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FRONT: HIV. EDMO 


EDMONTON S 100% INDEPENDENT NEWS & ENTERTAINIVENT WEEKLY 


MONSTER 
\ HOWDIRECTOR 
‘PATTY JENKINS 
_FOUND'GOMPASSION | 
FORAKILLER® 36 


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20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY 


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Come help us celebrate 20 
years of community radio in 
Edmonton! Tickets are only $7 
at the door or $5 for friends of 
CJSR members. Ail CISR 
volunteers and alumni are 
invited down to this very 
special event. 

CJSR DJ's will be rounding out 
the evenings events. 


FRONT 
2 Your Vue 


4 HIV Edmonton insurance 
5 Vue News 
5 VuePoint 
6 Tom the Dancing Bug 
6 Haiku Horoscope 
7 Three Dollar Bill 
8 Infinite Lives 
10 Bonhoeffer 
11 Snow Zone 


16 Dish Weekly 
17 Mebrat 


MUSIC 

19 This Week 

20 Music Notes 
22 Music Weekly 
24 Root Down 
27 Staind 

| 29 Classical Notes 
; 30 Buck 65 

32 Hassan Hakmoun 
33 BPM 

34 New Sounds 


ALM 


36 Monster 

37 The Butterfly Effect 
38 Pistol Opera 

| 39 The Cooler 

] 39, Party Monster 

39 Win a Date 

| With Tad Hamilton! 
40 Film Weekly 


| 
| ARTS 
42 The Last Train 

.42 Inamorata 

43 Theatre Notes 

43 Arts Weekly 

44 Free Will Astrology 


THE BACK 

44 Events Weekly 
45 Classifieds 

46 Alt Sex Column 


| 


47 Hey Eddie! 


QNTHEGOVER == 


What separates Buck 65 from Justin Timberlake? 
Aside from all the obvious differences in looks and 
talent, it’s the fact that while Timberlake not only writes 
a jingle for McDonalds but actually includes it on his 
new DVD, Buck 65 is so upset over the restaurant 
chain's impact on the farm industry that he turned 
down a lucrative promotional deal with them e 30 


A Bonhoeffer you 
can’t refuse ¢ 10 


yourVvVUE 


Vue nails the story 


Shannon Phillips's Media Jungle column 
“The Alberta underreport” [January 8-14] 
not only hit the nail squarely on the head 
but drove it straight into the truth about 
our mainstream media and reporting— 
of, as you say, underreporting. 

As your article noted, the Auditor 
General’s report discloses the $359 mil- 
lion in refunds for the oil and gas 
industry per year. Look at the skyrock- 
eting increase in automobile fuel and 
natural gas prices, and buying us off 
with our own money with gas rebates. 

Look at the seniors facility rate 
hikes, which the Tories claimed would 
increase services, but what they actual- 
ly meant was increased profit for 
“Extendicare” Tory supporters. | guess 
they scratched Ralph’s back so he 
turned around and kissed them. 

This demonstrates how the Edmon- 


Meet the woman 
who turned Charlize 
Theron into a 
Monster ¢ 36 


The Last Train: 
blood on the 
tracks ¢ 42 


ton Journal in this case enlarges on 
some things or bends the actual situa- 
tion or chooses not to report the item 
altogether and in the process pumps 
up the Alberta Tories, who are nothing 
more than a corporate government 
with a corporate agenda that ignores 
the citizens’ concerns. 

There has not been reporting of 
Alberta government scandals which | 
can recall. | guess this shows money 
will buy you your way out of any situa- 
tion—at least in Alberta, where greed 
and money are king. If this were not 
true, we would not re-elect the Tories 
for 30-some years. 

The real news is free. You prove it 
over and over. —FreD Rope, EDMONTON 


Vue nails the shoes 


I've just read Caitlin Crawshaw’s arti- 
cle on cobbling [“Awl or nothing,” 
Jan. 15-21]. In short, wonderful! Well- 
written, well-researched and thought- 
ful to boot. (Couldn’t resist the pun.) 
| think the article resonated with me 


because | repair and restore antique 
cameras. And | do mean antique— 
often in the neighbourhood of 100 
years old. The sorrier state the cam- 
era is in, the better. Like you, | need 
to sew leather, glue, stain, polish and 
do a bit of wood and mechanical 
work. The end result is like your 
shoes—something that looks good, 
but mainly is useful again. 

Please do write more—you have 
the gift for that. 

