlaine movie 
Total Eclipse. It goes to show that there's 
nothing, not surrealism nor sadism, not 
dada nor death metal, that cannot be 
appropriated and converted into stuffy 
museum pieces, sordid soap opera, or 
soul-deadening muzak. My recoil exac- 
erbated by the fact that at least one ofthe 
three figures in Little Ashes is among the 
artists whose work I treasure more than 
any other, I'm fighting the temptation to 


call the movie an abomination, because 
that word just sounds a little too exciting 
to be applied to what's found here. 

It starts in 1922, when the soon-to-be 
dark luminaries Garcia Lorca (Javier 
Beltran), Buifiuel (Matthew McNulty) 
and Dalf (Robert Pattinson) converge at 
university in Madrid. Much ostensibly 
iconoclastic wankerspeak about revis- 
ing the values of art is tossed about in 
mealy-mouthed Castellano accents, 
since, unfortunately, the proceedings 
are largely to be spoken in English by 
one Spaniard and two Brits. Dali upsets 
the status quo with his foppish ruffled 
shirts, giddy non-sequiturs (“I would 
love an enema!”), and advanced talents, 
arousing the admiration of Bunuel and 
the erotic desire of Garcia Lorca, whose 
quiet homosexual longings find an ea- 
ger receptacle in Dali's sexual ambiva- 
lence and overriding urge to be adored. 

The development of artistic vision in 
Little Ashes is largely reduced to shal- 
low manifesto spouting. To be fair, the 
story's emphasis is meant to be on the 
peculiar and fragile dynamic of the rela- 
tionships, yet here too, despite a valiant 
and genuinely sexy supporting turn 
from Marina Gatell as the sole woman to 
intrude on this very male milieu, we're 
asked to be satisfied with boilerplate 
conflicts that depend on our acceptance 
that Lorca was a sensitive saint cursed by 


an oppressive culture, Bufuel a bellige: 
ent homophobic thug with, most aston 
ishingly, no sense of humour, and Da! 
a poncy, profoundly pretentious idic; 
Now, I'm not trying to suggest that Dali 
wasn't, too a depressingly large ex*en| 
a poncy, profoundly pretentious idio 
since there's an awful lot of evidence to 
support this characterization. But it is 
the fundamental business of biopics to 
transcend the most superficial depic- 
tion of their subjects, because otherwis 
what's the point? I doubt that Little Asi 
es would have ever got any sort of theat- 
rical release at all were it not for Twiligh 
star Pattinson’s sudden stardom, but i 
surely won't do his career any favours to 
be found hamming it up wincingly, play- 
ing a public figure all too large for life «: 
begin with. Of the central trio only Bel 
tran can muster up any emotional integ 
rity from the material, so Lorca, at leas 
might not be rolling in his grave. V 


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DVD >> SUGAR 


Not so sweet 
Sugar's story of an immigrant baseball player is far from a rags-to-riches cliché 


Maybe the simplest way to understand : 
the small but distinguished oeuvre of : 


Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck is to 
see their films as tweaks on 
American cinematic clichés, 
complications on simple 
stories that define the na- 
tional ethos. Half-Nelson 
was, among other things, 
the very familiar story of 
an idealistic young teacher 
reaching out to help an inner- 
city youth; unfamiliarly, the teacher 


detective 


had his own problems and faults to over- : 
come, and his actions seemed to be as : 
much about finding his own redemption : 
as they were about helping a troubled : 
= lowing another—to disillusioned outsid- : 


er in the space of about a year, a far cry : 


youth 


In that sense, then, Sugar is most : 
readily understood as the sports story : 
strained through reality, the tale of a: 


D avid 
Berry 


out a few times in the special features on : 
the just-released DVD). Sugar follows its : 
: eponymous character, Dominican pitcher : 
: Miguel "Sugar" Santos (neophyte Al- : 
genis Perez Soto), from his days at : 
an American-run baseball camp : 
to his try-out at spring training : 
com to a brief, semi-illustrious stint ; 
with a small-town America A- : 
level team to his disillusionment : 
with the game and settling into : 
immigrant life in New York. We see : : 
: that hardly stops him from attempting to : 
salsa with a corn-fed blonde at the bar : 
afterwards—-bumping up uncomfortably : 
with the equally sincere but far more se- : 
date heartland Christianity of his lowan : 


: him go from arrogant young would-be ; 
star—he promises his girlfriend that, af- : 
ter he gets rich and famous in America, : 
he'll drive a car across the ocean to come : 


back for her, one impossible dream fol- : 
> host family. Here's the isolation of the 


American immigrant writ large, Sugar's : 
: tary on how the baseball machine uses 
up these third-world workers as it is a : 
punishing blow for a man who feels lost : 
: a perfect microcosm of what amounts 


from the usual rags-to-riches arch. 


That is, of course, not all there is to : 
scrappy underdog who fights against : Fleck and Boden's talents. Along the way, : 
long odds and fails, the 999 999-out-of- : 


a-million shot (something Fleck points : 


we'll get subtle commentary on any num 


Here's an examination of American cul- : 
tural imperialism, Sugar not just making : 
his living at a baseball camp—the play- : 
ers openly sport the incongruous Kansas : 
City logo, and their English lessons are : 
a mix of baseball terminology and sub- 
servient humility—but his family clam- : 
ouring to watch American Idol. There's : 
a subtle comparison of restrictive and : 
robust religion, Sugar’s sincere but more ‘ 
flexible Latino Catholicism—he clutches : 
a cross and prays before every game, but : 


inability to order anything but French 


toast at a greasy spoon as alienating and : 
depressing as the fans who lambaste af- : 
: in a strange land without him. 


: ter every poor performance, or the op- : : 
To that end, much can be said at Perez : 


ber of corollary aspects of Sugar’s life. : posing player who tells him to go back to : 


Puerto Rico after Sugar beans him. 


all that is how Fleck and Boden never let 


: rality tale, nor some purely intellectual 
exercise, its characters all argument and : 
no flesh. They are spiritual disciples of : 
: ful and compassionately sensitive hu- 
: man being. Perhaps his best scene is one 
: that only Spanish-speakers will actually 
: take care of themselves. Sugar's failed : understand, but that his performance al- 
attempt to bed the granddaughter of his : 
? porch bench, telling the story of how he 
? got his scar to the young girl he'll short: 


the Ernest Hemingway maxim that holds 
if you make things as true as possible, 
the wider meanings and themes will 


host family feeds as much into the immi- 
grant alienation/disparate religion ideas 


as it does his character's desperate need : 
to connect with somebody, mentally as : 
: much as physically. The release of his : 
: ease of chatting up a woman wash over 
: him and finally the return of disappoint 


friend and mentor is as much a commen- 


: Soto, found at one of the camps Fleck 
: and Boden document (his audition tape 
: But then, the most admirable quality of : 
} special features here). So much of the 
the film devolve into some treacly mo- : film just silently follows him, and he’s 
= never anything less than utterly com 


: pelling, fully realized both as a brash 


curiously charming, is another of the 


and impetuous young man and as a joy 


lows anyone to understand: he sits on 4 


ly try to seduce. As he relates his story 
in his native Spanish, we see the yearn 
ing for connection on his face, the casual 


ment as the realization that he's stil! 
not truly being understood returns. !t's 


to an utterly stunning film. ¥ 


ee ee 


44, // FILM 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 


SEP 16, 2009 


Film Society picked 

film to lead off its fall pro- 
gram," of Cool.” By which I don't 
mean that To Have and Have Not is all 
that great a film. What it is, though, 
is a perfectly mediocre flick that re- 
lies basically entirely on the chemis- 
try ofits leads, Humphrey Bogart and 
Lauren Bacall (it was their first film 
together—her first ever—and you can 
see how they ended up together): then 
as now, cool guys (and girls) can make 
a lot of otherwise unremarkable stuff 
worth watching. 

Based loosely on the novel by Er- 
nest Hemingway, it was changed just 
enough to keep it from saying much 
of anything (not that the original 
was amy great shakes: Hemingway 
himself reportedly thought it was his 
worst novel, which didn't prevent it 
from getting three separate film ad- 
aptations). Very consciously made to 
resemble Casablanca, it features Bo- 
gey as a gruff ship's captain content 
to while away his time in Martinique 
taking tourists on fishing trips, un- 
concerned with, though not unaware 
of, the island's Free French Resis- 
tance. It is only a matter of time, of 
course, before his inherent decency 
has him helping smuggle a couple 


EU 
<0 : 


FCOOL . skit tic 
the kings 


ynton Film Society's fall program showcases cool guys and girls from eras long gone 


resisters onto the island, necessitat- 
ing his own departure. 

Most of this is window dressing, 
however, for the blossoming rela- 
tionship between Bacall and Bogey, 
and thank heavens for it. Bacall’s 
part was evidently upgraded once 
the chemistry between the two be- 
‘came apparent, and their scenes to- 


71/77 TMA ANMANKMMHMNONTITOHACAMMNHROKMUNNNAHNMNHUNAINMANKHNN 


COOL CATS >> The EFS fall program celebrates old school cool // supplied 


gether encompass most of To Have 
and Have Not's charms. The dialogue 
is that kind of pseudo-sexual sub- 
terfuge mastered by old Hollywood 
writers—this script was penned by 
William Faulkner(!) and Jules Furth- 
man (The Big Sleep,.Rio Bravo)—and 
actors alike: his is the film with Ba- 
Call's now-infamous "You know how 


to whistle, don't ya?" line, which is 
made all the better by Bogart’s reac- 
tion, a smile equal parts knowing and 
dumbfounded. That’s one of maybe 
a half-dozen sharp exchanges, and 
comes at the end of a coy bickering 
Sequence that's one of the sharpest 
outside romantic comedies, 

The film deflates considerably when 
it's time to get away from all that, how- 
ever, thanks in no small part to some 
less-welcome old Hollywood tropes: 
just because there aren't explosions 
and everyone's dressed in a suit doesn't 
make films like this any more substan- 
tive than today’s studio filler. Walter 
Brennan is just painful as the hammy, 
drunken comic relief, and the film gives 
copious amounts of screen time to Ba- 
call and Hoagy Carmichael's lounge 
act, which is pleasant enough, I sup- 
pose, but serves no other purpose than 
to showcase the both of them. 


That said, “Kings of Cool," rounded out 
by Steve McQueen, Robert Mitchum 
and Paul Newman, will get quite a bit 
better, with films that manage to inte- 
grate star power into a sharply crafted 
story. Probably the best example is The 
Sting, George Roy Hill's Oscar-winning 
caper flick starring Paul Newman 
and Robert Redford. Trading heavily 
off the chemistry they developed in 
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, it 


Ra ee TTT TTI Lu nL MCT 


follows a pair of grifters attempting to 
pull one over on a big-time Chicago 
mobster. Hill was wise to cast New- 
man and Redford as characters who 
rely on charm to get by, and it has the 
built-in arch and suspense of a scam; 
the result is something akin to Ocean's 
11 (the remake) set to ragtime, the ef 
fortless screen presence of the cast 


only enhancing the visceral thrill of, 


pulling the wool over the mark's eyes. 
Also worth checking out are the two 
McQueen vehicles, Bullitt and The 
Great Escape. The former is a kind of 
proto-action film mostly notable for 
its infamous chase scene through the 
streets of San Francisco that actu- 
ally holds up pretty well—something 
like The French Connection, in that 
regard—and the latter is, of course, 
arguably his definitive role. Like The 
Sting, it's an impressive marriage 
of actor's persona with a well-put- 
together story, and represents the 
upper limit of working cool into an 
interesting film. 

MON, SEP 14 (8 PM) 

TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT 

DIRECTED BY HOWARD HAWKS 

WRITTEN BY JULES FURTHAM, WILLIAM FAULKNER 

STARRING HUMPHREY BOGART, LAUREN BACALL 

PART OF THE EFS FALL PROGRAM, KINGS OF COOL 

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM (12845 - 102 AVE), $10 


Cee eee ee rT TT TT SMT TICS STN TSTICAMTETTOGOARENETTITSSTOONTCTITTSTRNECCTPESTUERUNCCTTSTRCRLCCUOIUULLLCUOMONNGCLLCUD MO CLCLLUOOUOOLLLOOOTUCLCOOOOUOOLCOD NUON ODCOO OCU SUOULPCNUUOCCOTUAUCOUUOLCOOUUCCLNUONOC OOOO NUON UOC O TOOT TO OTT TUUT TUTTO TUTM CTU PMTCT 


FOREIGN DRAMA // KATYN 


Prisoners 


of war 


The moral and political decisions surrounding Katyn's brutal tragedy create nail-biting intensity 


JONATHAN BUSCH 
/ }ORATHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


= 


i leading up to a brutal enactment 
of the 1940 massacre at the Katyn 
forest, an intertwined series of re- 
lated events observe the nature of 
life and death in the face of conceal- 
ing the undoubted truth of a nation's 
past. The Soviets’ responsibility for 
the tragedy—the slaughter of Polish 
military officers, intellectuals and 
prisoners of war—was not acknowl- 
edged until 1990, though a number of 
witnesses would struggle with pieces 
of evidence that surfaced upon the 
return of letters and personal belong- 
ings of the victims to their surviving 
families. Prolific director Andrzej 
Wajda portrays the domestic testi- 
monials of these individuals, based 
on Andrzej Mulaczyk’s novel Post- 
Mortem, as a series of failed efforts to 
discover freedom in the expression 
of historical juStice. 

Anna (Maja Ostaszewska), wife of 
Polish military officer Andrzej, hears 
of her husband's arrest and immedi- 
ately begins a search until she finds 
him. Unable to convince him to sneak 
away from the camp, she pleads as he 
adheres to his militaristic pledge (to 
which she argues takes lesser pre- 
cedence than the vows of their mar- 
“age). Then, Anna’s professor father- 


WARTIME TRAGEDY >> Ka’ 


in-law, forced to attend the lecture 
of a SS officer, is also arrested along 
with his colleagues for the univer- 
sity’s failure to comply with German 
orders. These events kick off a closely 
detailed drama moving between the 
experiences of both the prisoners and 
their wives and children, where much 
of the emotional intensity relies upon 


's characters are Searchin, 


the moral and political decisions that 
central characters like Andrzej and 
Anna are forced to make. 


As the story continues, another of- 
ficer Jerzy (Andrzej Chyra) escapes 
death at Katyn, despite the inclusion 
of his name in a list read after the 
discovery of the mass grave. The wife 


of a slain General holds contempt 
to Jerzy's adherence to the Soviet's 
blaming of Katyn on the Germans, 
even as resistance to the false verdict 
may have cost him his life. Her cold 
and accusatory response forces him 
to question if life is truly lived while 
burdened underneath the plague of 
such a lie, and he decides his own 


fate. The last third of the film sees 
the Polish government attempt to 
pull the country from ruin after the 
Soviet invasion, all the while silenc- 
ing those who seek to come forward 
about Katyn. 

Wajda, who won his first Cannes 
prize in 1957 and more recently a 
2000 lifetime achievement Oscar 
(and a Best Foreign Language Film 
nomination for Katyn in 2008), plays 
loyal to the sensitive text while still 
captivating us into the epic of its nar- 
rative. The director's own mother 
and father suffered through a similar 
fate to the characters of Mulaczyk's 
novel, inspiring the film's power- 
ful reality. While he abstains from 
the sentimental melodrama of The 
Reader and the noirish campiness of 
Paul Verhoeven's Black Book, Wajda 
foregrounds his passion for history 
into which the stylish mise-en-scene 
and nail-biting plot of Katyn become 
subtly integrated. 


FRI, SEP 11, SAT, SEP 12 & SUN, SEP 13 (7 PM) 
KATYH 

DIRECTED BY ANDRZEJ WAJDA 

WRITTEN BY WAJDA, PRZEMYSLAW 
NOWAKOWSKI, WLADYSLAW PASIKOWSKI 
STARRING MAJA OSTASZEWSKA, ANDRZE} CHYRA 
METRO CINEMA (9828 - 101A AVE) 

Kk KK 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


FILM //45 


All About Steve is an odd humors, 
film letters) that sent me through fou, 
stages of Reviewer's Shrugging Acc... 
tance That This Is A 2-Star Movie: 1) |=. 
ing awkward for the lead characte; _ 
Feeling embarrassed for the actor ply), 
the lead character. 3) Feeling some ad 
ration for the movie's all-out, gawky co, 
mitment to awkward comedy. 4) Foe| 
some annoyance at the usual rom 
schmaltz-injections—cheesy music. so, 
ing speechifying, crap about self-(oya_ 
meant to turn our frowns upside-dow, 
The actor in quizzical question is San, 
dra Bullock, playing Mary Horowit» 
crossword puzzle-maker (14) who {|| 


IS ANYBODY THERE? 
GHTLY @7.00» SAT & SUNDAY MATINEES® 
RATED: PG. COARSE LANGUAGE. MATURE THEME 


“A PRL MASTERPIECE? 


VALENTINO THE LAST EMPEROR 
SAT & SUN MATINEES @ 


Opening at the Princess 


Séraphine 

Directed by Martin Provost 

Written by Provost, Marc Abdelnour 
Starring Yolande Moreau, Ulrich Tukur 
kkk 


Naive art is a loaded term, one that can 
technically refer to artists with a variety 
of backgrounds and concerns, but in prac- 
tice is often a semi-condescending term 
used to describe artists who create with- 
out formaV/academic training (and yet still 
make interesting work, which is where the 
concept's underlying patronization comes 
in). Séraphine de Senlis, the subject of this 
biopic, was not only a naive artist, mixing 
her own paints and creating stunning flo- 
ral pieces after completing her day job, she 
was also probably insane, spending the last 
years of her life in a mental institution. 
One would think the combination would 
make for a film pretty rife with big themes, 
but Martin Provost's Séraphine prefers 


the more typical, straight-ahead life-recap 
to really using de Sentis as a window into 
some deeper questions: occasionally some 
deeper messages are hinted at—her pa- 
tron, German art collector Wilhelm Uhde, 
makes an offhanded remark about disliking 
the term "naive art"—but by and large this 
is a point-to-point retelling of her life just 
before her discovery to her eventual down- 
fall due to a combination of honest naivety 
about how the world works and some 
deep-seated mental issues whose contri- 
bution to her work is left fairly unclear. 
Provost, however, is a skilled enough 
craftsman to still make the film palatable. 
He's not afraid of quiet, and cinematog- 
rapher Laurent Brunet's camera is fond 
of observing de Senlis from wide angles, 
the atmosphere indicative of her isolated 
status within both the art and regular 
worlds. More credit should probably go 
to Yolande Moreau, however, who brings a 
muted grace to a role that could easily de- 
volve into acting on parade, Though there 
is always a curious passion behind her 
eyes, her transformation from put-upon 
and devalued housekeeper to burgeoning 
art star is genuinely transformational, the 


in romantic feeling (4) with Steve (Braq 
ley Cooper), a TV news cameraman 4 
parents set her up with on a blind dat- 
There's something about Mary, alright 
she’s a reclusive workaholic who natter 
away in anyone's company, but when s| 
sees Steve, Mary Horowitz come off 
well, a whore with wit, joking away ar 
shooting off trivia and thesaurus word; 
(8) while stripping off Steve in the b 
of his truck for some hot down.a; 
across puzzle-solving action—not! 
cryptic about Mary's designs here 
Steve's scared off by this behaviow, 
as would be HBO's Samantha and Co 
not to mention anyone even remote 
feminist, since the kooky, sex-star 
spinster isn't exactly the most 2ist-c 
tury character around, But then the film 
starts to indulge its inner weird child 
Mary pretty much stalks Steve, and thei 
first reunion is a cringe-comedy take o 
the lovers-running-towards-each-othe 
cliché. And tragedies, especially fallin 
into an abandoned coal shaft, are mine: 
for their strange, uncomfortable slap 
stick quality. Turns out that watching 
someone absentmindedly, or purposely 
fall into a deep hole (3) is pretty damn 


funny, even in slo-mo. 

On the one hand, Mary is irritating, ever 
unlikeable. On the other hand, Mary is ir 
ritating, even unlikeable, and that's kino 
of daring for a romantic comedy. Beside 
Thomas Haden Church grabs most of t! 
attention (6, 3, 4) as Hartman Hughes 
leather-tanned, cocky TV reporter wh 
totally at ease with his sleaze. 


former's sunken world-weariness matched 
by the latter's childlike joy. Likewise, her 
slow slip into madness feels thoroughly 
grounded, her lashing out and ranting the 
honest response of a person who was nev- 
er quite cut out for dealing with the world 
watching it slowly crumble around her. It 
would be nice if they pushed that towards 
a grander end, but there's no denying the 


Paul Morrison Film 


LITTLEAASHES 


Three rebels willing to take onthe world. Two lovers risking itil One story, untold until now. 


FRIDAY «SUNDAY. 9:30PM | MONDAY 7:00 09:00PM 


GARNEAU 


film's esthetic appeal. All About Steve does have alot of dea 
DAVID BERRY spots, though. Laughs at strangenes 
#/ DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM and affectionate humour about gee! 


are tough to completely pull off, and 


Now playing Squalls' apple-sculptor doesn't quite 
it, nor does Katy Mixon's helium-chee 
All About Steve serial demonstrator. The zipping ar 


the country—in a Gremlin, no less— 
defies geography, and the use of dc: 
children in the climax feels a little chea 
(6). The direction is pretty boring (2?) 
and the Authorized Rom-Com Dictior 
ary, Volume 20: Sentiment to Sounc 
track, gets consulted a lot. Ultimately 
though, the romance gets punctured 
like a balloon at Pinhead's birthday 99! 
ty and the movie doesn't offer a totally 
upbeat conclusion (5, 6). 

(Answers: comedy; cruciverbalist; love 


Directed by Phil Traill 

Written by Kim Barker 

Starring Sandra Bullock, Thomas Haden 
Church, Bradley Cooper 

wk It 


ncpouse soe oF canon RAS. I APA SA IN 
FRIDAY SUNDAY: 7:00PM 


SUNDAY DOUBLE MATINEE 


POPPET PICTURES & METRO PRESENTS THE FILMS OF 
than the latest position outlined in the sex 


QUENTIN TARANTI thn the test poston ote 
KILL BILL «©. fm wea ’ 
VOLUME! & I Ag Te xc wry 

set oACT RAK 


SUNDAY ar 2:00PM 
6:309:30pmn 


SHOOT: WEDNESDAY 8:00PM 
THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE SES eres ere 


Everything you were too afraid to ask about working 
{ll Metro screenings are held at Zeidler Hall in the Citadel! Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave. 


p. with ACTRA: working with ACTRA, how to make an 
. . - ind: DT budget fil hh ACTRA and 
For more information, call 425-9212. or log on to www.metrocinema.org = LS« ndependent/low-budget film with ACTRA and the 
Motro operates with the support of ~, 
*= 


agreements you need to do so. 
undation eC; arts 
Arts f 
46 // F 


in the interest of doubling your review-read- 
ing fun, and since this movie is about some- 
one who devises everyone's favourite chal- 
TAKING WOODSTOCK lenge in the back of a newspaper—other 
NOGHTLY @ 6:45 & SISPM + SAT & SUM MATINEES & 2007 
RATED: 14A COARSE LANGUAGE, NUDITY, SUBSTANCE ABUSE 


FAVA 


FILM anv VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY: ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


102 STREET 
TSK OX4 


= 
GN Fotagarion eC | 


Canada Council 


Conseil des Arts A 


du Canada 


for the Arts 


y Mark Neveldine 


Michael C. Hall, 


the equally rabid 
ts a near future 
millions of dollars 

iy unlimited supply 


nning Man reworked 

ry, with digs at video 
culture replacing the 
trash television. And 
Man, it's a mostly fun 
action and gutting tF-aver- 


depts plenty of mate- 
slamming a world where 
and violence is being 
increasingly erate as a form of enter- 
tainment, where people are atrophied by 
material excess, and where most people's 
lives are so empty that they feel compelled 
to live vicariously through elaborate role- 
playing scenarios. Teenage kids direct peo- 
ple to kill each other for their own amuse- 
ment from the safety of their living rooms, 
without considering the implications be- 
hind what re doing, and disgusting, 
morbidly obese slobs fulfill sexual fanta- 
sies through the bodies of supermodels in 
Sim-like games. The cultural lampooning is 
almost overbearingly obtuse, but violent 
video games aren't subtle subject matter 
for parody. : 

It also could have been the source of 
some first-class self-conscious explosion 
escapism, but the most disappointing as- 
pect of Gamer is that the action sequences 
border on unwatchable. The camera work 
Js seizure-inducing, the settings are ugly, 
and it's all just generally displeasurable 
to the senses. It's impossible to tell who 
‘s killing who at any given point, and this 
incoherence arse any amount of ten- 
sion that the should be feeling 
for the hero. There are also erratic shifts 
in tone that make the product feel unpol- 
ished. Its sentimental moments, including 
@ scene in which the protagonist's wife 

espe ; attempts to regain custody 

their daughter, can't be taken seriously 
the context of the hyperbolic cartoon 
at ther eae Gerard 


§ CINENPLEX ODEON SOU 


DISTRICT 9A btalvsene gory sees cane 
Daily 7:00,9:00 


5074-130 Ave, 780.472.9779 
KISSAN (HINDI W/ES.T.) (STC) 
Fri-Sat 135, 4:35, 6:50, 9:20, 12235; Sun-Thu 1:35 4735, 6:50, 0:20 
BANDSLAM (PG) 
Fri-Sat 1:50, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00, 12:25; Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:20, 
7:10, 10:00 
AUIENS IN THE ATTIC (PG) 
Daily 2:00, 4:40, 7:25 
FUNNY PEOPLE (144, crude coarse language, sexual con- 
tent, not recommended for children) 
Daily 1:05, 4:05, 6:55, 9:55 
ORPHAN (1A) 
Fri-Sat 9:25, 12:10; Sun-Thu 9:25 
I LOVE YOU, BETH COOPER (144, crude sexual 


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Daily 1210, 4:00, 6:50, 9:50 

MY SISTER'S KEEPER (14A, mature theme) 

Fri-Sat 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:25, 11:45; Sun-Thu 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:25 
TRANSFORMERS: REVENGE OF THE FALLEN (PG, vio- 
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Fri-Sat 1:15, 4115, 6:30, 7:35, 9:45, 10:45; Sun-Thu 1:15, 4:15, 6:30, 
735 945 

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may offend) 

Fri-Sat 1:45, 4°35, 7:15, 9:40, 12:00; Sun-Thu 1:45, 4°35, 725, 9:40 
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Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30, 11:50; Sun-Thu 1:30, 4:30, 7:05, 
930 

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: BATTLE OF THE SMITHSO- 
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7:00, 9:50 


CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


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TYLER PERRY'S | CAN DO BAD ALL BY MYSELF (PG, 
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Fri-Tue, Thu 2:10, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25; Wed 1:00, 5:10,7:50, 10:25 
9 (PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for 
young children) 
Fri-Tue, Thu 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:5; Wed 1:00, 3:15, 
S15) TAS 9S 
ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-Tue 1:30, 4:10, 7:05, 10:15; Wed-Thu 1:30, 
4:10, 7:05, 10:15 
GAMER (184, brutal violence, nudity, language may offend) 
Daily 12:50, 320, 7:00, 10:40 
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Daily 110, 3-49, 6:50, 9:40 
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SORORITY ROW (134, gory violence, language may offend) 
Fri, Sun-Thu 1535, 4-45, 7:50, 10°30; Sat 12:50, 4245, 750, 40°30 
9 (PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


T TTT TT AIL TTS TIO In TLL MULT CET 
er oeepee! ase at fi. : Daily 993200 Sah Sun Tue Thy a3 THEA MNOHHHHNHANTMTHNNAAHNMATAER 


ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, come language) 


passes FrivTite 1:40, 4-15 7:00, 945: Wed 1:40, 4-15, 7200, 
sasha a Yosser Seg 


GAMER (:8A, brutal violence, nudity, language may offend) 
Daily 1:30, 420.745.1035 | 

EXTRACT (14A, crude coarse language. substance abuse) 
Daily 2555, 340, 735, 10005 

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‘THE TIME TRAVELER'S WIFE (PG, nudity, mature subject 
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Daily 1:10, 3:50, 6:5$ 9:35 

G1 JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA (144) 

Fri-Sat, Mon-Thu 12-45, 3:50, 7:10, 10:19; Sun 12:20, 3:00, 1010 
JULIE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) 

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THE UGLY TRUTH (14A, language may offend, sexual 
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HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
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Satua30 


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No passes, Stadium seating, Dolby Stereo Digital Fri-Sun, 
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THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (8A, gory violence) 

Digital 3d, Stadium seating Fri-Sun, Wed-Thu 12:10, 2:30, 
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ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

Stadium seating, DTS Digital Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 12:20, 2:50, 
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CLAREVIEW 10 
427-9 Ave, TEOATZ7600 

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Digital Presentation Fri, Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:40; Sat-Sun 12:50, 
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Fri, Mon-Thu 3:45 6:45, 9:30; Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:45, 6:45. 9:30 
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (18A, gory violence) 
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‘THE FINAL DESTINATION 30 (18A, gory violence) 

Digital 3d Fri, Mon-Thu $00, 7730, 10:00; Sat-Sun 2:00, $00, 
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ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

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Fri, Mon-Thu 4:50, 7-40, 9250; Sat-Sun 1:50, 4:59, 7:40, 9:50 
9.(PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
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Fri, Mon-Thu 4:45, 6:60, 9:10; Sat-Sun 12:35, 2:40, 4:45. 
6:40, 90 

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ed for young children) 

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DUGGAN CINEMA - CAMROSE 


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Language) 
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ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

No passes Fri 3:50, 6:50, 9:40; No Passes Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:50, 
6:50, 9:40; No passes Mon 6:50, 9:40; Wed-Thu 6:59, 9:40 
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Pri 4:20, 7:15, 10:00} Sat-Sun 1:45, 4:20, 7:15, 10:00; Man, 
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INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (138A, goty violence) 

Fri, Mon, Wed-Thu 7:00, 10:10; Sat-Sun 2:00, 7:00, 100 
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Fri 3:40, 7:20, 10:15; Sat-Sun 12:90, 3:40, 7:20, 1015; Mon, 
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THE TIME TRAVELER'S WIFE (PG, nudity, mature subject 
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Fri 4:10, 7:05, 9:45; Sat-Sun 12:40, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45; Mon, Wed- 
‘Thu 7:05, 9:45 

G.I, JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA (14A) 

Fri-Sun 3:30, 6:40, 9:50; Mon, Wed-Thu 640, 9:50 

JULIE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) 

Fri 3:45, 6030, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:35, 3:45, 6:30, 9:20 

SHORTS (G) 

Sat-Sun 1:00 


GRANDIN THEATRE 


» Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. Albert, 
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SHORTS (G) 

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HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

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G FORCE (G) 

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METRO CINEMA 
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Fri, Sat, Sun 7200 

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KILL BILL VOL 1& 2 (134, gory violene)) 

Sun 2:00; part of the series Films of Quentin Tarantino 
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Wed 8:00; part of the series Turkey Shoot! 

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‘TULPAN (STC) 
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PPARKLANDCINEMA7 CINEMA 7 


0 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove, 780.972.2332; Serving 
‘Spruce Grove, Stony Plairr, Parkland County 


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for young children) 

Daily 7:05, 9:10; Sat, Sun, Tue 2:05, 330 

SORORITY ROW (iA, gory violence, language may 


offend) 
Daily 7:10, 9:30; Sat, Sunm Tue 1:10, #0 
‘THE FINAL DESTINATION (:8A, gory violence) 
Daily gas 
THE TIME TRAVELERS Wife (PG, nudity, mature subject 
matter) 
Daily 7:00; Sat, Sun, Tue 2:00, 3:20; Movies For Mommies: 
Tue 1:00 
INGLORIOUS BASTERDS (:8A. gory violence) 
Daily 7:30; Sat-Sun, Tue 1:30 
GIJOE THE RISE OF COBRA (4A) 
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8722-109 St, 780.433.0728 
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substance abuse) 
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10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728 
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‘9 (PG, fnghtening scenes, not recommended for young 
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FriTMue, Thu 12:40, 2:50, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Wed 2:50, 4:50, 7:20, 
9:40; Star and Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 

ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

No passes Pri‘Tue 1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9°30; Wed 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 
‘Thu 1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:307 Star and Strollers Sereening: 
Wed i;00 

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THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (18A, gory violence) 

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THE TIME TRAVELER'S WIFE (PG, nudity, mature subject 
matter) 

Daily 22:50, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20 

G.L JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA (14A) 

Pri-Sat,Mon-Thu 1:10, 4:20, 7:15, 10:10; Sun 12:30, ys, 10:10 
HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

Daily aus, 4245, 8:15 

THE UGLY TRUTH (14A, language may offend, sexual 
content) 

Fri, Sun-Thu 1:40, 4:30, 7:30, 9250; Sat 4:30, 7:30, 9:50 
G-FORCE IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 

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TH Ave, Groat Rid, 780.455.8726 
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Dolby Stereo Digital Fri 6:30, 9:50; Sat-Sun 3:10, 6:30, 9:50; 
Mon-Thu 500, 8:25 
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language) 
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7,00, 10:00; Mon-Thu 5:20, 8:15 


brutal violence,coarse 


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DTS Digital Fri 7:10, 9:30; Sat-Sun 12°55, 3:20, 720, 9-30 
Mon-Thu 530, 835 

JULIE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) 

DTS Digital Fri 6:45, 9:40; Sat-Sun 12-45 3:45, 6-45, 9:49; 
Mon-Thu $10, 8:00 


| WETASKIWIN CINEMAS 


Wetasktwin, 780.352 3922 
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Daily g20 


FILM // 47 


So TTT LTT 


PREVUE // PAUL DI'ANNO 


Running free 


Iron Maiden's ex invades Edmonton 


EDEN MUNRO 
// EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ruce Dickinson might be the voice 

of Iron Maiden today, but it was 
Paul Di'Anno who owned the mic 
for the band's first two albums—that 
would be the self-titled debut and 
Killers, both of which feature songs 
that are still mainstays in Maiden 
shows to this day. After a relatively 
brief four years in the band, though, 
Di'Anno departed and went it alone, 
first putting together Battlezone and 
then Killers, and ultimately going it 
alone, using unsung musicians from 
around the globe whenever he took to 
the road—which has been most of the 
time, really. Di'Anno spoke with Vue 
Weekly as he was preparing to boarda 
plane for a Canadian tour. 


VUE WEEKLY: When you start out 
playing music as a kid, everyone 
around you is doing the same thing, 
but there comes a time when some 
people just fade away and stop play 
ing for whatever reason, while others 
never give it up. 

PAUL D'IANNO: Yeah, it's in the blood 
I guess. You hear the cheesy old 
chestnut, "It's the greatest drug in 
the world," and for me it probably it 
is. It's not about money or anything 
anymore—I've been there, done that 
one—it's really about genuinely just 
loving to go and play. 


VW: Who's playing with you on this tour? 
PD: You know what? I can't tell you. 
See, for me to keep ticket prices down 
and everything, we use different bands 
in different countries so we don't have 
to charge a fortune. Wé've got about 
36 [bands that I use]. These guys from 
Calgary, I don't even know the name of 
the band yet—I'm going into rehearsal 
with them and we'll take it from there. 
They're all rehearsed up and it's like, 
"Surprise me." Sometimes that can fall 
flat on its face, but normally it’s quite ex- 
citing getting to play with different mu- 
sicians you haven't played with before 
You get surprised, sometimes you get 
shocked—sometimes they're aw- 
ful. I mean if they're awful, I'm fucked. 


very 


VW: There are a lot of videos of you 
with various bands up on YouTube, 
and the one thing that's consistent 
throughout is that you're giving your 
all in every song 

PD: Well, if you're gonna do the job, 
you might as well do it all the way. 
It's not worth holding back. I've never 
done that in my life—even in rehears- 
als I sing just as hard as I will when 
I'm on stage. The thing is, every day 
there's something that will piss you 
off and it doesn't matter who you are. 


48 // 


LIVE AFTER MAIDEN >> Wrathchild Paul Di'Anno is pressing a Calgary band into 


service on his upcoming tour //Supplied 


Something's really going to get you 
off through the day, so I just chan- 
nel all that and instead. of punching 
somebody out or shouting at some- 
one, I do it on stage. I get rid of it and 
it's like therapy. 


VW: There's one video out there with you 
singing in a group called Rockfellas and 
you're playing "Message in a Bottle.” 

PD: I like the Police. Rockfellas is a 
project we all put together last year 
and it's with some of the top musi- 
cians in Brazil: the bass player from 
one of Brazil's biggest bands of all 
time, Raimundos, and the guitarist 
from Charlie Brown Jr. and me and 
Jean Dolabella from Sepultura, and 
we did it for fun. It was a fun project 
and we didn't play that many shows, 
but it was pretty awesome and we 
might do it again—we're not sure yet, 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 — SEF 


but we're e thinking about doing ‘punk 
covers this time. 


VW: Do you listen to a lot of stuff at 
home that might surprise people? 

PD: Bossa nova music. My girlfriend's 
a bossa nova singer. I love samba. I 
listen to classical musie and stuff as 
well, and some stuff like Cat Stevens, 
but it's mostly punk with me—it al- 
ways has been. 


VW: With your own music, 2006's The 
Living Dead was the latest release? 

PD: Yeah, we re-released it. It was called 
Nomad first of ail and released in 2000, 
and it was released in Europe as The Liv- 
ing Dead because we'd shot a video for 
the thing. And when Megadeth was 
breaking up—apparently—the record 
company asked us if we'd do a tribute to 
them, like a one-song tribute, and so we 


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did “Symphony of Destruction" and we 
liked it and Dave [Mustaine] liked it so 
we said, "OK, fuck it, let’s put it on the 
album as an extra bonus track for the 
re-release in Europe.” 

I don't even know how well we did over 
there, I have no idea. All I was happy 
about was when we recorded the album 
I did all of my vocals for all the tracks 
twice in two days from six o'clock until 
12 o'clock and I'm like, "Yeah, that was 
good.” I was really happy with that—I 
went home with my kids and went back 
in about two weeks to mix it. 


VW: Do you like to record quickly 
like that? 

PD: I fucking hate recording. Oh, God, 
how the hell can you get out what I've 
written, whether it's angry or whatever, 
surrounded by four walls, no audience 
or anything? I find it really difficult to 
drag it out of me, so I just get myself all 
spoked up and pissed off and get into 
the studio, I go storming in there and, 
as I said, when we did Nomad I did the 
first track at six and finished the whole 
album by 12—that's every track plus the 
backing vocals, and I did it again the 
next day and said, "Ah, fuck it, that's 
enough. If you can't get anything off of 
that then leave it.” 


VW: When you have to get yourself into 
a certain space like that, it would be dif- 
ficult to go into a studio for two months 
and stay there. 

PD: Oh, half of these bands do this. 
That's what gets me down. It's not 
about the money. Some bands that go 
in there, the singer will come in and 
sing two lines or four words. Oh, God, 
I'd probably be in jail for murder be- 
cause I'd shoot the producer for tak- 
ing too much fucking time. I'd be go- 
ing nuts, I couldn't deal with that. You 
must lose all the feel, all the energy 
must go. | understand that musicians 
might have to take a bit more time, but I 
don't play any of the instruments on the 
albums—lI write the songs but I don't 
actually play them in the studio—I just 
do the singing part of it and I couldn't 
do that, man, I'd be going nuts. 


VW: When something's done like that, 
it captures the emotion of the moment. 
PD: Oh, yeah, I'm not supposed to be 
some opera singer reaching all them 
perfect notes. You have a go and if 
you hit or get it around that mark it 
should be enough. 


VW: Are you working on anything 
new now? 

PD: We did five new tracks in Germany 
last year—it's very industrialized—but 
we got in a bit of an argument with the 
record company and we told them to 
piss off, basically. So | kept them songs 


Devilsplender performs live in Vue 
Weekly's studio 


ee TTT TT mnt Th 


and a friend of mine where I am po) 
the minute in Salisbury down in Sou) 
west England, has just handed me ,, 
pieces of music so I'm going to go a 
when Ihave a bit of time and see w};, 
can come up with for that. 


VW: You've been solo for far longe={\;,, 
you were with Iron Maiden, but tho 
first two albums have stood the test 
time and are a pretty solid foundation 
to be standing on. 

PD: Oh, yeah. I think this year 5r ney; 
year is the anniversary of the ‘irst 3| 
bum and it doesn't seem that anyone 
gonna be doing anything to celebra 
which is a bit ofa shame, really. | don 
really want to do that much, but then 
again, you look at it in another light 
and some of the Maiden fans of them 
first two albums, some of the younge 
ones haven't seen me doing the song 
or they've only heard my versions ot 
some of the Maiden stuff we put int 
the set which is a hell of a lot heav 
and faster than the originals, so it 
could be interesting. 

The Maiden songs I put in my set | 
keep saying never again, never again, 
and then when you get onstage and you 
see how much they're loving it then 
it's like, "Oh, shit, I'm never going to 
get rid of these songs, they're going to 
have to stay forever.” But then ag 
shouldn't knock it because they 
en me a fantastic career. You shouldn't 
bite the hand that feeds you 


VW: Since Maiden, you've had a fc 
bands of your own. 

PD: Yeah, there hasn't really been that 
many bands. There was obviously 
Battlezone, but Battlezone became 
Killers. We had a few sort of lineup 
changes and then we changed th 
name because we got all this shit from 
the record company. That's the bane 
of my life: record companies. | seem 
to fall out with them really quickly 
because they want one album every 
three years and I'm like, “Fuck thet 
no, I'm touring.” I don’t write thet 
quickly—I'm a little bit slow on (ha! 
side of it—I can't write when |'m on 
the road, and I'm always on the road 
so I'm never home to write songs 
VW: Do you set time aside then (0 ¢ 
nothing but write? 

PD: Yeah. I'll have someideas. As! say! 
got these 16 tracks here and it's just fixing 
it all out. On a day off I'll have a listen ' 
what he'sdone and iff likeit Pll mark" 
one off as a keeper and once that's 

I'll get on to writing lyrics then. * 


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GAGE 


Papice of life 


Metalcore band engages a wider variety on latest album 


erYAN BIRTLES 
// SOYANI@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


fter more than 10 years and four 
bums, it was important for heavy 
metal band Killswitch Engage to not 
fall into the trap of repeating itself, of 
yecreating an easy formula and bang- 
ing out songs the way a factory worker 
works an assembly line. To that end, the 
group knew it needed to make a change 
to the way it had always made albums; 
guitarist Adam Dutkiewicz had long 
been the band’s principle producer, 
but for the newest record it was time to 
shake things up. 

"Adam was definitely closely involved 
with the album but we ended up us- 
ing Brendan O'Brien,” explains vocalist 
Howard Jones, rattling off a list of rock 
‘n' roll luminaries the producer has 
worked with which includes AC/DC, 
Bruce Springsteen and Rage Against 
the Machine, amongst others. "He was 
into what we do, and so Adam and I flew 
down to Atlanta to talk with him and he 
was a really cool, mellow guy—a lot of 
energy but still real mellow. We thought, 
‘Let's give this a shot.’ It was time for us 
to change things up a bit. Using a differ- 
ent producer was a big thing.” 


Changing up the responsibilities in the 
studio allowed the band to focus on dif- 
ferent aspects of the songwriting, Jones 


& 


OFF THE RAILS >> Killswitch Engage hooked up with producer Brendan O'Brien and 


tried 


explains, and for him to personally try 
out a new approach to recording. 
"(O'Brien's] approach, it's a little dif- 
ferent; Adam recording vocals, he can 
be—I mean, we have a lot of fun—but 
at times he can bea little heavy handed 
and harsh. Brendan just pushed me to 
go for it, try some different stuff—it 
Was a more at ease atmosphere. But 
both things work so I really don't have 
a problem with that," he laughs. "It 
was really just a chance for us to focus 


SEPTEMBER 13 -E 


SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 // WUHEWEEKLY 


rding for the band's 2009 self-titled release // Supplied 


ing and make stron- 

ger, more varied songs and I think that 
that's really the main difference when 
you listen to this album compared to 
the other ones—there's a larger variety 
in the songs." WV 

TUE, SEP 15 (6 PM) 

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SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


music //51 


SRSRORSORETOSORU RAPA EIST SITLL TS ES 


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COMMENT >> DIGI 


MIXING 


Mixmaster Sandor 


Turns out digital mixing is good for novices and pros alike 


Back in June, | wrote a column that ques- 
tioned how much skill—or, dare | 
use the word, musicianship— 
was needed to mix music 
using electronic gadgets, | 
discussed the Pacemaker, a 
mixer that allows the user to 
upload MP3s and mix them 
together seamlessly. 

The people who represent To- 
nium, the company that makes the 
Pacemaker, saw the column and offered to 
send me out a loaner, so | could spend a 
few weeks playing with the device. | want 
to make that clear right up front. 

So, what did | think of the machine? 

First off, the thing is tiny, maybe about 
twice the size of an iPod. You can hold 
it one hand and manipulate the controls 
with the other. It has a round interface 
that you control with a finger, to do ev- 
erything from cueing up a song to play- 
ing with tempos. 

It's actually a very easy device to pick up 
and play. Sure, there are some advanced 
things you can do with it, but if you just 
want to load up some MP3s and mix them, 
it’s a breeze to figure it out, especially if 
you've used an iPod or any other kind of 


digital music player. 
Basically, you play one song, and 
cue up the other. The device will 
scan the songs and let you know 
the BPM. A click of a button, 
and the machine will actually 
match the beats, and you can 
simply rotate the wheel to slow 
or speed up a song after you've 
made a switch. And, of course, you 
can cue up one MP3 while the other is 
playing, no different than having a mixer 
and headphones between the decks. 

But, simply using a thumb trigger and the 
wheel, you can clip out a section of a song 
and loop it. You can even play it backwards. 

Really, with the BPM information and 
the automatic beat matching, a total nov- 
ice could, after less than a few minutes of 
practise, put together a credible mix, with- 
out awkward breaks or interruptions. 

The Pacemaker software can also be 
plugged into your computer, where you 
can do some more elaborate mixing, 
and create Podcasts. 


Now, there's no arguing that the Pace- 
maker is an extraordinary machine. But, ! 
found it a lot more fun to use by ignoring 


some of the features. Beat match, 
nice, but | think that a good danc; 
should be like a good mixtape: 
should flow into each other based 
mood and feel, not because the ; 
works out. Really, putting tog 
songs with varying BPMs isn't that bi 
a deal And, if the tracks are close, |isi 
ers or dancers aren't going to notic 

For me, the real nifty thing about : 
maker is that it allows the user to ma ni 
late a digital music file as if it was on vin. 
It can be cued to a certain spot, sped x, 
slowed down, chopped up. The rest of +} 
stuff is gravy. 

So, maybe | was a bit harsh back ,; 
June when | questioned the integrit 
those who use digital mixing devi 
think I've seen enough of the Pac 
to understand that it won't take the ay 
istry away from the Dj, as long as the 0} 
doesn't get too obsessed with numbe 
The key with the Pacemaker is to | 
it as a tool, not a machine that will 
everything for you. W 


Steven Sandor is a former editor-in-chi 
of Vue Weekly, now an editor and auth 
living in Toronto. 


WUNDERBAR Sundays 
Dj Gallatea and XS, guests; 
no cover 


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music monthly; no cover 


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you Mondays: Johnny Neck 
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stage every Tuesday night; 
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All Star Jam with Alicia Tait 
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SEP 10 SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY music //53 


it4 Ret ek ees hee teehee Wale 
PREVUE // LIGHTS 


Co ee Do ee a 


Punk, bat different 


It's all in Pe honest attitude for Lights 


BRYAN BIRTLES 
// @RYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 

‘ll let you in on a little secret about 

Toronto synth pop siren Lights: as 
much as she may come off as some kind 
of Warped Tour vixen, she is, ather core, 
a 14-year-old boy. Maybe even 13. 

With an affinity for video games, comic 
books and exotic animals, Lights will be 
the first to admit her interests don't run 
much in the way of what girls are "sup- 
posed" to like. But her attraction to heroic 
narratives and wivid colours inform her 
art—from the cover art of her upcoming 
album The Listening to her music videos 
to the way her songs are structured. Her 


entire esthetic is about overcoming inter- 
nal obstacles, about reaching further, in 
the same way a video game is about beat- 
ing a final boss and a comic book is the 
triumph of good over evil. 

‘Tve always grown up being very at- 
tracted to a very strong female image 
where you can be muscle-y and you can 
kick ass and you can be a hero in your 
own right for whatever battle you may 
be fighting—to me that's very cool,” she 
says. "It's just all very attractive to me and 
as far as comics goes it's the same situa- 
tion as video games—it's a nice getaway 
and it's actually great inspiration because 
this is a make-believe world where any- 
thing can be real. You can come up with 


a far-fetched idea, draw it into reality an 
now you have something you've inventec 
all ofa sudden in front of you that’s real 
that's a lot like songwriting.” 

Kicking ass even extends to her choice 
in pets—Lights is the proud owner ofat 
rantula named Lance. She didn't exaci! 
want a spider, but she did want a pet thai 
didn't need tons of attention or to be fe: 
every day, as her touring schedule would 
have made it too much work. Still, as she 
explains, when she first came up with th 
idea it was with trepidation, 

"It's honestly all about defeating the 
things that make you afraid—I was 
afraid of spiders but I thought I'd ¢ 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6: > 


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PREVUE // SCOTT COOK 


Keep it in the family 


Roaming troubadour Cook sings for the folks and the kids 


JAMES STEWART 
// jSTEWART@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
hae ro eae Edmon- 
ton-based roots musician Scott 
Cook, After laying down basic tracks 
for his upcoming album This One's 
on the House at Edmontone studios 
with Thom Golub, Dwayne Hrynkiw 
and Doug Organ, Cook looked to his 
musician friends to flesh out the 
record, tracking overdubs with the 
likes of Bill Bourne, Dana Wylie and 
Darrek Anderson among others in 
various locales throughout the city. 
The only problem? 

