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13 Barbara Gowdy 
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16 Dish Weekly 
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44 Events Weekly 

45 Free Will Astrology 
45 Classifieds 

46 Alt Sex Column 
47 Hey Eddie! 


Canadian author Barbara Gowdy’s new novel The 
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“belligerent teachers’ union,” Booi 
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relatively quiet end to a raucous 
second term as head of the ATA 
(which included a heated strike last 
year), but he’s leaving on his own 
accord. In fact, he made the deci- 
sion before he even became presi- 
dent, setting a two-term, four-year 
limit for himself the day he was 
elected. “I have a passionate belief 


in democracy,” he tells me. “I don’t 
think you should hang around in 
one position for too long.” 

Booi was first elected to the 
ATA’s executive council in 1992. He 
decided to throw his hat into the 
ring after watching classroom condi- 
tions decline along with provincial 
funding, which peaked in 1987. A 
veteran social studies teacher of 24 


years, he realized working as an 
individual teacher within his school 
wasn’t the way to effect significant 
change. “I always felt that I had to 
do the best job that I could with 
those kids in front of me,” he says, 
“but I also had to do something 
about the big picture if I was to do 
the best job with those kids.” 

Booi’s tenure with the ATA was 
relatively quiet until 2002. He notes 
proudly that not one working day 
was lost to job action between 1992 
and 2002. Concerns about deterio- 
tating classroom conditions contin- 
ued to simmer, however. During the 
1999-2000 school year, classes in 
Alberta were the largest in the coun- 
try. The explosion came in 2001, 
when the provincial government 
legislated a four per cent wage 


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Issue Number 401 
June 26 - July 2, 2003 
available at over 1,400 locations 


Editor/Publisher 
Ron Garth 
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Contributing Editors 
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<musicnotes@vue.ab.ca> 

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<listings@vue.ab,ca> 

Contributors 

Sean Austin-Joyner, Jonathan Ball, 
Ruben Bolling, Chris Boutet, Josef 
Braun, Rob Brezsny, Richard Burnett, 
Gilbert Da Silva, David DiCenzo, Jenny 
Feniak, James Grasdal, Lisa Gregoire, 
Kevin Kelly, Cherie Klassen, Allison Kydd, 
Deanne Langlois, Agnieszka Matejko, 
Kris Meen, Andrea Nemerson, Steven 
Sandor, T.GC. Shaw, Jered Stuffco, Chris 
Wangler, Christopher Wiebe, Juliann 
Wilding, Jenny Yuen, Vance Yung 

Cover Photo 

Kevin Kelly 

Production Assistant 

Michael Siek 

Administrative Assistant 

David Laing 

Printing and Film Assembly 

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# jungle 


By DAN RUBINSTEIN 


The Dan who knew too little 


June 26, 2003 is the one-year anniver- 
sary of the opening day of last summer's 
G8 summit in Kananaskis. The New Part- 
nership for Africa’s Development, Jean 
Chrétien's intended centrepiece, quietly 
slipped off the international agenda 
months ago. The summit’s supposed 
focus on fighting terrorism? Looks like 
cowboy George W. Bush has that bull by 
the horns himself, regardless of what 
leaders of the world’s top economic 
nations discussed at their cozy, two-day 
retreat in the mountains. A full year after 
the summit and a few weeks after this 
year’s annual gathering in Evian, 
France—yes, the mineral water city!— 
Kananaskis has been all but forgotten by 
Canadians, other than the occasional 
report about how many tax dollars 
Ottawa spent ensuring everybody's safe- 
ty ($192 million and counting). 

|, too, should have moved on by 
now. After all, it’s been a full year since ! 
was told that my application for media 
accreditation to cover the summit was 
rejected by the RCMP, who changed their 
minds when called to court. But despite 
the finest bureaucratic correspondence | 
could compose, | still don’t know why. 

A quick recap. As the news editor of 
Vue Weekly, | figured | had a legitimate 
shot at a press pass for the G8 media cen- 
tre in Calgary. Granted, we're a small 
paper, but the summit was taking place 
in our home province. At worst, | thought 
they‘d just say Vue was puny and insignifi- 
cant—like the good folks at the World 
Athletics Championships did in the sum- 
mer of 2001. But when | got my rejection 
e-mail and made my obligatory phone 
call to ask why, | was coldly referred to 
Personal Information Request Form TBC 
350-58 and told to send it to the RCMP’s 


Access to Information and Privacy Coordi- 
nator. Something was amiss. 

To make a long story slightly shorter, 
turns out | was one of a handful of Cana- 
dian journalists who were denied access to 
the summit because of so-called security 
concems. Oh, and the RCMP weren't giv- 
ing us any specific explanation of those 


concerns, only a list of possible criteria that 


included mental instability, anti-social 
behaviour and ties to subversive or 
extremist groups. Bored with covering the 
typical pre-summit protesters-versus- 
police maneuvers, the national media 
jumped on this story. Reporters love talk- 
ing about themselves, or at least their pro- 
fession and peers. | was featured in a few 
print and broadcast stories, filed my 
Access to Information request and was 
minutes away from driving to Calgary to 
cover the summit un-accredited when an 
Edmonton law firm specializing in social 
justice work phoned Vue. After a whirl- 
wind seven hours in their office—on the 
house, thank God—Chivers, Kanee, Car- 
penter filed an injunction at the Court of 
Queen’s Bench on my behalf. Lawyers Ritu 
Khullar and Patrick 
Nugent asked the 
judge to grant me a 
press pass because 
the RCMP had con- 
travened the Char- 
ter of Rights and 
Freedoms by saying 
no without provid- 
ing a valid reason. 
Those Charter 
rights, by the way, 
include freedom of 
thought, belief, 
opinion and expres- 
sion; freedom of the 
press; and freedom 
of association. 

On the morn- 
ing of June 25, 
2002, one day 
before the summit started, we went to 
the downtown courthouse anticipating 
a showdown with federal government 
lawyers. Instead, the Justice Depart- 
ment’s attorney told the judge that a 
pass was being printed, no legal argu- 
ments necessary. | asked him why 
they'd changed their minds. He said I'd 
have to file another Personal Informa- 
tion Request Form to find out. 


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The red wall of silence: the 


After the summit—the media cen- 
tre buffets were definitely the high- 
light did just that. But thanks to the 
cloaking devices otherwise known as 
Privacy Act exemptions, I’ve yet to 
receive a satisfactory answer about 
why the RCMP behaved the way they 
did. And | doubt | 
ever will. 

My second Per- 
sonal Information 
Request Form, 
which the RCMP 
received on July 9, 
2002, was lumped 
in with the one | 
filed before going 
to court. An efficient 
move, | thought. 
Now we're getting 
somewhere. But the 
first response | 
received, dated 
August 8, told me 
that despite promis- 
es of an answer 
within 30 days, the 
RCMP were enact- 
ing section 15(a)(i) of the Privacy Act and 
granting themselves a 30-day extension. 
Thirty days became 60 and | was final- 
ly sent a package on October 10. | 
opened it with anticipatory glee, but 
the cover letter informed me that sec- 
tions 22, 26 and 27 of the Privacy Act 
applied to my request. Translation: 
due to the sanctity of police investiga- 
tions, as well as solicitor-client privi- 
leges and concerns about revealing 


. information about others, they didn’t 


have to tell me nothing. 

The RCMP Privacy Commissioner 
did, however, “sever” some of the 
material and send it to me. And they 
were still consulting with the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Affairs and Internation- 
al Trade (DFAIT) about several 
documents, which they'd try to get to 
me later. Reading through the scrawled 
notes in the severed material, | did learn 
a little about what happened after we 
filed our court injunction. The RCMP, 
apparently, concluded “it wasn’t worth 
going to court over.” Moreover, when 
one officer complained that | wasn’t 
“associated to a recognized media out- 
let,” he was told “they should have 
done this long ago and it wouldn't look 
good for them to do this now.” There 
were also a line saying that because | 
wasn’t “legitimate/recognized” media 
the RCMP shouldn’t have been called 
on to do a background check in the first 
place “if DFAIT had done their job.” 

The paper trail was tantalizing. As 
was the second package | received, 
dated October 31 and couriered to me, 
unlike all previous correspondence, 


which had simply been mailed via reg- 
ular post. Ripping open the envelope, 
however, my hope faded quickly. A 
one-page cover letter promised all the 
information to which | was entitled. 
There was also a one-page photocopy 
of Section 26 of the Privacy Act, again 
giving the government justification for 
refusing to disclose certain information. 
The third and final page, in the middle 
of a sea of white space, read “VUE 
Weekly” and “Dan Rubinstein’—and 
not much more. 

My only viable recourse after this 
was to file a complaint with the Privacy 
Commissioner of Canada, asking for a 
second look at my request. | did that last 
February’and received a letter in April 
saying that an officer had been assigned 
to investigate. | talked to her a couple of 
weeks later. She was very cordial on the 
phone; she even laughed at some of my 
jokes. She told me she was one of 18 
investigators in the Privacy Commission- 
er’s office who cover all of Canada. She 
had 63 other complaints on her desk at 
the time and said six months was her 
goal for getting back to people. She also 
said that Privacy Act exemptions were 
very tough to break, that even if she 
learned why my application for accredi- 
tation was rejected, she still likely would- 
n't be able to tell me why. 

Considering the struggles brilliant 
lawyers like Clayton Ruby have had 
with the Privacy Act, taking his own 
hunt for personal information all the 
way to the Supreme Court of Canada 
before being shut down, I’m not very 
optimistic. Considering that the Cana- 
dian government is locking up people 
with alleged ties to terrorist organiza- 
tions and deporting them without 
telling their lawyers what evidence they 
have, | don’t think my story is a big 
deal. My biggest concrete fear—that I'd 
have trouble at the American border— 
vanished in May when | took a trip to 
the United States. But this mess still 
makes me angry. | know of no valid rea- 
son why | gave the RCMP any cause for 
concern. | have written columns that 
were critical of government and | have 
friends who are quote-unquote 
activists. But remember: the Charter of 
Rights does guarantee freedom of 
expression and association. 

Bottom line, I’m a journalist who 
works for an independent newspaper 
and it’s troubling that the RCMP has a 
hand in deciding who is “legitimate” 
enough to cover events like the G8 
summit. Especially when they don’t 
have to justify their decisions. In my 
case, they basically changed their 
mind when called to court to answer a | 
few questions. And I'm still awaiting 
those answers. © 


news 


______—CRIME 
Cop and pop 


EDMONTON—Police agencies around 
the world are notoriously good at taking 
care of their own. When an officer is sus- 
d of any wrongdoing, they're often 
protected by a blue wall of silence. In 
Edmonton, police chief Bob Wasylyshen 
appears to be one of the main bricks. 

A year ago, the chief’s daughter, 
constable Andrea Wasylyshen, was the 
subject of a citizen’s complaint along 
with another officer. Rick Land said he 
was the victim of excessive police force 
as well as unlawful prosecution during a 
confrontation on Whyte Avenue. Land 
and another man were charged that 
night, but those charges were dropped 
a couple of weeks ago. Land’s com- 
plaint against Andrea Wasylyshen has 
yet to be investigated, however, and 
Bob Wasylyshen insists there’s no need 
to call in an outside police agency to 
handle the matter despite concerns that 
anybody working under the chief might 
‘ind it, well, a little difficult to say the 
chief's daughter is guilty of any charge. 
The provincial Criminal Trial 
Lawyers’ Association filed its own com- 
plain to the police commission last 
week. The association “takes the posi- 
tion that Chief Wasylyshen’s decision 
constitutes discreditable conduct 
because it is likely to bring discredit on 
the reputation of the police service,” 
the complaint read. It suggests that 
the RCMP or a similar police force be 
summoned to look into the complaint 
against Andrea Wasylyshen to avoid 
the appearance of conflict of interest. 
Reacting to the Edmonton Journal, 
Bob Wasylyshen said he wants “the 
public to have confidence in our 
process and the way in which I’m han- 
dling it. If it turns out that somebody is 
able to point out why it wasn’t a fair 
process, then certainly | would make 
that consideration [to call in an outside 
agency]. But that hasn’t been the case 
so far.” The chief added that he doesn’t 
even see complaints about either his 
daughter or son, who's also a police 
officer. “They are automatically given 
over to one of the deputy chiefs and he 
will deal with that complaint through 
its entire process. | don’t get involved in 
the complaint at all.” —Dan RUBINSTEIN 


__ ACTIVISM 
On the way to the Forum 


EDMONTON—A handful of locals trav- 
elled to Porto Alegre, Brazil last winter 
for the second World Social Forum, a 
counterpoint to the World Economic 
Forum meetings taking place at the 


ie time in New York City. In keep- 


the first Alberta Social Forum, 
ed for October 17 to 19 at the 
of. —~ 


This week's editorial cartoon 
has been banned by American 


political interests. 


(Now go eat a steak sandwich with a side order of fresh cut PEI Pototoes) 


long festival “intended to create a 
space, a forum for all Albertans who 
are opposed to neo-liberal globaliza- 
tion and oppression of all kinds and 
who are searching for just, sustainable, 
humane and peaceful alternatives on a 
local, provincial and global level. It is 
also an opportunity for individuals, 
social movements, social organizations 
and NGOs to identify common goals 
and to develop strategies for concert- 
ed action around the province.” 

The Alberta Social Forum may still 
be nearly four months away, but orga- 
nizers have put out a call for proposals 
for people and groups interested in set- 
ting up workshops, panel discussions, 
debates, art and musical or theatrical 
performances. Sessions will be booked 
into 90-minute blocks for 20 to 250 
participants; all must be self-funded, 
self-organized and free to attend. For 
sample workshop ideas, such as “Art 
and Activism” and “Creating Democra- 
tic Media,” go to the Toronto Social 
Forum’s website at www.torontosocial- 
forum.ca. To learn more about the 
Edmonton event or to submit propos- 
als, go to www.albertasocialforum.ca. 
—DAN RUBINSTEIN 


PUBLISHING 
Bye bye, Byfield 


CALGARY—Of all the purportedly right- 
wing publications throughout Canada, 
none was as notorious or controversial 
as our province's very own conservative 
bible, the Alberta Report. But according 
to a recent interview with Report pub- 
lisher and editor Link Byfield, after 30 
years of bashing homosexuals and 
French people while extolling the 
virtues of the extreme Western right, 
the little twice-monthly magazine that 
was always frightening to see on some- 
one’s coffee table seems to have print- 
ed its last issue. 

Founded by Byfield’s father Ted dur- 
ing the years following the rise of the 
National Energy Program, the Alberta 
Report was a product of a time when 


many Albertans began to feel alienated 
and ignored by the federal govern- 
ment. But over the past decade, the 
magazine had been treading water as 
its popularity waned and was eventually 
purchased and run by the Calgary- 
based non-profit organization Citizens’ 
Centre for Freedom and Democracy. 
But having failed to increase its circula- 
tion beyond 40,000 despite a recent 
attempt to appeal to national readers 
under the masthead of Western Report, 
the magazine that many feel helped get 
the Reform Party off its feet and into 
the House of Commons is no longer 
able to sustain its printing costs. 

Although that may sound like good 
news to those of us who were so often 
appalled by the Report’s repeated 
attacks on gay rights and its vocal sup- 
port of the pro-life crowd, obviously 
some people are going to be Sad to see 
it go. As University of Calgary political 
scientist Barry Cooper puts it, “In its 
heyday, the Report provided a distinctive 
Western Canadian voice on national 
issues coming from the kind of political 
mythology that most Albertans grew up 
with. It was kind of refreshing to see. It 
didn’t take a back seat to ‘national unity’ 
or ‘sucking up to Quebec.’” 

Yeah, take that, national unity. But 
don’t worry, Alberta: I'm sure we'll find 
some other way to make ourselves 
look like backwards, intolerant hillbil- 
lies to the rest of Canada really soon. 
—Curis Bouter 


TRADE 


Ranchers still lose money 
under relief package 


OTTAWA—Although the federal gov- 
ernment has pledged hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars in compensation for 
Canadian cattle ranchers devastated 
by the American ban on Canadian 
beef, the preliminary “sliding scale” for 
compensation released by Ottawa last 
week shows that the relief package will 
still leave producers short. 

Agriculture Canada announced a 


plan, split between the feds and the 
provinces and territories on a 60-40 
basis, which could provide $460 mil- 
lion in relief for cattle producers 
depending on how long the American 
border remains closed. “The exact 
costs will depend on how soon the 
U.S. border reopens to Canadian 
beef,” says Agriculture Canada. 

Regardless, producers will only 
receive a percentage of the money 
they've lost. Ag Canada is basing its 
bailout on a reference price of $1.05 per 
pound of beef and as Canadian beef 
prices continue to fall, the government 
will only insure part of those losses. If 
prices fall to 70 cents/pound, for exam- 
ple, government will top up ranchers by 
29 cents/pound (reaching a total of 99 
cents/pound). If prices fall to 50 
cents/pound, ranchers will get an extra 
39 cents/pound, leaving them well short 
of the reference price, even with the aid. 

If the American ban isn’t lifted, 
beef prices are expected to fall heavily 
over the next few weeks. “Canada 
exports some 60 per cent of its total 
annual production of beef and live cat- 
tle,” says Ag Canada. “Although 
extensive testing has not detected a 
single other case of BSE, markets 
remain closed, creating a growing sur- 
plus of beef and cattle.” 

The United States announced a 
ban on all Canadian beef on May 20, 
hours after Ag Canada confirmed that 
an Alberta cow sent for slaughter and 
later quarantined had been diagnosed 
with Mad Cow Disease (Bovine Spongi- 
form Encephalopathy). The ingestion 
of Mad Cow-infected cattle and sheep 
products has been linked to variant 
Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease in humans, a 
condition which wastes away the brain. 

Alberta Premier Ralph Klein has 
said that the ban is costing the provin- 
cial economy $11 million a day, 
including losses to producers and 
packers as well as shippers and busi- 
nesses that service the beef industry. 
He went to Washington earlier this 
week in an attempt to get U.S. politi- 
cians to lift the ban. —STEveN SanDoR 


VUEWEEKIY QD LUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


Vue 
point 


By CHERIE KLASSEN 
and DEANNE LANGLOIS 


Altared states 


When we decided to celebrate our 
commitment to each other with a 
June wedding, many of our friends 
(both straight and gay) wondered 
why we'd go to all that trouble and 
expense when it wasn’t even going 
to be legally recognized. The 
answer was simple. Our love—and 
our commitment to each other—is 
as legitimate and valid as any het- 
erosexual relationship. We wanted 
to share our joy in finding each 
other with our friends and family 
and ask for their formal and ongo- 
ing support of our relationship. 

There were actually many bene- 
fits to having an “illegal” wedding. 
With no JP or minister present, we 
were free to create an experience 
that truly represented our values and 
personalities, We drew from faiths 
and cultural traditions across time 
and from around the globe, reading 
poetry and performing rituals. We 
connected through ages and added 
our experience to a history older 
than one dictated by a single reli- 
gion or Canadian legislation. 

Facing our quests, we conducted 
the wedding ourselves and, though 
at times we stumbled through tears, 
we had the opportunity to genuinely 
reflect on our community and rela- 
tionship. By writing our own vows, 
we were better able to express our 
love for each other. Afterwards, 
guests told us how the uniqueness 
and intimacy of the ceremony creat- 
ed a truly memorable and moving 
experience for them as well. 

Sadly, gay, lesbian, bisexual and 
transgendered relationships have his- 
torically gone unnoticed, seldom hon- 
oured or celebrated publicly. Today, 
they remain largely invisible. Although 
our wedding was everything we envi- 
sioned and more, we still want to be 
recognized legally as a married couple 
and will be applying for a license. We 
want to ensure that we have access to 
each other's hospital rooms and can 
make decisions for each other in case 
one of us falls ill. We want to have 
children together. We don’t want to 
have to go through all the anxiety, 
financial costs and hoop-jumping 
legalities that same-sex couples cur- 
rently face to access these rights. 

We are extremely pleased with 
the federal government's decision 
not to oppose the Ontario Court of 
Appeal ruling on the definition of 
marriage and to allow for the grant- 
ing of marriage licenses to same-sex 
couples. For all Ralph Klein’s talk 
against this decision, he’s fighting a 
losing battle. Alberta will eventually 
catch up with the rest of Canada. In 
the meantime, we'll hold our heads 
high, keep working towards equali- 
ty—and celebrate. © 


three 
dollar 
bill 


By RICHARD BURNETT 


() do or die 


I'm not at all fazed by fundamentalist 
propagandists like Rev. Fred Phelps. His 
followers are famed for picketing the 
funerals of AIDS victims, waving “God 
hates fags!” signs. And his Topeka, 
Kansas-based Westboro Baptist Church 
announced last week it will “picket the 
monstrous sodomite whorehouse mas- 
querading as a nation—CANADA—and 
burn the filthy Maple Leaf flag on Parlia- 
ment Hill, Ottawa [on] July 4.” Too bad 
Phelps can’t make it on July 1. I'd love to 
see him try it then. 

But if you really believe in Biblical 


“Tomtne 
DaNcINg 
anicIN 


plagues, then perhaps mad cow dis- 
ease is a sign that Alberta’s politicians 
had better recognize same-sex mar- 
riage, and do it fast. “If there is any 
move to sanctify and legalize same-sex 
marriage,” Premier Ralph Klein stated, 
“we will use the notwithstanding 
clause. Period. End of story.” 

| don’t think Klein’s that stupid. 

For instance, last week, former Mul- 
roney finance, minister John Crosbie told 
900 people at the Jewish National Fund’s 
Negev dinner in Montreal he despised 
the 1992 Charlottetown accord that 
Mulroney hoped would bring Quebec 
into the constitution. “I thought, frankly, 
it was a dog’s breakfast,” Crosbie said. 
“But | was a loyal supporter. When you 
heard me talk about Charlottetown, you 
would have thought the man was a 
fanatic about Charlottetown! | thought it 
was suicidal! But | still supported it.” 
That, | believe, it how Klein feels about 
outlawing same-sex marriage in his 
socially conservative province. 

Few other provinces, meanwhile, 
have plans to allow same-sex marriages 
until Ottawa changes the rules. On 
Parliament Hill the federal Liberals will 


pre-empt a showdown with Klein by 
asking the Supreme Court of Canada 
for a declaration that Ottawa alone 
decides who can legally marry. PM 
Jean Chrétien says his government will 
draft a bill, ask the Supreme Court if it 
is constitutional and then subject it to 
a free vote in the House of Commons. 
If all goes according to plan, PM-in- 
waiting Paul Martin will have a hot pota- 
to on his hands when he (likely) takes 
over in February. Chrétien goes into the 
history books while Martin will have to 
deal with Klein. Of course, it couldn’t 
have happened to a nicer guy: Martin 
never did publicly support gay marriage 
before the June 10 Ontario court ruling. 
Tellingly, 365Gay.com reports that 
“sources in the Martin camp admit they 
do not want gay marriage to be the 
main issue in an election campaign [a 
year from now, when Martin is expected 
to call a snap election] that could see the 
party's massive majority whittled down. 
Ideally, the source said, Martin would 
like the issue resolved before he 
becomes prime minister in February.” 
Most pundits, meanwhile, are 
clearly onside. A hilarious Halifax Daily 


RUBEN 
BOLLING 


BUSH'S NEW STRATEGY OF CELEBRIT Y PROSECUTION 


YOU MADE US 
FEEL INFERIOR / 
WE NEVER 
LIKED You! 


EXPOSED THE 
REAL You! 


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IDEAS WEREN'T 


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CAUSED THE 
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TRIAL PRODUC- 17 
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EG =, 
Chas pe anes 
MEO Wh 


Martha Stewart Indicted 


Bush's Justice Department Now Tough 
On Corporate Crime 


Kathie Lee Gifford Caught 


Unpopular TV Hostess/Singer Caused 


TJ AND \F THE ECONOMY 
DOESN'T REBOUND 

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| BULLOCK! 


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HAD DONE 
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Tom Arnold Found 
Responsible for 9/11 


Bush Administration Reveals the Cause 
of Intelligence Lapses 


YOU'LL SUFFER 
NOW FOR YOUR 
\LL-GOTTEN FAME! 


Olsen Twins Fabricated, 
Exaggerated WMD Claims 


Mary-Kate and Ashley Misled Pentagon, 
American People On Iraq Risk 


WHAT A RELIEF! 
\F OUR PRESIDENT 


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HOUSE" 
\ MAYBE WE 
S SHOULD GO 


News editorial cartoon showed Ernie 
and Bert travelling to Ontario to get 
married. The Toronto Star editorialized 
on June 11, “All Canadians should have 
the right to marry. And it should be 
Parliament, not the courts, leading 
society to accept those changes.” 

The New York Times hit the nail on the 
head on June 18 (pay attention, Rev. 
Phelps) when it reported, “Canada’s deci- 
sion to allow marriage between same-sex 
couples is only one of many signs that 
this once tradition-bound society is 
undergoing social change at an astonish- 
ing rate. Increasingly, Canada has been 
on a social policy course pursued by 
many Western European and Scandina- 
vian countries, and over the last few 
decades it has been moving gradually 


more out of step with the United States.” 

And as if that weren’t enough, The 
Economist last week positively noted, 
“Canadian marriage licenses are accepted 
in the United States; many gay Americans 
are now likely to cross the border to wed, 
throwing American law into confusion.” 

Savour the moment, folks, because 
it’s going to get uglier before gay and 
lesbian Albertans get to say “I do.” As 
my friend and colleague M-} Milloy, a 
Radio Canada International journalist, 
noted on his Canadian alt-news and 
views website thenewforum.ca, “If 
churches want to continue their tradi- 
tions, that is their right. [But] churches 
that will not sanctify same-sex unions 
will have taken another step out of the 
Canadian mainstream.” © 


ARIES 
(Mar 21-Apr 19) 

The magical cat 
That granted you three wishes 
Also drove you mad 


TAURUS 

(Apr 20-May 20) 

The stars are not in 

But if you leave a message 
They will ignore it 


GEMINI 
(May 21-June 20) 
Put on a blue suit 
It won't solve any problems 
But you will look sharp 


CANCER 

(une 21-July 22) 
Your genius will not 
Be realized until you 
Sell the evil car 


LEO 
(july 23-Aug 22) 

Your horoscope has 
Been sold as ad space for the 
JECO Worldwide Group 


VIRGO 
(Aug 23-Sept 22) 

Some people look good 
The way a train wreck looks good 
You are one of these 


Your belief that fire 


> Vengeance will be yours 


Gaye 


Js cool stems from a simple 
Misunderstanding 


SCORPIO 

(Oct 23-Nov 21) 

All week they will fight 
The wolves versus the penguins 
Either way you lose 


Between you and the wombat 
Will end in a tie — x. 


CAPRICORN 
(Dec 22-Jan 19) 

Once you pop the top 
Hope will be lost for the few 
Remaining diet plans 


(Feb 19-Mar 20) 


As your dark grip encircles 
The final French fry 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


f| 
6 


Larry Booi 


Continued from page 4 


_ increase for teachers. It was much 


wer than the raises given to nurs- 
es, doctors, civil servants and MLAs, 
all of which hovered around the 20 
per cent plateau. 


BOO! MAINTAINS that the purpose 
of the labour action was “to shine a 
spotlight on conditions in class- 
rooms in schools,” although he does 
acknowledge that salaries were the 
number-two issue on the agenda. 
And it appeared that, on this point, 
the teachers won when an arbitrator 
awarded them a 14 per cent increase. 
But it was a pyrrhic victory at best; 
the provincial government failed to 
give school boards enough money to 
cover the raise. Subsequently, the 
boards started laying off teachers, 
including 450 public school teachers 
in Edmonton alone. Which means, 
of course, that class sizes are going 
up again. And for this, Booi lays the 
blame squarely at the feet of the 
Klein government—he accuses the 
administration of bullying and not 
taking care of its responsibilities. 
“They refused to pay their bills,” 
he says. “What they’re really saying 
is, ‘You think you Won something 
with your 14 per cent? Well, think 
again. Nobody wins against us.’” 
Booi does hold some hope for 
the future. After last year’s strike, 
the government created a commis- 
sion on learning with a mandate to 
conduct a comprehensive review of 
the provincial educational system. 


Oma 


pyle 


In an interim report 
released in early 2003, 
class size and composi- 
tion topped a list of 19 
emerging issues. Booi is 
confident that the com- 
mission’s final report, due | 
out this summer, will “get 
the questions right.” But 
he's worried they’ll the 
answers wrong. 


ONE OF HIS FEARS is 
that the commission will 
capitulate to what Booi 
calls “the simplistic kinds 
of suggestions put for- 
ward by the Alberta 
School Boards Associa- 
tion.” Those suggestions 
have included making 
extracurricular volunteer- 
ing mandatory—in other 
words, turning “teachers 
into serfs,” Booi says. 
“Here we are in the 21st 
century and the ASBA’s solutions 
aren’t even 20th-century—they’re 
19th-century solutions.” 

Although Booi says he'd like so 
spend more time at home reading 
and “playing guitar badly” as he 
steps away from the presidency, he 
will stick around the ATA, albeit in 
different capacities. His biggest role 
will be as a member of a new task 
force on political action. “It’s become 
increasingly clear to me over the last 
few years that we don’t have a finan- 
cial problem and we don’t have an 
educational problem,” he says. “We 
have a political problem. If you've 
got a political problem, you'd better 


ing 
j 


Larry Booi 


: YOURSELF © 
ERNIE, B.C. 


ajestic mountain setting and 
ie Golf & Country 
ing to Sapper every wie. 


come up with a political solution.” 
The task force’s goal will be to 
encourage Alberta teachers to 
become more politically active. Even 
those with more conservative lean- 
ings, who Booi says should get 
involved with the PC party at the 
grassroots level. To make this idea 
work, the ATA has established field 
co-ordinator positions, 10 in urban 
areas and 18 in rural areas. Booi says 
that if you add up all of the members 
of all the political parties in Alberta, 
you'd get about 6,000 people. With 
32,000 teachers in the province, he 
Says “a really determined group 
could actually make a difference.” © 


Club 


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JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


Hardcore mofo 


Steve Earle’s 
tumultuous, self- 
destructive life is 
explored in Hardcore 
Troubadour 


By LISA GREGOIRE 


about the tormented and fearless 

life of Steve Earle is like watching 
a train wreck in slow motion. First 
the train catches fire, then falls off a 
bridge and into the ocean, where a 
tidal wave throws it onto the shore. 
Then it’s picked up by a tornado and 
spat out, crumpled and torn. 

The stomach-churning scenes in 
Hardcore Troubadour: The Life 
and Near Death of Steve Earle get 
prislier with each page: Earle hopped 


Bie: Lauren St. John’s book 


up on crack getting married to a 
woman he'd already divorced; Earle in 
a blood-splattered paper hospital robe 
waving a $10 bill to passersby in 
seedy South Nashville, looking for 
crack; Earle holed up in houses with 
guns, convinced CIA agents are after 
him; Earle, junk-weary before a show, 
letting his sister smear make-up on his 
skinny forearms to cover the tracks; 
Earle, at 120 pounds, weighing less 
than his estranged 14-year-old son 
Justin. This was the man legends like 
Guy Clark, Emmylou Harris and Bruce 
Springsteen—not to mention dozens 
of music critics—had lauded as one of 
the finest American songwriters of all 
time, the equal of Woody Guthrie or 
Bob Dylan. But there’s nothing like 
gritty tragedy to keep you riveted to a 
story, especially in this case when 
everyone knows the ending: Steve 
Earle cheats death and lives. 

St. John met Earle in 1999 during 


~ the “Journey of Hope,” a tour of 


Death Row survivors and relatives of 
Death Row inmates campaigning 
against capital punishment—the same 
tour in which Earle fell in love with 
his current partner, Sara Sharpe. St. 
John was occupied with another book 
at the time, Walking After Midnight, 
which chronicles the quest of artists 


=|BOOKS 


like Earle and Harris to make music 
that inspires and challenges the spirit. 
Over the course of a year, the author 
managed to convince Earle not only 
to agree to an unauthorized biogra- 
phy—allowing for the candid and 
gritty input of five ex-wives and all 
the musicians and industry folks"he’d 
burned over the years—but also to 
contribute to the book himself. The 
result, albeit a tad fawning at times, is 


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VUE 


’ WEEKLY 


the starkest look yet at one of the 
most insufferable, cantankerous, 
determined and gifted musicians in 
modern America. ; 


“1 HAVE A LOW TOLERANCE for 
mediocrity in life and music,” Earle 
says. “I’m into pain and joy, and the 
in-between doesn’t interest me.” It 
appears, from this book, he’s had 
plenty of both. St. John must be com- 
mended for cajoling interviews from 
dozens of sources close to Earle who 
describe both the moments of-success 
on and off stage and the times when 
Earle was pawning guitars and cook- 
ing crack in the basement. She also 
exposes the inner machinations of 
Nashville’s Music Row in the ‘70s and 
’80s and how record company gurus 
struggled to preserve classic country 
from the rock 'n’ roll onslaught of 
artists like Earle, Gram Parsons, Lyle 
Lovett and Dwight Yoakam. 

Earle, who beat the pavement for 
10 years before recording his first 
album, Guitar Town, in 1986, has noth- 
ing but disdain for country labels and 
most of the music industry in general. 
His attack against Garth Brooks and 
the industry which produced him isa 
good example: “He really is tone-deaf. 
He’s one of the worst singers I've ever 
heard in my life.” 

Disappointingly, the book’s writ- 
ing doesn’t always live up to its rich 
and chilling content but that may be 
more a reflection of the editors. St. 
John is a superb researcher and capa- 


e ~~ oO. " . 
conadian surwveal 


METROPOLIS « 


Tt! 


ble writer, but the book has a slapdash 
quality reminiscent of tomes rushed to 
the printer to capitalize on a subject’s 
spike in popularity—in this casé, per- 
haps the hype around Earle’s provoca- 
tive 2002 release Jerusalem. The book 
slathers detail on Earle’s every indul- 
gent misstep while lumping his phe- 
nomenal recovery and recording of 
seven albums clean and sober into the 
final few chapters. That, coupled with 
the countless spelling errors, typos 
and other editing gaffes, cheapen this 
legendary story. One suspects the 
gushing thanks St. John gives to her 
editors in the book’s acknowledg- 
ments were written before she read 
the finished product.O — 


HARDCORE TROUBADOUR: THE LIFE 
AND NEAR DEATH OF STEVE EARLE 

By Lauren St. John ¢ Fourth Estate « 

385 pp. * $39.95 


IS 


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TO THE BEAT OF [> du Maurier 


VUEWEEKLY ED JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


VUE WEEKLY NEEDS ihe 
July 10th edition, we'll be presenting 
aia a ever BESTEST OF EDMONTON 
awards. First ever, because this isn't another 
of your typical "Best of" reader response 
features. We respect all of your opinions 
and tastes, but frankly, we think you're tired 
of reading about McDonald's serving 
the best fries in the city, or who the sexiest Wad 
(We're certainly bored by now.) The Bestest 0 
eting stores or products. It's about the 
¢ Edmonton that make life in this city 


unique. At this very moment, our team of writers is hard at work ae 
dozens upon dozens of entries that'll reveal a ne (SESTEST 
itty ideas aS Well. 

before. But we want your witty | | 

SeeTeTON c/o Vue Weekly, 10303-108 St. T5J-1L7), email ea cay 

) or fax (426-2889) your responses to these survey questions, using = te 
x as few words as you like and we'll publish the most creative sugges 

0 ’ 


ive II line for entries is 
| h our comprehensive list. Dead 
cele Aa ae i noon on July 3. Be on your bestest behaviour. 