P.S.: | buy good shoes and some 
have seen a cobbler more than once. 
—Douc Craic, EDMONTON 


Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, 
both positive and negative. Send your 
opinion by mail (Vue Weekly, 10303- 

108 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5] 1L7), by 
fax ((780) 426-2889) or by e-mail 

(letters@vue.ab.ca). Preference is given 

to feedback about articles in Vue Weekly; 
we reserve the right to edit letters for 
length and clarity. Please include a 
daytime telephone number. 


vuEeweEKiy Gp 


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— wueweekty January 22-28, 2004 


VUE 
WEEKLY 


10303-108 St. 

Edmonton, AB T5J 1L7 

Tel: (780) 426-1996 

Fax: (780) 426-2889 

, @-mail: <office@vue.ab.ca> 
website: www.vueweekly.com 


Issue Number 431 
January 22-28, 2004 
available at over 1,400 locations 


Editor/Publisher 

Ron Garth 

<ron@yue.ab.ca> 
Associate 

Maureen Fleming 

<maureen@vue.ab.ca> 

Editorial Directors 

Dave Johnston (Music Editor/Art Director} 

<dj@vue.ab.ca> 

Paul Matwychuk (Managing Editor} 

<paul@vue.ab.ca> 

News Editor 

Dan Rubinstein 

<dan@vue.ab.ca> 


Production Manager 
Lyle Bell 


<iyie@vue.ab.ca> 
Listings Editor 
Glenys Switzer 
<glenys@vue.ab.ca> 
Layout Manager 
Sean Rivalin 
<sean@vue.ab.ca> 


Sales and Marketing Manager 

Rob Lightfoot 

<rob@vue.ab.ca> 

Sales Representative 

Aistair King 

Classifieds Sales 

Carol. Robinson 

Distribution & Promotions 

Representative 

Mariann eee 
<manann@vue.ab.ca> 

Local Advertising 

Call 426-1996 

National Advertising 
DPS Media (416) 413-9291 


Contributing Editors 
Phil Duperron (Music Notes) 
< vue.ab.ca> 


Contributors 

Sean Austin-Joyner, Jonathan Ball, 
Bobbi Barbarich, Ruben Boiling, Chris 
Boutet, Amber Bowerman, Josef Braun, 
Rob Brezsny, Richard Burnett, Colin 
Cathrea, James Elford, Minister Faust, 
Jenny Feniak, Brian Gibson, James 
Grasdal, Allison Kydd, Agnieszka Mate- 
jko, Carol Miyagawa, Andrea Nemerson, 
Brendan Procé, James Racke, Steven 
Sandor, Jered Stuffco, Darren Zenko 
Cover Photo 

Courtesy Warner Music 

Production Assistant 

Michael Siek 

Administrative Assistant 

Davie Laing 

Printing and Film Assembly 

The Edmonton Sun 
Distribution 
wart McEachern, 
ey, Killian Seisky, 
Clark Distribution 


; Wally Yanish 


Vue Weekly is available free of charge at 
well over 1,400 locations throughout 
Edmonton. We are funded solely through 
the support of our advertisers. Vue 
Weekly is a division of 783783 Alberta 
Lid. and is published every Thursday. 
Canada Post Canadian Publications Lid. 
Sales Product Agreement No. 40022989 


, 


Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Member 


Along came policy 


HIV Edmonton’s 
insurance deal 
won't solve bigger 
problem for 
non-profit agencies 


By BRENDAN PROCE 


nother irony here in one of the 
Aresc: more abundant 

‘conomies: the struggling non- 
profit sector. “One non-profit I know 
pays $30,000 a year for insurance,” 
says Sherry McKibben, the executive 
director of HIV Edmonton, “whereas 
we paid $3,500 [last year]. There’s 
even an organization I know of 
that’s running 
without agency 
insurance. They 
couldn’t get any.” 

HIV Edmonton, which provides 
crucial services (such as specialist 
referrals to counseling) to the local 
HIV-positive and Hepatitis C com- 
munities, was virtually forced into 
shutdown mode earlier this week 
because of their inability to find an 
insurer. Their old policy expired on 
January 20 and the thought of run- 
ning the agency without insurance 
was unfeasible—in that scenario, 
any liability would’ve fallen directly 
on its board of directors. 