‘It's just impossible, with every- 
one leaving town every weekend to 
go to this festival or do that show or 
whatever," explains Cook. "It made it 
really hard to finish up all the track- 
ing. I would never record an album 
in the summer again. We did it over 
the course of two or three months, 
and actually ended up running over 
deadline. I'd already booked a small 
CD release tour months ago, and I 
was starting to feel as though I'd 
painted myself into a corner. But in 
a way it was good to have the pres 
sure of those deadlines, otherwise it 
can be hard to move on. You just end 


icking at it forever.” 
Me eence eng CONTINUED GM PAGE tg26 latest albnurt 1 yerseimciet neat eg ER cas °° 


WUEWEEKLY // | EP 16, 2005 


HILLTOP HOODS 


Way Down Here . State Of The Art 


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SEP 10 ~ SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


Se rT LU AMM LULM LLL LL LLL LLL EC Eh 


PREVUE // DEVILSPLENDER 


Just like Canada Day 


Rob Malowany returns for a Hometown Riot 


CAROLYN NIKODYM 
// CAROLYM@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


hen devilsplender's Rob 
Malowany began talking up his 

ideas for his latest release Hometown 
Riot, there were plenty of musicians 
who thought he was crazy. The no- 
tion of heading into the studio with- 
out rehearsal, without demos even, 
does sound a little half-baked. But 
ask Malowany why, and you'll get 
some very well thought out answers. 
"There is something that I always 
loved, that was always my favourite 
thing about playing music with peo- 
ple, like when you pull out a brand new 
song and the very first time you play it. 
It has an energy unlike anything else," 
Malowany explains over the phone 


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from Vancouver. "Everyone is kind 
of, like, excited, and there's this real 
feeling of, ‘Oh, this is fun.’ And you're 
seeing it evolve immediately. It's this 
instantaneous gratification. Like, ‘Aw, 
that was cool; that rocked!” 


A} MVR RATA aap Ae a ANA LAALFEAAMLIENGAYAH ry nie 


his theory that spontaneity 
plus skill in the studio equals 
a sincere recording. The oth- 
er thing that Malowany had 
going for him is that he wasn't 
very worried about the results. 


q q When you pull out a brand new song and the very 
first time you play it... It has an energy unlike 


anything else. 


It's the kind of experiment a musi- 
cian has to grow into, one borne of a 
mixture of experience and camara- 
derie. Malowany did, after all, bring 
in some of his most talented friends 
(Rubim de Toledo, Robin Hunter, Stew 
Kirkwood and Chris Wynters) to test 


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"It's one of those things where if it 
didn't work, it wouldn't have worked,” 
he laughs. "We're making music here, 
you know? It's not like we're solving 
the world's problems or something. 
In the grand scheme of things, I can’t 
take myself that seriously.” 


be ready for the show, while Too 
and Kirkwood will be releasing «! 
own albums later in the fall 

"This record label is not somet!i 
where I am putting up a whole 
of money and releasing re 
Malowany explains. “It's more 
co-op. It's more of a relation 
based hugely on respect for on 
other, where it's like, why would 
want to go out and do what | ¢ 
support some other people wh« 
like-minded or have like interest 
have the same desire? 

"It's not like I set out this year 
‘Oh, these guys are doing this 
adds. “It was really just, ‘I'm doing 
do you guys want on board?’ And ©2 
oftheminstantly said, Of course! ‘ 
wouldn't I want to do that?” V 


This is an attitude that comes across on 
Hometown Riot, complete with Malow 
any’s self-effacing lyrics, A listen or two 
gives the sense that he is completely re- 
laxed and comfortable in his own skin. 

"When I was growing up and in Ed- 
monton for many years, I was like, aw, 
all my friends are doing all this stuff. 
It's just the kind of person I am—I felt 
competition or I felt tense about it or 
I felt I needed to do more,” he says. 
“But now—I think this comes across in 
the record and the performances and 
stuff—it's like, no, I am doing all I can 
do and I'm enjoying every second of it." 


it's 2 good place to be, and fans 
will get a sense of that at the home- 
town release party of devilsplender's 
Hometown Riot, which will also be a 
showcase for Malowany’s Reminder 
Records lineup: Neil MacDonald, Bri- 
an Toogood and Kirkwood. Despite 
moving to Vancouver last year, he has 
been able to get some of Edmonton's 
heavy hitters to release albums with 
him. MacDonald's EP Heavy Bag will 


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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 1 SEP 16 


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SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY music // 57 


Waleacte iin: 


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SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY music //59 


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60 // MUSIC WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 


BENTALL °': 


EDEN MUNRO 
// EDEM@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


t's been a few years since Dustin Bentall re- 

leased his debut album, 2007's Streets With No 
Lights, but it’s not like the BC musician has been 
sitting around letting time pass him by. No, Bentall 
has been busy writing songs and running down 
roads leading to stages all over the country, and 
it shows in the confident, rolling, dusty country 
of his new record—credited to the Dustin Bentall 
Outfit—Six Shooter. Bentall spoke with Vue Weekly 
recently about the path between his two albums. 


VUE WEEKLY: Six Shooter was recorded really 
quickly over a couple of weeks last summer, but 
how long was the lead up to that? 

DUSTIN BENTALL: Well, with the first album I just 
kind of made it and threw it out there with not 
much experience, and then it just slowly gained 
speed and after the first run of touring it got more 
attention and I kept going back out and getting 
busier and busier. So the timing just kept getting 
pushed and pushed until we got to goin the studio 
and make this album. I had all the songs—I was 
ready to make it probably at least a year before we 
did, but all these touring opportunities kept pop- 
ping up. 


VW: Do you write all the time? 

OB: I'm always writing. I'm not really one to sit 
down and just write an album or kind of woodshed 
to get it done like that. Especially with this album, 
2 couple of those songs were written right after I 
finished the first album, and one part of one of the 
Songs Was written five minutes before we recorded 
it in August last year, so they were written over a 
period of almost three years. 


VW: When the band came together, you worked as 
unit for about a year. Was that an important peri- 


LIGHTS 


<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 


and meet a spider so I went into the pet store and I 
asked the pet guy in there to put the spider on my 
hand and instantly I was unafraid of spiders and 
he beeame a beloved pet to me,” Lights says. "It's 
another way of challenging your fears and then 
Summing it around into something that you love. 
Plus he's great.” 


Lights's ability to challenge herself even came in 
sendy the first time she ventured onto the Warped 
‘Sur. Lacking the spiky hair and “fuck you" at- 
‘tude that appears to be a requirement, she was 
“nsure as to how her dreamy synth-pop would be 


TTL 
IM dieenineen ene a aL ALLO LLL en ee 


from home 


g serves Bentall well on Six Shooter 


od of development for you and the other players? 
DB: Absolutely. That was also it, we wanted to take 
the songs out on the road and just be playing to- 
gether so we could go in to the studio, because we 
really wanted a live feel with all of us just playing 
the songs. 


VW: Did you notice a big difference between when 
you first started putting the band together and a 
year later? 

DB: Yeah, absolutely. Even more so this year, this 
past summer, just because we have even that 
much more experience. The guys in the band are 
such heavy, talented players that we don't even 
rehearse much. We just play on stage and we get 
up whenever we can and play as much as possible 
and I can throw anything at them and they'll nail 
it. That kind of keeps [the songs] unscripted ... 
There's a benefit to when a band’s got their thing 
down and they nail it all the time, but I want to 
keep it interesting for us as well as whoever is 
watching so you don't know exactly what's going 
to be happening. Then it's fun for us because there 
are moments when you're just riding the rails and 
just hanging on. 


VW: Tell me about the name of the band—this sec- 
ond album is credited to the Dustin Bentall Outfit. 
DB: Well, the first record I did with session guys and 
it was just my songs and it made sense to do it like 
that. I didn’t have a touring band at the time, but 
with this record, we've been playing for a year and 
we've got plans to keep playing together—we're a 
band—so I didn’t want to call the record just under 
my name. I wanted to give the band more credit and 
let it be known that we're a band now. W 


received by concertgoers more used to skate punk. 
But, screwing up her courage, she made it work. 

“I had no idea how I was going to be received on 
Warped Tour because my music is very different 
than a lot of the music that’s on there,” she admits. 
"| think if you're being honest about what you're do- 
ing and you can play your instrument and you've 
invented this and this is your thing and you're mak- 
ing it your own, then you're not so different from 
NOFX—they’re doing the exact same thing.” W 


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GUY PICCIOTTO AND MEMBERS OF 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


music // 61 


suveverecocva que uveunenyvntanntangeyeavecaceenegvvneeaenvereeneeegccrceeceen ease eee vO anus nnn yun YE nba) PENI ONAR ota onp eens nnunssnener pata 
"1 pA MERLE THLE LISHELEHETHHHeaASHNaIy 


PREVUE // THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES : 


Snakes on a vinyl 


Seattle foursome offers fans a new way to say, ‘Screw you’ 


JUST ANNOUNCED- TICKETS ON SALE SEPT 19!!! 
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i] WUEWEEKLY // 


DAVID BERRY 
// DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


here isn't a lot to misunderstand 

about These Arms Are Snakes’ 
sound. Drawing as much from the big- 
time arena rockers of the '70s as from 
the punkand hardcore bands where the 
Seattle foursome cut its teeth, TAAS— 
whose acronym is almost as awkward 
as its proper name—mixes a pumping, 
punishing rhythm section with pointed 
guitars and occasional synth flourishes 
for something that isn't really assault- 
ing so much as overwhelming, less a 
wall of sound than a wave. 

The same can't quite be said of singer 
Steve Snere’s lyrics, however. Usu- 
ally delivered with a melodic gravel— 
though he can also shout with the best 
of them—Snere's words are about as 
dense as the most feverish of beat po- 
etry. But don't feel bad if you can't quite 
follow along: half the time, neither can 
his bandmates. 

“He gives us a minor run-down, but 
when he tells you what it's about, you 
just kind of look at the lyrics and go, 
‘I have no idea what the fuck you're 
talking about, but fair enough. That's 
how your brain works,” guitarist Ryan 
Frederiksen says with an understand- 
ing nonchalance. "Steve knows exactly 
what's going on with it, but he likes to 
leave it open to interpretation: that's 
his fun way of doing it, and we know 


each other well enough that we know 
he's not going to surprise with som, 
weird thing like, ‘Oh, by the way, this ; 
a white power song’ or anything” 


Nevertheless, you have to wonde: 
the general confusion hasn't pushed 
TAAS—rounded out by bassist Briar 
Cook and drummer Chris Common 
to go for a more direct format for its 
music. Though Snere’s themes tend to 
take centre stage on the albums, TAAS 
has recently favoured releasing split 
seven-inches with some of the band’ 
closest Seattle friends, which has pro- 
duced songs even more driven and 
tight than before. 

Just kidding, obviously. As Frederiks 
en explains, it's got more to do with the 
changing form of music distributio: 
than anything. 

"CDs are just boringatthis point; viny) 
always been a lot more fun," he say: 
"Now that you have download codes 
and stuff, you can have that kind of col 
lector's item—anybody can get an MP3 
but the record is that tangible thing tha 
you can hang on to. Plus you get brag- 
ging rights: ‘Oh, there's only 500 copies 
and J got one. Screw you.” W 

WED, SEP 16 (8 PAA) 

THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES 

WITH METZ, DESIDERATA 

PAWNSHOP, STS 


MTOM CULO COLO. ALLEL LLU. 


PREVUE // THE JOE 


Rap sheet 


Local workaholic rapper pushes his limits 


MIKE ANGUS 
// MIKEANGUS@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Edmonton rapper The Joe is 
just one side of Joe Gurba's creative 
schizophrenia. He's also an illustrator, 
record collector, youth worker and runs 
the artist label Old Ugly. In a word, the 
kid's creativity is relentless. 

"T need to be busy," he concedes with a 
grin, as if it weren't apparent. He's put- 
ting up two CD release parties for his 
latest record, Ut Oh, and although his 
prolificacy could easily fill both shows, 
he’s opted to invite several artists from 
the Old Ugly crew to share the stage with 
him. "[{That’s] the best thing about a rep 
crew: the voice keeps changing,” he al- 
ludes. "There's something really hip hop 
about this ‘pass-the-mic’ mentality, you 
keep hearing a new voice with new flow, 
something completely fresh.” 

For a rapper who admits to being "fed 
up with rap,” the pursuit of something 
fresh speaks more to his appetite as 
an artist than anything else. Ut Oh is a 
sprawling collection of hyper-literate 
rhymes, tongue-in-cheek criticisms of 
post-modern culture, experimental hip 
hop, “personal prayers” and even a Belle 
& Sebastian cover. 

"It's my first record in three years, so it's 
like I'm a different artist. I'd been writing 
poetry the year before, so I hadn't really 
focused on rap atall,” he explains. “About 
the same time, I booked an opening for 
GZA, so I tried to gear at least some of 
the songs towards a hip-hop thing, but 
... it just came off as really pretentious— 
which it is—so that's why the record's 
very polarized. Some of it’s really heart- 
rendering and some ofit's really cheeky.” 


This polarization creates tension on the 
recording. It's the conflict of an artist 
seeking to shape culture and gain legit 
macy while dismissing the super 
rites of passage in maintaining a hip 
stance. "It's more like a defense mech: 
nism, where ifit doesn’t go well, you jus 
say, ‘It was a joke.’ And if it does go well, 
you can say, ‘It started off as a joke 
like a built-in way for never feeling bad 
about yourself.” 

Gurba need not worry. His legitimacy 
stems from the integrity and scope ol 
his creativity. And besides, Ut Oh is re 
ally good. Gurba’s appetite for mile-e 
minute lyricism can leave your head 
spinning if you're not prepared to keep 
up with how smart he is, and how muc! 
weight he can pack in a rhyme, wheth 
he's “re-thinking the ‘battle rap’ prob 
lem” or calling out the absurdities of « 
white-Canadian, middle-class upbring 
ing. His collective creativity results in 
an infectious, hilarious examination 0! 
a post-Facebook existence, candidly (w) 
rapped in his sincerest geek-rap sens! 
bilities. While hip hop and Old Ugly may 
provide a safety-in-numbers for Joe the 
rapper, Gurba the artist possesses all the 
talent and skill to go it alone. ¥ 


ae eee ee 


sae ae a eR LLL evn 


D LOVE ALCORN 


‘to the beat 


st puts her bicycle to work as a kick drum 


eT TT Tn tt tt ttt te 


“There was about eight years where 
I wasn't promoting my own name. 
Everyone in the industry that I talk 
to, they would sort of invest in me 
for a certain point and then they'd 
be, like, ‘OK, but what are you?’ And 
I'd be, like, ‘I don't know. I can't be 
folk and jazz and hip hop—what?"" 
Alcorn laughs. "So for about three or 
four years, I just decided that I'm just 
going to bankroll myself and I'll be 
my own investor by being horribly in 
debt, and tour a bunch. 

"When I send packages to people, it's 
hard to encapsulate what I do in a sen- 
tence,” she adds. "Like, the thing they 
warned me about for years and years, 
I'm finding to be totally true. Whenever I 
wantto doa photo shoot or come up with 


NEW CITY 


“s 
sur Ve 


a poster design, I always have to think 
about, OK, how do I represent jazz and 
folk and soul, hip hop and bicycles?” 


On Joyful, however, all of these influ- 
ences mesh seamlessly together, and 
Alcorn has no trouble has no trouble 
representing all of them—even bi- 
cycles, "I Got a Bicycle” is a fun ode to 
her two-wheeled, transport. 

"I was recording with my friend 
Chris Gestrin [who has worked with 
the likes of k-os, the Rascalz and 
DOA] and my bike was right out- 
side, so I was like, ‘Hey, let's hit the 
bicycle and make the rhythm tracks’ 
and it worked out really well. He put 
a bunch of bass EQ of me hitting the 
seat of the bike, so that worked as 
the kick drum," she explains. "I love 
working with people that I have that 
type of triist with, where you can just 
try anything, and they're not going to 
be like, 'That's a crazy idea,’ they'll be 
like, ‘Fun!’ And you only throw the 


idea out if it doesn't work.” 

The fun element is key to any flir- 
tation, and it gives Alcorn the same ‘ 
kind of license as comedians might 
have. It’s the license to comment on 
the world's foibles—like, Say, stinky 
cars—without sermonizing. 

"I'm always trying to find a way of 
broaching the subject without get- 
ting too dark or preachy or some- 
thing—still feeling hope. Like, Say- 
ing, 'Look there's bad stuff, but let's 
try to still put positive energy into the 
world,'" she says. "If we acknowledge 
bad things but on top of that only put. 
bad, negative energy into the world, ~ 
that’s not going to help.” 

And if flirting is done right, every- 
one feels good, 


WED, SEP 16 (8 PM) 
COCO LOVE ALCORN 
WITH CHLOE ALBERT 
ARTERY, S12 = $15 


AY NEW CITY, MEGATUNES, ; 


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CAROLYN NIKODYM 
CAROLYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


oco Love Alcorn is a flirt. She 

Ca at folk, waves at soul, 
winks at hip hop and nods at jazz. 
While bestowing affections this way 
can lead to some misconceptions, 
there is also the chance of requited 
love from some unlikely sources. 

In the span of a week this summer, 
Alcorn’s latest album Joyful hit a jazz 
chart in Quebee City and on CJSR's 
hip hop Top 10. While she’s not to- 
tally confounded by this—she does 
actually rap on the track “Intellectual 


Boys"—she is pleased with where her 
music finds itself. She'll take it all. 

Flirting in this way isn’t always 
easy. After all, industry types might 
see the way she approaches music 
as fraught with commitment issues, 
but Alcorn has been at it for about 17 
years, releasing her first album back 
in 1995. And she's certainly had suc- 
cesses. She has opened for the likes of 
Burton Cummings and Ani DiFranco, 
had her music featured on televi- 
sion shows and released electronica 
albums as Paloma (with members of 
54-40) and Joystick (with Vancouver's 
Bradley Ferguson). 


a 


SCOTT COOK 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 


Previous to 2007, Cook was splitting 
his time between teaching in Taiwan 
and playing music in Canada. A deci- 
sion to play music full time brought 
him back to Edmonton for good at 
that time, though he notes it's more 
of a home base than anything, as his 
relentless touring schedule doesn't 
allow for much downtime in the city. 

My experience living over there 
helped me music-wise, because I now 
have friends all over Canada that I met 
while living there, and it definitely 
‘nformed my lyrics. There's no music 
industry in Taiwan; it’s all geared to- 
Wards pop music. As a result there's 
really no pie to fight over, so everyone 
‘elps and supports each other. Ed- 
monton definitely has that thing going 
’n, (00—there’s a real lamentable lack 
°* music industry here, too, so people 
“re in it more for the love ofit, and that 


encourages a sense of community.” 

Cook brings that sense of commu- 
nity to his upcoming album release 
party, a hall party replete with a pot- 
luck dinner,.raseals underfoot and— 
of course—a fully-stocked bar. 

"I'm making hummus!" laughs 
Cook. "I looked into getting a bigger 
or more established venue for the CD 
release, but in the end I decided to 
do the show the way that I've always 
done them. It's just nicer when you 
can have friends working the door 
and the bar, and this way we're able 
to do the potluck, and people can 
bring their kids. I've found it's better 
to keep it inthe family and have more 
ofa relaxed party atmosphere.” V 


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music // 63 


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66 // 


REVIEWS 


Vivian Girls 
Everything Goes Wrong 


(In the Red) 
kkk kt 


DAVID BERRY 
// DAVID@ VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Oo” of the ongoing debates of sci- 
ence is to what extent we can come 
up with what might be described as bio- 
logical laws: the worlds of chemistry and 
physics seem to our modern eyes to very 
much follow set patterns, predictable 
enough if we know the state from which 
they start. It would stand to reason that 
biology should probably be similar, but 
that also gets us wading into a whole 
lot of philosophical debates that make 
people uneasy: to use but the example 
of, say, genetic determinism, what kind 
of free will can we really be said to have 
if it's possible to determine the physical 
and psychological make-up of a person 
from a collection of nucleic acids? 

I'm not nearly qualified enough to 
offer any kind of solid opinion of that 
kind of debate, but I think a case can 
be made for our everyday lives being 


~ governed by what we consider purely 


scientific principles. For every action 
there's an equal and opposite reaction, 
for instance: Barack Obama inspires a 
youth group to finally engage in poli 
tics, and an older group to deery him 
as a terrorist and a fake, as an example. 
Or, for one more relevant to the music 
section, in the same time that aurally 
intricate and musically innovative 


ist= 


recordsa&cds 


popular songs trrco 
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03. lucifer rising bobby beausoleil 


04. string of pearls v/a 
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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 10 2 


02. luminous night six organs of admittance 


indie bands are in their ascendancy— ; 


think Animal Collective, Grizzly Bear, 


Dirty Projectors, Vampire Weekend if : 
you don't put too much stock in that : 
last deseriptor—along come a trendy : 
gaggle of bands who trade in fairly : 


simple instrumentation and screech- 


Wavves and of course Vivian Girls. 


Last year's self-titled debut set up the i 


all-female trio as punkily optimistic, in- 
spired to tell the world about the good 
times they were having to dirty guitars 
and a relentless rhythm section. Their 


follow-up, Everything Goes Wrong, takes ‘ 


a decidedly more disillusioned turn 
while also filling out their sound. The 
latter could hardly be classified as any 
great leap, but the overall thematic 
unity is a welcome step for a band that's 
purposely fairly straightforward, put- 
ting a little more art into their punk. 

A break-up album where the mood is 


anawful lot more "aw fuckit" than "what : 
have I lost?” Everything Goes Wrong runs : 
the gamut between bratty kiss-offs and : 


frustration at not being able to escape 
an ex's pull. The former includes the bit- 


ingly sarcastic "You're My Guy," about a : 
friend whose benefits aren't making up : 


for his insensitivity, and "I Have No Fun,” 


a semi-bitter turn-around of a lover's : 
criticism. The latter represent some of : 
the best stuff on the album, including : 
the relatively expansive and noodly "Set : 


Out for the Sun," which asks "why do I 
wait around for this one?" before burst- 
ing into ani extended, distorted fury, and 


the decidedly more to-the-point opener ; 
"Walking Alone at Night," where singer/ : 


guitarist Cassie Ramone wanders in a 
catchy daze, reprimanding herself for 
ever caring about the one who got away. 


There's plenty more, from the openly : 
hurt break-up song “Survival” to the : 


moodily sparse and surprisingly sin- 


ister "I'm Not Asleep," all of it adding : 
up to an album that manages to infuse : 


crashing and fuzz with a very vulner- 


able emotional core. It's not the kind of : 
delicate touch that can really pull your : 


heart strings, but it might be a perfect 


album to put on while you're walking : 


home pissed off. W 


10443 - 124 street 
780.732.1132 
www listenrecords.net 


sound of wonder Lrico 


The Seund _ 
Gi Wonder! 


legends of benin cev: 


06. king of jeans pissed jeans 
0 ark espvall/patoh 
‘fe is the headlight spiral joy band 


10. everything goes wrong vivian girls 


: traditonally arranged songs 
ing, fuzzy distortion—think No Age, : 


Fortresses 


: (White Whale) 

2 ketok irs 
Vancouver 
folk /rock art 
Mare Morri 
follows up twe i} 
received alb: 


with another », 
dle of somew} 
sounding 
more and more like a ghostly Tom p; 
in a grieving process. The experi; 
tion associated with the Canadia 
role is mostly heard teetering 
percussion, only becoming discerna| 
after a third or fourth full-length lis, 
Curious fans will be pleased to hea 
musician evolving at his own pac; 
teeming the kind of patience that wo 
make this particular act seem app 
ing. 

JONATHAN BUSCH 

// JONATHAN@VUEWEEKLY.CO. 


nent 


Arctic Monkeys 
Humbug 


: (Domino) 
way 


If you can get pa 
the band's init 
over-hypedness- 
and there are those 
who sti i 
with it—the Arct 
Monkeys is one of 
the more clever acts who can count or 
mainstream support. Though Humbu 
pushes the band away from its more 
upbeat, punky roots—not a whole lot 
here would play all that well ona danc: 
floor—Alex Turner's sharply sar 
lyrics haven't gone anywher 
though the album has its share 
missteps, for the most part the evolu 
tion seems natural: the groo 
ends of "Crying Lightning” and "P’ 
Approaching” seem appropriate foi 
Turner's weltschmerz, and the rel 
ly dreamy "Cornerstone" might be thc 
best song the group has ever written 
DAVID BERRY 

if DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.< 


Miles Jones 
: Runaway Jones 
: (Mojo) 
kkk ky 
With the help of 
several producers 
including Black 


Milk, Natura! Dig 
gers and DJ Serious, 
Toronto emcee/D! 
producer Miles 
Jones has crafted a record which shu’ 
fles between street beats and club bee! 
classic and contemporary styles a 
to Coast," came about from a [1 
Jones took in Japan and sounds like 
pinch of Lupe Fiasco with a da 
Akon. If Runaway Jones were an 
cartoon, "Runaway," whose tempo B'< 
ually accelerates as if to accompa”) 
moment of suspense, would be the p 
fect theme song. To answer Jone 
question, "Do you remember them 03 
at a time like this? When the music 
fly, and you could rhyme like this 
answer with a solid "Heck, yeah! 
KRISTINA DE GUZMAN 

/ KRISTINAGIVUEWEERLY.COM 


fH 


legacy. 
DAVID BERRY 
/ DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Megadeth 
Endgame 
(Roadrunner) 


Prisoners? Hell no, 


in the band’s past. 


atthew Sweet and Susanna 
Hoffs 

Under the Covers Vol. 2 
(Shout) 


Ook eit 


SEN @VUEWEEKLY.COM 


: The Black Crowes 

: Amorica 

: (American) 

= Originally released: 1994 


ul + There's a new album out by the 
continuation of his : 
legendary solo de- : 
but suffers a bit : 
from the same : 
nung iad ofthe Wu-Tang : 
we Ghostface: there hasn't been a : 

rE lot of evolution, and what was : 
once revolutionary and revelatory has : 
influenced so muchitseemsrunofthe : 
mill. Rae is certainly more inspired : 
than his frequently limp interceding : 
records, and with the right producer— : 
RZA on the creepy "Black Mozart,” J : 
Dilla on the epic "House of Flying : 
daggers’ —hits on some worthy follow- : 
up to the original. It won't ever be mis- : 
taken, but it's at least worthy of the : 
: thing the band 
: has tumed out on 
: record in more 
: than a decade, 


: Let's Go To War 
: Karmageddon 
: (Last Gang) 


; Slap-Chop Electro 
: Stuttering synth dance-a-thon 
> And youll love his nuts 


LBUM REVIEWS 


Black Crowes. Two, actually. The 
first—the official new album—is 
titled Before the Frost ..., while the 
second—a bonus f= 
digital giveaway | 
when you buy the | 
first—is .. Until 
the Freeze, and 
both were record- 
ed live in front of 
an audience. 
Truth be told, 
neither of the 
new discs is bad. 
In fact, the two 
albums are quite 
likely the best 


jammed-out sonic wasteland. 


But, while there are enough keepers to : 
make it worth wading through the two al- : 
bums at least once or twice, and while the : 
players in the group are sounding more like : 
a whole than they have in the past couple : 
of years, the new music ultimately suffers : 
from being scattered over too many min- : 


utes, with too much filler in between. 
Lack of focus is a problem that 1994's 


ting rock 'n' roll of its sophomore album— 


years later as Tall—Amorica is a wide- 
ranging set of songs that somehow man- 


ages to connect, seeming very much like : 


: Joey Cape 

: Bridge 
Albums made up of : 
cover songs are : 
pretty rarely any- : 
thing more than a : 
minor bump in an : 
artist's catalogue, : 
and that's pretty : 
much the case with this second covers : 
Sct from Matthew Sweet and Susanna : 
Nofts. It’s pleasant and often fun—the : 
ack and forth ofthe male-female vocals : 
Sves the songs a twist, ifnot anentirely : 
is ? Backpack hip hopper 
? Reformed Squeegee kid sounds like 
: He needs a showerrrrerrrrr 


(Bad Taste) 


It's in his nature 
HAD to make acoustic disc 
Like breathing, yawning 


Eas 
ko 

Let's Blaze 

(Castle Hil) 


AMORICATHE BRAVE >> Leaving radio behind 
; and it's miles above the last record, the : 
ee Se 


every piece is just one brick in a wall 
of sound. 
Its a record that swells up 
rather than kicking the door 
down, though it doesn't ex- 
actly build slowly and quietly. 
No, the opening percussion on 
"Gone" grabs hold of the listener 
and looks them straight in the eyes, 
swaying back and 
forth — hypnoti- 
cally as one guitar 
muscles in with a 
4 chunky, rhythmic 
riff, another lays 
down something 
funkier but borne 
of the same 
soul Before you 
know it, there's a 
lead snaking its 
way through the 
groove, hard to 
catch as it wiggles 
| through the song. 
It's a tough 
opening to an al- 


: bum that depicts the wear and tear the 
band's first with new guitarist Luther : 
= Dickinson, son of late soulman Jim Dick : 
: inson. This time out, the group manages : 
: to coalesce into a more than solid unit, : 
: helped along by a decent-enough help- : 
= ing of songs that go somewhere rather : 
: than wandering aimlessly through some 
we don't need : 
them. And Mega- : 
| deth doesn't take = 
them on Endgame, : 
which feels like a : 
new beginning as : 
the band tears apart the opening in- : 
strumental, “Dialectic Chaos,” with du- : 
cling guitars over a rhythm section as : 
olid as the band has ever known— : 
maybe even more so. Really, bandlead- : 
er Dave Mustaine has outdone himself, : 
ying together a fantastic band with : 
killer songs, from the heavy groove of : 
the main riff on "Bit the Hand" to the : 
Spanish-guitar undertone of "The : 
Hardest Part of Letting Go ... Sealed : 
With a Kiss" to the all-out beating of : 
"Headerusher.” And the production : 
serves it all well, too, utilizing sound = 
clipsand plenty ofatmosphericsounds : 
beneath the band's crunch, Mustaine : 
sounding as angry as ever with every : 
step along the way. All that makes for = 
an album every bitas good as anything = 


band had been through in the few years 
since it broke big, though the Crowes 
were just as willing to let the guard 


> down—even if distrust remained, lurking 


in the lyrical background—easing up on 
songs like "Cursed Diamond," "Nonfiction" 


: and Descending.” 


In fact, the quieter tunes outnumber 
the rockers on Amorica, even if they do 
tend to rise up loudly into musical thun- 
derstorms. Lyrically, though, singer Chris 
Robinson perhaps sums the band's evolu- 
tion up best in the chorus of the rolling 
"Wiser Time," where he sings, "On a good 
day, its not every day / We can part the 


: sea/ And ona bad day, its not every day / 
: Glory beyond our reach." It was this will- 
Amorica doesn't have, though. An album : 
borne of success—the band was still rid- : 
ing on the wave created by the classic-rock : 
stylings of its debut and the ragged, cut- : 


ingness to reach far—and occasionally 
fail—that imbued Amorica with an en- 
ergy that simply could not be sustained. 


While classic-rock radio has ensured ~ 
= that the band will be forever linked with 
and frustration—the band had spent time ; 
in the studio previous to the sessions that : 
spawned Amorica, only to abandon those : 
recordings until they were released many : 
: emerged from. Unfortunately, after a 
: couple more years the band would im- 


the hits from its first album—"She Talks 
to Angels,” “Jealous Again," etc—there 
is something infinitely more interesting 
about the painful chaos that Amorica 


plode and never fully recover. W 


Spirits 
Spirits : 
(Sonic Unyon) 


80's influenced 
DX7, played with balls 


: Anda popped collar 


: Jesse Harris 
: Watching the Sky 
: (Secret Sun) 


: Slinky and sexy 
: Penis and Vagina meet 
: When mambos kick in 


oe 
: Taken By Trees 

: East Of Eden 

: (Rough Trade) 


: Cosmopolitan 
: Cool-guy world music made by 
: Ululating Swedes 


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SATURDAY, SEPT 12 


SEP 10 — SEP 16, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY music // 67 


FRISEPT 11TH 
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Burlington youths aren't buying it, though 


MIKE ANGUS 
// MIKEANGUS@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Bonen: I Am Committing 
la Sin (IACAS) has only been to- 
gether for a year, has just released its 
first EP, Grow Past Their Promises, and 
the members’ average age is a mere 19 
years old. So it surprised me to hear 
guitarist Paul Marc Rousseau express 
his seeming premature frustration 
alongside his reverence for his home- 
town’s live music scene. 

"Burlington has a reputation for hav- 
ing one of the strongest music scenes 
in Canada. So many successful and in- 
fluential bands have come out of there, 
like Silverstein, Death Divine, they're 
doing really well. It's too bad I feel like 
the scene's dying, and that's upsetting 
Kids are stupid. People go to shows for 
the wrong reasons now. They don't go to 
shows to see bands; they want to hard- 
core dance until someone gets hurt. I 
have a bigger problem with how DJ sets 
by people who used to be in bands sell 
more tickets than the bands they used 
to be in. That shit sucks." 

Obviously, [ACAS has no problems 
getting in your face. In fact, the group 
seems hell-bent on it, taking an un- 
blinking-though-tongue-in-cheek run 
at hot topics such as politics and or- 
ganized faith throughout the EP—as 
if it weren't obvious from the band's 


OROSCOPE 


ARIES (Mar 21 — Apr 19) 


| don't think I'm being unduly optimistic : 
when | speculate that you're on the verge : 
of achieving a ringing victory over your : 
bad self. What makes me so confident that : 


this development is in the works? 
Well, in recent weeks you have 
been dealing more forthrightly 
and intelligently with the low 
est aspects of your character. 
You have also become more 
fully aware of the difference 
between your out-and-out 
unregenerate qualities and the 
unripe aspects of your character 


that may someday become very beauti- : 
ful There's a second sign that you're close : 
to transforming one of the most negative : 


things about you: you have almost figured 
out the truth about a murky curse that 


you internalized some time ago. When : 
you finally identify it, you will know intui- : 


: CANCER (Jun 2 — Jul 22) 


: Murmurs and whispers will have more : 


tively how to banish it forever. 


TAURUS (Apr 20 — May 20) 


| expect that you'll be a force of nature in : 
the coming days, the human equivalent : 
of a divine intervention. In fact, you might : 
want to give fair warning to friends and : 
loved ones who assume that you have : 
always been and will always be steady, : and temporarily. Forceful confrontations : 
placid and mild. Otherwise they may : 
be unduly freaked out when your intel- : 
ligence explodes like a double rainbow : 
or when you start emoting like a water- : 
fall. They might accuse you of “not being : 


GEMINI (May 21 — Jun 20) 


sun. Where are all the | dids'?" I'm happy to 


able period to make up for lost time. 


: are likely to be eminently trustworthy. 


yourself" when your laughter turns vol- : 


outbreak of your elemental gifts. 


68 //8 


: LEO (Jul 23 — Aug 22) 


canic or your decisions hit with the force : 


of the aurora borealis. It'll be interesting : KFC is test-marketing a flamboyant new 


for you to notice which of your close co- : 
horts responds most favourably to this : US. This remarkable delicacy is an exotic : 
: sandwich that consists of bacon, two serv- : 


WUEWEEKLY // 


"Here's what | did not do this summer," : 
begins the testimony of one of my Gemini : 
readers, Beth Hylton. "Not once did | swing : 
on a tire swing over the river, watching : 
the pink shimmery reflection of myself : 
in a wet suit on a tire swing. | did : 
not take a day off work to sneak : 
out alone to Jones Beach with a : 
book and a beer in a ginger ale : 
bottle. | did not eat outside ata : 
red-checkered-tablecloth-and- : 
too-much-cheese-on-the-pasta : 
Italian restaurant. | did not catch : 
fireflies for the satisfaction of setting : 
them free and! did not napinthenoontime : 
: LEO (Jul 23 — Aug 22) 
It's Build Up Your Confidence by Any : 
Means Possible Week—for Virgos only. : 
During this holiday, you have an astro- : 
logical mandate as well as a poetic license : 
: to pluck the easy victories. So go ahead : 
: and solve the kinds of riddles that are 
: your specialty. Arrange to be in situations : 
where your perspective is desperately : 
: needed. Put yourself in the presence of < 


inform Beth, as well as any of her fellow : 
: Geminis who might have been remiss indo- : 
: ing the kinds of activities she named, that 

the next three weeks will be a very favour- : 


clout than clamours and shouts. A candle : 
in the dark will provide more illumination : people who think you're a gift to the hu 
than a bonfire at high noon. Short jaunts : 
could transform everything permanently; : 


long trips might only shift things slightly = 


: ings of cheese and special sauce, all held : 
together not by bread but by two slabs of : 
fried chicken. | nominate this spectacular : 
creation to be your earthy metaphor of the : 
week. In accordance with the astrological : 
omens, | hope it inspires you to head out to : 
the frontiers of extravagance in both your : 
spiritual affairs and your romantic life. The : 
coming days will be an ideal time to pray to : 
both Christ and the Goddess while making : 
> pants as you pull off a savvy coup or abril- : 
liant stroke. An annoying pest may try to : 
: distract you at about the same time that : 
: movers and shakers are tuning in to your 4 
> magnificence. But | don't mean to imply : 
: that minor irritants will undermine your : AQUARIUS (Jan 20 - Feb 18) 
: victories. | think you're too unbeatable 
for that to happen. At worst, you'll have a : 
mild headache as you receive your reward : 
or stumble slightly as you stride into the : 
: This accomplishment is more possible for 
> you right now than it has been in a long 
: time. In fact, you could even overcome 2 
: negative legacy that made some of you 


love, for example, or to get sandwiched be- 


tween two delicious devotees while medi- : 


tating naked, or to perform a boisterous 


ritual to invoke emotional riches with the : 


help of a genius of love. 


man race and subtly encourage your se- : 


cret admirers to be less secretive. If you : 


have any trophies or awards, make them : Don't pour out the whole truth all atonce = 


> more visible. There's no shame in bragging 


may lead to a muddle; feints and tricks and 2 this week, Virgo, but for best results do it 


bluffs could spark crafty solutions. The : 


"simple facts” will probably be tainted by : 
lies of omission; the messy contradictions : LIBRA (Sep 23 — Oct 22) 
: My first demand is that you weed out the : 


: wishy-washy wishes and lukewarm long- : 
= ings that keep you distracted from your : 


: CAPRICORN (Dec 22 - Jan 19) 


: burning desires. My second demand Is that : ; 
menu item at selected restaurants in the : you refuse to think that anyone else knows : What if a billion Chinese people jumped 
: better than you what dreams will keep : 


your life energy humming with maximum > ment? Would they create, at the mo- 


with your best understated elegance. 


name—and wrapping it in razor-edged 
progressive rock that's as literate and 
smart as it is aggressive and inciting. 
“We definitely have a pretty major 
problem with organized religion. I 
don't think it was an initial tenet of the 


eratnmcenane en 


that’s a song,’ we try that out. ; 
comes together in 20 minutes 
that's a song. But if it takes more (| 
one session to work out the skele; 
then it’s probably not a good one. 3 
we're not gonna use it. So we're pr 


Bent mLAneLSFuAa aMMPMEaE?tEaM Sherine cot 


The big thing is there's a stigma that if you're an 
atheist you're amoral, you're a bad person, and we 
all think that's total shit. We obviously don't thin| 


x 


we're committing a sin, we don't think anybody 
commits sin and that's the bottom line. We're a 


veiled political band. 


band ... but at the same time, music is 
an art form, and it's useless if you don't 
have anything to say. The big thing is 
there's a stigma that if you're an athe- 
ist you're amoral, you're a bad person, 
and we all think that’s total shit. We 
obviously don't think we're committing 
a sin, we don't think anybody commits 
sin and that's the bottom line. We're a 
veiled political band.” 

Despite how much thought Rous- 
seau et al put into song, it's again 
shocking to hear him talk about the 
songwriting process. 

“It's enigmatic in a way. I'm not sure 
how songs come together. We get to- 
gether and if by accident something 
is played that's like ‘Oh, I don't think 


efficiency and beauty. Now please repeat ; 
the following assertions about 20 times: "I : 
: posite side of the world, in Chile an 


know exactly what | want. | know exactly 


what | don't want. | know exactly what | : 
: propose a not unsimilar but more int 


kind of want but | won't waste my time on 


it any more because it sidetracks me from : 
= corn who reads this horoscope 
: one minute at exactly 1 pm EDT on 
: tember 12, and during that time yo 
: meditate intently on a single glowin 


working on what | really really want." 


SCORPIO (Oct 23 — Nov 21) 


Ants may literally be crawling in your 


spotlight 


: SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 — Dec 21) 

: "That which can be destroyed by the truth : 
should be," wrote author P.C. Hodgell Iwish : 
there were a gentler way to articulate that : 
> wisdom, but | can't think of one. Instead Ml : 
: suggest a way to apply it so as to make the : 
end result more graceful than shocking: : 


> PISCES (Feb 19 — Mar 20) 


in one big dramatic gesture. Do it gradually 


: and tenderly. As you do, keep in mind that : 
: when the truth has finally dismantled the : 
: thing that could not endure the truth, you 
: may be able to use the debris as raw mate- : 
: rial to build something new that the truth 
> will feel right at home in. 


: up into the air at the same exact mo- : 
: the thing in earnest. W 


: around because of your charming 


: build it or pretend to build it, y 
? manic or send out mixed messages. ‘" 
: may be intrigued and attracted, but t"< 
: definitely won't come. So my advic 

> sces, is to suppress your mood 


impatient, ADD songwriters. | thi : 
all the best songs are written quick 
And that's how we handle everythj 
that’s how we record, that's how we cai __ 
our lunch. Do it quick or not at all 


eeerPEUMATINAAANEN MAB NCRINETRNNAENEN AINE AL 


1 } SEP 72 (5 PM) 
palit on A DAY TO REMEMBER, + 


ment they landed, a shockwave tha 
would cause an earthquake on the « 


Argentina? No one knows. I'd like 


esting experiment. What if every 


thought, which is this; all of you ¢ 
corns deserve an act of uncanny 5 
that will help free you from one of you 
most oppressive beliefs. 


: Some rare people, through heroic act 


will and the help of a really good imag! 
nation, manage to free themselves pret 
thoroughly from the inertia of their p2s! 


ancestors crazy and sick. For maybe 
the third time ever, you're In a posit 
to escape the sins of the fathers and the 


: flaws of the mothers! 


: if you build it, they will probably ¢ 


if you just pretend to build it 


may come anyway, and end up st! 
s attui 


ement to life's deeper rhythms. !f, a5 


swin 


as you at least start pretending to 


downstairs) 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq + ASA with the EPL 
eee ta wh Gr ‘St Maur (artist and 


«gjoam-330pm + $60 (before Sep 15-early bird special)/$75 
ater Sep 15) at 780-464-6005 E: hynntlau@gmailcom 

GIG BIN EVENT - edmonton.ca/reuse -To dispose of 
household items in good condition too large for regular 
garbage collection at no cost. Household hazardous waste 
tems not accepted « Sep 12-23 at Millwroods Town Centre, 23 
Ave, 66 St» Kennedale, 12810-58 St; Sep 19-20 

BLACK HOLES: A NINETY YEAR JOURNEY « 
Robbins Health Learning Centre, Rm 9-323, 10910-104 Ave « 


lecture by Laura Ferrarese, 


edimontenrasc-com + Pree public 

peeented by the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada « 
Seo16,7g0pm 

BUDDHIST PRACTICE « 1052-70 Ave, karmatashiling. 
a+ Karma Tashi Ling: Tranquility Meditation and Chenrezig 
Practice with Ani Kunzang every Wed, 7pm - DVD's and 
discussion; Fn, 7pm + Free, beginners welcome 
CANADIAN MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION . 
Suite 890, 10045-112 St + 780.414.6311 » Family support drop-in 
sgmup for individuals who are supporting an adult family 
rember who is living with a mental illness - Every Wed, 
$30-830pm. 

CHESS CLUB « 780.474.2318 « Leam to play chess; 
opportunities for all ages including classes, school programs 
and tournaments « rovingchessmits@shaw.ca 

CREE LANGUAGE . Stanley A. Milner Library, 
Centennial Room (lower level) « Introduction to basic 
conversational Gree « Tue, Sep 15-Nov 24; Wed; Sep 16-Nov 
a5 Thu, Sep 17-Nov 26, 6prn « Pre-register at 780.496.7020; 
tnfte Laura Morin at 780.495.1968 or lmorin@epl.ca 
DOLLHOUSE MINIATURE SHOW AND SALE . 
Exccutive Royal Inn West Edmonton, 10010-178 St + Sun, Sep 
®o, 10am-¢prn = S4 (addultSa (p-asyrsyinder 6 free 
EDMONTON BICYCLE COMMUTERS’ SOCIETY 
+ 1004)-80 Ave, back alley entrance « 780.433.2453 + 
cdmontonbikes.ca + Basic Bicyele Mechanics - Every Tue/ 
Fri to Sep a5, 6pm. + Free (member)/Si0 (non-member), 
preregister 

EDMONTON ESPERANTO SOCIETY - 10025-1024 
Ave, Rim aBia8 «780.702.5127 « Fri, noon-zpm - vaughn@ 
sewardeonsulting com 
EDMONTON FAMOUS SOCIETY « Lousie 
McKinney Park= Picnic in the Parle Celebrating Women 


Mectings for these who are supporting a family member 
who has @ mental ilinessjwant to learn more about mental 
Stoesses. Meet for 2 hours every Tue for6 consecutive weeks 
* Scuion © Sep 15- Oct 20, 6:30-830pmi « $20 (fee covers the 
coe? of mmamal 

GREAT EXPEDITIONS-HOSTEL TRAVEL 

SUDE Show - Hostelling totemational, 10647-8 Ave « 
oass.bon6/assings « Slide shows are on the and Mon each 
month « Hikes (2008) presented by Shirley 
jackoon, Oscar Zawalsley and Edda Loomes and Copper 
Ganyon (2008) presented by Elvira Leibovitz - Donation of a 
‘onic + Sep 24, 7-30pm 


Asovted Living Place, 1248-84 Ave « Home Blends music, 
“coma, creativity znd reflection on sacred texts te energize 
ou for passionate living « Every Sun 3-spm 
MOUNTAIN z LECTURE 
SERIES . E-120 Van Vitet Centre, Physed, U of A+ 
“seatattons by Dr. Dianne Chisholm on her new work 


THE NEW ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA - Winspear 

“este. 4 Str Winston Churchill Sq « Randall Stout, lead 

“<hatect on the renovation of the AGA will discuss the 

vo pe aa ilowopley behind the new gallery - Sst, Sep 

4 PHILOSOPHY FOR LIVING sGi Culture Centre, 
re. Awe, and «Free Buddhist lecture « Sat, Sep 12, 


Q&A WITH DERRICK JENSEN - ET. Bldg. Rm E 
pod fh denn + Forget 

“onal Change Dees Not Equal Potitical Change - $5-$10 
“tng scale ad tickets at Earth's General Store)« Wed, Sep 


RALLY TO TAKE THE POWER BACKI . Centra 
Lions Senior Centre, 11113-113 St + 780.406.9077 » OurPow- 
erEdmonton.ca» Stop the sale of EPCOR + Wed, Sep 16, 
T-9pm; 7pm (registration), 70pm (action) 
REPORT FROM PALESTINE - 8US1-s Business Bldg. 
U of A» Libby Davies and Kim Elliott will share stories and 
photos from their Aug 2009 delegation to the West Bank 
and Gaza in occupied Palestine - Fri, Sep 18,7-9pm Free 
(donations to fund Edmonton participation in the Jan 1, 2010 
(Gaza Freedom March) « psnedmonton.ca/2009/09/02/event- 
report-from-palestine/ 
‘MacEwan College, Rm 627, Alberta Coll bye ie 
27. lege Campus, 10050 
MacDonald Dr « rcvo.org » Sat, Sep 19, 8:30am-430pm « 
$3373 (ind moming refreshments, hunch}: Pre-register at 
Sepigboardworkshop.eventbrite.com, E: voluntarysector- 


SUGARSWING DANCE CLUB . Orange Hall, 10335-84 
Ave + 780.604.7572 « sugarswing com + Swing Dance at 
Sugar Foot Stomp: no experience needed, beginner lesson 
followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door) 

SYMPHONY 101-ES0 - stanley A. Milner Library 
«For those who wish to enhance their symphony-going 
experience. Hosted by D7. Baker « Sat, Sep 19, 1pm « Free, 
pre-registration required at 780.496.7030 

TAOIST TAI CHI SOCIETY « sir Wilbur McIntyre 
‘Gazebo, 103 St, 83 Ave « Demonstartions of Taoist Tai Chi; 
Sst, Sep 12, 10-130am + Butler Park, 15715 Stony Plain Rd, 
free introductory tai chi dass; Sat, Sep 12, 2-3pm 
VEGAN/VEGETARIAN POTLUCK - Riverdale Com- 
munity Hall, 9231-100 Ave « Bring a homemade vegetarian, 
vegan or raw vegan dish for 6 people, plate, utensils, mug, 
copy of recipe + Sun, Sep 13, 18 530-7pm 

WOMEN IN BLACK «In Front of the Old Strathcona 
Farmers’ Market « Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-12am, 
each month, stand in silence for a world without violence 
WORKING THROUGH INTERPERSONAL 
CONFLICT - Lois Hole Library, 17650-69 Ave « mrjcca+ 
Mediation and Restorative Justice Centre + Sep 19, 1-30-4- 
s30pm » Pre-register at stylermatters.eventbrite com; Heather 


at 780.423.0866 ext 201 
ee 


AZIMUTH THEATRE - 11315-106 Ave « A Close Encoun- 


ter with James Jordan: Vaudevilleian Magic show « Sep 17-20, 


8pm; Sep 19-20, 6pm + $22 at fixzzyhairnet, $15 (door) 
CENTURY CASINO «13:03 Fort Rd « 780.481.9857 - 
Shows start at 8pm Thu-Sat and late show at 10:30pm on 
Fri-Sat; $12 (Thu)/Si9 (Fri/Sat) 

COMEDY FACTORY « Gateway Entertainment Centre, 
34 Ave, Calgary Trail «Thu, 80pm; Sat, 8pm and 1opm 

» Danny Accapella; Sep 21-22 « Daryl Rhoades; Sep 18-19 

» Olivia Allen Arlington; Sep 24-26 + So You think You're 
Funny: competition for Comedy Factory's ninth Birthday, 
Every Thu in Sep 

COMIC STRIP « Bourbon St, WEM «720.483.5999 « Wed- 
Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm « Henry Cho; Sep 10, 8pm; 
Sep 11-12, 8pm and 10:30pm « Hit or Miss Monday's; Sep 
14, 8pm « Alternative Tuesday's; Sep 15, 8prn « Lars Callieou; 
Sep 16, 8pm - Finesse Mitchell; Sep 27, 20, 8pm; Sep 18-19, 
8pm, 10:30pm. 