TV personality is this year. 
Edmonton isn't about ranking comp 
interesting, idiosyncratic elements 0 


i BESTEST REASON TO STAY IN EDMONTON? 
I BESTEST REASON TO LEAVE EDMONTON? I 
I BESTEST POLITICAL FLIP-FLOP? 
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: BESTEST CATEGORY WE DIDN'T THINK OF? WORSTEST? 
k 


The bestest ten individual responses will receive a gift certificate from a local 
restaurant and will be entered into an exclusive drawing for the grand prize package. 
All entries are subject to standard Vue Weekly contest rules. 


VUEWEEKLY €@F> 


By CHRISTOPHER WIEBE 


New book roundup 


The fall lists of Canadian publishers will 
soon be let loose with marketing zeal and 
critical fanfare, a mighty purgative that 
flushes away memories of all the books 
that came before them, spring and sum- 
mer. Here then, lest they be forgotten, 
are a few of the new releases I’ve read. 
Reviewers of Douglas Glover's books 
usually begin by wondering aloud why 
he, one of the most technically brilliant 
and imaginatively gifted (and very 
funny) writers of his generation, isn’t 
better known. The answer is simple: 
most of his writing is too strange. Not 
strange in a whimsical and benign Louis 
de Bernieres way, but rather disturbingly 
strange in style and subject. Glover's 
third novel, Elle (Goose Lane; 205 pp., 
$21.95), is set in early 16th-century 
Canada. The heroine of the title is aban- 
doned by on the forbidding Isle of 
Demons in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence 
with her maid Bastienne and tennis rac- 
quet-wielding lover Richard, Comte 
d'Eprigny. “| am without a doubt a shal- 
low and frivolous girl,” she writes. “And | 


then as easily abandoned. 

Elise Turcotte’s novel The Body’s 
Place (Cormorant; 151 pp., $22.95, 
translated by Sheila Fischman) follows 
15-year-old Helene over a summer holi- 
day in which she must grapple with her 
dysfunctional family and the murder of a 
girl her own age. | am tempted to call 
the novel's style very French. There is an 
angular stillness to the writing, which 
unfolds seamlessly in brief and breathless 
sentences in the manner of Marie Dar- 
rieussecq or Marguerite Duras. “She sees 
herself on the street, in her neighbour- 
hood. She sees that street, deserted, and 
at the end of the street the railway track 
crossing the island filled with legends 
where the body of a 15-year-old girl has 
just been found.” Turcotte brilliantly 
develops the consciousness of an adoles- 
cent—the unsublimated desire, the 
boredom, the unmotivated acts—and 
drives the considerable narrative tension 
with psychological exploration. 

There is a similarly wistful mode of 
expression in Michael Delisle’s collec- 
tion Helen With a Secret and Other 
Stories (Mercury; 150 pp., $17.95, 
translated by Gail Scott), which, at its 
best, is stylistically interesting and 
offers superb insights on family dynam- 
ics. In “Javex,” a laundry attendant liv- 
ing out the perverse texts of Bataille 
and Lautremont compulsively snorts 
the detergent scent of clean, white 
towels. Unfortunately, some of the 
other stories in the collection succumb 
to easy, predictable resolutions. 

The Encyclopedia of Literature in 
Canada (University of Toronto; 1369 
pp., $75), released last fall, strikes me as 


a man’s neck muscles have ceased to function, 
a husband has turned into a dill pickle, 
a domestic help desk telephone clerk 
talks a woman through preparing canned soup 


know we shall die soon. It is clear to me 
that all my haphazard and naive 
attempts to survive are pathetically inad- 
equate, that | am truly and amazingly 
unprepared to be anything but my 
father’s daughter back in France.” Alone 
for much of the book in the throes of 
starvation and childbirth, Elle’s internal 
monologue is populated with feverous, 
mystical reveries. The new land, the sto- 
ries told by Itslk, an aboriginal hunter 
she meets, infect and alter these subcon- 
scious European narratives and the 
memoir she later produces. Glover mas- 
terfully captures the 16th-century flux of 
violence, religion and exploration and in 
the same breath reinvigorates the form 
of the historical novel. 

Toronto performance poet Phlip 
Arima’s first book of fiction, Broken 
Accidents (Insomniac; 160 pp., 
$21.95), is a provocative collection that 
careens from surrealism to social com- 
mentary to flat-out silliness. Many pro- 
ceed from a situational premise: a man’s 
neck muscles have ceased to function, a 
husband has turned into a dill pickle, a 
domestic help desk telephone clerk talks 
a woman through preparing canned 
soup: “But Rick, | don’t know what a 
saucepan is, —Oh honey, you‘re so 
sweet. Saucepan is just a fancy word for 
pot. —Then why don’t they just say 
pot? —I really don’t know. Maybe they 
just like making things difficult.” It’s 
hard to know what to make of these 
sharp-edged stories that favour brisk 
consumption and resist being savoured. 
Dispensing with the usual cues and 
trappings of “craft,” these unusual sto- 
ries offer a quick jolt of intrigue, and are 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


the perfect book for the summer cabin. 
You can read an entry on the “Tish 
Group” or “Book Design and Illustra- 
tion” and get a quick fix of dense, sum- 
mary opinion that counteracts the sloth 
and brainlessness of holiday life. Editor 
W.H. New’s panoramic survey leapfrogs 
over the second edition of the Oxford 
Companion to Canadian Literature, teas- 
ing new relevance out of this kind of ref- 
erence text and incorporating different 
voices and critical assessments. The 
heart of the encyclopedia is, naturally, 
the entries on individual authors, both 
famous and obscure. For those living in 
“the regions,” it is especially gratifying 
to see attention paid to important writ- 
ers outside of southern Ontario—Jane 
Urqhuart receives seven column inches 
to Robert Bringhurst’s 58. This might 
explain some of the crusty reviews the 
book received in Ontario papers. 

More flexible and immediately use- 
ful than the Oxford, which is organized 
in longer essay-type blocks (“Novels in 
English 1960 to 1982”), New has creat- 
ed smaller, more useful groupings that 
align with changes in literary study. 
There are sections, for instance, on the 
Métis, First Nations Literature, and the 
Native in Literature along with entries 
on specific languages like Cree Litera- 
ture and Tlingit Oral Literature. The 
incorporation of potted descriptions of 
literary movements, theories and liter- 
ary terms make it easier to find points 
of entry into the Encyclopedia’s mass of 
detail. A short entry on “hybridity” 
sends you scampering to extensive 
entries on “multicultural voices,” “cul- 
tural plurality” and “nationalism.” © 


Romantic disposition 


We so seldom look on love—or authors who 


write about it as beautifully as Barbara Gowdy 


By JOSEF BRAUN 


le end of Carlton Street in Toronto. 
She'd just returned from promoting 
her new novel The Romantic in the 
U.K. and I was already planning on 
being in Toronto at that same time for 
different reasons when I unexpectedly 
heard we could meet. Our encounter 
couldn’t have been more serendipi- 
tous and I was delighted to land the 
interview. Yet I was nervous too, feel- 
ing unprepared, jet-lagged and more 
than a little awed by this woman who 
I felt no small attachment to since 
reading her short story collection We 
So Seldom Look on Love years ago. But 
Gowdy was an accommodating and 
generous subject, articulate and loose, 
radiating empathy behind her slightly 
weary eyes. 

Gowdy’s work penetrates a very 
particular chamber in my heart with 
its boundless compassion for charac- 
ters whether they are seemingly unre- 
markable like The Romantic’s heartsick 
Louise, disfigured and freakish like 
the title character in “Sylvie” or not 
even human, like the elephants who 


[i Barbara Gowdy at a café near 


Memories are made of this 


Barbara Gowdy’s The Romantic pre- 
sents us with a thesis right there in 
the first sentence: “The past isn’t fixed 
if it isn’t dead.” Yet this statement 
only yields its real meaning gradually 
throughout the scattered shards of 
memory that follow. Memory, how it 
lives and changes within us, as we try 
desperately to hold onto it before it 
fades, is the seed of The Romantic’s 
narrative. And the way Gowdy’s 
deeply introspective protagonist 
Louise describes her relationship to 
memory (“You 
hear of a flood; 
mine washed up at 
odd moments and 
in pieces, like debris from a plane 
crash”) is indicative of the unruly 
chronology her story will take. The 
book’s opening paragraphs are rife 
with stark, contextless yet devastat- 
ingly potent images: “I'd be brushing 
my teeth and see his hands on the 
piano keys twenty years ago.” 
Gowdy’s tone is jarringly intimate, 
and | found myself going over these 
first pages several times, as though | 
needed to somehow absorb every- 
thing in them before | could continue. 
But these frozen images soon ease 
into a loose, idiosyncratic and 
humourous flow. We follow several 
paths in Louise’s memory that inter- 
twine almost randomly: memories of 
her mother, a former beauty queen 
who married young, became reclusive, 
obsessively purchased clothes from the 
Eaton’s catalog and left her family 


populate The White Bone. This sense 
of compassion extended to the con- 
versation we shared, in which Gowdy 
showed endearing curiosity regarding 
things as innocuous as my handwrit- 
ing, the local grocery clerk who sup- 
plies savant-like statistics correlating 
with the sequence of digits on his 
customer’s bills or the panicked fly 
pathetically ramming into the win- 
dow behind us. I heard her whisper 
“poor fly” under the din of the 
espresso machine. 


Vue Weekly: The Romantic contains 
motifs that recur throughout your 
work—the absent mother, visions of 
light, identity being shaped by sexual 
experience—and yet the more overt- 
ly bizarre elements of your other 
books seem largely absent this time. 

Barbara Gowdy: Yeah, I just 
didn’t feel the need to be quite as 
outlandish. I don’t know why that is. 

VW: It’s the kind of shift that 
critics characteristically praise as an 
artist’s “mature work.” 

BG: Some critics call it my 
mature book; others say the charac- 
ters aren’t mature enough. Certainly 


when Louise was nine; memories of 
the Richters, a German family who 
moved to her neighbourhood after her 
mother’s departure; and memories of 
Louise’s love for Abel, the Richters’ 
adopted son who, despite his gentle, 
magnetic spirit, seemed to perpetually 
slip from the grasp of anyone who 
loved him. And we follow Louise as she 
comes into a quiet adulthood, a life 
still aching with Abel’s absence. 

Abel embodies Louise’s idea of 
romantic love—and ideas are very 
powerful to her. What Gowdy implies 
throughout The Romantic is that, 

despite the infinite 

number of possi- 

ble ways in which 

one person can 
feel a deep sense of love for another, 
Louise, like most of us, experiences 
nearly every one of them at a very 
young age. It’s what transforms 
Louise into the romantic of the book's 
title: love becomes something to 
measured not by its constancy but by 
the weight of its loss. Gowdy has a 
remarkable talent for taking the stuff 
of overwrought adolescent tragedy 
and imbuing it with earthiness, empa- 
thy and a detachment that allows us 
to access these emotions without 
being pummeled by them. And The 
Romantic is an eloquent and very indi- 
vidual portrait of love that radiates 
longingly in the margins of everyday 
life. —Joser BRAUN 


THE ROMANTIC 
By Barbara Gowdy * Harper Flamingo * 
372 pp. * $38.95 


vueweekiy €E> 


it’s my most conventional or inof- 
fensive book, but there are women 
especially who've taken great offense 
to Louise. They can’t understand 
why she puts up with Abel. 1 guess 
there's a certain way of being in the 
world now where it’s not cool to 
love that deeply and for that long. 

VW: There’s that persistent 
strain of feminism that believes 
female characters should be role 
models. It always strikes me as odd 
when people resist flawed characters. 

BG: The book market's heavily 
influenced by women’s book clubs, 
and if you read the books they pro- 
mote you can find a template. You 
have nice people. You don’t have 
Anna Karenina or interfering Emma 
or whiny Madame Bovary. I don’t 
know that those books could be pub- 
lished today. What we have are nice, 
decent, usually well-educated people 
and something bad happens to them, 
a child drowns or there's a war, but 
they come through. Nothing really 
changes in them. There’s an ethical 
decorum about how characters should 
be. And the characters in The Roman- 
tic challenge that—they consider sui- 
cide, there's abortion and drinking. 
But what’s so hard to identify with 
here? These characters aren’t hurting 
anyone but themselves. The character 
in “We So Seldom Look on Love” was 
based on a woman who made head- 
lines back in the ‘70s because she was 
a necrophiliac who was actually 
attractive. And | thought, who was 
she hurting? Well, maybe the family 
of the body she was caught with, But I 
mean, really, having sex with them is 
beautiful and she’s in love, and in a 
way, she’s doing something more real 
with that body than the family is. 

VW: How do you feel about hav- 
ing a new novel that readers might 
take to be autobiographical? 

BG: Well, it isn’t, really. I mean, I 
pull from my own experience to gen- 
erate certain details. | have a pretty 
impeccable memory, so I can get the 
house and dialogue and temper of 
the period right. And if I get all that 
right, then, if I’m lucky, I can con- 
vince the reader of my lie, which is 
the rest of it. But I’m not an only 
child; my mother didn’t leave; I’ve 
been deeply in love, but not like 
Louise and certainly not so young. 
What is similar is that in my twenties 
I was in love with an alcoholic. He 
wasn't like Abel, but he was nice and 
charming and witty. And also he 
seemed more optimistic and engaged 
with the world than I was. I never got 
why he drank so much. I told him I'd 
give up anything if you give up 
drinking, and he said, there’s nothing 
more important than this to me. He 
eventually died of drink, indirectly. 

VW: The way you incorporate 
sexual experience into the develop- 
ment of a character's identity feels 


very personal. It reminds me of what | 
find so special in Jane Bowles’s work. 
It’s like an invitation to comprehend 
female identity in a particular manner 
that I feel like I was always searching 
for but could never find before. 

BG: | think it’s because for 


women sexual congress generally 
involves penetration and men are 
generally bigger and stronger, so 
there’s a sense of abandonment in 
submission—and that doesn’t always 
come all that naturally to women. | 
often think that it’s such an odd thing 
to do. /Laughs.] But what you're talk 
ing about with identity, | think it’s 
because women lose their virginity in 


a way that’s much more invasive, and 
lingering in your subconsciousness is 
this possibility of creating a new life 
form. I think that when a man and a 
woman get together and fall in love 
there's more than just the two of 
them involved. And this potential 
miracle changes things in you. 

VW: Well speaking of creation, 
I’m curious about the process of 
writing The Romantic because the 
temporal structure has this unruli 
ness that could almost have us 
believe it poured out of you in the 
same sequence we read it. 

BG: No, | moved it around a bit, 
with the advice of my editor. | wanted 
the narrative to be simple, but it just 
wasn’t. There was a need to balance 
how we viewed the characters’ actions 
in light of their behaviour as children, 
so the chronology shifted. I think 
especially with Abel it’s easier to sym- 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


pathize with him once we've seen 
him as a child. I often think of the 
trial of Paul Bernardo and how his 
parents were there and | wonder, 
would I be there if my son had raped 
and murdered and tortured those peo- 
ple? Maybe I would. When you know 
people as children, you can still see 
the little angel. I think children are 
such wondrous, poetic little weirdos 
just walking down the street with 
their mouths gaping. /Laughs.] But of 
course they don’t remain that way. 

VW: In “We So Seldom Look On 
Love,” you write that “all desire is 
desire for transformation.” This 
statement strikes me as essential to 
your work, a thread that links all of 
it. Is this too reductive or do you 
relate to what I’m saying? 

BG: Oh yeah, a lot. Even the 
desire to get up is driven by some 
urge, an urge to see something else, to 
get somewhere else, somewhere where 
you'll be another person. You know, at 
my age—I’m turning 53—maybe I've 
had all my deepest experiences and 
nothing’s going to get better. I don’t 
know that anything entirely new 
could happen to me and, you know, 
maybe I'll just die. But there’s this 
sense that I might learn something 
new. I've always felt very self-invented, 
and the possibility that I can change is 
what keeps me going. You know, a 
chair is only a chair because we name 
it a chair. You smash it up and it's just 
pieces of wood. And you can recon- 
struct that wood into something else. 
Transformations happen all the time, 
we can see it. People lead hugely magi- 
cal lives and it’s only natural that we 
wonder why some of that fairy dust 
can't fall on me. O 


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Viva goth Vegas! 


Shopping for 
corsets and 
avoiding the sun 
at a Las Vegas 
goth convention 


By GILBERT DA SILVA 


a great place for people to go and 
let their hair down. But what hap- 
pens when a group of people travel 
there who are so pretentious they call 
their yearly gathering a Convergence? 
I had to know. Every year various 
cities compete for the privilege of 
hosting a massive international con- 
vention for goths. This year Sin City 
got the nod and Convergence 9— 
perhaps the biggest event of the year 
for the North American goth com- 
munity—took over the strip for four 
days last April. It’s a gathering of all 
those crazy kids 
you knew (and 
perhaps avoided) 
in high school 
who dressed in black, wouldn’t stop 
listening to their Love and Rockets 
albums and seemed a little too 
unhappy with their own existence. 

Well, those kids never went away. 
Great hordes of them have been hid- 
ing in closet-sized bars all over the 
country, and this year they congre- 
gated at the pastel-pink Flamingo 
Hotel like moths drawn morosely to 
a flame. More than 700 people 
attended the event and so it seemed 
as though every third person ‘in Las 
Vegas was draped in black and 
weighed down with hair extensions. 
You saw them everywhere: the buf- 
fets, the gambling dens, the shadows 
around the pool. Every night from 
three to eight in the morning, the 
hot tubs became overrun, the water 
turning murky with diluted hair dye. 

After a quick sign-in, the festivi- 
ties began with a much-needed 
round of karaoke. Nothing like 
putting a collection of social misfits 
together for the first time and then 
expecting them to make asses of 
themselves in front of total 
strangers—and to do it all sober. 
After that painful event, the night 
took a definite leap forward with a 
fashion show. Across town at the 
classic Huntridge Theatre, 10 compa- 
nies displayed the future of goth 
clothing. There were corsets and 
light-reactant clothing, corsets, 
boots of all shapes and heights... and 
a few more corsets for good measure. 
The cameras flashed, the crowd 
gasped and the mood was electric. 
Personally, I had a hard time getting 
into the hot new “bishop” look for 
men, but that just might be the 
Catholic in me acting up. The night 
ended with three bands knocking it 
out for the nihilists in the house. 
From the retro-styled Reverb TV to 
the moody Goth Babylonian Tile, 
the night had it all. 

The next night was entirely 
devoted to dancing, as an array of Los 
Angeles DJs tore the place up. People 
moved from the pounding, pulsating 


[: Vegas is a convention town. It’s 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


TRAVEL 


dance floor to the cool, quiet breeze 
of the caged-in parking lot. Schmooz- 
ing and socializing was the name of 
the game—I even met a few escapees 
from the People’s Republic of Ontario 
(a bunch of Torontonians trying to 
avoid SARS questions). In fact, I came 
across several pockets of Canadian 
goths. Most of them were from 
Toronto and Montreal, but I did run 
into an oilfield employee from Cal- 
gary at the hot tub Saturday night. 


. We shared a drink and laughed at 


news of recent snowfalls back home. 


MY DAYS—YES, we actually went 
outside during the daytime—were 
spent in the makeshift market where 
visitors could purchase all manner of 
goth clothes and paraphernalia. There 
were the obligatory tattoo and pierc- 
ing artists, of course, as well as the 
apparently mandated five corset sell- 
ers. Beyond that, there was a wide 
array of clothiers (mostly for women; 
goth clothing is so much for the 
women) and music 
companies. Then 
there were the fun 
vendors like the 
New York soapmaker whose bars bore 
sexually explicit designs with the 
warning “for external use only.” There 
was the coffinmaker who designed 
caskets to your specifications and 
desires. There was the maskmaker 
who fashioned skulls out of leather. 
There was the goth china set and mar- 
tini arrangement. There was the 
alchemist from Hollywood with an 
amazing array of oils and potions for 
any occasion. It just kept going. 

The final night was a gala of 
mythic proportions. Being in Vegas 
and staying in the hotel that Bugsy 
Siegel built, our inner gangsters were 
raring to go. Everyone wore their 
most spectacular outfit or just opted 
for ‘30s cool. Men in pinstripes 
trolled with women in skin-tight 
black leather miniskirts. The hotel 
staff had been pretty cool during the 
entire event—I suppose working in 
Las Vegas will make anybody jaded— 
but even they had to look twice as 
we walked in packs through the 
lobby. Another set of bands played 
to the wee hours of the morning. No 
one wanted to say goodbye; most of 
us stayed by the pool until the 
farewell breakfast, then promptly 
slinked away to find sleep or hide 
from the glaring sun. 

It’s kind of funny. Goth scenes 
are all alike—I even met a younger 
version of myself in Vegas and we 
shared a drink as we commiserated 
about our lives. Most times when 
you put two similar types together, 
they'll duke it out for supremacy. 
But being in Vegas and meeting so 
many like-minded people was a nov- 
elty, a chance to see how well we 
could fare in another city. We all go 
out into the world trying to establish 
our uniqueness, I realized, and yet 
we all end up the same. I may not 
have the hair extensions or the tat- 
toos or the corsets, but at least | 
know that in every scene in every 
city there's another version of me 
dancing out on the floor. And that’s 
pretty damn cool. © 


Old clothes, new technology 


The Internet makes 
hunting for vintage 
clothing easy 

(and addictive) 


By JULIANN WILDING 


lopping online for vintage cloth- 
S a serious business. What do 
want—are you a dedicated col- 
lector, or do you just want a cool shirt 
to wear on Saturday? Being specific in 
your search can actually be more fruit- 
ful than combing thrift stores—the 
best items you could find are already 
handpicked and ready to go. There are 
countless online vintage sites offering 
everything from lace pyjamas made in 
the pre-Renaissance era (seriously) to 
those boots your mom used to have 
that you wish you'd stolen when you 
had the chance. 

Looking through more than 100 
websites—all with links to other spe- 
cialty websites—I tried to choose a 
few that stood out and impressed 
me with the quality of their mer- 
chandise. Enjoy, and remember: 
there are far too many rad sites to 
check out all at once. What a terri- 
ble habit to pick up.... 

Trashy Diva (trashydiva.com) is 
an independent label as well as an 
online shop, and the site is laid out 
like a boutique, with a “clothing 
department,” a “jewelry counter” and 
a red, white and black theme. Trashy 
Diva the line features a simple yet 
sleek collection of classic style 
remakes, which they display alongside 
the designer originals. There is also a 
more generic vintage section which 
focuses on elegant, flirty, sexy pieces. 
The jewelry selection features lots of 
glittery stones on great ornate 
brooches and draping necklaces. They 
also have a full selection of profession- 
ally made corsets, some cute petti- 
pants and a wicked selection of 
stockings. The prices are the same as 
you'd pay in a real boutique—I could 
almost hear my money buming away 
while I was looking on this site. It may 
not have the large selection of some of 
the more general sites, but these ladies 
have pretty good taste overall. 

Milan Tainan has been seriously 
collecting beautiful, rare vintage for 
more than 20 years. Her site Just 
Say When (justsaywhen.com) is 
filled with a selection of the rare and 
the beautiful, starting with gowns 
from the 1920s all the way through 
to ’80s Armani. It’s obvious that this 
is someone who has really fine-tuned 
their eye and knows how to pick out 
the awesome from the everyday. The 
site also includes recommended read- 
ing, articles and interviews about the 
way she runs her business, what kind 
of clothes get her really excited—she 
has good taste, too—and tips on how 
to be a successful collector. The site 
features lots of unique, ornate and 
tare finds, and even if you wouldn't 
Wear some of them they’re pretty 
Cool to take a close look at. 

Shockadelic (shockadelic.com) 
is a simple little online shop based 
in Australia that’s a little more mod- 
erm than most of the sites I found, 


with most of its pieces taken from 
the ’60s, '70s and '80s. Both the 
men’s and women’s collections focus 
on colourful, sporty pieces, but 
there’s not much in the way of rare 


STYLE 


label finds and design house clothes 
here. The Shockadelic shopping cou- 
ple would likely be one of those 


trashydiva 


__cute, clean-cut couples who are into 


-old-schoot classics and matching 
their colours really well. The site 
itself could be set up a little better— 
it seems quite new—and the photos 
display the clothing lying flat rather 
than the typical mannequin display, 
making styles, cut and fall a little 
more difficult to gauge. 

Viva la Vintage (vivalavin- 
tage.com) features items from the 
1940s to the '80s and is a really easy- 
to-use website—mostly because the 
categories are cleverly divided into 
subcategories to help you find the 
exact styles and items you're looking 
for: Rockabilly, Mod, Disco, Swing, 
Asian, Designer... see what I mean? 
The best section is probably Denim, 
which boasts sexy cowboy threads, 
deliciously faded jeans (mostly 
designer) and a sweet collection of 
acid-wash pieces. (Yeah!) They also 
have two “specialty” categories— 
Cherries and Leopard—and have 
done their handpicking quite well in 
these departments. © 


CORRECTION: In last week’s Hot 
Summer Guide, the editorial department 
made a change to Juliann Wilding’s 
piece on summer essentials that left the 
impression that the Reebok Super 
Knockout boot was not available 
exclusively in Alberta at locations of 
Gravity Pope. Vue Weekly regrets the 
error, and apologizes for any 
inconvenience this may have caused. 


Reebok >< 


exclusively available at 


nockout 


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BRIT’S FISH AND CHIPS 

6940-77 Street * 485-1797 

Brit’s boasts authentic fish and chips, 
Bass beer on tap and what my friend 
calls the nicest people she’s met since 
leaving the Yukon and Alaska. | was 
amazed by the spread: two and a half 
pieces of tender haddock and too many 
chips/onion rings to finish. It’s as though 
I've been teleported back to a roadside 
pub on a damp, foggy evening in the 
British autumn. You'll find traditional 
English fare as well as a complete take- 
out menu filled with yummy choices. 
Average Price: $ (Reviewed 09/26/02) 


BRUNO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 
9914-89 Avenue * 433-8161 

There are times when a low-key meal 
can be very satisfying. That's exactly 
what | got when | went solo (mio) to 
Bruno’s Italian Restaurant, a quaint little 
room just off 99 Street. The compact 
menu, which lists only about 15 items, 
contains many interesting and different 
options. | chose the penne puttanesca 
(only $5.95), which has olives, garlic 
and hot peppers in a tomato sauce. It 
was fantastic: spicy and delicious and | 


mopped up every last drop with the 
crusty bread that came with the meal. 


Food is the focus here. Average Price: 


$-$$ (Reviewed 05/09/02) 


CALABASH CAFE 

10630-124 Street * 414-6625 

The Calabash Café on 124 Street does 
a damn decent job with their take on 
Caribbean cuisine. The tiny dining area 
features colourful purple and orange 
accents, West Indian art and a cozy_lit- 
tle couch dropped right in the middle 
of the floor. Their menu is to the point 
with a handful of traditional dishes like 
jerk chicken, rotis (the goat and potato 
curry choice looked awfully good the 
night we visited), Jamaican patties and 
Escovitch fish (pan-fried snapper with 
sautéed onions and a hot pepper vinai- 
grette). The bottom line ts that it 
makes your belly happy and when 
that’s the case you needn't worry 
about anything else. Average Price: 
$-$$% (Reviewed 06/20/02) 


CHURROS KING 

10152-82 Avenue * 989-1083 

Veterans of the Old Strathcona food 
scene have probably been wondering 
just exactly what was going on with 
the Churros King, the tiny Latino grill 
on Whyte Ave just east of Calgary Trail. 
Well, a seemingly simple plan to reno- 
vate the restaurant turned into a night- 
mare that dragged out for months, 
with the place’s doors closed all the 
while. “I thought it was a joke when 


PREVIOUSLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS 


Dad called and said we finally had the 
permit,” says Volkhart Caro. The beau- 
tiful touches throughout the expanded 
space are plucked right from the fami- 
ly’s roots in Chile—the stucco-arch- 
ways, the lattice board across the 
ceiling with plastic grapes hanging 
down, the homemade kites hanging 
near the cash counter and the terra 
cotta-coloured roof tiles. They’ve 
added some wicked stuff to the menu, 
too, like pesco frito (deep-fried sole) 
and the mack daddy of all meat dish- 
es, the Parrillas King, a barbecue for 
two served on a hot grill right at your 
table, which would've been impossible 
in the old setup. It contains about a 
kilo of meat, including top sirloin beef, 
chorizo, chicken and pork, served with 
salad and sopaipillas, a Chilean bread 
for mopping up the goodies. Average 
price: $ (Reviewed 04/03/03) 


DUNN’S FAMOUS DELI 

4404 Calgary Trail North * 434-6415 

| was in the mood for a decent sandwich 
and Dunn’s—a Western arm of the origi- 
nal Montreal-based establishment that 
has been in operation for about 75 
years—was looking good. The menu has 
a small selection of Jewish fare like latkes 
and blintzes, as well as some entrées and 
a lovely-sounding bagel and lox platter. 
And the price is right—everything is listed 
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giant smoked meat sandwiches, and 
“quite tall” ones at that. At the very least | 
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Lunch-drunk love 


No-nonsense joints 
like Pat N’ Mike’s 
deserve as much 
respect as a ritzy 
restaurant 


By DAVID DiICENZO 


he guy sitting beside me at the 
Te counter of Pat N’ Mike’s 

Family Restaurant apparently 
doesn’t have enough carbs on his 
plate. So he inquires about a bun. 

“You have two slices of bread,” 
the sensible response from the ae 
Brit waitress. 

That’s good enough for him. He's 
not heard from again ‘til it’s time to 
go. I like the server's no-nonsense 
approach, the same one she employed 
with me moments earlier. 


25 years ago 
this week... 


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“Want coffee?” 


“Yes... thanks,” I say. 
“Menu?” 
“Yes.” 


If only J could be so concise. 

The bang-bang nature of the con- 
versation at Pat N’ Mike's is kind of a 
necessity. The lunch crunch is on and 
the large-sized dining room is packed 
with people—probably around 100, if 
I had to guess. I begin to flip through 


| [RESTAURANTS 


the big, man-made, leather-bound 
menu, which is filled with a wide 
selection of family restaurant fare, 
from sandwiches (good ol’ corned 
beef, for example), burgers and break- 
fast to a few bigger entrées (breaded 
minute steak) and a trio of lighter 
stuff that includes liver and onions. 

However long it’s been since Pat & 
Mike’s got started, I figure not much 
has changed. And that’s good. As I sit 
up at the diner-style counter in my 
spacious, swiveling double seat, I gaze 
around the noisy room and find all 
sorts of cool stuff. There’s a rack filled 
with those mini-boxes of cereal; nearby 
are a couple of pies awaiting their call 
to duty. I smile when I see the circular, 
revolving chit holder that the open 
kitchen uses for new orders from the 
“veteran” waitstaff. And Mike himself 
is making the rounds, keeping an eye 
on things during the controlled chaos 
of the lunch rush. I assume that most 
of the blue collar clientele is from the 
surrounding businesses that make up 
the Westgate Business Park. 

This place is a throwback—an 
assessment verified the second my 
waitress brings me water in one of 
those yellow/brown rock-type glasses 
your parents had in the cupboard 
back in the ’70s. 


| DECIDE ON THE CUTLET sandwich 
with some fries and coleslaw on the 
side. Almost everything that comes out 
of the kitchen has gravy on it so I join 


in and get a scoop for the fries. Now, 
I’m not going to pretend that my sand- 
wich is one of the best things I’ve ever 
ingested—it was zapped in the deep 
fryer just a little too long for my lik- 
ing—but for $5.75, I didn’t really 
expect the world. I’m eagerly anticipat- 
ing the “special sauce” but can’t help 
but crack another smile when I find 
relish and mayo on my bun. The 
chunky slaw is pretty good, though. 

The two pies available for dessert 
today are pineapple coconut cream 
and apple crumble. I choose the lat- 
ter, which costs a mere toonie—half 
a buck more to have it a la mode. 
How sweet is that? My piece of apple 
crumble is huge, so I’m guessing 
Mike doesn’t make all his profit from 
the pie counter. 

That’s it—I’m all done. I leave a 
few bucks for a grat on the counter 
and go up to the front to pay my bill, 
taking full advantage of the cool little 
wooden toothpick dispenser sitting 
next to the bowl of mints. Mike takes 
my money and wishes me a good day. 

After sitting at the counter watch- 
ing this place run, I realize that I have 
as much respect for a busy restaurant 
that serves simple food to a ton of 
people as I do for a ritzy kitchen 
where truffle oil is the condiment of 
choice. Everyone gets their food 
quickly, no one complains—and if 
they happen to do so unnecessarily, 
brash spitfires like the Brit Lady will 
set you straight. It’s a case of being 
functional, which is very hard to do. 
As hard as creating a trendy mew space 
and trying to build a loyal following. 

Just like that, the crowd at Pat 
& Mike’s dissipates and the busy 
ladies running the joint have some 
temporary relief. They'll probably 
be thrown right back in the fire 
again a few hours later for dinner. 