On January 16, however, the 


Brian Webb 


DANCE COMPANY 


presents 


lalala 


NV Gae 


Royal and Sun Alliance Insurance 
Company delivered last-minute sal- 
vation. “Now that we have insur- 
ance,” McKibben said in her most 
recent press release, “the next chal- 
lenge HIV Edmonton faces will defi- 
nitely be financial.” She anticipates 
that the new policy will cost at least 
400 per cent more than the old one. 
Resources at HIV Edmonton, it’s 
clear, are already thin. McKibben’s 
voicemail, after a standard greeting, 
appends a warning: “If I don’t get back 
to you today, then tomorrow. Like all 
the staff at HIV Edmonton, we've got 
more work than we can ever get to.” 


THE INITIAL NEWS about HIV 
Edmonton's insurance troubles broke 
just over a month ago, on December 
17, when the 
agency announced 
that its current 
insurer would not 
be renewing its policy. “The insur- 
ance industry sees an agency like 
HIV Edmonton as a risk and to date 
we have had 14 refusals,” a Decem- 
ber press release-stated. At one point, 
McKibben was pursuing Capital 
Health, the local health authority, for 
interim coverage until a new policy 
could be arranged. 

Next door to HIV Edmonton, in 
the same building, is Living Positive. 
Although both agencies work with 
the HIV-positive community, they 
offer different services, are staffed dif- 


Jan 29. 8pm 
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ferently and are independent of one 
another. Insurance at Living Positive 
would not have been affected by this 
disruption. “Reason being,” explains 
Perry Schatz, a community developer 
with Living Positive, “we don’t run a 
needle exchange. We don’t run a 
methadone program. We don’t do a 
lot of things that they offer.” Instead, 
insurance for any needs beyond their 
office, such as retreats, is purchased 
on an as-needed basis. 

Living Positive is staffed and 


SEE PAGE 9 Sherry McKibben 


HIV fact sheet 


People with HIV in Canada: 50,000 

New infections each year: 4,200 

Canadians who do not know they have HIV: 15,000 

Albertans diagnosed with HIV every year: 200 

Increase in government funding for people living with HIV/AIDS since 1994: none 
People in Canada living with HIV/AIDS, compared to 1994: double 

HIV Edmonton’s annual client contacts: 1,500 

HIV Edmonton’s monthly caseload: 164 

People counseled through the agency monthly: 130 


Reported HIV infections since 1998 
Edmonton: 408 

Calgary: 306 

Northern Alberta: 119 

Southern Alberta: 71 


Source: HIV Edmonton, all figures approximate 


The Canadian Authors Association 


presents... (Alberta Branch) 


An evening with warding-winning and bestselling writer 


Sharon Butala 


Friday, January 30 at 8 pm 
~ Room!-22, Education South Building, U of A 
+» Mbwelcome. (A drop-in free may be in effect) 


Botala will also be conducting a full-day workshop on writing 
© memoirs, Saturday, Janvary 31 in the same location, 


$30 for (AA members, $60 for non-members. 
of the workshop contact Sue Paulson 


(all 4 


-3679 or email sue@fingertipsolutions.com 


Joan Clark 
_ Bruce Hunter : 


Feburary 2] - 28 
March 26 - y 
May 28-29 | 


Ty (ite ec teaaceee 
Writers and assist in the 


vuewrexiy QD 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


WG epee 
NEWS 


EVENTS 


The Week shall inherit 
the earth 


EDMONTON—One year shy of its 20th 
anniversary, with a full schedule of 
films, lectures, panel discussions and 
performances—and some controversy, 
too—the University of Alberta’s Inter- 
national Week is set for January 23 to 
30. The cleverly worded theme this 
year is “Picking up the peaces.” 

“We thought it was a really timely 
topic,” says Nancy Hanneman, the U of 
A International Centre's global education 
program co-ordinator and one of the 
event's organizers. “We see many con- 
flicts around the world today [and] issues 
towards building peace when conflicts 
are over. We thought that was worth 
examining in a little more detail.” Hanne- 
man hopes International Week encour- 
ages more community activism. “In 
general, the goal is to increase people’s 
skills and knowledge in the area of being 
global citizens,” she says. “And so we 
need to know a whole lot more about 
the world and what's going on in it.” 

The keynote address, “Building Sus- 
tainable Peace” (Monday, January 26 at 
noon in Myer Horowitz Theatre) will 
feature U of A political science profes- 
sors Andy Knight and Tom Keating, 
who'll talk about the practice of “peace 
building” undertaken by national gov- 
ernments and international organiza- 
tions. “I think the tone will be 
somewhat skeptical,” Keating says. 
“Not necessarily of the general princi- 
ples of peace building or the possible 


contributions that peace building could * 


make to the reconstruction of societies 
that have experienced conflicts, but 
skeptical about the practice to date.” In 
Keating's mind, those involved in peace 
building have overestimated the ability 
of outsiders to reconstruct societies dev- 
astated by oppressive governments or 
violent conflict. “I think we've exagger- 
ated our ability to bring these people 
back together,” he says, “to heal over 
differences and to set them on a course 
to a sustainable peace in the future.” 