DRUID « 11606 Jasper Ave «780.710.2119 - Comedy Night: 
Hosted by Lars Callieou « Every Sun, 9pm 

LAUGH SHOP—Whyte « and Fi, 10368-82 Ave « 
780.476.1010 « thelaughshop.ca + Harry Doupe until Sep 13+ 
‘Tim Koslo; Sep 22-27 

RIVER CREE «The Venue « Brent Butt + Sat, Sep 19, 8pm. 
WINSPEAR CENTRE . Sir Winston Churchill Sq + 
780.428.1414 « winspearcentre.com + Gerry Dee « Thu, Sep x7, 
‘Spm + $44 and $36.75 at Winspear box office 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-Red Deer - Sunnybrook 
United Church, Red Deer « 403.347.6073 - Affirm welcome 
LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 
and Tie, 7pm, each month 

BISEXUAL WOMEN’S COFFEE GROUP - A social 
group for bi-curious and bisexxal women every and Tue of 
the month, 8pm « groupsyahoo.com/group/bwedmonton 
BOOTS BAR AND LOUNGE 10242-1065 st- 
780.423.5014 + bootsbar.ca « and Thu: Illusions Social Club « 
3rd Wed: Edmonton O Society « and Tye: Edmonton Rain- 
bow Business Association « Every Fri: Philosophy Café « Pri 
and Sat DJ SeXXXy Sean 10-3 « Long Weekend Sundays fea- 
ture the Stardust Lounge with Miss Bianca and Vanity Fair 
BUDDYS NITE CLUB « 117255 Jasper Ave - 780.488.7736 « 
DJ Dust 'n' Time; Mon 9pm + DJ Arrow Chaser; Tue gpm + D) 
Dust 'n' Time; Wed gpm, no cover before 1opm + D] Arrow 
Chaser; Fri 8pm, no cover before 1opm + DJ Earth Shiver 'n’ 
Quake; Sat 8pm, no cover before 10pm + DJ Bobby Beatz; 
Sun opm « Drag Queen Performance Show, Sun, no cover 
before iopm. 
EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) « Unitarian 
‘(Church of Edmonton, 10804-119 St « A group of alder 

gy men who have common interests meet the and Sun, 
2:30pm, for a social period, short meeting and guest speaker, 
discussion panel or potluck supper. Special interest groups 
meet for other social activities throughout the month. E: 
edmontonpt@yahoo.ca « primetimersww.org/edmonton 
GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION - teamedmon- 
ton.ca « Women’s Drop-In Recreational Badminton; Oliver 
School Gym, 10227-218 St; 780.465.3620; Wed, 6-730pm 

+ Bootcamp; Lynnwood Elementary School at 1545-84 Ave; 
ing: Gateway Lanes, 100, 3414 Gateway Blvd; Sat, 5-7p™ 


SEP 10 - SEP 16, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


106 St’ Tue, 8-gpm, Thuy 7-fo-8jopm; sWwithming@teamed- 
monton.ca + Volleyball: Tue Recreational: Mother Teresa 
Elementary School at goo8-105A, 8-10pm; Thu intermediate: 
Academy, 101 Airport Rd, 8-10pm; recvol- 
; volleyball@tearnedmonton.ca 
+ YOGA (Hatha} Free Yoga every Sun, 2-3-30pm; Korezone 
Fitness, 203, 10575-115 St, yoa@teamedmonton.ca 
ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB: CROSSDRESSERS . 
786.387.3343 + meet monthly « For info goto groupsyahoo, 
‘com/groupfedmonton_illusions/ 
INSIDE/OUT ..U of A Campus « Campus-based organi 
: nganiza~ 
tion for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer 
(LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, Straight allies 
and support staff « 3rdThu each month (fall/winter terms}: 
Speakers Series. Contact Kris (kwells@ualberta.ca) 
LIVING POSITIVE « 404, 1048-124 St. edmlivingposi- 
tive.ca + 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5763 « Providing confidential 
Peer support to people living with HIV + Tie, 7-9pm: Support 
Group + Daily drop-in, peer counselling 
MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB . geocities 
‘com/makingwaves_edm + Recreational/competitive swim- 
ming, Socializing after practices + Every Tue, Thu 
PLAY NIGHTCLUB . 10220-103 St « playnightdub, 
a» Open Thu, Fri, Sat with DJs Alexe Brown and Eddie 
Toonflash 


PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON -- 9540-11: Ave» 
780.488.3234 + pridecentreofedmonton.org + Open Tue-Fri 
1-10pm, Sat 2-6:30pm + LGBT Seniors Drop-in: Every Tue/ 
‘Thu, a-4pm « CA: Thu (7pm) + Suit Up and Show Up: AA big 
book study group every Sat, noon + Youth Understanding 
Youth: Up to 25 years, support and social group every Sat, 
7-9pm™; yuy@shaw.ca * Womonspace: Board meeting ast Sun 
every month, 10:30am-12:30pm « Trans Education/Support 
Group: Meet the ast and 3rd Sun, 2-4pm, every month; al- 
bertatrans.org « Men Talking with Pride: Sun 7pm; facilitator: 
Rob Wells robwells78o@hotmail.com » HIV Support Group: 
and Mon every month, 7pm « Transgender, Transsexual, 
Intersex and Questioning (TT1Q) Alliance: Support meeting 
and Tue every month, 7;30pm + Transgender, Transsexual, In- 
tersex and Questioning. Education, advocacy and support for 
men, women and youth * Free short-term, solution-focused 
drop-in counseling; Wed, 7-10pm « YouthSpace: drop-in for 
LGBTQ for youth up to 25; Tue-Sat, 3-7pm. 

PRISM BAR - 10524-101 St + 780.990.0038 « Wed: Free 
Pool; Karaoke, 9pm-midnight «Thu: Prism Pool League; 
7-1:30pm « Fri: Steak Nites; 5-9pm; DJ at 93pm 
ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH . 
10209-123 St « 780.482.1587 + Soul OUTing: an LGBT-focused 


alternative worship » and Sun every month, 7pm; worship Sun, 


1030am; people of all sexual orientations welcome. LGBT 
monthly book dub and film night. E: jravenscroft@rwucorg 
ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH - 1526-76 Ave + 
780.436.5855 « People of all semua! orientations are welcome + 
Every Sun (10am worship) 

WOMONSPACE . 780.4321794 + womonspace.ca, 
womonspace@gmail.com «A Non-profit lesbian social 
organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly 
activities, newsletter, reduced rates inchided with member- 
ship. Confidentiality assured 


WOODYS - 11723 Jasper Ave + 780.488.4557 « Karaoke with 
Nathan; Mon 8pm « Martini Mondays; 3pm « You Don't 
Know Game Show with Patrick and Nathan; Thu 9pm « 
Long Island Iced Tea; Thu 3pm « Karaoke with Morgan; Wed 
7pm > Karaoke with Keyin; Sun 8pm 

YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH - yuyedmca- 
Meets every Sat,7-9pm « Contact Scott for info email: info@ 
yuyedin.ca, T: 780.248.1971 


CANINES AND COCKTAILS - Palace Banquet and 
Conference Facility, 3223 Parsons Rd « scarscare.org « It's 
Magic silent and live auction; fundraiser for Second Chance 
Animal Rescue Society (SCARS) « Sep 18, 6pm » $35 ind buf 
fet dinner) available at Tail Blazers and online 
COHENIGHTS ARTS SOCIETY - Westin Hotel, Devo- 
nian Rm, 10135-100 St « Fund Raising Gala for Nepal Medical 
School; Sat, Sep 19, 7-30pm (appetizers, silent auction) 
dancing until 4am; $60 (entire evening)/$a5 (after 10pm, for 
the dance) at TIX on the Square « A Tower of Song: Jubilee 
Auditorium « Leonard Cohen Night 2009: With Adam Co- 
hen, Adam Gregory, Larisa Sembaliuk Cheladyn (visual art), 
Janaya “Sista J” Elis of Souljah Pyah; Ido vanderLaan, hosted 
by Peter Brown « Fri, Sep 18, 8pm » Tickets at TicketMaster 
COMPETITIVE DANCESPORT TEAM . st John's 
Cultural Gentre, 10611 110 Ave « Gala and fundraiser + Sat, 
Sep 12, 6-30-22 + $20 (adult/Sx0 (3-15) at TIX on the Square 
CORNFEST AND FAMILY FUN DAY - Callingwood 
south parking lot, 69 Ave, 178 St callingwoodmarketplace. 
com + Support the Firefighters Burn Treatment Society + Sat, 
Sep 12, noon-spm 
EDMONTON COMPETITIVE DANCESPORT 
TEAM . St John's Cultural Centre, 10611-110 Ave « 
dancesportfundraiser.ca + Gala and fundraiser featuring Jim 
Deglau and Elena Sinelnikova; a free introductory ballroom 
lesson, social dancing, silent auction, hors d'oeuvres and des- 
sert buffet « Sat, Sep 12, é-yopm « $20 (adultl/S1o (youth 3-15) 
at TIX on the Square; infants under two are free 
EDMONTON EARTH DAY EVENT - Macintyre Park 
beside the Old Strathcona Farmers Market, 82 Ave, 104 St; 
Adventure Park, behind the Knox Church, 85 Ave, 204 St+ 
Harvest celebration with entertainment and environmental 
advocacy and exhibits and demonstrations « Sat, Sep 19, 12- 
6pm « Info 780.460.1796, E edmontonearthday@shaw.ca 
GADEN SAMTEN LING'S TIBETAN BAZAAR . 
Alberta Avenue Hall, g210-1n8 Ave + 780.418.8340 - gasamling. 
ca Jewellery, dothing, and arts and crafts from Tibet, Nepal 
and India, books and informative presentations, and Tibetan 
food » Sep 12-13, 10am-spm + $s, child under 12 free 
JAMBHALA « Westin Hotel, Devonian Rm + pahsedunp « 
‘An eventing of music, poetry and dance supporting the Patan 
Academy of Health Sciences + Sep 19, 7:30pm + $60 (entire 
event) at theonthesquare.ca; $25 (10pm until event ends) 
ST ALBERT CELEBRATES THE ARTS FESTIVAL - 
Various venues through St Albert « celebratethearts.ca « Sep 
18-19 « Mayor's Celebration of the Arts Gala: $40 


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BACK // 69 


_The journey to acceptance 


| stand surrounded by about a hundred : other, Gender Spectrum, is for families 
with children or teens who are trans and : 


(he 


ridiculously hot transmen, surprised to : 


find myself the minority in a room 
like this. When | signed up for 
a conference on transgender 
issues, | didn't know the 
event would be populated 
almost entirely by FtMs. I'm 
not complaining, of course, 
and not just because of the 
insane level of attractive- 
ness. I've now seen more trans 
and gender variant males here than 


of just being, | suppose. 


: and 
[have in my whole life and the beauty in ! 
this room of these masculine, unique fig- : 
ures is something to admire. The courage : 
: [can never truly get what it feels like. 

The event itself is actually two con- : 
ventions held simultaneously in Seattle, : 
Washington over the Labour Day week- : 
end. One set of workshops, known as : 
Gender Odyssey, is for transidentified : 
people, their partners and their allies. The : 


link the conferences together. 


: gender variant. There are also a number : 
of parties and meet-and-greets that : 


cussions that | don't get it. | don't know 


this weekend. Queerness, my sexual ori- 


= entation, does not help me to fit in, not 


| came here to try to under- : 
stand, to learn more about what : 
the hell it really feels like to be : 
trans. | am cisgender, meaning : 
that I'm lucky enough to iden- : 
tify with the body that | was born : 
into. | am a lot of things—a dyke : 
a tomboy, very queer and maybe : 


even gender non-conforming in my ap- : 
pearance—but | am not transgender, and : 
no matter how much | want to empathize, : 


Unfortunately, I've been left feeling : 
a bit disconnected at this event. Being : 
the minority, the person of some sort of : 
privilege amongst a bunch of trans and : 
gender variant people, feels weird. I'm : 
consistently reminded as | listen to dis- : 


ual orientation is who | bounce it off of” 


events to ask a person's preferred pronoun 
(with the caveat "if you have one’) right af- 


jecting onto me. They couldn't care less. 


: But this isnt about me. It's about the : 
: 65-year-old in the elevator who's living in: 
: between genders and the 8-year-old at the 


: pool who was born female but is now living 
= as a boy. It's about the supportive parents 
what it's like because I'm biologically af- : 


firmed, another new term I've learned : 
: with his mom. It’s about acknowledging : 
: people's journey to acceptance and recog- 
that | expected it to; the sex you like has : 
little to do with the sex you are. Or as : 
conference director Aidan Key put it: "My : 
gender is my innate sense of self. My sex- : 


of a gender fluid teenager and a 20-some- 
thing “fancy-gendered princess boy” here 
nizing that it's almost never an easy one. 


their parents has been enlightening for 
me. The amazing strength and power 


: inside kids who are able to articulate 
It's expected behaviour at these sorts of : 


their sense of self while still in elemen- 


: tary school is obvious. What really shook 
: me though, is the parents. Sure some of 
ter you trade introductions. The idea being : 
that you never know and shouldn't attempt : 
to guess someone's gender identity. | find : 
: myself feeling a strange sense of shame ev- : 
ery time | answer, as if the fact that | was : 
born into a body I'm fine with is somehow : 
something to feel uncomfortable about. : 
This is absolutely my own feeling and nota : 
distaste the other convention goers are pro- 
: wholly wrong at worst. 


but most are exceedingly average and 
"normal" mothers and fathers who were 
able to listen when their children con- 
fided their difference. These are parents 
willing to take on other family members, 
school administration, neighbours and a 
society as a whole that still condemns 
the gender variant as confused at best or 


: them to understand why a cla 
: would be arriving to school in 
= now or would be using a different nar, 
Meeting and watching the children and - 


Conference attendees all seemed 


: agree that the best and most imports 
: place to instigate acceptance and unde 
: standing was inside the grade schooi 

: tem. A number of parents that | 
: to mentioned that it seemed thar + 
: younger kids were, the easier it was 


{ft seems an obvious choice to paren 


: at this conference to fully commit the 
: Selves to supporting and nurturing the 


ransidentified child. To ther, it's cles 


? no choice at all. As one mom so eloguen 
? ly put it, "The gifts are seeing my child 
: joy life. Because she was living a lic.” 
them are liberal-thinking hippie-types, : 
: their kid to be really and truly hap: 
: One mother illustrated this beautit 

: in relating a story about offering to | 

; her daughter a dress after years of know 
: ing the child silently desired one. On th) 
: day they went to the mall to try ther 
= on, she said, "| have never before or 

= seen her so incredibly happy. | thoug! 
: she was going to faint.” W 


And that's what any parent wants, | 


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to edmontonjobs@publicoutreach.ca 
or call 780.436.9896 


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Dear Will: : 
indeed, but first let's get our terms straight: : 
are you conflating the standard-issue blow : 
job with the X-treme sport called “deep- : 
throating” (taking the penis all the way into : 
the throat), or has the boyfriend specifical- : 
ly requested the latter? "Deep-throating” : 


. INSTRUCTION 
MODAL MUSIC INC. 780.221.3116 
Quality music instruction since 1981. 
Guitarist. Educator. 
Graduate of GMCC music program 


Stanley A. 
Sq, Edmonton ABT] 2V4; T: TBo.ss6:7030; inf 
cragalleries&cdisplays@epl.ca 


VAAA Gallery Call for Submissions: Deadline: 
Mon, Sept 21, 4pm; T: 780.421.1731 for info 


ART TALK: Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre 
(dowmstairs),7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq; ASA 


St. Maur (artist and poet); Thu, Sept 17, 7-30pm 
Art from the Unknown. Emerging artists call 
Pgh ah a met 


a ee 
show and sale. Vendors for art market wanted 
also. Contact aota_artists@yahoo.ca for details 
The Zombie Short Film Festival (Oct 30 in 
Toronto) is ¢ submissions 

from all over Your film must be less 

than 25 minutes | and must involve zom- 


bies in some 

be on DVD in NISC format. $20 (CAD) fee for 
com or contact Jim Taylor at 647.291.4774, 

lowing categories: Environmental Site Specific 


grams are invited to participate in 2010 at The 
Works Art Market and Food Street (deadline 


Feb. and Mar. 


—_———_——— 
"Experienced country lead guitarist. Old 
person, Looking for work or will join new 


has not replaced and ought not to replace 
"blow job,” "giving head,” or "going down 
on." They are not at all the same thing. 


with nothing fancier or more 


you can tolerate an oral foreign 


that the more control you take over the 
process (you do the moving, he just lies 


less gaggy you will feel. If it still feels 
overly intrusive or out of control, wrap 


band. 780.421.1250 


Session drummer for hire in Edmonton . 


Experienced, creative and easy to work with. 
Lots of studio credits. Check www.kellystod- 
ola.com for more info. stodola@telus.net 


WANTED: JAMMERS for open public monthly 
jam on the second Sunday of the month at 9119- 
128A Ave. Rock, country & old time music Ph. 
780.973.5593, randyglen@JumpUpDj.com 


Volunteers Wanted for Kaleido Festival, 
Sept 25-27, 2009. Please contact Nathan at 
kaleidozoog@gmail.com for info 


Volunteer at Edmonton chante, Edmonton's fran- 
cophone music festival, Sept 26-Oct 3. Positions 
for francophone and bilingual-speaking volun- 
teers available. T: Mathieu Gauthier 780.469.4402 
E: m.gauthier@acfaedmonton.ab.ca 


Continue Terry's Marathon of Hope: Sun, Sept 23 
at Telford House, 4907-46 St, Leduc. All ages can 
run, walk or roll 2, 5 or 10 kilometers to raise funds 
for the Terry Fox Foundation. Pet-friendly. Free 
registration at 9am; run at 10am. Other Terry Fox 
Runs will be taking place in and around Edmon- 
ton: CFB Edmonton, Devon, Fort Saskatchewan, 
Sherwood Park, Spruce Grove and St. Albert. 
Pledge forms at the Leduc Public Library, Leduc 
Recreation Centre, Kennelli Springs, Leduc Cham- 
ber of Commerce, terryfox.org, Info: 1.888.836.9786 


Continue Terry's Marathon of Hope: Volunteer 
before and on Sun, Sept 13 to help set up the 
site, distribute refreshments, and cheer on the 

participants. Call Susanne at 780.986.5983 or email 
terryfoxleduc@shaw.ca for info 


S.CARS. 
Second Chance Animal Rescue Society. Our dogs 
are TV stars! Watch Gobal TV every Sat at 9:45 AM 
where new, wonderful dogs will be profiled. www. 
scarscare.org 


Canadian Mental Health Association / Board Re- 
ctuiting 2009 Learn about our community work 
www.crha-edmonton.ab.ca 


IE Sea com ta nee of asie: 

daily items, please bring: coffee, sugar, powde! 

cae diapers, baby formula to Bissell Centre 
East, 10527-96 St, Mon-Fni, 8:30am-4:30pm. 


HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS required for studies at 
UofA. Call 780.407.3906; E: Us = 
Reimbursement led 


———————————————————__ 
of A is seeking major depression sufferers 
hes ed in participating in a research study. Call 

icom 


6 eS SO 
The Support Network: Volunteer today to be 
a Distress Line Listener. Apply on line thesup- 

portnetwork.com or 


780.732.6648 


WANT TO STOP SMOKING? NICOTINE ANONYMOUS 
IAEETINGS: 7PM, EVERY WED, EBENEZER UNITED 
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: as though sealing a bargain) around the : 
: base and move this in concert with your : 
: mouth. Some men can easily detect the : 
: difference but many don't care—friction : 
has long had its place in the lexicon, but it : is friction, after all, and warm, wet and : 
: deep are usually good enough without : 
: having to get all picky about it. Most men : 


? enjoy a blow job, period, and few—I can- : 
If all you two are interested in is mouth- : 


Penis contact, you shouldn't need a : by the corner cases—get off on making : 


textbook or a night of, you should : girls gag or produce involuntary Roman : 
pardon the expression, cram- : 
ming. You can practice a bit : 
/ : ona dildo and not immediately collapse 
eyo banana-flavoured than your : 
own finger or a popsicle stick, : 
just to determine how far back : 


: body before you need to expel it. : 
: It does get easier with practice. Once you : 


: the harder this is to carry off, | imagine) : 
$ graduate to the real thing, you will find 


i and see how deep, fast, et cetera, you can 
? go without gagging. Keeping your neck 
> straight and head slightly back are sup- 
there being happy he has a penis), the : 
? mended lie-on-your-back-with-your-head- 
: off-the-edge-of-the-bed position strikes 


your hand (spit into it generously first, ; meas ill advised at best, since we are try- 


: ing to avoid panic here, and what could ; 
: be more panic inducing than having your : 
airway and vocal capability cut off while : 
: somebody straddles your chest? Try ly- : 
: ing prone or crouching, with the dildo up- ; 
right as though projecting jauntily from 
your boyfriend's pelvis as he lies on his : 
back, and practice opening your throat as : 
though chugging a beer or saying "Ah." : 

You may find, in time, that you really : 
: can control your gag reflex. The feedback : 
showers. ; provided by areal live boyfriend, though, : 

If you can imagine yourself practicing : in the form of appreciative gasps and : 
} groans, is a motivator the likes of which : 
in giggles, you're ahead of the game and : mere plastic, no matter how colourful, 
| give you my blessing. Buy something : will never achieve. Not, at any rate, with : 
realistically sized and inexpensive (jelly : today's technology. Androids and repli- 
rubber, probably), pretend it's attached : cants haven't yet started rolling off the 
to your boyfriend (the sillier the colour : assembly lines and into our toy boxes. : 
Faking it with inanimate objects will : 
: only get you so far; if you really want to : 
: learn, you're going to have totryit onthe : 


not say none, but let's not get distracted 


posed to help, although the often recom- : 


: that neither of you brings to it unrealistic 


: real thing. | don't know your boyfriend, : 
but | bet he'd be game for a little experi- : 
+ mentation. Just make sure that the ses- : 
: sion Is approached as an experiment, and : 


expectations of immediate, spectacular 


; success. Nobody's born knowing how to 
: do this sort of thing, at least not until 


those replicants get here. ~ 
If you two get this far and wish to—oh 


: heck, there's no better way to put this— 
: goalittle deeper, there's good informa- 


tion to be found in instructional videos 


: and DVDs, like the ones Nina Hartley 


puts out, and in books such as Violet 
Blue's The Ultimate Guide to Fellatio, 
which contains nifty tips like how to 
keep your lipstick perfect throughout, 
as well as, yes, bona fide deep-throat- 
ing techniques. | think deep-throating is 
overrated, myself, but then, | only bor, ‘ 


: row a penis and ought to defer here to 
: those who possess them full time 


One last word of warning: yes, there 
can be a somewhat unpleasant surprise 
at the end of a successful blow job. In- 
form him that he is responsible for early 
warning and withdrawal, no “whoopsies" 
allowed. This probably ought to be con- 
sidered non-negotiable at the beginning, 
subject to later review. 


: Love, Andrea 


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SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY UP FRONT //5 


EDITORIAL 


4 


SCOTT HARRIS 
// SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Eo by the wildly unpredictable 
standards of an Alberta byelection, 
Paul Hinman's victory in Calgary-Glen- 
more was a result—and at numbers— 
that few had predicted. 

Hinman, who will hand over the lead- 
ership reins of the Wildrose Alliance on 
October 17, managed to pull in hordes 
of disgruntled Calgary Tories who were 
all to happy to "send Ed a message" just 
ayear anda halfafter Albertans handed 
the Stelmach Conservatives a landslide 
72 of the 83 seats in the legislature. 

The Tory vote, which has delivered the 
riding to the ruling party for four de- 
cades, utterly collapsed and moved to 
the right, despite the Tories offering up 
a high-profile local candidate who wise- 
ly distanced herself from the premier. 
Conservative support was chopped in 
half compared with the 2008 contest, 
in which Ron Stevens collected over 
half the votes in the riding, with just 26 
percent of voters putting their X next to 
Diane Coliey-Urquhart's name. 

Support for the Wildrose Alliance, 
heretofore a party with almost exclu- 
sively rural appeal, quadrupled on 
the way to squeezing out the Liberals, 
whose support remained stagnant. 

It was, of course, a referendum on a 


fat lady? 
bumbling Ed Stelmach and the Conser- 
vative's increasingly directionless and : 


incompetent handling of the province : 
which has seen a $15.5 billion swing in c 


its bottom line over the past year. 


The Hinman victory has led many : 
commentators to declare a sea-change : 
in the province's politics, with the To- : 
ries facing a new threat from its right : 
flank, particularly if Wildrose Alliance : 
members opt for Danielle Smith in the : 


upcoming leadership vote. 


But while the victory will likely : 


rouse provincial politics somewhat, it 


also bears keeping in mind that simi- : 
lar pronouncements of impending : 


change were being brandied around 


in advance of the 2008 election. Not 


to put too fine a point on it, but the 
Tories would have to additionally lose 
as many seats as all opposition parties 
combined have ever managed since 
big blue took over to lose power in a 
legislature with 87 seats. 

While a split in the right-wing vote will 


hopefully lead to more opposition seats : , 
and a more realistic representation of : | 
Alberta's political diversity under the : 


dome, the Tories could take the result 


as a message that they need to somehow : 
find a way to move even further to the : 


right in the years before the next elec- 
tion, a thought almost as disturbing as a 
Wildrose Alliance government. W 


Kk 
z 
° 
a 
a 
a. 
> 


Ge TTTTTTTSTTIITELLLMLLL LUM Mn LLLLUMLULLLLL LULU ELLLEELLLLLUOOLOO Lon UM CLELLLULLO OT TEUUCELUDCM OOOO OTUERULCCCLOOOO TOU LECLOOOUUTU CELLCOM TUUUMT MN TUM UCP OU 
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Pov 


Audit Bureau 
of Circulations 


DROWSY ERRORS 


would like to supply correct informa- 

tion for four errors in David Berry's 
article about the history of the Drowsy 
Chaperone ("A briefhistory ofthe Drowsy 
Chaperone," Sep 3 - Sep 9, 2009). 

1. No one from the original Toronto 
cast, except Bob Martin, appeared in 
the Los Angeles production. 

2. The show won five Tony Awards, 
not two. 

3. The show won seven Drama Desk 
awards, not four. 

4. And just to nitpick, the correct spell- 
ing is Van de Graaff 

Thank you for your time. 

Sandra Balcovske 


————— 
GO TO THE PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE 


n response to Ricardo Acufia's ar- 

ticle ("Back-to-school blues,” Sep 
10 ~- Sep 16, 2009): while I agree that 
responsibility for large class sizes 
can be blamed on inadequate gov- 
ernment funding, the problem that 
Acufia raises in regard to fees can 
best be brought up with the school's 
principal and the other parents at the 
school. Fees are decided at the school 
level, and it's time, I think, for parents 
to recognize that this is an issue they 


have the power to fix. 

I can't help but think that the hor- 
rendous fees that McKernan School is 
asking of families is a reflection of the 


supposed socio-economic make-up 
of that school’s student body and the 
principal's (probably correct) expecta- 
tion that McKernan parents will ulti- 
mately pay up. My daughter attends a 
junior high school that draws from a 
very mixed socio-economic communi- 
ty—ranging from upper-middle class 
families to a significant number of low- 
income parents. It simply would not be 
possible for many of our families to pay 
$540. In sharp contrast to McKernan, 
our fees are much, much lower, rang- 
ing from about $25 - $40 for the whole 
year, depending on what (i.e. lock, 
yearbook, agenda) you opt to pay for 
or not. Frankly, I'm trying to imagine 
what could possibly account for such 
a discrepancy between two junior high 
schools in the same system. Our school 
may not offer all of the extras that McK- 
ernan can, but it still offers a full range 
of options (including band), anew com- 
puter lab, a new fitness club and, most 
importantly, several excellent teachers 
in reasonably sized classes. 

Parents like Acufia need to ask point- 
ed questions of their principals—and 
of themselves—and regardless of their 
individual capacity to pay, stand up as 
a united front, refuse to pay the fees, 


and fight against the development of 
fee structures in their schools that are 
debilitating for many people in their 
own communities. 

Anne Bailey 


eee 
HARPER DOESN'T GET IT 


Doesn't Stephen Harper get it? “If we 
do not get a majority the Liberals, 
the NDP and the Bloc Québécois wil! 
combine and they will form a govern 
ment ... If we do not win a majority 
this country will have a Liberal gov 
ernment propped up by the socialists 
and the separatists,” Stephen Harpe: 
said in Sudbury, where Progressive 
Conservative Stephen Butcher was 
bumped after running as a Conserve- 
tive in 2004 as the last Tory candidate 
in favour of an evangelical Reformer 

"Socialists and separatists?” There 
is more to fear from the neocons who 
got us into this mess in the first place 
The last time Harper tried this failed 
gambit he had to beg the GG to pro- 
rogue parliament to save his party 
and his leadership. He cares not for 
the country. 

Rather a coalition compromise than 
ideological intolerance; rather parlie 
mentary democracy than a dictator 
ship of one. 

Brian Marlatt 


6 // UP FRONT 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 —- SEP 23 


2009 


gas prea = two kilometres 
under the earth's surface. And since Oc- 


tober 2008, someone has blown up six 
sour gas pipelines operated by EnCana, 
North America’s largest gas corporation, 
in controlled acts of sabotage. 

in Wild West fashion, EnCana is of- 
fering a one-million-dollar bounty for 
information leading to a conviction. It 
is likely the largest reward in Canadian 
history (the RCMP offered the same 
amount during the hunt for those who 
blew up Air India, killing 329 people). 

The In National Security En- 
forcement Team (INSET), a mix of top 
law enforcement officials tasked with 
investigating the attacks, has sent some 
250 officers to the region, located six 
hours from Edmonton. The force in- 
cludes masked men with high-powered 
machine guns who have been spotted in 
the woods by local residents anda sniper 
flown back directly from Afghanistan. 
INSET labels the sabotage as "eco-terror- 
ism" even though no one has been hutt. 

The bomber apparently sees it differ- 
ently. "Return the land to what it was be- 
fore you came every last bit of it ... before 
things get a lot worse for you and your 
terrorist pals in the oil and gas business," 
wrote the alleged bomber in a July 15 let- 
ter sent to the Dawson Creek Daily News. 
The badly printed, hand-written letter 
demanded EnCana cease operations in 
the area. It also promised to suspend at- 
tacks during a three-month grace period 
so “we can all take a summer vacation,” 
meaning attacks could recommence 
now that September 15 has passed. 

At a July press conference, police ac- 
cused the saboteur of “terrorizing these 
communities of Pouce Coupe and Daw- 
son Creek.” But the Mayor of Pouce 
Coupe, a village of 749 residents at the 
epicentre of Peace River gas activity, 
doesn't see it that way. 

"I have discussed this [sabotage] with 
some pipeline workers,” says Mayor Ly- 
man Clark, a vocal supporter of the gas 
industry, during an interview at the vil- 
lage's office. "One just frankly told me, ‘I 
am more afraid of the bears.” : 

Despite low natural gas prices, drilling 
activity continues at an almost frantic 
pace on the BC side of the border—as 
Mayor Clark puts it, "The whole area is 
in a boom right now, unlike the rest of 


PIPELINE BOMBINGS 


AVOOAY 0A PEALE CHAO ere senna aetna ent 


BUSINESS IS BOOMING >> Area resident Rick Koechl doesn't support the bombings, but says they've brought attention to local 


concerns about development //chris Arsenault 


the world economy.” Shiny new pickup 
trucks line the roads from Dawson Creek 
to Fort St. John. Since 2000, companies 
have drilled more than 10 000 oil and 
gas wells in the region, and in 2008 the 
BC government collected more than 
$3.6 billion dollars from selling drilling 
rights and reaping royalties. And the 
boom shows no signs of slowing down 
as companies compete to lay claims to 
underground leases, even at current 
prices, which analysts don't think will 
stay down indefinitely. 


But as sour gas lines cut into fields of 
canola, companies flare toxic chemicals 
lighting up the night sky with an eerie 
glow and trucks kick up dust on previ- 
ously tranquil dirt roads, some local 
residents say increased production is 
coming at their expense. 

"The pace of the development hit us 
like a tsunami," says Tim Ewert, an or- 
ganic farmer living near Tomslake, in 
the heart of the sabotage area. 

"We counted 82 trucks pass the house 
one day before noon,” says Woody Ew- 
ert, Tim's son, after coming into the 
farmhouse fresh from plowing the 
fields. "The amount of dust that traffic 
generates on our gravel road is inered- 
ible. Our lawn would look like we were 
ina fog bank, but it was just dust.” 

But Brian Liverse, a spokesperson for 
EnCana, the region's largest player and 


so far the only target of sabotage, says 
his company works hard to be a good 
neighbour. The corporation has a pro- 
gram called "courtesy matters" where 
contractors are expected to drive less 
than 50 kilometres per hour to minimize 
dust and noise. 

"Where we have a large amount of 
regular traffic, we put calcium down on 
the roads to reduce the dust,” Liverse 
adds during an interview in a sparse 
boardroom at the company’s Dawson 
Creek field office. "We try to avoid rig 
moves and a large amount of traffic 
when school buses are picking up their 
kids.” The company, he adds, also sup- 
ports numerous charitable projects in 
the Peace River region. 

While Tifh Ewert agrees that EnCana 
has tried to mitigate dust and other sur- 
face issues, he says all the companies ex- 
tracting gas from the area have failed to 
address larger environmental concerns. 

"There were never any baseline studies 
done onair or water. They never checked 
to see what size or how deep the local 
aquifers were before starting the whole 
drilling program,” says Tim Ewert, as we 
sip hot coffee, fresh off the stove, at his 
kitchen table. Ewert worries that cumu- 
lative impacts from the gas boom could 
damage the local water supply, create 
harmful air pollution or leave sulfuric 
residue on his fields. 

"Gas plants are flaring 24/7," says Pe- 


OPEN DAILY FOR DINNER AND LUNCH! 


ter Kut, a municipal cotfncillor in Pouce 
Coupe, "That concerns some people, too. 
They don't know what toxic materials 
come from the burns.” 

Much of the region's gas is sour, con- 
taining hydrogen sulfide, a "highly toxic 
gas” which can cause death within a few 
breaths, according to the US Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. 

Industry's incursions into previously 
pristine land are "changing the way of 
life, our hunting, trapping, berry picking 
even just going camping,” says Cliff Cal- 
liou, hereditary Chief of the Kelly Lake 
First Nation, an aboriginal community 
with some 500 residents a 30-minute 
drive from sabotaged sites. 

After the first attacks in the fall of 
2008, police and media speculated— 
without evidence—that the bomber 
came from Kelly Lake. Chief Calliou 
calls the police actions in his commu- 
nity a "witch hunt." 

"They [police] threw two people in 
jail with no charges," Chief Calliou 
says during an interview at Kelly 
Lake's community centre. In addition 
to the unwarranted jailing of Kelly 
Lake residents, police also accused 76- 
year-old Regina Mortensen, a grand- 
mother recovering from hip surgery, 
of sabotaging the pipelines. 

The Kelly Lake First Nation, which 
maintains traditional governance struc- 
tures outside of the Indian Act, hasn't 


Pun 
TT 
SO MORU LILO LGC Tmt tr tt tt Ce TTTTTTTITI TI ITU LULL LLU en Tn 


surrendered its traditional land base via 
a treaty. Despite the region's resource 
wealth, many houses in Kelly Lake are 
tamshackle trailers. Natives say the gas 
is being stolen from unceeded land and 
they have launched a $5.2 billion-dollar 
land claim for recompense 


Most people who live near sabotaged 
sites aren't against extracting gas, per 
se. Rather, they say regulations favour 
corporations over landowners and the 
environment. Companies, with their 
teamis of lawyers, engineers and experts, 
often understand the regulations better 
than the cash-strapped provincial gov- 
emmient which is supposed to be over- 
seeing extraction. 

Ken and Loretta Yause have farmed 
near Dawson Creek for the last 30 years, 
growing cereals, canola and grass seed. 
“We have three [gas] leases on our prop- 
erty and a pipeline,” Ken Vause, who 
used to work on a drilling rig, says as we 
chat at their kitchen table. 

The Vauses say they "never had a prob- 
lem” with the industry until the latest 
round of negotiations, the first since 
BC's gas boom really got going at the be- 
ginning of the 21st century. 

"A land agent came here for an hour, 
he didn't show us any plans for where 
the new pipeline would go," Ken recalls. 
In BC, unlike Alberta, land agents—the 
people who represent gas companies in 
negotiations with farmers—don't have 
to be registered, a situation farmers say 
leads to all sorts of abuses. In previous 
encounters with gas companies, the 
Vauses had always managed to negoti- 
ate deals for pipeline routes and com- 
pensation. But not in today's boom- 
ing BC; the pipeline ended up cutting 
through the middle of an active field. 
The land agent, a former RCMP officer, 
filed papers with the Mediation and Ar- 
bitration Board (MAB), the provincial 
body responsible for ruling on disputes, 
without ever explaining where the 
pipeline was going, says Vause. 

The Vauses, like many farmers, con- 
siderthe MABa "kangaroo court" which 
favours gas companies at farmers’ ex- 
pense. Once the land agent, represent- 
ing Calgary-based Spectra Energy, filed 
MAB papers, the Vauses hired a lawyer 
and drove to Grand Prairie to be in the 
lawyer's office for a conference call 
with representatives from Spectra and 
the MAB. 

"On the conference call, everyone iden- 
tifies themselves,” Vause recalls. "When 
Spectra's representative introduced 
himself, the mediator [from the MAB] 
said, 'Oh, how are you Brian? Haven't 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 >> 


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8 // UP FRONT WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 


ers 14, as city coun- 
usly in favour of ap- 


, which will guide city of- 
portation planning for 
. A major advance from 
, which focused almost 


s edition, titled The Way We 
a much more integrated 
and sustainable view of transporta- 
tion, witha particular focus on alterna- 
tive methods of getting around, such 
as transit and “active transportation" 
{cycling and walking, essentially). 

"It was a year inthe making, and there 
was potentially a lot of controversy 
around the LRT and some of the work 
we've been doing, so it's very good to 
see that the council was on side in 
terms of concepts and principles,” said 
city transportation manager Robert 
Boutilier of the result. "I didn't get a 
sense [from the meeting] that there 
was a lot of criticism, councillors were 
just looking for more information and 
assurances that we would do what we 
said we would do.” 

Those assurances did prove to be the 
one sticking point in what was other- 


he Transportation Master - 


CONCEPT 


PHASE 


wise a very supportive day for the TMP, 
which was passed following a third 
public consultation on the matter after 
major hearings in October of last year 
and another in June. Both the Edmon- 
ton Transit Service and several coun- 
cillors expressed concern over the lack 
of tangible goals in the plan, which is 
nevertheless an impressive philosoph- 


RH nr cae cc a TUTOR ENHTUMANLANTAMTinNti 


DRTATION MASTER PLAN 


noves ahead on how Edmontonians move 


es green light to first Transportation Master Plan update in a decade 


of the overall vision—the introduction 
of premium bus service, and improving 
cycling facilities throughout the city. 
That last point seemed of particular 
concern on September 14, as several cy- 
clists, who all spoke in favour of the plan, 
showed up to stress its importance, as 
well as the disparate nature of commuter 
cycling and recreational cycling. Boutili- 


ee NT PU NAA AT ANI eNENOOHONTERRET seer z0N 


It's the right vision, with the focus on transit and 
active transportation. The big question is whether 


we're going to implement it in our lifetimes. 


ical document that aims to shift the 
transportation focus away from traffic 
in one of Canada’s most car-dependent 
major cities. 

The TMP, the first commissioned by 
the city in 10 years, stresses sustain- 
able transportation methods, from 
integrating land-use and maintaining 
infrastructure to its most ambitious el- 
ements, shifting modes of transport to 
more transit ridership and active trans- 
portation over the next 30 years. Among 
the proposals to that end include fur- 
ther LRT expansion—the exact routes 
of which will be determined after an- 
other public consultation in November, 
as council didn't want the controversy 
surrounding the proposed west and 
southeast lines to hamstring approval 


SOUTHEAST AND WEST LRT ROUTE 
INFORMATION SESSIONS 


er said he understood the concerns, and 
emphasized that his priority was on get- 
ting Edmontonians around the city, not 
helping their leisure activities. 

"Riders have different profiles, and 
we have to make sure we have right 
profiles for the right use. The trans- 
portation network I'm talking about is 
more towards providing linkage from 
wherever you live to wherever you 
work or shop,” said Boutilier, who also 
pointed out that, as far as active trans- 
portation is concerned, the battle will 
be more on changing public percep- 
tions than anything. "My biggest con- 
cern with active transportation is not 
the commitment by councillors or to 
a certain degree even the budget, but 
the awareness of the public [of what 


options they'll have].” 


Budget concerns do factor into the deci- 
sion to not set more tangible goals, how- 
ever. Boutilier cited both the unanimous 
decision and recent council actions—in- 
cluding controversial decisions to scrap 
the trolley buses, expand the LRT to- 
wards NAIT and emphasize the right of 
transit over traffic in recent decisions— 
as proof that council has the will to im- 
plement the TMP but did worry about 
where money might come from. 

"I don't think they have a lack of de- 
sire, but we just can't tax people to the 
limits,” he said. "[The desire is] there, 
the only thing will be the budget, and 
with the economy the way it is and 
questions about provincial and federal 
government funding, we don't know 


Ce er TTT Tun LLO nD LULULM LLnL MU 


SKIERS, SNOWBOARDERS, 


how it will go.” 

Ward 5 Councillor Don Iveson, one of 
the TMP's earliest proponents on coun- 
cil, echoed Boutilier's sentiments on 
moving forward. 

"More than anything else [that might 
hamper the agenda], it's the budget,” 
Iveson said. "Essentially, the challenge 
is always that we want to do different 
things, but we're pretty much addicted 
to roads. Up until now, anyway, it's been 
really difficult for our transportation 
department to say, 'We're going to slow 
down the road agenda so that we can 
fund these other priorities.’ 

"It's the right vision, with the focus 
on transit and active transportation,” 
he added. "The big question is wheth- 
er we're going to implement it in our 
lifetimes." WV 


ao zor ope SS aint TELEMARK « NORDIC SKIERS 
Find out more. SOUTHEAST LRT Wee. $ AGES 18+ 
Attend one of the public information MONDAY, SEPT 21 Woodvale Facility (Mill Woods 
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More information please contact us at 
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429-CSPS (2777) 
Recruitment night 
Thursday, October |, 2009 
6:30 pm 

Coast Edmonton Plaza 
10155 105 Street 


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Learn more about and get involved in City 
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Go to www.edmonton.ca/Publicinvolvement 
Calendar for a list of public involvement 


oppertunities. 


~ 
TRANSFORMING | EDMONTON 


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Services for deaf or hard of hearing persons provided 
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UP FRONT //9 
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—~/ 


«<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 


talked to you in a while.’ The mediator 
personally. You don't stand 


"This pipeline they put here, lam stuck 
with the liability forever,” Vause contin- 
ues. "I never signed a paper or anything 
for it, but lam still liable, If I drive over it 
and damage it, lam responsible.” 

The Vauses received $19 000 dollars 
from Spectra as compensation for the 
land disturbance, which didn’t even 
cover half their legal bills. 

Tom Flanagan, a political science 
professor at the University of Calgary, 
agrees farmers consider present regula- 
tions unfair, and says it's driving hostil- 
ity to the industry in the area. 

"Maybe part of the answer [to dealing 
with sabotage] would be to amend the 
legislation for companies to pay greater 
compensation to surface rights owners,” 
Flanagan suggests. 

Making laws less favourable to oil com- 
panies isn't easy, especially for provinces 
increasingly dependent on petroleum 
revenues. An article in the Journal of 
Environmental Management argues that 
Alberta is a "first world jurisdiction" 
with a "third world analogue” in its lax 
environmental and political regulation 
of the oil industry. Area farmers say BC 
is even worse than Alberta, which might 
help to explain why drilling rigs are 
moving across the border from Alberta 
to BC in record numbers. 

"The BC government has seme excel- 
lent programs to stimulate their econo- 
my and oil and gas activity in the area,” 
according to EnCana's Brian Liverse. 

But critics of the current regulatory 
regime say gas companies can buy po- 


Walmart >\< Zkes 


Enter PESOC 


Now that’s a great deal 
one you want 


litical support at their expense. EnCana, 
for example, has donated $255 470 to the 
governing BC Liberals between 2005 
and 2008. The Liberals, in turn, have 
used monies from their economic stim- 
ulus to build roads and other infrastruc- 
ture primarily to facilitate gas extraction 
in the region. 


In a dozen interviews, not one Peace 
River resident, including harsh critics 
of the oil industry, supported the sabo- 
tage, but some are happy that their com- 
plaints are finally being noticed. 

"I don't condone what this person [the 
bomber] is doing,” says Rick Koechl, a 
junior-high-school teacher who lives 
some 40 minutes from the bombed sites 
and an activist pushing for sour gas 
wells to be set back at least a kilometre 
from houses and schools, "but at least 
it's bringing attention to the situation 
up here. We've had legal organizations 
help us with this fight, but that's not 
very sexy, is it?” 

Attacks in northeastern BC aren't the 
first case of high profile sabotage against 
Canadian sour gas pipelines. An Alberta 
court on April 20, 2000 convicted Wie- 
bo Ludwig, a well-known farmer and 
preacher, of bombing gas wells owned 
Alberta Energy Co. Ltd. (AEC}—which in 
2002 merged with PanCanadian to form 
EnCana. Ludwig claimed his wife mis- 
carried a child because of sour gas expo- 
sure. During their investigation of Lud- 
wig and his associates, police admitted 
to blowing up a gas well themselves in 
order gain credibility for an informant. 
EnCana reps refused to comment on 
what, if anything, the company learned 
from the Ludwig saga. 

As the September 15 deadline for re- 
suming attacks passes, Ludwig has re- 


any new phone, 


“entered the limelight, this time with an 
open letter to the bomber asking him or 
her to end the attacks. The sabotage cam. 


these conflicts cannot ultimately be 
settled by use of force, but by way of in- 
formed and patient persuasion.” 

But while attempts at persuasion 
continue, profits from the region's gas 
are building the towers of Calgary and 
Vancouver and feeding the provincial 
treasury in Victoria. While oil workers 
move to northeastern BC in search of 
well-paying jobs as truck drivers, pipe- 
fitters, inspectors and technicians, 
June Volz says those with a connection 
to the land are getting busted up by the 
current boom. 

Volz has farmed in the region for de- 
cades and has no intrinsic complaints 
with the gas industry—rent from pipe- 
lines are, after all, putting her kids 
through university. But Volz says the re- 
spectful tone which defined interactions 
between industry and residents through 
the 1980s and ‘90s has changed since 
the boom started. 

"(Negotiating with oil companies] was 
almost kind of fun. They'd make an offer 
and you'd go back and forth. And it was 
always with respect." Volz says as we sip 
iced tea. "[Now] there is a great degree of 
arrogance on the part of companies." 

When asked what made relations go 
sour, Volz pauses for a minute before 
saying, "I think that they [gas compa- 
nies] are getting a lot of support from 
the government. The oil companies and 
government are at the dinner table and 
the farmers are underneath the table 
looking for crumbs." W 


Y LAW >> PRIVACY 


world of privacy 


Privacy law emerges as a Canadian export 


HK 


a. 


series of changes that will affect 250 mil- 
lion users. While the case is widely 
viewed as a significant victory 
for Canadian privacy, the is- 
sue might never have been 
addressed but for a second, 
little-noticed privacy decision 
released two weeks later. 

In December 2004, the Cana- 
dian Internet Policy and Public 
Interest Clinie (CIPPIC) at the Uni- 


to consumer preferences. 


to further pursue the case given jurisdic- 
tional limits of Canadian privacy law. 


might prove difficult. 
Trade Commision mmis 


Canadian law, 


The recent Canadian privacy case involv- : 
ing Facebook attracted international : 
attention as the world's leading social : 
networking site agreed to implement a : 


versity of Ottawa filed a complaint with : 
the Privacy Commissioner of Canada : 
against US-based Abika.com, an online : 
data broker that collects, uses and dis- : 
closes the personal information of Cana- : 
dians (| am an adviser to CIPPIC but was : 
not involved directly in the case). The : 
company offered a wide range of search : 
services on individuals, purporting to dig : 
up everything from past police reports : 
: will not shield it from the application of 
A year later, the commissioner ruled : 
that she could not investigate the com- : 
plaint. The company refused to respond : 
to questions and the commissioner was : 
of the view that there was no mechanism : 
= concerns. The European Union actively 
: promoted its detailed, regulatory ap- 
CIPPIC asked the federal court to re- : 
view the decision. In February 2007, it : 
ruled that the commissioner was mistak- : 
en—the law did not preclude conduct- : 
ing investigations of foreign entities even : 
if subsequent enforcement of a finding : 
? commissioner, but with greater mar- 
in light of that ruling, the commissioner : 
resumed her investigation of Abika.com, : 
releasing a new finding on July 31, 2009. : 
her with the US Federal : 

the commissioner : 
determined that "the American company : 
disclosed the personal information of : 
Canadians, without their knowledge or : 
Consent, to third parties" in violation of : 
: = Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at 
During the nearly five years that the : 
Abika.com case was winding its way : 
through the Canadian legal system, CIP- : 


PIC filed a separate complaint against 
Facebook. Once again, the commissioner 
spent about a year investigating the issue. 
Now armed with the Abika.com decision 
that conclusively determined that there 
was no legal barrier to investigat- 
ing foreign companies on their 
compliance with Canadian law, 
the commissioner conducted 
a comprehensive investiga- 
tion of Facebook's privacy 
practices, identifying several 
areas in need of change. 
Taken together, the two cases 
provide a powerful response to 
skeptics who doubted the ability of Ca- 
nadian privacy law to influence foreign 
organizations. Canadian law will not 
always apply—there is no reason to fol- 
low Canadian rules if there is no con- 
nection to Canada or no Canadian data 
collection. However, organizations that 
do business in Canada or collect Canadi- 
ans' personal information should recog- 
nize that a corporate office in Chicago 


Canadian law in Calgary. 

When the Canadian government intro- 
duced its private sector privacy law in 
1998, the world was divided on the best 
approach to address emerging privacy 


proach, while the US sought market-driv- 
en solutions backed by tough penalties 
for violations of privacy promises. 
Supporters touted the Canadian law as 
a middle ground alternative, featuring 
regulatory requirements and a privacy 


ketplace flexibility. At the time, many 
thought Canada might serve as a model 
for other countries. Last month, the Pri- 
vacy Commissioner demonstrated that it 
is not the Canadian privacy model that 
has been exported to other countries, 
but rather the law itself. WV 


Michael Geist holds the Canada Research 
the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law. 


He can reached at mgeist@uottawa.ca 
or online at michaelgeist.ca. 


Ss 


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! 


UP FRONT //11 


COMMENT >> 


NUCLEAR POWER 


the organizations they represent or of Vue Ws 


Issues is a forum for individuals and organizations to comment on current events and feces 
issues of importance to the community. Their 


Weekly. 


commentary is not necessarily the opinion af 


A clear and present danger — 


Despite biased consultations Albertans have spoken out 
against nuclear power, but will the government listen? 