And the next day, lunch starts all 
over again. O 


PAT N’ MIKE’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 
17732-102 Ave (Westgate Business 
Park) © 484-7673 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


DISHWEEKIY 


sandwiches. Average Price: $$ 
“(Reviewed 04/25/02) 


FABIO’S PLACE 

10625-51 Avenue » 434-5666 

You remember Fabio, don’t you? It came 
as no surprise that the clientele at Fabio’s 
Place, on 51 Avenue by Southgate Mall, 
looked nothing like the long-haired Italian 


who graces the covers of cheesy Paper-. 


backs. Instead, | found a small group of 
local regulars eating pub food and drink- 
ing draft. The wings are great at Fabio’s, 
and | haven’t come across many good 
wing joints in Edmonton, so these ones 
surprised me. You have to love these little 
neighbourhood retreats where you can 
just pop in and talk bullshit with your fel- 
low regulars over a game of stick, a draft 
and a meal. Average Price: $-$$ 
(Reviewed 05/16/02) 


FIFE ‘N’ DEKEL 

9114-51 Avenue * 436-9235 

10646-170 Street » 489-6436 
12028-149 Street » 454-5503 

3464-99 Street (drive-thru location) 
My views on apple pie have changed 
since | dropped by one of three Fife ’N’ 
Dekel locations here in Edmonton—four, 
if you count the drive-thru on 99 Street. 
The café/deli makes a wicked version 
with sour cream in the filling and an 
exquisitely crunchy buttercrumb top- 
ping. This rich slice is easily the best 
apple pie I’ve ever had. Fife 'N’ Dekel 
began selling only milkshakes, then 
added their famous pies; eventually the 
scope expanded to include a full array of 
lunch fare. Don’t be surprised if the pies 


and sandwiches blow you away. Aver- 
age Price: $ (Reviewed 05/30/02) 


GRUB MED RISTORANTE 

17 Fairway Drive + 436-1988 

Not only is the food great and plentiful 
at Grub Med Ristorante, but this fine 
Greek establishment also provides live 
entertainment in the form of a kinky- 
haired and beautiful exotic belly dancer 
who works the room for about half an 
hour. We ordered Grub Med’s mezé 
option: a sampling ofa variety of Greek 
dishes that ranged from excellent apps 
to a delicious main course for $21.95 per 
stooge. It didn’t seem like much food 
was being brought out at the time, but 
all of us were stuffed by the end, and | 
think that says it all. Average Price: $$- 
$$$ (Reviewed 05/02/02) 


HIGH VOLTAGE FOOD 

AND COFFEE BAR 

10387-63 Ave * 437-3202 

It's off the beaten path in the sense that 
you might not think to stop there—see- 
ing as you're likely driving past it in a 
car. But High Voltage is a gem, serving 
the best assortment of donairs you'll 
find on the south side. Traditional 
Greek, blue cheese, jerk—they’re just 
some of the styles on the menu, in 
addition to a wide assortment of cold 
cut sandwiches, Greek specialties and 
-vegetarian fare like spanakopita or 
falafel. The Chicago gyros is a must. If 
you haven't eaten in a few days, order 
the high voltage size. Average Price: 
5 (Reviewed 03/20/03) 


HONEST MUR’S BAR AND GRILL 
8937-82 Avenue * 463-6397 
This atmospheric Bonnie Doon pub is 


Presents 


ciry 


International music festival 


well worth seeking out—honest! The 
charm of this place is that everyone is 
welcome. Besides, the football para- 
phernalia tacked all over the walls is an 
unmistakable tipoff that you're not 
going to have to grab a blazer out of 
the back of the car. Just the way | like 
it. I'm told that the burgers are all the 
rage at this joint. They even have a 
cafeteria-style hamburg on the menu. 
Honest Mur’s also serves breakfast on 
the weekends and according to some 
friends of my friend Colin, it’s a great 
spread. Average Price: $-$$ 
(Reviewed 12/12/02) 


KRUA WILAI 

9940-106 Street » 424-8308 

In the downtown eatery Krua Wilai, | got 
to sample some of the better Thai food 
in icy Alberta. It was authentic indeed, 
though somewhat toned down in the 
spice department. Unlike we North 
Americans, Thais consider eating a 
group activity. No 4 Ia carte ordering or 
spacing out of courses here—in Thai- 
land, you put all the dishes on the table 
at once and everyone enjoys. Krua Wilai 
offered me a true taste of Thailand. 
Sweet, sour, hot; it was wild. Average 
Price: $$ (Reviewed 01/23/03) 


THE MONGOLIE GRILL 

10104-109 Street » 420-0037 

The Mongolie Grill off Jasper Avenue 
will more than suffice when the barbar- 
ian in you requires sustenance. Head 
up to the raw buffet, take a bowl and 
load it up with whatever you fancy 
from a large variety of meats, seafood, 
veggies and sauces. A cook then takes 
it off your hands, weighs it and pro- 
ceeds to prepare it for you before 


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VUEWEEKIY GE JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


DISH WEEKLY = 


delivering it to your table a few min- 
utes later. In terms of dollars and cents, 
you pay $2.39 per 100 grams of raw 
ingredients, so each of our plates came 
to about $12 and change. But beware: 
you're essentially choosing everything 
that will go into your own dish—so if it 
sucks, you can only blame yourself. 
Average Price: $$ (Reviewed 
06/27/02) 


MOTORAUNT 

12406-66 Street * 477-8797 

It took mere moments for my buddy and 
| to decide what we would select from 
Motoraunt’s tiny menu—the Monster 
Burger, two whole friggin’ pounds of 
beef at a steep but seemingly reasonable 
price of $13.95. Ever get one of those 
round loaves of bread that are about a 
foot in diameter? Well, that was the bun. 
As far as burgers go, the Monster is pret- 
ty standard: a charbroiled patty and 
ultra-fresh toppings. The Motoraunt is a 
massive double-decker motor home 


Paaeretakce ae Relmincmselicc.| 
local musical performers 


Viavinehtone schemes mec lielac martini's 


fram |} am to 11 pm 
.the Riverside Pass & Lounge 


kitchen 
North Saskatchewan River 


such as the North Saskatchewan, 
Ocean Moon, or the Percolator 


=| SWite)asicet! 
“= Court Hotel 


Court, 9th & Ave 
387 
none: 780.423.9999 
Fax: 780 423.9996 
Emait hoveli@chorntoncourt. com 


complete with velvety red accents. It’s 
truly a fun experience—one that people 
have apparently been enjoying for 
almost two full decades. Average Price: 
$-$$ (Reviewed 08/01/02) 


PADMANADI 

10626-97 Street » 428-8899 

What's a hungry vegetarian to do? We 
drove into the belly of the beast—97 
Street—and sauntered into the couple- 
month-old Padmanadi Vegetarian Restau- 
rant ready for a surprise. Ordering was 
easy: we picked the dinner for four, an 
incredible deal at $48, And that wee price 
tag hardly prepared us for the bounty of 
food that came our way. Everything was 
perfect. Padmanadi serves a wide range 
of Asian styles, concentrating on Indone- 
sian and Taiwanese-accented dishes. It’s 
completely vegan and moreover follows 
the Buddhist belief of eschewing all garlic 
and onion. Even without these so-called 
culinary essentials, the flavours were alive. 
Average Price: $$ (Reviewed 01/16/03) 


PUB 1905 

10171 Saskatchewan Drive * 431-1717 
There’s definitely a sporting flavour in 
Pub 1905 (the old Ritchie Mill restau- 
rant). Yeah, they still have the old 
stone walls, but it’s amazing how a few 
strategically placed hockey jerseys can 
change a restaurant’s theme. And the 
mood is further lightened by pictures 
of Canadian celebrities (Michael J. Fox, 
Leslie Nielsen, John Candy and even a 
print of Rush’s Moving Pictures) strewn 
across the walls. They may have 
changed over to a pub theme, but the 
food has flair. Despite the changeover, 
there’s still a special on mussels. Our 
big bowl, done in a tasty coconut curry 
cream sauce, was delicious. They were 


large, plump suckers and the half-price 
deal of just $5 was certainly okay with 
the woman and me. We also tried the 
black tiger prawns in Cajun butter, an 
appetizer-sized spinach salad and 
something called a gourmet stuffer, a 
huge baked potato topped with your 
choice of special sauce. Average 
price: $ (Reviewed 04/ 10/03) 


RATT (ROOM AT THE TOP) 

7th Floor, SUB (U of A) * 492-2153 
Beautifully located on the top floor of the 
Students’ Union Building, RATT offers a 
spectacular 270-degree view of the city. 
The menu offers the usual bar-friendly 
but student-priced choices, each under 
five bucks—chicken club sandwiches, 
veggie wraps and BLTs. With such friend- 
ly service and an affordably diverse 
menu, it’s small wonder that RATT is a 
favourite not only with students but with 
professors seeking an up-close dose of 
true campus spirit as well. There are few 
better places to rekindle those old-time 
schoo! stories or simply hang with your 
buddies as you munch on nachos, down 
a beer and enjoy a lordly view of the city 
below you. Average Price: $ (Reviewed 
09/05/02) 


RED OX INN 

9420-91 St * 465-5727 

You either know the Red Ox or you 
don‘t—and from my understanding, if 
you're an Edmontonian with any gen- 
uine love for food, you're fully aware of 
this gem tucked away in the residential 
south side neighbourhood near Gal- 
lagher Park. A superior food experience is 
sensual by its very nature and not only 
was my nose happy, but my eyes were 
likewise when my basil crusted lamb 
chops were delivered. After a good 


while, my plate was completely void of 
any food. (Had | been home, | would've 
licked it for sure.) We sipped some more 
of the luxurious wine and eventually 
ordered something sweet—blueberry 
and white chocolate bread pudding with 
a warm créme anglaise. The food, the 
atmosphere, the well-timed service... all 
of it inspires awe in me, but what | think 
best sums up a place like the Red Ox Inn 
is the incredible attention to detail, from 
the finely-crafted side dishes to the lovely 
prints on the orange-shaded walls. Aver- 
age Price: $555 (Reviewed 03/27/03) 


REMEDY 

8631-109 Street * 433-3096 

Remedy is relaxed, authentic and off the 
beaten path of Whyte Ave both in geog- 
raphy and style. You could booze it up if 
you like or get a coffee if you’re content 
to keep it civil. A couple of pool tables 
upstairs offer some entertainment. And 
of course, they always have a bunch of 
tasty things to snack on. The menu 
board has just a handful of items, like 
chili (vegetarian, too), sandwiches, sal- 
ads and small dishes like hummus. To 
have a versatile little haunt like Remedy 
in my neighbourhood—again, away 
from Whyte—is a large comfort. Aver- 
age Price: $ (Reviewed 1 1/14/02) 


RICKY’S ALL DAY GRILL 

10140-109 St * 421-7546 

Ricky’s—a western Canadian chain with a 
ton of outlets throughout B.C., Alberta 
and (I believe) Saskatchewan—serves a 
bevy of diner staples like liver and onions, 
Salisbury steak, burgers and sandwiches, 
but there are almost two full pages of 
brekkie food on the menu as well, and 
the cool thing is it’s all available any time 
of the day. It’s definitely a boon to the 


The Edmonton Musicians Directory 


Edmonton's only musicians directory will offer free listings to 
phone number and/or email address, a photo (if possible) and 


any musician, band or artist. Just send us your band's name & genre, a contact name, 
a brief description of your band. (Vue Weekly reserves the right to edit for length) 


Send information to VUE WEEKLY musicians guide, 10303-108 St., Edmonton, AB, T5J 1L7 or email to directory@vue.ab.ca 
Advertisers contact Rob Lightfoot at 780.426.1996 for advertising information. 


VUEWEEKLY €i> 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


hungry diner, even if it throws a mighty 
ig wrench into the selection process. 

»ffee cups are already on the tables 
(turned upside-down no less), and the 
eating consists mostly of booths. You 
ect Linda Lavin to walk up to 

__ take your order, but the Ricky’s inner 
belly is new and clean, not beat-up and 
dingy like Mel's. It’s like a new pair of 
glimmering white kicks—you need to 
scuff them up a bit... you know, work 
‘em in. They even offer shakes, so | order 
a chocolate one, the first time I've done 
so in a restaurant in years and years. The 
triple chorizo Benny was absolutely gar- 
gantuan, with three eggs and a moun- 
tain of home fries piled onto an 
extra-large red plate (heated, good for 
keeping the breakfast contents warm). 
Average Price: $$ (Reviewed 05/29/03) 


RIVERSIDE BISTRO 

1 Thornton Court (99 Street & Jasper 
Avenue) * 423-9999 

Summer buzzes and glorious views aren't 
the only reasons to visit the Riverside. Sit- 
uated inside of Thornton Court Hotel, the 
place has been in operation since the fall 
of 2001. There’s an immediate upscale 
feel as you walk through the cozy lounge 
and into a spacious room with gold high- 
lights, massive windows and nice wood- 
en highbacked chairs. The food itself is a 
mix of the elegant and the casual and the 
clientele was similar to the menu— 
diverse. As visually appealing as it was sat- 
isfying. Average Price: $-$$ (Reviewed 
02/14/02) 


SAVOY LOUNGE 

10401-82 Avenue * 438-0373 

The owners of Savoy Lounge make no 
apologies for going upscale on a street 
where phrases like “$2 hi-balls” and 
“happy hour” are part of the vernacular 
(slurred, of course). I’ve always been a 
proponent of good, affordable fare; 
therefore, I’m all the more impressed to 
find that Savoy's dinner plates run 
around $12 and the tapas menu ranges 
from $3 to $9. Not everyone goes for 
this kind of intricate cuisine, but it’s a 
rare thing to see such a selection in a 
lounge, let alone at prices you can 
stomach. Average Price: $-$$ 
(Reviewed 10/17/02) 


THREE MUSKATEERS 

FRENCH CREPERIE 

10416-82 Ave * 437-4329 

“The cuisine of cowardice,” remarks Steve 
as we walk in to grab a bite. “I wonder 
what they'd say if | asked for freedom 
fries?” In fact, we order a couple of Fin du 
Monde beers (from Quebec) and scan 
through the brunch menu. | quickly fall in 
love with this brew, which is murky and 
looks like a frothy mango juice but boasts 
a great sweet taste—amazing considering 
that it’s nine per cent alcohol. Exceptional 
flavour and a high alcohol content— 
that’s a dangerous mix on a sunny day. 
After a scan of the menu, Steve makes his 
decision. “| don,t know what it is,” he 
says, “but I’m getting the gallette 
Canadiénne.” Myself, | can‘t stray away 
from the eggs Benedict, especially when 
the Hollandaise sauce is homemade, 
unlike-the handy Knorr packets | use in 
my own kitchen. Steve's gallette is a 
whole-wheat crepe stuffed with smoked 
salmon, sour cream and capers and 
topped with a pink seafood purée. He 
takes care of the entire thing so I’m 


guessing it’s good. My eggs Benny are 


Sensational. I'm certainly pleased with the 
buttery Hollandaise, but the thick, juicy 
back bacon makes the dish even better. 
The home fries could’ve been a little 
crispier, but still, it’s the best Benedict I've 
had, which is saying a lot. I've tried many. 
Average Price: $$ (Reviewed 04/24/03) 


TOKYO EXPRESS 

Various locations 

Edmontonian Cathy Luke digs her sushi. 
The only problem is that her busy lifestyle 
made it difficult to make regular stops at 
all her favourite local haunts. What she 


(and people like her) needed was a quick 
answer to that craving—so she opened 
up Tokyo Express. How’s that for prob- 
lem-solving? The Hong Kong-born Luke, 
along with her sushi chef brothers Steve 
and William, debuted Tokyo Express five 
years ago at WEM and now the family 
Owns seven River City locations, including 
the groundbreaking drive-thru down on 
23rd Ave, a first in the Great White North, 
“Lam a sushi lover,” Luke says. “I thought 
that there should be a place where you 
can grab it quick, with good quality and 
reasonable prices. “That’s how we start- 


ed.” Well, I've now run the gamut at 
Tokyo Express. In four days, | made three 
Visits to two different locations, sampling 
a wide selection of what the homegrown 
chain had to offer. My stomach was rum- 
bling by about noon so | went to one of 
their two mall locations to enjoy a mas- 
sive rice bowl—the teriyaki chicken, to be 
exact. For $4.95, you get a hearty dish 
loaded with rice, julienned carrots, 
cucumbers and a breaded piece of chick- 
€n, slathered in the teriyaki and topped 
with sesame seeds. On Saturday, we 
ordered the udon noodle soup, a single 


\eS 


Smo 


R Patio Now open: 


dynamite roll and rainbow rolls. Oh, and 
green tea. The udon was wicked, a gen- 
erous helping of broth loaded with the 
thick four-sided noodles, crab, a breaded 
Pork cutlet, sweet tofu, fish cake slices, 
green onion and a big, deep-fried shrimp. 
Monday, | tried the assorted sushi combo 
and took advantage of the add-on, $1.99 
for miso soup and green tea ice cream. 
So there you go — three trips in four days, 
at a total cost of about $30. Try and scout 
out four decent, healthy meals for that 
much dough. Average Price: $ 
(Reviewed 05/01/03) 


UTE 


{ 


, foe eal +9! 
Pore Applebee's to love..come visit usat our'Red Deer ¢ Calgary? loc 


VUEWEEKLY 3 JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


26 Gates:6:05pm Game:7:05pm 
ea Military Appreciation Night 
courtesy the BEAR 
June27 Gates:6:05pm Game:7:05pm 


Cokeproduct giveaway 
first 2000 fans 


June28 Gates:6:05pm Game:7:05pm 


Ron Kittle Day 
bobbleheads to 1000 fans 
courtesy Greyhound Canada/CHED ° 


June29 Gates: 12:35pm Game: 1:35pm 


Law Enforcement/Emergency : ; 
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courtesy Power92 


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JulyO1 Gates:12:35pm Game:1:35pm 
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Wallace in wonderland 


The Dropkick 
Murphys’ new 
piper goes from 
steelworker to 
punk rocker 


By DAVE JOHNSTON 


Scruffy Wallace wouldn’t be play- 
ing with the Dropkick Murphys. 

When the Boston punk band lost 
their previous piper Spicy last year to 
marriage and a life in England, the 
Calgary native answered an open 
call that appeared in the group’s 
Internet newsletter saying they were 
searching for a replacement. Wallace 
didn’t think his application would 
get a response, but a couple of days 
later Ken Casey called him at home 
to invite him to come down to 
Boston to try out. Excited, Wallace 
quit his steelworking job in Calgary, 
drained his savings, bought a ticket 
and flew down. Three weeks later— 
just before St. Patrick’s Day, Wallace 
notes—the band invited him to stay 
on. Since then, he been across Amer- 
ica and Europe, and currently he’s 
enjoying the punk road show known 
as the Van’s Warped Tour. 

Wallace couldn’t be a happier 
guy. “These guys have done nothing 
but open their arms to me,” he says. 
“They're solid, down-to-earth peo- 
ple. Especially for accepting a Cana- 
dian in their midst.” 

Playing the pipes is an usual 
choice for any young man, especially 
if you take them up at age 13 the way 
Wallace did, right around the same 
time he discovered the world of punk 
tock. Rather than take up the guitar 
or buy a drum kit, Wallace heeded 
the advice of his late grandmother. “I 
was very close to my grandmother,” 
he says. “My mother and brother, as 


|: it wasn’t for his grandmother, 


well. And she told me when I was 13, 
‘One day I'm going to die, and I want 
you to play the bagpipes at my funer- 
al.’ I decided to learn—not because 
she was going to die, but because she 
wanted me to learn.” 

The decision kicked off Wallace's 
military career. He joined Calgary's 
Highlander cadet corps, where he 
learned the basics of playing the 
pipes. He carried on, joining the reg- 
ular army when he was 17, serving 
for five years with the 3rd Battalion 
PPCLI, better known as the Calgary 
Highlanders. He even saw action in 


Z 


Bosnia at the height of the region’s 
hostilities in 1992. “That wasn’t a lot 
of fun,” he quips. 

When his grandmother did die, 
Wallace fulfilled her wish. “That's 
how it all started,” he says quietly. 
He carries her with him every- 
where, in the form of a tattoo on 
his arm. “She’s helped me get to 
this point in my life.” 


DURING HIS TIME in the army, Wal- 
lace also learned the importance of 
unity, a theme he found in the music 
of the Dropkick Murphys. He bought 
the band’s first album, Do or Die, in 
1997 and discovered songs about life 
as a working stiff, trying to get by in 
the world. “I relate to what they’re 
talking about,” he says, “being out 
drinking beers with my buddies, 
being close to my family. That’s what 
so appealing about this band. Before 
I joined the band, I was a steelworker 
in Calgary. I was working 10 to 12 
hours a day, breaking my back doing 
something I didn't enjoy doing. 
What always attracted me [to 
punk]—aside from the aggressive 
part of it—was the unity. It’s a broth- 
erhood between all people, no matter 
what colour or creed you might be.” 


vueweekiy €F> 


Being a piper, Wallace was also 
drawn to the band because of the 
presence of original member Joe 
Delaney. “He’s a brilliant piper and a 
great friend,” Wallace says. “It was 
another reason | kept Struggling 
along, and it always refreshes me to 
play. It’s my favourite instrument.” 


ALTHOUGH HE DIDN'T get to play 
on the Murphys’ new album, Blackout, 
Wallace believes it’s the group's best 
work. Rather than record a disc full of 
drinking anthems, the band broad- 
ened their focus on the plight of the 
blue-collar class, from domestic unrest 
(“Walk Away”) to wasted opportuni- 
ties (“Bastards on Parade”). The band 
even got permission from the estate of 
working-class folk hero Woody 
Guthrie to record a version of “Gonna 
Be a Blackout Tonight.” 

As a fan, Wallace is blunt with 
his praise. “It’s an album that’s going 
to explode,” he predicts. “They've 
stayed true to their roots, but some- 
how they sound stronger. Their last 
album, Sing Loud Sing Proud, was a 
good drinking-with-your-lads-down- 
at-the-pub record, but this album 
means a lot more. All the songs 
mean something, but when you hear 
a song like ‘Buried Alive,’ which is 
about a group of miners trapped in a 
coal mine, you realize that these 
songs mean a lot. There's only one 
song about getting shit-faced in the 
pub at the end of the night [“Kiss 
Me I'm Shit-Faced"] and that’s really 
just a novelty song.” 

And what would his grandmoth- 
er think of him playing in a raucous 
punk band? “I think she'd be at 
every show,” he says. “I honestly 
believe that.” © 


VANS WARPED TOUR 

Featuring the Dropkick Murphys, Rancid, 
Less Than Jake, Andrew W.K. and more 
* Race City Speedway (Calgary, AB) « 
Wed, July 2 


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Suicide bonds 


Himsa * With Chore and Ghosts 
of Modern Man * Seedy’s ¢ Fri, 
June 27 Seattle's Himsa are a five- 
piece firestorm of fury who layer dark 
images and lyrics beneath a shower of 
metal guitars and shrieking vocals. 
Their website features morbid graph- 
ics, including a gory thumbnail photo 
gallery of suicide victims. 

Bass player Derek Harn also dou- 
bles as the band’s web designer. He 


got the idea for the site’s grisly motif 
from a huge poster of gun-related 
deaths in America and decided to 
focus in on those who took their own 
lives. “It’s not like | have this fascina- 
tion with suicide or anything,” says 
Harn over the phone from Calgary. 
(The band’s been on tour since April to 
support the new disc and won't stop 
until they've played Hellfest, the mas- 
sive metal/hardcore festival in Syra- 
cuse, New York. Then it’s off to 
Europe.) “It’s more of an attention-get- 
ter. I'm not a person that like to spell 
things out for people real easily.” 
Himsa’s latest disc, Courting Tragedy 
and Disaster, delves into the darker 
aspects of society and the bleak imagery 
just goes along with the theme. “Lyrical- 
ly everything's pretty dark as far as rela- 
tionships go and how people deal with 
their fucked-up feelings and that’s just a 
way for us to let that out,” Harn 
explains. “The website sort of wraps 
around that idea. People just down on 
their luck who came to a point where 


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they couldn’t take it anymore. A lot of 
people feel like that a lot of times, and 
the new record has the same kind of 
undertones—a darker message. For me, 
it’s sort of like embracing that darkness 
and using that energy for whatever you 
want to turn it into—whether that be 
something good or something bad. It’s 
kind of like taking that dark energy other 
people might see as morbid or chaotic 
and making it into usable energy.” 

Harn and singer John Pettibone 
come from a hardcore background 
while the rest of the band was more 
influenced by metal acts like Iron 
Maiden and Slayer. “We just bring 
those two together and that’s what we 
end up with here,” Harn says. 


Your phone’s ringing, Dude 
The Dude's Night Out * Featuring 
the Little Lebowski Achievers, the 
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us sinners,” says the Stranger in the 
Coen Brothers’ The Big Lebowski, a 
movie that speaks to the couchbound 
slacker in all of us like few others. The 
Big Lebowski even made bowling seem 
cool again. Now all of you waiting for 
an opportunity to swill White Russians 
and lounge around dressed as their 
favourite Lebowski character—your 
time has come. Local journalist Dave 
Alexander took it upon himself to 
organize The Dude's Night Out after a 
lunch with Old Reliable drummer Scott 
Lingley turned to talk of Jeffrey 
Lebowski—the Dude to you and me. 

“Something led to us quoting lines 
from the movie, as it often does, and 
then we just thought about possibili- 
ties of having a Big Lebowski theme 
party,” says Alexander, who will be 
dressed as Walter, the hot-tempered 
Vietnam vet played in the film by John 
Goodman. “We asked a few people 
and they thought it was a great idea.” 
if you think you'll need a refresher on 
the film in order to have a chance to 
win any of the cool prizes up for grabs 
at the Lebowski trivia contest, the film 
will be screening that night at Metro 
Cinema before the party kicks in. 

Guitarist Shuyler Jansen, some 
other Old Reliable boys and a few spe- 
cial guests will be starting the night 
off; billing themselves as the Little 
Lebowski Achievers, they'll be playing 
a set of songs culled from the film’s 
soundtrack. “We'll play the more clas- 
sic rock songs,” says Jansen. “There’s 
lots of jazz and Latin music off the 
soundtrack, but we’re not going to 
insult those people by trying to inter- 
pret them.” One song he couldn’t 
resist slipping into the set, however, is 
the Eagles’ “Hotel California”; after all, 
the Dude hates the Eagles and it'll set 
the proper tone for the night. 

“If we're gonna do ‘Hotel California,’ 
how serious could we be?” he asks. “It’s 
obviously a classic rock song, but it’s also 
one of the worst songs ever written. If 
you read the lyrics for that song it’s so 
hilarious. It’s like lyrics to a Rush song put 
to a country song or something.” 


Donalda’s Duck 


Alberta’s Own Rock Weekend * 
With Agriculture Club, the Head- 
stones, Staggered Crossing and 
more (see www.albertasown.com 
for details) * Donalda, AB ° Fri- 
Sun, June 27-29 Picking up where 
early ‘90s festivals like Infest and High- 
wood left off, Alberta’s Own Rock 
Weekend is bringing together another 
great line-up of indie bands for a week- 
end of camping, drinking and, of 
course, rocking. There may not be the 
same kind of big-ticket bands here that 
you'll find at Stage 13, but you're not 
likely to have to line up with 30,000 
other people or fight for the last work- 
ing toilet either. The focus for AORW is 
on indie Alberta talent—the Headstones 
are the closest thing to a huge com- 
mercial draw on the bill. But with more 
than 50 bands from across the heavy 
music spectrum, who's complaining? 
Agriculture Club, Calgary's honest- 
to-goodness Pilsner-swilling country- 
punk gods, headlined the mainstage 
during the inaugural edition of the fes- 
tival last year, and they’re more than 
happy to be repeat offenders. Gui- 
tarist/singer Rubber Duck says the line- 


North Country Fair * Jous 
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beats about pride and overcoming marginalization. Mad 
d a champagne-soaked set to celebrate the Fair's 25th 
y and the next night had the plug pulled on their late show for going too long. 
med to be everywhere at the fair, playing workshops, the main- 


stage and a late-night set on Friday that went well past sunrise. Greyhound Tragedy 
cranked up the amps for the last set on Saturday night, blasting away the drunken crowd 


Tale By 


up last year was a little strange, but 
playing on a huge stage in front of a 
few hundred folks who'd never heard 
of them before was a total blast. “It 
was cool ‘cause we got to play in front 
of a crowd we'd never be exposed to 
otherwise,” says the Duck. “A lot of 
people love indie music; they just 
don’t know it ‘cause they don’t see it. 
Maybe they’re a Creed fan, but if you 
actually get them in front of a good 
indie band, they'll usually respond.” 

Most importantly, everything ran 
smoothly. If things keep on track, Alber- 
ta may have another fine rock institu- 
tion to look forward to every summer. 
“If [they] can afford to keep it running,” 
the Duck says, “and people come and 
support them, [they’ve] got a structure 
going on where they'll be able to bring 
in these wicked bands and you'll be 
able to find a functioning fucking toilet 
and you know that your favourite band 
is going to get paid. So | have nothing 
but the highest respect for [RGB].” 

Agriculture Club plays a high-ener- 
gy mix of country twang and AC/DC's 
everyman rock—a perfect combination 
for hard-working, hard-drinking Alber- 
tans who always seem to eat it up at 
their live shows. Now if they could only 
convince more promoters that punks in 
cowboy hats ain‘t too weird and their 
songs about country life as seen 
through the bottom of a bottle are 
actually worthwhile (not to mention 
hilarious). “Then you have all these 
fucking music critics who seem to think 
you only have half an !Q point if you 
wear a cowboy hat and you don’t sing 
about nuclear war or whatever,” the 
Duck spits. “They seem to think it takes 
less intelligence to write a song about 
growing up in the country than about 
hard life in the city streets.” 


Boba féte 


Boba ¢ With Forbode and Quanca 
© Stars * Sat, June 28 Some bands 
want their name in lights, a green room 
full of beer and hot and cold running 
groupies. In other words, they want it 
all. But local metalheads Boba have a 
much simpler desire: they want you to 
ask yourself, “How important are you?” 
Not only does the query serve as the 
title of their debut disc, which hit the 
streets less than a year ago, but also a 
chance for people to realize you, the 
audience, mean everything. They put 
the disc together themselves—even 


soming the summer solstice with a shuddering bang. —PHit DurerRoN 


designing and printing the cover on 
their own—and the only place you'll 
find it is at their shows. They didn’t put 
it any local record shops because they 
want to get to know you better as you 
hand over a few bucks for a copy. 

“| kind of like the feeling of selling 
something at a show—underground 
stuff,” says drummer Chad Olyowsky. 
“It means more because the guy’s like, 
‘Wow, these guys are wicked. I’m 
going to pick up that disc.’ And they 
go to the little merch table you got and 
get the disc and you get to meet them 
first hand. To me it’s more down-to- 
earth. | kinda like that. They come up 
and shake your hand afterwards and 
say, ‘That rules.’ That is truly the 
biggest thing for me right there. That 
makes up for all the jamming, all the 
hassles of getting ready for a show. All 
that just goes away. I’m really into the 


littler things that make me smile.” 
Cex machine 


Cex * With Rockets Red Glare * Lis- 
ten * Wed, July 2 So what is Cex, any- 
way? Bad spelling aside, it’s the moniker 
adopted by Ryan Kidwell, a self-effacing 
young man with a well-toasted website 
(www.rjyan.com) that uses the word 
“retard” in generous doses. He's also the 
producer of quirky electronica in the 
vein of Kid 606 and Console, infused 
with the offbeat attitude of Ween, He 
recorded his first album, Cells, when he 
was 16, and followed it up with the 
caustic Oops, | Did It Again for Tigerbeat 
Records—its notorious cover art depict- 
ed a graphic wrist-slitting episode 
Clearly, this is a man you should keep 
your distance from if you don’t share his 
sense of dark humour. Mind you, the 
record did have a song with one of the 
best titles on earth—“Florida (is shaped 
like a big droopy dick for a reason).”” 

After doing a series of dates with 
Mogwai down in the U.S., Kidwell is 
heading north in support of his latest 
creation, Being Ridden. The cover art 
isn’t the only thing that references 
David Bowie's eccentric Heroes 
album—Being Ridden is a double album 
split between vocals and instrumentals, 
much like Bowie’s ambitious ‘70s LP. 
The Venetian Snares even show up to 
work the production. If any of this 
makes any sense to you, then perhaps 
you'd enjoy this electronic slugfest of 
retarded proportions. Get down, my 
robots. —Dave JOHNSTON @ 


a 


cl Cin 


IDO Josper Ave. Polodium Build. 
coll 429-CLUB for more info 


Friday June Z7th 


Jazz Fest presents 


Mitte Stern 


Early show, doors at 7 


\ 


Friday June Z7th 
From Olympia WA 


THE GONAI 


late show, doors at tl: 


oO 


Friday July 3rd 


FunherVog 


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Toxic Shock Syndrome 


Friday July “tth 
The Floor 


Tom Cruise Missile 


The Faunts. 


Frida 


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of Champs Showdown Pt. 3 
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Rainbow Qua 
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July (6th 
rtz Ae 


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Tickets for select shows available at: 


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VUEWEEKLY GE JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


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DINO & TERRY (crash RECORDS, Toronto, ON) 
JOJO FLORES jcort sout REcoRDS, Montreal, PQ] 


NESTOR DELANO 
WINSTON ROBERTS 
DAN COSTA 


Tickets @ Foosh 


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Doors of 


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$3.00 Smimoff Red Bulls 


Colorblind 


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Underground WEM, The Standard 


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with Stephanie Beaumont Weeknights at 11:30 pm 


Fax your free listings to 426- 
2889 or e-mail them to 
listings@vue.ab.ca 

Deadline is Friday at 3pm 


THU 


LIVE MUSIC 


ABBEY GLEN PARK Don 
Berner Quintet; 11:30am: 
2:30pm 


BLUES ON WHYTE Nigel 
Mack and the Blues Attack 


CAPITOL HILL PUB 
Musician's Night hosted by 
Pazzport; 9:30pm 


CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) 
Robin Kelly (Elvis tribute) 


DONNA Danny DePoe and 
guests 


DRUID Ben Sures* 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY 
THEATRE The Improvised 
Network; 7:30pm; $12 


FOUR ROOMS (DOWN- 
TOWN) Brett Miles; 9pm-mid 
night 


FOUR ROOMS (ST. ALBERT) 
Lori Mohacsy 


GLENORA ROOM Carol 
Welsman; 2pm; free; Carol 
Welsman; 8:30pm; $25 


THE JOINT Nazareth, King 
Ring Nancy; 7pm (door); $20; 
tickets available at TicketMaster 


JULIAN'S Gary Bowman and 
friends; Spm 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB Jeffery 
Sez 


MANHATTAN CLUB Jeff 
Henrick 


OUTDOOR PAVILION Ben 
Sures, Ken Brown, Brett Miles, 
Marwill, Dale Ladoucer, Craig 
Simon, Ghettoblasters; noon- 
9:30pm 

RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Colleen Rae and Cornerstone 


RED'S Reel Big Fish, 
Zebrahead, Wakefield, 
Matches; licensed, all ages 
event; 7:30pm; $23.50 (adv); 
$25 (day of); tickets available 
at Blackbyrd Myoozik, 
Freecloud, Listen, FS 
Skateboard and Snowboard 
(WEM), Red's 

SHERLOCK HOLMES (CAPI- 
LANO) Tim Becker 
SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Dave Hiebert 
SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen 

SIDETRACK CAFE Flytrap; (8. 
piece soul/punk/funk/rap/acid 
jazz/metal); 9pm; $10; tickets 
available at TicketMaster 


THORNTON COURT Liana 
Bob Trio; 8-11pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Firewater 


no cover 


CLASSICAL 
———— Sa 


TIMMS CENTRE Opera Ni 
presents Mozart's le Nox 
Figaro; 7:30pm; $20/$15 (stu 
dent/senior); tickets available at 
TIX on the Square (420-1757) 


DUS 


THE ARMOURY Lo Bail Night 
top 40 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Big 


Mouth Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Thump: intronica with the DDK 
Soundsystem 


VUEWwEEKLY €@q> 


ELEPHANT AND CASTLE ON 
WHYTE Sleeman Method 
Thursdays: hip hop, downtem- 
po with DJ Headspin 


MANHATTAN CLUB Up and 
Coming DJ Night: 
house/trance/breaks with Crash 
Davis, Nostalgia, D] Koue Bok, 
Dj Xu, Rezident Funk, Big 
Daddy 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Rub-A-Dub: ska/dub/dance- 
hall/reggae with the Operators 


THE ROOST Rotating shows: 
Ladonna’s Review, Sticky’s open 
stage and the Weakest Link 
game with DJ Jazzy second and 
last Thursday; $1 (member)/$3 
(non-member) 


SEEDY’S Kicked in the Teeth 
Thursdays with DJ Liloyd 

THE STANDARD Bump and 
Hustle: house with Dino and 
Terry (Toronto), Jojo Flores 
(Montreal), Winston Roberts, 
Nestor Delano, Dan Costa; 
8pm; $8 (adv)/$10 (door); tick- 
ets available at Foosh, 
Colorblind, Underground 
(WEM), The Standard 

STARS NIGHTCLUB Retro 
Thursdays: classic rock, top 40, 
retro with Dj Rage and quests; 
9pm (door) 

SUGARBOWL Unhooked: 
funk/soul with Bob Trampoline 
and Ben 


VELVET LOUNGE Urban 
Substance: hip hop/R&B/ 
dancehall with Spincycle, 
Invinceable, |-Money, Sean B 


YOUR APARTMENT Brit Pop 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Same Old Story, 
Calico Drive, Coalescense; 9pm 
(door), 10pm (show) 

ABBEY GLEN PARK Shucker; 
11:30pm 

BACCARAT CASINO Tim 
Tamashiro Trio 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE The 
Hummers; 9pm 
BLUES ON WHYTE Nigel 
Mack and the Blues Attack 
CAPITOL HILL PUB Jack 
Sample Band; 9:30pm 
‘CASINO (EDMONTON) 
Madison County (classic 
rock/country) PIANO BAR: jo 
Ann Paul; $:30pm-8pm 
CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) 
Robin Kelly (Elvis tribute) 
DONNA Danny DePoe and 
quests 

DOUCETTE'S Musaic (top 40 
country, big band, swing, jive, 
classic rock, dance) 
EDMONTON ART GALLERY 
THEATRE Antonello Salis and 
Sandro Satta; 10pm; $15 
FAIRMONT HOTEL 
McDONALD Ancire Glover; 5. 
8pm 

FOUR ROOMS (DOWN. 
TOWN) Kelly Alana; 9pm-mid 
night 

FOUR ROOMS (ST. ALBERT) 
Don Bemer Trio; 8pm 
GLENORA ROOM Mike Stern; 
2pm; free; Christine jensen 
Quintet, Ingrid Jensen; 
8:30pm; $15 


HIGHRUN CLUB Ten Inch 
Men 


1J.’S Capricom (rock) 


FULIAN’S Charlie Austin Duo; 
Spm 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB Stiff 
LB.'S PUB Nite Life 


LONGRIDER’S Monkey's 
Uncle; 7pm (door); $4 after 
9pm 
MANHATTAN CLUB The 
Rascalz; no minors; 6pm 
(door); $15; tickets available at 
TicketMaster 

| 


MEZZA LUNA Sonora Tropical | 


MICHAEL'S PUB AND GRILL 
Eric Miller 


MONA LISA Mr. Lucky (blues, 
boogie, R&B); 9:30pm-1:30am; 
no cover 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Mike Stern Quartet, Alain 
Caron; 7pm (door), 9pm; 
$29.50; The Gossip; 11:30pm 
(door) 


OUTDOOR PAVILION Wendy 
McNeil, Dale Ladouceur, Ken 
Brown, Terry Morrison, 
Nathan, Rainshine; noon- | 
9:30pm 


OSCARS PUB Ron Pedersen 


PALACE CASINO The Real 
Deal 


POWER PLANT The Dudes, 
White Russian, The Little 
Lebowski Achievers; 7pm; $7 
(door); $5 (w/costume or 
Metro Cinema screening stub) 


THE ROOST Anna Beaumont, 
Rhonda Withnell 


SEEDY’S Chore, Himsa, Ghosts 
of Modern Man 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (CAPI- 
LANO) Tim Becker 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Chuck 
Belhuimer 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(WHYTE) Duff Robinson | 


SIDETRACK CAFE Frank 
Zappa’s We're Only In It for the 
Money w/J.|.F. (14-piece, rock); 
9pm; $20; tickets available at 
TicketMaster 


SPORTSMAN’S LOUNGE 


Fin'it (rock) 
SUGAR BOWL The Operators; 
10pm; $6 8 


THORNTON COURT Liana 
Bob Trio; 8-11pm 

URBAN LOUNGE Firewater 
WINSPEAR CENTRE Holly 
Cole, Denzal Sinclaire; 8pm; 
$39.50 

YARDBIRD SUITE NOJO with 
Sam Rivers; 8pm (door), 9pm 
(show); $20 (member)/$24 
(quest); tickets available at 
TicketMaster 

ZENARI'S ON 15ST Jeff 
Hendrick 


CLASSICAL 
= 


TIMMS CENTRE Opera Nuova 
presents Mozart's Le Nozze Di 
Figaro: 7:30pm; $25/$20 (stu: 
dent/senior); tickets available at 
TIX on the Square (420-1757) 


DUS 


THE ARMOURY Heaven and 
Hell: top 40, dance, retro 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Royale: funk/soul/classics with 
Echo, Shortround 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Big 
Mouth Entertainment 


BOOTS Retro Disco: retro 
dance 


BUDDY'S NIGHT CLUB Top 
40 with D] Arrowchaser 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
Funktion Fridays: hip 
hop/R&B/dancehall with Team 


a 
CHANNEL 


Bravo (Toronto), Invinceable 


CLIMAXX AFTERHOURS 
House, trance with James 
Gregory, Clark Nova, Wil 
Danger, Geoffrey | 


COWBOYS Ladies Night: top 
40 


DONNA Fuzion: live jazz/house 
with DJ Zohar, Dr, Yvo, Indigo 
and guests 


HALO Camaro: retro/hip hop 
with Davey James ‘ 


THE JOINT Fresh Fridays: R&B, 
hip hop with Urban Metropolis 


MANHATTAN CLUB Top 40, 
dance/R&B 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Rock with Asstoad 


THE ROOST Euro Blitz: best 
new European music with D} 
Outtawak; Upstairs: D) jazzy; 
Downstairs: female stripper; $3 
(member)/$5 (non-member) 


ROXY ON WHYTE Babylon 
Fridays: retro/R&B/dance with 
D) Extreme 


SAVOY Eclectronica with Djs 
Bryana, Chris 


THE STANDARD Top 
40/dance with Standard Issue 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Freedom 
Fridays: alternative, house, hip 
hop, top 40 with Tri Force 
Sound Crew featuring Dj Eagle 
Fly, D} Japetto, Dj Fatal 
STONEHOUSE PUB 
Altemative, house, hip hop, 
top 40 with Dj Rage and D) 
Weezle; 9pm. 

TONIC AFTER DARK Fluid 
Fridays: top 40, dance with Dj 
Philler 


Y AFTERHOURS F#SK Fridays: 
house/breaks/d ‘n’ b with 
Tripswitch, Sweetz, Remo, 
Juicy, Jameel, LP, Degree, 
Sureshock, Old Bitch 


YOUR APARTMENT House 
with DJ Tomek 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Quanca, BOBA, 
Forbode; 9pm (door), 10pm 
(show) 

ABBEY GLEN PARK Pazzport, 
11:30am-2:30pm; Jack Semple 
Band; 3-5:30pm; America Rosa; 
6-9pm 

BACCARAT CASINO 
Tamashiro Trio 


BLUES ON WHYTE Nigel 
Mack and the Blues Attack 


CAPITOL HILL PUB Jack 
Sample Band; 9:30pm. 


CASINO (EDMONTON) 
Madison County (classic 
rock/country) PIANO BAR: jo 
Ann Paul; 5:30pm-8pm 


CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) 
Robin Kelly (Elvis tribute) ; 


DONNA Danny DePoe and : 
guests Doucette’s Musaic (top 
40 country, big band, swing, | 
jive, classic rock, dance) | 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY 
THEATRE Michael Snow; 
7:30pm; Satta/Salis; 10pm; 
$30 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 
McDONALD Andre Glover; 6- 
9pm 

FOUR ROOMS (DOWN- 
TOWN) Proxy Boy; 9-midnight 
FOUR ROOMS (ST. ALBERT) 
Don Berner Trio; 8pm 


GLENORA ROOM Ingrid 
Jensen; 2pm; free; Christine 


Jensen Quintet, Ingrid Jensen; 
8:30pm; $15 

HIGHRUN CLUB Ten Inch 
Men 


MS Capricom (rock) 


JULIAN’S Charlie Austin Duo; 
7:30pm 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB Stiff 
L.B.’S PUB Nite Life 


LONGRIDER’S Monkey's 
Uncle; 7pm (door); $4 after _ 
9pm 

MEZZA LUNA Sonora Tropical 


MICHAEL'S PUB AND GRILL 
Eric Miller 


OSCARS PUB Ron Pedersen 


OUTDOOR PAVILION Pattii- 
Emme, Terry Morrison, Ben 
Sures, Wakaba-kai, Dale 
Ladouceur, Steve Coffey; noon- 
9:30pm 

PALACE CASINO The Real 
Deal 


SEEDY’S Road to Nowhere, 
Electric Rape Machine, 
Mooseknuckle 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (CAPI- 
LANO) Tim Becker 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Chuck 
Belhuimer 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen 

SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(WHYTE) Duff Robinson 


SIDETRACK CAFE Frank 
Zappa's We're Only In It for the 
Money wi/J..F. (14-piece, rock); 
+9pm; $20; tickets available at 
TicketMaster 


STRATHCONA LEGION 
Moksha Adsquad (CD release 
party); 8pm (door), 9pm 
(show); $10 

THORNTON COURT Liana 
Bob Trio; 8-11pm 


URBAN LOUNGE Firewater 


YARDBIRD SUITE Theo 
Jorgensmann Quartet; 8pm. 
(door), 9pm (show); $14 
(member)/$18 (quest); tickets 
available at TicketMaster 


ZENARI'S ON 1ST Don 
Bradshaw's Big Idea 


CLASSICAL 


TIMMS CENTRE Opera Nuova 
presents Mozart’s Le Nozze Di 
Figaro; 2pm; Half price mati- 
nee; tickets available at TIX on 
the Square (420-1757) 


DUS 


THE ARMOURY Top 40, 
dance 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Flava: hip hop with Shortround 


BILLY BOBS Top 40, country 
with DJ 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Big 
Mouth Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Brendan’s Sausage Party: 
obscure indie rock with D) 
Ballhog 


BOOTS Flashback Saturdays: 
retro dance, house with Derrick 


BUDDY’S NIGHT CLUB 
Animal Night: top 40 with DJ 
Arrowchaser 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
‘Community: house/techno 
with Dj Nightcrawler, quests 


CLIMAXX AFTERHOURS 
House/hard dance with Mr. 
Anderson, LP, Shortee, Marc 
Lossier, Jeff Hillis 


CRISTAL LOUNGE Hip 
hop/R&B/dancehall with 
Invinceable 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


Downstairs: 
Dj Dan; $3 (member)/$5 (non- 
priser) 


ROXY ON WHYTE Session 
Saturday: dance/R&B, hip hop - 
with D] Extreme 

RUBY SKYE BAR LOUNGE 
Nite at the Skye: R&B/hip hop 
with People’s D) 


SAVOY Deep house with Ariet 
and Roel” 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Fire and 
Ice: R&B, hip hop, reggae with 
DJ Robin ofda Notes 


STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 
with DJ Clay : 

_ TONIC AFTER DARK Surreal 
Saturdays: top 40, dance with 
D) Philler : 
‘WINDSOR BAR AND GRILL 
Sonic Eclipse: house/techno/ 
trance/drum ‘n’ bass with 
Galatea, lowtek, Dreadnought, 
MG Simeon, MC Dsnow, 
quests 


¥ AFTERHOURS 
House/trance/breaks with 
Paranoid Jack (Toronto), Charlie 
Mayhem, Anthony Donohue, 
Daniel Milan, Juicy, Donovan, 
Shortee 


YOUR APARTMENT Nordic 
Foundations: D) Dennis Zaz 
and Rackman Powers 


LIVE MUSIC 
—Ea SS) 


BLUES ON WHYTE Rusty © 
Reed 


CAPITOL HILL PUB Open 
stage with Backstreet Rob and 
Co. 


OUTDOOR PAVILION jim 
Findlay, Dale Ladouceur, Ben 
Sures, Craig Shafer, Roger, The 
Fabulous Beefeeders, The 
Wowzers; noon-9:30pm * 


82.Ave, 439-1422 


Ave, 102 St, 433-4000 


Ave, 702-1800 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND 
GILL 7704-104 St, 432- 
4611 - 


BACCARAT CASINO 
13128-104 Ave, 413-3178 


10324-82 Ave, upstairs, 
436-4418 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE 
Continental Inn, 16625 


10425-82 Ave, 439-1082 


82 Ave, 439-5058 


S014 


BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB 
117258 Jasper Ave, 488- 
6636 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 


Stony Plain Rd, 454-3063 


CASINO (EDMONTON) 
7055 Argyll Rd, 463-9467 


CASINO ( 


CLIMAXK 
10148-105 St 


A STARS Upper Fl, 10545- 


THE ARMOURY 10310-85 


'YELLOWHEAD) 
12464-153 St, 463-9467 


| 


PROVINCIAL MUSEUM THE- 
ATRE My Father G 

Gershwin: Alan Gershwin fea- 
turing Nancy King, Tommy 
Banks, Duke Thompson, Mark 
Lmacher, 8pm; $29.50 


SIDETRACK CAFE 
w/Dj Dudeman (rock): $6 


WINSPEAR CENTRE 
ICubanismo!; Spm; $39.50 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL An 
Hamage to Marek fablonski- 
Ayako Tsuruta (piano); 2pm; 
$20/$15 (student/senior); tick- 
ets available at TIX on the 
Square, (420.1757); benefit 
concert, proceeds to support 
the Edmonton General's Mel 
Miller Hospice Unit 


TIMMS CENTRE Opera Nuova 
presents Mozart's Le Nozzé Di 
Figaro; 2pm; $20/$15 (stu- 
denU/senior); tickets available at 
TIX on the Square (420-1757) 


Js 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Underground Rescue: 
house/downtempo with Djs 
Dragon, LP 

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
‘What the Hell: downtempo, 
funk with Trampoline 


‘CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB Ladies 


Night: hip hop/R&B/dancehall 
with Invinceable 


MANHATTAN CLUB Industry 
Night: top 40, dance/R&B 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Progress: electroclash/new 
‘wave 


THE ROOST Betty Ford 
Hangover Clinic Show Beer 
Bash: every long weekend with 
DJ Jazzy; $1 

SAVOY French Pop: mixed 
with Deja D) 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Cromdales, Dirtbags, 
Same Old Story; 9pm (door), 
10pm (show) * 


VENUE GUIDE 


CONVOCATION HALL Arts 


ABBEY GLEN PARK Jasper 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 


Stony Plain Road, 484-7751 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 


BLUES ON WHYTE 10329- 


BOOTS 10242-106 St, 423- 


10815 Jasper Ave, 425-0850 
CAPITOL HILL PUB 14203 


BLUES ON WHYTE Sam 


Building, U of A Campus, 
420-1757/455-8289 


COWBOYS 10102-180 St, 
481-8739 


CRISTAL LOUNGE 10336 
Jasper Ave, 426-7521 


DONNA 10177-99 St, 429- 
3338 


DOUCETTE’S 2nd Fi, 
10120-103 Ave, 423-9982 


DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 
454-9928 


EDMONTON ART 
GALLERY 2 Sir Winston 
Churchill Sq, 422-6223 


ELEPHANT AND CASTLE 
ON WHYTE 10314-82 Ave, 
439-4545 


FATBOYZ LOUNGE 6104- 
104 St, 437-3633 


FESTIVAL PLACE 100 
Festival Way, 439-3378 


FILTHY McNASTY’S PUB 
10511-82 Ave, 432-5224 


4 PLAY NIGHTCLUB 
10338-81 Ave, 433-7183 
FOUR ROOMS RESTAU- 
RANT (EDMONTON) 
Edmonton Centre, 102 Ave, 
Entrance, 426-4767 . 
FOUR ROOMS RESTAU- 
RANT (ST. ALBERT) 28 


Mission Ave, St. Albert, 460- 


6638 


AFTERHOURS = CLENORA ROOM 


Cockrell and the Groove 


L.B."S PUB Open stage with 
Martin; 9pm-2am 

OUTDOOR PAVILION Jay 
Giiday, John Gorham, Brett 
Miles, Ben Sures, Bob Cook, 
Jim Findlay, Viajante: noon- 
9:30pm 

SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Tim Becker . 
SIDETRACK CAFE Open stage 
with Ben Spencer; 8:30pm; no 


DUS 


THE ARMOURY Upstairs: 
house with Junior Brown 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Local Motive: trance, house, 
breaks with Dj Waterboy, 
Quests 

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Indie rock with Penny and the 
Jets 

MANHATTAN CLUB Canadian 
Craziness: house/breaks with 
Tripswitch, Sweetz, Xu, Lo 
NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 


New Music Industry Night: 
mixed 


THE STANDARD Gold Club 
Series presents Ice tong week- 
end party: dance/top40 
STARS NIGHTCLUB Long 
weekend rave and dance 
marathon 


URBAN LOUNGE D] Gilligan 


TUE 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Chuck Nortis, 
London Disturbance Force, Soy 
Not Ai; Spm (door), 10pm 
(show) 

BLUES ON WHYTE Sam 
Cockrell and the Groove 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Open stage and jam hosted by 
Randy Smaliman, Chris Burant 
and Mark Kozov; 9pm-lam 
CITY HALL Kokopelli 


| DRUID Open stage with Chris 
Wynters 
NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 


Paul Dianno 


Coast Edmonton Plaza 
Hotel, 10155-105 St, 477- 
6648 


HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 
423-HALO 


HIGHRUN CLUB 4926-98 
Ave, 440-2233 


J.J.’S PUB 13160-118 Ave, 
489-7462 


THE JOINT WEM, 486-3013 


JULIAN’S Chateau Louis 
Hotel, 11727 Kingsway, 
452-7770 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9221 
34 Ave, 433-2599 


L.B.’S PUB 111-23 Akins 
Dr, St. Albert, 460-9100 


LONGRIDERS 11733-78 St, 
479-7400 


MANHATTAN CLUB 
10345-105 St, 423-7884 


MICHAEL'S PUB AND 
GRILL 11730 jasper Ave, 
482-4757 


MONA LISA 9606-118 Ave, 
477-7752 


NEW CITY LIKWID 
LOUNGE 10081 Jasper Ave, 
413-4578 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
10081 jasper Ave, down- 
stairs, 413-4578 


O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 
414-6766 


Chippewa Rd, Sherwood 
Park, 467-0052 


PALACE CASINO 8882-170 


OUTDOOR PAVILION Wendy 
McNeil, Ben Sures Trio, Stone 
Merchants, Painting Daisies; 
noon-9:30pm 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 


Tim Becker 
DUS 


BACK ROOM VODKA BAR 
Wild Cherry: deep house/pro- 
gressive/breaks with Tripswiteh, 
David Stone 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE 
Karaoke and O} Tues with Run 
Riot Professional Music 
Productions 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Viva Le Rock: indie rock 


BUDDY’S NIGHT CLUB Top 
40 with D] Stephan 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
Bashment Tuesdays: hip 
hop/R&B/reqgee/dancehall 
with Bomb Squad, D} 
Invinceable 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Stupid Music for Stupid People 
for Stupid Cheap: rock 


NEW CITY Sui BS 
Resurrektion: industrial/EBM/ 
electro/goth with Nik Rofeelya 


| THE ROOST Wild and Wet 


| contest with D) Rhonda; $1 
| (tgember)/$3 (non-member) 


ROXY ON WHYTE Hip hop 
| with DJ Vadim (UK), with the 
| Russian Percussion, First Rate, 
Shortround and Echo 


SEEDY’S Electro-trash 
Tuesdays: with D) Miss 
Mannered 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Funky Fix 
Tuesday: with D] Robin ofda 
Notes; 10pm 


WED 


LIVE MUSIC 


| ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 
| Open mic hosted by Kimberly 
MacGregor; 8pm 


| BLUES ON WHYTE Sam 
Cockrell and the Groove; no. 
| cover 


| FESTIVAL PLACE Wednesday 
| night patio series: No Guff; 
| 7:30pm 


St, 444-2112 


PLEASANTVIEW HALL 
10860-57 Ave, 434-5997 


POWER PLANT U of A 
Campus, 492-2048 


PROVINCIAL MUSEUM 
THEATRE 12845-102 Ave, 
420-1757/439-S094 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
9261-34 Ave, 438-8878 


RED'S WEM Phase Ill, 481- 
6420 


THE ROOST 10345-104 St, 
426-3150 


ROSSDALE COMMUNITY 
HALL 10135-96 Ave 


ROXY ON WHYTE 10544- 
82 Ave, 439-7699 


RUBY SKYE BAR LOUNGE 
WEM, Bourbon St, 489. 
6789 


RUM JUNGLE WEM, Phase 
Ni, 486-9494 


SAVOY 10401-82 Ave, 438- 
0373 


SEEDY’S 10314-104 St, 
421-0992 


SHERLOCK HOLMES PUB 
Capilano Mall, 1136, 5004- 
98 Ave, 463-7788 * Rice 
Howard Way, 426-7784 * 
10341-82 Ave, 433-9676 * 
Bourbon St (WEM), 444 
1752 


SIDETRACK CAFE 10333- 
112 St, 421-1326 


SPORTSMANS CLUB 5708- 
75 St, 413-8333 


WUEWEEKLY 


OUTDOOR PAVILION Terry 
Morrison, Ben Sures, 
Swamptlowers, Kat Danser, 
John Gorham, Dustin Cole, Jay 
Guiday; noon-9:30pm 
PLEASANTVIEW HALL 
Norther Bluegrass Circle 
Music Society bluegrass jam; 
7:30pm 

ROSSDALE COMMUNITY 
HALL Little Flower open stage 
with Brian Gregg; 8pm 
SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Tim Becker 

TIM'S GRILL Dale Ladouceur, 
Terry Doherty, Kevin McGrath 
URBAN LOUNGE Clayton 
Bellamy Band; $$ 


DUS 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Cherny: deep house with 
Tripswiteh’ and quests 

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Glitter Gulch: country, roots 
BUDDY’S NIGHT CLUB Top 
40 with D} Stephan 

FILTHY McNASTY’S Mix Tape 
Wednesdays: hip hop with 


Reece, C-Sekshon, Sonny 
Grimezz 


THE ROOST Amateur Strip: 
Weena Luv, Sticky Vicky with D] 
Alvaro; $1 (member)/$3 (non: 
member) 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Wet 


Wednesdays: hip hop, R&B, 
soul with DB] Who and the 


Sound Crew, special MC quests 


YOUR APARTMENT Big Rock 
Indie Rock Night: indie rock 
with D} Shouldbeinaband 


SPORTSMAN’S LOUNGE 
8170-50 St, 469-3399 


THE STANDARD 6107-104 
St, 438-2582 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Main 
Fi, 10551-82 Ave, 432-7977 


STONEHOUSE PUB 11012 
Jasper Ave, 420-0448 


STRATHCONA LEGION 
10416-81 Ave 


SUGARBOWL 10922-8588 


Ave, 433-8369 
THORNTON COURT 
HOTEL 1 Thornton Court, 


423-9999 


TIMMS CENTRE 87 Ave, 
192 St, 492-2273 


TIM'S GRILL 7102-109 St, 
413-9606 


TONIC AFTER DARK 9920. 
62 Ave, 408-2877 


URBAN LOUNGE 6111-105 
St, 439-3388 


WINDSOR BAR AND 
GRILL 11712-87 Ave, 433 
7800 


WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir 
Winston Churchill Sq, 428 
1414 


VELVET LOUNGE 10041 
170 St 


YARDBIRD SUITE 10203 
86 Ave, 432-0428 


YOUR APARTMENT 41 20- 
101 St, 433-3337 


ZENARI'S ON 1ST 10117- 
101 St, 425-6151 


& 


Serving 


Lean Bison 
Al 


Month! 


TORU 
AWARDS 


Pubs 


www.thesherlockholmes.com 
CAPILANO WHYTE AVE 


JUNE 20-20 TIM DEER JUNE 27620 DUFF ROBINSON 
JULY 2-C JIMMY WHIFFEN == JULY 46 BOOM BOOM KINGS 


MALL, DOWNTOWN 


JUNE 22-20 SIMMY WHLEEEN = JUNE QE DAVENICRERT 
JUNEO-JULVE TIM DEGAER JUNE 27620 CHUGH DELUUIMER 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


this 1s a special 
Late show 
doors at 41:30 
following 
the Mike Stern 
jazzfest show 


| NDB) Josper Ave. Polodiuin Build 
coll 429-2LUB for more info 


Edmonton Welcomes JUNO Award Winners 


performing their smash hit "MOVIE STAR’ along with old faves a 2 


TOP OF THE WORLD’ DREADED FIST’ & ‘NORTHERN TOUCH’ 


Advance Tickets: $ POWER 5 
available ot FOOSH i 
TASEEY cy Tie KETMASTER sa 
a 8! www.tickelmaster.ca 
This is a Licensed Event 
MANHATTAN CLUB 


10345 105 St., Edm. ph: ONY NYNY 


VUEWEEKLY €=> 


ee 


root 


By JENNY FENIAK 


How nifty! 


The Swiftys * Honest Mur’s « Fri- 
Sat, June 27-28 The music of the 
Swiftys might sound simple, but there’s a 
lot going on beneath the surface. For 
one thing, Shawn Jonasson—the nick- 
name “Swifty” comes from his childhood 
days in Dauphin, Manitoba—has moved 
from being just the band’s songwriter 
and frontman to being its manager too. 
As well, the production of the band’s 
new album was an all-consuming affair, 
according to drummer Grant Stovel. 

“In some ways, the album took a 
really long time to put together,” says 
Stovel, who also hosts the radio show 
Calling All Blues on CjSR. “But in other 
ways it was really spontaneous and 
quick because we recorded so sporadi- 
cally. The idea was basically that we’d 
go in there whenever Scott [Franchuk 
of Riverdale Recorders] wasn’t really 
busy and whenever we were all in 
town and not gigging with other 
bands. So it took about a year to 
record the album, but in fact there 
were only a few sessions.” 


down _ 


“Rees 


PATHS 


The origin of the Swiftys is a simple 
tale. Jonasson had played with bassist 
Jody Johnson in Jen Kraatz’s back-up 
band the Whispers as well as the long- 
time blues group House of Payne. With 
their common background—not to 
mention Stovel’s expertise and reputa- 
tion as a percussionist—the chemistry in 
the trio was bang-on, a fact that shines 
throughout the Swiftys’ new disc. 

From the moment Jonasson croons 
his first few lines, his voice sounds like 
a close cousin to Johnny Cash’s, as 
deep and strong as an old Scotch 
whiskey. As the band winds its way 
through tales of broken hearts and 
wild nights, you’d never guess from 
the disc’s spare but polished classic 
country sound that 17 different musi- 
cians wound up dropping acoustic 
cameos into the mix. “I like to sound 
as good as | can,” Jonasson says. “A lot 
of people want to sound trashy. They 
strive to sound the way they do, but 
I'd rather sound rough around the 
edges in other ways—you know, just 
by being myself | am.” 


A bicycle built for tours 


Jeremy Fisher ¢ Black Dog Free- 
house (afternoon show) « Sat, June 
28 Names like John Prine and Ron Sex- 
smith have a way of coming up when 
people discuss the work of Jeremy Fish- 
er, but | hear an eerie resonance of a 
young Bob Dylan going on somewhere 
in there too. Listen to the gravelly echo 
just settling into this 28-year-old’s voice 
and you'll hear the sound of personal 
atrocities and inescapable destiny. But 
whatever dark shadows lurk in the cor- 
ners of his music, in person Fisher 
comes across as a bright spirit, running 
towards life’s opportunities. Or at least 
pedalling toward them. 

Hailing from Hamilton, Ontario, 
where he honed his craft playing in rock, 
jazz and big bands, Fisher eventually 
broke free and relocated to the big city 
of Seattle in 2000. “| started playing 
music on the streets there and hanging 
out with some other guys who'd been 
playing folk music all their lives,” he says. 
“They were a lot older than me and it 


AUTO GRAPHED 


* 
rly Z 


& 


4 


Jeremy Fisher 


inspired me to make a change in what | 
was doing and just sort of branch out. | 
grew up on AC/DC—I still love AC/DC, 
they're probably my favourite band—but 
it was just time to lear to play differently 
and to sing differently and cater to that 
venue. The rock stuff and the stuff |’d 
play in bars didn’t always work and it 
wasn’t really personal enough. It was 
more about the guitars and all that stuff 
and now it’s more about the words and 
that’s what I’m into.” 

But it was more than just his music 
that’s kept Fisher on the streets—his 
trusty bicycle is literally his chief mode 
of transportation, whether he’s han- 
dling the local distribution of his CD 
Back Porch Spirituals or embarking on 
full tours of North America. “One less 
tour bus,” is how Fisher describes his 
7,500-kilometres tour last summer that 
took him from Seattle to Halifax and 
back. “Everybody’s always asking me if 
I'm against cars and so on,” Fisher says 
in his soft speaking voice, “but that’s 
not really my agenda—it’s more just 
about it being a fun way to tour.” 

Last November, Fisher and his wife Jill 
relocated north of the border to Victoria, 
B.C., where he’s been working on his 
next solo album. He hopes to release it 
sometime next spring before he hits the 
long and lonesome road yet again. © 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


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On LOVE & HATE, Acey spins some 
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2-CD set from the master himself. 
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Gossip worth repeating 


Believe the rumours: 
Arkansas rock trio is 
as exciting onstage 
as they say 


By JENNY YUEN 


athan Howdeshell of the Gossip 
i that he’s a Southern boy 

at heart. You’d never guess that 
judging by the 22-year-old’s current 
post as the guitarist for the Arkansas- 
formed-now-Washington-based soul- 
punk band, but underneath his 
vintage leather jacket and thick- 
rimmed nerd glasses, hometown val- 
ues still mean something to this boy 

“Coming from the South, it’s like 


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this weird family thing where every- 
one lives and hangs out together,” 
he says. “Family's still very impor- 
tant to us and we still have some of 
the weird politeness. We still feel like 
we're living in a small town.” 

But it’s been about four years since 
Howdeshell, lead singer Beth Ditto 
and drummer Kathy Mendonca left 
the small town of Searcy, Arkansas 


(population: 19,000) to pursue bigger 
ambitions their homestead couldn’t 
offer. In the big bad city of Olympia, 
Washington, they've earned street 
cred for putting on raw high-energy 
live shows that demands you pay 
attention once they hit the stage. And 


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you'd better dance, or there’ll be hell 
to pay—in the nicest way, of course. 

“Kids that go to see bands they 
like and they don’t move must be 
destroyed,” Howdeshell says. “Our 
only mission is to make the squares 
move. We played shows and, I mean, 
a lot of things happen. On one occa- 
sion, | busted my head open. People 
will pick us up, pull us or push us 
down. That friendly kind of audience 
reaction is a really exciting thing.” 

The recognition of fans is becom- 
ing more common to the Gossip, 
partly as a result of Ditto’s aggressive 
onstage.presence. She’s overweight, 
she’s a lesbian and she’s not afraid to 
show that she’s proud of both. This is 
a woman, after all, who’s been known 
to get every sizé 16 in the house 
jumping by stripping down to her bra 
and granny panties and screaming, 
“This one’s for all the fat bitches!” 
And when she howls, “It seems like 
lonely is a friend of mine,” you can’t 
help but want her to push your face 
into her breasts and hope some of her 
jagged spirit rubs off on you. 


BUT WHILE THE GOSSIP have been 
compared to riot grrl bands such as 
Sleater Kinney and Bikini Kill, Ditto’s 
bluesy voice preaches the gospel of 
the band’s true forebears—Janis 
Joplin, Mama Cass and even some 


Poem 


Beatles, all gutsy, soulful performers 
whose influence on the Gossip’s 
third and foremost record, Movement, 
is unmistakable. “I like hearing that 
our record is really honest,” 
Howdeshell says. “A lot of pop music 
is pretty boring and tends to be 
watered-down, not very abrasive or 
interesting. We're not trying to make 
the opposite of pop music, just some- 
thing that’s not so planned-out.... 
My guitar only has four strings and 
Kathy’s drums are really minimal— 
she doesn’t have a lot of the drum 
pieces. We hope kids realize that you 
don’t have be a professional-looking 
or sounding band to be popular or to 
make music that people appreciate.” 
All three bandmates are under 23 
and have been friends for years, and 
while sometimes you grow to hate 
your friends when you're stuck work- 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


ing with them 24/7, the Gossip's 
members still make time to paint the 
town brown together. In fact, Ditto 
and Howdeshell are roommates and 
they all get together twice a week to 
throw “dance parties.” 

While Howdeshell doubts that 
the band will be revolutionary to 
the music meat market, rest assured 
that if the Gossip were jointly elect- 
ed president of the U.S., their first 
act of office would ensure that the 
country would be living the sweet 
life, so to speak. “I’d make sure that 
Americans were able to enjoy 
Crunchie bars,” he laughs. “They're 
the best candies I’ve ever had in my 
life. They don’t have that here in 
the States, which is lame.” © 


THE GOSSIP 
New City Suburbs « Fri, June 27 


classical 
notes 


By ALLISON KYDD 


Eaton and runnin’ 


in high spirits after their pre-tour con- 
cert last Saturday night (june 21), 
members of the Richard Eaton Singers 
can now focus on packing their suitcas- 
es. Most of the 80 singers, plus con- 
ductor Leonard Ratzlaff, accompanist 
Leanne Regehr and what Ratzlaff calls 
the “25 or so hangers-on,” will depart 
on June 28, although one hardy soul is 
driving and already en route. 

The choir’s 16-day maritime experi- 


HORIZEN 


Performing Arts Centre 


The 3rd Annual 
Spruce Grove 
Street Performers 
Festival 


Sunday, June 29 
Monday, June 30 
Tuesday, July 1 


Location: Central Park 


ence begins with Newfoundland’s Fes- 
tival 500 Sharing the Voices. Besides 
Participating in the festival, the singers 
will appear in a church service and give 
several concerts while in St. John's. 
They will also be the core choir for the 
mass choir performance in Mile One 
Stadium on the festival's final day. The 
highlight of this finale will be Carl 
Orff’s Carmina Burana and, for at least 
one chorister, the prospect of working 
with conductor Bobby McFerrin alone 
will be worth the trip. 

Tour organizer Brian Halliburton, 
who sings bass in the choir, says tour- 
ing gives singers the opportunity to 
develop perspective and learn new 
repertoire. It also shows them that they 
belong in “stellar company.” “We're a 
world-class choir,” he says, “but we 
don’t believe it yet.” 

One thing they will carry from 
Alberta to the maritimes is Larry Nick- 
el’s delightful arrangement of lan 
Tyson's “Four Strong Winds.” As Rat- 
zlaff points out, the song marks the end 


7:00 p.m. — 7:00 p.m 

200 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. — 7:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. — §:00 p.m. 


+p 
—* 


Spruce Grove, AB 


vueweeKiy €ED 


of every Edmonton Folk Music Festival 
weekend and 80 voices do a remark- 
able job of imitating those thousands 
that lift up from Gallagher Park each 
year. Perhaps Ratzlaff will drop by the 
festival and conduct that finale as well. 
The choir’s final number on June 
21, however, was a tribute to their des- 
tination, an arrangement of “The Ode 
to Newfoundland,” and the audience 
rose obediently to its feet to show 
respect for the province's unofficial 
national anthem. The second half of 
the concert, consisting primarily of folk 
music from Sweden, Latvia and Cana- 
da, may not have had the polish of 
some of the sacred pieces in the first 
half, but the choir made up for it in 
sheer goodwill. For instance, a wide 
selection of soloists participated in 
Peter Bjerring’s A Canadian Rhapsody, 
an arrangement of six Canadian folk 
songs. This gave a friendly, inclusive 
feel to the work, and choristers them- 
selves appreciate Ratzlaff’s policy of 
choosing from the group as a whole 


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instead of always promoting a select 
cadre of favourites. 

Some of the works in the first half 
were repeats from the choir’s recent 
Crown Imperial Super Special with the 
Edmonton Symphony Orchestra on 
June 6. However, the experience was 
much different with simple piano and 
organ accompaniments—and not so 
simple, as in Regehr’s boogie-woogie 
accompaniment to the Swedish folk 
song “Domaredansen” and organist 
Jeremy Spurgeon’s dance in C. Hubert 
Parry's “| Was Glad.” For those who 
missed both concerts, many of the 
same works are on the choir’s first CD, 
In Praise of Music, also launched at the 
June 21 concert 

The Richard Eaton Singers aren't 
the only musical ambassadors to be 
selling the world on Alberta this sum- 
mer, The Cantilon Chamber Choir is 
the official Canadian choir at the 57th 
Annual Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales, 
from July 8 to 12. Following the com 
petitions, the choir will tour southern 


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England, stopping to perform in such 
impressive venues as Conventry Cathe- 
dral, St. Mary Redcliffe Church in Bris- 
tol and St. Paul's Cathedral in London®® 
And again Edmontonians can be part 
of the send-off by attending the pre- 
tour concert Blessed Is the World That 
Sings on July 4 at the Winspear. 

In the meantime, Edmonton 
pianist Ayako Tsuruta rushes home 
from giving a solo recital and a master 
class in Columbia, Missouri in order to 
play a benefit concert at Convocation 
Hall for her late professor, Canadian 
pianist Marek Jablonski, on Sunday 
June 29 at 2 p.m. The concert includes 
a solo work, Andante Spianto et Grand 
Polonaise, by Frederic Chopin, as well 
as chamber works. Tsuruta will be 
joined by pianist Sylvia Shaddick-Tay- 
lor, clarinetist Don Ross and violinist 
David Colwell 

In the words of Brian Halliburton, 
“We have a wonderful music legacy 
here in Edmonton, and it’s wonderful 
to share it with the world.” © 


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Pushing twins 


Dino and Terry 
Demopoulos have an 
identical commitment 
to house music 


By JERED STUFFCO 


slight problem—he’s currently 

without turntables. 