CECILY MILLS 
1 CAULS@COMPUSMART.AB.CA 


Grassroots provincial Tories in May 2007 


~ endorsed a plan to have the government 


strike a committee to study and make rec- 
ommendations on whether nuclear power 
should be part of the province's energy mix. 
Premier Ed Stelmach promised to “involve 
all Albertans through public discussion to 
see if that’s the direction we want to go in,” 
pointing out that "this is a very important 
decision that the next generation and gen- 
erations after that will live with.” 

The report of the government-appoint- 
ed "Nuclear. Power Expert Panel,” which 
was expected in the fall of 2008, was 
finally released on March 26, 2009. 
"There are those of course who have very 
strong feelings," said Minister of Energy 
Mel Knight at the time. "We have to make 
sure that all Albertans, whether they 
have strong feelings or whether they're 
just interested in what we're doing here, 
we want to make sure all Albertans have 
their questions and concerns answered. 
The views of Albertans will be important 
in developing a provincial approach on 
the issue of nuclear power generation. 
The Alberta government has been clear 
that the province will not take a position 
until we hear from Albertans.” 

There were indeed "strong feelings," 
most of them directed at the $250 000 
Expert Panel report and the lack of ac- 
cess to the "consultation." Although the 
Government of Alberta spent six figures 
to tell Albertans interested in comment- 
ing to go to the Internet, they forgot that 
not all Albertans have Internet. After 
three attempts to complete the online 
survey with a dial-up connection, a call 
to my MLA that failed to turn up a hard 
copy and three telephone calls to Alber- 
ta Energy, | finally managed to secure a 
paper copy, which | duly completed and 
mailed in prior to the June 1, 2009 dead- 
line. If the government had really wanted 
"to hear from all Albertans" on this criti- 
cal issue they would have sent the sur- 
vey with a stamped return envelope to 
every home in the province. 

Further input was limited to "randomly 
selected Alberta citizens," 20 “discussion 
groups” held in 10 communities across 
Alberta and some stakeholder meetings. 
By June 5 the last of these "consultations" 
had taken place. So much for Mel Knight's 
April 23, 2008 promise of "an unbiased ex- 
amination of the issues ... an objective and 
broad-based research paper as a first step 
to having informed and meaningful discus- 
sions with Albertans.” So much for the May 
20, 2009 promise from Tim Grant, the as- 
sistant deputy minister of energy: "There's 
no doubt in my mind that if the people 
say: ‘We don't want nuclear power, it’s not 
going to be here. It’s my job to make sure 
people have access to the information they 
need to make an informed decision.” 


Despite the fact that the government's 
side of the nuclear power “debate” is a 
travesty of a full and transparent demo- 
cratic process, Albertans have nonethe- 


12 // UP FRONT 


GONE FISSION >> How many ways do Albertans need to say no to nuclear? //rie 


ES: spoken out frequently and clearly 
on the issue. All this information is public, 
and the government needs to take it into 
account before making a final decision on 
nuclear power. What follows are just some 
of the many ways in which Albertans have 
tried to have their voices heard. 

Numerous reports. questioning nuclear 
power in Alberta have been released, 
including Nuclear Power in Alberta: An 
Alternative Perspective by Citizens Ad- 
vocating the Use of Sustainable Energy 
(Cause), Nuclear Power in Canada: An Ex- 
amination of Risks, Impacts and Sustain- 
ability by the Pembina Institute, Keep Al- 
berta Nuclear Free: Community Nuclear 
Action Guide by Sierra Club Prairte and 
Risks from Nuclear Power Development 
in Northwestern Alberta by the Peace 
River Environmental Society. 

Citizens’ groups have also emerged in 
all corners of the province, including the 
communities where future nuclear plants 
may be constructed. These organizations 
include Nuclear Free Alberta, Citizens 
Advocating the Use of Sustainable En- 
ergy (CAUSE), the Athabasca Bioregional 
Society, the Grimshaw-based Citizens 
Against Nuclear Development (CAND), 
the Peace River Environmental Society, 
the High Prairie Regional Environmental 
Action Committee, the Whitecourt-based 
Tipping Point Project, the High River Re- 
gional Environmental Action Committee 
and Lethbridge's Greensence. 

Leading nuclear experts have visited 
the province to speak on the dangers 
of nuclear power, including Jim Hard- 
ing, author of Canada's Deadly Secret: 
Saskatchewan Uranium and the Global 
Nuclear System, the world-renowned Dr. 
Helen Caldicott, author most recently of 
Nuclear Power is Not the Answer and Dr. 
Gordon Edwards, president of the Cana- 
dian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility. 

Albertans have also spoken out 
through letters to the editor and by sign- 
ing petitions opposed to nuclear power. 
In a collection | have of 80 letters writ- 
ten by Albertans in the last three years, 
75 are opposed to nuclear power in the 
province. Of the five that supported 
nuclear power, two came from persons 
with ties to the nuclear industry. There 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 — SEP 2 


is, of course, no way to estimate how 
many Individual letters were written 
to Ed Stelmach and Mel Knight. A peti- 
tion with more than 1500 signatures of 
Peace Country residents opposed to the 
construction of a nuclear plant in the re- 
gion were presented to Peace River MLA 
Frank Oberle in November 2007. About 
2500 signatures from residents across 
the province opposed to nuclear power 
was presented by the Coalition for a Nu- 
clear Free Alberta in November 2008. 

Despite it all, the Alberta government 
has clearly failed to read the signs of the 
time, which are apparent to most com- 
mentators. July 31 and August 1, 2009 
National Post articles announced the 
“nuclear renewal" was over after Ontario 
suspended plans for two nuclear reac- 
tors at its Darlington station, saying the 
nuclear renaissance is "dead on arrival,” or 
as Alberta NDP leader Brian Mason put it 
somewhat more cleverly, "nuclear power 
is an idea whose ‘half-life’ has long since 
expired.” Calgary author Chris Turner in his 
2007 book The Geography of Hope wrote, 
"The Economist ... stated baldly of nuclear 
power plants that ‘not one, anywhere in 
the world, makes commercial sense.” 

For three years, the Alberta government 
has managed and suppressed dissent on 
this critical issue. As one Calgarian wrote 
on June 22, 2009, “The Stelmach govern- 
ment has already made up its mind and 
the entire public process, including the 
public survey and stakeholder consulta- 
tions, is a farce.” 

When the legislature resumes in the 
fall, Mel Knight will most likely announce 
that nuclear power is "the right fit for the 
province.” But this decision is too impor- 
tant to be left to politicians and Industry. 
Albertans have spoken. In a climate that 
did not permit debate, Albertans never 
gave up because they believe in the 
democratic process. They want to keep 
Alberta nuclear free, and it is the respon- 
sibility of the government to listen and 
declare Alberta nuclear free. W 


Cecily Mills is a retired teacher, volunteer 
and lifelong social justice activist who 
has researched, written and given presen- 
tations on nuclear power. 


2009 


Widespread electoral fraud + Karzai offers 
Obama a way out, if he’s willing to take it 


Maybe it's the relatively thin air up on 
those high plateaus that makes 
them foolish. First Mahmoud 
Ahmadinejad, who would 
probably have won the sec- 
ond round in the presiden- 
tial election in Iran anyway, 
cheated massively in order 
to win in the first round and 
avoid a runoff. The incredible ~ 
voting figures declared by the 
government triggered huge demon- 
Strations in Iran and gravely under- 
mined the regime's legitimacy. 

Two months later, in next-door Af- 
ghanistan, Hamid Karzai did exactly the 
same thing. All but one of his opponents 


round of voting, so his re-election as 
president in the second round was as- 
sured. He had bribed the northern war- 
lords to deliver large blocks of votes to 
him, and in the south his Pashtun ethnic 


among those who dared to vote. 
Yet in order to "win" in the first round 


been inserted into a real ballot box.) 


Karzal's organizers also took over 800 : 
real voting stations and kept local citi- : 
3 in Afghanistan. They were planned by 
: al-Qaeda operatives in Germany and 
: Florida, and it is very unlikely that the 
? Taliban government of Afghanistan had 
? advance warning of them. 


zens out while they stuffed the ballot 
boxes with votes for their man. In some 
provinces, the number of votes for 
Karzai was 10 times greater than the 
total number of people who had actu- 


ally shown up and voted. But the "Inde- : 
pendent Election Commission,” a body : 
dominated by Karzai loyalists, reported : 
: live. The mainly Arab senior members 
! of al-Qaeda were in Afghanistan in 
: 1996 — 2001 because they had fought 
: alongside the Afghans as foreign volun- 
: teers during the war against the Soviet 


that Karzai got 54 percent of the votes 
and won in the first round. 

Why did he do it? Maybe it was be- 
cause he knew that the Obama ad- 
ministration wanted him replaced, 


and feared that the US would try to : 
: leaders felt a debt of honour towards 
: them, and gave them refuge. 


manipulate the election in the other 
direction. At any rate, the damage is 


done, and Washington is now shackled : 
for the next four years to acorrupt and : 
: tun homeland in the south and east, 
: plus Kabul and some other bits, but 
: the militias of the other ethnic groups 


incompetent “winner” whose contempt 
for the electoral process and the Af- 
ghan people is manifest. 


At the moment, there is dismay in the : 
western capitals that have sent troops : 
: ric take it for granted that the Taliban 
: would gain control of all of Afghanistan 


to fight in Afghanistan. How can they 
ask their soldiers to die defending an il- 


legitimate regime whose leading lights : 
are a crooked president, his drug-trading : 
brother and two vice-presidents who are : 
? slightest desire to attack the West? 


both former warlords with much Afghan 


blood on their hands? But this shameful : 


election is not just a’disaster for western ; 
: make a deal with the Taliban, and he 


policy. It's also an opportunity. 


President Obama made a huge mis- i 
take in accepting the Washington or- : 
} outcome. This outrageous parody of an 


thodoxy that the war in Afghanistan 


is both vital to American interests and : 
: political room he needs to save himself, 


winnable. If he doesn't turn around 


and start looking for a way out, it may : 


destroy his administration in the end : 

: Gwynne Dyer is a London-based inde- 
: pendent journalist whose articles ore 
change course: you are punished far : published in 45 countries. His column 


more severely for admitting a mistake : 


(though probably not in his first term). 
But the hardest thing in politics is to 


: than for making it in the first place. 


What Obama could now say |f 
he wanted, however, is: "This 
changes everything.” 

It doesn't, really, because 
the war in Afghanistan has 
been unwinnable for years, 
and it was never a vital Amer- 
ican interest. Nor was Karzai’s 
regime honest or competent be- 
fore this election. But Obama could 


: say that the revelation of the true nature 
: of the regime that the United States is 
: supporting has forced him to reconsider 
} the scale of the US military commitment 
: in Afghanistan, and he could then start 
: working his way towards the door, 
would have been eliminated in the first. : 

: Suppose he does that, and that in a 
: couple of years he is safely out of the 
: door. The last American and other for 
: eign troops have gone home, leaving 
: Karzai to his fate. What happens then? 
roots made him the favoured candidate : 


This is the tricky bit, because of course 


! we cannot know for sure. But here are 
= some significant facts to consider. 

of voting and avoid that run-off, Karzai's : 
people indulged in brazen, systematic : 
cheating. His men set up hundreds of = 
fictitious polling stations and regis- : 
tered hundreds of thousands of ballots : 
in his favour. (Some of them weren't : 
even folded, so they could never have : 


The 9/11 attacks were not planned 


q This shameful 
election is not just a 
disaster for western 
policy. It's also an 
opportunity. 


The Taliban and al-Qaeda were not 
“allies,” though they held similar views 
about the right way for Muslims to 


occupation in the 1980s. The Taliban 


The Taliban never ruled all of Afghani 
stan. They controlled their own Pash 


always held out in the north. 
So why does western political rheto- 


if western troops left, or that they would 
then allow al-Qaeda to have bases in the 
country again, or that they have the 


If western troops did pull out of Af- 
ghanistan, Hamid Karzai would try to 


might succeed. Even if he failed, few 
western interests are at stake in the 


election has given Barack Obama the 


and he should seize the opportunity. V 


appears each week in Vue Weekly. 


Here’s your opportunity 
ant ives. ; 


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activists chained themselves to equip- 
ment on the site and unfurled a banner 
reading “Tar Sands: Climate Crime." On 
the same day members of the Rainforest 
Action Network unfurled a 20-metre- 
high banner over Niagara Falls, calling 
on Obama to reject oilsands oil in favour 
ofa “clean energy future.” 


Ome SSS 
BYELECTION SENDS ED A MESSAGE 


Vos in Calgary-Glenmore sent Pre- 
mier Ed Stelmach a stinging rebuke 


; A PARTNERSHIP PROJECT OF 

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Jcanapian fy OC OENNE 
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inthe September 14 byelection, ending 40 
years of Tory rule in the riding by sending 
outgoing Wildrose Alliance Leader Paul 
Hinman back to the legislature. 

Hinman, who lost his former seat in 
Cardston-Taber-Wamer in the 2008 elec- 
tion, won the contest with 4052 votes, or 
37 percent of the total. Three-time Lib- 
eral hopeful Avalon Roberts came a close 
second with 3776 votes, while the PC's 
local star candidate, city alderman Diane 
Colley-Urquhart, finished a distant third 
with 26 percent of votes, just half the sup- 


port enjoyed in 2008 by former MLA Ron 
Stevens, who stepped down in May. 

The byelection, widely seen as a referen- 
dum on Stelmach's leadership, comes on 
the heels of the Wildrose Alliance Party's 
October 17 leadership contest and a vote 
on Stelmach’s leadership at the Conserva- 
tive AGM in early November. 


PSE CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED 


Ihe advocacy group Public Inter- 
est Alberta has launched a provin- 


cial campaign to head off what it calls 
"plans for deep cuts to post-secondary 
education” as the province wrestles 
with a $6.9 billion deficit. The group 
says funding cuts are already impact- 
ing the quality of education, and that 
investments in PSE are critical despite 
the current economic situation. Details 
of the campaign are available on the 
group's website, pialberta.org. 


SCOTT HARRIS 
I/ SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


WALK FOR LIFE 


The Walk will do us good, 


Sunday, September 20, 2009 
Rogistration at 11:00 am 
Walk at (:00 pm 


The 5 ku event begins at Churchill Square, winds through 
Edmonton's dewntown core and returns to the start. 


cipants will collect pledges between new and 
an Participants can walk as individuals er as part of a team. 


, participants will walk the Skm course and return to 
ilies for food, live music and entertainment for the whole family. 


$120,000 te be achieved by participants, with an additional 


$50,000 in corporate sponsorship. 


| LOG ON TO 


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THERE'S A TKUST GAP 
IS WHAT IN SAYING. 


14 // UP FRONT WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 


I WANNA HELP 
You ACROSS THE 


WHEN YOORE HALFWAY ACROSS 7 


A REPORTS OF {DU STIUIGIN' FOLKS 


e 
A few grains of salt 


SMON offers just one example of why a 


| shouldn't read the things | read, or talk : 
to the people | talk to; they sometimes : 
fuel what some view as unnecessarily vig- : 


ilant skepticism. Too late though, | 
had a conversation with former 
Health Canada scientist Chiv 
Chopra this week, and in 
perusing an obscure library 
pick, read about iatrogenic 
disease—disease caused 
by medical treatment—and 
about SMON in particular. 

Chopra and SMON aren't really 


related, except that both fuel my skep- : 
ticism of the medical establishment and : 
our food and drug regulatory bodies. : 
Chopra, former Health Canada scientist, : 
knows the inner workings of the regu- F 
latory process, and about the power : 
of industry to obscure the truth about : 
: ism," is still largely taboo. 

Which brings me to SMON. SMON is : 
short for subacute myelo-optico neu- : 
ropathy, a polio-like illness in its ability : 
to paralyze. It swept through Japan in : 
the 1960s and was attributed to a virus : 
for a decade and a half before it was hy- : 
pothesized it might be caused by high : 
doses of a drug called clioquinol used : 
to treat intestinal symptoms. In the : 
end clioquinol was found to be neuro- : 
toxic in high doses; SMON was an lat- : 
rogenic disease. The drug was banned, : 
the courts awarded damages in the : 
hundreds of millions, and the epidemic : 
disappeared—but not before it left tens : 
: medical interventions; don't get me 


where the real risks lie. 


of thousands in its wake. 


The thing is that microbial causes come : 
with Lucrative potential preventions and : 
treatments. They come with ready re- : 
search money. Non-microbial theories of : 
disease tend to stay on the back shelf, : 
because discovering that what's behind : 
some of our troubling plagues might be : 
: dom at face value. 


our own doing just isn't as lucrative, 


They're really not out to get us, | some- : 
times hear. | know they're not, not in a : 
conspiracy sort of way. But, since sci- : 
ence itself has been caught in the web of : 
corporate interests, it is prudent to View = 
press-release-driven medical and health : 
: research and determines the treatments 
? we receive when we visit our doctors, 
As Marcia Angell, former editor of the : 
New England Journal of Medicine put it, : 
the pharmaceutical industry has co-opt- : 


news with a generous sprinkling of salt. 


little bit of skepticism can go a long way 


ed “every institution that might stand in 
its way, including the US Congress, the 
Food and Drug Administration, academ- 
ic medical centers, and the medical 
profession itself.” 
History shows that almost 
everything we learn needs 
=m _ modifying. That's the beauty 
of science; we keep adjusting 
what we know. But though 
we acknowledge the prob- 
lems of conflicted interests and 
knowledge monopolies, and though 
we've been wrong too often to count 
and alternative theories initially vigor 
ously resisted often prove true, skepti 
cism directed at the medical orthodoxy 
and delivered via what Steve Anderson 
writing in last week's Vue Weekly, aptly 
called "big business-supported journal 


Taboo or not, skepticism is in order 
Because once enormous amounts of 
time and money have been invested in 
an accepted theory, once too many ca- 
reers are at stake, course corrections 
are delayed at the expense of humar 
lives. So | listen to the experts and reac 
the health news, but | also keep in mind 
the power of sheer momentum. And | 
listen to those who tell a different story 
because it is often the unpopular, un 
published hidden rest of the story tha! 
will develop a fully-informed decision 
on how to approach our health. 

| admire doctors and am thankful for 


wrong. They save lives, every day. My 
son is alive because of insulin. My broth 
er-in-law had blocked arteries bypassec 
last week. My other son now wears 2 
white coat in a university hospital, and 
yes, | think that’s pretty cool But none 
of that means I'd take any orthodox wis 


Because despite our desire to trust the 
experts, despite our hopefulness, medi 
cal science is industry driven; knowledge 
monopolies and conflicts of interest 
affect what filters down to us. It is in 
dustry that charts the path for medica! 


and industry, as we all know, must pu! 
shareholder values above the public 
health interest. W 


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UP FRONT //15 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


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Spicy secrets 


Learning the secrets of Indian cooking at City Arts Centre 


ANGIE ROOS 
// ANGIE@ VUEWEEKLY.COM 


'm one of those people that can cook 

a fairly decent meal if I have a good 
recipe. But for some reason or other, 
Indian cuisine has always eluded me. I 
can follow a recipe by Madhura Jaffrey 
(the Indian cookbook guru) and it still 
inevitably ends up tasting like a non- 
Indian person trying to cook Indian 
food. A totally unauthentic, definitely 
not spicy enough version of what you'd 
get at an Indian restaurant. What was 
wrong with me? 

I've long been obsessed with Indian 
food and my inability to cook it properly, 


. So it would make sense that I, a vegetar- 


ian, would sign up for the City Arts Cen- 
tre's Indian Vegetarian Shop, Cook and 
Eat class. I would finally be able to mas- 
ter aloo gobi. How hard could it be? 

I met my classmates and my teacher 
at the Spice Centre (9280 - 34 Avenue) 
one Saturday morning in July for our 
tour and an explanation of all things re- 
lated to Indian cooking. Our instructor, 
Sukhi, led us through the mind numb- 
ing Spice Centre while explaining to us 
the difference between garam masala 
and tandoori masala. I have to admit I 
was feeling a little cocky at the centre, 
thinking I knew everything I needed to 
know about spices. I was so wrong. I be- 
gan to discover that my biggest mistake 
was always changing up the spices, mix- 
ing whatever I had around, thinking, 
"Well, I don't have coriander seeds, but I 
have cumin seeds!" or using ground co- 
tiander instead of the seeds, thinking, 
"Well, they're both coriander!” Appar- 
ently, it makes all the difference in the 
world, What a fool I've been. 

After a thorough tour and lesson on 
spices, mixes, lentil varieties and okra 
we were invited to stock up on spices 
and snacks and meet at the City Arts 
Centre to start cooking. 

At the City Arts Centre they provided 
us with a great big kitchen, plenty of 
room and lots of good cooking uten 
sils. We were handed a list with seven 
different dishes, divided into groups of 
three people and given a station. I was 
at the masala rice and aloo gobi station. 
There wasn't a lot of instruction per 
se, we were just following a recipe and 
hoping for success. My teammates and 
I carefully measured out the spices, be- 


ea errauanenstoest nase tym nina 


spices. I prepared the aloo gobi, a po- 
tato and cauliflower curry, with great 
interest, as ] think this is a very impor- 
tant dish to get right. 

After an hour or so, everyone was start- 


a After an hour or so, everyone was starting to 
look pleased with themselves and the kitchen 


smelled wonderful. 


ing very particular all along so the dish 
would taste as “authentic” as possible. 
We started with the rice dish, taking 
turns chopping, mixing and grinding 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 


ing to look pleased with themselves and 
the kitchen smelled wonderful—like real 
Indian food. One team had made pakoras, 
a yummy, spicy nugget made of mixed 


vegetables and chickpea flour and fried 
until golden. Another team made mush- 
room curry and raita, a cool yogurt dish 
with red onion and fresh cilantro. There 
was also a shahi paneer, a creamy pink 
tinged curry with homemade cheese, 
and a vegetable korma, which is a mix of 
vegetables and spices in a yogurt sauce. 
We set out all the food buffet style 
and began to garnish the meals and get 
utensils out. Everyone piled their plates 
high, excited to taste everything. I first 
tasted the aloo gobi, which my team 
had prepared. It was spicy! The paneer 
was tasty, as was the korma. | felt that 
the rice would have been good plain, as 


79 Veni, Vidi,Vino 


ANCEAREEELELLCUOUAEATEETLALEENTELHAEAAANNLAFHANI TAN, 


everything else was so flavourful. jy, 
the real winner were the pakoras; (} 
were a hit and they disappeared befo 
anything else. We ended our mea! w)i:), 
a big mug of chai that our instruc 
prepared using only cloves, cardamo) 
black tea, milkand sugar. She cooked 
very slowly and for quite some time a; 
Irealized that this was an essential ¢ p 
I was happy to have a real chai recipe a 
I find it is always the perfect ending « 
any Indian feast. 

Although the instructor's input w: 
invaluable at the Spice Centre, | hardly 
recall her during the cooking portion 
of the class, which was unfortunate as | 
would have enjoyed a few anecdotes an. 
some tricks of the trade. I certainly en 
joyed the class but I felt I was just read 
ing a recipe and following it. That said 
I left feeling stuffed and happy, armed 
with recipes and the hope that I cou! 
make this feast all on my own one day 


Hoping to impress friends and fami\ 
I decided to host an Indian feast at m 
home so I could try out my recipes ar 
dazzle people with my cooking skill. | 
was pretty sure they would think thai 
grew up in Mumbai! I now had a gian' 
box of Indian spices purchased fro: 
the Spice Centre and from Superstor: 
Superstore carries a good selection « 
spices, but you might end up with five 
pounds of chana flour and a lifetime 
supply of fenugreek leaves. 

I started with my aloo gobi recipe and 
instead of adding the cauliflower and 
potato, I made a dal instead. Dal is a 
spicy lentil curry using the same spi: 
combination and tomato base you us 
for making aloo gobi. I made the dal t! 
evening before and discovered that it was 
really quite simple once you have all the 
Spices: it only took about 20 minutes 
fact, all ofthe recipes were quite simple 
follow—lI think it is often a matter of hev 
ing the correct spices on hand. | also pi 
pared the vegetables for the pakoras th« 
night before, as they require a lot of cho; 
ping. I prepared the mushroom curry a0 
the shahi paneer about an hour and hal! 
before my guests arrived. We were give” 
a recipe in class for making homemade 
paneer, but I figured since I have two jobs 
and a two-year-old I could be excused 
from making it from scratch, regardless 
of how easy it seemed. 

I put all the food out buffet style anc 
we sampled everything. The pakoras 
were a hit, although part of me regret 
ted the decision to fry them up in the 
29-degree heat. I heard a lot of happ’ 
comments about the mushroom cur) 
and the paneer was also garnering ° 
tention. But there was one maggie 
problem that almost everyone exce)' 
my two-year-old seemed to notice: tii 
food just wasn’t spicy! Not any of 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 >” 


waffles ever? é 


ispies to the batter yields surprises 


ae 


i like waffles, but | don't like Rice Krispies. 
That doesn't usually pose a problem; 
eat waffles, and | don't eat Rice Krispies. 
But | ran across a recipe that insisted i 
made the best waffles ever. And guess 
what the secret and mysterious 
(and weird) ingredient was? 
Yup, Rice Krispies. 

I'm still not sure what pos- 
sessed me to actually try it. 
Maybe it was the big box of 
Christmas Rice Krispies lan- 
guishing in my cupboard, the 
one my daughter simply needs to 
have every year and then only downs 


a bowl or two of. Maybe it was my utter : 
adoration of waffles and the possibility : 
that these were, in fact, the best waffles : 
: the grocery store. 


ever. Or maybe it was because it was 
just too bizarre to pass up. 


Whatever the reason, the very next : 
morning found me climbing onakitchen : 
chair and reaching way to the back of : 
that impossible cupboard above my : 
fridge. My fingers grasped a large rect- : 
angular box and pulled. Ta-da—the : 
= | usually skip that step but, in the spirit 

| checked the expiry date. Evidently : 
even airy specks of sugar and salt are : 
: wheat flour | substituted, that is. 


Christmas Rice Krispies. 


subject to ruin. Perfect—I had a two- 


F pew 
wept: 


Alberta’s 
electrical workers 


: week buffer before they were due to : 
: self-destruct. Out came my bowls and! : peaks held their shape when | lifted up 
: started combining the most unlikely in- 
: gredients. Into one bowl went the flour : 


a mewseek co 


So | beat the egg whites until soft little 


: the beaters. And | pretended | enjoyed it 
Then it was time to combine every- 
(1 used /2 cup whole wheat and 3/4 : thing. The milk mixture got dumped 
cup white), Rice Krispies, corn- : 
starch, sugar, baking powder, : 
baking soda and salt. Since : 
{ had broken the cardinal : 
rule of baking and didn't : 
give the recipe a thorough : 
read before embarking on 
my experiment, cornstarch 
was kind of a surprise ingredi 
ent, too. One | don't use very often, 
It must have been my husband's lucky 
day—t! had just enough, circumventing 
an unexpected morning jaunt for him to : 


Into another bowl went the egg yolks, : 
the milk, the vanilla and the oil, andthen : 
| beat the egg whites. | have to admit, : into the flour mixture. Before | could 
separating the yolks from the whites : even stir, the whole concoction started 
and then beating the whites is not my : to snap, crackle and pop. Seriously. Mu- 
favourite thing to do. It takes time, dirt- : sical waffles. Thankfully, the concoction 
ies extra dishes and is, in general, apain. : quickly tired of singing and started to 
resemble normal waffle batter again, 
except for the red and green flecks. 

I then folded in the egg whites. Folded, 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 >> 


of the experiment, | followed the recipe : 
exactly. Except for the little bit of whole : 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


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<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 


not stirred, Stirring would deflate them 


white thing futile. So don't stir. 

| now had lovely, airy, and very colour- 
ful waffle batter. The red and green Rice 
Krispies did not magically become mut- 
ed once they were incorporated into the 
waffle batter. 


: don't keep pouring until the batter : 

: reaches the edge, or you'll have waffle : 
: batter everywhere. Leave some room : 
t : for the waffles to expand. 
and make the whole beating the egg : 


It was time to cook, 
The recipe says to pour 2/3 of a cup of 
batter into the centre of the waffle iron, 
but that's far too methodical and pre- 
cise for me. | just poured until it looked 


like enough, and then | closed the lid : 


and waited, A word of warning, though: 


WHIP IT GOOD >> The topping is the most important part mnt 


: The anticipation was high, and one of : 
: my kids immediately whisked it away. : 
: It was treated to a strawberry-and- : 
: whipped-cream bath before | could : 
; even snag a measly crumb. : 
More batter, more high-pitched beeps : 
: and, finally, a waffle of my own.Isnucka : 


corner before dousing it with toppings. 
naked waffle can't hide anything. 
The waffle was light and crispy and 3} 


? solutely lovely. And still speckled wit: 
A minute or two later, a high-pitched : 
: beep pierced the kitchen. It was my : 
! signal the waffie was done, courtesy 
t of the all-knowing waffle iron. | gen- 
i tly coaxed the large, fluffy and deep 
: golden brown creation out of the hot 
* iron and plunked it on a waiting plate. 


red and green flecks. | read—and wh, 
knows—that the Rice Krispies leave |i: 


: tle pockets of air in the waffles, Making 


them extra-light. Someone in my hous- 


i thought they tasted like Rice Krispic 
: squares, but | think that was just wishf\)| 
: thinking. They definitely had a slightly 
: Sweeter edge, though, thanks to th 
: Rice Krispies. 


The crispness even held up well to 


: liberal dousing of various toppings, An, 

: there was no snap, crackle and popping 
: when they came into contact with ms 

: ple syrup. They must have gotten it | 
: out of their system earlier. 


Were these the best waffles ever? | 


? not sure, but they were pretty darn good 
: And now! know what to do with big boxe 
: of leftover Christmas Rice Krispies. W 


(from America's Test Kitchen) 


1V& cups all-purpose flour 
1.cup Rice Krispies 
3/4 cup cornstarch 


: V4 cup sugar 


1 teaspoon baking powder 
1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
3/4 teaspoon table salt 

2 large eggs, separated 
1V2 cups milk 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
1/2 cup vegetable oil 


COOKING CLASS 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 


Now this is entirely my fault and I ac- 
cept full responsibility. I halved the 
chili powder in my recipes, as we had 
done in class, Our instructor informed 
us that the recipes were seasoned ac- 
cording to her spice preference, which 
was pretty spicy. When I made the aloo 
gobi in class and forgot to halve the 
chili powder, it was definitely burning 
our tongues. So I thought in order to 


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cick te BACK +OSCHOOL putter 


keep everyone happy, I would keep all 
of the dishes mild. The result was that 
my meal at home ended up tasting like 
a non-Indian person trying to make 
Indian food. And I was pretty sure no 
one thought I grew upin Mumbai. Now 
1 know for next time to follow the in- 
structions to the letter. 

I was feeling pretty confident about 
making the chai on my own since re- 
ceiving this tip from my sister-in-law: 
let the spices boil a little longer on 
their own before adding the tea bags 


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ft's easy to get confused about the 


ing campaigns of Australian wine- 
makers, who have all but exclu- 4 
sively associated Shiraz with 
their country. Add to all that 
a number of legends about 
the grape's origin and one 
might become so mixed up, 
not even-a tall glass of the 
stuff can take the edge off. 
One of the most persistent leg- 


ends surrounding the wine comes from : 
the city of Shiraz in Iran which was, at : 
one time, famous for its wine. Despite : 
the many legends surrounding Shiraz : 
which appeared to back up claims that : 
the city was the origin of the varietal, in : 
the late 1990s this was proven to not be : 
the case. In 1998, researchers successfully : 
concluded that the grape varietal is native : 
: as well, but with undertones of earthi- 
ents of Shiraz—or Syrah if you prefer— : 
to be two obscure Vitis Vinifera grape : 
varietals called Dureza and Mondeuse : 
Blanche; both existing only ina very small : 
; out to be ideal for growing Syrah. Napa, 
: Sonoma and Paso Robles are some of 
lations are the main growing regions for : 
this varietal in France. Known to make : 
some of the most complex Syrah in ex- : 
istence, these wines are also made to : 
last, as they can age up to 20 years with : 
proper cellaring. The powerful and bold : 
wines of Hermitage, the most famous of : 
the Rhone Valley appellations, gave Syr- : 
ah its global recognition. Made from 100 : 
percent Syrah, these inky, deep garnet- 
coloured wines have luscious aromas of : 
black/red fruits, leather and spice, along : 
with smoke, rich fruit and pepper on the : 
palate, Syrah is also commonly blended : 
with Grenache and Mouvedre to enhance : 


to France. The DNA testing found the par- 


region close to the Rhone Valley. 
The Rhone Valley and southern appel- 


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: each of the grape varietals’ strengths and 
grape sometimes known as Syrah and : 
sometimes as Shiraz—after all, having : 
two names for what is essentially the : 
same thing seems designed to bring on : 
befuddlement. The confusion has only : 
been increased by the effective market- : 


e' 
mno@VUer 


to minimize its weaknesses. 


The first plantings of Syrah in Australia 
occured in 1831 after clippings of the vari- 
etal were brought over from France and 
Spain. From there, the Australian wine 
phenomenon slowly took hold of the 
market, increasing its fans signifi- 
cantly between 1970 and 1990, 


the turn of the century. | don't 
ely.col as think the Aussies or the world 
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away. The Aussies, like the French, use 
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growing, harvesting and crafting these de- 
licious, rich-berried wines the Californians 
were also focused on Syrah; inky and rich 


ness and licorice spice. In 1970 a group of 
viticulturists called the "Rhone Rangers” 
planted the first Syrah in California. The 
hot climate of the western regions turned 


the regions producing these inky, jammy 
wines. In essence, California Syrah was on 
the market in a New World package, with 
New World style ready to compete. 

Syrah/Shiraz is one of the most popu- 
lar grape varieties in the market today, 
whether it's from Australia, California, 
France or the many other wine-produc- 
ing countries in the world, From the in- 
credible richness on the nose of a Rhone 
Valley Syrah, to the jammy, luscious fruit 
and spice of a New World Shiraz, each 
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SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY DISH //'19 


PREVUE // VICTORIA MARTIN: MATH TEAM QUEEN 


The nerd circle of life 


Victoria Martin: Math Team Queen examines the 
clique-filled, high-stakes days of high school | 


FAWNDA MITHRUSH 
// FAWNDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ihe way people see their high school 

years might depend on what school 
they attended: the view might be skewed 
if the student body was large or small, or 
if the school was in a big city or remote 
town. Usually though, hindsight of that 
very special time in life—that excruciat- 
ing, uncertain, pressurized handful of 
developmental years—all depends on 
who was there, who pissed you off, or 
who you tried to impress. 

It's at this tortuous cusp in life where 
Victoria Martin comes in. The themes in 
Northern Light Theatre's season opener 
are quite a departure from the compa- 
ny’s reputation for curating dark and dif- 
ficult subject matter (NLT is also moving 
south to the Varscona venue this year), 
but Victoria Martin: Math Team Queen 
was one play Artistic Director Trevor 
Schmidt was unwilling to pass up. 

"Tove this play, I think the kids in it are so 
sweet, and it's so endearing,” he explains. 
"There's social status and peer groups and 
cliques and unspoken rules about social 


behaviour that nobody can ever get on top 
of. When I read it I remember being quite 
moved emotionally. [think probably wept 
alittle bi—I'ma big sucker that way—and 


ifa play moves me emotionally I definitely _ 


want to do it. I read it and thought about 
that terrible time in life when everything 
is life and death—it invoked that time 
period on such a gut level, on such a core 
emotional level." 

Essentially, the play presents the 
storied clash of the cliques. The very 
pretty, very popular Victoria (Melanie 
Piatocha) has to join the math team— 
eeeww—to avoid detention. Of course, 
said team is chock-full of geeks, four to 
be exact, each with his own quirks and 
troubles. They don't like her, so to spite 
them she sticks it out on the team, all 
the while keeping it secret from her 
popular friends. As it turns out, all of 
them actually do have feelings (includ- 
ing Victoria)—and there's plenty sur- 
prises going on to thicken the angst. 

"Everyone has a little secret, every- 
one has a little crush, and everyone has 
their own insecurities,” Schmidt says, 
admitting that he and the cast of young 


AONE ne ae et ener e enw reeeseeeensenanannssnres Debs shee Ueeeee neepRSAtmeR ees e's>cresass.... 


Find reviews of past theatre, 
dance and visual arts shows on 
our website. 


ALGEBRA IS SO TOTALLY, LIKE, HARD >> Victoria Martin: Math Team Queen 
follows clashing high school cliques // supplied 


up-and-comers are working with some 
pretty hackneyed stereotypes. "I'm try- 
ing not to do like tape and the glasses 
and bad mixes of plaid with bowties— 
we're not trying to do a cartoony, over- 
the-top version of nerds. I think it's 
grounded and rooted ina kind of reality. 
It doesn't matter what you're dressed 


PTT  LLOLLTLT LO TUTT ETO OT CTTTTCETT 


VISUAL ART // PROSPECTUS 


The sum of its parts 


The individual works in SNAP's group project PROSPECTUS 
don't make up a greater whole 


ADAM WALDRON-BLAIN 
ADAMWE@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
NAP, as a workshop and gallery 
combined, is intentionally a very 
community-oriented space. Artist-run 
centre members’ shows are strange 
things, however, asevenatightcommu- 
nity-driven organization like this one 
draws a varied audience. They aren't 
like the usual kind of group show, be- 
cause they present a minimally curated 
cross-section of the group rather than a 
focused exploration of an idea, or even 
a group of people tied together by more 
than circumstance. What then, is there 
to say about them? 

But the initiative to exhibit this collec- 
tion, the desire of the society members 
to mount something as an organiza- 
tion, makes sense. Like many of SNAP’s 
initiatives, it is about emphasizing and 
strengthening the community surround- 
ing the centre. I can only speculate about 
the specific reasons for mounting PRO- 
SPECTUS, aside from tradition, but as 
a group project, from the artists’ point 


20 // 


of view, I can perhaps see the draw. That 
doesn't necessarily make for a compel- 
ling show, though. 

Despite all of this, what fascinates and 
frustrates me most about PROSPECTUS 
is the work itself. Beyond Marc Siegner's 
rough characterization of the work as 
small or medium-sized, on paper, and 
drawing-like, most of the prints are basi- 
cally the same. All but a handful are black 
and white, with perhaps a pale, warm 
neutral like cream helping out, and fea- 
turing cloudy tones mixed with snatches 
of photography, semi-legible text and 
drawing. This is apparently what print- 
making is about in Edmonton, and this 
show is not the only place to see it. 


Not all of the work fits this category, 
of course: there are tricks in a few of 
the works, appealing details, and even 
once in a while some colour. And I'm 
well aware that working in a certain: 
method or with a certain press or what 
have you will produce results of a kind, 
and in a shared studio like SNAP where 
the presses and associated equipment 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 


are such a big attraction, a certain com- 
monality is expected. But I am not sure 
why “printmaking” seems to refer to 
this kind of image specifically. 

I wrote last week about sculpture that 
I felt failed to distinguish itself from a 
long line of similar work, and the same 
phenomenon can be seen in these prints. 
Looking at the show as a whole, it's not 
really clear why we should care about 
the works individually, which really does 
a disservice to the prints and even to the 
artists themselves. Beyond that, I can't 
help but question why the common ele- 


*ments have become so typical. It seems 


an overwhelming adherence to a single 
method, a single tradition, the justifica- 
tion for which has been all but forgotten 
by the younger artists, It doesn't seem 
to know what it has to say, so it's hard to 
want to listen. W 


SEP 23, 2009 


like or what social scene you 
school, it's all based in that terrible fear 
of not knowing if you're doing the right 
thing because you've never done it be- 
fore. One of the things they keep saying 
in the play, the characters keep turning 
to the audience and saying, ‘In case you 
don't remember, this is what high school 


is like. The stakes are so high. If you' 
ever seen a teenager who's had a {(0), 
with their friends, their world is over 


Working with the young cast has cays. 
a bit ofa shift in gears for Schmidt, to 
Joining Piatocha are Branden Mart), 
playwright Jason Chinn, and best bu: 
Cole Humeny and Richard Lee Tsi. 
"It's really great as a theatre dire; 
to work with younger people once 
a while because they will blindly tr, 
you, which is great,” he laughs, “bu 
also realize that I want them to unde 
stand why I want them to do thine; 
and it's good to force me to articulate 
... I said to the actors at the beginnin 
‘T could try and force you all to work 
the speed and the way that I work. bi 
that's not really good. I'd like to figu 
out how you work as a performer an 
to speak to you in your language rath: 
than making you all learn mine.” 
Good advice for any student strut 
gling to understand the people arour 
them, isn't it? W 
————— 
~ SUN, SEP 27 (7:30 PM) 
‘MATH TEAM QUEEN 


OR SCHMIDT 

NG? IE PIATOCHA, BRANDEN 
MARTIN, JASON CHINN, COLE HUMENY, RIC» 
ARDLEETS! 

VARSCONA THEATRE, (10329 - 82 AVE) 


TIT LEM TILT OLED LE LCL ELEC CLO COOL ULOOEO CLE CCL CLC 


DRAMA // TIDELINE 


Bury the past 


A stint as a gardener helped 


Jeff Page find Tideline 


PAUL BLINOV 
/ PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Ihe summer before he entered the 
University of Alberta's MFA direct- 
ing program, Jeff Page was broke. 

"I heard that Tom Peacocke, who was 
one of the founders of the drama depart- 
ment and a great, great theatre artist in 
Edmonton, a very important man, need- 
ed a gardener,” he says, taking in the 
coffee house patio sunshine between re- 
hearsals. "I don't know anything about 
gardening, but I know I can lift heavy 
things, and at least have the skills of a 
gorilla. So! called him up.” 

Soon Page was getting his hands 
dirty in Peacocke's yard. The work 
itself was, of course, not very theat- 
rical, but Page's gardening stint did 
lead him to his MFA thesis project— 
knowing that the guy toiling about his 
garden was about to enter the direct- 
ing program, the guy started exerting 
a little influence over Page. 

"The gardener was being gardened, in 
essence,” Page muses. “He kept asking 


saricernetey 


me these questions: why do you choos: 
plays that you choose? What's the first 
question you would ask a designe: 
How do you communicate with an a 
tor? I would be left all day to ponde 
them while I pulled weeds and plante 
pogonias ... One day I was sitting there 
and he threw a book at me, and he said 
"Nobody does this guy. He's important 
And he threw Tideline at me.” 

A strange, poetic script, Tideline fo! 
lows Wilfrid's (Scott Shpeley) attempt (0 
bury his father in the man’s home coun 
try, a war-torn Middle Eastern land tha! 
already double-stacks its corpses in the 
ground, and has little use—or room 
for another cold body. As Wilfrid ven 
tures deeper through the country, " 
starts to encounter similar individual's 
burdened by their own pasts and famil; 
histories, and his journey starts to wide D 
beyond just laying a man to rest in hi 
native land—Tideline questions how w« 
can bury a violent past altogether a" 
start fresh, free of hereditary conflicts 
and old hatreds that too often get han‘ 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 >” 


" PTTL Ut [I 
rm w SPO PREV en ete Mat ATED UOVTEU et U1 PUERTO UeTENNCPEE NANNY taNT R 


TRE // THE DROWSY CHAPERONE 


Dream weaver 
The Drowsy Chaperone's hilarious musical-within-a-play lets our 
own personal experiences transform it into something heartfelt 


THEATRE NETWORK - 


Ironic distance can frequently come 
off as annoyingly post-modern, when 
it doesn't completely undercut what 
follows, but it works extremely well 
for two reasons. For starters, the mu- 
Sical itself, while ridiculous, is impec- 
cably put together (with the possible 
exception of Ullyat's singing; while a 
talented and emotional performer, he's 
nevertheless routinely outclassed in 
musicals, though at this point I blame 
casting). Even the occasional record 
skip is sharply choreographed, and the 
music is grand, particularly if, as the 
Man in Chair suggests once, you don't 
pay much attention to the lyrics. 

More important, though, is that con- 
nection between Man and play. Though 
he claims at the beginning to only want 
a little entertainment, as he leads us 
through its patently obvious theatre, or 
at least this little musical, is not such a 
simple thing for him: he glories in the 
curious foibles, rants about things that 
break the mood, almost breaks down 


heart /jeupplied over connections that draw him back to 
Se Nd viv boy ine none a <nvubeacsceseoenurensiectVenesscceccusaecensanes his own life. It leads to an ending that's 
DAVID BERRY foreignerandtheeponymouschaperone anunexpectedbutentirely earned heart- 


J/ DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


i: my preview for The Drowsy Chaper- 
lone a few weeks ago, I talked a bit about 
how it was a love letter to theatre, and its 
power to move us. There are certainly 
elements of that—anything that creates 
a musical-within-a-play as lovingly and 
unreservedly as this is obviously saying 
something about what theatre does— 
but after seeing it on stage, I have to 
say that's too small a piece of the whole 
puzzle. This is much more a play about 
how our own personal experiences can 
transform a play: the musical, as our 
guide will point out numerous times, 
is a fairly cheesy bit of puff, the kind 
of thing that, if it were real, would be 
justly largely forgotten. But it is some- 
thing else entirely to Man in a Chair—a 
personal connection with his mother, a 
place to tum when he is blue, a welcom- 
ing capsule of another age that he not- 
so-subtly pines for—and as he guides us 
through it, we're not so much reminded 
of the power of theatre to move as the 
power we have to make theatre moving, 
the myriad esoteric personal connec- 
tions we bring to a performance that 
influences, sometimes profoundly, what 
we take away from it. 

The play begins in Man in Chair's (Jay 
Brazeau) apartment while he is experi- 
encing one of his blue moods, or as he 
describes it, in a taste of the self-awarely 
clever asides to come, "self-conscious 
anxiety resulting in non-specific sad- 
ness.” His remedy, implied to be his 
usual way of dealing with the feeling, is 
to take us through the eponymous musi- 
cal, a 1920s pseudo-vaudevillian specta- 
cle that takes place in the lead-up to the 
wedding of Robert Martin (John Ullyat) 
and Janet Van De Graaf (Debbie Timuss). 
The main plot point, as Man in Chair will 
gleefully point out, is that the groom is 
not supposed to see the bride on the 
wedding day, and that’s rounded out 
by punny gangsters, a daffy, spit-taking 
Society matron, a ridiculously accented 


(Susan Gilmour), a tipsy mentor played 
by an egomaniac. So that’s the musical 
we're supposed to be dealing with. 


The framing device of the Man in Chair 
allows The Drowsy Chaperone to produce 
its ridiculous musical and mock it, too, 
and it takes full advantage of both op- 
portunities. The aforementioned for- 
eigner, Aldolpho, is ridiculed by Man 
in Chair as a relentless ham and then 
draws some of the play's biggest laughs 
from strained overacting; the Chaper- 
one is revealed as an irresistible diva 
who selfishly demands a chance to belt 
out an anthem in every show, right be- 
fore Gilmour nearly brings the house 
down with an ode to alcoholism. It lets 
us in on the joke right before it pushes 
it to its ridiculous extreme. 


The festival kicks off with the No Tie Gala Art Show and Sale, which this year also marks the Grand Opening for the’, 


fabulous new Nina Haggerty Centre for the Arts. 


cut the giant ribbon to officially open 


display, wine and cheese and watch the rooftop for human gargoyles! 


wringer, the Man in Chair's breakdown 
a very welcome and fitting reminder 
that theatre's—and, if we're going to be 
high-falutin’, art's—greatest trick is giv* 
ing us insight on the hang-ups and con- 
nections we bring to it, taking our own 
personal world and giving us a chance to 
work it out up on stage. V 

UNTIL SUN, OCT 4 

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE 

DIRECTED BY MAX REIMER 

BOOK BY BOB MARTIN, DON\MCKELLAR 

LYRICS & MUSIC BY LISA LAMBERT, GREGG 

MORRISON 

STARRING JAY BRAZEAU, SUSAN GILMOUR, 

DEBBIE TIMUSS, JOHN ULLYATT 

CITADEL THEATRE (9828 - 101A AVE) 

$60.~- $95 


= 
> — 


FAMILY ARTS FES 


Friday, September 25, 6-10 with Ribbon Cutting at 8. 


SEP 17 


SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


‘ 


sid Stephen Mallatratt 
From the book hy Susan all 


Pou by Nir 


JoctgumEpe 


RRTS ON THE-AVE-PRESENTS THE 4™ANNUAL 


Join Minister Lindsay Blackett and Mayor Stephen Mandel as they 


the new Centre. There's live Jazz by the Parkers, work by over 50 artists on 


ADMISSION IS FREE, donations are welcome. 


VA 
y/ 


Arts on the Ave is ‘TAKING IT TO THE STREETS’ September 25 - 27 with the 4th annual Kaleido Family Arts Festival 


idas 


~ MINA HABGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS - 9225-118 AVENUE 


ARTS // 21 


sesterrarry 


ART >> PRAIRIE ARTSTERS 


Elaborate on collaborate 


What does it mean when someone wants to collaborate? 


Collaborating, as both word and action, : 
gets tossed around a lot these days. Ev- : 
eryone seems to be collaborating with : 


someone, and if for some untimely 
reason they are not, then there's 
definitely talk of collaborating 
on a future project. 

| will offer the opinion up 
front: collaborating is ex- 
tremely difficult. Or more 
precisely: good collabora- 
tions are extremely difficult. 
A juggling act of vision, skills, 
€gos, personal growth and straight 


up logistics, to collaborate means to : 
trust and release total control by all : 


Recently experiencing three very differ- : 
ent types of collaborations in the form : 
of contemporary dancer/choreography : 
Paul André Fortier with musician Robert : 
Racine, drawing between Tim Rechner : 
and Caitlin Sian Richards, and a mixed : 
media visual installation by Sarah Al- : 
ford, Jennifer Bowes, and Shirley Weibe, : 
I'm left wondering about the limitless : 
processes behind such a common yet : 


parties in favour of a unified and com- 
prised vision—and unfortunately not 
many people can pull this off. 


diverse practice. 


In their artist talk prior to their opening : 
performance, Fortier and Racine made it : 
clear that collaborating needs a single vi- : 
sion. Fortier, who turned 60 last year and : 
who cites visual artist Betty Goodwinasa : 


entre for th 


Vv 


: laborations between now-prominent art 


OP COTIONS 


referenced the art happenings and col- 


ists like John Cage, Merce Cunning. 


influences and collaborations, 
production of Cabane moved be- 


realm of collaboration. 


past collaborator (in an era when nobody : 
gets to collaborate with Betty Goodwin), 


yond mutual inspiration and into the : 


A juggling act of vision, skills, egos, personal growth 
and straight up logistics, to collaborate means 


Fortier’s concept of how Racine could 


> contribute to Fortier’s meticulously cho- 
: reographed work. 