“My turntables are in for repair 
right now,” he laments over the 
phone from his Toronto studio. 
“They're so old—I really need a new 
set. | think they’ve been rotating 
nonstop for about 15 years.” 

Considering that Dino and his 
twin brother Terry have spent the bet- 
ter part of the last two decades rock- 
ing dance floors all over the world 
(including appearances at top clubs 
like Ministry of Sound, Back2Basics 
and New York’s dearly departed 
Twilo), what’s surprising is that he 
hasn't had to replace his decks sooner. 
Back in the mid-’80s, the teenaged 
Demopoulos brothers got their start 
spinning funk, hip hop and electro at 
all-ages jams and high school parties 
in their native Toronto. By the time 
the duo was old enough to buy booze, 
they were among the first in Canada 
to catch onto the early house sounds 


D: Demopoulos is a DJ with a 


that were filtering northward from 
Chicago and New York. 

“After having done this for a 
while, I think one thing that we’ve 
realized as DJs is that every club and 
every crowd is really different,” says 
Dino. “We've had a lot of experience 
playing in so many different venues 
with so many different kinds of 
crowds that we try really hard to tailor 
what we play—we've really begun to 
realize what the crowd wants to hear.” 


DINO AND TERRY’S early residencies 
at infamous Toronto clubs such as the 
Twilight Zone and the after-hours 
warehouse parties they threw in the 
late '80s have become the stuff of leg- 


E 


end among Toronto clubbers. Howev- 
er, while they’ve maintained a busy 
DJing and production schedule with a 
number of original productions, 
remixes and releases on their own 
Crash imprint, Terry's increasing 
responsibilities as a Ph.D. student in 
theoretical physics has forced the pair 
to slow down on their out-of-town 
appearances. “Terry’s such a brainy 
guy,” says Dino, also a U of T alum. 
“Musically, we're on the same wave- 
length, though. You wouldn’t believe 
how many times we've been playing a 


ao 
- 
2 


set and I'll go to grab a certain record 
and Terry's already holding it.” 

Even with their busy personal 
schedules and their recent three-year 
anniversary at System Soundbar, the 
pair has found time to launch their 
latest endeavour, a series of parties 
called Deep Motion. According to 
Dino, Deep Motion is an attempt to 
take the music back to its roots in the 
underground. “When we throw our 
own Deep Motion parties,” he says, 
“the space itself is a really nice ware- 
house space with hardwood floors, 
high ceilings and big, huge windows. 
For us, it’s exactly the kind of space 
that we started in. The whole idea is 
to recapture that early vibe.” 

Whatever the political and eco- 
nomic reasons behind them, Dino 
thinks that the recent trends of corpo- 
rate sponsorships and massive, super- 
star DJ bills have diluted the original 
aesthetic of the music. “The idea of 
turning this music and this culture 
into a concert or a huge event—that’s 
not what the perspective was when we 
started,” he says. “When we started, it 
was like playing for people in our liv- 
ing room. I believe in the power of this 
music to really affect people and to 
bring them together.” © 

THE BUMP A\ AND HUSTLE 
Featuring Dino and Terry, Jo Jo Flores 
(Montreal) ¢ The Standard © Thu, June 26 


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Fine-tuning their 
latest batch of 
songs is #1 on 
Chore’s to-do list 


By STEVEN SANDOR 


uring Canada is a grueling 
proposition. Bands have to pile 
into the cramped confines of 
vans for drives that can last 12 to 15 
hours between widely-spaced cities— 


and the treks only seem longer when 
you're journeying across the long 
stretch between the last outpost in 
western Ontario and Winnipeg. 

The long days and nights are 


ALTERNATIVE 


enough to wear down the hardiest 
of people. But when Chore bass 
player Mike Bell talks about the 
band’s current coast-to-coast 
jaunt—the sixth time the quartet 


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"A NEW ROYAL FAMILY 


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(Bell, brother Chris Bell on vocals, 
guitar and piano, Mitch Bowden on 
vocals and David Dunham on gui- 
tar and drums) has made the voy 
age—there is excitement in his 
voice, not dread. “We look at tour- 
ing Canada as one big adventure,” 
Mike Bell says from a mid-after- 
noon rest stop in Revelstoke, B.¢ 

“This is our sixth time, so we know 
what to expect. We know there are 
times when we have to drive all 
night long. And Chris is a machine 
behind the wheel; he’s been driving 


The Essential 


since last night and that’s the sec- 
ond time he's had to do that on this 
tour. Our mom doesn’t like to hear 
about that, though.” 

The new tour is also giving the 
band a chance to test some new 
material planned for the follow-up 
album to 2002's atmospheric The 
Coastaline Fire, named by Chart 
magazine as one of the top Canadi- 
an releases of last year. In July, the 
band will record the best tracks and 
return to the road for an October 
tour and a new album should be 
released by Sonic Unyon sometime 
in the spring of 2004. “We're really 
in the pre-production stage,” says 
Bell. “We wanted to test these 
songs for the first time on this tour, 
and so far the reaction has been 
pretty positive.” 

Bell says that fans can expect the 
new material to be even more com- 
plex than The Coastaline Fire, in 
which layers of sound were com 
bined to make an album that was 
heavy with wall-of-guitar textures 
mixed with dynamic leads, morose 
vocals and even a cello or two. “I 
think the new music will be even 
more atmospheric,” says Bell. “I 
think the songs are more intricate, 
because | think there's a little more 
math going into the songs that 
Mitch and Chris have written than 
were on The Coastaline Fire.” 


FOR LONGTIME FANS, the news 
that Chore is ready to go back into 
the studio is welcome indeed. The 
Dunnville, Ontario-based band (for 
those of you wondering where the 
heck that is, it’s a town of 15,000 
on the Lake Erie shore about a 45 


THE Essential CLASH 


¥ 


minute drive from Hamilton) first 
made a national splash with their 
bass-heavy 1999 Sonic Unyon 
release Take My Mask and Breathe. 
But when charter member Brian 
Pettigrew left the group, Bowden 
was drafted to replace him. Be&* 
admits that the band had to build 
chemistry with Bowden before 
being ready to go forward with The 
Coastaline Fire. 

Now Bowden is one of Chore’s 
chief songwriters and Bell hopes 
that the success of other bands mak- 
ing loud music based on more than 
the three-chord formula of rock 
means Chore may be ready for big- 
ger things themselves. “I've been lis- 
tening to the major-label debut 
from Cave-!n,” he says, “and they're 
doing a lot of things that are very 
similar to what we are trying to do. 
If they have success, then it means 
that there is a real chance for our 
music to try and get more exposure 
around the world.” 

If that happens, it would make 
the quartet Dunnville’s most famous 
citizens, a far cry from the band that 
used to play out of a rehearsal space 
built into an addition on the Bell 
family home. “When we started 
there, we created a kind of Dun- 
nville scene,” recalls Bell. “Most @§ 
those people have grown up and 
moved on, but that was a good situ- 
ation for us. We were halfway 
between Hamilton and the Niagara 
region, so we were able to get shows 
in both those areas.” Now they go 
much further. © 


CHORE 
Seedy’s ® Fri, June 27 


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AMERICA 


AUDIO BULLYS 
EGO WAR 
(SOURCE/VIRGIN) 


If rave culture is dead, the Brits have 
already shown us the way forward. 
Whether it’s the rough breakbeats of the 
Stanton Warriors or the Plump Djs, or the 
dubbed-out kick of the Streets, Britain 
has a knack for packaging angst with a 
slick but edgy pop sensibility. Such is the 
case of the Audio Bullys, two suburban 
London youths with a love for house 
music, dub, punk and ska—and they‘ve 
managed to ball it all up into an endlessly 
listenable debut album, Ego War. 

Simon Franks litters his vocals over 
Tom Dinsdale’s speaker-busting 
basslines with airy charm, whether he’s 
aping the Happy Mondays on “100 Mil- 
lion” or descending into a coke-fueled 
nightmare on “The Snow.” Musically, 
it’s a revelation, as the pair shifts from 
stuttering punk beats (“We Don’t Care”) 
to the elastic throb of electro (“Real 
Life”) without dissolving the tension that 
colours the whole picture. Like the 
Streets’ Original Pirate Material, it’s the 
kind of apparently haphazard collision of 
influences that’s nevertheless so original 
it transcends any scene you'd attach to 


it. Heo te ted —Dave Jornston 


QUANTIC SOUL ORCHESTRA 
STAMPEDE 

(TRU THOUGHTS) 

ES > 
To quote the Beastie Boys, “Oh my 
God, that’s some funky shit!” If you 


Kier 3. See ee a 


ay. ae 


Motion Notion 


WUBEWEEKLY 


can listen to Stampede, the new disc 
by the Quantic Soul Orchestra, with- 
out getting up off your chair and 


_ dancing, then you'd better go to the 


hospital and get yourself an ass trans- 
plant, because something is seriously 
wrong with your central funk system. 
This is absolutely irresistible 
stuff—10 tracks featuring ultra-sharp 
hooks, tight musicianship and some 
especially nice and insinuating horn 
charts. (Just listen to the sly, Lee Mor- 
gan-style chord changes on the 
QSO’s cover of Bonobo’s “Terrapin.”) 
The songs on Stampede have been 
polished to a high gloss, but at the 
same time Will Holland, who besides 
playing guitars, bass and percussion, 
also produced and arranged the disc, 
gives Stampede a loose, live-band 
sound that prevents it from seeming 
merely like a self-conscious retro 
excursion. When a string section pops 
up on “Something That’s Real,” it 
sounds completely modern instead of 
a studied attempt to duplicate the 
Philly soul sound of the ‘70s. It 
sounds like something that’s real. 
Most of the disc is instrumental, but 
even the rare lyrics are terrific—“If | was 
to believe everything you said,” Alice 
Russell sings to an unreliable boyfriend 
on the propulsive “Hold It Down,” “I'd 
end up believing the grass was red!” 
True to its title, Stampede is unstop- 
pable. ¥&x ¥r rte —PauL MatwycHuk 


JOHN MELLENCAMP 
TROUBLE NO MORE 
(COLUMBIA) 
EE 
Mellencamp’s long and checkered 
career has seen many ups and downs, 
beginning with his professional name, 
Cougar (which he loathed), dropped, 
mercifully when Mellencamp proved to 
the powers that be that he could sell 
records no matter what his name was. 
So, after a string of classic rock hits all 
but dried up, he turned to painting as 
a creative outlet, finding his way back 
to pop music only quite recently. 
Perhaps because his last couple of 
discs were basically ignored, it seems 


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as if Mellencamp has chosen material 
with a certain, shall we say, maturity 
about it; Trouble No More is made up 
of blues classics and traditional songs 
found in the public domain. From the 
strong opening cut, the Robert John- 
son gem “Stones in My Passway,” 
Mellencamp casts himself as a sort of 
elder statesman of pop, no longer the 
gyrating teen idol of days past. Wear- 
ing a black suit, white shirt and sport- 
ing a D.A., he looks every inch the 
older-but-wiser artist | suspect he’s 
always wanted to be—part John Ham- 
mond, part Johnny Cash, part Bob 
Dylan, an artist of substance and 
integrity. For his part, these songs are 
played loosely but with the respect 
they deserve. 

| can’t see the kids eating this up, 
but it’s still probably a good career 
move for Mellencamp to play music an 
artist can age gracefully with. And to 
play it this well. Yew te te —T.C. SHaw 


BRUCE COCKBURN 
YOU’VE NEVER SEEN EVERYTHING 
(TRUE NORTH) 
a eS 
Any suspicions that Bruce Cockburn 
has mellowed in his old age are 
smashed by the first track on his new 
studio album. On “Tried and Tested,” 
he sings “By the claws of the beast/By 
the laws of priests/By the glutton’s 
feast/By the world police.” Nature? 
Check. Religion? Check. Greed and 
globalized conformity? Check, check. 
Yup, this is a Bruce Cockburn record. 
While I'm not a big fan of the 
White Man Rapping section of “Tried 
and Tested,” and some of the themes 
on You've Never Seen Everything feel a 
little, well, tried and tested, these are 
small criticisms for a disc which finds 
that amazing balance between intro- 
spection and hard-hitting political 
outrage. Cockburn, in fact, sings 
about personal balance on “Open.” 
But it’s quickly followed by “Trickle 
Down,” with lines like “Pinstripe 
prophet of peckerhead greed.” (Or, 
in French, “Prophéte en habit raye 
d'une cupidité de connard”—that's 


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right, all the lyrics are translated!) For 
me, Cockburn’s appeal has always 
been his words more than his music. 
There’s a lot of jazzy nood!ing on 
You’ve Never Seen Everything that | 
could’ve done without. But most 
songs shine, spiced up with surprises 
like harmonies from Emmylou Harris 
on “All Our Dark Tomorrows.” Cock- 
burn, again, has kicked at the dark- 
ness ‘til it bled daylight. kKke%key — 
DAN RUBINSTEIN 


GILLIAN WELCH 

SOUL JOURNEY 

(STONY PLAIN/ACONY) 
SSS 
“1 wish | was in Frisco in a brand-new 
pair of shoes,” Gillian Welch sings on 
“Wayside/Back in Time,” a track from 
her new disc, Soul Journey—and | 
knew instantly that the only possible 
way for Gillian Welch to complete the 
rhyme would be to talk about actual- 
ly being someplace else, suffering 
from the blues. To my delight as well 
as my disappointment, my predica- 
tion was right on the money—"But 
I’m sittin’ here in Nashville,” went 
the rest of the lyric, “with the 
Nashville/N’Awlins blues.” 

My delight, of course, derived 
from my own obnoxious cleverness. 
My disappointment, however, 
stemmed from a worry that Welch’s 
downbeat style of alt-country song- 
writing had begun to get so pre- 
dictable that | was arriving at the ends 
of her songs minutes before she did. 
After the artistic breakthrough of her 
brilliant 2001 album Time (The Revela- 
tor), Soul Journey feels like a retreat into 
old habits. Revelator saw Welch taking 
the moody, austere traditional folk 
music she had been emulating with 
such slavish care on her previous 
albums and fusing it with personal, 
contemporary themes. It was, well, a 
revelation—an album that somehow 
seemed emotionally immediate and 
timeless at the very same time. 

Soul Journey, by contrast, is a far 
less visionary collection of material. 
One of the tracks is even called “One 


we 


Little Song”—and perhaps “little” 
songs is all Welch has energy for after 
the workout of putting together Reve- 
lator. Still, “small” Gillian Welch songs 
like “Wrecking Ball” or “No One 
~ Knows My Name” can seem like 
giants compared to the puny con- 
cerns of most country music, and 
Welch and her partner David Rawlings 
perform them with their usual impec- 
cable musicianship. It’s just that | 
think Welch has more to offer listeners 
these days than impeccable cover ver- 
sions of traditional songs like “Make 
Me a Pallet on the Floor.” Forget pre- 
serving traditions—Welch has the tal- 
ent to completely redefine them. 
ete te —Paut Matwycuuk 


EVAN DANDO ? 

BABY I’M BORED 

(BAR/NONE) 
a 
After releasing seven albums under the 
Lemonheads name, frontman Evan 
Dando has finally ditched the rise-and- 
fall baggage associated with that 
moniker and started fresh under his 
own. But dubbing Baby I’m Bored his 
first solo release is a bit of a misnomer 
since the band, with its ever-changing 
roster of musicians from 1986 to 1996, 
was effectively Dando’s exclusive musi- 
cal vehicle anyway. 

After spending seven years in a 
fearless drug- and alcohol-soaked fog 
which finally cleared shortly after the 
Twin Towers exploded two blocks 
away from his home, Dando is now 
sober, in love and looking to tour 
again. Baby I’m Bored, written under 
the influence but recorded clean, 
bored me at first but the songs eventu- 


ally sunk in, most notably the Talking 
Heads-like “Waking Up,” and the 
unmistakable Lemon flavour of “It 
Looks Like You” and “Repeat.” Dando 
co-wrote most of the songs with 
friends including former Lemonheads 
Jon Brion and Tom Morgan. Don’t 
expect Dando to fall too far from the 
Lemon tree on this CD. Country- and 
pop-infused licks, hooks a-plenty and 
stories of narrow escapes and delirious 
life lessons, it’s a solid collection. 
FoI —Lisa Grecoire 


LORRIE MATHESON 
YOU SHOULD KNOW BY NOW 
(WESTERN FAMINE) 


—— ES 
I've been spinning this CD for more 
than a month now, unsure what to 
say about it. There’s the basic stuff: 
You Should Know by Now is catchy, 
Canadian guitar-driven indie rock. 
There’s the obligatory lyrical observa- 
tion: Matheson writes clever songs 
and turns some nice phrases, like 
“escapegoat clause.” There’s the ref- 
erencing part of the review, where | 
showcase my musical knowledge by 
mentioning a couple of cool artists 
who display at least superficial simi- 
larities: Matheson, at times, sounds 
like Ron Hawkins (as in Lowest of the 
Low, not Rockin’ Ronnie). Beyond all 
this, however, | still don’t have much 
to say, other than | really like this 
album, it’s great accompaniment for 
cooking dinner or doing dishes, and 
there’s so much going on here lyri- 
cally it’ll take me another couple 
months to figure out what You 
Should Know by Now is trying to tell 
me. x tr tx —DAn RusinsTeIn 


JOE BUDDEN 
JOE BUDDEN 
(DEF JAM/UNIVERSAL) 
(EERE RN a 
Boy, do | love being surprised. When a 
CD I'm expecting to be little more than 
a one-trick pony turns out to possess 
some literary merit, I'm floored. It hap- 
pened with Mr. Cheeks’s Back Again, it 
happened with 50 Cent's Get Rich or 
Die Trying and it’s just happened again 
with Joe Budden’s self-titled debut 
Though the disc contains its share 
of filler, Budden has gone out of his 
way to make it as personal as possible 
Besides the mega-hit “Pump It Up,” Joe 
Budden features a few could-be club 
hits in “Ma Ma Ma” (featuring 112) 
and “U Ain't Gotta Go Home.” Howev- 
er, the focus of Joe Budden isn't dance- 
floor lures but high-quality wordplay. 
Although you'll probably need more 
than two hands to count all the oral 
sex references, Budden manages to slip 
enough intimate facts and conversa- 
tion pieces into the disc to appease 
both backpackers and the old-school. 
“10 Mins.,” the most delicately- 
worded track on the album, deals with 
more private matters than most MCs 
would be comfortable bringing up. And 
if you think the length of the track is a 
bit much (it actually does clock in at 10 
minutes), the song is so captivating the 
time will fly by. “Walk With Me,” anoth- 
er superb cut, explains the ills of record 
label backing in a manner that merits 
comparison with Eminem’s ramblings. 
Despite its many assets, Joe Budden 
may still slip under the radar of many CD 
buyers. But those who do indulge and 
give it a chance will not be disappointed. 
Foto! —Sean Austin-Joyner 


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A young girl defies 
centuries of male 
tradition in stunning 
Whale Rider 


By CHRIS WANGLER 


that inhabits a fishing village on 

New Zealand's east coast, believe 
that their leaders are descended 
from Paikea, a legendary figure who 
escaped death at sea by riding on 
the back of a whale. His descen- 
dants form a patrimonial line that 
infuses the community of 
Whangara with strength. 

Early in Whale Rider, that line 
is broken when a son (the expected 
heir) and his mother die during 
childbirth. A twin sister survives, but 
her devastated father (Cliff Curtis) 


The 
ae 3. a 


T:: Ngati Kohoni, a Maori tribe 


Blood-spewing 
virus victims ravage 
London in grim 

28 Days Later 


By JOSEF BRAUN 


clear from the outset is that while 
the North American distributors 
of Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later are 


0: thing I should probably make 


leaves the community, overwhelmed 
by grief. The girl is left to be raised by 
her kindly grandmother (Vicky 
Haughton) and stern grandfather 
Paka (carefully portrayed by Rawiri 
Paratene), the community’s spiritual 
chief. Although he loves the girl and 
the two share a deep passion for the 
fate of their people, tradition dictates 
that no girl, regardless of her gifts, 
could ever carry on the tribal line. 

Intent on saving his community, 
Paka searches, in vain, for a new 
leader among the boys of the island. 
He becomes angry when he discovers 
his granddaughter is secretly training 
herself in the traditional ways. Yet in 
spite of his opposition, Pai is deter- 
mined to win him over, bolstered by 
her unique mana—a kind of heredi- 
tary authority and pride. When a cri- 
sis washes up on the shore, the stage 
is set for a collision of old and new 
orders that will either render the 
beleaguered com 


Caro’s secret is to give us some- 
thing at once both familiar and 
exotic; she walks very lightly 
between the naturalistic and spiritu- 
al narratives. The film’s mystica] 
undercurrents, connected to some 
key Maori symbols such as rope, take 
on expansive significance in the 
film’s unforgettable climax, in which 
the tribe attempts to rescue a num- 
ber of beached whales. 


THE CAST, WHICH CONSISTS of 
many well-known Maori actors, is 
consistently brilliant. The standout is 
Keisha Castle-Hughes, a skinny pre- 
teen with captivating eyes making her 
acting debut as Pai. (Coincidentally 
enough, she was auditioned by the 
same casting agent who discovered 
Anna Paquin for The Piano.) Like a 
Maori Joan of Arc, Castle-Hughes alter- 
nates between sorrow and passion 
with uncanny poise, never demanding 


+ pity or losing con- 
munity asunder or trol. Her understat- 
reunite it through ed spiritual zeal, 
an incredible act of especially while 


Spiritual courage. 

This kind of film is notoriously 
hard to pull off. Working with a 
breathtaking seaside setting, another 
director might have stereotyped the 
characters and buffeted the action 
with Zamfir-type music and forced 
spiritual awakenings. But in her sec- 
ond feature, Kiwi director Niki Caro 
(Memory and Desire), who is not her- 
self of Maori descent, plays an 
unusually restrained hand, working 
from a novella by Maori writer Witi 
Thamaera. During the first half of the 
film, Caro patiently trains her lens 
on the everyday rhythms of this 
vibrant but troubled culture, which 
is in dire need of reconnecting with 
its origins. The society is complex, 
consisting of stoic elders and apa- 
thetic twentysomethings who are 
prone to mild drug abuse and 
parental neglect. Meanwhile, a 
younger generation seems to feel the 
demands of tradition but can’t chan- 
nel its power. All except Pai. 


delivering a heart-rending speech 
about the history of her people, stands 
in strong contrast to her grandfather's 
blind faith, which is clouded by his 
deeply concealed anger. 

This film bears comparison to 
another film about contemporary 
New Zealand natives, Lee Tamahori’s 
Once Were Warriors, a bleak examina- 
tion of a Maori family struggling to 
survive in an Auckland slum. Unlike 
that film, however, which used jar- 
ring violence and unsettling themes 
to make its point, Whale Rider suc- 
ceeds as a delicate, powerful coming- 
of-age story. While it is a “small 
film,” celebrated by festival audi- 
ences across the world, it delivers a 
surprisingly meaty message about 
the mysterious ways of spirit. O 


WHALE RIDER 

Written and directed by Niki Caro « 
Starring Keisha Castle-Hughes, Rawiri 
Paratene, Vicky Haughton and Cliff 
Curtis * Opens Fri, June 27 


hoping to hook audiences by market- 
ing it as a revisionist zombie movie, 
there are in fact no zombies to be 
seen here. Oh sure, there are swarms 
of anonymous, crazed-looking bodies 


EIHORROR 


running around limp-limbed and 
attacking the innocent; it’s just that 
they’re not at all dead. And when you 
think about it, that’s potentially a 
much more frightening concept. 


28 Days Later is actually a far time- 
lier cultural product than any undead 
splatterfest could hope to be, but not 
in a way that makes distributors 
happy. The film’s a savage, apocalyp- 
tic chiller about an illness with the 
poppy moniker of “Rage,” a highly 
contagious disease that affects its vic- 
tims most directly and dramatically 
through blood contact. Get even a 
drop of Rage-infected blood on you 
and your own blood almost immedi- 
ately becomes saturated with the virus 
as well, transforming you instanta- 
neously into a babbling freak hell- 
bent for raw flesh. In the new age of 
SARS, West Nile, Mad Cow and what- 
ever the hell else is seeping into the 
fragile human ecosystem these days, 
the film touches a very raw nerve. 

Because a horror movie is only as 
effective as it is resonant, this 
premise, as far as I’m concerned, is 
one of 28 Days Later’s selling points. 
There are others, too, such as the 
nerve-rattling, richly toned digital 
camera work by Anthony Dod Man- 
tle (The Celebration). And Boyle and 
his new screenwriting partner, novel- 
ist Alex Garland (author of The Beach, 
the basis of Boyle’s previous feature), 
smartly avoid wasting time explain- 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


er eenwes 


a 


2 eee 


Neatly wrapped Brakhage 


Metro Cinema 
celebrates America’s 
greatest experimental 
filmmaker 


By JOSEF BRAUN 


e films of the late Stan 
Brakhage careen, spill, rush, cry, 
plume and sizzle with an unfet- 
tered vibrancy and a gen- 
uine, childlike awe that 
comes from devoutly follow- 
ing the dictates of a deeply 
personal, audacious and 
highly conflicted vision of 
what film can present us 
with. Through more than 
400 films (most of them 
quite short), Brakhage 
explored the possibilities of 
filmmaking completely out- 
side of any commercial 
realm, often working alone 
and using the simplest of 
means to bypass the entire 
lexicon of narrative film con- 
ventions and cut straight to 
its key components: light, 
colour, rhythm and, perhaps 
most significantly, move- 
ment—his camera darts 
around in the tiniest spaces 
like nothing else I’ve ever 
seen. This weekend Metro 
Cinema, in collaboration 
with the Works Art and 
Design Festival, pays tribute 
to the life and work of 
Brakhage over three pro- 
grams: Brakhage, Jim Sheri- 
dan’s 1999 documentary 
portrait; Dog Star Man, 
Brakhage’s 79-minute “epic 
poem” in prelude and four 
parts; and Selected Brakhage 
Shorts 1955-2002, which col- 
lects seven of Brakhage’s 
most popular films. 

The defining factor in Brakhage’s 
films is their decisive resistance to 
representation. Brakhage, who died 


ing what's happening. After all, a true 
horror classic like Night of the Living 
Dead is freaky precisely because we 
don’t understand what's going on. 
Boyle and Garland suspend our disbe- 
lief and sidestep whatever niggling 
questions we might have about the 
world beyond their film’s handful of 
characters by simply setting their 
story on an 4sland, a location which 
itself is a tool of disease containment 
the rest of the planet would undoubt- 
edly take advantage of. 

When Jim (Cillian Murphy) 
wakes up from a month-long sleep in 
a London hospital some time after 
Rage has ravaged the city’s populace, 
he’s oblivious to what's transpired 
and wanders out into eerily empty 
streets and overturned double-decker 
buses. The mood is set perfectly and 
after the first 15 minutes of 28 Days 
Later, | became convinced that I was 


last March at the age of 70, spent his 
life searching for a beauty indepen- 
dent of recognizable things (Jackson 
Pollock was an early hero), painting 
or scratching directly onto film and 
often avoiding actors, places, objects 


EXPERIMENTAL 


and photography altogether. Yet he 
was fully cognizant of the fact that 
the average viewer (and certainly the 


over-analytical critic) will often find 
representations of nameable things 
in even the most abstract art. And 


about to see Boyle’s strongest work 
since Trainspotting. But these desolate 
early scenes of mounting panic (set 
to the tempestuous build of God- 
speed You! Black Emperor's “East 
Hastings”) and the more introspec- 
tive ones that soon follow remain 
the film’s high points. 


THINGS GO DOWNHILL after Jim 
and his fellow survivors (including 
the gutsy and fetching Naomie Har- 
ris) encounter a small, exclusively 
male military encampment. Authori- 
ty figures are always obvious bad 
guys in Boyle’s movies and are rarely 
invested with much depth, but more 
troublesome is Garland’s tendency to 
strive for grandiose metaphors, psy- 
chodrama and allegory (not to men- 
tion happy endings) without earning 
them. The soldiers want to “rebuild 
society” and before they even have a 


this tension between struggling to 
get past the nameable and the view- 
er’s ability to see their experiences 
reflected in art is part of what makes 
Brakhage’s work human. As Brakhage 
scholar Fred Camper says, these 
films, for all their stripping away of 
things, are never about aesthetic 
purity—they’re way too terrifically, 
idiosyncratically messy for that. 

Dog Star Man (1961-64) in fact 
contains plenty of recognizable things 
and a whole lot of Brakhage himself 
in the feature role of a “big 
daddy” figure out in nature, 
chopping logs, climbing 
mountains and wrestling 
with an old, dead tree. The 
prelude presents us with a 
collage of what's to come: 
microscopic blood cells, fire, 
ice, skin, beautiful sun flares 
and all manner of textures 
swinging into frame and 
moving across the screen in 
a jazzy rhythm of overlap- 
ping image. The subsequent 
parts reveal Brakhage’s 
Homeric narrative ina 
streaming flow that layers 
more superimpositions with 
each transition. 


MANY CALL DOG STAR 
MAN Brakhage’s master- 
piece, but while the film is 
pretty mind-blowing, the 
somewhat macho, archetypi- 
cal subject matter isn’t as 
appealing to me as the 
themes and sensations 
depicted in the later work 
highlighted in Selected 
Brakhage Shorts. I... Dreaming 
(1988) also features Brakhage 
in the role of family man but 
in a more subtle manner 
suggesting the experiential 
disparity between the way 
he and his kids pass time, 
with sped-up images of them 
running and playing in the 
living room while he continues to 
simply sit in a rocking chair with his 
face out of frame. Commingled Con- 


chance to catch their breath, the 
film’s two heroines are being turned 
into concubines while Jim goes all 
Straw Dogs in mere minutes, wreaking 
an unlikely revenge that shifts the 
film’s gears completely. 

I'm predisposed to the sort of 
harsh subversion and civilized-man- 
as-base-animal theory you get in 28 
Days Later, but Boyle and Garland 
rush things, not letting their charac- 
ters and events unfold organically. 
It still makes for an interesting 
enough 112 minutes in the dark, 
but I doubt you'll be testing your 
blood or even checking your pulse 
when it’s all over. © 


28 DAYS LATER 

Directed by Danny Boyle * Written by 
Alex Garland « Starring Cillian Murphy, 
Naomie Harris and Brendan Gleeson * 
Opens Fri, June 27 


tainers (1997) is a beautiful montage 
of rushing water and bending light, 
while The Dante Quartet (1987) offers 
luscious floods of billowing paint, 
sometimes obscuring a photographic 
image behind, to eloquently represent 
each part of The Divine Comedy. Moth- 
light (1963) was made without a cam- 
era at all, only images placed directly 
on perforated tape (including moth 
Wings) and transferred onto film. The 
piece suggests the strange, short life of 
the moth drawn to the flame in a 
manner that poetically reflects 
Brakhage’s vocation—the desire to be 
near that seductive light against all 
rational good judgment. © 


STAN BRAKHAGE: A TRIBUTE 
Zeidler Hall, The Citadel # Sat-Mon, June 
28-30 (7pm) * Metro Cinema * 425-9212 


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| ODEON FILMS - AN 


VUEWEEKLY GZ JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


{ANCE ATLANTIS COMPANY 


er" 


NEW THIS WEEK 


The Big Lebowski (M) Jeff Bridges, John 
Goodman, Steve Buscemi, Julianne Moore 
Pic K and John Turturro star in Miller's Crossing 

director Joel Coen’s cult comedy about a 
perpetually stoned bowling enthusiast who gets 
mixed up in a complicated kidnapping scheme. 
Zeidler Hall, The Citadel; Fri, June 27 (7pm) 


Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle (CO, FP) Drew 
Barrymore, Cameron Diaz, Lucy Liu, Bernie Mac _ 
and Demi Moore star in director McG’s jiggle- 
filled sequel to his 2000 hit action-comedy, 
based on the cheesy ‘70s TV series, in which 
three sexy crimefighters are pitted against a 
Pogue villainess who once worked for their boss. 


RS 
Legajly Blonde 2: Red, White and Blonde 
(CO, FP) Reese Witherspoon, Sally Field, Bob 
Newhart and Luke Wilson star in Kissing Jessica 
Stein director Charles Herman-Wurmfeld’s 
sequel to the 2001 hit comedy, in which unlike 
ly Harvard Law School graduate Elle Woods 
brings her cheerful, fashion-conscious ways to 
the U.S. Congress. (Opens Wednesday) 


Life Without Death (M) Director Frank Cole’s 
autobiographical documentary, an account of 
the harrowing 11-month trek he took across the 
Sahara Desert as a way of confronting his own 
mortality following his grandfather's death. Zei- 
dler Hall, The Citadel; Thu, June 26 (7pm) 


Seratch (M) Hype director Doug Pray’s 

musical documentary about the history 
PI and evolution of the hip hop Dj. Featur- 

ing interviews with and performances by 
Afrika Bambaataa, Q-bert, Mix Master Mike, 
Cut Chemist, DJ Shadow and Dj Krush. Zeidler 
Hai the Citadel; Fri-Mon, June 27-30 (9pm) 


Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas (CO, FP) 
The voices of Brad Pitt, Catherine Zeta-Jones, 
Michelle Pfeiffer and Joseph Fiennes are fea- 
tured in this animated adventure from Antz co- 
director Tim Johnson, in which the legendary 
sailor must battle giant monsters and a vengeful 
goddess in order to clear his name after being 
falsely accused of stealing the priceless “Book of 
(Opens Wednesday) 


Peace.” 


Stan Brakhage Tribute (M) A selec 

tion of films by and about the celebrated 
PICK American artist, perhaps the most influ- 

ential experimental filmmaker of all time 
Featuring: Brakhage (dir: Jim Sheddin): Sat, June 
28 (7pm) * Dog Star Man (dir: Stan Brakhage); 
Sun, June 29 (7pm) ® Selected Brakhage Shorts 
(dir: Stan Brakhage): Mon, June 30 (7pm). Ze/-~ 
dler Hall, The Citadel 


Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (CO, 
FP) Arnold Schwarzeneager, Nick Stahl, Kristan: 
na Loken and Claire Danes star in the latest 
entoy.in the popular sci-fi/action series, in which 
John Connor and an obsolete cyborg must bat- 
tle an army of intelligent machines and an 
advanced female android for contro! of the 
planet. Directed by Jonathan Mostow (U-577). 
(Opens Wednesday) 


28 Days Later (CO) Cillian Murphy, Naomie 
Harris, Megan Burns, Christopher Eccleston and 
Brendan Gleeson star in Trainspotting director 
Danny Boyle’s “thinking person’s” 


CARNEAU 


theatre 
8712 - 109 Street - 4535-0728 


AUDIENCES WORLDWIDE AGREE 


WHALE RIDER IS THE BEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR! 


Nightly 7:00 & 9:00 pm 
Sat & Sun Matinee 2:00 pm 
Ge 


thriller about a small group of Londoners strug- 
gling to survive after a highty contagious virus 
tums nearly everyone in the world into blood- 
thirsty cannibals. 


Whale Rider (GA) Keisha Castle-Hugh- 
O es, Rawiri Paratene and Cliff Curtis star in 
PICK writer/director Niki Caro’s inspirational 
= drama about a 12-year-old Maori girl’s 
efforts to defy her disapproving grandfather 
and become a Whale Rider, an inherited tribal 
role traditionally reserved for males which she 
nevertheless feels it is her destiny to assume. 


FIRST-RUN MOVIES 


Alex and Emma (CO, FP) Luke Wilson, Kate 
Hudson and Sophie Marceau star in When Harry 
Met Sally directoe Rob Reiner’s postmodern 
romantic comedy about a desperate writer who 
must finish his latest novel in 30 days in order 
to pay off a huge debt, only to have his 
planned storyline unexpectedly invaded by new 
characters inspired by the sexy, beguiling 
young stenographer he’s dictating the book to. 


Anger Management (CO, FP) Adam Sandler, 
jack Nicholson and Marisa Tomei star in Tommy 
Boy director Peter Segal’s comedy about a mild- 
mannered businessman who enrols in a court- 
mandated anger-management program, only to 
be paired up with a psychotic instructor whose 
insane behaviour makes his life a living hell 


Bend It Like Beckham (CO, FP) Parminder 
Nagra, Keira Knightley and Jonathan Rhys-Mey- © 
ers star in Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder 
Chadha‘s ethnic cormedy about a soccer-crazy 
British teenager who defies her traditional- 
minded Sikh parents by secretly joining a 
women's football league. 


Bruce Almighty (CO, FP) Jim Carrey, Jennifer 
Aniston and Morgan Freeman star in Liar Liar 
director Tom Shadyac’s comedy about a con- 
stantly complaining local TV reporter whom God 
endows with all His powers for one week and 
challenges to make the world a better place. 


Chalte Chalte (CO) Shahrukh Khan and Rani 
Mukherjee star in director Aziz Mirza’s oppo- 
sites-attract Bollywood romance about the 
rocky love affair between a free-spirited but 
hard-working middle-class man and his much 
more mature, practical and sophisticated 
fiancée. In Hindi with English subtitles. 


Daddy Day Care (CO, FP) Eddie Murphy, Jeff 
Garlin, Regina Hall and Anjelica Huston star in 
Dr. Dolittle 2 director Steve Carr's domestic 
comedy about a downsized dotcom worker 
who convinces his buddies to help him set up a 
new business: a “guy-run” daycare centre. 
Down With Love (CO) Renée Zellweger, 
Ewan McGregor and David Hyde Pierce star in 
Bring It On director Peyton Reed’s campy tribute « 
to the Rock Hudson/Doris Day comedies of the 
‘50s, about a cocky, womanizing journalist who 
concocts a scheme to make a man-hating best- 
selling authoress fall in love with him. 

Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met 
Lloyd (CO, FP) Eric Christian Olsen, Derek 
Richardson and Eugene Levy star in Jack Frost 


THEA NA rR ES 
10337 - Whyte Ave. - 433-0728 


“A VERY SEXY MOVIE! 
FRANCES McDORMAND ISN'T JUST GOOD 
SHE'S FANTASTICI” 


“ABSOLUTELY 
PITCH PERFECT! 


LAUREL CANYON 


Nightly 7:10 & 9:10 pm 
Sat & Sun Matinee 2:30 pm 
o14Ae 


VUEWEEKLY €f)> 


director Troy Miller’s prequel to the 1994 hit 
comedy Dumb and Dumber, which depicts the 
efforts of brainless teenagers Harry Dunne and 
Uoyd Christmas to get out of “special ed” and 
enter mainstream high-school life. 


Finding Nemo (CO, FP) The voices of Albert 
Brooks, Ellen DeGeneres, Willern Dafoe, Geof- 
frey Rush and Allison Janney are featured in A 
Bug’s Life writer/director Andrew Stanton’s com- 
puter-animated comedy about a clownfish who 
embarks on a dangerous trek to be reunited 
with his son after they are separated near Aus- 
tralia’s Great Barrier Reef. 


Flower and Garnet (CO) Callum Keith 
Rennie, jane McGregor, Colin Roberts 
ava and Kristen Thomson star in writer/direc- 
4 tor Keith Behrman’s slice-of-life drama, 
set in rural British Columbia, about a father and 
his two children, all of whom still feel the effects 
of the death during childbirth of their wife and 
mother eight years ago. 


From Justin to Kelly (CO, FP) American Idol 
contestants Justin Guarini and Kelly Clarkson play 
lightly fictionalized versions of themselves in this 
romantic comedy about two college students 
falling in love during spring break in Miami. 
Directed by Robert Iscove (She’s All That). 


Ghosts of the Abyss (FP) Titanic director 
James Cameron's 3-D IMAX documentary 
depicts the efforts of a team of historians and 
scientists to venture 2.5 miles beneath the 
North Atlantic and explore the wreck of the 
doomed Titanic luxury cruise ship. 


Holes (CO) Shia La Beouf, Sigourney Weaver, 
Jon Voight and Tim Blake Nelson star in The Fugi- 
tive director Andrew Davis's film version of Louis 
Sachar’s children’s novel about a teenager who is 
sent to a juvenile detention camp where the war- 
den forces her young charges to spend their days 
digging hole after hole in a dry lake bed 


Hollywood Homicide (CO, FP) Harrison Ford, 
Josh Hartnett, Lena Olin and Bruce Greenwood 
star in Bull Durham writer/director Ron Shelton’s 
crime comedy about a mismatched pair of LAPD 
detectives whose investigation of the onstage 
slaying of a rising hip hop group seems to lead 
to the ruthless boss of a rap record label. 


The Hulk (CO, FP) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly, 
Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte star in Crouching 
Tiger, Hidden Dragon director Ang Lee's big- 
screen version of the Marvel comic book about 
a meek scientist who, as a result of a gamma- 
ray experiment gone horribly wrong, trans- 
forms into a gigantic, incredibly powerful, 
virtually unstoppable green behemoth whenev- 
er he gets angry. 


The In-Laws (CO, FP) Michael Douglas, Albert 
Brooks, Robin Tunney and Candice Bergen star 
in Dick director Andrew Fleming’s remake of the 
1979 comedy about a mild-mannered podia- 
trist who is taken on a wild espionage adven- 
ture on the eve of his daughter's wedding by 
his new in-law, a crazed CIA agent. 


The Italian Job (CO, FP) Mark Wahlberg, 
Edward Norton and Charlize Theron star in The 
Negotiator director F. Gary Gray’s remake of the 
classic 1969 caper comedy, in which a band of 
thieves commits a daring gold heist as part of 
an elaborate revenge scheme against their 


(a) 


‘I FOUND MYSELF BLOWN AWAY! 


S ONE OF THE MOST AMAZING HUMST 


show July and 
e booking) 


io 7:00pm 
(private 


WINGED 
MIGRATION 
WINGED MIGRATION 


Nightly 7:00 & 9:00 pm 
Sat & Sun Matinee 2:00 pm 
Ge 


Lebowski 
upon its initial 
ing the 2nd An 


July 18-19 w 


Metro Cinema. Or just the Metro, if you're in 


crooked former partner. 


Laurel Canyon (P) Frances McDormand, 
Christian Bale, Kate Beckinsale and Alessandro 
Nivola star in High Art writer/director Lisa 
Cholodenko’s indie drama about an uptight 
Harvard graduate whose relationship with his 
equally straitlaced fiancée suffers strain when 
they move in with his mother, a successful but 
loose-living L.A. record producer. 


The Lizzie McGuire Movie (CO, FP) Hilary 
Duff, Yani Gellman, Adam Lamberg and Robert 
Carradine star in Trick director Jim Fall’s tween- 
friendly comedy, based on the popular TV 
series, in which a cute but clumsy American 
teen falls in love with an Italian pop star during 
a trip to Rome. 


[x The Matrix: Reloaded (CO, FP) Keanu 
Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Laurence Fish- 
Pick burne and 100 Hugo Weavings star in 
the Wachowski Brothers’ hotly anticipat- 
ed sequel to their 1999 sci-fi/action blockbuster 
about a team of rebels who must enter a virtu- 
al-reality environment in order to battle the 
soulless machines that have enslaved humanity. 


, AMighty Wind (CO) Christopher Guest (who 


also directed), Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, 
Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara and Parker 
Posey star in this quirky, improvised “mocku- 
mentary” in the vein of Waiting for Guffman and 
Best in Show, about three ‘60s folk acts who 
reunite for a memorial concert in honour of a 
legendary folk-music promoter. 


Rugrats Go Wild (CO, FP) The voices of Bruce 
Willis, Lacey Chabert, Elizabeth Daily, Tim Curry 
and LL Cool J are featured in the latest big- 
screen Rugrats adventure, in which the Pickles 
family encounters the cast of The Wild Thomber- 
rys after getting stranded on a desert island. 


2 Fast 2 Furious (FP) Paul Walker, Tyrese Gib- 


he °) ity thing 


son, Ludacris, Eva Mendes and Devon Aoki star 
in Boyz N the Hood director John Singleton’s 
sequel to the 2001 hit The Fast and the Furious, 
in which disgraced undercover cop Brian 
O'Conner seeks to redeem himself by infiltrat- 
ing a Miami street-racing gang. 

Winged Migration (P) Microcosmos director 
Jacques Perrin’s visually spectacular, technologi- 
cally innovative documentary about migratory 
birds, which traces the arduous annual journeys 
of several species of birds through 40 countries 
and all seven continents. 


Wrong Turn (CO) Eliza Dushku, Jeremy Sisto, 
Emmanuelle Chriqui and Desmond Harrington 
star in Crime and Punishment in Suburbia director 
Rob Schmidt's horror flick about a group of 
young people who get stranded by a car crash in 
the woods of West Virginia, where they are hunt- 
ed down by a gang of inbred hillbilly cannibals. 


X2: X-Men United (CO, FP) Hugh Jackman, 
Patrick Stewart, lan McKellen, Halle Berry, 
Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, Alan Cumming, Farhke 
Janssen and Brian Cox star in director Bryan 
Singer's sequel to his 2000 adaptation of the 
Marvel comic book, set in a world where the 
growing population of mutants with fantastic 
powers are looked on with suspicion and fear 
by “normal” humans. 


CO: Cineplex Odeon, 444-5468 
EFS: Edmonton Film Society, 439-5285 
FP: Famous Players 
GA: Garneau Theatre, 433-0728 
L: Leduc Cinema, 986-2728 
M: Metro Cinema, 425-9212 
P: Princess Theatre, 433-0728 


SUMMER YOGA RETREAT 


JUNE 28 - JULY 1 
GOLDEYE CENTRE - NORDEGG 


+ Beautifully secluded location. 


* This widely used education and conference centre features excel- 
lent meals and hotel style rooms with private bath and shower. 

+ Weekend features Yoga classes Saturday, Sunday and Monday 
with time for personal relaxation and outdoor exploration. 


¢ Call for details. 


EDM ONTO ev 


yoy fl 


A sTuDIO 


Hatha < Ashtanga 


Ken Strachan founder 


Classes 7 days a week. 


tel 451.8131 or 457.9707 
12039 — 127 Street 


edmontonyogastudio@shaw.ca 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


RATIO 
9.00 Sat Sun Mon Tue 2.00 
METRO CINEMA 
9828-101A Ave, 


ss BRAKHAGE SHORTS 


LEDUC CINEMAS 


4762-50 St, 986-2728 


CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE 
Violent scenes. Daily 1.10 3.30 7.00 9.20 
DUMB AND DUMBERER: 


WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD 
Grude content. Daily 1.10 7.10 


_ HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 
Fri Sat Sun Mon 3.10 9.10 


7.05 3.30 7.05 9.15 


Frightening scenes, not suitable for younger children 
Daily 1.00 3.45 6.50 9.30 


TERMINATOR 3: 
RISE OF THE MACHINES 
Violence throughout. Wed 1.15 3,10 7.10 9.25 


LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS 
Wed 1.20 3.20 7.10 9.10 


WETASKIWIN CINEMAS 


(1). 780-352-3922 


Frightening scenes, not suitable for younger children. 
Daily 1.00 3.40 7.00 9.40 


GRANDIN THEATRE 


Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
‘St. Albert, 458-9622. F 


Showtimes are for date of issue, Thu, June 26 only. 
Please contact theatre for showtimes. 


2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 
Violent scenes. Thu 11.20 2.00 4.10 6,50 9.00 


DADDY DAY CARE 
Thu 11.45 4.00 


Frightening scenes, not suitable for younger children. 
Thu 10.45 1.20 4.00 6.40 9.20 


THE ITALIAN JOB 


FINDING NEMO 
Thu 11.30 1.30 3.30 5.30 7.30 9.30 


HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 
11.20 2.00 4.15 7.20 9.35 


CINEPLEX ODEON CINEMAS 


CINEMA GUIDE — 


_ CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE 
Violent scenes. No passes. 
Daily 12.20 2.40 5.00 7.20 10.00 


28 DAYS LATER 
pay ene No passes. Dally 1.10 3.50 7.40 10.20 


suitable for younger 
See eth 12.90 880 6.00 990 THX Fi. 
| que 12.00 3.10 6.20 9.30 


ALEX AND EMMA 
scenes. 


DUMB AND DUMBERER: 
WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD PG 
Crude content. Fri-Tue 9.20 


FINDING NEMO G 
Daily 12.10 2.30 4.50 7.10 9.40 


THE ITALIAN JOB 
Fri-Tue 1.00 3.40 7.20-10.10 
Wed-Thu 1.003.406.359.20 | 


Bauce ALMIGHTY PG 
Coarse language. Fri-Tue 12.40 3.20 7.00 


THE MATRIX: RELOADED 140 
Violent scenes. No passes. Fri-Tue 12.50 4.00 6. 
9.50 Wed-Thu 9.00 | Ps 


TERMINATOR 3: RISE OF THE MACHINES 144 


14A 


Violence throughout. No passes. Tue 7.20 10.10 THX 
Wed-Thu 1.20 4.10 7,20 10.10 

LEGALLY BLONDE 2: 

RED, WHITE AND BLONDE PG 


Wed-Thu 11.50 2.20 4.40 6.50 9,30 


SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS SG 
Wed-Thu 12.00 2.10 4.20 7.00. 9.10 


WEST MALL 8 
; 8882-170 St, 444-1829 
28 DAYS LATER 18A 


Gory violence. No passes. Fri Mon-Thu 7,00 9.40 Sat 
Sun 1.30 4.00 7.00 9.40 


DOWN WITH LOVE PG 
Fri Mon-Thu 6.45 9,20 Sat Sun 1.40 4.10 6.45 9.20 
BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM PG 
Fri Mon-Thu 7.20 9.45 Sat Sun 1.10 3.50 7.20 9.45 
A MIGHTY WIND PG 
Daily 7.30 

WRONG TURN 18A 
Gory violence throughout. Daily 9.10 

THE IN-LAWS PG 


Suggestive language. Fri Mon-Thu 9,50 
Sat Sun 1.20 4.40 9.50 


DADDY DAY CARE G 
Fri Mon-Thu 7.10 9.25 Sat Sun 2,004.30 7.10 9.25 
x2 PG 


May frighten younger children. Fri Mon-Thu 6.40 9.30 
Sat Sun 1,00 3.40 6.40 9,30 


FLOWER AND GARNET 
Mature themes. Fri Mon-Thu 6,50 
Sat Sun 1.50 4.20 6.50 


CHALTE CHALTE G 
Fri Mon-Thu 7.40 Sat Sun 2.10 7.40 


144 


CLAREVIEW 


4211-199 Ave, 472-7600 


CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE PG 


Violent scenes. No passes. Fri-Tue 12,00 1.30 2.30 
4.10 5.15 7.00 8.00 9.20 10.20 Wed-Thu 1.30 2,00 
4.10 5.15 7.00 8.00 9.20 10.20 


THE HULK PG 
Frightening scenes, riot suitable for younger children, 
No passes, Daily 12.20 3,30 6.30 9.45 


FROM JUSTIN TO KELLY G 
Fri-Tue 1.40 4.40 7.35 Wed-Thu 12.15 ra 
ALEX AND EMMA PG 
Suggestive scenes. Fri-Tue 6.50 9,00 

2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 14A 
Violent scenes. Daily 1.10 3.50 7.50 10.10 

FINDING NEMO G 


Fri-Tue 12,10 2.40 5.00 7.20 9.40 
Wed-Thu 12.10 2,40 5,10 7.30 9.40 


THE ITALIAN JOB 144 
Fri-Tue 1.20 4.20 7.30 9.50 

Wed-Thu 1.20 4.20 7.20 9.50 

BRUCE ALMIGHTY PG 


Coarse language. Fri-Tue 12.50 3.20 7.40 10.00 
Wed-Thu 12,50 3.20 6.45 9.30 


HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 
Fri-Mon 9.10 


DUMB AND DUMBERER: 

WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD 

Crude content. Fri-Mon 12.40 2.50 4.50 7.10 
Tue 12.40 2.50 4.50 


RUGRATS GO WILD G 
Fri-Tue 12.30 2.20 4.30 


TERMINATOR 3: 

RISE OF THE MACHINES 

Violence throughout. No passes. Tue 7.40 10.15 
Wed-Thu 12,00 2.30 5.00 7.40 10.16 


SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS . G 
Wed-Thu 12.30 2.50 4.50 7.10 9.10 


144 


14A, 


LEGALLY BLONDE 2: 

RED, WHITE AND BLONDE PG 
Wed-Thu 12.40 3.00 5.20 7.55 10.00 

THE MATRIX: RELOADED 144 


Violent scenes. No passes. Fri-Tue 9.30 


SOUTH EDMONTON COMMON 
1525-99 St. 436-8565 


CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE PG 
Violent scenes. Fri-Tue 1.15 2.15 3.50 4.50 6.40 7.30 
9.15 9.50 Wed-Thu 2.15 3.50 4.50 6.40 7.30 9.15 
950 THX Daly 12.15 2.50 5.20 8.10 10.30 


28 DAYS LATER 18A 
Gory violence. No passes. 
Daily 12.90 3.10 5.40.8.15 10.45 


THE HULK PG 
Frightening scenes, not suitable for younger children 
No passes. Fri-Tue 12.00 2.30 3.15 5.45 6.90.9,00 
9.45 Wed-Thu 2.30 5.45 9.00 

THX Daily 12.45 1.45 4.00 5.00 7.15 8.00 10.20 


ALEX AND EMMA PG 
Suggestive scenes. Daly 1.90 4.15 7.20 9.45 

FROM JUSTIN TO KELLY G 
Fo-Tue 12.50 3.00 5.10 7.50 Wed-Thu 1.15 

2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 14A 
Violent scenes. Daily 2.00 5.30 8.20 10.40 

FINDING NEMO G 
Daity 1.09 3.45 7,00 9.20 

THX Daily 12.10 2.40 5.15 7.40 10.10 

*BRUCE ALMIGHTY PG 
Coarse language. Daily 2.10 4.40 7.10 9.40 

THE MATRIX: RELOADED 14A 


Violent scenes. No passes. 
Dally 12.20 3.30 6.45 10.00 


HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 14A 
Fri-Tue 1.10 3.40 6.50 9.30 Wed-Thu 9.45 

DUMB AND DUMBERER: 

WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD PG 
Crude content. Fri-Tue 10.15 

LEGALLY BLONDE PG 


Suggestive language. 
Wed-Thu 12.40 3.15 5.30 7.50 10.15 


SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS G 
Wed-Thu 12.00 12.50 2.20 3.00 4.30 
5.10 6.30 7.45 8.45 


8882-170 St, 444-1331 
HOW TO LOSE A GUY IN 10 DAYS PG 


Suggostive language. Fri Mon-Thu 7.15 9.40 
Sat Sun 1,30 4,30 7.15 9.40 


HOLES PG 


Fri Mon-Thu 6,30 9,00 Sat Sun 1.45 4.15 6.30 9,00 
CONFIDENCE 144 
Coarse language throughout 
Fri Mon-Thu 7,30 Sat Sun 2.15 5,00 7.30 
HEAD OF STATE PG 
Coarse language. Daily 9.50 
bee Eh 'S MOST WANTED PG 
arse language, Fri Mon-Thu 7.00 
Sun 2.00 4.00 7.00 
BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE 14A 
Fri Mon-Thu 6.45 9.30 Sat Sun 1.15 3.50 6.45 9.30 
CHICAGO 144 
Daily 9.15 
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: 
THE TWO TOWERS 14A 


Violent scenes, frightening scenes 
Fri Mon-Thu 8,30 Sat Sun 1.00 4.45 8.30 


VILLAGE TREE 
1. Gorvais Rd, St, Albert, 459-1212 
BRUCE ALMIGHTY PG 


Coarse language. Fri Mon-Thu 7.15 9.45 
Sat Sun 1.30 4,30 7.15 9.45 


ALEX AND EMMA PG 


Suggestive scenes. Fri Mon-Thu 7.15 9.45 

Sat Sun 1,75 4,00 7.15 9.45 

HOLES PG 
Fri Mon-Tue 7.00 9.30 Sat Sun 12.45 3.45 7,00 9.30 
THE LIZZIE McGUIRE MOVIE G 
Fri Mon-Tue 7.15 9,20 Sat Sun 1.30 4.15 7,15 9,40 
Wed-Thu 7.15 
* DOWN WITH LOVE PG 


Fri Mon-Tue 6.30 8.45 Sat Sun 1.45 4.00 6,20 8.45 
Wed-Thu 6.45 


THE IN-LAWS ; PG 
Suggestive language. Fri Mon-Tue 6.45 9.00 
Sat Sun 1.15 3.30 6.45 9.00 


x2 Fa 
May frighten younger children. Fri Mon-Tue 6.30 9.15 
Sat Sun 12.30 3.15 6.30 9.15 Wed-Thu 9.15 


RUGRATS GO WILD G 
Fi Mon-Tue 6.45 8.45 Sat Sun 1.00 3,00 4.50 6.45 
8.45 Wed-Thu 6.45 


WRONG TURN 186A 
Gory violence throughout. Fi Mon-Tue 7.30 10.00 
Sat Sun 1.45 4.45 7.30 10.00 


THE MATRIX: RELOADED 14A 
Violent scenes. No passes. Fri Mon-Thu 6.30 9.15 
Sat Sun 12.90 3.20 6.30 9.15 


FROM JUSTIN TO KELLY G 
Fri Mon-Tue 7.30 10.00 

Sat Sun 3.00 1,00 5.00 7.30 10.00 

Wed-Thu 6.45 


HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 
Fn Mon-Tue 7.10 9.40 

Sal Sun 12.45 4.40 7.10 9.40 
Wed-Thu 9.20 


LEGALLY BLONDE 2: 
RED, WHITE AND BLONDE PG 
Waed-Thu 7.00 7.30 9.15 9.45 


144 


vueweeKty €f> 


TERMINATOR 3; 


RISE OF THE MACHINES 14A 
Violence throughout. No pa: 
Wed-Thu 7.05 7.30 9.50 10.¢ 


* SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS G 


Wed-Thu 7 


GA 


00 7.30 9.00 9.30 


Y CINEMAS @ SHERWOOD PARK 


2020 Sherwood Drive 


Edmonton 780-416-0150 
THE HULK PG 
Frightening scenes, not suitable for younger children. 
Daly 12.15 3.90 6.55 9.65 
ALEX AND EMMA PG 
Suggestive scenes. Fri. Mon 7.15 9.25 Tue 9.25 
FROM JUSTIN TO KELLY G 
Fr Tu@ 1.45 3.45 7.25 Wed-Thu 12.46 
2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 144 
Violent scenes. Fri-Tue 2.00 4:20 7.00 9.45 
Wext-Thu 4.20 9.4€ 
FINDING NEMO G 
Daily 12.00 2.25 4.45 7.10 9,20 
THE ITALIAN JOB 14A 
Daily 1,00 3.95 6.50 9,30 
BRUCE ALMIGHTY PG 
Goarse language. Fri-Tue 1,80 4,15 7,05 9.40 
Wed: Thu 2,00 7.20 
THE MATRIX: RELOADED 14A 
Violent scenes. Dally 9.15 
HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 14A 
Fri-Tue 3.15 9.15 
DUMB AND DUMBERER: 
WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD PG 
Crude content. Fri-Tue 12.50 6.40 
RUGRATS GO WILD G 
Fri- Tue 12.30 2.30 


CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE PG 


Violent scenes. Fri-Tue 12.45 1.15 3,90 4.00 6.30 
7,00 9,10 9.40 Wed- Thu 1.15 3.20 4.00 6.30 7,00 
9109.40 

TERMINATOR 3: 

RISE OF THE MACHINES 14A 
Violence throughout. Tue 7.00 10.00 Wed-Thu 1,00 
1.00 3.45 4.15 6.45 7.16 9.30 10,00 


SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS G 
Wed-Thu 12.30 2.40 4.55 7.10 9.20 


LEGALLY BLONDE 2: 
RED, WHITE AND BLONDE PG 
Wed-Thu 1.45 4,90 7.90 9.45 


—S—SS5=5=—__ 
—SSS===.. 


PLAYERS 
GATEWAY 8 
29 Ave, Calgary Trail, 496-6977 
THE LIZZIE McGUIRE MOVIE G 
1.20 4.00 7.10 9.20 
THE IN-LAWS PG 
Suggestive language. 9.25 
THE ITALIAN JOB 14A 
Fri-Mon 1,00 1.45 3.45 4.30 6.55 7.20 9.25 9.50 Tue 
1,00 1,45 3.45 4.30 7.20 9.50 Wed Thu 1.45 4.30 
7.20 9,50 
ANGER MANAGEMENT 14A 
Fri-Mon 1.40 4,10 7.00 9.40 Tuo 1.40 4.10 
BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM PG 
1.15 4.20 7.05 9.35 
RUGRATS GO WILD G 
12.45 2.45 4,45 6.45 9,00 
x2 PG 
May frighten younger children, 12.50 3.50 6.50 9,30 
DADDY DAYCARE G 
1.10 3.30 7.15 
TERMINATOR 3: 
RISE OF THE MACHINES 14A 


40 7.45 10.15 10.20 
30 9.40 10,10 


Violence throughout. Tus 7 
Wed Thu 1.00 1.30 3.45 4.15 7.007 


SILVERCITY WEST EDMONTON MALL 


WEM, 8892-170 St, 444-2400 


CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE PG 
Violent scenes. Fri-Tue 1,15 1.45 3.2) Ae 
7.16 7.45 10.00 10.30 Wed 12.15 
7.16 9.20 10.00 Thu 12.15 1.00 3. 
9.30 10,00 


LEGALLY BLONDE 2: 


Y0.4.15 


RED WHITE AND BLONDE PG 
Wed Thu 12.50 3.20 7.10 9.55 

SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS G 
Wed Thu 12.40 2.60 6.10 7.35 9.55 

TERMINATOR 3: 

RISE OF THE MACHINES 14A 


Violence throughout. Tue 7.30 7.45 10.15 Wed Thu 
12.46 1.20 4,00 4,20 7.20 7.50 10.10 10.40 Wed 
Thu 1.30 4.30 7,50 10.40 


2 FAST 2 FURIOUS 144 
Violent scenes. Fri-Sun Tus 1.10 3.50 7.10 9.50 
Mon 1.10 3.50 9.50 Wed Thu 1.10,3.50 6.55 9.40 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


BRUCE ALMIGHTY PG 


Goarse lanquage. Fri-Tue 1.00 3.40 6.40 9.30 Wed 
1,00 3.40 6.40 9.20 Thu 1.15 3.40 6.40 9.20 
GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS G 
12.00 pm 

THE MATRIX: RELOADED 140 
Violent scene 1,30 4.40 7.40 10.40 Fn-Mon 10.10 
HOLLYWOOD HOMICIDE 148 
Fri-Tue 6.50 9.45 

THE ITALIAN JOB 140 
Fri-Tue 1.20 4.10 7.50 10.35 

Wed Thu 1.20 4.10 7.45 10.30 

FINDING NEMO “e 
Fri Tue 12,10 12.40 2.30 3,00 4.50 5.30 8.00 10,20 
Wed Thu 12.10 2,30 10 7.25 9.45 

RUGRATS GO WILD G 
Fn: Tue 12.15 2.46 4.45 = 

FROM JUSTIN TO KELLY G 
Fri-Tue ¥ 19.40 

THE HULK PG 
Frightening scanes, not suitable for young children. 
12,00 12,0 315 3.45 a) ) 10.15 10.4! 

ALEX AND EMMA PG 
Suggestive scenes. FrieMon 7.20 Wed 1.00 
Cinebabies: Wed 1,00 

DUMB AND DUMBERER: 

WHEN HARRY MET LLOYD PG 
Crude content, Fri Sat Sun Mon 12.05 2.20 5.00 7.35 
10,05 Tue12,08 10 5,00 

WESTMOUNT CENTRE 
111. Ave, Groat Ad, 455-8728 

BRUCE ALMIGHTY Pe” 
Course language. Fri Sat Mon 1.15 4.06 ) 
9.20 Tue 1,15 4.00 

FINDING NEMO G 
12.40 2.40 4.50 20 9,90 

CHARLIE'S ANGELS: 

FULL THROTTLE PG 
Violent scen¢ 1003.80 09.50 

TERMINATOR 3: RISE 

OF THE MACHINES 14A 
Violence throughout, Tue ) 10,15 Wed Thu 1.15 
4.16 7.00 10,00 

THE HULK PG 


Frightening scenes, not suitable for y 
12.45 3.45 6.45 9.45 


ha MOVIES 12 
[.] CINEMA CITY 12 


| 
SHOWING AT BOTH CINEMAS 


HOLES PG 
Daily 11.05 1,25 4,10 7.10 9.4 

Fri Sat Midnight 12.10 

ANGER MANAGEMENT 14A 
Dally 11,20 1.40 4.20 7.00 9,90 

Fri Sat Midnight 11.45 

RUGRATS IN PARIS “4 
Dally 11,10 1,10 3.106.15 

CHICAGO 140 
Daily 11.30 1.55 4.36 7,059.35 

Fri Sat Midnight 11.5 

PHONE BOOTH 14A 
oarae language throughout 

Dally 11.55 2.10 4.40 7.35 9.50 

Fri Sat Midnight 11,40 


THE LORD OF THE RINGS: 


THE TWO TOWERS 14A 

Violent scenes, frightening scenes. 

Dally 12.35 4.16.7,50 

Fa Sat Midnight 11.26 

MAL IBU'S MOST WANTED Pg 
6 language 

Daily 11.18 4.16 5.10 7.209.25 

Fri Sat Midnight 1 

THE CORE PG 

Not suitable for younger children, 

Daily 10.55 1.30 9.45 Playing al Movies 12 only 

BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE 14A 

Dally 4.20 7.05 

Fri Sat Midnight 12.25 Playing at Mavies 12 only 

AGENT CODY BANKS PG 

Dally 11.25 1.2 5 7.15 9.40 

Fri Sat Midnight 11.60 

THE HUNTED 18A 

Brutal Violence throughout. Daily 11.35 1.50 4.45 

7.45 10.05 Fri Sat Midnight 12.05 

BRINGING DOWN THE HOUSE PG 

Suggestive language, not suitable 

for younger children, Daily 11.40 2.05 4.30 7.30 

10,00 Fri Sat Midnight 12.15 A= 

BULLETPROOF MONK PG 


Violent scenes, not suitable for younger children. 
Daily 7.40 10. 10 Fri sat Midnight 12.20 


HOW TO LOSE A GUY IN 10 DAYS PG 
suggestive lanugage. Daily 11.50 2.00 4.50 7.25 
9.55 Fri Sat Midnight 12.15 


‘The art of the DJ is 
dissected and 
celebrated in Doug 
Pray’s Scratch 

By DAVE JOHNSTON 


young Dj named Grand Wizard 

Theodore was idly spinning 
records in his bedroom when he 
stopped one with his finger to hear 
his mother. Moving the vinyl back 
and forth, he found a sound he'd 
never heard before. “That’s when I 
first introduced the scratch,” he says 
in the opening of Doug Pray’s 
‘tcratch, a bold feature-length docu- 
mentary that aims to define the 
most controversial musical move- 
ment of modern times: turntablism. 

To a great many people, the idea 
of calling a DJ as a musician is akin 
to calling an elephant an ideal pet 
yet you'd be hard pressed to say that 
any of the individuals in front of 
Pray’s camera are simply mixing 
other people's tunes. These DJs are 
schooled in the world of hip hop, 
which, like jazz, relies on sponta- 
neous self-expression. Yet the instru 
ments are appropriations from 
industrial culture, from spray cans 
and concrete walls (graffiti) to 
turntables and vinyl (DJing). As DJ 
Babu says at one point in the film, 
“Hip hop poses the question, ‘What 


0: day back in the early 1970s, a 


are you going to do?'” 

The answer, Say the assortment 
of visionary performers narrating 
Pray's film, involves cutting up 


The 2nd Annual 


| Global Vision 


sounds on turntables to invent 
futuristic compositions, creating a 
new musical language in the 
process. Unlike his previous work, 
the grunge documentary Hype!, Pray 
isn't chronicling the implosion of a 
pop phenomenon. Rather, he lov- 
ingly illustrates a culture on the rise, 
using interviews and performance 
footage (both recent and vintage) to 
sweep the viewer through two 
decades of musical innovation that 
rests uneasily between the main 
stream and the underground. 

But any resemblance to a tedious 
academic meditation in the Ken Burns 
vein is happily avoided by Pray’s 


Seas?" **saue 


S X 


ss 
Film Festival 


[Documentary 


2 


AS) 


Death 


Canada, 2000, 85 min 


One man's journey to the edge of the 
world and the bottom of his soul. 


Series presents: 


Life without = = al | 


»- The harrowing 7100 km trek across the 
Sahara Desert by filmmaker Frank Cole. 


"... he most un 
diary of recent 


"A stunning, 
work, " <s0u 


Thursday, June 26, 2003 
@ 7pm 

Metro Cinema in Zeidler Hall, 
Citadel Theatre 


Admission: $6 Global Visions 
Festival Society members, 
$8 regular 


Presented in part by: =(/{]{)——___ 


Global Visions 
Documentary Series 


films about 
the world 
we live in 


YW veeweny Game 


\3 
Flan Poveteas 


vuewerkiy €T> 


vibrant editing and lively tone. The 
material is well researched enough to 
satisfy the aficionado and presented 
entertainingly enough to engage the 
novice, thanks to articulate, insightful 
interviews with everyone from Z-Trip 


DOCUMENTARY 


to Jazzy Jay (although seminal figures 
like Jazzy Jeff and Cash Money are 
strangely omitted). The film also cov- 
ers a lot of ground, presenting the 
principles of scratching and the sci- 
ence of creating sample-laden “battle 
records” in a coherent manner. 


It ain't 
“Rockit” science 


As a historical document, Scratch is 
exceptional. The acknowledged inspi- 
ration of nearly everyone interviewed 
in the film is “Rockit,” the 1983 Her- 
bie Hancock single that featured the 
scratching of Grandmixer DXT, which 
Pray brilliantly uses as a thread upon 
which to hang everything else in the 
film. From there, Pray explores every- 
thing from Kool Herc's creation of 
extended drum breaks by playing parts 
of songs back to back in the early ’70s 
to recent sonic innovations by the 
likes of Q-Bert. 


THE FREESTYLE DEMONSTRATIONS 
by Pray’s cast of virtuoso turntab- 


lists are the unquestionable high- 
lights of Scratch. Watching some- 
one like Mix Master Mike create 
unworldly sounds from a simple 
record as if it were as natural as 
breathing is a jaw-dropping sight 
that you don’t need any specialized 
musical knowledge to appreciate. 
Equally dramatic is DJ Shadow’s 
mission to “build up his arsenal” as 
he plunders the basement of a 
record store, where millions of old 
records sit piled up to the ceiling. 
It’s a poignant moment when 
Shadow says, “This is the archive of 
music culture. It’s also a big pile of 
broken dreams.” Reinventing the 
past to push the boundaries of the 
future is what lies at the heart of 
turntablism—in the film’s coda, 
Cut Chemist and Shadow blitz 
through a spectacular version of 
“Peter and the Wolf.” 