As Edgar Degas was greatly influenced 


: by sitting in on ballet classes, produc- 
E ham, and Robert Rauschenberg - 
\ as how dance, music and visual : 
arts have always influenced : 
each other. Wishing to distin- : 
guish the differences between : 


ing a series that would shape the era of 
Impressionism to Richard Serra’s forma- 


rary dance, channeling this perception 
of movement and space into post-war 


; sculpture, these too are not collabora- 
| am unconvinced that Fortier’s : 


tions, but points of research and one- 
sided inspiration. The question then is: 
does actively involving your inspiration 


: in the process equal a collaboration? 


CAAT HRT METAS 


to trust and release total control by all parties 
in favour of a unified and comprised vision—and 
unfortunately not many people can pull this off. 


The wonder of Racine was certainly on : 
display, and as a presence, Racine as a : 
performer certainly triggered much of = 
the movement; but the production was : 
without a doubt a Fortier Danse creation = 
: first and foremost. Racine's skills have : 
most likely inspired and benefited For- : 
tier as an artist, and Fortier has injected : 
new blood into the melancholic Racine, : 
but the work created was not a collabo- : 


-ration of visions, but a performance of 


ry | m_. 
| ee) w 
WVE/ Cir 


AY 
Ps 


UEWEEKLY // SEP 17 — SEP 23, 200: 


Local figurative painter Caitlin Sian Rich- 
ards premiered her new series of draw- 
ing exercises made with abstract painter 
Tim Rechner in FAVA’s Ortona Gallery as 
a more democratic collaboration. With 
Pieces created in tandem in Rechner’s 
studio, along with pieces traded between 
the two over a span of four months, it is 


niques are heading into a new direction 


: through the influence of Rechner’s mo, 
: emotional and immediate approach: 
: Rechner, whose work continues to | 
: based in a harnessed intuition, contribute 
: his aesthetic and energy to the show, x, 
: like Racine, he too serves more as a tripe: 
: and influence in the overall work. F 
tive and vested interest in contempo- : 
= Rechner’s opening, Alford/Bowes/Weibo’; 
: Spaces Within | Within Spaces premiera, 
? at Harcourt House. Also calling this a col 
: laboration, the artists showcase thre 
i distinct sections reflective of each artis’; 
; practice. Since meeting three years ap. 
: in Grande Prairie, and living and working 
i respectively between areas in Norther; 
: Alberta/Chicago/Vancouver, the three 
: have kept in touch through periodic 
. : dates on what each is working on, an 
= even sending in samples of materials 

¢ times. The individual works alone are ir 
; dicative of each artist's heavily processec 
? aesthetics and practices, sharing similar 
: ties in transformative labor technique 
: and subtractive aesthetics. With unde 
: tectable compromises engaging in quiet 
: conversations amongst the works, 
i unification of the pieces solidifies their 
; process into a collaborative exhibit. A 
: each piece can stand on its own, it is thei 
= inclusion of each other's growth that cre 
> ates the potential to mutually inform and 
= expand each other. W 

visually clear that Richards’ formal tech- = 

= Amy Fung is the author of PrairieArtsters.com 


On the same night of Richards anc 


TIDELINE 
<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 


ed down from father to son. 

"T think a lot of what [playwright Wa- 
jdi] Mouawad is talking about is this 
idea of cultural belonging, and this idea 
of how can we, as young individuals in 
this world, move forward in the creation 


emu Leeann veunaymtaHmorteAn ue 


brought in a cast and crew whose cul 
tural backgrounds meant they too could 
point him in the right direction, cha 
neling their collective cultural exper- 
ences into the production. 

"] think if you were gonna do thi 
[play], you have to work that way,” h 
says. "I know for me, I couldn't be ar 
rogant enough to say ‘I’m gonna te! 


yy wan) AGP Ee FRA AISNE Ne 


I think a lot of what Mouawad is talking about is this 
idea of cultural belonging, and this idea of how can 


we, as young individuals in this world, move forward 
in the creation of ourselves if we're constantly being 
urged to kill each other by these ghosts, and these 
age-old hatreds, and rivalries and prejudices. 


of ourselves if we're constantly being 
urged to kill each other by these ghosts, 
and these age-old hatreds, and rivalries 
and prejudices,” Page explains. “It isvery 
political in that way, because you kinda 
can't write about that era without it be- 
ing political. But I think that ultimately, 
it's about human connection, and it's 
about how do we find those people in 
the world that we can join with to help 
us, in essence, be ourselves authenti- 
cally in the world, to create the new idea 
that we want to live in.” 


Page was intrigued by Tideline, but the 
second act was filled with what he calls 
"sort of political and social poetry,” and 
some cultural ideas that he, American- 
born, didn’t have an immediate handle 
on. So he geared most of his MFA ses- 
sions towards helping understand that 
world, seeking out courses in theatre 
and war, and the politics and cultural 
theories of the Middle East. He also 


your story for you, because I have ' 
right in the theatre.’ One of the thing 
I think the theatre is full of, and are 
dangerous people, are what I call e 
torial page humanists: people who ca 
get outraged at what they read in th 
newspaper, and yet create environ 
ments around themselves that are bit 
ter and abusive and less than humane 
and will stand on a pedestal and say 
‘I'm doing important work." In the en 
I'm just making plays, but if I'm gonn< 
make a play about a certain thing, | 
better get the people that it will res‘ 
nate within it.” W 


Featured Artists 


Jeannette Sommers 
Laura Watmough 
SIV mal- lalate] 

Pearl Der 


MONK 
Laraine Weaver 


Doris Charest 


Pat Wagensveld 


to visit ed in their suai tow ip ether at wor k. 


12:00pm - 5:00pm 


Spotlight Gallery #107, 25 Chisholm Ave. 
St. Albert, AB * P: 780.419.2055 / 


66 Estate Way West, Summerbrook Estates 
St. Albert, AB « P: 780.973. 6771 


19 Glen Meadow Cres. 
St. Albert, AB » P: 780.418.1192 


Big Lake Artists Studio 32 Rayborn Cres. 
St. Albert, AB + P: 780.458.3951 


Studio Gallery 11 Perron Street stilbert Signe 
St. Albert, AB * P: 780.460.5993 County 


ARTs //23 
SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY ARTS // 


* + pee ) ee 
TOP 30 FOR THE WEEK OF 
1. Sam Baker—Cotton (music road) 
Tom Russell—Blood And Candle Smoke (shout) 
Slaid Cleaves ~ Everything You Love Will Be Taken Away.... (music road) 
Delbert McClinton & Dick 50 - Aquired Taste (new west) 
Christian Hansen & The Autistics ~ Power Leopard (ch) ; 
Watermelon Slim —Escape From The Chicken Coop (northern blues) 
Levon Helm — Electric Dirt (dirt farmer) 
Steve Earle — Townes (new west) 
Raul Malo - Lucky One (concord) 
The Dead Weather - Horehound (warmer) 
11. Kieran Kane- Somewhere Beyond The Roses (dead reckoning) 
12. Tinariwen — Imidiwan: Companions (outside) 
43. Modest Mouse - No One's First, And You're Next (epic) 
14. Dustin Bentall — Six Shooter (impala) 
15. John Fogerty & The Blue Ridge Rangers - Rides Again (verve) 
16. The Black Crowes — Before The Frost.... (silver arrow) 
17. Gurf Morlix - Last Exit To Happyland (gurf moriix) 
18. Dan Mangan — Nice, Nice, Very Nice (fum) 
19. The Cave Singers - Welcome Joy (matador) 
20. The Wooden Sky — If | Don't Come Home You'll Know I'm Gone (bbr) 
21. Fruit Bats — The Ruminant Band (sub pop) 
Wilco — The Album (nonesuch) 
23. Gordie Tentrees — Mercy Or Sin (gordie tentrees) 
24. Johnny Flynn—A Larum (vertigo) 
25. Behemoth — Evangelion (metal blade) 
26 
27 


SeMmNonnwn 


Trevor Tchir — Sky Locked Land (riverdale) 
. Young Galaxy — Invisible Republic (Fontana) 
28. Joe Henry —- Blood From Stars (anti) 
29. Lee Harvey Osmond - A Quiet Evil (latent) 
30. Reverie Sound Review - S/T (boompa) 


JOHN WORT HANNAM 
QUEENS HOTEL 


“Queen’s Hotel” is Wort Hannam’s 
fourth full-length recording. Once 
again, Juno award winning Steve 
Dawson takes the helm producing 11 tracks of 
authentic Canadiana folk/roots music. The writing, 
although true to John’s narrative story-telling style, is 
tighter, smarter, more personal, and with a breadth of 
subject matter not seen on previous recordings. 

e sure TO FRIEND U E.COP ATUNESEDMONTON 
10355 Whyte Ave. Shop online at megatunes.com 434-6342 


24 // ARTS 


monton flamenco artists featuring flamenco 
cbse! ial cl patter Sep Ba qcysoTTGoCTe 
FM 


CINEMA AT THE CENTRE - Library Theatre, Stanley 
A. Milner Library «7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq « Centre 
for Reading and the Arts showcases little-known films 
every month. Titles to be announced 


FAVA-FRESHWORKS « Metro Cinema, 9828-101A Ave Zei- 
dler Hall - 780.429.1671 « Pushing Borders: FAVA Freshworks 
Screening: Showcasing 5 local artists and 7 original and new 
works « Sep 17, 7pm » $8 (FAVA members)/$10 (general) 
JUBILEE AUDITORIUM + Razom: A Fusion of Ukrainian 
Dance « Sat, Sep 26, 8pm 


NFB FILM CLUB - Library Theatre, Stanley A. Milner 
Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq » Free monthly film 
series shows the best in animated and documentary film 
from the National Film Board of Canada Titles to be 
announced « Sun, Sep 20, zpm 


STANLEY A. MILNER LIBRARY - 7 Sir Winston 
Churchill Sq Centre for Reading and the Arts Depart- 
ment + epl.ca « From Books to Film: Weekly showings of 
films adapted from books; every Fri, apm - Teen Movie 
Scene: movie club for teens; ist and 3rd Thu every month 
(no movie Oct 15; screening Oct a2 for Teen Read Week) 


SS SS 
GALLERIES + MUSEUMS 


AGNES BUGERA GALLERY « 12310 Jasper Ave + 
780.482.2854 » SOTTO VOCE: Paintings by Daniéle 
Lemieux + Until Sep 24 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL « 10186-106 St « 780.488.6631 

+ Discovery Gallery: SAVING PARADISE: Trees of the 
Canadian West by textile artist Lorraine Roy; Sep 19-Oct 

31; opening reception: Sat, Sep 19, 2-4pm - Lower Gallery: 
HITCHED: Couples in craft + Until Oct 3 
ALLEYSCAPE STUDIO-Red Deer « 4930 Ross St Alley, 
403-997-9788 « THE ACCIDENTAL NATURE OF MUCH THAT 
APPEARS: Srnall collages by Donna Herrick « Until Oct 10 


ARTERY + 9535 Jasper Ave « WHERE ARE YOU FROM?: 
Poster show featuring 29 visual creatives from Edmonton 
and beyond « Until mid Oct 


ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA - Enterprise Sq, 100, 10230 
Jasper Ave + 780.422.6223 « MUSEUMS IN THE 21ST 
CENTURY: Presenting the world’s leading museum building 
projects conceived in the ast century; Sep 19-Dec 13; opening 
reception: Sep 18 (AGA members and invited guests only) 

+ CANADIAN MUSEUMS NOW: Contributions from the 
Ast Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, Gardiner 
Museum in Toronto; Canadian War Museurn in Ottawa and 
the new Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg, 
Sep 19-Dec13 » THE NEW FLANEURS: rary Urban 
Practice and the Picturesque: A selection of picturesque 
works of art from the AGA collection. Featuring Don Gill; 
until Dec 13; opening reception; Sep 38 (for invited guests 
and AGA members only) « BUILDING A VISION: Art Gallery 
of Alberta and Randall Stout Architects: Compare building 
sketches, photographs, diagrams and plans with the final 
model of the new Art Gallery of Alberta, charting the design 
and construction of Randall Stout Architects’ new Art Gallery 
of Alberta; until Dec 13; opening reception: Fri, Sep 18, 7-9pm. 
(AGA members and invited guests only) Lecture: Randall 
Stout Presents: The New Art Gallery of Alberta; Sat, Sep 19 at 
the Winspear Centre; 10 « Tours: Walking on Water: A Walk- 
ing Tour of Edmonton's Water Features conducted by Renato 
Vittic in celebration of Alberta Arts Days; Sun, Sep 20, 1~gprn + 
Curator's Tour of The New Aldneurs with Marcus Miller; Thu, 
Sep 24,7pm:+ Art for Lunch: Enterprise Square Atrium; free 
on the last Thu each month, 12-10-12:sopm « All Day Satur- 
days: The Flow tours with Parkour enthusiasts; Sep 26 « Free 
(member)/S10 (adult/$7 (senior/student), $5 (6-x2yrs)/free (syrs 
and under\'$20 (family); Pay-What-You-May, Thu, 48pm 
BILTON CONTEMPORARY ART-Red Deer - 4b- 
809-51 Ave, Red Deer, 403.343.3933 » WALLS AND 
WHISPERS: Ceramic works by Eva Lapka « Sep 19-Oct 
17 « Opening reception: Sep 18, 7-9pm 

CALGARY AND EDMONTON RAILWAY MUSEUM - 
10447-86 Ave + 780.433.9739 « Edmonton's first railway 
station, 1891 + Open through Sep, Tue-Sat, 1oam-4pm + 
$2{incl local rail history book) 

CENTRE D'ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA « 9103-95 
Ave - WINDOW ON...: Artworks by Denise Parent, 
Jeannine Chalifoux, Sylvie Pinard, Alain Favre, and 
Andreas K. Hellum + Until Sep 22 

CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621-82 
Ave « 780.498.1984 + FALL SALON AT RED: Christ!'s 
paintings from the past - Until Oct 2 

CROOKED POT GALLERY « 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain « 
780.963.9573 » Open Tue-Sat 10am-spmn « SMALL PACKAGES: 
Pottery by Carol Hartwell » Until Sep 30 

ELECTRUM GALLERY - 12419 Stony Plain Rd « 
780.482.1402 « Gold and xilver jewellery by Wayne Mack- 
enzie, and artworks by various artists 


FINE ARTS BUILDING GALLERY « U of A, Rm 1-2, 02 St, 


Liberian Refugees): CD launch and reception: Sep 24, 7-10pm « 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 


‘Shows run until Sep 26 
FRINGE GALLERY - 10:6 
‘Spot » 780.432.0240 + Artworks 


‘Ave, bsmt of the Paint 
James Davies « Until Sep 30 


Paintings by Corinne Anderton « Until Sep 20 « Closing 
Feception: Fri, Sep 18, 5-7pm (Alberta Arts Days) 
ee 

University Ave « 780.433.5807 + : :3Oam-1pm; 
pupm TIP OFTHE BRUSHE Avooks bythe 
and students of Strathcona Place « Until Sep 25 


JOHNSON GALLERY « Southside: 7711-85 St- : 
New Woks by Ad Worg ic Dee metal ae 


v Bagan. 
Edmonton. Wood carvings by Adie. Pottery by Noboru Kubo 
KAASA GALLERY - Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave « 


OPEN PHOTO 2009: Presented by Visual Arts Alberta 
+ Until Sep 30 


LATITUDE 53 - 1024-106 St» + DAZED AND 
AMUSED: Artworks by Chris Reid; Artist talk and opening 
reception: Fri, Sep 25, 7pm; A Bunny Making Workshop with 
Chris Reid: Sat, Sep 26, 1-3pm; $10 pre-register » 

Festival 200% Festival of performance art-Until Sep2x 
LOFT GALLERY « g90 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park « 
780.922.6324 « Open every Thu 5-9pm; Sat 10-4pm + FLORALS 
AND STILL LIFE: until Oct 31 « Art Society of Strathcona 
County general meetings the and Tue each month 
(MANULIFE PLACE « 10180-101 St, first and second levels « 
COLOUR FIX Paintings by Jeri Lynn Ing » Until Sep 27 
MCMULLEN GALLERY - U of A Hospital, £440-122 St + 
780.407-7152 * COLLECTING, COLLECTED, COLLECTIONS: 
The Women’s Art Museum Society of Canada show 
featuring women’s collections; until Oct 24 + Noontime 
Panel Discussion: On the Bencfits of the Arts in Hospital 
and Healthcare Settings; Featuring Dr. Steven K. Aung, Ted 
Bishop, Ted Blodgett; Fri, Sep 18, 12-4pm 

MCPAG - Multicultural Centre Public Art Gallery, sensi St, 
Stony Plain « 780.963.2777 « Alberta landscape paintings by 
‘Garol Hama and Sharon Hazen; until Oct7 

MICHIF CULTURAL AND METIS RESOURCE INST. 
TUTE « 9 Mission Ave, St Albert « 780.651.8376 « Aboriginal 
Veterans Display « Gift Shop + Finger weaving and sash 
display by Celina Loyer 

MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM «5 St Anne St, St Albert - 
780. 459.528 « DECOYS TO DECORATIVES: the History 
and Art of Decoy Painting « Until Nov 15 


MUTTART CONSERVATORY « 9626-96A St «780. 496.8755 + 
SERENDIPITY: Sculpture show « Until Sep 27 

ORTONA ARMOURY + 9722-102 St « Open every Sat 
12-spm, by appointment 780.423.2966/780.431.1737 « BACK- 
WARDS STARE: Experimental Drawing Show: Tim Rechner 
and Caitlin Sian Richards « Until Oct 3 


PICTURE THIS GALLERY - 959 Ordze Rd, Sherwood 
Park « 780.467.3038 CANADA SCAPES AND SPACES 
FROM LANDSCAPES TO SEASCAPES: Artworks by 
Gregg Johnson, Brent Heighton, Dean Mcleod, Jonn 
Einerssen, Audrey Pfannmuller, Roger D. Arndt, Bi Yuan 
Cheng, and Murray Phillips » Until Sep 19 


PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY « 1183-112 St - 
Edmonton Contemporary Artists, Society's Seventeenth 
Annual Exhibition featuring painting, sculpture and 
photography + Until Sep 25 

PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY « 19 Perron St, St 
Albert - 780.460.4310 + GUILDED: St Albert Place Visual 
Arts Council « Until Sep 26 


PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA - 8ss< Roper 
Rd + 780.427.1750 * ALBERTA WOMEN'S INSTITUTES 
100 YEARS OF COMMUNITY SERVICE: Celebrating the 
contributions of the Alberta Women’s Institutes over the 
last 100 years - Until Oct 3: « Pree admission 


ROYAL ALEX HOSPITAL - Food Court, 10240 Kingsway 
«+ Artworks by the members of the Emerging Artist 
Society of Alberta - Until Oct 5 


‘SCOTIA PLACE - Jasper Ave, Main Floor « 780.469.7341 + 
New and old photos of Edmonton landscapes and build- 
ings by David Aaron - Until Sep 30 


SCOTT GALLERY « 10411-124 St + 780.488.3619 » Art- 
works by Martha Cole + Until Sep 22 


SNAP GALLERY - 10309-97 St - 780.423.1492 » Main and 
Studio Gallery: SNAP Membership Exhibition curated by 
Belfast Print Workshop, Norther Ireland » Until Oct x7 
‘SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY « Melcor Cultural 

Centre, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove « 780.962.0664 - OPEN ART 
COMPETITION: Alberta Artists; until Sep 19 » 2009 SENIOR'S 
SHOW: Artworks by Albertan artists over 55; Sep 22-Oct 10; 
opening reception: Sat, Sep 26, 1-4pm_ 

‘STUDIO GALLERY - 1 Perron St, St Albert - LANDSCAPE 
INSPIRATIONS: Artworks by Pam Wilman + Until Sep 26 


URBAN ROOTS 1048-82 Ave alley » AFRICA AT HEART: 
Work by Ash Shumba, two exhibits, by one artist in one 
venue. Getting you in touch with Africa « Until Sep 22 


VAAA GALLERY « yrd Fi, 1ozi5-112 St « 780.421.1771 « Doing 
What Come: Naturaily: Artworks by the membership Hand 
Weavers, Spinners and Dyers of Alberta celebrating the 
United Nations International Year of Fibre « Until Oct 10 
VISUALEYEZ FESTIVAL 2009 - Latitude 53, 1048-106 
St, and various other venues - 780.423.5353 « The tenth 
edition of Canada’s only festival of performance art, 
curated by Todd Janes, writing and animation by Warren 
Arcand (Mohawk/BC) « Until Sep ax 

WEST END GALLERY - 12308 Jasper Ave - 780.458.4892 « 
Featuring artworks by Jean-Gabriel Lambert « Sep 29-Oct 1+ 
Opening reception: Sat, Sep 19, artist in attendance 


im | 


AUDREYS BOOKS « 10702 Jasper Ave - 780.423 348 
Poetry Nights and Fri each month - Book signing of :,. 
Bt of rige Brava! by fige ladles, Mary and Sa,” 


wt ¢; Sep 35. 730pm_— = 
BLUE CHAIR CAFE - 9625-76 Ave + A 
E FE - Axe + 780.469.8755 « Story 


CARROT CAFE « 9351-118 Ave « 780.752.4867 « Carrot 
Cirle ‘Tue, 7-9pm; A e 
pean Every 7-9P critique circle the 
CITY ARTS CENTRE « 10943-84 Ave « 780.93: . 
Pons toiktanteete res nth alors 
Hi month + Until 
(free first time) ees 
CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LIBRARY Arno\: 
Guebert Library, 73 St, 112 Ave + Alberta Arts Days— a 
Afternoon with Local Authors: Readings by Lisa Martin- 
DeMoor, Jasmina Odor, Thea Bowering, Katherine Miller 
and Mark Morris « Sep 21, 3-30pm « Free 
EDMONTON PUBLIC LIBRARY « iment. 
c fee . eplca/experiment EPI 


FACULTY CLUB - 11435 Saskatchewan Dr, 780.492.8832 
+ Nora and Grant Stovel and The University of Alberta 
Press launch, Jane Austen Sings the Blues, inspired by 
Bruce Stovel's passion for Jane Austen and blues music . 
‘Thu, Sep 24, 4-6pm - Free 

KASBAR LOUNGE - 10444 Whyte Ave = 780.422.8174 « 
Spoken word, performance poetry by Moe Clark and 
friends, presented by Writers Guild of Alberta and the 
Canadian Authors Association, starting with an open mc 
session with “raving poet” Mike Gravel, MC; in celebra 
tion of Alberta Arts Days « Fri, Sep 18, 7pm « Free 

LEVA CAPPUCCINO BAR + 1053-86 Ave + 780.479.5382 - 
Standing room only, poetry every 3rd Sun evening 
ROSIE'S - 10475-80 Ave + 780.932.4409 « TALES: 
Edmonton Storytelling Café: TALES. Alberta League 
Encouraging Storytelling open mic «ast Thu each month 
7-9pm; Pay-What-You-Will (min $6) 

ROUGE LOUNGE - 10111-1317 St « 780.902.5900 + Poetry Tues 
day: Every Tue with Edmonton's local poets « 8pm « No cover 
RUTHERFORD HOUSE « 11153 Saskatchewan Dr, U of A- 
Book launch for Diane Wishart's new book The rose that grew 
from concrete: Teaching and learning with disenfranchised youth 
+ Thu, Sep 17, 530-7pm; info at dianewishart@ualberta.ca 
ST ALBERT PUBLIC LIBRARY - Children's author and 
illustrator, Wallace Edwards, presents Alphabeasts, Monkey 
Business, The Extinct Files and more « Sat, Sep ig, 11am 
noon « Pre-register at 780.459.1532 

UPPER CRUST CAFE « 10909-86 Ave + 780.422.8174 «The 
Poets’ Haven: Monday Night reading series presented by 
Stroll of Poets - Every Mon, 7pm + $5 door 

WHITEMUD LIBRARY - Reading by Marie-Louise Gay a 
thor of Beloved Stella and Sam Series « eplca/stellaandsarn 
anEEEEEEEEEEEEEaeemaEE ee 


BEWARE THE QUICKLY WHO - Shell Theatre-Dow 
Centennial Centre, 8700-84 St, Fort Saskatchewan « 
780.992.6400 « By Eric Nichol; Rare Form Theatre's all-age 
presentation «Fri, Sep 18, 8pm + $15 (adult)/Si0 (senior 
student)/$5 eyeGO at Dow Centre, TicketMaster 
CHIMPROV - Varscona Theatre, 1032983 Ave + 
780.433-3399 » Rapid Fire Theatre's improv show featuring 
some of Edmonton's hottest comedy troupes every Sat 
apm, except for the last Sat of each month « Sep 19-June 
12 «$10 (door); adv at TIX on the Square 

CONCRETE THEATRES 20TH BIRTHDAY PARTY - Caz 
lyst Theatre, 8<29 Gateway Boulevard Sat, Sep 26, 7:30pm - 
All ages, licensed event + $10 at TIX on the Square 

DES FRAISES EN JANVIER (STRAWBERRIES IN JANU- 
ARY) « L'UniTheatre « Sep 24-Oct 4, 8pm Thu-Sat; Sun at 
apm + $24 (adult)/$20 (senior)/$1s (student) 

DISNEY'S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL: SUMMER CEL: 
EBRATION - Jubilee Auditorium « Wed, Sep 23, 7pm 

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE - Citadel Shoctor Theatre, 
9828-101A Ave + 780.426.4811 « Main Stage Series: A toc- 
tapping tribute to the golden age of musical theatre. Book: 
by Bob Martin and Don McKellar; music and lyrics by Lis: 
Lambert and Greg Morrison + Until Oct 4 


NASHVILLE ICONS - Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 Ave 
+ 780.483.4051 « By Tracey Power and Will Marks, celebrating 
the evolution of Country Music, fom its early days with Henk 
‘Williams, to modern day: Garth Brooks and Shania 
Twain « Until Nov: « Buffet and Show from $55.99 


‘STRUT AND JIVE THE NIGHT AWAY - Jubilation: 
Dinner Theatre, 8882-170 St, Phase Il WEM, Upper Leve! 
« 780.484.2424/1.877.214.2424 (Toll Free) » Hustle back 

to the os, featuring the funkiest hits of the flashiest 
decade in history + Until Oct-25 


THEATRESPORTS - Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave ~ 
780.433.3399 « Rapid Fire Theatre presents the 30th sea- 
son of Theatresports every Fri night at axpm « Sep 18-July 
30 + $10 (door; adv at TIX on the Square 

TIDELINE « Studio Theatre, Timms Centre for the Arts. U c! 
A. 8} Ave, 12 St» By Wajdi Mouswad, translation by Shes) 
‘Tepperman, directed by Jeff Page. A young North Amen 
mn across the ocean to bury his father in his 
native land + Until Sep 26, 7-30pm; Thu, Sep 24, 1230p" 
a aberw Dic Sepa eas ok ena Pe cer Dost 
before performance), adv at TIX on the Square 


Women's Project « Sep 18-27, 7-30pm; Sat 
matinee » $2s (opening night/S20 (adultySs8 (student/s=00" 
at door, adv at 780.471.1586, TIX on the Square 


WALTERDALE THEATRE OPEN HOUSE - Walterdaic 
Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave « Tour the theatre with 2 cos 
tumed guide + Sat, Sep 19, 12-4pm + Free 


i! TULPAN 


ear < 


Fi 


where's this image in Sergei Dvort- 

_sevoy’s Tulpan that lingers in your 
mind long after seeing it, perhaps be- 
cause it sort of sums up the particular 
blend of utter strangeness and delight 
that this film invokes so eloquently. Asa 
(Askhat Kuchencherekov) is moving 
along the vast flatness of some Kazakh 
steppe with his buddy Boni, who drives 
this souped-up tractor pasted over with 
tittie pies, blasting Boney M's rendition 
of "Rivers of Babylon" through the ste- 
reo on endless repeat. Asa dangles his 
slight frame off the edge of the vehicle 
-as though he's a sail catching the wind, 
doing so with a capacity for joy and 
optimism that silently defies whatever 
glum presumptions you might have of 
the two worlds he's moving between, 
one being that of a low ranking officer 
in the Russian navy, the other that ofa 
nomadic shepherd trying to support a 
family in this hardscrabble wilderness 
that might as well be the fucking moon 
to most of us, so wildly desolate is the 
landscape, so remote from modern 
comforts, 

Though straddling two worlds and 
probably not fitting in very well with 
either, Asa’s young and optimistic. He 
wants to get married and start a fam- 
ily and have some sheep and a settle- 


ment of his own, through he dreams 
not of a traditional yurt like his sister 
and her husband and their three kids 
inhabit, but some sort of big, Western- 
style spread with electricity, running 
water, and satellite TV. He is above all 
a dreamer, which doesn't help much 
when there's sheep to be herded and 
children to be clothed and fed. But the 
world around him is changing, a life- 
style is vanishing, and maybe some sort 


J ee ee rrr TTITIRIII MAL Ln mM 


y1-% Film Caps 


of special human fortitude along wit 
it, so maybe a dreamer is just what's 
needed to make the transition. He getsa 
hard time from his gruff brother-in-law 
Ondas (Ondas Besikbasov), who doesn't 
believe Asa has what it takes to build the 
sort of life Ondas has so tirelessly forged. 
And he gets little sympathy from the 
family of Tulpan, the "neighbour" girl 
whose hand he comes asking for in mar- 
riage. It makes for one of the funniest 


P23 Pushing Borders 


An optimistic protagonist and an environment with personality create Tulpan's immaculate charm 


scenes in the film, Asa trying to impress 
Tulpan’s parents with his sailor suit and 
his terrifying and no doubtvery tall tales 
of survival amidst the deep-sea food 
chain. "God, is she beautiful!” Asa raves 
at one point about Tulpan. But for all his 
efforts he's never even been granted a 
peek of the girl he so wants to make his. 
Again, it's alla dream. 


Winner of the Prix Un Certain Regard at 
the 2008 Cannes Film Festival, Tulpan is 
some kind of wonder, A bit like Atanar- 
juat, it offers an unusual combination 
of elements, a narrative that roughly 
adheres to a genre convention or two, a 
startling and rigorous anthropological 
study and a,distinctive cinematic ap- 
proach to characters that for the most 
part have likely never stepped inside 
a cinema in their lives. The results no 
doubt have a lot to do with the depth 
of Dvortsevoy's investment into the 
people and place before his camera. He 
was born in Kazakhstan, and lived there 
for 28 years while working for an avia- 
tion company and developing his chops 
as a documentary filmmaker. He spent 
months casting the nonprofessional ac- 
tors and then brought them out to live 
in a yurt fora month before production 
began. He's said that only about 20 per- 
cent of the film was fully planned out, 
while the other 80 percent was prompt- 
ed to some degree by the environment 


Onlineatvueweekly.com 


Fest or Famine? 
by Brian Gibson 


Film fests season is upon us, and Brian Gibson ex- 
amines what, exactly, is the point of the festivals, 


VCO AANANANANSANATNENE 


and its wildlife, which is found to be 
bursting with personality. When you 
see the film, you'll understand just how 
attuned to its environment Tulpan re- 
ally is. It's not too much of a stretch to 
Say that Dvortsevoy's camera captures 
miracles. Messy miracles. 

Of course, there are miracles and 
there are miracles. Kuchencherekov's 
performance is itself something that 
verges on the transcendent, not only 
when he's under extreme duress, but 
also when he's just trying to drum up 
some good faith. Asa seems endear- 
ingly innocent to his lack of conven- 
tional handsomeness, and there's a 
terrific scene in which he displays a 
picture of Prince Charles as evidence 
that guys with jug ears can be glam- 
orous, too. It's another sparkling 
moment of dry comedy, but there's 
something more to it, something that 
testifies to the breadth of what mov- 
ies can do, taking us to the loneliest 
places on the world, patiently waiting 
to find some vision to film there that's 
pulled straight out of the uniqueness 
of that place, and still in the end com- 
ing up with something that has genu- 
ine old-fashioned movie charisma. W 


THU, SEP 17, FRI SEP 18, SUN SEP 20(9 PM), 
MON SEP 21(7 PM) 

TULPAN 

WRITTEN BY SERGE! OVORTSEVOY, GENNAD! 
OSTROVSKY 

DIRECTED BY DVORTSEVOY 

STARRING ASKHAT KUCHENCGHEREKOY, SA: 
MAL ESLJAMOVA, ONDAS BESIKBASOV 
METRO CINEMA (9828 - 107A AVE) 

kkk kk 


The invariable Mr. Mamet 


David Mamet's Homicide doesn't stray from his usual style, and that's fine 


A fresh appraisal of David Mamet the : 


filmmaker—as opposed to the play 
wright, novelist, essayist, or polemi- 
cist, which each present a whole 


acquired taste, 


artifice and stoic machismo 

of Redbelt (08), | see this body of work 

as less varied, or variable, than it’s often 
made out to be. 

Anyone who knows anything about 


Mamet knows something about Mamet- 
speak, that deliberately repetitive, frag- 
mented, something wildly cryptic form 
of verbal exchange that pushes 
naturalism so far that it be- 
Tm comes abstract and flamboy- 
antly stylized. People don't 

yo" actually talk like this, but 
there isn't a word spoken in 
Mamet that isn't drawn from 
the eccentricities of real talk. 
Over the years I've found this defin- 
ing aspect of Mamet's work less reward- 
ing, or at least not as rewarding as other 
aspects. Though mapped out in big, alter- 
nating blocks of silence and often over- 
heated patter, I'd suggest that Homicide's 
real strengths, as with a lot of Mamet, lie 
more in story and theme, in engrossing 
complications that finally lead to simple 
conclusions. Simple, but not stupid. This 
is a movie about cops and criminals do- 
ing what cops and criminals do, about 
taking sides, about tit-for-tat acts of 
violence. But then again, maybe it’s not 
about any of these things. Maybe it's 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


about the same thing nearly all Mamet 
stories seem to be about, something to 
do with how the road to integrity gets 
narrower and lonelier the further you 
follow it, to the degree that even those 
who directed you down the road in the 
first place turn out to be false allies. It's a 
world-view that can seem either bleak or 
existentially freeing. 

Detective Bobby Gold (Joe Mantegna), 
the protagonist of Homicide Is, to be sure, 
a talker. He's the resident hostage nego- 
tiator. His colleagues refer to him as the 
Orator. They depend on him when deal- 
ing with people in need of convincing. It's 
not that he has some unusual style of 
speech but rather that he's so eloquently 
plainspoken. Somehow this connects 
to Bobby's being a Jew, something he's 
worked hard to erase from his persona— 
he grew up being disparaged for his race 
and just wants to be a cop now, and a 
good one. He's always the first to enter a 
door when danger could lie on the other 
side. Though his reputation is solid some 
part of him is always trying to prove 


himself. He and his partner Sully (WiL- 
liam H. Macy, with a big-ass moustache) 
are supposed to track down a cop-killer 
(Ving Rhames) who slipped through the 
FBI's fingers, but chance steps in and 
shoves Bobby onto another case. An old 
lady was killed behind the counter of her 
convenience store. The locals say it's be- 
cause she had some legendary treasure 
hidden in the basement. Bobby wants to 
shake it off, but his superiors demand he 
attend to it. Partially because the griev- 
ing family is wealthy and Influential. Par- 
tially because they‘re Jews. 


Bobby's journey is founded in identity 
crisis. It takes him from disdain for his 
own Jewish heritage to an all-consuming 
longing to belong to a community with 
deeper roots and a more profound cause 
than that of the police, who Bobby refers 
to as "the garbage men’; he goes from 
audaciously insulting the family of the 
murdered woman to desperately trying 
to penetrate their secret world of re- 
taliation against the quiet but very active 


; 


; forces of violent anti-semitism surround- 
: Ing them; he goes from loathing what 
= he sees as a Jewish persecution complex 
= to realizing the conspiracy against them 
: seems all too real. But without spoil- 


ing too much of what follows, Homicide 
comes to reveal that blood ties are never 
what they're built up to be, that the only 
family worth trusting Is the one you bulld, 
that those who seems closest to you are 
perfectly capable and actually far better 
equipped to fuck you over. We meet a 
man who killed his wife and children. We 
meet a mother talked into trapping her 
own son. And we meet Bobby, searching 
for meaning through connection to his 
ostensible People, only to find himself 
increasingly isolated and ill-prepared 
to take care of himself or his work—an 
early scene in which something as seem- 
ingly minor as a torn holster strap pays 
off in that old-fashioned dramaturgical 
way that Mamet has such enduring af- 
fection for. So Homicide is a lesson in 
noir, and for the most part about as 
good as Mamet gets. And | think if you 
watch it and (re-)try his later, less cele- 
brated films—The Spanish Prisoner (‘97) 
anyone?—you might find the through- 
line has more consistency and integrity 
than naysayers claim. W 


FILM // 25 


LM REVIEW 


Opening Friday 


EE oe ee? 
Cloudy with a Chance of 
Meatballs 

Written & Directed by Phil Lord, Chris 
Miller 

Featuring the voices of Bill Hader, Anna 
Faris, Bruce Campbell, Mr. T 

kkk ke 


_ Don't snag yourself on the whole "funny 


for grown-ups too" thing—jokes in family 
films we think children are too dense to 
relate to. Creativity succeeds when those 
lines are dissolved, or at least made insig- 
nificant, so that even the keenest talkers 
can't decipher what they liked about it. 
Cartoons are no exception; they're alright 
when they make adults feel like children, 
but are even better when they remind us 
that we're hardly that different to begin 
with. We all like to watch stuff, and some- 
times we can't wait to watch it again. 

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is 
about an oft-failed scientist named Flint 
who lives in a town that Loses its sardine 
factory, the prime source for jobs. People 
only get to eat sardines, and then the 
mayor tries to boost the town's cred by 
el he tourism. There's an obvious 
parallel here to Michael Moore's Roger & 
Me, a grown-up movie that a lot of people 
thought they wouldn't find entertaining 
because it’s about unemployment. 

Flint notices that, because of the sar- 
dines, everybody has lost their interest in 
eating. He invents a computer application 
that can turn the rain that falls on his town 
into whatever kind of food he writes into 
the program. What's funny is that Flint 
merely types in the kinds of food into a 
line of text that closely resembles HTML 
coding. Also, the display on his computer 
is a pastiche of different styles of graphics 
from various time periods, which confuses 
us as to which branch of computing styles 
that the film is referring to. 

Then Flint meets Sam Sparks, an aspiring 
weathergirl eager to cover his story when 
the town makes news as delicious food 
begins dropping from the sky. He makes 
her a palace out of Jello. They have trouble 
defining it, and why it's so fun to eat—it's 
practically synthetic, like the food that he 
makes in his computer. But it still brings 
a kind of joy to everyone, and they don't 
stop to think why they like it so much. 

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs works 
because it bounces so many different ele- 
ments of humour and contemporaneity off 
of each other, and makes us feel like they're 
somehow all related because we are so en- 
tertained by watching them work together. 
It’s not that it lets us escape from what we 
call our over-thought, complicated lives— 
that’s impossible. Instead it makes sense of 
those complications so that we feel good 
about therm, and that’s better. 


26 // FILAA 


The 3-D version costs a few dollars more, 
but the filmmakers put the technology to 
good use. The objects don't leap out from 
the screen at the audience, like we might 
expect. The most interesting effects, like 
intricacies of the characters' physical fea- 
tures and the spaces they inhabit, occur 
inside the space of the screen—instead 
of forcing the world of the film to collide 
with the space of the real, we are invited 
all the more close until it becomes that we 
are one and the same. 

JONATHAN BUSCH 
/7 JONATHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


~ 


The Informant! 

Written by Scott Z. Burns 
Directed by Steven Soderbergh 
Starring Matt Damon 

kak ky 


The exclamation point decorating the 
title of The Informant! gives us a help- 
ful nudge from the get-go that where 
we're going is going to be plenty goofy. 
It's not a musical, but it is in one sense 
a hell of a song and dance. As imagined 
by obscenely productive director Ste- 
ven Soderbergh and Bourne Ultimatum 
screenwriter Scott Z. Burns, this filmic 
realization of investigative reporter Kurt 
Eichenwald's 2000 nonfiction book of 
the same name—sans flamboyant punc- 
tuation—is less a corporate thriller than 
it is a punchy comic meditation on greed, 
compulsion and manipulation. Mark Whi- 
tacre, the agri-business executive who se- 
cretly collaborated with the FBI in a cam- 
paign against his employers on charges of 
price fixing back in the mid-1990s, would 
have made a perfectly fascinating subject 
for a more conventional sort of white- 
collar crime movie. But Soderbergh and 
Burns have gone way out on a limb in 
terms of tone and narrative focus to ren- 
der him a figure that's at once enigmatic 
and strangely intelligible. They've taken 
some pretty crazy risks, and the risks pay 
off as terrifically audacious entertain- 
ment with a toothy social slant. 

A large part of the credit for why this all 
works so well should go to Matt Damon, 
who in films like The Departed, The Good 
Shepherd and the Bourne franchise has 
nurtured a niche for himself via his remark- 
able talent for twisting his own boyish cha- 
risma into perverse shapes. His Whitacre is 
a golf-loving, Wal-Mart-clad, mustachioed 
Midwesterner, an imminently cheerful 
husband and father of three with a big, 
ugly suburban house and eight—count 
‘em—eight cars. Even his tics, such as his 
habit of constantly adjusting his glasses, 
feel so utterly normal and trustworthy. 
He approaches the feds as a guy who just 
wants to do the right thing, so naive that 
he thinks he'll actually become the com- 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 


pany’'s new CEO once all the fuss blows 
over and his current bosses are behind 
bars. But his innocence is always undercut 
by his evident intelligence. As he keeps re- 
minding everyone, he’s the only guy who 
knows the science and the business side 
of things at Archers Daniels Midland. He's 
someone capable of big things. 

The Informant!'s most winning distinction 
lies in what we're able to gather of Whita- 
cre's private thoughts and obsessions. The 
use of voice-over is inspired. Rather than 
function in the past-tense as a way of con- 
veying exposition or foreshadowing, Whi- 
tacre's disembodied voice comes to us as 
present-tense reportage direct from his eas- 
ily distracted brain, a series of frequently hi- 
larious digressions into deceitful butterflies, 
polar bear camouflage, German words and 
time-saving techniques, into ideas for TV 
shows about doubles and a story of a man 
who drops dead upon realizing that the man 
across from him is wearing a tie with the 
same pattern—but in reverse. These inter- 
ruptions are brilliantly timed and only seem 
like non-sequiturs until you gradually detect 
a pattern evolution that speaks, however 
obliquely, to Whitacre's peculiar pathology, 
his desire to lead a double life. He's a strange 
man, one who needs to talk, and listening 
to him let loose as the contradictions in his 
claims accumulate to preposterous degrees 
is an awful Lot of fun. 

JOSEF BRAUN 
// WOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Playing at the Metro 
eS ES TE RS 
Only 

Fri, Sep 18, Sun, Sep 20 (7pm) 

Sat, Sep 19, Mon, Sep 21 (Spm) 
Written & directed by Simon Reynolds, 
Ingrid Veninger 

Starring Jacob Switzer, Elena Hudgins 
Metro Cinema (9828 - 101A Ave) 
kkk 


The one-magic-day story, where a man and 
a woman (there might be same-sex exam- 
ples, but | can't recall any; | don't think gay 
love is depoliticized enough for this kind 
of casual, solipsistic tale) meet and fall in 
love in 24 hours or less, is well-established 
territory, and has produced some of the 
finest, quietest explorations of love of the 
past few decades: Aaron Katz's hipster-fied 
New York drama Quiet City, for instance, or 
for a slightly more mainstream experience, 
Richard Linklater’s absolutely brilliant and 
heartbreaking pair, Before Sunrise and Be- 
fore Sunset (any excuse to mention those 
two should be taken). 

Simon Reynolds and Ingrid Veninger de- 
serve points for cleverness for transplanting 
the scenario to an adolescent pair. What 
we lose in more realized romantic tension 
and the weight of life experience, we gain 
in the unassuming frankness of youth, the 
lack of guile or recognition that what's hap- 
pening might be at all important. Daniel Ga- 
cob Switzer) is a bit of an outcast in Parry 
Sound. He's got friends—even, kind of, a 
girlfriend, though as he says they mostly 
just talk online—but he seems to be kept 


Though the film captures some excellent 
moments between the young leads— 
particularly a snack inside a playground 
crawling tube, a wide-ranging discussion 
backgrounded by the pitter-patter of 
snow on industrial plastic—it's not with- 
out its problems. Vera's parents are just 
a little too over-the-top to be all that be- 
lievable, little more than a harpy and an 
almost comically insecure loser. As well, 
for what's mostly a pretty quiet film, the 
musical choices are overbearing and not 
really all that appropriate, unless small- 
town 12-year-olds are way more into indie 
rock than | remember. 

But it works when it's trying to capture 
the increasing connection between Vera 
and Daniel, each approaching the other 
with a very adolescent mix of trepidation 
and openness, hurt by life but not quite 
enough to close off. By the time their 
inevitable parting comes, you definitely 
want to see more between them, or at 
least what happens next, and that’s really 
what it takes for these kinds of movies to 
stick with you. 

DAVID BERRY 
// DAVID@VUEWEEKLY. COM 


Now playing 


Jennifer's Body 

Written by Diablo Cody 

Directed by Karyn Kusama 

Starring Amanda Seyfried, Megan Fox 
wet Ky 


The body in question belongs to the 
resident narcissistic teen hottie of Devil's 
Kettle, the generic rural American town 
where a suitably demonic series of events, 
dreamed up by a writer whose own first 
name is Spanish for devil, unfolds. Along 
with a limpid rock band on tour, lifelong 
pals Jennifer (Megan Fox) and Needy 
(Amanda Seyfried) are the only survivors 
of a fire that inexplicably breaks out at 
the local watering hole, prompting what 
is surely the most poorly managed evacu- 
ation of a one-floor licensed truck stop in 
movie history, replete with extras running 
around, flaming, flailing, screaming. But 
only Needy will make it home that night. 
Jennifer will be abducted by said rockers 
in their boogie van—‘agents of Satan with 
really awesome haircuts,” as she'll come 
to describe them—and whisked away into 
the wilds of Devil's Kettle to endure hard- 
ships only gradually revealed. When she 
returns from her ordeal she's covered in 
blood, breaks into Needy’s house, starts 
gobbling up mom's roast chicken without 
even asking and lets a massive black barf 
bomb erupt all over the kitchen floor. | 
guess it's the barf that lets us know we're 
watching a horror movie. 

"Hell is a teenage girl,” declares Needy 
at the top of her excessively explana- 
tory voice-over, setting the tone of flam- 
boyantly hormonal high school journal- 
keeping which will prove to dominate 
Jennifer's Body, the follow-up to Acad- 
emy Award-winner Diablo Cody's screen- 
writing debut juno. Like Juno, Jennifer's 
Body has a sassy and irreverent sense of 
humour to help ease us into the angst, 


F messiness of teenage existence. Jennifer's 


it has of its predecessor's mod. 
est charms nor its feeling for the ordinary 


Body wants to tap into the thick ambigui- 
ties of female bonds, using supernatural 
conventions, namely telepathy and some 
sort of Satanic shenanigans, to flush the 
internal drama out into something height 
ened, fantastic and immediate. But the 
film's teenage monster is only vaguely 
conceived and engages in no particular 
mythology. Its central relationship is un- 
developed, and its attempts to character. 
ize Needy as the geeky one are laughably 
reduced to disguising her beauty behind 
a pair of glasses. Finally, its rendering of 
adolescent psychosexual trauma is crassly 
superficial So it’s no Let the Right One In 
no Carrie, no Ginger Snaps. It's not even 
Trick or Treat. It feels like a mostly cyni 
cal cash-in on the latest teen exploitation 
trends and Cody's emerging brand. 

More disappointing however is where 
this film finds director Karyn Kusama, 
whose feature debut Girlfight was such 
a knockout nine years ago. Between 
Girlfight and Jennifer's Body Kusama's 
sole feature credit. has been Aeon Flux 
(didn't see it either.) But it seems like 
Kusama's career has gone in roughly the 
same direction as Girlfight’s star Michelle 
Rodriguez, who went from coming out of 
nowhere with a genuinely tough, Oscar- 
worthy leading performance, to a string 
of supporting roles as the snarling, more 
one-dimensionally tough girl in films like 
The Fast and the Furious, Resident Evil 
SW.A.T. and Battle in Seattle. While it 
wouldn't have redeemed her resume 
any, | kind of wish Rodriguez would have 
showed up in Kusama's latest, just to cut 
to the chase and beat the shit out of Jen- 
nifer, preferably in the first act. 

JOSEF BRAUN 
Hf \OSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Ast SE 
Sorority Row 

Written by Josh Stolberg, Pete Goldfin 
ger, Mark Rosman 

Directed by Stewart Hendler 

Starring Briana Evigan, Leah Pipes 
weet 


Imagine Child's Play: Senior Year, with 
Chucky killing off the Bratz dolls, all in 
university now. That's what we get with 
Sorority Row’s Theta Pi, on a campus in 
Preppieland, USA—we know it's Preppie- 
land because a common phrase among 
these budding college feminists is ‘lm 
gonna go get the Escalade and you round 
up the girls.” 

This band of sisters is: Ice Queen (Leah 
Pipes), Slutty Spice (Margo Harshman), 
Token Ethnic amie Chung), Bookish Virgin 
(everyone's favourite badly named celeb 
rity child-actor, Rumer Willis), and Faintly 
Moral (Briana Evigan). Well, there's also 
Megan (Audrina Patridge), but she turns 
out to be the Corpsey One. They all have 
less emotional complexity than actual 
Bratz dolls, but slightly more posability— 
not to be confused, in this case, with points 
of articulation. Screaming, calling “Hello” 
in dark spaces, saying "destroy the people 
we love" without laughing and being able 
to form the occasional post-teen sarcasm 
sentence—but not actual irony—do not 
count as articulation. 

After the requisite fake-vomit scene and 
lipstick-lesbian kiss are ingeniously com- 
bined, Megan Is, lucky for her, quickly re- 
moved from the film—death by tire iron— 
after a revenge-on-boys prank (Involving 
fake roofies! Hilarious.) taken too far. The 
sisterhood, imitating Steinem and co. to 2 
wet-T, decide to emphasize the "secrecy 


js now" Then they dump her down a mine 
shaft and the plot follows, dropping us 
into dark spaces without any emotional 
gravitas, real scares, smart twists or even 


Faintly Moral, who puts on scruples like 
it's anew makeup she's trying, goes along 
with the coverup and, come convocation, 
she’s at the sorority house, ready to be 
hunted by a graduation-gowned killer 
whacking off everyone who knows about 
Megan's death (plus an extra college 
party zombie or two) with a Swiss Army- 
style tire iron: "It looks like ... someone 
pimped it out.” Grad the Ripper can kill 
pretty smoothly with it, making the sup- 
posed labour of Sorority Row’s writers 
and director (who should be hooded in 
anonymity) look even more like bloody 
bad hackwork. Unfortunately for bargain 
bins everywhere, after the only sisters 
who can get beyond their own cattiness 
are left standing, a pointless opening for 
a direct-to-DVD sequel is thrown in. 

But at least, after this survey of uni- 
versity students as techno-savvy. se- 
rlal partiers with the compassion of Nazi 
youth-troopers, many ponderous build- 
ups leading to gruesome deaths, some 
gratuitous nudity before it's back to Girls 
Gone Dead, and a last-minute switch to a 
hokey, comic tone, there's a saving face. 
For those who'd been betting on how 
low Star Wars alumni could go, watch 
Princess Leia—Carrie Fisher as "House 
Mother Crenshaw*—blast up a kitchen 
with a shotgun as she tries to kill a Vad- 
er-reject in a black cowl 

Maybe it's the roofies, but that's got me 
thinking: Chucky vs. the Ewoks ... 

BRIAN GIBSON 
// BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Whiteout 

Directed by Dominic Sena 

Written by Jason Hall, Paul Kolsby 
Starring Ashton Kutcher, Anne Heche, 
Margarita Levieva 

KARI 


Antarctic research bases are an abused 
setting in thriller films for a reason. Harsh, 
inhospitable and Isolated “habitats con- 
trasted with claustrophobic, manufactured 
interiors make for an unquestionably sexy 
and paranoid setting. In the hands of a 
competent filmmaker, it should be enough 
to make a audience go stir crazy. 

Unfortunately, the only cabin fever 
elicited from Whiteout is the result of 
sitting in a theatre and being subjected 
to an endless stream of clichés. In this 
graphic-novel adaptation, Kate Beckin- 
sale plays an archetypal jaded cop who 
has lost faith in her own abilities and is 
subsequently on the verge of early re- 
tirement. She takes up a position in the 
South Pole in order to escape her duties 
until she can officially give up, but ends 
up having to deal with a bunch of dead 
Scientists and the remains of an ancient 
Russian cargo plane missing a valuable 
snipment. A perfunctory and unneces- 
Sary romantic interest is thrown in, and 
voila: you have a dictionary definition of 
2 Suspense film. 

Minus the suspense, of course. It at- 
‘empts to substitute a gradual build-up 


of tension with an occasional gratuitous- 
ly violent moment in between stretches 
of boredom. The result is both dull and 
occasionally nauseating. 

One scene that isn't nauseating is the 
opening, which involves Beckinsale stripping 
down and having a shower for reasons of 
no apparent consequence to the plot. Score 
that as a plus if you like, but it's a pretty con- 
trived way of adding some sex appeal to a 
movie where the hot protagonist logically 
has to spend the rest of the time in a parka 
(oh, and there's some obscuring steam any- 
way). And it betrays the assumptions that 
the people behind Whiteout make about 
their audience. Recycled plot devices and 
filmmaking techniques are one thing. But 
constant insults to the intelligence are an- 
other, and this is a movie that gives abso- 
lutely no credit to its viewers. 

It's filled with expository dialogue so 
that no plot point is illustrated without 
explicit commentary from the characters 
describing what is happening on screen. 
Kind of like aid for the visually impaired 
that can't be turned off. Flashbacks are 
employed liberally, even at one point 
reminding us of something that hap- 
pened a minute earlier. It ends on a twist 
in which the mastermind behind the 
murderous scheme is revealed (com- 
plete with a long monologue expound- 
ing his motives) after every single other 
character that has been introduced has 
since been conclusively ruled out. And 
the characters walk around in 50-below 
weather without their faces covered, just 
so that the audience can tell the differ- 
ence between them. 

Perhaps it’s unsurprising that Whiteout 
has been dusted off two and a half years 
after filming was completed. That kind of 
delay is usually the result of either per- 
fectionist directors polishing their arty 
films, or marketing teams needing extra 
time to figure out how to make a really 
tough sell It's pretty clear which camp 
this falls into. Like the unfortunate plane 
that triggered the bloodshed within it, 
Whiteout should have been left buried. 
CODY CIVIERO 

Jf CODY@VUEWEEKEY.COM 


~ TPM ar SCOTIABANK THEATRE 
WEST EDMONTON MALL 


PANDORUM 


THURSDAY 
SEPTEMBER 24™ 


A LIMITED NUMBER OF DOUBLE GUEST PASSES 


ARE AVAILABLE FOR PICK-UP AT 


WUEWEEKLY 


10303 -108 STREET 


PRESENTED BY 


VUE 


WEEKLY ALLIANCE 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


) 


FEAR WHAT Haren Wein 


de 


MH ~——eeEeE 


September 24 — 


F 


Cold Souls 


COLD SOULS 
NOGHTLY AT 700 20 Pe SAT & SUM MATINEES AT 2:0 
RATED: PG. NUDITY, COARSE LANGUAGE 


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FOR QO & A FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY! 


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SCHOOL CLASS ae & 


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POPPET PICTURES & METRO PRESENTS THE FILHS OF 


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SUNDAY ar 2:00PM 


All Metro screenings are held at Zeidler Hall in the Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave. 
For more information, cal! 425-9212. or log on to www.metrocinema.org 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 


er RR Te Te 


PREVUE // COLD SOULS 


Soul on ice 


Cold Souls has a clever premise, 
but doesn't take it very far 


DAVID BERRY 
// DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Fo a metaphysical concept, the soul 
is physicalized quite a bit. Sikh reli- 
gion represents it as fire, which I suppose 
speaks fairly closely to its ethereal quali- 
ties; Descartes held that the soul inter- 
acted with the body through the pineal 
gland, a pea-sized part of the endocrine 
system; not long ago, 21 Grams took its 
title from the supposed weight of a soul, 
that being the change in weight between 
a living body and a dead one. 

In Cold Souls, Paul Giamatti (as Paul 
Giamatti) is somewhat perturbed to find 
out that his soul looks like a chickpea, 
although considering some of the other 
manifestations we see—a jelly bean, 
what appears to be a lump of coal—he 
seems to get off alright. Potentially odd 
physical properties, though, are about all 


GARNEAU 


LON MAE ( Bite 


NOGHTLY @ 7.00 4 S:00PM» SAT & SUN MATINEES & 2.0078 
RATED: PG COARSE LANGUAGE NUDITY 


Meruronrcerurssemomery™ 


the insight we get into what might con- 
stitute a soul; well, that and the fact going 
into your soul seems to involve a preten- 
tiously fuzzy trip through an abandoned 
apartment block. Even the doctor who 
performs Giamatti's de-soulification 
(David Strathairn) refuses to offer any in- 
sight, stating "We simply remove it.” 
Giamatti's spurred to consider such a 
radical surgery because he's having trou- 
ble getting into and out of character as 
Uncle Vanya at a generic theatre. There's a 
potentially interesting idea there, using an 
actor's heightened and constantly shifting 
identity to explore our own slippery no- 
tions of same, but writer/director Sophie 
Barthes instead uses the situation mostly 
for laughs: Giamatti's acting when he's lit- 
erally soulless is a creepy Shatnerian par- 
ody, and he naturally nails the role when 
he gets his soul briefly replaced with that 
of a supposed Russian poet (really a hum- 


ATONE MAOUUALEATL HK, 


drum machine worker who sold her s,, 
forallittle financial gain on the apparen, 
lucrative black market). 


The humour, greatly helped along byG 
amatti’s skill, is refreshingly offbeat, |), 
there's not much else going on here. B; a 
thes abandons what little philosophic 
pondering she's doing halfway throug) 
when Giamatti’s soul is stolen by a Ris 
sian mobster whose girlfriend wants 
soul of an American actor to help 2 
Soap opera career. We spend the rest o; 
the film watching him try to get it bac| 
with the help of a former soul mule (Din 
Korzun) who helped swipe his chickpe 
and has grown fond of him because , 
it. Tangibly, their connection isn't muc! 
more than her telling him he has a bea) 
tiful soul, with no real explanation 
what it is about the soul that Giamat; 
found so heavy that she likes. 

Barthes has come up with a cleve 
premise, but she does so little with it- 
there's less in the way of philosophica! 
questioning here than was in the Mat; 
series, never mind the work of David ( 
Russell or Charlie Kaufman—the {jl 
basically goes nowhere. I'll grant that n 
everything has to be some grand meta 
physical treatise, but Barthes is the on 
using such a loaded concept, and there 
little evidence that she thinks of it as any 
thing more than a quirky set-up. Vv 
Remora sere 

colo souLs 

WRITTEN & DIRECTED BY SOPHIE BARTHES 

STARRING PAUL GIAMATTI, DIRA KORZUN, 

DAVID STRATHAIRN. 

eo 6'a:4 


DTT ITT ST TUTTE TOTS TTUTSTTRETTPESOSTT UTTER TTC CU CLO CLUE CCE CLOUT CLLR TELCO CEE 


FILM // PUSHING BORDERS 


Border-crossing 


FAVA's Pushing Borders has local filmmakers 
playing with content and form 


PAUL BLINOV 

// PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM 

ye could forgive Ryan Halun for be- 
inga little nervous. He'sbeena FAVA 

member fora few years now, helping out 

on a number of film works in that time, 

but this season's opening salvo of origi- 

nal local shorts—part of the Freshworks 

Screening Series—marks the first time 

he's constructed a film of his own. 

After what Halun calls a “little life cri- 
sis" where he settled on trying his hand 
at a short film, and FAVA silent auction 
where he bid on and won a filmmaking 
package—"I had a few too many drinks,” 
he jokes—he's created “On The Way To 


AUDITION 
SKILLS 


122-102 STREET EC 
TSK OX4 7804 


SEP 23, 


FAVACA %* 


2009 


Members: Bird $700, $765 (+G3T) 
fton-Members: $895 (+GST) 
Maiy Course focunss on advanced jevel in 


11 weeks with intormadiete and advanced 


a 
AA Foundation | . 


The Video Store,” the quick tale of a ma 
who spots his porn star crush on 
street, and tries to cultivate a relation 
ship with the fantasy man right th: 
and there. 

"I'm pretty excited about it. Also, e 
tremely terrified,” Halun admits ov 
the phone. “This will be the first time al 
of our group has seen my film." 

His is one of seven entries in this ed) 
tion of Freshworks, together loose! 
titled Pushing Borders, and, he note: 
probably "the most narrative” partofthe 
program: Kyle Armstrong's "MENTA 
NOTESFROMACLUTTEREDMIND," is 
short “stream-of-consciousness”-sty! 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 29 >> 


FILM ap VIDEO ARTS 
SOCIETY- ALBERTA 


€dmonton 


ithm 


un's "Videostore" also plays with 
, Superimposing the at- 
meeting as it happens with 
the protagonist’: ‘s phone call to a 
friend, recounting the whole thing— 
whic h isn't too far from how Halun 
cametopossesstheidea. _ 
"It was actually my best friend's 
{story],” Halun says. “I was at a club, 
and he's agay male bear, and he sawa 
guy on the dancefloor that he'd actu- 
ally seen in a porno film. And it was 
just a tiny little incident, right? But it 
triggered a little thing in my head on 
what would you do if you did see your 
porn star dream?” 

, you make a movie 


technig 


about it. 9 


‘unenenu rents nee 


Meunier ewer 


fo ben O ALND OL LL LLU EON UC 


FILM WEEKLY = 


FRI, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 ~THU, SEPTEMBER 24, 2009 
ee TU TMM MoT 
CHABA THEATRE-JASPER 


Pri-Sat2:s0, 4:20, 7-00, 9°50, 12:25 Sun-Thu 1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 
$50. 2 


A PERFECT GETAWAY (14A, gory violence, substance abuse, 
not recommended for children) 


Fri-Sat 2:05, 4-45 7:40, 10:05, 12:15; Sun-Thu 205, 4:45,7:40, 
10005 

ALIENS IN THE ATTIC (PG) 

Daily 200, 4:40,7:25 

FUNNY PEOPLE (144, crude coarse language, sexual con- 
tent, not recommended for children) 

Daily 1:05, 4:05, 655, 9255 

PUBLIC ENEMIES (14A, violence) 

Daily 110, 4:00, 6:50, 9:50 

MY SISTER'S KEEPER (14A) 

Fri-Sat 1:25 4:00, 6-45 9°25, 21:45; Sun-Thu 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:35 
‘TRANSFORMERS: REVENGE OF THE FALLEN (PG, vio- 
lence, crude content, not recommended for young children) 
Fri-Satasas, 415,735, $45 1045 Sun-Thu 115, 45, 735. 945 
THE PROPOSAL (PG, coarse language) 

Fri-Sat 2:40, 4:10, 7:20, 9:45, 12:05; Sun-Thu 1:40, 4:10, 7:10, 9:45 
‘THE HANGOVER (184, crude content, nudity, language 
mayen 

Fri-Sat 1:45, 435,75, 9:40, 12:00; Sun-Thu 1:45, 435 7S 9:49 
UP(G) 

Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:05, 9530, 13:90; Sun-Thu 1:30, 4730, 7205, 
9730 

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: BATTLE OF THE SMITHSO- 
NIAN (PG) 

Fri-Satxss, 4:25,720, 9935 235 Sun-Thu 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 9935 
STAR TREK (PG, violence) 

Fri-Sat 1:20, 4:15, 7:00, 9:50, 12:20; Sun-Thu 1:20, 4215, 7-00, 
#50 


CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 


‘W231 7th Avenue, 780.732 2236 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 
Digital 3d, No passes Daily 12:15, 230, 4:40,7:00, 9:20 
‘THE INFORMANT! (4A) 
Fri-Tue, Thu 12:40, 330, 6:50, 9:30; Wed 3:30, 6:50, 9-305 Star 
and Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 
LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-The, Thu 12:50, 3:40,7:20, 10:00; Wed 3:40, 7-20, 
10:00; Star and Strollers Screening, No passes Wed 1:00 
JENNIFER'S BODY (144, gory violence, crude coarse 
language, sexual content) 
No passes Daily 1230, 3200, 5:30, 8:00, 10735 
WHITEOUT (144, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended 
for children) 
Daily 230, 4:30, 7-45. 10:10 
SORORITY ROW (13A, gory violence, language may offend) 
Daily 2:00, $20, 7:50, 10:25 
‘TYLER PERRY'S | CAN DO BAD ALL. BY MYSELF (PG, 


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Daily 4:50,1035 

‘THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (184, gory violence) 

Digital 3d Daily 2:10, 4:10, 6:15, 8:20, 10:30 


THE UGLY TRUTH (144, language may offend, sexual 

‘content) 

Daily 1:40, 4:00, 725. 945 

CINENPLEX ODEON SOUTH 
1525-99 St, 7BOAIG.BSES 

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (6) 

No passes Fri-Wed 1250, 515 $30,745; Thu 435, $39,758) 

‘THE INFORMANT! (14A) 

FricWed 2215 4105.70, 10:25; Thu 4:05, 720, 10-9 Star and 

Swollers Screening: Thu 200 

LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) 

No passes Daily 12:40, 3:55 699, 54° 


ot ener EULA 


SEP 1? SEP 23, 2009 // WUWEWEEKLY 


evn 4050064 VCORE PALM AED AU 


No passes Daily 1:30, 4:40, 7-45 10°35 

DAL BOLE HADIPPA (HINDI W/ES.T) (STC) 

Daily 1230, 400,725 

WANTED (HINDI W/E.) (STC) 

Daily 100, 430,00 

a eres not menetinecti 
Daily x20, 7-35 105 

SORORITY ROW (8A, gory violence, language may offend) 
Daily 7-59, 1930 


SRG, recommended for 
3 young 


ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

FrieTue, Thu xas, 425 7:00, 9:45; Wed 2:20, 4:5, 7200, s045 
GAMER (184, brutal violence, nudity, language may offend) 
Daily 420, 9:50 

EXTRACT (14A, crude coarse Language, substance abuse) 
Daily 12:55, 735 

‘THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (8A, gory violence) 
Digital 3d Pri-Wed 2:00, 3-20, 5-25, 7:40, 9:55; Thu 12:45 2:50, 
455. $55 

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (18A, gory violence) 

Daily 2200, 6:30, 10:00 

DISTRICT 9 (14A, gory scenes, brutal violence, coarse 
language) 


Digital Cinema Daily 12:35, 3:40, 700, 10:05 

THE TIME TRAVELER'S WIFE (PG, nudity, mature subject 
matter) 

Fri-Tue, Thu 1:10, 3:50, 655 9:35, Wed 6:55, 9:35 

THE UGLY TRUTH (14A, language may offend, sexual 
content) 

Daily 1920 

HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

Daily 4:00 

ICE AGE: DAWN OF THE DINOSAURS (G) 
Daily 1:05 345 

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 

‘Star and Strollers Screening, No passes Thu 1:00 


CITY CENTRE 9 


¥0200-102 Ave, 780.421.7020 
(CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 3D (G) 
Digital 34, No Passes, Stadium seating Fri-Sun 12:45, 310, 
6:00, 8:20, 10:40; Mon, Wed-Thu 1:45, 4:00, 6:20, 8:40; Tue 
145, 4:00, 6:20, 8:40 
‘THE INFORMANT! (144) 
No pastes, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium seating Fri-Sun 
22540, ¥15, 790, 10:05; Mon, Wed-Thu 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00; 
‘Tue 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 
LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) 
Digital, Stadium seating Fri-Sun 12:15, 3:00, 725, 9:50; Mon, 
Wed-Thu 11, 3:45, 615, 8:45; Tue 1215 3:45 6:15, 8:45 
9 (PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 
Stadium seating, DTS Digital Fri-Sun ra-as, 2°30, 4:45, 6:50, 
9:00; Mon, Wed-Thu 1:25, 3:30, $30, 7:30; Tue 1:25, 3:30, 
59730 
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (13A, gory violence) 
Dalby Stereo Digital Fri-Sun 12:00, 3:30, 6:40, 10:00; Man, 
Wed-Thu 1:00, 4:15, 7:30; Tue 1:00, 4:25, 7:30 
EXTRACT (14A, crude coarse language, substance abuse) 
Stadium seating, DTS Digital Fri-Sun 12:40, 3:05, $45, 8:10, 
10735 Mon, Wed-Thu 1:05, 725, $45, Bias; Tue 105 y35, 
S45, Sas 
ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coare language) 
Stadium seating, DTS Digital Fri-Sun 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45. 
105 Mon, Wed-Thu 120, 3°35, 6:00, 8:30; Tue 1:10, 3°35, 
&00, 830 
DISTRICT 9 (14A, gory scenes, brutal violence, coarse 
language) 
Stadium seating, DTS Digital Fri-Sun 2:05, 2:50, 7:00, $45; 
Mon, Wed-Thu 1:20, 4205, 645, 9°30; THe 1:20, 4:05 6:45, 9630 
WHITEOUT (14A, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended 
for children) 
No passes, Stadium seating Pri-Sun 12:20, 2:55 530, 8:00, 
1045; Mon, Thu 1:35, 4:10, 6:40, 7s The 1:35, 420, 6:40, FS 
Wed 2:35 4:30, 955 


‘427-38 Ave, 7BOATLTCOO 
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (18A, gory violence) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 500, 8:30; Sat-Sun 1:40, 900, 8:30 
‘THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (:8A. gory violence) 
Digital 3d Pri, Mon-Thu 4-49, 7-90, 9:50; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:40, 
730.950 
ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 
Pri, Mon-Thu 4:30, 7-20; Sat-Sun 110, 4°30, 720 
GAMER (:8A, brutal violence, nudity, language may offend) 
Pri-Thu gas 
9 (PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 


Pri, Mon-Thu 4-45 6:50, 9:10; Sat-Sun 12ryo, 2:40, 4-45, 650, 
wo 

WHITEOUT (144, gory scenes, mudity, not reeornmended 
for children) 

No passes Pri, Mon-Thu 4:10, 7-5 9-40; Sat-Sun 1290, 420, 
TAS 40 

SORORITY ROW (184, gory violence, language may offend) 
Fei, Mon-Thu 4-20, 7-10, $35 Sat-Sun 1:00, 629. 7-10, $35 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (6) 

Digital 4, No passes Fri, Mon-Thu 4:90, 7:05 9-20; Sat-Sun 
14, EP, FOS $20 

JENNIFER'S BODY (144, gory violence, crude coarse 
Language. sexual content) 


Fel, Mon-Thin 4:06, 7:00, 9:30; Sat-Sun YLAS, 4:00, 7200, 9:30 
THE INFORMANT! (144) 
No passes Pri, Mon-Thu 350, 645, gag: Sat-Sun 12:40, }: 
hem Ss 32:40, 3:50, 
LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 345, 6-40, gis; Sat-Sun 32°30, 345, 6:40, gas 
DUGGAN CINEMA - CAMROSE 
SSO148 Ave, Camrose, 780.608.2164, 
DISTRICT 9 (4A brutal violence, Ory scenes, coarse 
language) 
Daily 705 9:05 Sat, Sun, Thu 2:05 
SORORITY ROW (i8A, gory violence, language offen: 
Daily 720 9:20; Sat, Sun, Thu 2:20 a 
JENNIFERS BODY (14A, gory violence, crude coarse lan- 
guage, sexual content) 
Daily 725, 945; Sat, Sun, Thu x15 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 
Daily 7:00 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:00; Movies for Mommies: Thu, 
Sep 2g 1:00 
WHITEOUT (4A, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended 
for children) 
Daily 720, 9:10; Sat, Sun, Tie, Thy 2:10 


EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY 
moval All ta m2 née 10.439. 5284 
HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON (PG) 
Man, Sept 21, 8:60 


GALAXY - SHERWOOD PARK 
2020 Sherwood Drive, 780.416.0150 


CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 

Digital 3d, No passes Pri coo, 75, 9:30; Sat-Sun 12550, 2:45, 
$00, 7as, 9:30; Mon-Thu 7:15, 930. 

THE INFORMANT! (144) 

Fri 3:45, 7220, 9:45; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:45.70, 9:45 Mon-Thu 
TAO, 3:45, 

LOVE HAPPENS (PG, course language) 

No passes Fri 3:30, 6:99, 9:59; Sat-Sun 12:46, 3:30, 6:90, 9:90; 
Mon-Thu 60, 9:50 

JENNIFER'S BODY (14A, gory violence, crude coarse 
language, sexual content) 

No passes Pri 4:20, 7:20, 10:00; Sat-Sun 1:45, 4:20, 7-20, 10:00; 
Mon-Thu 7:20, 19:00 

WHITEOUT (14A, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended 
for children) 

Fri 430, 7:50, 10:20; Sat-Sun 1:20, 4:30, 7250, 1020; Mon-Thu 
750.1020 

SORORITY ROW (138A, gory violence, language may offend) 
Pri 4:50, 7-45, 10:30; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:50, 7-45, 1030; Mon-Thu 
745,10330 

9 (PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 

Pri 4:40, 6:40, 9:20; Sat-Sun 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 6:40, 9:20; 
Mon-Thu 6:40, 920 

ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

Fri 3:50, 645, 9:40; Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40; MoreThu 
6:45, 9:40 

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (184, gory violence) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:00, 10:10; Sat-Sun 2:00, 7200, 10:10 
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language) 

Fri 3:40, 7:30, 10215; Sat-Sim 12:50, 3:40, 7:30, 10:15 Mon-Thu 
FBO, 10-15 


GRANDIN THEATRE 


Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. Albert, 
78OAS8.9822 


Date of issue only: Thu, Sept 17 

THE FINAL DESTINATION (:8A, gory violence) 

Date of issue only: Thu, Sept 17: 6:15, 7:55, 953° 

SHORTS (G) 

Date of issue only: Thu, Sept x7; 12:55 2:30 6:50 
HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

Date of ismue only:’Thu, Sept a7: 420, 8295 

GFORCE(G) 

Date of issue only: Thu, Sept 17: 1:00, 2:49, 4:25 
JULIE'G JULIA (PG, coarve language) 

Date of timue only: Thu, Sept 17; 1:35, 4:15 6:40, 8:55 
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (12A, gory violence) 

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GAMER (:8A, brutal violence, nudity, language may offend) 
Date of issue only: Thu, Sept 17: 1:20, $20, $20, 7:20, 525 


CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 

Daily 7-00, 9:10; Pri, Sat, Sun 1200, 3:10 

SORORITY ROW (:2A, gory violence, language may offend) 
Daily 7:05 geass Fri, Sat, Sun 1205, 315 

JUUE & JULIA (PG, coarse Language) 

Daily 7200, 9:25 Pri, Sat, Stun 1200, 5:35 

JENNIFER'S BODY (14/, gory violence, crude coarse 


language, sexual content) 
Daily 720, 9-20; Pri, Sat, Sun 120, 320 


9828-1014 Ave, Citadel Theatre, 780.425.9212 


TULPAN (PG, coarse language, nudity) 
Pri, Sun ¢:00; Mon 7:09 


ONLY (PG) 
Fri, Sun7-00; Sat, Mon q.00 


EDMONTON FILM SCHOOL CLASS SCREENING (STC) 


GRINDHOUSE (14, gory scmnes, brutal violence) 


superego et 


DOT ESOL UURUESUTATDUUAETLLUIELUELUCLLD ULL 
Sun 2:09; Part of the seriés The Film: of Quentin Tararitino 


METROPOUS (PG, violent scenes) 
‘Thu 7-09; part of the series U of A Film Studies Dep't 


PARKLAND CINEMA7 
10 Contury Crossing, Spruce Grove, 780.972.2322: Serving 
‘Spruce Grows, Stony Plain; Parkland County 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 
Daily 6:45, 9:00; Sat, Sun, Tue 22-45, 3:00; Not presented in 3D +! 
JENNIFER'S BODY (14, gory violence, crude coarse 
language, sexual content) 
Dally 6:50, 9:05; Sat, Sun, The 12:50, 3:05 
THE INFORMANT! (1A) 
Daily 7:00, 9:20; Sat, Sun, The 1:00, 3-20; Movies For Mom- 
mies: Tue, Sep 22:2:00 
WHITEOUT (14A, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended for 
young children) 
Daily 7205 95 Sat, Sun, Tue 1:05, 315 
SORORITY ROW (iRA, gory violence, language may offend) 
Daily 7210, gas; Sat, Sun, The 110, 3-25 
INGLORIOUS BASTERDS (184, gory violence) 
Daily 730; Sat, Sun, Tue 2:30 
ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 655. 9:10; Sat, Sun, The 22°55 320 


8712-109 St, TEOATLOTZB 
EVERY LITTLE STEP (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, 9:00; Sat-Sun 2:00 


‘W0337-42 Ave, 780.433.0728 
ADAM (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 925; Sat, Sun 330 
COLD SOULS (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, ¢:00; Sat. Sun 200 
SERAPHINE (PG) 
Daily 6:45; Sat-Sun 1:00; No show Wed, Sep 23, private 


booking 
SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM 


WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.444.2400 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 
Digital 3, No passes Dally 12:30, 2:50, s:10, 7:30, 9:50 - 
THE INFORMANT! (14A) 
Daily 12290, 3:40, 6:50, 9:40 
LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) 
No passes Fri-Tue, Thu 1:20, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; Wed 4:00, 
6:45, 9:30; Star and Strollers Screening, No passes Wed 
1:00 
JENNIFER'S BODY (14A, gory violence, crude coarse 
language, sexual content) 
No passes Daily 12:00, 2 


40, $:45, 7290, 10:30 
WHITEOUT (14A, gory scenes, nudity, not recommended 
for children) 

Daily 12:40, 7-15, 10215 

SORORITY ROW (8A, gory violence, language may 
offend) 

Daily 1:45, 4:30, 7:40, 10:30 

9.(PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 

Fri‘Tue, Thu 12:20, 2:45, 5:00, 7:20, 9:45; Wed 3100, §:00, 

7720, 9:45; Star and Strollers Screening: Wed 1:00 

ALL ABOUT STEVE (PG, coarse language) 

Daily 1:10, 4:20, 6:40, 9:20 += 
GAMER (:8A, brutal violence, nudity, language may 
offend) 

Fri-Sun, Tue-Wed 1:30, 4:20, 7:45, 10:15; Mon, Thu 130, 
4:20, 10215 

THE FINAL DESTINATION 3D (:8A, gory violence) 

Digital 3d Daily 4:50, 8:00, 10:20 

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (18A, gory violence) 

Daily 2:00, 6:30, 10:00 

DISTRICT 9 (4A, gory scenes, brutal violence, coarse 
language) 

Pri-Tue, Thu 12:00, 3:50, 
G-FORCE IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D (G) 

Digital ad Daily 12:10, 2:30 

HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (PG, 
violence, frightening scenes) 

Daily a5 


WESTMOUNT CENTRE 


TH) Ave, Groat Rd, 7BOAES.8726 
LOVE HAPPENS (PG, coarse language) R 
Dolby Stereo Digital Fri 7:00, 9:45; Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:45, 

:45; Mon-Thu $30, 8:30 


7210, 10:10; Wed 3:09, 3:50, 10:10 


7:00, 
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (18A, gory violence) 

Dolby Stereo Digital Pri 8:15; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:55, gas; 
Mon-Thu $00, 8:15 

9.(PG, frightening scenes, not recommended for young 
children) 

DTS Digital Fri 720, 9:20; Sat-Sum 12°55, 3:20, 7:10, 9:20; 
Mon-Thu 5:40, 8:49 

JULIE & JULIA (PG, coarse language) 

DTS Digital Fri 6:45, 9:30; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:35, 6:45. 9:30; 
Mon-Thu ss, 8:60 


Wetaskiwin, 780.352.3922 
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS (G) 
Daily 7:00 PM and 9:10; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:0 sz 
SORORITY ROW (:8A, gory violence, language may offend) 
Daily 7205 pm and 9:15; Sat-Sun 1:05, 3:35 
JULIE & fULIA (PG, coarse language) 
Daily 7:00, 9-25; Sat-Sun 1:00, 3:25 
TAKING WOODSTOCK (14A, coarse language, nudity, 
substance abuse) 
Daily 6:55. 9-20; Sat-Sun 12:55, 320 


PTT NOT OT LULU DLL LCL LL 


FILM // 29 


te bm 


PPL LPC L iti ti ee ee ery oeees aes, , asmen - — Foss > 


‘Whatever you’re looking for, find it at yellowpages.ca 


(Al Yellow Pages: 


MUSIC 


ee eee ser TILL LLM LLL 


OVER // THE HOLD STEADY 


Steady as they go 


ne Hold Steady tries to Stay Positive while growing up 


LOOKING NEW YORK, FEELING MINNESOTA >> Frontan Craig Finn and guitarist Tad Kubler found their Hold Steady bandmates in NYC after moving there from Minnesota // supplied 


DAVID BERRY 
// OAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
t's quite possible that I caught Craig 
Finn at his Craig Finn-iest. Relaxing in 
Boston with some of his college friends in 
advance of the Hold Steady’s expansive 
British and North American fall tour, he's 
fresh off taking in the previous night's 
Bruce Springsteen concert. Perhaps 
drinking beer in the bleachers at a Twins 
game would actually be just a bit more 
in keeping with the singer's mythos and 
obsessions, but it's doubtful he conducts 
interviews under those circumstances. 
"We were just watching him last 
night," Finn responds with a breezy 


he had a chance to meet the man with 
whom he tends to draw more than a 
fleeting comparison, and who he also 
counts as a personal hero. “I have met 
Bruce Springsteen, though, and it was 
4 real pleasure. When you meet your 
heroes, there's a big chance for them to 
disappoint you, but I don't think he dis- 
@ppoints too many people.” 

Perhaps Finn could have asked Spring- 
Steen for some pointers on how to deal 
with adoring fans. Finn and his band- 
mates—guitarist Tad Kubler, keyboar- 
_Zmult-instrumentalist Franz Nicolay, 

‘ssist Galen Polivka and drummer 
ed Drake—may not exactly be on E 

€et yet, but they're almost certainly 
the biggest inheritors of The Boss's bar- 


rock-about-blue-collars style. Formed in 
Brooklyn after Finn left his native Min- 
nesota and previous band, indie notables 
Lifter Puller, behind, the Hold Steady 
built a reputation with punishing, bom- 
bastic and frequently hard-drinking live 
shows, distilled into its first two records, 
2004's Almost Killed Me and 2005's 
Separation Sunday—the latter of which 
contributed to the group being the first 
band in 15 years to grace the cover of leg- 
endary New York alt-weekly the Village 
Voice. It was the subsequent two releas- 
es, 2006's rock hymn for misspent youth 
Boys and Girls in America and 2008's 
growing-older-with-grace classic Stay 
Positive, though, that has really pushed 
the band to the top of the indie rock 
world, topping best-of-the-year lists and 
pushing its very down-home American 
sound across the planet. 

Now Finn, always highly regarded for 
his lyrical talents—a sharp observer nev- 
er afraid to back away from life's grimier 
side, he's less poetic than he is narrative, 
Bukowski set to the kind of rock 'n’ roll 
that makes you want to pound a bottle 
on your bar table—is rightly being rec- 
ognized as one of America’s most acute 
and talented songwriters, the next in a 
long line of Middle America’s chroni- 
clers. Which has led to people respond- 
ing in much the same way he responds to 
Springsteen—something the remarkably 
congenial rock star admits he's having 
trouble adjusting to. 


"It's hard, because, you know, it’s a part 
of it that I'm still getting used to and am 
still not that great at. It's one thing to be 
at your shows and sort of be prepared for 
it, but when someone comes up to you at 
a restaurant or something like that, it’s 
kind of shocking,” he admits, pausing to 
ruminate onthe phenomenaa bit further. 
"It's part of being an artist in some ways, 
but it usually takes me by surprise. I hope 
I'm pleasant, but it kind of knocks me out 
of my own world—I guess it startles me, 
actually, more than it shocks me: to be all 
ofa sudden thrust into that kind of mode 
when you're sitting with your girlfriend 
having dinner, it's a weird situation.” 


That kind of situation may be more 
fraught for Finn than the average person 
thrust into the spotlight. As mentioned, 
his subject matter certainly veers towards 
those who, while not exactly failures, are 
certainly mired in the quotidian living of 
averagemediocrity, the guys and gals who 
work nine to five and the odd overtime 
shift, relax with a drink and occasion- 
ally wonder where it’s all going. Notwith- 
standing the occasional crime narrative 
of songs like “Sequestered in Memphis” 
or "One for the Cutters,” Stay Positive is 
littered with the people who live in the 
marginally upkept houses on your block. 
"Constructive Summer” finds a group of 
dudes finding an almost transcendent 
joy in working on a summer project; "Joke 
About Jamaica” whirls up the story of an 


aging bar-star into a near-epic tragedy; 
"Lord, I'm Discouraged" finds a man beg- 
ging for salvation because he thinks his 
girlfriend is cheating on him. These are 
hardly unique topics in the Hold Steady 
ouevre, as well. 

But more than just subject matter, 
Finn's lyrics rely on a very particular mi- 
lieu, a specificity of time or place or char- 
acter that separates him from so many 
would-be barstool poets, The group of 
friends at the centre of "Constructive 
Summer" gathers on top of water towers 
and gets compared to “double whiskey 
coke no ice”; "Joke About Jamaica" takes 
its name froma choice bit of Led Zeppelin 
trivia; the title track from Stay Positive has 
enough tell-tale details to fill a magazine 
issue, maybe its choicest line the recogni- 
tion that "the sing-along songs will be our 
scriptures.” You can't help but wonder if, 
the further he gets away from living like 
his song’s subjects, the harder it might be 
for Finn to write. He, fortunately, has no 
such worries. 

"A good song should use something 
specific to explain something universal,” 
he emphasizes. “It's always there though, 
especially with the lifestyle I lead: I still 
watch baseball, I still sit down and havea 
beer with my friends. 

"The one thing I've been focusing on 
lately is, I'm getting older, and everyone's 
getting older,” he continues. "My peers 
are maybe involved in different things— 
young children and careers—but it's still 


Dragonforce i 
6) ae New Sounds online 
Octoberman More album reviews online, Monday to Friday. 
Vuefinder 


Live show slide shows. This week: Sans AIDS, 


very possible to have an insight on how 
they're living. Maybe it's just a matter of 
working at it a bit more—making sure 
that, when I get off the road, I'm not just 
hanging out in rock clubs all the time— 
but there's always that connection.” 

His mention of not just hanging out in 
rock clubs isn't just an offhanded remark, 
either. Like most of the Hold Steady's 
records—"I reserve the right to not write 
an album with a theme in the future,” 
Finn jests—Stay Positive organizes itself 
around a loose idea, in this case what it's 
like to let go ofa wild youth and find your 
kicks in a slightly more adult fashion 
For Finn, the obvious point of entry is his 
jourmmey from a twentysomething who 
used to spend his days in the clubs and 
bars that made up Minneapolis's always- 
burgeoning music scene to someone who 
recognizes his commitments and respon- 
sibilities the next day, even if those are 
related to a rock band. Which isn't to say, 
as the album's name and the rollicking 
chorus of its title track would imply, that 
he's turning grandpa and telling the kids 
to quiet down and get outta his bar. 

"It’s a fun time, but I think when you're 
hanging on to it, it can ultimately lead 
to kind of a dead end,” Finn explains 
"Hanging on to it was sort of what I was 
talking about with Stay Positive: that just 
kind of running its course and leaving 
people washed up, waking up one day 
and finding yourself 40 years old with a 
drinking problem and no real prospects 
and fooling yourself that you're involved 
in something exciting at night.” 


For Finn it was, somewhat ironically, a 
rock band that put him on the straight- 
and-narrower. Reflective of his humble 
middle-American persona, Finn takes 
the responsibility of entertaining his 
fans rather seriously, and sounds hon- 
estly reverential when he describes 
what's it like to be able to talk to this 
many people with a song he's written. 

"When we first started, we were really 
heavy partiers. When we started tour- 
ing so heavily, it became obvious that 
we couldn't keep up the level of shows 
we wanted to do and still go crazy every 
night,” he says. "I mean, we see people 
at six straight shows, people who travel, 
and we think, ‘Well, we don’t want to 
give them the same show every night.’ 
These people are taking off work, put- 
ting money in their gas tanks, driving to 
the shows, getting hotels: let's make it 
worth that. It’s really flattering to have 
those people aboard, so we better make 
sure that we're living up to that." 

It would seem that Finn has learned 
something from the Boss after all. W 
ol 
MON, SEP 21 (8 PM) 

THE HOLD STEADY 
WITH STILL LIFE STILL 
STARLITE ROOM, $20 


SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY music //31 


MUSIC 


BRDOE BAR c.)) p- 
URBAN LOUNGE Elis- OVERTIME~South Retro to Dig Bird Sang 5. , 
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ENDURING THE FALL 
SUBURBAN SYNDROME 
& SPARKY 


SEPT 22 


CUFF THE 
DUKE 


WITH GUESTS ZEUS 
SEPT 26 


TWO HOURS 
TRAFFIC 


SPIRAL BEACH & 
THE DANKS 


THE JIMMY 
OWIFT BAND 


OCTOBER 3 


THE WHEAT 
POOL amas: 


EAMON MCGRATH 


» ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave - ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 461 
| VENUE GUIDE AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 « AXIS CAFE 10349 Jasper Ave, 780.990.0031 - BAN! 
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i + BUDDY'S 127258 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 - CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argyll Rd, 780.463.9467 » CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-253 St, 780 424 9 
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¢ = 
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: Albert, 780.459.0295 


3 
WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 


32 // MUSIC 


New: classic rock, R&B, urban 
and dance with DJ Mikee; 9pm- 
2am; no cover 

PLAY NIGHTCLUB The first 
bar for the queer community 
___to.open in adecade with _ 
Dj's Alexx Brown and Eddie 
Toonflash; 9pm (door); $5 www. 
playnightclub.ca 

RED STAR Movin’ on Up 
Fridays: indie, rock, fink, soul, 
hip hop with Dy Gatto, D] Mega 
Wattson 

ROUGE LOUNGE Solice 
Fridays 
SPORTSWORLD Top 4o 
Request with 2 mix of Retro 
and Disco; 7-10:30pm; sports- 
world.ca 


STOLLI'S Top 40, R&B, house 
with People’s DJ 


‘STONEHOUSE PUB Top 4o 
with DJ Tysin 

SUEDE LOUNGE Dj Nic-E 
Remixed every Friday 
TEMPLE T.G.1 Psydays; 9pm 


WUNDERBAR Fridays with 
the Pony Girls, DJ Avinder and 
DJ Toma; no cover 


Y AFTERHOURS Foundation 


Dale Ladouceur, John Spearn, 
Incanto, Peter Puffin; 12-6pm; 
free; edmontonearthday@ 
shaw.ca 


EDDIE SHORTS Mojave 
{acoustic original rock), guests; 
$5-$10 (door) 

ENCORE CLUB So Sweet 
Saturdays: with DJ Love Jones 


FESTIVAL PLACE Café Series: 


‘The Lost Fingers (pop/rock); $15 
at Festival Place box office 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 
Quiet Evolution (CD release); 
7:30pm (door), 8:30pm (show); 
$15 (door) 


HILLTOP PUB Open stage/mic 


Sat: hosted by Sally's Krackers 
Sean Brewer; 3-530-3pm. 


HOOLIGANZ PUB Fringe; 
9pm; no cover 


HILLTOP PUB Open Stage/ 
mic hosted by Sally's Krackers; 
3pm 

IRON BOAR PUB Jazz in 
Wetaskiwin featuring jazz trios 
the ist Saturday each month: 
this month: The Don Berner 
Trio; gpm; S10 

IVORY CLUB Duelling piano 
show with Jesse, Shane, Tiffany 
and Erik and guests 


JAMMERS PUB Saturday 
‘open jam, 3-7:30pm,; country/ 
rock band gpm-2am 
JEFFREY’S Gordie Matthews; 
Sio 


JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB 
Headwind (classic pop/rock); 
gpm; no cover 


B'S PUB Molsons Saturday 
open stage every Saturday 
aftemoon hosted by Gord 
Macdonald; 430-gpm. 


MACLAB CENTRE-Leduc 
‘Lewis and Royal, 2pm; free 


MEAD HALL Alberta Stew 
Do, Preying Saints, The Grave 
Mistakes, Frolics; 8pm (door), 
‘9pm (show); Sio 
MORANGO'S TEK CAFE 
Saturday open stage: hosted by 
Dr. Oxide; 7-10pm 

NEW CITY Apoptygma 
Berzerk; no minors; 7pm 
(door) early show; 7:30pm 
(show); followed by Saturday 
Sucks afterparty; tickets at the 
Likker Box 


O'BYRNE'S Live Band 
Saturday 3-7pm; DJ 9:30pm. 
180 DEGREES Dancehall and 
Reggae night every Saturday 
ON THE ROCKS Bonafide; 
9pm. 


ORLANDO'S 1 Caldera; $5 


PAWN SHOP SONIC Presents 
Live On Site Anti-Club 
Saturdays (rock, Indie, punk, 
rock, dance, retro, rock); 8pm 
(door); This week: Bear Country, 
A Trophy Life, guests 


Summer Jazz Series: Dan 
Skakun Trio; 8pm; no cover 


STARLITE ROOM Edguy, 
Epicurean, Luna Mortis; 8pm 
(door); tickets at TicketMaster, 
Blackbyrd 


WESTIN HOTEL-Devonian 
Room Jambhala: Edmonton 
Opera Chorus, Souljah 

Fyah, Second Hand Smoke; 
Aroot's Bazaar, Front Porch 
Roots Revue; 7:30pm; $60 at 
tixonthesquare.ca 

WILD WEST SALOON Jo 
Hikk 


X-WRECKS Damn-ItJim 


YARDBIRD SUITE Cheryl 
Fisher (CD release) Moments 
Like This, The Hutchinson 
Andrew Trio, Eric Allison; 
Spm (door), gpm (show); $16 
(member)/$20 (guest) 


Classical 
DOW CENTENNIAL CENTRE 


SHELL THEATRE Yvonne 
Jenkins; spm; free 


STANLEY A. MILNER 
LIBRARY Symphony 102: DT. 
Baker's interactive intro to the 
symphony with excerpts from 
the ESO's upcoming season; 
1pm; pre-register By Calling 
780.496.7030 


WINSPEAR CENTRE ESO 
Momentous music from the 
world of the film The Red 
Violin; 8pm; Saturday at 
Symphony Prelude at 7:15pm. 
in the Upper Circle 3rd level 
lobby; $20-$69 at Winspear 
box office 


Dis 
AZUCAR PICANTE Every Sat: 
DJ Touch It, hosted by DJ Papi 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Saturday DJs on three levels. 
Main Floor; Menace Sessions: 
alt rock/electro/trash with Miss 
Mannered 


BUDDY'S DJ Earth Shiver'n’ 
Quake; pm; no cover before 
iopm 


EMPIRE BALLROOM Rock, 
hip hop, house, mash up 


ESMERALDA'S Super Parties: 
Eyery Sat a different theme 


FLUID LOUNGE Saturdays 
Gone Gold Mash-Up: with 
Harmen B and DJ Kwake 


FUNKY BUDOHA-Whyte 
Ave Top tracks, rock, retro with 
Dj Damian 


GINGUR SKY Soulout 
Saturdays 


HALO For Those Who Know: 

house every Sat with DJ Junior 
Brown, Luke Morrison, Nestor 
Delano, Ari Rhodes 


LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Sizzle 
Saturday: DJ Groovy Cuvy and 
guests 


NEWCASTLE PUB Saturdays: 
Top 40, requests with DJ Sheri 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Punk Rawk Saturdays with 
Todd and Alex 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Saturdays Suck with Greg Gory 
and Bluejay 


PAWN SHOP SONIC Presents 
Live On Site! Anti-Clob 
Saturdays: rock, indie, punk, 
rock, dance, retro rock; Spm 
(door) 


PLANET INDIGO-jasper 
Ave Suggestive Saturdays: 
breaks electro house with PI 
residents 


indie 
rock, hip hop, and electro with 
Dj Hot Philly and guests 
RENDEZVOUS Survival metal 
night 

SPORTSWORLD Inline and 
Roller Skating Disco: Top 40 
Request with a mix of retro and 
disco; 1-4:30pm and 7-10:30pm; 
wwwsports-world.ca 
STOLLI'S ON WHYTE Top 
40, R&B, house with People’s DJ 


SUEDE LOUNGE The Finest 
Underground House with DJ 
Nic-E every Saturday 


TEMPLE Oh Snap!: Every 
Saturday, Cobra Commander 
and guests with Degree, Cobra 
Commander and Battery; 9pm. 
(door); $5 (door) 


WUNDERBAR Featured Dj 
and local bands 


Y AFTERHOURS Release 
Saturday 


SUNDAY 


BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT 
Jazz on the Side Sundays: Don 
Berner 


BLUE CHAIR CAFE Jim 
Findlay Trio; donations 


BLUES ON WHYTE 
Funkafeelya 


BRIXX BAR An Horse, guests; 
gpm (door); Sia at Blackbyrd, 
TicketMaster 


DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB 
Celtic Music Session, hosted by 
Keri-Lynne Zwicker, 4-7pm 


EDDIE SHORTS Sunday 
acoustic oriented open stage 
hosted by Uncle Jimmy; all 
gear provided; 9pm-1am. 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 
Souljah Fyah Sundays hosted by 
Rhea March; 8pm; $10 (door)/$s 
(student)/$s (restaurant/pub: 
employees with pay stub) 


J AND R BAR Open jam/stage 
every Sunday hosted by Me 
Next and the Have-Nots; 3-7pm 


LOOP LOUNGE Jam hosted 
by JJ, Lenny B and the Cats; 
4:30pm ‘til whenever 


NEWCASTLE PUB Sunday 
acoustic open stage with 
Willy James and Crawdad; 
36pm 


NEW CITY Open Mic 
Sunday hosted by Ben 
Disaster; 9pm (sign-up); no 
cover 


O'BYRNE’S Open mic jam 
with Robb Angus (the Wheat 
Pool) 


ON THE ROCKS Shocker 
Sundays with Self Evolution; 
9pm 


ORLANDO'S 2 PUB 
Sundays Open Stage Jam 
hosted by The Vindicators 
(blues/rock); 3-8pm 


PAWN SHOP Ninjaspy, 
Sparky, guests; 8pm 


REXALL PLACE Keith 
Urban (Escape Together 
World tour), Lady 
Antebellum; 6:30pm (door), 
7a0pm (show); sold out 


ROYAL ALBERTA 
MUSEUM THEATRE How 
1 Hear It: CKUA Radio Finale 
Concert: participants from 
Sat Workshop and mentors; 
a-apm 


RUTHERFORD HOUSE 
From Classics to Ragtime and 
Great-War ballads: Corinne 
Lillo and friends; 1-3pm 


SECOND CUP-Mountain 
Equipment Co-op Live 
: 2-4pm 


music every Si 
ey 
CONVOCATION HALL 
Edmonton Chamber Music 
Society, Manitoba Chamber 
Orchestra with Dame Evelyn 
Glennie; apm; $30 (adult)/$a5 


wenior)/$10 (student) at TIX 
on the Square 


-COMING SHOW 


SHOWS 


Call 780.481. YUKS 
FOR TICKETS & INFO 


STATING $39 


Ser 


+g | —) 


$4*/si9* 


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Ps 


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= 


SUB S3O* 


7, 
P ysArcnv RAY SAWYER 


Mitch R 


and the 


DETROIT Wnt 


SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


MUSIC // 33 


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EDMONTONEVENTCENTRE.CA 


tion president Graham Henderson 
believes that if Canada enacts 
tougher copyright-protection 
legislation, like that which 
exists in Sweden or the 
United States, more busi- 
nesses will spring up to pro- 
vide legal downloads. 

In a recent editorial posted in 
the Georgia Straight, Henderson 


to legal downloads or sharing. 


online music is between iTunes and il- 
legal," he wrote. 


ment. But ... 
Sorry ... "iTunes and illegal?" 


suggested that Canadian consumers : 
don't have a lot of choice when it comes : 


"Here, effectively the only choice for i 


Henderson said that countries that : 
have gotten tough with piracy have fos- : 
tered economies where start-up down- : 
loading and sharing services can thrive, : 
as illegal activity has been curtailed and : 
users look for new ways to get their : 
music legally. Sounds like a logical argu- : 


Let's debug that statement. Because, : 


COMMENT >> DOWNLOADS 


More than one dl in town 
ITunes isn't the only option for legal downloads 


Canadian Recording Industry Associa- ; 


that's an awfully big one for Henderson 
to make. Are Canadians who want 
to shop for downloads only lim- 
ited to the world of Apple? 