Scratch leaves you exhilarated 
with the knowledge that you've dis- 
covered a new world that needs to 
be explored further. It’s not a sound 
for everyone, as Pray wisely shows 
during a segment filmed at a music 
trade show. “How can anyone like 
this?” asks one aging merchant 
scowling at a crowd gathered to 
watch a turntablist demonstration 
“These sounds are unpleasant!” You, 
however, may conclude that exactly 
the opposite is true. O 


SCRATCH 
Directed by Doug Pray © Featuring 
Afrika Bambaataa, Dj Shadow and Q- 
Bert © Zeidler Hall, The Citadel « Fri- 
Mon, June 27-30 (9pm) © Metro 
Cinema ® 425-9212 


The wearying of the green 


Aaargh! Hulk smash! 
Hulk bore puny 
humans to tears! 


By CHRIS BOUTET 


you can win when you're making 

a movie based on a comic book. 
If you create a big, stupid, block- 
buster CGI parade loaded with explo- 
sions and catchphrases, you'll get 
murdered in the reviews for failing to 
capture the subtle nuances and 
invariably “simple-yet-honest” story- 
telling of the comic. Try making a 
subdued think piece that depends on 
strong characterization and dialogue, 
however, and everyone who came to 
see things blow up will be bored to 
tears. And you've still got to run that 
unforgiving, sweatpants-and-potato- 
chips-strewn gauntlet of hardcore 
comic enthusiasts who won’t like 
what you did no matter what 
because it bears little resemblance to 
how they would have done it—you 
know, if they were film directors, or 
even had jobs 

It’s a lose-lose situation, sure, and 
most directors will at least try to 
shrug off the pressure to appease, 
making whatever the hell kind of 
movie they want while ignoring that 
ever-present urge to take the middle 
ground that will produce a nice, 
bland, strained-peas-and-carrots sort 


A: a director, there’s simply no way 


of movie mush that will be equally 
unimpressive to palates of every 
type. But sadly, it appears that with 
The Hutk, director Ang Lee buckled 
under the weight of the task and 
took that middle road—and the 
result is a tragically boring movie. 


LOOK, | KNOW YOU’RE disappoint- 
ed to hear that. I’m sorry. I really 
am. I wanted to like this movie, and 
lord knows that Universal Pictures 
pulled out every trick, teaser and tie- 
in in the book to make you think 
you liked The Hulk long before you 
ever saw it. But the fact is that it’s 
just plain dull, and that’s a shame, 


ACTION 


considering the film's potential. The 
tragic, Jekyll-and-Hyde tale of a 
weak, emotionally distant and trou- 
bled scientist who becomes a rage- 
consumed destroying machine when 
he gets angry had the capacity to 
offer moments of both powerful 
drama and horrific violence. And if 
there was anyone who could realize 
this story’s full potential, it was sup- 
posed to be Lee (the genius behind 
1997’s The Ice Storm and 2000's 
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), 
armed to the teeth with the best CG 
effects money could buy. 

The effects are great—despite 
what you may have heard, the CG 
Hulk is pretty much flawless—and 


Lee uses some nifty little split- 
screen effects and inventive transi- 
tional wipes and fades to give 
create a feeling of constant motion. 
But any sort of kinetic energy is 
more than wiped out by some of 
the longest and most uninspired 
“dramatic moments” known to 
mankind. Yes, they’re saying what 
they’re supposed to say, and the 
actors try to look as interested as 
possible—Eric Bana as Bruce Banner 
is particularly notable in his role, 
while Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte 
turn out mildly entertaining carica- 
tures of the Hardass Old Army Guy 
and the Crazy-Haired Mad Scientist 
Dad, respectively. But the charac- 
ters are far too hollow and the dia- 
logue too pedestrian to sustain the 
audience between the effective and 
exciting Hulk sequences. 

Maybe time will be kinder to 
The Hulk than I’ve been here, but 
judging from the huge chorus of 
groans and impatient shuffling that 
greeted the appearance of the 
words “One year later...” on the 
screen near the end of the film dur- 
ing the showing I attended on 
Sunday, I doubt it will be much 
remembered at all. © 


THE HULK 
Directed by Ang Lee * Written by John 

Turman, Michael France and James 
Schamus ® Starring Eric Bana, Jennifer 
Connelly, Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte « 
Now playing 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


Over park, 


Like Puck, the 
River City 
Shakepeare Festival 
has wandered 
everywhere 


’ BY PAUL MATWYCHUK 


en I talked to Free Will Players 
artistic director Geoffrey Brum- 

lik, it was less than a week 
before Brumlik’s own production of A 
Midsummer Night's Dream was sched- 


Bequeathing lessons 


It might be the only significant blot on 
Shakespeare's literary reputation (and, 
ironically, it’s one of the very few 
extant items in the Bard’s own hand- 
writing). When Shakespeare died in 
1616, he left behind one of the most 
notoriously anti-romantic wills in histo- 
ty—it mentioned Anne Hathaway, his 
wife of 30 years and the mother of his 
three children, only once, and then 
only to leave her his “second-best 
bed.” (Most of his money and proper- 
ty went to his eldest daughter, Susan- 
na.) This bequest might not be 
the heartless oversight that it may 
appear to be; English law ensured that 
Anne would get a third of Shake- 
speare’s goods and real estate and the 
use of their home until her own 
death—and according to some schol- 
ars, there’s evidence to suggest that 
the Shakespeares’ second-best bed 
tion of posthumous affection you'd 


ee 


an 


over pale 


uled to kick off the 15th anniversary 
season of the River City Shake- 
speare Festival. However, the 
weather was anything but midsum- 
mery—and over the next’couple of 
days, it would only get worse, with 
steady, dismal rain and temperatures 
dipping as low as 6°C. But Brumlik 
remained utterly unfazed, and for 
good reason: his festival and the ele- 
ments have always been on excellent 
terms with each other. (The Free Will 
Players have always been careful to 
give Mother Nature an “ambience” 
credit in the program.) Shows have 
occasionally been performed in 


some of the greatest paeans to roman- 


_ tic love in the entire English language. 


Shakespeare might not have 
devoted much of his literary imagina- 
tion to Anne Hathaway, but Edmonton 
playwright Vern Thiessen is deter- 
mined to pick up the slack. His new 
play-in-progress Shakespeare’s Will is 
the result of a commission from Geof- 
frey Brumlik to create a Shakespeare- 
themed one-woman show for actress 
Jan Alexandra Smith as part of the 
River City Shakespeare Festival's 15th 
anniversary. “The play is loosely 
based—loosely based—on the life of 
Anne Hathaway,” Thiessen says, “or, 
rather, the little we actually know 
about her. There’s a lot of conjecture, 
but the actual facts are few and far 
between. In particular, | was very inter- 
ested in her life as pretty much a single 
mom, since Shakespeare was in the 
city most of the time. And | was partic- 
ularly interested in the fact that one of 
her children died, and nobody has a 
clue as to what that death was about.” 

Right now, what form the play will 
ultimately take is as much of a mystery 


vueweeKty CD 


unseasonable cold—I remember 
watching Macbeth back in 1999 and 
admiring the actors playing the 
Weird Sisters for so bravely facing the 
chilly nighttime winds in their thin 
costumes. Fewer than 10 perfor- 
mances in the festival's 15-year histo- 
ry have had to be cancelled due to 
the weather; I think it was at Julius 
Caesar in 1998 that I saw a violent 
rainstorm stop the show by literally 
flooding Heritage Amphitheatre. 

More often, though, the play and 
the weather work together to create 
effects that are impossible during a 
conventional indoor performance. 
“We still remember the claps of light- 
ning during The Tempest last year,” 
says Brumlik. “Prospero would come 
onstage and say a few magic words, 
and you'd have three claps of light- 
ning and the thunderbols behind 
him and you'd hear the audience lit- 
erally gasp. It sends a little shiver up 
your spine. I remember the year 
before, during Richard III we had 
duck with a limp walking around the 
park—and then about 15 minutes 
later, we saw a hare hopping around, 
and it had a limp as well. It all 
seemed oddly appropriate.” 


AN UNUSUAL STRETCH of gloriously 
sunny weather combined with 14 
years’ worth of positive word of 
mouth combined last year to give 
the festival by far its most successful 
summer ever—17,000 Edmontonians 
showed up to see The Tempest and 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, with 
attendance some nights pushing 
2,000. “We don’t have a lot of 
money for publicity and that sort of 
thing,” Brumlik says. “We sort of live 
on word of mouth. And I think grad- 
ually that momentum has built over 
15 years to the point where we have 
a very strong, loyal audience. | think 
people like the informality of it. It’s a 
bit like going to Disneyland—the 
play comes at you from all sides, the 
actors can run in from the back of 
the house. It’s meant to be a celebra- 
tion of Shakespeare and not some 
dour, structured experience. | meet 
people who come with their dates 
and say, ‘Oh yeah, I came here when 


to Thiessen as Anne Hathaway. (“I’ve 
been writing madly over the last three 
weeks,” he laughs, “trying to figure out 
what the hell this play is about.”) By 
the sounds of it, though, the play will 
rely much less on archival research than 
his most recent historical drama, Ein- 
stein’s Gift. “In terms of style,” Thiessen 
says, “I'm interesting in experimenting 
with something that’s slightly raised 
and poetic in nature.” And he’s not rul- 
ing out the possibility of incorporating 
Smith’s talent for singing and move- 
ment into the finished product either. 
“She's one of the top actors in the 
country,” he says, “and when you 
write for an actor like that, you try to 
create a text that'll be a challenge for 
them—you sort of throw down the 
gauntlet and go, ‘Yeah? Act this! Try 
this on for size!’ But she has a great 
facility for language, so | know that | 
can write in a pretty heightened style 
and know she'll be able to handle it.” 
A staged reading of Shakespeare's 
Will featuring Jan Alexandra Smith will 
take place at La Cité francophone on 
July 13 at 8 p.m. —Paut MatwycHuk 


I was nine years old and I still come 
every season!” 

It was 10 years ago that the Free 
Will Players last performed Midsum- 
mer Night’s Dream (Stephen Heatley 
directed and Brumlik himself played 
Puck), and Brumlik says it’s a some- 
what sobering-experience to realize 
how much time has passed since 
then. “The first time we did Dream,” 
he says, “all our longtime company 
members were acting in it and play- 
ing all the younger roles. And now 
we're all far too old to play them, so 
we sort of have to go back to the 
drawing board and go, ‘Okay, maybe 
it’s not such a good idea for me to 
play Lysander..." 


THEATRE 


The Free Will Players are far from 
decrepit, though—in fact, they’ve 
only increased their workload starting 
in 1998, when they began performing 
an astonishing fwo full-length Shake- 
Speare plays in repertory instead of 
merely one. (This year, in addition to 
Dream, the company is presenting 
Shakespeare's most popular history 
play, Henry V, in a production directed 
by Ashley Wright.) “It's a really hard 
thing to do,” Brumlik says, “but 
they're an incredible company. The 
big challenge is going from one world 
one day to a completely different 
world the next. In some ways, I think 
the actors-especially the first-timers 
find it invigorating in a funny sort of 
way to play two diametrically 
opposed characters. It provides a sort 
of balance to what they’re doing. But 
the actual workload, especially once 


self storage: ' 
wearable works by Ms Ink 


exhibiting to July 1 
Please join us far a closing reception 
on July 1 from 2pm — Spm. 


Gorment racks display the merchandise. 
Everything is priced. The selection changes 
periodically ~ several variates of shirts, 

with the oecasional special edition of a jacket 
or a two piece oulfit. Adult t-shirts ore $19.95 


each and children's shirts are $9.95 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


we get into the long days at the park, 
requires incredible stamina and even 
more incredible commitment.” 


THE FESTIVAL HAS NEVER BEEN a 
place for radical reinterpretations of 
Shakespeare. Aside from an occasiona® 
bit of playfulness with the time set- 
ting (a post-apocalyptic Macbeth, a 
Merry Wives of Windsor set in 1930s 
Hollywood, a swinging '60s Much Ado 
About Nothing), their productions have 
been resolutely traditional-minded. 
But Brumlik thinks that’s one of the 
company’s strengths. “With Dream,” 
he says, “I think there’s a danger in 
thinking that you have to do some- 
thing new with it. What we're trying 
to do is find a sense of mythology® 
with characters like Puck that works 
for us today—to find a sense of won- 
der without being cloying. We'd like 
audiences to believe that Puck really 
has been living just out back of the 
pond or that the fairies live under the 
stage when the show’s not on. It’s not 
a precious kind of magic—it's a pas- 
sionate, /ustful kind of magic that’s 
perfect for the outdoors and perfect 
for the summer too,” © 


RIVER CITY 

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL 

Directed by Geoffrey Brumlik and Ashley 
Wright * Written by William Shakespeare « 
Starring James MacDonald, Julien Arnold, 
Jan Alexandra Smith and Kevin 
Kruchkywich # Heritage Amphitheatre, 
Hawrelak Park « A Midsummer Night's 
Dream: July 26-July 20 (even dates plus 
July 1) at 8pm, plus Sat matinees at 2pm * 
Henry V: July 27-July 19 (odd dates, no 
show July 1 or July 13) at 8pm, plus Sun 
matinees at 2pm * 420-1757 


be a feature artist! 


SNAP invites you to submit 

a proposal to be the feature 
artist, exhibiting several of your 
works. Works should be 
printmaking based, for sale, 
and artist and SNAP share the 
proceeds. Contact SNAP for an 
applicotion form. All feature 
artists need to be currant SNAP 


members. Applications will be 


accepted on an ongoing basis 


4 


eae GALLERY 


society of northern 


alberta print-ortists 


10137, 104 street 
edmonton, alberta T5J 0Z9 


phone 423.1492 fax 426.1177 


snap@snapartists.com 


vvew,snapartists.com 


aa 


Hammer sickle and painthrush 


Ukrainian famine 
inspires high school 
painter Erin Corlett’s 
vivid images 

By AGNIESZKA MATEJKO 


hen I attended high school, I 
Wi: lucky to have a battery of 
dedicated teachers who would 
expound upon the intricacies of 
‘Canadian politics with remarkable 
vigour and enthusiasm, determined 
to prepare us for an adult life as full- 
fledged citizens and responsible 
members of society. Sadly, much of 
their effort was lost on me. In those 
days I had only two all-consuming 
passions: boys and my unruly hair. 
So it was with a mixture of awe 
and humility that I met Erin Cor- 
lett, a student at Harry Ainlay 
High School and the winner of the 
Edenton Public Schoo! Board Dis- 
trict Art Award. (Her winning work 
is currently’on display in the Best 
of High School Portfolio Award 
Exhibit at Kids in the Hall Bistro.) 
Corlett has no time for hair when 
social studies is so fascinating. After 
class, she has been doing research 
into the history of the Ukrainian 
famine and developing her own 
political views in the process. Not 
only that, Corlett decided to use 
her considerable artistic talents to 
disseminate these ideas to the 
world in the hope that people who 
see her work will rethink their 
political attitudes. 
wi am of Ukrainian heritage— 
my mom is Ukrainian,” explains 
Corlett. “I'd heard about the famine 
in social studies, so that got me 
interested.” Around that same time, 
Corlett attended a concert by the 
Ukrainian Male Choir (of which her 
grandfather is a member), where she 


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heard a guest pianist perform a song 
he wrote about the famine. Corlett 
was captivated and shocked to find 
that a famine created by the policies 
of one man- (Stalin) could kill mil- 
lions of her ancestors. And then she 
realized something even worse: very 
few people around her knew about it, 
or cared. Meanwhile, her art teacher 


VISUAL ARTS 


Theron Lund was encouraging her to 
think of an artist as someone who 
conveys a message rather than some- 
one who paints pretty pictures. 


FROM THAT POINT ON, Corlett 
began to paint images of the famine. 
She regards those images as much 
more than historical relics; to her, 
they symbolize the way politics 
affect everyone. “As soon as I had 
done my work depicting the 
famine,” she says, “I realized that 
there was still discrepancy in the 
world. I could see it first-hand and 
that made me realize that it wasn’t 
all in the past. I see disparity all over 
the place. There is discrimination 
between kids that are black or kids 
that are slower than others. Kids that 
are wealthier tend to think that they 
are better then the ones who have 
less opportunity than them.” 


Animation 


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' Most people's priorities in life are 
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BR Center fo 


Corlett would like to see every | 
student get a chance at a university 
education. “University tuition is | 
going up,” she says. “If you are poor- | 
er, you have less of a chance of an 
equal education and that affects the 
rest of your life. If everyone is treat- 
ed equally and has the same oppor- 
tunities and everyone is provided for 
the same way, that gives people the 
idea that we are all equal. I would 
like to see a system where so much 
has to be provided for everybody.” 

Observing inequalities led this 
well-adjusted, middle-class young - 
woman (whose ancestors fled com- 
munist regimes) to embrace this 

contentious ideology. “They call 
me a commie at school,” she says, 
“because all my work is inspired by 
communism. It's a good ideology 
‘and I think that it could work. 


from someone my age to the presi- 
dent of the United States. As a 
result, important issues are not 
addressed. That’s where commu- 
nism might come in handy. It 
might be a good tpol to set us on 
the right track as long as you don’t 
take it to the extremes. When you 
take it to extremes, it begins to 
contradict itself.” 


IN CORLETT’S LARGE (much larger 
than she is) prize-winning work she 
depicts a field at harvest time. 
Sheaves of wheat bow under their 
own weight foretelling a plentiful | 
yield. Overhead the sky is blue and 
all seems quiet—this could be 
Ukraine, the bread basket of 
Europe, or the Alberta prairie. But 
in the shadows below, this sense of 
complacency is shattered: an omi- 
nously gleaming sickle is cutting the 
upright stems. As they fall, red 
blotches of blood pour out, staining 
the canvas. Sheaths of broken wheat 
scatter across the blood red of a 
Communist flag. This is not pretty 
Sunday painting. 


“T wanted to create art that 
forced people to listen, to confront | 
the issues that they have tried to | 
ignore,” Corlett says. When her | 
teachers hear those words, they must | 
feel so proud. This time, at least, 
their hard work has not fallen on fal- 
low ground, © | 


theatre 


KX notes notes 


By PAUL MATWYCHUK 


Here today, Connemara 


Theatre Network artistic director 
Bradley Moss revealed the contents of 
his company’s 2003/2004 season last 
Thursday, and the four-play lineup he 
announced is evenly split between 
high-profile titles from international 
playwrights and new plays by Canadian 
writers whose work has become virtual- 
ly synonymous with Theatre Network. 

The season begins with Martin 
McDonagh’s A Skull in Connemara 
(September 16-28), a grimly funny 
gravedigging comedy set in the same 
bleak corner of western Ireland as 
McDonagh’s earlier international hit, 
The Beauty Queen of Leenane. Moss will 
direct; John Wright, Daniel Arnold, 
Julien Arnold and Patricia Benedict will 
star. Next, the brilliant actor, playwright 
and marionette artist Ronnie Burkett 
presents the world premiere of his new 
play, Provenance, in an extended run 
from Octobér 14 to November 23—the 
story involves a stolen painting and the 
half-mad Viennese madam who has 
hidden it away in her brothel. 

Another art-related play takes The- 
atre Network into 2004: Nicholas 
Wright’s Tony-nominated Vincent in 
Brixton (February 3-22), in which a 
lonely, widowed, middle-aged landlady 
has a profound effect upon one of her 
tenants, the young Vincent van Gogh, 
who has yet to take up painting as a 
profession. Jim DeFelice directs a cast 
led by Sandra Nicholls and one of my 
favourite young local actors, Martin 
Happer. The main season concludes 
with a new play by Eugene Stickland, 
the author of A Guide to Mourning, 
Midlife and Excavations, who's practical- 
ly become Theatre Network’s play- 
wright-in-residence; All Clear (April 
6-18), in which a family struggles to 
survive in a grim, post-apocalyptic 
world, may be his darkest play yet. 

As always, the annual youth arts 
festival NextFest (June 3-13) takes 
Network into the summer, guided by 
festival director Steve Pirot. 

Season subscriptions are available 
by calling the Theatre Network box 
office at 453-2440. 


| Pack mentality 


8TH ANNUAL BEST OF HIGH SCHOOL 


PORTFOLIO AWARD EXHIBIT | 
Kids in the Hall Bistro * All summer | 


Digital Film 


While you're snapping up theatre tick- 
ets, you may want to consider invest- 


Recording Arts 


r Arts & Techngiogy Okanagan 


.. Kelowna — Tel: (250) 860 


“" aoa, a 


ing in the 1 200 4 Th tre 6- 
Pack, a = 2003/2004 tear ae on 
the ila that buys you admission to 
six eclectic plays by six different the- 
atre companies for the bargain price of 
$66. Those plays are: Debbie Isitt’s The 
Woman Who Cooked Her Husband 
(Northern Light Theatre; September 
25-October 5); Ron Chambers’s 17 
Dogs (Workshop West; October 10-19); 
Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being 
Earnest (Walterdale Playhouse; Novem- 
ber 26-December 4); Wajdi Mouawad’s 
Pacamambo (Fringe Theatre for Young 
People; January 30-February 8) and 
A.R. Gurney’s Later Life (Shadow The- 
atre; April 22-May 9). 

That's five titles; the sixth will be 
part of Catalyst Theatre’s Blind Dates 
With Theatre series—and since mys- 
tery is the whole point of the Blind 
Dates concept, the only thing anyone 
knows about this particular produc- 
tion is-that it'll be an unusual touring 
show hand-picked by Catalyst’s very 
discerning artistic producer Heather 
Redfern, and that it'll run from Janu- 
ary 28 to February 1. 

You can buy a Theatre 6-Pack from 
TIX on the Square by calling them at 
420-1757, or by going online to 
www.tixonthesquare.ca. 


Code name Firefly © 


Annie Dugan and John Ullyatt never 
meant to offend anybody. 

When the husband-and-wife team 
of actors, playwrights and aerial 
artists (whose physically demanding, 
science-inspired circus Primordial Blues 
was one of the more spectacular 
entries in last season’s Kaboom! festi- 
val) started up their own theatre 
company a couple of years ago, they 
decided to name it after the stupidest 
yet most welcoming object they 
could think of. And Dugan, who grew 
up around horses and stables, 
thought Lawnjockey Theatre would 
be a perfect, silly title. 

“1 only found out that some people 
consider it a racist symbol while | was 
doing some searching around the 
Internet,” says Dugan. “I always just 
associated it with stables, where it 
would be sort of a mascot.” q 

Dugan says nobody ever com- 
plained about the name to her and 
Ullyatt, but figured it would be a wise 
move to change their name to some- 
thing less problematic before they 
started taking their shows on tour 
across Canada and the States. The 
first public appearance of the newly- 
christened Firefly Theatre will be this 
Saturday at 11 p.m. the Varscona The- 
atre, when Dugan performs a seg- 
ment during Oh Susanna! 

Has she made sure the new name 
doesn’t contain any slurs? “Oh yes,” 
Dugan says. “I’ve Googled it exten- 
sively.” © 


X-Media 


Talk to us. = 


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JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


ARIS WEEKY 


Fax your free listings to 426-2889 or e-mail 
= to listings@vue.ab.ca. Deadline is Friday 
at 3pm 


EN VIVO Myer Horowitz Theatre, 
SUB, U of A Campus, 8900-114 St (420- 

_ 1757/424-0898) * Flamenco dance performance 
featuring Veronica Ruiz Kubichech and jane 
Ogivie * Sat, July 5 (8pm) * $20 + Tickets avail- 
able at TIX on the Square, and at the door 


IGALLERIES/MUSEUMS| 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY See 
What's Happening Downtown 

ART BEAT GALLERY 8 Mission Ave (459-3677) 
* Paintings by Russ Hogger, Sharon Moore-Foster 
* Until ey 31 © St. Albert’s Art Walk July 3 
(69pm) 

THE BOOKSTORE ON PERRON GALLERY 7 
Perron St (460-9537) * Artworks by various 
artists * St. Albert’s Art Walk July 3 (6-9pm) 


BUZZY’S Lower level, 10416-82 Ave (437-3707) 
« Artworks by Sirkka Kadatz 


D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA 
9103-95 Ave (461-3427) * MULTIMEDIA: 
Artworks by Govro, Shoko César, Sylvia Grist, 
Louise Amyotte * Until July 2 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM’S RED GALLERY 9621- 
82 Ave (439-8210) * Open Mon-Fri 11am-Spm; 
Sat by appointment * ON BEING DIDACTIC (BUT 
NOT NECESSARILY PEDANTIC): Paintings by Christ! 
Bergstrom 

(CITY HALL See What's Happening Downtown 


DESTINA GALLERY 10727-124 St (488-8720) « 
Open Wed-Sat 1lam-Spm * FRUITS OF OUR 
LABOUR-ODE TO THE GARDEN: Artworks by vari- 
ous artists * Until July 15 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY See What's 
Happening Downtown 


ELECTRUM DESIGN STUDIO 12419 Stony Plain 
Rd (482-1402) * Open Tue-Fri 10am-Spm; Sat 
10am-4pm * LITTLE GEMS: Paintings by James 
Trevelyan * Until June 27 


EXTENSION CENTRE GALLERY 2nd Fi 
University Extension Centre, 8303-112 St (492- 
3034) * Open Mon-Thu 8:30am-8pm; Fri, 
8:30am-4:30pm; Sat 9am-noon * THE BLUE 
BEFORE DAWN: Drawings and paintings by Jim 
Davies * Until July 9 


FAB GALLERY 1-1 Fine Arts Building, U of A 
Campus, 112 St, 89 Ave (492-2081) * Open Tue- 
Fri 10am-Spm; Sun 2-Spm * LINES OF SITE 2003: 
CONFLUENT VISUAL CULTURES: Artworks by grad- 
uate students and staff from the printmaking pro- 
gram * Until July 2 


FORT DOOR 10308-81 Ave (432-7535) * Open 
Mon-Wed, Sat 10am-6pm; Thu and Fri 10am- 
9pm; Sun 12-Spm ® Eskimo soapstone carvings 
by S. Ogruk. West Coast Native and Eskimo jew- 
ellery by L. Wadhams © Until July 31 


FORT EDMONTON PARK Fox Drive, Whitemud 
Drive (496-8787) * Dominion Day: Tue, July 1 
(10am-6pm) * $8.25/$6.25 (youth/senior)/$4.50 


(child 2-12 yrs)/$26 (family) 


FRINGE GALLERY Bsmt 10516 Whyte Ave (432- 
0240) * Open Mon-Sat 9:30am-6pm * CLEAR 
CONFUSION: Installation by Myken Woods and 
Lu Landing; until June 30 * Paintings by jill 
Hiscox and Linda Ould; July 4-31 


GIORDANO GALLERY See What's Happening 
Downtown 


HARCOURT HOUSE 10215-112 St (426-4180) 
* Open Mon-Fri 10am-Spm; Sat 12-4pm 

* Artworks by Harcourt members * ANNEX: 
NAKED: Figurative artworks * Until July 2 


JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY Strathcona Place, 
10831 University Ave (433-5807) « Open Mon- 
Fri 9am-4pm * VIEWS OF NATURE: Landscape and 
floral paintings by Ann McLaughlin © Until July 3 


JOHNSON GALLERY 7711-85 St (465-6171) 
* Open Mon-Fri 9am-S:30pm; Sat 9am-Spm 

* Artworks by various artists, Pottery by Peggy 
Heer * Until June 30 


JOHNSON GALLERY 11817-80 St (479-8424) 
* Open Mon-Fri 9am-S:30pm; Sat 9am-Spm 
* Artworks by various artists * Until June 30 


LATITUDE 53 See What's Happening Downtown 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, East 
Entrance, 8440-112 St (407-7152) * Open Mon- 
Fri 10am-8pm, Sat-Sun 1-8pm * FANTASY IN 
FIBRE: A presentation of contemporary and tradi- 
tional fabric art; until Aug. 24 


MODERN EYES GALLERY 24 Perron St (460- 
9537) » Artworks by lan Sheldon ® St. Albert’s Art 
Walk July 3 (6-9pm) 


MOUNTAIN FOODS CAFE Jasper (780-852- 
8117) * THE KUNST AUSSTELLUNG: Black and 
white photography by Peter Ramos * Until July 9 


MURUNGO AFRICAN ART GALLERY 12505- 
102 Ave (433-5504) * Sculptures by Lazarus 
Tandi; music by the Rafuhini Afrika Drummers 

© Fri, June 27 (6-11pm) * $10 Proceeds to the 
Harare Street Kids Association 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM S St. Anne Street, 
St. Albert (459-1528) * Open Mon-Sat 10am- 
Spm; Sun 1-Spm * FACES OF ST. ALBERT: Until 
Aug. 24 * $2 (suggested donation) 


MUTTART CONSERVATORY 9626-964 St (496- 
8787) * Open Mon-Fri 9am-5:30pm,; Sat-Sun 
11am-5:30pm * SOUTHERN BELLES: Show pyra- 
mid display; July 6 (1-3pm Chimes); Until Sept. 7 
* HANDMADE NATURE: Artwork in Centre Court: 
Photographs by Wade Pike; through July 

* Sculptures by members of the Sculptors’ 
Association of Alberta; until Sept. 15 

* $5.50/$4.50 (senior/youth)/$3 (children) 

/$17 (family) 


NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS 
9702-111 Ave (438-7030) * GENESIS: Artworks 
by artists with developmental disabilities 

* Opening reception: Thu, June 26 (6-7pm), 
artists in attendance 

PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron 
Street, St. Albert (460-4310) * Open Mon-Sat 


10-5pm; Thu 10am-8pm * /LLUSIVE IMAGES 
Polaroid transfers by various artists * 1 30V: 


SEE NEXT PAGE 


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Tae SuaPr OF TAGS 


ay NEIL LABUTE 
SEPT 23 - OCT 19, 2003 


HOW FAR WOULD YOU GO FOR LOVE? 
ot 


BR DE or 


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ev JOE PENHALL 
JAN 20 - FEB 15, 2004 


RACE, RAGE AND POWER POLITICS 
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Continued from previous page 


Sculptures by Brent Irving * July 3-Aug 2 
* Opening reception: Thu, July 3 (7-9pm) 
* St. Albert’s Art Walk: July 3 (6-9pm) 
PROVINCIAL MUSEUM OF ALBERTA 12845- 
‘POP Ave (453-9100) * Open weekdays 9am-9pm; 
weekends 9am-Spm * 8/G THINGS 2: Featuring 
large-scale sculptures by the artists of the North 
Edmonton Sculpture Workshop; until Apr. 30, 
2004 * WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: 
Canadian premiere of wildlife photographs; until 
Sept. 28 * SYNCRUDE CANADA ABORIGINAL PEO- 
PLES GALLERY: Spans 11,000 years and 500 gener- 
ations, people of the past and present, record- 
ings, film, lights, artifacts and more. Permanent 
exhibit * SPOTLIGHT GALLERY: GO FISHI 
Featuring the research and collections of the 
Museum's ichthyology program. Until July 20 
* THE NATURAL HISTORY GALLERY: * BUG 
ROOM: Live invertebrate display. Permanent 
exhibit * THE BIRD GALLERY: Mounted birds. 
anent exhibit * THE WILD ALBERTA PREVIEW 
GALLERY: Sneak peek at the new gallery’s layout 
* TREASURES OF THE EARTH: Geology collection. 
Permanent exhibit * A TO Z AT THE MUSEUM: 
Every Sat (9am-11am): family-fun drop-in 
program 
SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St (488-3619) 
* Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm * NEW PAINTINGS: 
Landscape paintings by Phyllis Anderson; Until 
July 1 


SEGHERS STUDIO GALLERY See What's 
Happening Downtown 


SNAP GALLERY See What’s Happening 


Downtown 

SNOWBIRD GALLERY WEM, 8882-170 St 
(444-1024) * Work by J. Yardley-Jones and Gregg 
Johnson, acrylics by Jim Vest, pottery by Noburo 
Kubo and Jacqueline Stenberg 

SOSA (SOCIETY OF STUDENT ARTISTS) 
GALLERY See What's Happening Downtown 
SPECTRUM ART GALLERY AND STUDIO 
11745 Jasper Ave (482-6677) * Open daily 
10am-6pm * Paintings by Christopher Lucas, 
Patricia Young, Bridgit Turner, Deanna Larson 
and David Phillips 


STUDIO 321 See What's Happening Downtown 


STUDIO GALLERY 143 Grandin Park Plaza, St. 
Albert (460-5990) * Open Tue-Fri 10am-Spm; 
Sat 10am-4pm or by appointment * INSTINCTS 
AND INTUITION: Paintings by various artists 

* Until June 28 


UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Human Ecology 
Building, 116 St, 89 Ave (492-2528) * Open 
Mon-Fri 8am-9pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun noon-4pm 
* 1950s RETROSPECTIVE: Selected items from 

the U of A clothing and textiles collection * Until 
Oct 30 

UPSTAIRS GALLERY 11631-105 Ave (452-8906) 
* THE BITUMINOUS NIGHT: Artworks by Daniel 
Bagan * Until July 15 

VAAA GALLERY 3rd Fl, Harcourt House, 10215- 
112 St (421-1731) * Fibre works by various artists 
* Until July 2 

WEST END GALLERY 12308 Jasper Ave (488- 
4892) * Watercolour paintings by Irene Klar 

* Until June 28 


THE WORKS ART AND DESIGN FESTIVAL See 


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VUEWEEKLY EZ JUNE 26-WULY 2, 2003 


What’s Happening Downtown 
WORKS GALLERY See What's Happening 
Downtown 


LITERARY 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 10324-82 Ave, 
upstairs * Every Tue (8pm): A Raving Poets 
presentation 

NAKED CYBER CAFE See What's Happening 
Downtown 


LIVE COMEDY 


THE COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Gateway 
Boulevard (469-4999) * Bob Beddow; June 27- 
28 * Bob Angeli; July 4-July 5 

FARGO’S 10307-82 Ave (433-4526) * Fargo’s 
Laugh-a-Lot Comedy « Every Sun 


SCRUFFY MURPHY’S Whitemud Crossing 
(485-1717) * Pints and Punchlines comedy night 
* Every Thu (9pm) 

SIDETRACK CAFE 10333-112 St (421-1326) 

* Comedy improv show * Every Thu (7:30- 
9:30pm) * $3 


THEATRE 


CARIBBEAN MUSKRAT Varscona Theatre, 
10329-83 Ave (433-3399, VB #2/420-1757) 

* Presented by Teatro La Quindicina 

* Director/playwright Stewart Lemoine and 
actor/playwright Josh Dean’s madcap romantic 
comedy—one of the hits of the 2003 Comedy 
Arts Festival—about a love triangle that develops 
between a bachelor sleep therapist, a control- 


freak restaurant manager and a stubborn customs 
agent. Starring Briana Buckmaster, Josh Dean and 
Celina Stachow * july 3-12, Tue-Sat (8pm); mati- 
nee Sat (2pm) * $15/$12 (student/senior/ 
Equity); Tue evening and Sat matinee Pay-What- 
You-Can; Fri, July 4: Two-for-One * Tickets avail- 
able at TIX on the Square 


CHIMPROV! The New Varscona Theatre, 10329- 
83 Ave (448-0695) * Long-form improvisational 
sketches performed by Rapid Fire Theatre’s top 
improvisers * Every Saturday (11pm) 


THE FORBIDDEN PHOENIX Catalyst Theatre, 
8529 Gateway Boulevard (420-1757) * Ben 
Henderson directs Chris Fassbender, Jared 
Matsunaga-Turnbull, Elyne Quan and George 
Szilagyi in Mom, Dad, I’m Living With a White Girl 
playwright Marty Chan’s new play, inspired by 
the visually spectacular productions of the Peking 
Opera, which uses the old Chinese myth of the 
Monkey King’s journey to a prosperous Western 
kingdom as an allegory for the experiences of 
Chinese immigrants to Canada in the early 1900s 
* Until June 29 (8pm), Sunday matinees (2pm), 
no shows on Mondays * $18/$15 (student/ 
senior/Equity member) * Tickets available at TIX 
on the Square 420-1757, Catalyst Theatre (one 
hour before show time) 


IMPROVAGANZA! Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave (448-0695) * Week Two of Edmonton’s 
international festival of improvised comedy, in 
which acting teams from Calgary, Tokyo, 
Auckland, Hamburg, San Francisco, Seattle, 
Winnipeg and Edmonton host nightly demonstra- 
tions of their favourite forms of long-form improv 
* Until June 28 (7pm and 9pm) « $10, $50 

(10 show pass) 


once again to use his astonishing crir 
skills following a murder on board a travel- 
ling through the Rocky Mountains * Until Aug. 2 


OH SUSANNA Varscona Theatre 10329-83 Av 


(433-3399) « Edmonton's live Euro-style t 

show, featuring interviews, music, food and high- 
spirited all-star competition hosted by intema- 
tional glamour gal Susanna Patchouli and her 
co-host Eros, God of Love * Sat, june 28 (11pm) 
* $8/36 (Die-Nasty membership); tickets avail- 
able at the door (10:30pm) 


RIVER CITY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Hawrelak 
Park, Heritage Amphitheatre (420-1757) * The 
Free Will Players celebrate their 1Sth anniversary 
season of outdoor Shakespeare with new all-star 
productions of the fanciful romantic comedy A 
Midsummer Night’s Dream (directed by Gi 

Brumlik) and the historical epic Henry V (directed 
by Ashley Wright) * June 26-July 20, Tue-Sun 
(8pm), Sat/Sun (2pm); A Midsummer Night’s 
Dream (even dates) and July 1, matinees Sat 
(2pm); Henry V (odd dates), matinees Sun (2pm) 
* $12/$9 (student/senior) children 12 and under 
free/$18 (passes, for both shows); opening nights 
and Tues Pay-What-You-Will * Tickets available at 
TIX on the Square, door 


THEATRESPORTS New Varscona Theatre, 
10329-83 Ave (448-0695) * Teams of improvisers 
create sketches on the spot based on audience 
suggestions, and have the results evaluated by a 
team of heartless judges * Every Friday (11pm) 


Fax your free listings to 426-2889 or e-mail them to 
listings@vue.ab.ca. Deadline is Friday at 3pm 


CLUBS/LECTURES 


EQUALITY NOW: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME? See 
What's Happening Downtown 


EXPRESSIVE DEVOTION See What's Happening 
Downtown 


OPPORTUNITIES UNLIMITED NETWORKING 
GROUP See What's Happening Downtown 


THE TIBETAN BUDDHIST MEDITATION SOCIETY, 
GADEN SAMTEN LING 11403-101 St (479-0014) 

* Learn about Tibetan Buddhism and meditation with 
Kushok Dhamchoe of Namgyal Monastery in India 

* Every Tues (7-9pm): Beginner * Every Wed (7-9pm) 
and Sun (11am-1pm): Advanced 


VOICE FOR ANIMALS Bishop Savaryn School, 
16215-109 St (457-3034) * Public presentation on captive 
marine mammals who live in slavery * Wed, July 2 (7pm) 


WASKAHEGAN TRAIL ASSOCIATION * Southgate 
Mall, 111 St, Whitemud Dr (434-7390) Free guided 
hike, approx. 12 km at Trappers Lake; Sun, June 29 


QUEER LISTINGS 


AXIOS (454-8449) © A support group, local chapter of 
the international organization of Eastern Orthodox and 
Eastern Rite Catholic Gay and Lesbian Christians 


BOOTS AND SADDLES See What's Happening Downtown 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB 117258 Jasper Ave (488-6636) 
* Open 9-3 * Dancing, strip contests, go-go boys 

* Every Mon: Free pool. Djs Arrow Chaser, jeffy Pop, 
Code Red * No membership needed 


DIGNITY EDMONTON (482-6845) Support commu- 
nity for lesbigay Catholics and friends 


DOWN UNDER 12224 Jasper Ave (482-7960) 
* Steambath 


EDMONTON RAINBOW BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 
(422-6207) * An organization for gay men and 
lesbians in business and their non-gay friends to share 
business knowledge, learn, make friends and network 
in @ positive, proud space where being yourself is 

the norm 


GAY AND LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTRE OF 
EDMONTON (GLCCE) See What's Happening 
Downtown 


GAY MEN’S OUTREACH CREW (GMOC) See What's 
Happening Downtown 


HIV NETWORK OF EDMONTON SOCIETY See 
What's Happening Downtown 


ICARE See What's Happening Downtown 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB See What's Happening 
Downtown 


LAMBDA CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 
Garneau United Church, 11148-84 Ave (474-0753) 

* Every Sun (7pm): Worship services. Serving the gay, 
lesbian, bisexual and transgendered community 


LIVING POSITIVE www.connect. ab.ca/livepos 
(488-5768) * Edmonton Persons Living with HIV 
Society. Peer-facilitated support groups, peer coun- 
selling. Daily drop-in 


LUTHERANS CONCERNED wwnw.icna.org (426-0905) 
* A spiritual community which gathers monthly for 
sharing, friendship, individual support and a safe space 
for our own spiritual questions 


METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF 
EDMONTON (429-2321) * Weekly non-denomina- 


tional church services 
PFLAG See What's Happening Downtown 


POLICE LIAISON COMMITTEE (421-2277/1-877- 
882-2011, ext. 2038) * Edmonton Police Service and 
the gay and lesbian community 


PRIME TIMERS (426-7019) * Meetings every second 
Sunday of the month at 3pm. A social group for 
gay/bisexual men over 40 and their friends 


THE ROOST See What's Happening Downtown 


SECRETS BAR AND GRILL See What's Happening 
Downtown 


TRANSSEXUAL/TRANSGENDER SUPPORT GROUP 
See What's Happening Downtown 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave (488-6557) * Open Sun- 
Thu 1-12; Fri Sat 1-3 * Gay nightclub. Every Sun-Tue 
(7-12am): karaoke with Tizzy. Every Wed: game show. 
Every Fri: free pool. Every weekend: open stage, dance 
with D] Arrow Chaser * No membership needed 


YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH See What's 
Happening Downtown 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


ARTS HABITAT See What's Happening Downtown 


‘CANADA DAY CELEBRATIONS * STONY PLAIN 
EXHIBITION PARK An old fashioned country fair at 
the Stony Plain country market; Sat, June 28 (9am- 
Ipm) * MULTICULTURAL HERITAGE CENTRE 
Canada Day bike parade and celebration (11:15am 
registration/11:4S5am parade down Main Street to the 
Multicultural Heritage Centre); Tom MeCormack, abo- 
riginal entertainer and storyteller (1pm); Tue, July 1 
(Ipm-3pm) * EDMONTON CITY HALL See What's 
Happening Downtown 


CELEBRATING CANADA'S CULTURAL DIVERSITY 
Stanley A. Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq 

(496-7000) * Celebrating Canada’s Multiculturalism 
day * Thu, June 26 (1:30pm) 


DEVONIAN BOTANIC GARDEN Skm North of 
Devon on Hwy 60 (987-3054) * Canada Day tours: 
Tue, July 1 (12-4pm) 


EDMONTON GHOST TOURS Rescuer Statue next to 
the Walterdale Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave (469-3187) 

* Walk through Old Strathcona and hear ghostly tales 
of hauntings and the unknown * Every Mon-Thu, until 
Aug. 13 (9pm) * $5 


EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL STREET PERFORM- 
ERS FESTIVAL See What's Happening Downtown 


FASHION SHOW See What's Happening Downtown 
FEAST OF FOOLS See What's Happening Downtown 


GEORGIAN FOOD FAIR See What's Happening 
Downtown 


MILE ZERO DANCE ROAST ‘N’ TOAST Azimuth 
Theatre, 11315-106 Ave (424-1573) * A send-off for 
Andrea Rabinovitch * Sat, june 28, 9pm (door) = $5 
(poor)/$7 (emplayed)/$15 (rich) * Proceeds go to 
Mile Zero Dance 


SPRUCE GROVE STREET PERFORMERS FESTIVAL 
Central Park, King St, Spruce Grave (962-9491) « 
Celebration of theatre i jugglers, comedians and 
more * June 28-30, July 1, Sat-Mon 2-7pm, Tue 1-Spm 


WHEN THE EAGLE FLIES WITH THE CONDOR 
Provincial Museum of Alberta, 128-45-102 Ave (420- 
1757/463-4915) * Featuring Azul Nahuel, The White 
Buffalo Dancers and Drummer Society, arts and crafts 
discplay * Thu, July 3 (7pm) * $15/$10 (student/ 
senior); tickets available at TIX on the Square, 
Panaderia Latina 


free 
il 
astrology 


By ROB BREZSNY 


Buddhism’s holiest objects are ringsel, pearly 
deposits left behind by dead saints who've 
been cremated. | recently visited a collection 
that was offered to the public at Spirit Rock 
Meditation Center in Woodacre, CA. A pam- 
phiet in the lobby outside the sanctuary said, 
"The ringsel are of unimaginable benefit for 
Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike. Their 
power does not depend on the viewer having 
faith in them.” Though | am not a Buddhist 
and was initially skeptical, | soon changed my 
mind. As | sat in the presence of the ringsel, | 
was flooded with useful insights, including a 
solution to my longest-running problem. | 
predict a similar experience for you, Aries. 
You'll soon receive a blessing from a visitation 
whose magic you don’t believe in. 


TAURUS se20-nav20 


if an infinite number of monkeys typed for an 
infinite number of days on an infinite number 
of *ypewriters, they would eventually produce 
all the works of Shakespeare, as well as the fol- 
lowing horoscope, which is apt advice for you 
in the coming week: You could let your monkey 
mind jabber on forever, Taurus; you could allow 
it to spew out a million options about how to 
deal with your most pressing dilemma, hoping 


that one of them will miraculously be the 
answer you desperately need. But there is a 
better option: dive down into your deep eter- 
nal self and open yourself gladly to its clear, 
simple wisdom about what to do, 


Don’t bother looking for help from great minds 
and deep thoughts this week. You're in one of 
your “folk wisdom” phases, when the only kind 
of counsel that can be of any use is the goofy 
brilliance that now and then gurgles up out of 
that vast compost heap known as mass culture. 
Here, for instance, are the bumper sticker slo- 
gans that are most in alignment with your 
astrological needs: (1) “I will not obsess. | will 
not obsess. | will not obsess.” (2) “We all have 
problems. Mine are just more important than 
yours.” (3) “If all the world’s a stage, I'll be 
needing more wardrobe.” (4) “Excuse me. I'm 
Off to see the wizard.” 


SSCCANGER mest. 


If you choose to take the following prescription 
seriously, Cancerian, consider the possibility 
that you should regard it as a metaphor, not a 
call for concrete action. Or if you do decide it 
would be appropriate to treat it as a call for 
concrete action, do not carry it out in such a 
way that would scare people or destroy prop- 
erty belonging to anyone but yourself. Got all 
that? Okay. Here we go: my reading of the 
astrological omens tells me that the most 
empowering ritual you could perform in the 
coming week is to kick in a locked door. 


A few months ago there was a story in the news 
about an awkward situation at the San 
Francisco Zoo. Two tigers there were complete- 
ly psyched out by an oil painting of another 
tiger. They seemed to regard the image, an 


> 


ART oF Downt® 


“¥ 


DOWNTOWN 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 
www.edmontondowntown.com 


GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY 10186-106 St 
(488-6611/4808-S900) * Open Mon-Sat, 10am-Spm 
(closed all hols) * MAIN GALLERY: ADORN AND 
PROTECT: An exhibition of body objects that beautify, 
nurture or shield; until july 5 * DISCOVERY GALLERY: 
* Wood furmiture by Gordon Galenza * Until July 5 


CITY HALL City Room (426-2122) * SNAPSHOTS: 
Photographs of downtown * Until july 10 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY 2 Sir Winston Churchill 
Sq (422-6223) » Open Tue-Wed and Fri 10:30am- 
Spm; Thu 10:30am-8pm; Sat, Sun 11am-Spm. Closed 
Mon * SOUNDTRACKS: Multimedia artworks based on 
the interplay of visual art, music and words; opening 
June 28-Aug. 24 * ART FOR LUNCH PROGRAM: 
Gallery Theatre; New York Eye and Ear Control film by 
Michael Snow; Thu, June 26 (noon) * VIDEOS: 
Lecture Theatre; showing of videos: Art of the Rockies | 
and Art of the Queen Charlottes |; Tue, July 1 * 
CHILDREN’S GALLERY: BECOME: Created by Don 
Moar; until July * $12/$10 (student/senior), $5 (chil- 
dren 6-12)/free (mempber/children 5 and under) 


GIORDANO GALLERY Main Fl, Empire Building, 
10080 jasper Ave (429-5066) * Open Wed, Sat (12- 
4pm) or by appointment * Artworks by David Bolduc 
* Until June 28 


LATITUDE 53 10248-106 St (423-5353) * (474- 
6058/490-1414/453-1763) = FLOW: Artworks by 
lastic, an artistic collective from Italy * Until july 19 + 
PROJEX ROOM: THE | ACCEPT MYSELF SERIES: Mixed 
media/photo installation by Shelley Rothenburger * 
Until July 19 


SEGHERS STUDIO GALLERY 604A, 10030-107 St. 
Seventh Street Plaza, North Tower (425-6885) * Open 
‘Artworks by 


Jeff Collins, Pamela How (Vilsec), Neil McClelland and 
Jacqui Rohac 


SNAP GALLERY 10137-104 St (423-1492) * Open 
Tue-Sat (12-Spm) * LOSING SIGHT OF BLINDNESS. 
Artworks by Nick Dobson * July 5-Aug. 2 * Opening 
reception; Thu, July 10 (7-9:30pm) * FRONT SPACE: 
SELF STORAGE: Wearable artworks by Mariann 
Sinkovics; until July 1; closing reception: July 1 (2- 
Spm) * FLUCTUATIONS: Artworks by Erik Waterkotte 
and Tonia Bonnell; july S-Sept. 6 


SOSA (SOCIETY OF STUDENT ARTISTS) GALLERY 
10154-103 St, Basement (707-8305) * ALTERED CON- 
TEXTS; Group show * Until July 2 


STUDIO 321 101689-100A St (424-6746/429-3498) * 
Open Sat-Sun 14pm * THE FATHER-SON ART EXHIBIT: 
Artworks by Mare Munan and Louis Munan * June 29 


THE WORKS ART AND DESIGN FESTIVAL 
Various venues throughout downtown Edmonton 
(426-2122) www.theworks.ab.ca * Featuring art- 
works by local, national and international artists + 
Until July 2 


WORKS GALLERY Commerce Place, 10150 Jasper 
Ave * Open Mon-Fri 10am-Spm; weekends, hols 
noon-Spm * Artworks by the graduating class of the 
Faculty of Extension * Part of the Works Art and 
Design Festival * Until July 2 


UBS/LECTURES 


EQUALITY NOW: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME? 
City Hall, Heritage Room (420-6866) * The New 
Canadian Multiculturalism Day forum and opening 
ceremonies * Fri, june 27 (Jam-1:45pm) 


EXPRESSIVE DEVOTION 10503 Jasper Ave * Mon- 
Thu (6-9pm) * For people in search of trying new 
and innovative workshops such as Dj/scratching, 
breakdancing, musical freestyle, visual design, and 
dance freestyle ¢ $10 walk-ins * Until July 3 


OPPORTUNITIES UNLIMITED NETWORKING 
GROUP Edmonton Chamber of Commerce, 600, 
10123-99 St, west door (426-4620) * Speaker jeff 
MacLeod PHSP’s The New Trend in Health 
Benelitse Fri, june 27 (6:45-8:30am) * $2 


vueweekty CD 


eight-square-foot piece of art on the wall of 
their home, as a giant ghostly competitor. 
Whenever they came close to it, their eyes 
bulged, their mouths gaped and their ears 
retracted. Sadly, this reminds me of you lately, 
Leo. A mere picture that exists only in your 
mind’s eye has you all messed up. | say it’s high 
time to reclaim your regal authority over it and 
any other images that intimidate you. 


The World Health Organization says that a 
good diet should consist of no more than 10 
per cent sugar. Lobbyists for the sugar indus- 
try disagree. They maintain that you'll be fine 
as long as no more than 25 per cent of your 
food and drink contains their favourite prod- 
uct. In regards to your current needs, Virgo, | 
disagree with both assessments. Since you're 
in a phase when you need to toughen up, 
strengthen your will and think leaner and 
meaner, | believe you should temporary limit 
your sugar intake to three per cent or less 


i 1 rr 


This is the right astrological moment to raise 
the bar and up the ante; to throw your 
weight around and kick some butt; to call in 
favours and claim your rewards; to make 
everything official and seal the deal; to 
assume a new title and create your own rite 
of passage. Don’t wait around for VIPs or 
authorities to initiate any of this; don’t fanta- 
size about what “fate” intends or whether 
you should prepare a little longer. The time is 
now. The place is here. 


SCORPIO scizs-rwv21 


At a recent outdoor party, the host's 
German shepherd shuffled over to me and 
dropped something at my feet. Crouching 
down, | found a tiny twig, It dawned on me 


LITERARY 


NAKED CYBER CAFE 10354 Jasper Ave * Open 
poetry and music jam hosted by the G man and Phil 
the Cowboyrobobeatnikpoet * Wed, July 2 


QUEER LISTINGS 


BOOTS AND SADDLES 10242-106 St (423-5014) 
* Large tavern with pool tables, restaurant, shows 
Members only 


GAY AND LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTRE OF 
EDMONTON (GLCCE) Suite 45, 9916-106 St 
(488-3234) * Open Mon-Fri, 1:30-5:30pm, 7-10pm * 
Support groups, library, youth group and discussion nights 


GAY MEN'S OUTREACH CREW (GMOC) 45, 9912- 
106 St (488-0564) * Peer education initiative for 
gay/bisexual men that works toward preventing the 
spread of HIV by improving self-esteem 


HIV NETWORK OF EDMONTON SOCIETY 105, 
10550-102 St (488-5742) * Programs and support 
services for people affected and infected by HIV/AIDS 
and related ilinesses. Counselling, referrals, support 
groups, harm reduction, education, advocacy and 
public awareness campaigns 


ICARE 702A, 10242-105 St (448-1768) * wwew.icare 
alberta.org * The Interfaith Centre for AIDS/HIV 
Resources and Education (formerly Interfaith 
Assocation on AIDS) provides spiritual support and 
connections for those affected by HIV/AIDS 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB CLCCE, Suite 45, 
9912-106 St * Meetings every second Thursday 
each month 


PFLAG GLCCE, Suite 45, 9912-106 St (462-5958) 
# Meetings every third Tuesday of the month at 
7:30pm * Support/education for parents, farnilies 
and friends of lesbians/gays/bisexuals/transgenders 


THE ROOST 10345-104 St (426-3150) * Open Sun-Thu 
Bpm-3am, Fri-Sat Bpm-tam * TUE Wid and Wet Contest 


that the dog wanted to play fetch. | 
plucked the twig off the ground and threw 
it as far as it would go, which was only 
about two feet; it wasn’t heavy enough to 
carry any farther. The dog moseyed over, 
delicately snagged it-in his teeth, and 
returned it to me for another round. | was 
mystified. Why didn’t he bring me a 
decent-sized stick that | could hurl a great 
distance so we could enjoy the full plea 
Sures of fetch? | pose an analogous ques- 
tion to you, Scorpio; isn’t it time to expand 
the parameters of your favourite game? 


In his book On the Road to Baghdad: A 
Picaresque Novel of Magical Adventures 
Guneli Gun offers his analysis of what's 
wrong with everything. “The world is run 
by those who can’t make love,” one of his 
characters says, “or those who do it badly. 
That's why the world is in trouble.” | agree 
And people who want to become better 
leaders would be smart to purge their neg- 
ative imprints about sex and improve their 
lovemaking skills. I'm sure you've already 
gone pretty far in that work, Sagittarius, 
but there's always room for improvement, 
fight? It so happens that this is a perfect 
astrological moment to boost your political 
and social authority by enhancing your 
mastery of the erotic arts. 


Kary Mullis is the only Nobel Prize-winning 
scientist ever to assert that astrology is 
valid, He's also the most distinguished 
Capricorn in history to have described a 
close encounter with a UFO. When he’s not 
doing pioneering research on the human 
genome, he enjoys life as a surfer, lover 


and shamanic adventurer. “A scientific 
genius with a vibrant soul,” said one critic 
in a review of his autobiography, Dancing 


(8 midnight) with female Bj Rhonda * WED: Amateur 
strip with Weena Luy, Sticky Vicky, DJ Alvaro * THU 
Rotating shows: Ladonna’s review, Sticky’s open stage and 
the Weakest Link game second and last Thursday with DB) 
Jazzy * FRI: Euro Blitz: Best new European music with Dj 
Outtawak Upstalrs-Dj Jazzy and fernale stripper * SAT 
Monthly theme parties with D| Jazzy Upstairs-New music 
Dj Dan Downstalrs-Retro music * SUN: Betty Ford 
Hangaver Clinic Show Beer Bash every long weekend with 
Dj jazzy * Tue-Thu $1 (member)/$3 (non-member); Fri 
Sat $3 (member)/$5 (nonenember); Sun $1 


SECRETS BAR AND GRILL 0249-107 St (990 
1818) « Lesbian and gay bar/restaurant 


TRANSSEXUAL /TRANSGENDER SUPPORT GROUP 
egret@hotmail.com * Meeting’ fourth Tuesday 
of the month # Information and mutual support for 
transgendered people in an open, friendly and safe 
environment. Open to transsexuals, transvestites, 
cross-dressers, drag queens/kings 


YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH Gay and Lesbian 
Community Centre of Edmonton (GLCCE), 45, 9912 

106 St (488-3234) * veww.yuyouth.tripad.com/yuy * 

Every Sat (7-9pm) * A facilitated social/support group 
for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, straight and 
questioning youth under the age of 2 


SPECIAL EVENTS 


ARTS HABITAT 3rd FI, 10217-106 St * Open stu 
dio/open house * Sat, june 28 (2-Bpm) 


CANADA DAY CELEBRATIONS City Hall (496-8200) 
* Displays, music, indoor and outdoor activities * july 
1 (lam-4pm) 


EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL STREET PERFORM. 
ERS FESTIVAL Various venues throughout downtown 
Edmonton (425-5162) * [uly 4-13; vaww.edmonton 
streetfest.com * OUTDOOR SHOWS: Daily 11:30am- 
10pm * FIRE SHOWS: Steps of City Hall Plaza; Nightly 
10pm * KIDS’ WORLD: Winspear Plaza and the ATB 
Financial Big Tent; Daily 11:30am-6pm 

* FEAST OF FOOLS: Sheraton Grande; Festival “Fun” 
raiser dinner arid silent auction; Thu, July 3 (7pm); $65 


JUNE 26-JULY 2, 2003 


Naked in a Mind field. “There is nothing 
too Preposterous for him to rigorously 
investigate and learn something valuable 
from,” said another observer, “just as there © 
are few commonly held truths in which he 
cannot find some fundamental fallacy.” | 
Suggest you make Mullis your role model 
for now, Capricorn. Imitate everythin 
about his spirit, including the way he 
blends intellectual discipline and open- 
minded curiosity. 


It’s time once again to evaluate the quali- 
ty of your emotional pain, Aquarius Every 
year, | ask you to take inventory; to deter- 
mine how you're progressing in your 
efforts to cultivate useful suffering and 
avoid the useless stuff 


So how have ya 
been doing since the last time we checked 
in July, 2002? Are you getting better at 
Steering clear of boring torments you've 
repeated a thousand times before? Have 
you made yourself less susceptible to 
being hurt by ignorant, careless people? 
Are you able to quickly shake off the 
effects of relatively trivial trouble? Do you 
tind yourself drawn to fascinating angst 
that compels you to become smarter and 
more resourceful? 


Fertility clinics in the U.S. are filled to the 
brim with frozen human embryos. Forty 
thousand would-be fetuses are now on 
ice, waiting for a go-ahead from the cou 
ples that spawned them. This backlog of 
potential life in limbo reminds me of you, 
Pisces, If you could get access to the 
parts of your imagination that are immo- 
bilized by fear, you'd become a power- 
house of focused creativity, I'm happy to 
tell you that this is a perfect time to do 
just that. © 


(Adv); Tickets available at 425-5162 * WOMEN IN 
COMEDY Citadel's Maclab Theatre; Sat, July 5 (8pm); 
$10 (adv)/$12 (door); tickets available at 425 
5162/451-8000 * VAUDEVILLE REVUE 1; ATB Financial 
Big Tent, Churchill Square; Sun, July 6 (1pm); All ages * 
LATE NIGHT MADNESS; ATB Financial Big Tent, 
Churehill Square; Fri, July 11-Sat, July 12 (10:30pm); 
$10 (adv)/$12 (door); tickets available at 425: 
§162/451-8000 * VAUDEVILLE REVUE 2: ATB Financial 
Big Tent, Churchill Square; Sun, July 13 (1pm); All ages 


FASHION SHOW The Works Festival Stage, Sir 
Winston Churchill Sq (429-4407) * Young designer 
showcase presented by the Marvel College Fashion 
Design program * Thu, June 26 (7:30pm) 

FEAST OF FOOLS Sheraton Grande Edmonton Hotels 
10235-101 St (425-5162) * Fundraiser for the 19th 
Annual Edmonton International Street Performers 
Festival * Thu, July 3 (7pm) * $65 (incl dinner, 
StreetFest preview, silent auction) 

GEORGIAN FOOD FAIR Stanley A. Milner Library, 7 
Sir Winston Churchill Sq, Centennial Rm (470-0676) 
* Presented by the Jane Austen Society * Sat, June 
28 (2-4pm) * Pre-register * Free 


MAYFAIR HOTEL 
APARTMENTS 


Furnished Suites 
starting at $495 


Bachelor 
One-Bedroom starting at $695 
Two-Bedroom starting at $795 


Utilities and Cable Included 


10815 JASPER AVE 
PHONE: 423-1650 


_ 24 column 


By ANDREA NEMERSON 


Fakey breaky heart 


Dear Andrea: 

For some reason | faked an orgasm. | 

regretted it soon after, but he seemed so 
“Fiappy ‘cause | never had had one. Should 

! tell him that | lied, or should | just not 

fake anymore and maybe he'll do some- 

thing different? Which would be better? 

Love, Faker Shaker 


Dear Shaker: 

Oh dear. Why do you think every 
expert in every book cautions the 
young and well-meaning against fak- 
ing it? I'll tell you. It isn’t so much an 
ethical problem (although it’s that, 
too) as it is a practical one. Think about 


— 


FREE* FREE * FREE* FREE* FREE 
ARTIST/NON PROFIT CLASSIFIEDS 
Need a volunteer? roan acting troupe? 
Want someone to jam with? Place up to 20 
words FREE, providing the ad is non-profit. 
Ads of more than 20 words subject to regular 
price or cruel editing. Free ads must be sub- 
mitted in writing, in person or by fax. 
Duplicate ads will not be published, except by 
mistake. Free ads will not be taken over the 
phone, Free ads will run for four weeks, if you 
want to renew or cancel please phone 426- 
1996/fax 426-2889/e-m office@yue.ab.ca or 
drop it off at 10303-108 St. 
Deadline is noon the Tuesday before 
publication. 

Placement will depend upon 
available space. 


artist to artist 


Fringe show needs: stage manager and experi 
enced director for collective show. Small cast 
some workshopping, musical numbers. Christie 
439-9705, primaenterprises®yahoo,ca 

0807 
Whyte Ave Art Walk July 11-13. Seeking 120 
visual artists. Turn Whyte Ave into an outdoor art 
studio. Call The Paint Spot 432-0240 

nad60e 


* SUPER 


GUITARS * AMPLIFIERS * KEYBOARDS * DAUMS 
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it: once you start lying, when do you 
stop? And how can you expect to get 
your needs met in the future when 
your partner thinks he’s already meet- 
ing them? Hell, once you fake it you 
can’t even get mad at the poor guy for 
leaving you high and dry. He’s giving 
you exactly what you asked for. 

Look, don’t fret too much. It was 
just the one little lie; it should be possi- 
ble to get out of this undamaged. You 
needn’t even cop to having faked it; 
you can just start fresh from here. Ill 
tell you what you cannot do, though: 
you cannot compound the problem by 
lying there silently, hoping he'll do 
something different next time. As far as 
he knows, he’s doesn’t have to. 

Now, have you really never had an 
orgasm, or just never with him? If the 
latter is the case, it’s time to start show- 
ing him what you know. Believe me, 
he’ll be thankful for the lesson. If it’s the 
former, it’s time to get some books (and 
maybe a vibrator) and start figuring out 
what does work for you. And if he keeps 
asking about that magical night when 
everything mysteriously came together, 
you can just shrug and start flipping 
through your new how-to books: “| 
thought | did, but I’m not really sure 


artist to artist 


Downtown law firm seeks to promote work of 
local artists by displaying contemporary and 
abstract artwork on our walls. Ph, Rod 482-6555 

90410 


Looking for musicians for Walterdale production 
Blood Brothers. Looking for drummer, guitar 
player, violinist and others. For info ph Neil 913- 
6407, e-m: salsbury@shaw.ca 

nao6i2 


auditions 


Auditions for an Indie, feature film 
based on people addicted to Karaoke. 
Filming in Calgary July/August 2003 Highly 

tuned improvisational skills are a must 
Singing is an asset. Non-union actors only 
no payne for film credit 
Auditions held in Calgary 
Wednesday July 2nd - evening 
Thursday July 3rd - all day 
Bring headshot & resume, no prepared piece 
necessary. To book an audition time or fora 
more detailed character list, please contact 
VAL LIESE Casting Director ~ rifffilms 
viieske@telusplanet.net www.silililms.com 
VW0619-0625 (2wks} 


Place your Classified ad in Vue Weekly. 
Phone 426-1996 for more info. 


now. Hey, how about we try this?” 
Love, Andrea 


Finishing school 


Dear Andrea: 

I’ve been dating this new guy. It was his 
first time. When I’m playing with him, he 
always stops me and finishes himself off. 
This is a total turnoff for me and | just 
roll over and go to sleep. He says it’s only 
because he’s been doing it for himself for 
so long, he doesn’t like for other people 
to try to help him. Oooooookay, and | 
am supposed to do what exactly? 

Love, Laid Off 


Dear Off: 
Well, at least he’s honest. 

That's not a very helpful answer, is 
it? But there’s something to it—lots of 
people would just as soon finish them- 
selves off as wait around forever for 
their partners to do it for them or do it 
the way they want. And lots of people 
have trained themselves into respond- 
ing to a certain set of stimuli and dread 
trying to teach new partners old tricks. 
It sure might be nice, though, if your 
new guy would at least give you an 
audition, wouldn’t it? You say he won't 


Edmonton’s Greenwood Singers: Auditions Thu, 

June 26 at the U of A Education Building by appt. 

only Ph Alana 433-7476. or alanaesh@shaw.ca 
na0619 


Karaoke singers/impersonators wanted! Take the 
stage for half-hour Sat nights. Auditions call 
Debra-Fae ® 468-5661 

00619 


Short film going to camera July 11th seeks cast 
Open audition to be held June 28. Athletic lead 
ing male, love interest, villains; others needed 
please call 435-9567 


dance lessons 
SUMMER BELLY DANCE CLASSES 


5 weeks $50 starting August 5, Beginners, 
Intermediate. Edmonton and St. Albert. 488-0706 
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Belly Dance 
Party Entertainment 
Summer classes/workshops 
Mother and daughter classes 
For more informationCall 426-5571 
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Bass player available for occasional gigs or part- 
Bi L 


time band. Blues, roots, R&B only. Call Mike 15 
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even let you try? Have you asked? 

| think it’s perfectly reasonable for a 
couple to decide that it works best 
when partner B, say, finishes himself off 
after partner A does such-and-such and 
the two of them together do such, such 
and such. That's just problem-solving, 
and I’m all for it. If you can make that 
work for you, great, all fixed. If, howev- 
er, you feel rejected and left out and he 
doesn’t even want to discuss the mat- 
ter, let alone give you a chance to try it 
yourself, that’s not problem-solving; it’s 
just a problem. For you. 

Love, Andrea 


Hooked on a feeling 


Dear Andrea: 

My girlfriend recently bought a vibrator. 
It’s a turn-on, but she’s been using it 
more and more and is having problems 
reaching an orgasm when we're togeth- 
er. Is she addicted? Is it possible that she 
is so dependent on a battery-operated 
machine that it makes it harder for her 
to climax during the real thing? 

Love, Left Out 


Dear Lefty: 
| could go into the lecture about how, 


while you cannot become addicted to 
your vibrator, you can become habitu- 
ated to it—and they are different 
because blah blah, whoop-de-doo and 
so on. Instead, I'll just say that yes, it 
may be more difficult for her to come 
from human-powered stimulation now 
that she’s used to the vibe’s superhu- 
man ministrations. She can fix this 
problem by putting the toy away for a 
while and retraining herself, or you can 
simply consider the machine part of 
your ménage from now on and bring it 
out as needed. 

Another possibility, which you 
won't like but may have to get over, is 
that back when you thought she was 
having all those orgasms with no 
mechanical intervention, she, well, 
wasn’t. Especially if by “the real thing” 
you meant intercourse. Intercourse is 
great and all, but for most women, it 
just can’t compete with the Magic 
Wand in the “I can’t help it, I'm gonna 
come” department. 

Love, Andrea O 


Andrea Nemerson writes and teaches in 
San Francisco. You can e-mail her a 
question at andrea@altsexcolumn.com. 


New venue seeking live bands for Sat gigs. For more 
info call Sandy at 444-1822 
930826 


Drummer wanted for new up-and-coming band, orig- 
inal style pref, infl: metal, punk, grunge. rock. Ph 
Derek 458-6360/463-3520, veww.thousandblow.com 


Female singer/songwriter “atl band tor covers 
and originals, 25-35 yrs. Inil: Sarah McLachlan, 
Avril Lavigne, Michelle Branch. Ph Julia 472-1026. 

30605 


Drummer needed for established country and 
western band. Call Mike 459-7301. 


nags2o 


Fifth Annual Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards 
CBC Galaxie Rising Stars Award Call for Entries: 
submission deadline: June 30, 2003. 

Info: www.canab.com or call 519-751-0040. 
Upright bass player wanted for swing jammin: 
Paty Phone Pact 433-0049. ey 4 


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So, you want to get the real goods about acting? 
You want to learn from the BEST in the industry 
Tom Logan, LA. director is the “real McCoy 
and he will be in Edmonton on 
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2 classes: * 1. The On Camera Commercial and 

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Toms workshops have stood the test of time tor 
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Heritage Festival Needs More Volunteers 
The Edmonton Heritage Festival, occurring 
this year in Hawrelak Park from August 2 to 
August 4, still requires volunteers to help out 
with stafiing information booths and the site 

administration office, providing children’s activi 
ties, and a number of other important tasks 
Volunteers sign up for five- or six-hour shits 
during the Festival and receive T-shirts, hats 
pins, meals, and draw prizes. If you are interest 
ed, please call Marnie at 488-3378 
or em: marnie@heritage-festival.com 
VW 0612-0625 (2k 


Looking for students to volunteer with children 
at The Edmonton Art Gallery this summer 
Gain experience. Ph 422-6223, ext, 235 

anes 


Volunteer Research Assistant required for Profiles 
Public Art Gallery to assist the Education Curator 


help wanted help wanted 


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Place your Classified ad in Vue Weekly. 
Phone 426-1996 for more info. 


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VUEwEEKLY @E JUNE 26-WULY 2, 2003