Hmm. Napster offers legal : 
downloads to Canadians; for : 
yg $9.95 a month, a Napster 
member gets unlimited down- 
loads. Only issue is that Nap- : 
ster is a PC-only service. Still, the 
company markets to Canada. 

And eMusic, another member-driven, : 
legal download service, has been avail- = 
able to Canadian users since April of : 
2008. My album is available on eMusic, : With the bluster comes the ' 
and | have received royalties (19 cents a : And it's easy to dissect an o 
download) for songs purchased by Ca- : ment the likes of which Hende, 
nadian users. : in his column. In the end, such 

Last.fm also pays royalties to artists : only goes to hurt his argumen 
for streaming and downloads, andthose : Or, if you're really too tired , 
are available to Canadian users and art- : line debate, just go out and 
ists from our home and native land. : It's a lot more fun and sounds 2 | 

Puretratks, another download site, is : a lot better. W 
available in Canada and the United States. : 

And let's not even start about the ring- 
tones that are available through all the 
various service providers in Canada. 


: The pointis that choice for « 
especially in a country with a p 
base as small as Canada, is pre 
good. There are plenty of a\:. 
to iTunes out there. To me, ¢/ 
about tougher copyright. 
laws and the rise of the e-ms, 
are totally separate issues 
ing piracy will send more y 
gitimate sites, but it doesn 
investors are hesitant to kick< 
downloading and sharing sto 
country at this time. 

But that's the problem with 


: Steven Sandor is a former editor 
: of Vue Weekly, now an edito 


: thor living in Toronto, 


WINSPEAR CENTRE 
Davis Concert Organ and 
members of the Edmonton 
Symphony Orchestra, 1-3pm, 
free; Symphony 101. D.T. 
Baker, 3-4pm 


BACKSTAGE TAP AND 
GRILL Industry Night: with 
Atomic Improv, Jameoki and 
DJ Tim 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Sunday Afternoons: Phil, 
2-7pm; Main Floor: Got 

To Give It Up: Funk, Soul, 
Motown, Disco with DJ Red 
Dawn 


BUDDY'S DJ Bobby 

Beatz; 9pm; Drag Queen 
Performance; no cover before 
iopm 


FLOW LOUNGE Stylus 
Sundays 


GINGUR Ladies Industry 
Sundays 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Get Down Sundays with 
Neighbourhood Rats 


OVERTIME DOWNTOWN 
Sunday Industry Night 
Requests with DJ Bo 


SAVOY MARTINI LOUNGE 
Reggae on Whyte: RnR 
Sundays with DJ IceMan; no 
minors; 9pm; no cover 


WUNDERBAR Sundays 
DJ Gallatea and XS, guests; 
no cover 


MONDAY 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Sleeman Mondays: live 
music monthly; no cover 


BLUES ON WHYTE 
Sonny Rhodes 


DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB 
Open stage Mondays with 
different songwriters hosting 
each week; presented by 
Jimmy Whiffen of Hole in 
the Guitar Productions; 8-12 


HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Jazz 
Night; 7pm; $20 (door)/Ss 
(student) 

NEW CITY This Will Hurt 


you Mondays: Johnny Neck 
and his Job present mystery 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 


musical guests 


PLEASANTVIEW 
COMMUNITY HALL 
Acoustic instrumental old 
time fiddle jam hosted by the 
Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers 
Society; 7pm 


PROHIBITION Chicka-Dee- 
Jay Monday Night: Soul, 
R&B, British Invasion, Ska, 
Rocksteady, and more with 
Michael Rault 


ROSE BOWL/ROUGE 
LOUNGE The Legendary 
Rose Bow! Monday Jam: 
hosted by Sherry-Lee Wisor 
and Darrek Anderson; 8pm 


STARLITE ROOM The Hold 
Steady, Still Life; 8pm (door); 
tickets at TicketMaster, 
Blackbyrd, Megatunes 


BAR WILD Bar Gone Wild 
Mondays: Service Industry 
Night; no minors; 9pm-2am 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Main Floor: Eclectic 
Nonsense, Confederacy 

of Dunces, Dad Rock, T] 
Hookah and Rear Admiral 
Saunders 


BUDDY’S Dj Dust 'n' Time; 
9pm 


FILTHY MCNASTY'S Metal 
Mondays: with DJ S.W.A.G. 


FLUID LOUNGE Mondays 
Mixer 


NEW CITY LIKWID 
LOUNGE Daniel and Fowler 
(eclectic tunes) 


TUESDAY 


BLUES ON WHYTE 
Sonny Rhodes 


BRIXX BAR Joel Kamps, 
guest; 9pm (door); $8 (door) 


DRUID-Jasper Ave Open 
stage with Chris Wynters 


L.B.'S PUB Ammar'’s 
Moosehead Tuesday open 
stage every Tuesday night; 
9pm-1am; featuring guests; 
hosted by Mark Ammar and 
Noel (Big Cat) Mackenzie 


O'BYRNE'S Celtic Jam 
with Shannon Johnson and 
friends 


- SEP 23, 2009 


PAWN SHOP Cuff The 
Duke, Zeus; 8pm; tickets at 
Ticketmastser, Blackbyrd, 
Megatunes 


REXALL PLACE Keith 
Urban (Escape Together 


world tour), Lady Antebellum; 


6:30pm (door), 7:30pm 
(show); $84.50, $69.59, $20 


SECOND CUP-124 Street 
Open mic every Tue; 8-10pm. 


SECOND CUP-Stanley 
Milner Library Open mic 
every Tue; 7-9pm 


SIDELINERS PUB Tuesday 
All Star Jam with Alicia Tait 
and Rickey Sidecar; 8pm. 


YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday 
Sessions: Dave Babcock 
Quartet; 7:30pm (door), 8pm 
(show); $5 


aa 


ENTERPRISE SQUARE 
Enterprise String Quartet: 
Guillaume Tardif (violin), 
Virginie Gagné (violin), 
Charles Pilon (viola), and 
Joanne Yu (cello); 4:30- 
5:45pm 

Djs 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Main Floor: CJSR’s Eddie 


Lunchpail; Wooftop: with DJ 
Gundam 


BUDDY'S DJ Arrow Chaser; 
gpm 
ESMERALDA'S Retro 


every Tue; no cover with 
student ID 


FUNKY BUDDHA-Whyte 
Ave Latin and Salsa music, 
dance lessons 8-10pm 


GINGUR SKY Bashment 
Tuesdays: Reggae music; 
no cover 


NEW CITY LIKWID 
LOUNGE ‘abilly, Ghoul- 
rock, spooky with DJ Vylan 
Cadaver 


PROHIBITION Tuesday 
Punk Night 


RED STAR Tuesdays: 
Experimental Indie Rock, 
Hip Hop, Electro with DJ 
Hot Philly 


SPORTSWORLD Retro 


Night; 7-10:30pm; www. 
sports-world.ca 


WEDNESDAY 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Main Floor; Glitter Gulch 
Wednesdays: live music once 


Yukon Jack; 7:30- 


SECOND CUP-Mountai; 


Equipment Open 
Wed, 8-:opm 


STEEPS TEA Lou? 
College Plaza 
every Wed; h 


a month Tersigni; 8:30-1 
BLUES ON WHYTE Bee Wyld t 
Sonny Rhodes ednesday: Live 

every Wed; $s 
RGPPERPO! ee = weer oe 
RESTAURANT Live jazz Dis 
every Wednesday night; BANK ULTRA LOUNG 
6-gpm; Shelly Jones Wednesday Nig 
DV8 The D.B.G; 9pm; $6 Harley 

FREEHOU 
EDDIE SHORTS Wed open BLACK DOG FREEH( 
ain Floor: Blue j 

stage, band oriented, hosted Nest Wed Night: B 
by Chuck Rainville; 9pm-1am aa eee a 
EDMONTON EVENT with LL Cool Joe 
CENTRE Dragonforce; 6pm; BUDDY’s Dj Du 


$36.60 (adult)/$36.50 (youth) 


FIDDLER’S ROOST Little 
Flower Open Stage with 
Brian Gregg 


FOXX DEN The Mary 
Thomas Band Wed night 
open stage; 8pm-12am 
HAVEN SOCIAL Open stage 
with Jonny Mac; 8:30pm; free 


HOOLIGANZ PUB Open 
stage Wednesdays hosted by 
Shane and Naomi 

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Open 
mic NEW CITY SUBURBS 
NEW CITY Circ-O-Rama- Shake It: with Greg 


gpm; no cover bef 
DIESEL ULTRA LOUNG 
Wind-up Wednesday 
hiphop, reggae, ) 
Teggacton sith I TnVincea' 
Touch It, weekly gucst 


FLUID LOUNGE 
Wednesdays Rock T 


LEGENDS PUB 
hop/R&B with D 


NEW CITY LIKWID 
LOUNGE Dj Roxx 5! 
{indie, punk and metal 


Licious: Gypsy and circus Eddie Lunchpail; 1 
fusion spectaculars; last Wed gpm (door) 
be NIKKI DIAMONDS 
OIL CITY ROADHOUSE and ‘8os metal every 
Jimmie Van Zant Wednesday 
PLEASANTVIEW RED STAR Gues! 9! 
COMMUNITY HALL Wednesday 


Acoustic Bluegrass jam 


ARLITE ROOM ¥ 
presented by the Northern aT H 


Style Wednesday 


Bluegrass Circle Music 9pm 

Society every Wednesday 

evening; 6:45-11pm; STOLLI'S Beatpa 

bluegrassnorth.com Wednesdays: Hou 
pragressive and cle 

PROHIBITION Wednesdays with Rudy Electro 


with Roland Pemberton It! 
RED PIANO BAR Jazz and 


Space Age and ' 
9pm-aam; www 


Shiraz Wednesdays featuring WUNDERBAR Wed: 
Dave Babcock and his Jump with new DJ; 09 cove 
Trio 

Y AFTERHOURS 
RIVER CREE Wednedays Wednesday 
Live Rock Band hosted by 


SE 


THE HANDY | | <dala 
anO);7 \eeene) site), ae 


CE PRODUIT (al 
CREE UNE ' 
FORTE 


Smoke free, chew free and ' 
spit free, SNUS is an alternative | 
for adult tobacco users. | 


SNUS is packaged in small, 
handy pouches that just need 
to be tucked under the upper lip 
to deliver maximum taste. 


SNUS Original and Freshmint tins 
are available now through select 
tobacco retailers in Edmonton. 


Visit www.snus.ca for more information, 


Cigarettes are highly addictive. 


La cigarette crée une tres 
forte dépendance. 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY MUSIC // 35 


‘© UNIONEVENTS 


SHOW THIS SATURDAY!!! 


En concert CAK7 G SEPTEMBER ION 


‘CHAM ag CONE OY, AVENUE THEATRE 
©" (B _- ALUAGES WELCOME= DOORS 6PR 


SiHHIS SGI SS Bo WITH THE LATENCY, «© "™ASOATBtacKBYRD 


. 


* NOVEMBER 10 4 : i ee 
_ STARLITE’ ROOM: V2F. 7: || _ SEPTEMBER 26 


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shears <- CE SSR eg a Ae Sea 


Divicet si: 


) WITH RUBY JEAN AND THE THOUGHTFUL BEES 


murder by death 


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EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE | oO ARLITE ROO 


DOORS AT 6PM - ALL AGES WELCOME - TIX ALSO AT BLACKBYRD S AT 8PM - NO MINORS 188 
vue EQ eG, in ame, VME 


ALSO AVAILABLE ON ticketmaster.ca 780-451-8000 FOLLOW US AT TWITTER.COM/UNIONEVENTS 


36 // MUSIC WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 


BUY TICKETS + Cae ‘(OM SIGN. uP FOR E-ALERTS 


, IMASTODONG Wethee- q 
ae 
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"SHOW TO TONIGHT! 


STS G 


WITH TEN SECOND EPIC 


SEPTEMBER 16 SEPTE® 
| oie TEROO'  STARL sib 1 


AEB ASIN ~ } 

)REMEN 4 SIN HOW - WITH A DAY TO REMEMBER : 

SAT PM ALL AGES WELCOME HOUR AT SPM - ALL AGES WELCOM Bhi he 

LSOA i AT BL ACKBY ‘RO TIX ALSO AT BLACKBYRO fe 
is ey aes : 


" gout 2000) } 


di Foye = 
A. < 


SEPTEMBER 23 
EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE 


DOORS AT GPM -ALL AGES TCMETS ALSO AV BLACKEYRD 


CONVERGE high an jive 


OCTOBER 7 ¢ SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE 


DOORS 6 PM - ALL AGES - LIMITED TIX AT BLACKBYRD 


a 


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| LACUMA oe grit 
| Ci “IN TICKETS ALSO AT BLACKBYRD 
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Sa 5 - 


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DOORS AT 7PM - 18-+- NO MINORS - TIX ALSO AT BLACKBYAD TICKETS ALSO AT BLACKBYRD wBEA 


ae 
BLE ON ticketmaster.ca 780-451-5000 


— 


FOLLOW US AT TWITTER.COM/UNIONEVENTS 


music // 37 


SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 // WWEWEEKLY 


WwW 


Qrarlite 


G@S/ZL FOUNDATION & RMS PRESENT 


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STILL LIFE 


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BOUNCING SOULS} 


Wit YOUTH BRIGADE =e 
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THE WOODEN SKY 


temple 


FVIEMBERS & GUESTS FACILITY 


BEHIND STARLITE ROOM 


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WEDNESDAYS 
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WITH DJS BUDAKRON 
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WWW.STARLITEROOM.CA 


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RED RAM / OLD JOE & THE TRUTH HURTS 


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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 


BUMS >> DRAGONFORCE 


Roar of the DragonForce 


English power-metal band delivers an Ultra Beatdown 


FAST AND FURIOUS >> Yeah, DragonForce can throw down the killer high-speed 


leads, but the band occasionally slows it down to great effect, too //supplied 


In the realm of metal, the sound o 


England's DragonForce veers pretty far : 
away from sanity. Guitars and keys spin : 


intricate lines across the speakers, the 


just as the vocals twist and turn through 


videogame soundtrack, and that doesn't 
seem like an unreal stretch, though it 


would be a mistake to dismiss the group 


as all flash and no substance. No, 
every line—no matter how 
wild and driven—comes 
across as well-considered 
within the context of the 
songs. Founding guitarist/ 
producer Herman Li spoke 
with Vue Weekly recently 
about the band's latest release, 
2008's Ultra Beatdown. 


VUE WEEKLY: How long did it take to make 


Ultra Beatdown, from the initial songwriting 
through to the end of the recording? 


our time to experiment with the music 


change it around a few times and see : 


what works best for all the instruments. 


songs: Lyrics first? Music first? 
HL: We always write the music before 
the lyrics. Some words can only fit cer 
tain notes in music, along with the tim 


ing and the melodies. For us it doesn't : 
make sense to write lyrics without the : 
music, and when we change the vocal : 
melodies most of the time we have to : 
change certain words too so it still fits : 


well together. 


VW: What was the recording process. 
like for Ultra Beatdown? There.are a lot 
of notes flying around throughaut the 
album in very complex passages—were 


the instruments all tracked together, : 


SEP 23 


2009 


One at a time or some combination of 
the two? 
HL: Every person has to be recorded : 


: separately so we can isolate each in- 
drums and-bass grounding the songs : 


strument and focus 100 percent of our 


: attention on each one. When you play 
the music, weaving otherworldly tales. : 
The band's output has been likened toa : 


all together, it's impossible to really 
hear yourself and everyone else all at 
the same time. 


VW: Were there other songs written 
that were left off the album? 


tracks which were released in 
different countries and on dif- 


songs which were all meant 
to be on the album as we 
_ thought they were all as good 


but unfortunately this time two end- 
ed up as bonuses! 


VW: How did you decide which songs 


: to include on the album? Did you have 
HERMAN LI: It took roughly a year to : 
write, demo and record. We really take : 


an idea of what you wanted Ultra Beat- 


down to be when you started, or did the ; 
finished shape emerge as the writing : 
: VW: Is there anything else you'd like 


and recording went along? 
: HL: Everything interacts with each oth- 


er—if one thing changes in a song, we ; 
VW: How did the band approach the : 
: ent song so they can be on the album 
: together. We really look at the overall 


might change another part of a differ- 


big picture as well as the tiny details 


each time we make an album. As the : 
: DragonForce. We are really happy abou! 
? it, and this world tour so far has beer 
‘ the best DragonForce experience eve’ 
> seen on stage. We will only keep on ge 
: ting better! V 

> constantly changing and adaptable type : 
: of production schedule. : 


songs develop, we start thinking about 
the setlist and how particular songs will 
flow better on the album together. If we 
need to change or re-write a part in a 
song, we will do it. | run a very flexible, 


ferent formats. We wrote 10 : 
: HL: That's a big'map! It starts from th 
: time we started listening to rock musi: 
: Everything we listen to has played a 
as each other in different ways, : 
? sically. All the touring and recording 
: experience we've had were essential i: 
: making Ultra Beatdown so successful 
: It was pretty unbelievable that we gol 
: nominated for a Grammy recently for 
: playing the style of music we do. | mea 


vw: _Careening ‘instrumental ores 
~>arethe gor for Qragonkorce—is there: ; D 
: any pressure to up the ante with éach : 
new album, or is the song still number ; 


: one no matter the complexity of | 
: parts? 

: HL: The songs have always been 
: number one priority and not the ins 
: mental parts or guitar solos. We <p 
: Way More time on the singing sec 
: than the guitar parts. We always w, 
t to evolve—it is something we do 

i cause we believe we must impro 

: everything as much as possible a| 

> time. Ultra Beatdown shows a ve 

": namic side of DragonForce not se< 

: any previous albums. 


: VW: At the same time, some of 
: tracks, like "A Flame for Freedom 

? "The Warrior Inside," feature slow: 
: more delicate parts amongst the mc 
: aggressive bits, giving the music a sen: 
: of ebbs and flows. When the band 
: working on the songs is there m: 

: thought given to covering a variety 

: textures and emotions? 

; HL: On this latest album, we pi 
: posely wanted to explore that pa 
: of our sound in more variety. Anothe 
? example is the song "The Last Journ 

! Home”: it is a very melodic and dynamic 
t track, but at the same time still sound 
: totally DragonForce. 


: WW: Karl Groom produced the album 
: alongside you and Sam. What did’ | 
: bring to the album during the recor 
ing? Was it important to involve a set 


ears from outside the band? 


: HL: We've been working with Karl since 
: the year 2000 when we did our firs 

: demo. Karl understands our way of 
: working more than anyone out there. He 
: isan extremely underrated producer and 
: engineer. He's been a very important o 
: the DragonForce production sound. You 
? can also hear his excellent work throug 

: his prog-rock band Threshold 

HL: There were two bonus 2 

: VW: If you were to trace the mus 

: cal map that led DragonForce to Ult/ 


Beatdown, what would it look like? 


part in influencing or inspiring us m 


really, who would have thought? 


> say about the album? 
HL: The new album really shows ho 


? much we have evolved as musician 
: and performers. Even our fans were 
: surprised how we have matured as 

: band and the variety we have shown on 


the new album while still sounding lik« 


ae Np 
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=) 


THU, SEP 17 (9 pm) 


TAs 
T 


ELDORADO 


RAYGUN 
BRIXX BAR & GRILL, $12 


inclined to play something. 


WITH SHILOH LINDSEY, JOSEPH BLOOD, MAN- : 


: FRI, SEP 18 (8 pm) 


LEONARD COHEN NIGHT 2009 


$20~$50 


: Peter Brown hosts an evening of music, : 
: poetry and movement, all inspired by : 
Leonard Cohen. The night is headlined by : 
: Adam Cohen and also features Souljah 4 
Fyah's Janaya "Sista J" Ellis, Adam : 
Gregory, visual artist Larisa Sem- ‘ 
baliuk Cheladyn with dancers : 
from the Victoria School of : 
Performing and Visual Arts : 


ES 


and more. 


{Asan DOLE TOL FEEAPTN LULL NveseroASIMUTLALAVOTY 


FRI, SEP 18 (9 pm) 


: WALLPAPER 
A whole whack of West Coast folks have : 
gpteamed up for the Two Cadillacs and a : 
Pack Mule Tour. Really, the tour name it- : 
self is reason enough to check the show z 
out, but if you need another, every one : 
of the band's on the bill is pretty killer. : 
Plus, local Manraygun Is gearing up to : 
release its second full-length album, so : 
you might be able to snag a live preview : 
of something new if the boys are feeling : 


WITH NOAH YORK CITY 
PAWNSHOP, $15 —$20 


So, this is a celebration in honour of : 
Calgary's Beatroute's Sth anniversary, ; 
so I'm just going to let the magazine's : 
founder, Glenn Alderson, do the talking : 
here: "Honestly, this band could be as big : 
as Chromeo ... not that Chromeo is cool : 
anymore, but this is going to be a really : 
: fun show!" Check it. 


BIG ROCK PRESENTS... HAIR OF THE DOG LIVE 


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WUEWEEKLY // SE! 


: SAT, SEP 19 (8 pm) 


NORTHERN “ALBERTA® JUBILEE AUDITORIUM” * 


; MOJAVE 
} EDDIE SHORT'S 


: Spooky, folky soundscapes are the order : 
> of the day for Mojave. Not that this band : 
: sounds like it spends much time out in 
+ the daylight. No, these tunes are the sort 
: that tend to be creeping out of the shad- 
: ows as dusk is falling and you're trying to 
: get home safely. The band's latest, Crow's 
: Funeral, is stellar. And the members care : 
: about the world, too. From the band's : 
: MySpace: "Mojave is focused on creat- : 
: ing a green music scene. 'Stories’ avoids : 
: packaging by being offered exclusively : 
: through digital retailers. All travel made 
: by the band is carbon offset through Tree : 
Canada, and they are members of 1% for : 
the Planet, donating a portion of their : 
profits to environmental charities. They : 
also help raise money for a cause near to : 
their hearts, the Stillpointe Llama Sanc- : 
tuary where they have adopted Starman. : 
and Miss Honey.” So go help out and buy : 
: an album. Or a download. 


; SAT, SEP 19 (8 pm) 


MIKE PLUME 
HOROWITZ THEATRE 


Newfoundland, “covers a lot of years and 
Rock’ on the title track and lead single; 
: from late winter games of shinny on a 
frozen Alberta pond, where 'the season 


from the highways out of town where 


leading nowhere, where people whose 
dreams have died go to heal in peace, on 


: his tales out of life, and he delivers them 
: like they matter. 


FRIDAY OCTOBER 9 
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In a few words pilfered from his press : 
release, Mike Plume's latest album, 8:30 : 


: alot of miles: from'Norman Wells to The : 


never ended’ on ‘More Than a Game’; : 


dreams begin on ‘Free; to back roads : 


Junior.” Plume's a storyteller who carves : 


: SUN, SEP 20 (9 pm) 
AN HORSE 

WITH GUESTS 
- BRIXX BAR & GRILL, $12 


OK, it's all about the press rele, 

? emails this week. But seriously, t} 
i great paragraph: “It is not because 
: is the size of jockey or because [ 

: was once kicked by a goat that An | 
: bears its name. There's no s 

: that. A friend once gave Kate a sy 
: with An Horse written on it beca 

: thought it was grammatically cor; 
: wasn't and that was quite a long 
: ago but Kate still wears the s- 
: She hasn't grown in years. Damon 
: remembers the goat like it was y 
: day.” Well, it makes me want to s¢ 
: band anyway. 


: TUE, SEP 22 (8 pm) 
: CUFF THE DUKE 

> WITH. ZEUS 

PAWN SHOP, $13 


: | was skeptical about this album | 
cause the biggest thing on the cove; 
: is a sticker proclaiming that it 

: produced by Blue Rodeo's Greg K 

? Well, Vue writer Justin Shaw revi 

: it in this week's New Sounds and 
: likes it, so maybe it's nothing 
than a little namedropping in the int 
test of commercialism. | assume 

: Greg Keelor will not be appearing 
the band on stage since | haven 

j any gigantic stickers stuck on the Pa 
: Shop's door lately. W 


Gabriela Montero ff loctis Il - Tita gorisl 


A 
yerforms Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 Gs gay, Alberta 


Friday Oct. 2nd - The Distillery 18+ 


mye’ SVU qooyt KILVAKAL 
/ 2 


SLOUGH 
FEB : 
TRUCK | TOC ALY 


Saturday Oct 3id | | 


Mlain Stage - Mackwan Hall U of C Alt Ages 


Saturday Oct 3d at The Den 


Second Stage All Aqes 


September 30, 2009 Winspear Centre fret} 


fom 
On ood cz ‘ 
with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra Ky cicred - Aig 


After intermission: solo recital of piano improvisations XA i ; 
=z ’ , =x OM FON BION 


When improvising,” Gabriela says, “| connect alia 
my audience in a completely unique way - elite MLIT=4 - 1 ee nm 1a Shiv: Se Shes 
connect with me.” Gabriela recently performed with ere i “Sinan 
Ma and Itzhak Perlman at the inauguration va pike. ee 
ceremony for President Barack Obama. 
| lickets: Meqatunes, Octopus Ink, The Mead Hall & Online at: or 


to 
Tickets at EdmontonSymphony.com or 780-428-1414 VAVAVAL(Ole T isvalkymes. com 


ausic // 41 
SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 3 


FOUNDATION _FOUNDATION CONCEES 


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WUEWEEKLY // 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 21 
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 26 


ve and well 
ses his power for good 


figured it out," he 
of facetious answer 
together by a lot of 
n use it for anything, if 
roken or if part of your 


Or, you know, useitto secure fleeingband 
members to the bumper of the van... 

A better question might be to consider 
how Keithley himself has held it together 
all these years, being the sole continuous 
member of the band since its inception. 
Maintaining a very vocal stance about 


politics and freedoms, he notes, is notonly 
part of the punk ethic, but also precisely 
what makes DOA matter to people. A 
couple years back, the Vancouver Sun rana 
poll where Keithley was included in a list 
naming British Columbia's 150 most influ- 
ential people. 

"Inanutshell the DOA philosophy isto be 
your own boss, think for yourself and try 
and affect some sort of positive change in 
theworld. Therewereabunchofpeopleon 
[the list] that lthought were totally unwor- 
thy,” he chuckles. “It had some politicians 
and media types and some musicians on 


it. But it showed that there's a lot of open- 
minded people who live in Vancouver that 
kind of relate to DIY—that, in a way, set the 
template for punk rock. But it's the punk/ 
activism angle that really I think sticks out 
for people. It again goes to the longevity 
we're talking about: DOA's not just about 
a band that goes out there and sings their 
songs and gets fucked up. That's made it 
last longer for people.” 


Now that he's a dad and a very recogniz- 
able rock star, Keithley notes that celeb- 
status can really, truly be used positively 
in politics—if you're smart about it. He 
doesn't exactly take a stance on the baby- 
harp-seal issue, but does admit that it's 
definitely an argument that varies by 
region—kind of like how over in BC the 
view of Alberta's oilsands problem is a bit 
more, say, objective. 


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SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


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"If you do have a certain influence with 
people, hopefully you can use that in a 
constructive way,” he says. "Some people 
Say entertainers or writers or actors or mu- 
sicians should not be involved in politics. 
But why would we as artists be any less 
Savvy about these issues than politicians? 
In lots of cases a lot more savvy. You've got 
an actor who's the governor of California, 
an actor who was the president of the US 
and on the positive side a playwright who 
was president of the Czech Republic for 
eight years. If you do want to drum up 
an issue and you can use your ‘celebrity 
status’ to further that, then that's a good 
thing. Of course, sometimes people will 
tackle the wrong subject and fuck itup—it » 
depends how informed they are.” 

Here's hoping he'll draw up a read- 
ing list for the likes of all those PETA 
bandwagoners. V 

FRI, SEP 18 

DOA 

WITH LET'S DANCE, PANIK ATTAK, FU BOATS 

NEW CITY 


AUDITORIUM 


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music //43 


‘vectors encase aaa near orosvneonntasseterorenenn 


PREVUE // OCTOBERMAN 


Hold the Fortresses 


~Octoberman comes together for its new album 3 ose 


ee mn 
HinEHETLYy 


MIKE ANGUS 
/f MIKEANGUS@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


or Toronto alt-folk band October- 
man, success has emerged from 
the scaled-back honesty and dark 
folk delivery of the group's stark 
soundscapes. As much as this unique 
formula has worked for the band, 
. frontman Marc Morrissette explains 
how the players chose to change the 
recording process in order to keep 
things interesting for their new re- 
cord, Fortresses. 

“We didn't want to record it the 
same way as the last one, where we're 
all doing it in chunks and then going 
back and sleeping in our own homes. 
I really wanted to capture the vibe of 
when you're on tour and you're excit- 


ed about music and that's all you're 
doing and all you're thinking about.” 

The five-piece band shacked up in 
Ottawa with Dave Draves for a crash 


still wanted to include what October- 
man is known for. 

"I still want to keep the other side 
of Octoberman alive, where it's more 


When you're recording to tape, it totally changes 
the way you respond to it. To fix the mistakes, you 
have to actually record over the last take, so you 
really need to make the decision, 'Is it worth fixing 
this mistake?' And nine times out of 10, we just 
said, ‘You know what? It sounds fine.’ 


course in recording live off the floor, 
putting everything to analogue tape 
and banging out eight songs in four 
days. This breakneck pace left little 
time for over-thinking song arrange- 
ments or ideas, though Morrissette 


austere sounding and acoustic based, 
so we then went down to Portland 
and worked with Larry Crane, who's 
worked with some amazing artists 
we're all fans of: Elliott Smith, Steven 
Malkmus, Cat Power. We didn't re- 


IN THE MOMENT >> Octoberman recorded Fortresses live to analogue tape and 
then added flourishes to the basic tracks //supplied 


Supporting Caste 2009 Tour S 
—_sr a 
with 4 
The Rebel Spell 
Passenger Action 
. | & DFA 


October 24th + October 25 t 
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Tickets at ticketworkshop.com, ~ 
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i 


/ BASIC WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 
44 // MAUSI 


SEP 23, 2009 


hearse those sessions very much, we 
wanted to keep it really spontaneous.” 


This overall insistence on on-the-spot 
creativity and unadulterated perfor- 
mances served an ultimate purpose, 
“Which is kinda nerve-racking," Mor- 
rissette admits before adding, "but at 
the same time, you're really captur- 
ing a performance rather than over- 
thinking it.” 

The goal was to extract an essential 
collection of songs where emotion 
and feel outweighed studio gloss and 
calculated perfection. The justifica- 
tion was the band's ability to trust its 
collective skill and judgment. 

"When you're recording to tape, it 
totally changes the way you respond 
to it. To fix the mistakes, you have to 
actually record over the last take, so 
you really need to make the decision, 


‘Is it worth fixing this mistake?’ A 
nine times out of 10, we just said, ‘You 
know what? It sounds fine." 

Whereas most artists would squirn 
at the thought of leaving blemish« 
on record, for Morrissette, it was a 
most the goal, inspired by some of hi 
favourite records. 

"When it's five people playing ina 
room, there's just something there 
you don’t wanna mess with too 
much. There's a vibe. I can hear a! 
the mistakes on there, but my fav 
rite records are ones I can hear m 
takes on. There's something exciti': 
about that.” W 


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SEP SEP 23, 2009 // WWEWEEKLY 


MUSIC // 45 


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SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY MUSIC // 47 


PREVUE // AMELIA CURRAN 


On the hunt 


Halifax-based songwriter tests her limits on new album 


DAVID BERRY 
/f DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


f Amelia Curran sounds a little 

worn out, she’s got good reason to 
be. Talking to her just before she ac- 
tually sets out on the road to promote 
her latest, Hunter, Hunter—this after a 
hefty summertime schedule that saw 
her jump from folk festival to folk 
festival—she's fresh off no less than 
three sold-out shows in her current 
home town of Halifax, and admits 
that summoning up the energy for 
that kind of crowd three nights in a 
row has sapped some of the energy 
from her. 

It. serves, for the time being, as a 
very nice little peak for the St. John's- 
born  singer-songwriter. Though 


she's rarely been lacking in acclaim 
and attentien since she first started 
busking on the streets of Newfound- 
land's capital—her first show was at 
the behest of a local stalwart, and her 


Records (home of other guitar-and-a- 
folky-tune types Luke Doucet, Justin 
Rutledge and Wendy McNeill, among 
others). Her first album for the label, 
War Brides, spread her name far be- 


You know, there was one two-month period where 
I thought, ‘All right, that's it, I'm tapped out. | 


have nothing; I'll never write a song again ... but 
it comes back. Life doesn't stand still, so there's 


always something. 


first few records earned her a col- 
lection of East Coast Music nomina- 
tions and awards—things have really 
started to take off for Curran since 
signing with Toronto-based singer- 
songwriter specialists Six Shooter 


yond the Atlantic coast she's haunted 
her entire life, and Curran has spent 
much ofthe last few years either tour- 
ing or holing up in St. John's working 
on Hunter, Hunter. 

Of course, with increased exposure 


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comes increased pressure: three full 
rooms in one relatively small town 
is an awful lot to expect of a woman 
more used to playing open mics than 
stadiums. For her part, though, Curran 
is taking her rising stature with grace, 
especially for a self-admitted home- 
body who tends to shun the spotlight. 

"You know, there was one two-month 
period where I thought, ‘All right, 
that's it, I'm tapped out. I have noth- 
ing; I'll never write a song again. The 
Six Shooter girls are going to be real- 
ly angry,” Curran says with a throaty 
laugh, one that definitely sounds as 
though her voice has been getting a 
workout of late. "But it comes back. 
Life doesn't stand still, so there's al- 
ways something. I've described [the 
last little while] as getting a promo- 
tion: it's the same job, it's just more 
of it, and it's more focused.” 


Curran has helped herself along in 
her stepped-up job by expanding her 
own horizons. Always a highly con- 
fessional, introspective songwriter, 
Hunter, Hunter sees her venturing 
more into storytelling mode, Curran 


dl 


Ir 


populating her music with a few m« 


battered souls besides her own. W)! 


ness something like “The Mistres 


number that takes the view of the o 
er woman, who can't be much hay 
than the woman being cheated on 
Curran says, trying on someone else 
life, even if only fora few minutes, h 
helped her deal with the whirlwind : 
the last few years. 
"You've got so much time in your 

mind when you're an artist, especia!! 
when we're on the road—and it's 


a cyclical journey: it's always 
and deeper," she explains. “Ther 
a few songs on Hunter, Hunter t! 
almost exercises in trying to tric 
self, make myself a bit lighter anc 
bit more cheeky, maybe more ¢g0"' 
tical—just creating a character, 10’ 
ever it is, and it can be a fun little (" 
to step out." W 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 


SEP 23, 2009 


an affecting little strummed 


eee neu ETsun nun gegg poner act resaeeonsgoea cgay ntenoeas AEE NMUAAASAN OUTLET 


PREVUE PREVUE // U UKE FEST 2009 


Save a ukulele 


Doug Hoyer does his part to elevate the instrument 


yoo el eT 


Hoyer isn’t one to shy away 
a challenge. Anyone who's 
seen him perform around town can 
attest to his self-deprecating wit and 
a knack for off-the-cuff humour in his 
wry, winsome pop tunes. So who bet- 
ter to launch a local campaign to res- 
cue the much-maligned ukulele from 
being a cruel punchline, or being eas- 
ily dismissed as meaningless kitsch? 
With an all-ukulele 2008 fundraiser 
raising just over $1000, Hoyer decided 
to take another kick at the can with 
Uke Fest 2009, featuring a stacked 
lineup featuring local and touring tal- 
ent showcasing the ukulele. 
“| started Uke Fest with [New City tal- 


ent buyer] Mark Hayes last year,” Hoy- 
er explains. "I'd met a Peterborough 
band called the Burning Hell on tour,” 
Hoyer explains. "They're a totally fun, 
awesome band that use the ukulele. 
Their singer, Mathias Kom, introduced 
me to an organization called Ukuleles 
for Peace. Basically they set up these 
classes and ensembles in Israel, and 
they bring Israeli and Palestinian chil- 
dren together, and teach them how 
to play the instrument and have con- 
certs. It's just a really grassroots way of 
promoting peace.” 


Initially introduced to the instru- 
ment on a Hawaiian family vacation 
Many years ago, it wasn't until Hoyer 
heard the distinctive tone through- 
out many of his favourite records that 


PLL on URE LOT LU AL LLUCOL ULL AO LLLLLEE LULL LLOLELUO ULL CUCL LCLOUEES OCLC CLLCOU OCLC CCLOEOecU CL LLLCOUCCLLEEEO OCLC 


PREVUE // SHILOH 


Competitive streak 


Shiloh bounces back to Edmonton 


BRYAN BIRTLES 
/{ BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


ne time Edmontonian Shiloh will 

be making a triumphant return to 
the city as Canada's newest pop-punk 
phenom, headlining a tour in support 
of her debut album, Picture Imperfect. 
And while she may have only lived in 
the City of Champions for a short pe- 
riod—seven months by her count—it 
is where she got her big break, by win- 
ning a singing contest put on by radio 
station 91.7 the Bounce. 

"It was three weeks after I moved to 
Edmonton and a few days before the 
competition I saw something in the 
newspaper sol thought, ‘Eh... mightas 
well do it because it’s good exposure,” 
she says. "I ended up winning it and 
went to Vancouver ... where I recorded 
some songs and met my managers.” 

It was not, however, her first time 
singing in front of people, or even 
singing competitively. Born in Ab- 
botsford, BC and growing up in 
Saskatchewan before moving to Ed- 
monton, Shiloh spent much of her 
formative years going from competi- 
tion to competition, relying on her 
mother to get her to the far-off places 
where they were being held. 

‘I've been doing competitions my 
whole life for singing,” she says. “I 
went down to the States, did a lot of 
country singing competitions. I trav- 
elled a lot when I was younger to do 
this, just me and my mom in the car 
for three days of travelling, do the 
competition and then go back home 
and a month later we'd go back down 
for the next round.” 


Unlike plenty of other singers who 
find the business of selling records 
to be taxing, Shiloh takes it all in 
stride. Not only is she enthused about 
‘ouring—insisting on sleeping on the 
bus even when there are hotel rooms 
booked—but she even likes making 
musi¢ videos, often the bane of other 


NEVER MIND THE BOLLOCKS >> 
Here's Shiloh // supplied 


artists’ existence. 

"Making the videos is kind of like a 
day off for me where I can just chill 
and sit down. People are running 
around all the time but I don't even 
notice them,” she says, going on to 
explain that she's been very involved 
with the visual aspects of her career. 
"If something is in the video that I 
don't agree with I'm like, ‘Oh that's 
not so cool.’ I have a lot of input into 
my videos, and I hada lot ofinput into 
my album as well. I spent a lot of time 
thinking about it. It was like thinking 
about a tattoo—it took a little while 
but I'm going to be living with it and 
I'm glad it’s the way that it is." W 

Se ee 


aon 


TOTO TTA LLL LOU LCLTCOT TET CUNT T TT 


he took the time to get reacquainted 
with the instrument. 

"I have this very distinctive memory 
of sitting in a tree in Hawaii in Grade 
8, watching the sun set over the ocean 
and picking out the bass line to ‘Pretty 
Fly for a White Guy’ by the Offspring 
on a ukulele,” laughs Hoyer. "I defi- 
nitely don’t view it as a joke anymore. 
I don't see it as kitschy at all—it has 
a really nice sound to it. Also, a while 
back I toured Germany with the Blaz- 
ing Violets, and after the tour I was 
kind of stuck overseas without an in- 
strument, so I started to go pretty cra- 
zy. So the next time I went travelling I 
brought a uke with me and you really 
appreciate how light and portable of 
an instrument it is.” 

Itshould serve him well again this fall, 


TTT TTT MOTO 


when Hoyer hits the road for a cross- 
country drive alongside localsongsmith 
Michael Rault, as the two.tour their way 
out to the Halifax Pop Explosion. 

"Michael Rault will actually be playing 
bass in my touring band, and my friend 
Kevin Guadett will be playing drums 
for me. It’s not my regular band, so it'll 
be interesting to see how different it 
might be. Kevin actually dropped out 
of college to do this tour, so hopefully I 
haven't ruined his life.” WV 

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WEEKLY 


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SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


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50 // Music 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - 


LBUM REVIEWS 


Corb Lund 
Losin' Lately Gambler 


(New West) 
kkk ik 


EDEN MUNRO 
// EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 
Us strums mark the opening 
of Corb Lund's Losin’ Lately Gam- 
bler, “Horse Doctor, Come Quick” ably 
continuing the songwriter’s trend to- 
wards equine topics, which once again 
emerge several times over the course 
of Lund's latest song cycle, though he's 
not expressly tied to the subject. There 
is much fertile ground for this cowboy, 
not all of it rooted far from city life; 
be it roads made of dirt or pavement, 
Lund is plenty adept at working up 
some captivating blues for the charac- 
ters who populate his soundscapes. 

Musically, “A Game in Town Like This” 
finds a comfortable groove, riding a 
wave of smoothness that might seem 
out of place coming from the more me- 
tallic Lund of yesteryear, but the long 
miles that have led the man from the 
smalls to the backroads of country mu- 
sic suit him well as he sings like a man 
more resolute than desperate: he may 
know that the cards are losers, but that 
doesn't mean the game is over. 

When Lund pauses for a little reflec- 
tion, the result is devastating on “Alber- 
ta Says Hello,” a brokenhearted tale that 
leaves plenty of space around Lund's 
languid acoustic strumming for Grant 
Siemens to wrangle a suitable counter- 


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SEP 23, 2009 


point on his slide, all but illustrating the : 


tears note by note in a sonic tapestry. 


There are a couple of pieces here that : 
are exactly the type of songs that Lund : 
can knock out with casual ease, and : 
the sort which tend to please barroom : 


crowds of any size. On record, though, 


they fall a little flat—not derailing the : 
recording, but certainly fragmenting it : 
a bit with the heavy cloud of the past : 
hanging overhead: "Talkin' Veterinar- : 
ian Blues" tips its hat to the venerable : 
talkin’ blues style, but here it lands a : 
shade close to Lund's own "Truck Got : 


Stuck,” but with slightly less effect, 


while "It's Hard to Keep a White Shirt : 
Clean" cuts closely to "Always Keep an : 


Edge on Your Knife.” 


It's on the backstretch of the record : 
where some of Losin’ Lately Gambler's : 
bestmomentsarefound,thoughthere’s : 
something about this round of songs : 
that seems a little less urgent then the : 
strongest cuts on his last album, Horse : 
Soldier! Horse Soldier!. Where Lund and : 


Bndefsk 


: baby darling doll face honey 
: (Universal) 
: kkk 


The hype sur 

ing England's 5 
of Skulls ma} 
lot of sens 
only does the 
apparently pur 
Smoking | live s 

: but when the band is turned o 
turned on all the way. Unfortu; 
Band of Skulls’ debut, baby darlin 
face honey, lacks consistency and 
tually peters out. Blasting out o; 
gate, the first two songs on the alby 
"Light of the Morning” and "Dea: 
Diamonds and Pearls"—sound like | 
: White invented a time machine ;; 
took him back to 1966 where he becam 
best friends with Eric Clapton and sta 
: edsinging for Cream. It stays pretty 
after that for a bit, but by the tim 
get to the end, the whole thing has <; 
ply ceased to grab you in the same \ 
and has lost the sense of urgency th 
the album jumps out with. 

BRYAN BIRTLES 

// BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


his band of Hurtin’ Albertans pushed : 
the walls with all their might on im- : 


mediate and intimidating, unclassifi- 


able tracks like “Student Visas” and “A ‘ 
Leader on Losing Control,” they now sit : 


back and lope comfortably, more than 
at home with the sound that they've 
carved out for themselves. 


The album doesn't quite step right : 
to the edge that Lund has looked : 
leapt— : 


down—and occasionally 
from before in his songwriting. Still, 


there's comfort in the absolute com- : 
mand that the group takes over the : 
Marty Robbins-channelling "Devil's : 
Best Dress” and the '70s country-rock ; 
of "Chinook Wind,” not to mention : 
the absolute perfection of the melan- : 
choly, never-say-die closer "This Is My : 
Prairie” (which is technically not the : 
closer, given the "bonus" live reading : 


of "Time to Switch to Whiskey”). Losin’ 
Lately Gambler is not a perfect work, 
but it wields its flaws with confidence, 


Lund and band never doubting their : 
path as they venture onward with a : 
pinch of caution—though, really, that : 
might just be the sound of them gath- : 


ering energy for the next charge. W 


10443a - 124 street 
780.732.1132 
www .listenrecords.net 


eskimo snow Lrico 


06. persistent reptition caretaker 
07. sft deceh 


08. plegsure is the headlight spiral joy band 
09. the visitor jim o’rourke 
10, king of jeans pissed jeans 


| EEE 
Porcupine Tree 

The Incident 

: (Roadrunner) 

i tokintsk 


I've got a pret 
high tolerance 
pretension: I used 
to go to perfor 
mance-art parties 
I once watched 
guy hump a broke 
TV to a soundtrack of a feedbacking 
guitar. It was a pretty good party, but a 
a certain point even I have to go 
"Naaaaah ... that's too much,” < 
that's how I feel with this one. It feels 
little mangled and ill thought out, |i! 

: someone inthe band really wanted it tc 
: be industrial and weird, and someor 

: else wanted it to sound like a space 
pop album, and now we're treated to 
this weird middle thing that doesn 
make much sense. 

BRYAN BIRTLES 

/{ BRYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Scotland Yard Gospel Choir 

... And the Horse You Rode in On 
(Bloodshot) 

kkk 


Drama queens 
joice: Elia, his dron 
¥ ing British accer 
and his never en‘ 
ing lineup of pley 
ers are back w 
: another albuin 
: of poppy, whiny, self-absorbed sons 
: about relationships, parents and bei! 
: plain depressed. The music, still ve 
: dancy and fun, juxtaposes with the s 
? loathing lyrics and allows the songs ‘ 
? come off somewhat happy. Compa" 
: sons to the Cure, the Smiths, and Pu! 
: canbe heard, and many of the hooks 3! 
} catchy, but the album may be best suit« 
: for those predisposed to cynicism. * 
: those who would prefer listening ‘© less 
: rambling and wallowing in ones ow” 
2 blah lyrical content, venture elsewhere 
: JUSTIN SHAW 

// (USTIN@ VUEWEEKLY.COM 


rae 


for redemption and 


ber and relenting guilt 


ing softly and firmly into 


imperial Blaze 

(Atlantic) 

aKa 
I left a kind of in- : 
dent in my com- : 
puter chair be- : 
cause I didn't : 
realize how muchI : 


pretend that much. 
JONATHAN BUSCH 
// }OMATHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


Phish 

Joy 

(EMP) 

2.9.0:0"4 
After wrapping upa : 
stellar summer tour : 


introduction to : 
| Phishv.3.0, the Ver- : 
mont foursome re- : 
lease their first stu- : 
dio offering since : 
2004's Undermind. Asalwayswithaband : 
: Concentration 


renowned for its live shows, the chal- 


lenge is to try to capture the energy ofa : 
Phish show in the studio. While nothing : 
matches the band live—and phans were : 


Been Around” was played only once, on 
the final night—Joy, produced by Billy 
Breathes' Steve Lillywhite, is a solid re- 
turn to the studio. The music on the al- 


bum suffers a bit from a lack of coher- : 
ence—jumbling together as disparate : 
styles as the jaunty “Backwards Down : 
the Number Line,” the standout bluesy : 
rock "Stealing Time From the Faulty : 
Plan," Mike's groovy “Sugar Shack," and: 
ig-minute prog-rock "Time Tums : 
Elastic"—but there is a definite lyrical : 
theme running through the album: a : 
mix of reflection on the tribulations that : 
brought the band back together and a : 
hopefuulness for the promise of the fu- 
ture, in this—in the final words on the : 
= Don't want to see how it’s made 
: Don't care what's inside 


album—Phish’s "second time around.” 
SCOTT HARRIS 
(| SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM 


: The Magnetic Fields 
: 69 Love Songs 

: (Merge) 

5 Baarelly released: 1999 


: In his foreword for the 2006 
: edition of David Foster Wallace's 
; Infinite Jest, Dave Eggers compares 
i : the appeal of the doorstop book 
with spirited, in- : 

cs and very few syn- : 
Many of the songs are : 
2 Songs: for Eggers, 
3 both are works of 
son. the band, offers honest ad- : and genius. It may 
> bea little bit of a 
i stretch to com- 
timistic, hope springs from : 


: of music, even 
: with a limited 
5 subject 
: with about TIOO 
> written pages in 
: terms of ambition, 
: buthe'sabsolutely ® 
: right on the genius 
: level Over the course of 69 songs aah 
= outon three CDs, Magnetic Fields' frontman 


was wiggling my : 
butt in my seat to : 
Sean Paul's fourth and latest disc. The : 
highlight is that he isn’t particularly -: 
distracted by electro trends, yet still : 
feels pretty current—a signthathe'sa : 
mature musician who doesn't have to : 


ALBUM REVIEWS 


to the Magnetic 
Fields’ 1999 mas- 
terpiece 69 Love 


excessive ambition 


pare three hours 


matter, 


sneering cynic to subdued romantic What 


survey of late-20th century pop music with 
some of the funniest and most touching 
love songs of the 1990s. 

This is certainly to some degree a parody 


deflates every clichéd gesture of love he : 


Dog Day 
(Outside) 


Not exactly new 
But it needs to be mentioned 
This dog is a champ 


————— 
Etienne Jaumet 

Night Music 

(Domino) 


Space synth relaxer 


For fans of Edgar Froese 
All seven of us 


Hudson Mohawke 
Butter 
(Warp) 


Delicious sausage 


S 


can think of)—there's a moment 
of very real, and often painful, 
sincerity. 

Merritt is certainly at his fun- 
niest when he's at his most 
sardonic, however. "Yeah! Oh 
Yeah!" isa brilliant little call-and- 
response where the eponymous 
airy refrain serves to drive home the 
slow deterioration 
of a relationship, 
ie. "What a dark 
and dreary life / 
Are you reach- 
ing for a knife? / 
Could you really 
kill your wife? / 
Yeah! Oh yeah!" 
The first album's "| 
Don't Want to Get 
Over You" is a se- 
ries of excessively 
downer options 
Merritt could do 
to get over his lost 
= love, and his emo- 
' tionless baritone 


: gives lines like "| could make a career of 
: i being blue /! could dress in black and read 
: Stephen Merritt parodies everything from : 
: Irving Berlin to punk rock to Fleetwood Mac : 
and also manages to run the gamut from : 


Camus / Smoke clove cigarettes and drink 
vermouth’ a stingingly dry cleverness. 
Still, it's when he drops the sneer that 


; 69 Love Songs really shines. "The Book of 
could have been an easy gimmickisinsteada : 


Love" is a great example, Merritt's slightly 


: snarky verses bookended by a sincerely 
+ romantic admission that his love can basi- 
: cally do anything and he'll still be around. 
? "Love is Like a Bottle of Gin’ draws out 
album—Merritt has said that these are : 
really much more about love songs than : 
love itself, which fits with the Magnetic : 
Fields' frequently meta MO—but to take : 
it solely, or even primarily, as such is to cut : 
> off a lot of its power. Merritt takes some : 
; shit for being disingenuous and cynical, : 
: and that's certainly in his arsenal, if not : 
_: his preferred tactic, but passing him off as : 
= just that is to fail to recognize that cyni- : 
= cism almost always comes from someone : 
: disappointed with things, for which sincere : 
: appreciation is a necessary precondition. : 
: For every bit of sneering piss-taking— : 
= both thematic (‘World Love," a world mu- 


the titular simile to the somber and sur- 
prisingly wrenching conclusion that the 
comparison only works one way, and "The 
Death of Ferdinand de Saussure" involves 
the murder of the composer, but also the 
recognition that love is both incompre- 
hensible and essential. 

The album's best moment, though, Is 
maybe it's most sincere. The electro-pop 
"Long-Forgotten Fairytale,” something of 
a template for the later hit "| Thought You 
Were My Boyfriend," is a melancholy, if 
not occasionally bitter, encounter with an 
ex, Merritt's overwhelming desire used 


: and abused by a lover who's walked out 
= sic parody that isn't exactly spot on but is : 
intellectually right on the mark) and lyric : 
("How Fucking Romantic," where Merritt 


before. It's a stunning ode to how simulta- 
neously powerful and stupid Love can be, 
which works as a description of the entire 
brilliant album as a whole, too. W 


(Ninjatune) 


Giant tease EP 
Like a night with Dave Berry 


: It's over too fast 


oo 
: Crazy Frog 

: Everybody Dance Now 

: (M1 Recordings) 


: The perfect soundtrack 
: Cruisin’ Whyte in the Lancer, 
: Applying bronzer 


——————— 
: Jason Greeley 

: Jason Greeley 

: (Royalty) 


i Guy has what It takes 


: Huge choruses, black wardrobe, 
: Songs about "The Mall” 


EP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 // WUIEWEEKLY 


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ARIES (Mar 21 — Apr 19) 
To the thug who stole my Chevy Malibu : 
from its parking place while | was record- 
ing an album in San Francisco back in : 
"91: | forgive you. To the lovely : 
and talented Artemisia, who 
couldn't bring herself to fall in 
love with me as we partied at 
the Burning Man festival back 
in 2001: | forgive you. To the 
agent who helped my writing 
career so much but also cheated 
me out of thousands of dollars: | 
forgive you. To any Aries readers who 
hate it when | refer to my personal life in : 
their horoscopes, and would much rather : 
| confine myself to talking about them: 
forgive you, and recommend that you : 
engage in a more thorough and profound j 
version of the cleansing | just illustrated. 


TAURUS (Apr 20 — May 20) 
The old saying “You can't have your cake : 
and eat it too” suggests that maybe it's 5 
not a good idea to go out on dates with : 
a variety of lovers while you're engaged : 
to be married. Nostradamus scholar John : 
Hogue has taken the spirit of this idea : 
and.created a-variation that | think ap- ; 
plies to you right now, Taurus. "Youcan't : 
have your past and your-future, too," he : 
says. In other words, you cannot fully : 
embrace the exciting and daunting possi- 
bilities that loom ahead of you if you also : 
insist on immersing yourself in the plea- : 
ures of the past. You can either have the : 
old ways or the new ways, but not both. 


GEMINI (May 21 — Jun 20) 
According to my astrological analysis, you : 
currently have a certain resemblance to : 
a vacuum cleaner or a hungry baby or a : 


52 // BACK 


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CANCER (Jun 21 — Jul 22) 


: These days, your gods can kick the butts d 
: of everyone else's gods. Likewise, your : 
: lawyers and agents and sidekicks can most ; 
likely outwit, outdo and out-wrestle ev- : 
eryone else's. But it's crucial to note that if : 
you try to work alone, you will not be able : 
to kick other people's butts, let alone the : 
butts of their gods, lawyers, agents, and : 
sidekicks. The skills of your allies will be : 
indispensable. The way | see it, your test : 
in the coming days will be to overcome : 
any tendency you might have to indulge : 
in pathological levels of self-sufficiency as : 


: you cultivate a greater capacity to ask for : 
: the greatest pain is the pain of a new idea.” 


5 The corollary to King's pronouncement is 
> that changes are less likely to be painful if : 


and receive help. 


: LEO (Jul 23 — Aug 22) : 
> "We're all mutants,” read the headline of : 
: a report on the latest genetic research. : 
> It turns out ‘that like everyone else, you : 
: have between 100 and 200 mutations in : 
your DNA—absolutely new characteristics : 
that were not passed down to you by your : 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP | 


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: Clef du Vin say that by using their simple : 
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: matic development of the wine's flavour ; SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 - Dec 21) 

: If I'm reading the astrological omens cor- 
rectly, you're now ensconced inasmooth : 
groove and not even close to being stuck : 


Global 


EDMONTON” 


parents. To gather the evidence for this : 
revelation, scientists had to sort through : 
huge amounts of data; there are thousands 
of genes but only a few mutations. A Chi- 
nese scientist who was a member of the 
research team said that “finding this tiny : 
number of mutations was more difficult 
than finding an ant's egg in an emperor's 
rice store." | predict that you will soon have 
a comparable experience, Leo: from an : 
overwhelming array of choices, you'll be : 
able to locate the rare catalysts you need. 


EARTH FRIENDLY PRODUCTS % WHOLISTIC HEALTH DISPLAY 


WALK, TAKE THE BUS, OR RIDE YOUR BIKE (Free Bike Lock up in Adventure Park 
Courtesy of Edmonton Bicycle Commuters) 


ve ee ny 


i acm ck, qa WUEWEEKLY Gre Fotifdation 


HOROSCOPE 


: min-black hole. Every time I've turned my : 
meditations to the Gemini tribe, ve been : 
: hearing a psychic version of a giant suck- : 
ing sound. What does it all mean? | sense : 
that you're especially voracious : 
right now, almost insatiable—as : 
if you're inclined to engorge and : 
absorb any old thing that you : 
happen to find in front of you. : 
Are my speculations true? If : 
so, | hope and pray that all the : 
things you're finding in front of : 


edmonton 
arts council 


courage and tough-mindedness. 


: SCORPIO (Oct 23 — Nov 21) 
: Studies show that many people believe 
: their attendance at a sports event impacts 


the outcome of the game. They are obvi- 


: ously suffering from a ridiculous delusion, 
: right? Theyre enthralled by the kind of 
: magical thinking that our primitive ances- : 
tors engaged in, right? Normally I'd say yes, : 


but not right now, not for you Scorpios. 


: For a limited time only, your presence at : 


: events where people congregate may exert 


VIRGO (Aug 23 — Sep 22) 
There's a device on the market that claims 
to age wine very quickly. The makers of : 


and soften its structure." So dramatic is 
the supposed effect that “one second : 
of the device in the wine is equal to one : 
year's age." | believe that you now have the : 
metaphorical equivalent of this marvel, 
Virgo. This temporary talent won't work 
on wine, but it could perform wonders 
with other processes that would benefit : 
from having their evolution expedited. 


LIBRA (Sep 23 — Oct 22) 

"The soft-minded person always fears 
change,” said one of my favourite trans- 
formers,, Martin Luther King Jr. "For him,. : 


you're not afraid of them. According tomy : 
astrological analysis, Libra, none of that 
stuff will be an issue for you in the coming 
weeks. As you slip into a phase of riotous 
growth, | expect you will have abundant 
accéss to previously dormant reserves of : 


2009 


; an uncanny influence far beyond the power 
: of logic to explain. Your opinions will carry 
more weight than usual, and your power to -: 


shape group dynamics will be at a peak. 


in a cluttered rut. You're making the right 


: moves for the best reasons, and never 
: trying to get ahead at the expense of 
: others. During a grace period like this, : 


| think you'd be wise to convene what | 


: call a problem team. A problem team is 
: a posse of smart allies whose task it is : 
: to dream up every possible glitch that 
: could threaten te undermine your ef- 
: forts in the coming weeks. They lead you 


through dry runs that test your reflexes 


; and prime your resourcefulness, thereby 
: making those glitches unlikely to occur. 


CAPRICORN (Dec 22 — Jan 19) 


: While I'm pretty much a genius when it 
* comes to the meaning of Kurt Cobain's 
> Lyrics, the art of cooking perfect scram- 
: bled eggs and the secrets of beinga good : 
: listener, I'm an absolute idiot about how : 


Z 7 104.9 fm 
: 


ID 


SUN ETS 
Megs: 


: a car engine works, how to make money 
: on eBay and how to craft a foreign policy 
: that would deal effectively with Pakistan 
: What about you, Capricorn? What are 
: dumb about? This is an excellent time 
: to cure your ignorance about any sub 

: ject that will be important for you to be 
: smarter about in the future. 


: AQUARIUS (Jan 20 - Feb 18) 

: The following projects would be excellent 
ways for you to spend your time in the 
= coming weeks; 1) Attend a fantasy camp 
:. where you Learn rodeo tricks. (They might 
: come in handy during committee meet 
ings and collaborative efforts in the ne»! 
: six months.) 2) Teach a worthy candidat 
: the intricacies of licking your nuzzle spot 

: (It no longer makes sense to expect pe: 
: ple to read your mind). 3) Scratch an itch 
that has been subliminally bugging you 
(Unless of course you find some value 
: in being subliminally bugged.) 4) Solicit 
: lively information from a devil's advocate 
? a sexy mother and a world traveller. (You 
need exposure to people whose perspec 
: tives will pry open a couple of the closec 
: areas of your mind). 


: PISCES (Feb 19 - Mar 20) 

: Your quest has come to a fork, Pisces 

: Down one path lies a tumultuous 00 
? session—a compulsive, tormented hunt 
: like Captain Ahab's pursuit of Moby 
: Dick. In the other direction, a graceful 
: chase beckons, more in the manner of 
: Sir Galahad's pure-hearted search for 
: the Holy Grail” Choose one fork and 
: your quarry will be beastly, impossible 
: and frustrating. If you choose the other 
: fork, your quarry will be magical, earthy, 
and transformative. W 


‘Singles dance « Sat, Sep 19, 
(guest)/free West Coast Swing 


HEORGE LITTLECHILD i 
+ Artist, author and illustrator will discuss his work « Wed, 


_ Sep 23, 7-8:30pm « Free, Pre-register at 780.459.2682 


PASSIONATE LIVING - Gameau/Ashbourne Assisted Living 
Place, 1148-84 Ave « Home Blends music, drama, creativity 
and reflection on sacred texts to energise you for passionate 


‘living + Every Sun 3-spm 
HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN ALBERTA? « Corbett Hall, U 


‘A campus - The Edmonton Soroptimist Club presents 
alive video conference feed of Victor Malarek « Sio at 
780.439-7333/780.963.1155 » Sep 26, 8pm. 

(CLOSEST ANIMAL RELATIVES - Jubilee Auditorium « 
Presentation by Dr. Jane Goodall; followed by a book signing 
+ Sun, Sep 27, 6:30pm « Tickets at TicketMaster; proceeds 
support the Emergency Unit and Quarantine Facility for 
orphaned mountain gorillas in Rumangabo, DRC 

CENTRE FOR CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES Law Centre, 
Ren 32/237, U of A « lawuualberta.ca/centres/ocs « Lecture by 
Professor Constance Backhouse, who will examine the ways 
in which female sexuality was has been negotiated in the 
workplace, the plight of lesbians in the workplace, and the 
role of the state in enforcing fernale heterosexual conformity 
through criminal law «Thu, Sep 17, spm 

MINI MEDICAL SCHOOL - Bernard Snell Hall, U of A 
Hospital, 8440-112 St « Six evenings of lectures, with topics 
‘ranging from viruses to aging, are designed forthe public to 
learn more about the world of medicine and science from 
doctors and researchers at the U of A «Tue, Sep 22-Oct 27, 
7-9pm « Register at cpLualberta.ca/Home/Events/mini.cim 
THE NEW ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA - Winspear Centre, 
4 Sir Winston Churchill Sq «Randall Stout, lead architect 
on the renovation of the AGA will discuss the architectural 
philosophy behind the new gallery « Sat, Sep 19, 2pm = $10 
THE QUANTUM ACTIVIST - Unity Church of Edmonton, 
Westmount Presbyterian Church, 13820-109A Ave + 
780.913.6466 « Showing of a film challenges us to rethink 
our ideas of existence and reality « Fri, Sep 25, 7pm; Sun, Oct 
4, 6pm + $10 

RAISING SPACES ECO RENO DEMO DAYS « Eco Ammo 
Headquarters, 10436-81 Ave, 780.965.5954 » Eco friendly 
products for your home and renovations projects * Sat, Sep 
12, 12-430pm, 

REPORT FROM PALESTINE - BUS 1-5, Business Bldg, U 
of A= Libby Davies and Kim Elliott stories and photos from. 
their Aug 2009 delegation to the West Bank and Gaza in 
occupied Palestine « Pri, Sep 28,7-gpm » Free 

SOUTH EDMONTON BUSINESS ASSOCIATION (SEBA) 
+ The Fouf Points Sheraton « 7230 Argyll Rd « 780.436.7410 = 
‘sebaonline.ca - Business networking event with a presenta- 
tion by Ron Gilbertson about Edmonton's current economy, 
opportunities, threats and challenges « Sep 23, 7am « $25 
(SEBA member)/$35 (non-member) 


‘SYMPHONY 101-ES0 - Stanley Milner Library + 
For those who wish to enhance their 

‘experience Hosted by D:T. Baker « Sat, Sep 19, 1pm + Free, 
pre-registration required at 780.496.7030 


CKUA Celebrates Arts Days! 


September 18th 
12pm to 3pm 


Royal Alberta Museum 
12845-102nd Avenue 


‘rv Market « Silent vigil the ast and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each 
month, stand in silence for a world without violence 
WORKING THROUGH INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT « 
Lois Hole Library, s7650-69 Ave «mrje-ca + Mediation and Re- 
storative Justice Centre + Sep 19, :30-4:30pm + Pre-register at 
stylematters eventbritecom; 


Heather at 780.423.0896 ext 201 


AZIMUTH THEATRE « 11315-105 Ave « A Close Encounter 
with James Jordan: Vaudevilleian Magic show + Sep 17-20, 
Spm; Sep 19-20, 6pm « $12 at fuxryhair-net, S15 (door) 
CENTURY CASINO « 13103 Fort Rd - 780.481.9857 « Shows 
start at 8pm Thu-Sat and late show at x030pm on Fri-Sat; 
‘Sia (Thu)/$u9 (Pri/Sat) + Lan Sirota; sep 17-19 + Terry Clement 
Sep 24-26 

COMEDY FACTORY « Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 
Ave, Calgary Trail + Thu, 8:30pm; Sat, Spm and opm + Daryl 
Rhoades; Sep 18-19 « Olivia Allen Arlington; Sep 24-26 » So 
You think You're Funny: competition for Comedy Factory's 
ninth Birthday; Every Thu in Sep 

COMIC STRIP « Bourbon St, WEM « 780.483.9999 « Wed-Fri, 
Sun Spm; Fri-Sat 1930pm + Finesse Mitchell; Sep 17, 20, 
‘Spm; Sep 28-19, 8pm, 10:30pm + Trailer Trash Tuesday's; 

Sep 21, 8pm + Jamie Kaler; Sep 23-24, 27, 8pm; Sep 25-26, 
‘Spm, 1o30pm + Hit or Miss Monday's; Sep 28, 8pm + Daniel 
Kinno; Sep 30, Spm 

DRUID + 11606 Jasper Ave » 780.710.2119 + Comedy Night: 
Hosted by Lars Callieou + Every Sun, 9pm. 
HYDEAWAY~ALL AGES ART SPACE + 10209-100 Ave + 
Comedy Variety Show with guest host Matt Alaeddine + Tue, 
Sep 22, 830pm (door), gpm (show) 

LAUGH SHOP-Whyte « and Fl, 10368-82 Ave «780.476.1010 
+ thelaughshop.ca « Andrew Grose; until Sep 20 « Tim Koslo; 
Sep 22-27 

MYER HOROWITZ THEATRE « Students’ Union Building, 
8900-114 St, U of A Jon Lajoie » Wed, Sep a3, 7:30pm «$5 
at TicketMaster ; 

RIVER CREE + The Venue « Brent Butt « Sat, Sep 19, 8pm. 
WINSPEAR CENTRE - Sir Winston Churchill Sq + 
780.428.1414 + Gerry Dee + Thu, Sep 17, 8pm « $44 and $36.75 at 
Winspear box office 

YARDBIRD SUITE « 11 Tommy Banks Way « CBC, The Irrl- 
‘evant Show * Sun, Sep 27, 7-30pm « Sis at TIX on the Square 


AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK-Red Deer « Sunnybrook United 
Church, Red Deer + 403.347.6073 « Affirm welcome LGBTQ 
people and their friends, family, and allies meet the and Tue, 
7pm, each month 

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP « A social group 
for bi-curious and bisexual women every and Tue of the 
month, 8pm + groupsyahoo.com/group/bwedmonton 
BOOTS BAR AND LOUNGE 10242-106 St « 780.423.5014 

+ bootsbar.ca « and Thu: Illusions Social Club « 3rd Wed: 
Edmonton © Society « and Tue: Edmonton Rainbow Busi- 
ness Association « Every Pri: Philosophy Café « Pri and Sat 
Dj SeXXXy Sean 10-3 » Long Weekend Sundays feature the 
Stardust Lounge with Miss Bianca and Vanity Fair 
BUDDYS NITE CLUB « 117258 Jasper Ave + 780.488.7736 « DJ 
Dust 'n' Time; Mon gpm « DJ Arrow Chaser, Tue gpm + DJ 
Dust 'n' Time; Wed gpm, no cover before 10pm + DJ Arrow 
Chaser; Pri 8pm, no cover before 10pm + DJ Earth Shiver 'n’ 
Quake; Sat 8pm, no cover before 1opm « DJ Bobby Beatz; 
Sun gpm + Drag Queen Performance Show, Sun, no cover 
before 1opm. 

EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) - Unitarian Church 
of Edmonton, 10804-119 St+ A group of older gay men who 
have common interests meet the and Sun, 2:30pm, for a 
social period, short meeting and guest speaker, discussion 
panel or potluck supper. Special interest groups meet for 
other social activities throughout the month. E: edmon- 
tonpt@yahoo.ca « primetimersww.org/edmonton 


GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION « teamedmonton. 
<a Worrien's Drop-In Recreational Badminton. Of 
School Gym, 10227-118 St 780.455 3620; Wed, 6-7: 
+ Bootcamp; Lynnwood Elementary School at 1541-84 Ave; 
Mon, 7-Saspm; bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca - Bow!- 
ing: Gateway Lanes, 100, 2414 Gateway Blvd; Sat, ¢-7pm: 
bowling@teamedmonton.ca + ‘Curling: Mon, 725-92spm), 
Granite Seley leon Sun, Tue, Thu; 
running@teamedmonton.ca « Swi > NAIT niy6a- 
106 St; Tue, 8-9pm, Thu, 7-30-8:3opm; swimmin, es, 
monton.ca + Volleyball: Tue Recreational: Mother Teresa 
Elementary School at 9008-105, 8-10pm; Thu intermediate: 
Amiskiwaciy Academy, 101 Airport Rd, 8-1opm; recvol- 
leyball@teamedmonton.ca; volleyball @teamedmanton.ca 
«YOGA (Hatha): Free Yoga every Sun, a-3:30pm; Korezone 
Fitness, 203, 10575-115 St, yoga@teamedmonton.ca 
ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB: CROSSDRESSERS « 
780.387.3343 » meet monthly + For info go to groupsyahoo. 
‘com/group/edmonton_illusions/ 

INSIDE/OUT « U of A Campus « Campus-based organization 
for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer (LGBTQ) 
faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and sup 
port staff - 3rd ‘Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers 
Series. Contact Kris (kwells@ualberta.ca) 

LIVING POSITIVE « 404. 10408-124 St» edmiivingpositive 
a+ 877.975. 9448/780.488.5768 « Providing confidential peer 
Support to people living with HIV «Tue, 7-9pm: Suppart 
group « Daily drop-in, peer counselling 

MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION Faculté St Jean, 

Rim 3-18, 780.490.7332 « Program for HIV-AID'S prevention, 
treatment and harm reduction in Prench, English and other 
African languages « yrd and qth Sat, gam-spm each month « 
Free (member)Sio (membership) « Pre-register 

MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB « geocities.com 
makingwaves_ecim + Recreational/competitive swimming, 
Socializing after practices + Every Tue, Thu 

MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH - Holding monthly 
coffee shop group for gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans-identified, 
and straight friends « qth Sun in Sep and Oct, 22:30pm at the 
Starbucks on Jasper Ave and 101 St 


PLAY NIGHTCLUB « 1022010 St « playnightclubca » Open 
‘Thy, Fri, Sat with DJs Alexx Brown and Eddie Toonflash 
PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON - 9s40-111 Ave « 
780.488.3234 « pridecentreafedmonton.org + Open Tue-Pri 
1-1opm, Sat 2-6:3opm + LGBT Seniors Drop-in: Every Tue/ 
‘Thu, a-qpm + CA: Thu (7pm) « Suit Up and Show Up: AA big 
book study group every Sat, noon « Youth Understanding 
Youth: Up to as yeas, support and social group every Sat, 
7-9pm; yuy@shaw.ca » Womonspace: Board meeting ist Sun 
every month, 10:30am-1a-yopm + Trans Education/Support 
Group: Meet the ist and 3rd Sun, 2-4pm, every month; al. 
bertatransorg + Men Talking with Pride: Sun 7pm; facilitator: 
Rob Wells robwells72o@hotmail.com » HIV Suppart Group: 
and Mon every month, 7pm + Transgender, Transsexual, 
Intersex and Questioning (TT1Q) Alliance: Support meeting 
and Tue every month, 7-30pm + Transgender, Transsexual, In- 
tersex and Questioning Education, advocacy and support for 
men, women and youth « Free short-term, solution-focused 
drop-in counseling; Wed, 7-10pm + YouthSpace: drop-in for 
LGBTQ for youth up to a5; Tue-Sat, j-7pm. 

PRISM BAR « 10524-101 St «780.990.0038 » Wed: Free Pool: 
Karaoke, 9pm-midnight «Thu: Prism Pool League; 7-1a:3opm. 
+ Pri: Steak Nites; 5-gpm; DJ at 9:30pm 
ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH « 10209-123 St 

+ 780.482.1587 + Soul OUTing; an LGBT: focused alternative 
worship « and Sun every month, 7pm; worship Sun, 10-30am; 
people of all sexual orientations welcome. LGBT monthly 
book club and film night. & jravenscroft@rwucorg: 

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH « 1526-76 Ave «780.436.1555 

« People of all sexual orientations are welcome « Every Sun 
(toam worship) 

WOMONSPACE - 786.482.1794 » womonspace.ca, womon: 
space@gmailoom +A Non-profit lesbian social organization 
for Edmonton and surrounding area, Monthly activities, 
newaletter, reduced rates included with membership. 
Confidentiality assured 

'WOODYS - 11723 Jasper Ave «780.488.6557 « Karaoke with 
Nathan; Mon 8pm + Martini Mondays; 3pm + You Don't 
Know Game Show with Patrick and Nathan; Thu gpm + 
Long Island Iced Tea; Thu 3pm « Karaoke with Morgan; Wed 


Join Monica Miller, for a special, How! Hear It, in 


Special Guests: 


celebration of Alberta Arts Days. 


+ Karla Anderson performing from her new CD Brand New Day 
m2 + U22 sensation Lindsay Ell 


« Edmonton's first poet laureate, Alice Major 
« local indie latin/experiemental band Aroot’s Bazaar 


— Ckud 


radionetwork 


SEP 17 — SEP 23, 2009 // WUEWEEKLY 


Come on down, tune in to 94.9 FM or listen online at ckua.com. 


AlbertaArtsDays 
Sept 18-20 AibertaArtsDays.ca 


Discover Experience Celebrate 


7pm» Karaoke with Kevin; Sun 8pm 
YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH - yuyedm.ca + Meets 


very Sat, 7-gpm + Contact Scott for info email: info@ 
yuyedm.ca,T: 780.248.1911 


SS ee 
SPECIAL EVENTS 


BRIDGES OF HOPE-Leduc - Maclab Centre, 4308-50 St « 
bridgesofhope.ca + International Network of Development 
Agencies presents cultural music featuring West African > 
music, and dance from the ancient Manding Empire 
with Noumoufassa and members of Manding Jata « 
Thu, Sep 24, 730pm «Tickets at Leduc Recreation Centre 
780.980.720, TIX on the Square; proceeds to Bridges of 
Hope's programs in Africa 
CANINES AND COCKTAILS - Palace Banquet and Con- 
ference Facility, 3223 Parsons Rd « scarscare.org « I's Magic 
silent and live auction; fundraiser for Second Chance 
Animal Rescue Society (SCARS) + Sep 18, 6pm « $35 (ine) 
buffet dinner) available at Tail Blazers and online 
CELEBRITY AUCTION - Fairmont Hotel Macdonald 
+ Edmonton Meals on Wheels fundraiser. high profile 
Edmontonians will be auctioned off - Sep yopm «$50 
(inel dessert buffet and bid card) at 780.42 rn) 


EDMONTON EARTH DAY EVENT - Macintyre Park 

beside the Old Strathcona Farmers Market, 82 Ave, 104 St; 8 
Adventure Park, behind the Knox Church, 85 Ave, 104 St» 

Harvest celebration with entertainment and environmen: 

tal advocacy and exhibits and demonstrations « Sat, Sep 

19, 12-6pm « Info: 786.460.4756, E: edmontonearthday@ | 
shaw.ca | 
EVERYONE FOR EDMONTON SHOWCASE . Shaw 

Conference Centre + everyoneforedmonton.com + 

Fidmonton's non-profit organizations show the service 

they offer and the volunteer opportunities available « Sep 

20, nam-4pm « Free 

THE GREAT POTATO GIVE AWAY « Norbest Farms, | 
Northeast Edmonton, Manning Freeway N; Rt on 195 Ave 
+ 780.485.1089 « Sat, Sep 26, gam-gpm + Free 

HARVEST FESTIVAL « Grain Elevator Grounds, Spruce 
Grove + 780.060.4600 + Corn roast, carnival and silent 
auction « Sep 26 


JAMBHALA « Westin Hotel, Devonian Rm « pahsedu. 

hp + An evening of music, poetry and dance supporting 

the Patan Academy of Health Sciences « Sep 19, 730pm 

+ $60 (entire event) at tixonthesquare.ca; Sas (Lopm until 

event ends) > 


KALEIDO FAMILY ARTS FESTIVAL « 118 Ave between 
91-94 St « artsontheave.org « Music, dance, theatre, film, 
literary and visual arts on Alberta Ave « Sep 25-27 | 
RHYTHMS OF OUR OWN-DRUM FESTIVAL - Catalyst | 
‘Theatre, 8529 Gateway Boulevard « aipsdrumsshaw- 
webspace-ca +A celebration of percussion music, featuring 
percussion and dance ensembles and performers « Sep 

19; workshops (gam), drum cireles (a-7pm); perfor- 
imances at apm; Performance/drum circle; Sas (adult AIPS 
member)/$jo (adult non-member), $15 (senior/student/ 
youth AIPS member)/Sao (non-member) 


ST ALBERT CELEBRATES THE ARTS FESTIVAL « Vari- 
ous venues through St Albert « celebratethearts.ca « Sep 
18-19 « Mayor's Celebration of the Arts Gala: $40 


STANLEY CARROLL'S PROFESSIONAL WAKE - 
Einpress Ale House « It's a wrap! « Thu, Sep a7, 7pm Thu, 
Sep x7, 7pm 

TIMERAISER « TransAlta Arts Barns + Using volunteer 
hours as currency rather than dollars, this is the only 
Edmonton event connecting people and causes with art« 
Sat, Oct 17 «Tickets attimeraiser.ca 


ZACHAROVANA NICH: AN ENCHANTED EVENING - St 
John’s Cultural Gentre, 1611-110 Ave « Silent auction and — sr 
gala presented by the Alberta Council for the Ukrainian 
Arts Entertainment by Euphoria, Darcia Parada, Lilia 
Krieger (Mercury Opera), Atomic Improv, Charlie Sakuma 
(Bandura), and Dniprovi Khvyli « Sat, Sep 26, 7pm + 
$35/830 (member) at 780.488.8558 

A WORLD OF ROCKS, FOSSILS AND GEMS « Elmwood 
Community Hall, 16415-83 Ave « Displays, demonstrations 
by Lapidary artists « Fri, Sep 25, 1-9pm; Sat, Sep 26, gam-6- 
ppm « $4 (adult)/$3 (senior/student)/free (child under 12) 


Mbertos 


Preetons To Create Sprit To Aahaere 


“ip 


BACK //53 


Dr 


=® It was 1987, and Debra Jakubec was work- : grounding support for Tolin. He got sick : tina Friday morning at the offices of i 


\ : : HIV Edmonton, and Jakubec, the executive = 
of one of her co-workers died of AIDS. The : from there quickly passed. Tolif’s hospice } director, and LaBriola, the fund dikepan : 
: coordinator, are gathered around a com- 
Sitting around with her theatre : puter screen, going over last-minute de- 
friends over beers at a gathering : 


Ow 


ww 


a 


and didn't know her co-worker all 


LGBT >> MALE PRIVI 


Learning to share 


ing in a restaurant kitchen when the father : in 2001, was admitted to a hospice and 


family wouldn't help clean out his apart- 
ment after he died because they 
were afraid of AIDS. Jakubec 
befriended. her co-worker as 
a way to support her, seeing 
as no one at work was talking 
with her about her father’s 
death. Although Jakubec had 
never met her co-worker’s dad 


that well, she helped clean up the dead 


man's apartment. This was her first experi- : 


ence in dealing with HIV/AIDS. 


Around 10 years later, Joyce LaBriola : 
was enrolled in a small theatre school : 


in New Jersey, where she made a great 


group of friends, including James To- : 
lin. While they were attending school : 
together Tolin was diagnosed as living : 


with HIV and LaBriola was able to be a 


ER 


bill almost bankrupted his parents. 


after James's funeral, reunited al- 
most 10 years after graduation, 
they brainstormed on what they 
could do to honour Tolin’s life 
and support his parents. The idea 


fo}! 


nections they pulled together a silent auc- 


members decided that they would make it 


: an annual event, and seven years later are 
still at it. Now living in Edmonton LaBriola : movement is symbolic of a larger issue : 
helps out with what is now called the James : 
Tolin Memorial Fund, and she is planning a : 


: satellite event in Edmonton this spring. 


tails of the upcoming AIDS Walk for Life. 
Through their history and their current 


work Jakubec and LaBriola represent the : 
under-acknowledged work of women who : 
; have been caregivers, fighters, advocates = 
: and, perhaps hardest of all, the survivors : 
came to hold a fundraising event. : 
Donating their time, skills and con- : 


within the AIDS movement. 
While there is no doubt that in the 


: face of AIDS gay men fought back, 
tion and a theatrical production of Jeffery, : 
: raising $75 OOO to donate to the hospice. 
Exhausted but exhilarated, the group- : the struggle were women. This lack of : 
: acknowledgement from gay men about : 


: the work of women within the HIV/AIDS : 


: worked hard and saved lives, what is 
: often forgotten is that beside them in 


with the gay community: the inability for 
gay men to share and acknowledge their 


; power specifically with "groups" such as 


: women who were so instrumental in the 
: support of gay men when they needed 
: it the most. 


= dous strides towards equality in recent 
: times. The experience of a gay, white, mid- 


: dle-class man bears no significant differ- : 
: ence in terms of privilege compared to a : 
: straight, white, middle-class man. Pair two : 


: men together, as happens in a gay relation- 
: ship, and they arguably have more acces- 
sible privilege than a heterosexual couple, 
and seemingly infinitely more possible 
: power than a lesbian couple, a mixed-race 
; couple or any pairing of a visible-minority 


: couple, Gay men have a larger amount of : 
: social, economic and political power than : 
> they ever had before. Because of this, and : 
? to celebrate it, gay men should consider : 
how they can give back within gay com- : 


: munities and throughout society. 


ing their privilege is continued heterosex- 
ism and homophobia, but what we forget 


CLASSIFIEDS 


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www.maxtrax4u.com/kenneths 


Learn to voice cartoons, commercials, gaming, TV 
shows, web design, comedic scripts, dj work, and 
more. Fall workshops—Voice Over Training 
780.756.4435 
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FILM AND TV ACTING 
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Affordable picture frame options. 
8126 Gateway Blvd. 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL, TEACH 
ENGLISH: We train you to teach. 1000's of jobs 
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Call for info pack 1.888.270.2941 


The Cutting Room is looking for 
Assistants and Stylists 
Please drop off your resume at 
10536 -124 Street 


Selling old Stainer violin; nice tone, label reads 
1600 with case and bow, in good shape; will 
take repairable better quality violin in trade 

$475.00 780.421.1250 


MODAL MUSIC INC. 780.221.3116 
Quality music instruction since 1983. 
Guitarist. Educator. 
Graduate of GMCC music program 


Free Trial Guitar Lesson 
Learn Guitar the Fun Way with Ma Fletcher. 
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Guitar Courses with Ma Fletcher 
One of Edmonton's most respected teachers. 
Seen on TV in 26 countries, performances 
at go festivals and fairs. 25 years teaching to 
over 3,000 students, Courses at Don Wheaton 
YMCA (Downtown)-Mondays pm; Castle 


Downs YMCA-Tuedays pm; U of A-Saturdays. 
Beginner to advanced. Courses start week of 
September 21st. New-Ultimate Blues Course. 
Check out my website www.mafletcher.com; 
register online: mafltchr@gmail.com or call 
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Need a volunteer? Forming an acting troupe? 
Want someone to jam with? Place up to 20 words 
FREE, providing the ad is non-profit. Ads of more 

than 20 words subject to regular price or cruel 
editing. Free ads must be submitted in writing, in 
person or by fax. Free ads will nun for four weeks, 
if you want to renew or cancel please phone Gle- 
nys at 780.426.1996/fax 780.426.2389/e-m office@ 

vueweekly.com or drop it off at 10303-108 St. 
Deadline is noon the Tuesday before publication. 

Placement will depend upon available space 


a 
Gallery at Milner; Call for Submissions; Deadline: 
Oct 15. Inquiries/applications: Art Selection 
Committee, Centre for Reading and the Arts, 
Stanley A. Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill 
Sq, Edmonton AB Ts] 2V4; T: 780.496.7030; E: 
cragalleries&displays@epLca 


VAAA Gallery Call for Submissions: Deadline: 
Mon, Sept 21, 4pm; T: 780.421.1731 for info 


ART TALK: Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre 
(downstairs), 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq; ASA 
with the EPL present a free art talk with Gerald 
St. Maur (artist and poet); Thu, Sept 17, 7-30pm 


Art from the Unknown. Emerging artists call 
780.414.0702 for submission package 


Call for artists-Kaleido 2009 Art Festival, 
Sept 25-27. Looking for all styles of work for art 


SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK 


LINES FOR $20 


* Lines oa i A 
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: able-bodied our privilege increases te 
fold. Our gender and our colour will 3! 


In spite of HIV—some have argued be- é matters now, and how we will be 


cause of it—gay men have made tremen- = 


is what we do with our privilege * 
Gay men rose up during the aips - 
sis and changed the world. Th, 
passion and strength and love ang 
port of allies, gay men fought f 
cessible drugs and woke the wor; 
to a complex health crisis unparai 


: In modern times. This should be 


ery history book ever printed anc 
gay man should swell with pride ; 
accomplishment. But let us also y, 
the next chapter, the one in which 
as gay men acknowledge our privil-. 
honour women like Jakubec and Lag 
la for the role they play in ous lives 
use our ever-growing clout to make 
world a better place for women anc 


: of society. W 
An obstacle gay men may have in shar- : 


The 2009 Scotiabank AIDS Walk fo: 


: takes place Sunday, September 20 j 
: is we are men—a privileged status in our : 
: world. For those of us who are white and : 


am to 4 pmat Sir Winston Churchill Sq. 
Visit hivedmonton.com for full details 


show and sale Vendors for art market wanted 
also, Contact aota_artists@yahoo.ca for details 


The Zombie Short Film Festival (Oct 30 in 


Toronto) is currently seeking submissions 
from all over the world. Film must be less 
than 25 mins long and must involve zombies 
in some way. All styles are welcome, on DVD 
in NTSC format. $20 (CAD) submission fee. 
Info: zombieshortfilmfestival.com or contact 
Jim Taylor at 647.291.4774, zombieshortfilmfes- 


tival@gmail.com 


Submit exhibits for consideration in the 


following categories: Environmental Site 
Specific Installation; Curated Group Exhibit, 
Individual or Two Artist Exhibit, and Com- 
munity Programs are invited to participate 


WE’RE 


in 2010 at The Works Art Market and F« 
Street (deadline Feb. 15, 2010) and Stre¢ 
(deadline Mar. 15, 2010). Application at ws. 
theworks.ab.ca 


Bass player with vocals needed. Roots mu 
Three piece: the Mary Machura Band. M 
Machura 780.240.1509, marvymachura.co 


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SHELTER SOCIETY-PROGRAMS FOR 
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WUEWEEKLY // SEP 17 - SEP 23, 2009 


of people agreeing to do sex thing they 
don't want to do, it sounds like 


has, up to now (emphasis on 
for both of you. Discovering 


mw 0? Especially when the things 


i to reframe the “agreeing™ to try 
ties and deciding to accept them. 


? would be mad at you or disappointed in 
? some relationship-changing way if you 
decided to take a pass on anything then 
the set-up is just a skootch less com- 
pletely consensual than | would like. Do 
be sure that you feel completely (ugh) 


t doesn't sound non-c to me. As long as 


reading, writing and/or math skills. Volunteers 
icipate in group learning, tutor one-to-one, 
ee drop-inleamers. Skills and jence: 


lead guitarist. Older 


Experienced country school level reading, writing and/or math 
versa Koakiog for work or will join new ills. Contact: Denis Lapierre, 780-429-0675, 
~ - 780.421.1250 dilearningcentre@shaw.ca 
Session drummer for hire in Edmonton . Second Chance Animal Rescue Society 
Experienced, creative and easyto work with. (SCARS) Join Andrea or Alison on Global TV 
Lots of studio credits. Check www.kellystod- at 9:45am every Saturday, where they will 
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5 Contact: info@edmontonbikes.ca 
The Carrot needs volunteer barristas for weekly 
or bi shifts (training provided). Volunteer 
host to introduce Friday night’s musical acts. 
Volunteer cleaners ( or biweekly cleaning). 
If any of these jobs appeal to you contact Irene at 
770.471.1580, i artsontheave.org: 


Dr’s Appointment Buddy—Accompany new 
_ refugee immigrants to their medical appoint- 
ments to give support and assist with paper- 
work. Thu, 10:30am-2:30pm. Transportation not 
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SCARS. 


PALS. Project Adult Literacy Society needs 
Second Chance Animal Rescue Society.Ourdogs _volunteers to work with adult students in the 
areTV stars! Watch Gobal TV Sat at 9:45 ESL English as a Second Language Program. 
AM where new, wonderful dogs will be profiled. Call 780.424.5514 Training and materials are 
_ starseare.org, provided 
: ee ee 
Ganadian Mental Health Association / Board Re- Volunteer drivers and kitchen help urgently 


needed. If you're available weekdays, 1oamapm 
call Meals on Wheels. 780.429.2020 


ae ee Se Se Se 
Volunteer with your Pet, The Chimo Animal 
Assisted Therapy Project uses animals in therapy 
sessions with trained therapists to help the clients 
achieve specific goals. Info: www.chimoproject.ca. 
E: volunteer@chimoproject.ca or T: 780.452.2452 
Se eee 
CANADIAN LIVER FOUNDATION is looking 


for enthusiastic volunteers for presentations 
and special events. Call Carmen at 780.444.1547 


‘Guiting 2009 Learn about our community work: 
www.cmha-edmonton.ab.ca 


; ‘East, 10527-96 St, Mon-Fri, 8:3oam-4:30pm 


SS Se ES es eae 
The Support Network: Volunteer today to be a 
Distress Line Listener. Apply on line at: www. 
thesupportnetwork.com or call 780.732.6648 


ders.com; An Eating 
Program for those with anorexia or with bulimia. 
E:sacred6@telus.net; T: 780.429.3380 


as being offered new opportuni- : 


Or not. If you feel in any way that he : 


empowered to not do it, whatever it : most likely to provide congenial partners : 


= is, but on the surface at least it really : 


But that was the easy part. Anything 


talk through a disappointment or an em 


> bring ina third (or fourth?) party ... 


: what he means by “opening up your bed- 


? not talking about pros, are we?) and dif- : 
: ferent cons (them either). There is, alas, : 


: mo guaranteed simplest, safest and most 
: fun method, or else everyone would do 
: it that way. The safest way and also the 


: Is, also alas, the most likely to produce 


: social complications: do it with your : 


barrassment, it is as nothing, pffft. Now, : 


3 friends. This was by far the most popular : 
> group-activity style in my extended circle 
= for yoinks, and while | cannot possibly 


‘ : claim that it was socially uncomplicated, : 
: you can say no, why not give yourself : 


+ permission to enjoy saying yes? 


your boyfriend's playfulness : 


: most of us/them survived years of it with : 
: our friendships still intact. It takes a real- : 
: ly powerful dedication to self-awareness : 


> you and a single, trusted partner can get : 


the "up to now’) been good = up to, no matter how complicated, can : determination and the skill to transcend : 


: easily be called off whenever. Provided : 


: : the baser sorts of great-ape-ish territori- 
more about yourself is good, = 


: you generally get on well and assume : 
: the best of each other and know how to : 
you discover feel good and/ : 
~ or give you orgasms? So perhaps : 


and often quite a lot of alcohol. 


: panions for outre activities this way 
: but there is an undeniable element of 
: unsavouriness to many of the couples 


: friends, you see, which implies that they 
> have friends to do it with. 
Or was your boyfriend thinking of orga 


nized "swing" parties or houses? Has he 


: done the research? | don’t know where you 
+ are, of course, but there are just plain few- 


er of these than there used to be, and moy_ 
have a pronounced bias toward heterosex 


: uality and recreational lesbianism, that is 


: to say, big polymorphous puppy piles and 


: and open discussion of feelings, and the : male/male partnering are out, and women 


: just plain get more action than men do. 


: This may sound titillating in theory, pro- 


ality to succeed at this, though. Oh, that : vided he js one of those guys who at least 


: imagines enjoying watching. In practice, it 
You may be able to find a couple : 
: through the “alternative” personals, but 
> you may not like them or, indeed, be : 


Do you have any more specifics about : in any way willing to take off so much : 


+ as your socks in their presence. | know : 


room?" There are many ways to go about : lots of people who have found fun com: : 


> this, with different pros (although we're : 


can be less than fun for the guy and much 


* less than fun afterwards when you both 
: have to have a big stupid fight about it. 


In short, you need to know what he has ip 


: mind before you can either agree or form 


a well-reasoned objection. And in answer 


to your original question, yes, one can 


: turn back—swinging doors swing both 


! ways—but somebody may not want to. 


+ you find trolling the interwebs for new : You can neither know which one of you 


: “friends.” Many of the less frightening ; that will be, nor how you'll feel about it 


: couples are already dong it with their : 


when it happens. Proceed with caution, 


+ and do not let this be one of those things 
: you do to please the fella 
: Love, Andrea 


Are you an International Medical Graduate seek- 
ing eensure? The Alberta International Medical 
Graduates Association is here to help. Support, 
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Canadian Mental Health Association, emha- 
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56 // BACK 


NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY 


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28 Hopscotch 


32 DVD Detective 


MUSIC // 36 


Enter Sandor 
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58 New Sounds 
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9 Quickspins 


60 Free Will Astrology 
62 Queermonton 
63 Alt.Sex.Column 


EVENTS LISTINGS 


30 Arts 
35 Film 
38 Music 
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Events 


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Beh eS 
SCOTT HARRIS 
// SCOTT@WVUEWEEKLY.COM 


f there is one lesson the Stelmach 

government has taken from years 
of failed attempts by former-premier 
Ralph Klein to goas faras he would have 
liked in privatizing the health care sys- 
tem in the province, it's to never show 
Albertans the entire plan at once. 

Rather than come out with an overall 
vision for privatization which public 
health-care advocates can analyze and 
use to galvanize opposition from Al- 
bertans, the strategy now is to make 
piecemeal changes one announcement 
by one in order to sidestep a legitimate 
public debate on the overall direction 
being implemented. 

With so much going on behind closed 
doors, then, it's illuminating to get a 
peek at the discussions that are being 
had about where the government is 
headed when it comes to caring for the 
sick and elderly in the province. The leak 
of a consultants’ document on alterna- 
tives to publicly-funded long-term care 
beds provides one such opportunity, and 
it doesn't look pretty. 

The May 2009 document prepared for 
the Alberta Seniors department, leaked 
after a freedom of information request 
in the spring by the provincial NDP re- 


suovvvuyeavenzcengvsnaenacnenennnno eS 


ing closed 


* 


approaches offered as the remedy. 


The documents reveal discussions ! 
about a massive reduction in the com- : 


ing years in the number of seniors’ 


long-term care beds in the province— : 
an 80 percent reduction in the next 20 : 
years—and a deregulation of the pricing ; 
system for lower-service privately-run : 
assisted-living facilities to encourage : 


the private sector to take up the slack. 
Options discussed for pricing mod- 


els include a deregulation of rates to : 
merely limiting the number of times : 
rates could be increased (look how well : 
that worked during the rental crisis) : 
to implementing a star system similar : 
to hotels, which would allow different : 
rates to be charged. Building new fa- : 
cilities through public-private partner- : 


ships (P3s) were also discussed. 


Minister of Seniors and Community 
Supports Mary Anne Jablonski stressed : 


that it is only a discussion document, 


not government policy, but that's the : 
point. Major cuts and deregulation to = 
our health-care system are being talked : 
about, and Albertans aren't in on the : 
conversation. With such major changes : 
being proposed Albertans need to insist : 


ona place at the table. WV 


ISSUE N°- 727 // SEP 24 - SEP 30, 2009 // AVAILABLE AT OVER 1400 LOCATIONS 


WUEVWVEEKLY 


10303 - 108 STREET, EDMONTON, AB T5) 1L7 
1: 780.426.1996 F: 780.426.2889 E: OFFICE@VUEWEEKLY.COM W: VUEWEEKLY.COM 


EDITOR / PUBLISHER RON GARTH // ron@vueweekly.com 
NEWS EDITOR SCOTT HARRIS // news@vueweekly,com 


ARTS / FILM EDITOR 


PAUL BLINOV // paul@vueweekly.com 


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224 


PATTIE HERES 


Audit Bureau 
of Circulations 


6 // UP FRONT 


doors : 


sulted in a heavily-censored version, : 
shows a system with significant prob- : 
lems, with increasingly market-based : 


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Letters 


kule Neid too be 
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UP FRONT 


| ZeitGeist 


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WHEN PIGS FLY 


pandemic is trying to sweep the 

globe, but it just doesn't seem to be 
catching on. People were first alerted 
to this in March when it broke out in 
Mexico, and was dubbed "Swine Flu." 
After the flying pig jokes started get- 
ting old—and pig farmers began get- 
ting anxious—and medical experts 
started getting officious about accu- 
racy, it became Influenza A (HiN}). It 
is said that the striving for accuracy, 
not diminishing the backlash to the 
pork industry, is the true reason for 
the change, but I have my doubts; it's 
far more likely that the concern over a 
backlash to the humour industry is the 
real concern. 

Seriously, I went to the World Health 
Organization (WHO) site to find out 
what HiNi even stands for, and I dis- 
covered that it's not new at all! It’s 
something to do with the two main 
proteins of the virus, which are of the 
hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase 
varieties. This is, to me, pretty much 
gobbledygook, but there are, accord- 
ing to WHO, 16 hemagglutinin variet- 
ies and nine neuramainidase varieties. 
Supposedly this is the strongest variety, 
hence the double #1 status. The Avian 
Flu of a few years back was H5N1, it 


was, I surmise, four weaker on the H 


WUEWEEKLY // SEP 24 — SEP 30, 2009 


scale. Interestingly, there was little 
outcry and no official rebranding back 
then, and nobody beyond the labora- 
tory level knew the term H5Ni. Maybe 
it's because lots of birds actually fly. 
Whether or not this pandemic will 
pan out is something which is uncer- 
tain, but it didn't happen in the spring, 
and it's still too early in the autumn. In 
a racially insensitive response to the 
call for preparatory supplies in case of 
a greater outbreak (the supposed cor- 
rect cautionary move according to the 
WHO), Health Canada sent large quan- 
tities of body bags to some Manitoba 
First Nations in lieu of more preventa- 
tive supplies. Health Minister Leona 
Aglukkaq has pled ignorance on the 
matter of what looks like planned eth- 
nic cleansing to some. While stating 
that she thinks it is regrettable, she 
stopped short of giving an apology. 
The rise in irrational behaviour like 
excessive “cleansing” by rather ineffi- 
cient methods, such as the use of hand 
sanitizers at the entrance to schools, 
hospitals and some stores, is providing 
people with what is likely a false sense 
of security, but a false sense of security 
is still a sense of security! The multi- 
national pharmaceutical corporation 
GlaxoSmithKline is fast tracking (ie. 
without going through the proper test- 
ing channels) a vaccine against the flu 
and it will likely be ready by November. 


The Tories have “inoculated” the corpo- 
ration against liability if people become 
ill from the untested drug. In the mean- 
time, I am working on a formula for a 
new hand sanitizer that prevents OCD. 
TJ Mair 


—— 
YOU TAKE MY BREATH AWAY 


The Harper government shipped body- 
bags to two First Nations communi- 
ties as "preparation" for a