Political analyst Satya Das will mod- 
erate the Monday evening keynote dis- 
Cussion focusing on Canada’s role in the 
global community. “I think any time 
that Canadians can get together and 
talk about our role in the world and the 
specific things that we can do to try to 
help to make a better world, | think it’s 
all for the good,” says Das. “I look upon 
it as a chance to build awareness, a 
chance to confirm some of the things 
that everybody is already working on or 
may know about, and to share ideas 
and thoughts about how we can build a 
better future for humankind.” 

In the lead-up to International 
Week, however, all was not right in the 
eyes of the U of A Jewish Students’ Asso- 
ciation. “They were very concerned that 
the program presented the Palestinian 
issue—the conflict between Israel and 
Palestine—from a Palestinian perspec- 
tive,” says Hanneman, “and that their 


perspective wasn’t being presented.” 

JSA director Shira Uretsky argues 
that the perspectives of Israeli citizens 
are not represented by International 
Week programming and that the JSA 
should have been consulted. “It certain- 
ly created even more of an atmosphere 
of one-sidedness,” she says. “It’s not so 
much that they’re showing a Palestinian 
perspective,” says JSA executive board 
member Jeremy Glick. “It’s more of an 
issue of not having any perspective on 
the other side. And the problem with 
the Middle East is that you have two 
groups: it’s not an issue that’s clear cut; 
there’s no necessarily ‘wrong’ group; it’s 
two different groups trying to coexist.” 

When the JSA complained to the 
International Centre, it was too late to 
make changes to the program, but a 
film selected by the JSA was shown 
after another film was screened last Fri- 
day, Behind the Fence, which depicts 
the struggles of Palestinians living 
under Israeli occupation. (Uretsky was 
disappointed by the response to the 
complaint because few stayed to 
watch the JSA‘s film.) 

According to Hanneman, organiz- 
ers took care to select a film presenting 
the conflict from a balanced perspec- 
tive and she feels that Behind the Fence 
represents the issues fairly. The Interna- 
tional Centre chooses presenters and 
presentations that will not be “inflam- 
matory,” she adds. For more informa- 
tion and a complete schedule, go to 
www.international.ualberta.ca/iweek20 
04. —CAmTUN CRAWSHAW 


SPACE 
Signed, shield, delivered? 


OTTAWA—The official line from the 
Department of National Defence and 
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is that 
Canada “continues to oppose the 
weaponization of space.” But recent let- 
ters sent to Washington by defence min- 
ister David Pratt and foreign affairs 
minister Bill Graham suggest that Paul 
Martin's Liberals may be warming up to 


some of America’s most hardline policies. 

Both Pratt and Graham sent letters 
to American officials “regarding co- 
operation in ballistic missile defence,” 
according to a release from the Depart- 
ment of National Defence. Since the 
September 11, 2001 attacks, the U.S. 
government has been soliciting interna- 
tional support for the revival of an old 
Ronald Reagan initiative: a missile 
defence shield. In theory, the shield 
would use satellites to help detect 
incoming missiles, then shoot them 
down before they reached their intend- 
ed targets. Of course, America is only 
proposing a theory, not a workable plan. 
Scientists are still far from creating a mis- 
sile shield design and, if one were creat- 
ed, it would cost billions to implement. 

“This step will help to move for- 
ward discussions on possible Canadian 
participation in the missile defence of 
North America,” said Pratt. “It sets out 
a clear path for-future negotiations 
and will allow Canada to have access 
to the information about missile 
defence that we will need to make a 
decision on participation.” 

While Pratt's comments don’t 
repudiate the traditional Liberal posi- 
tion opposing the missile defence 
plan, they do hint strongly that Cana- 
da is willing to talk about the plan with 
the Americans. Pratt is suggesting that 
there one day might be a need for 
negotiations on the topic, which 
wouldn’t be the case if Canada contin- 
ued its head-shaking stance regarding 
the shield. “We believe this should 
provide a mutually beneficial frame- 
work to ensure the closest possible 
involvement and insight for Canada, 
both government and industry, in the 
U.S. missile defence program,” he 
wrote in his letter to American secre- 
tary of defense Donald Rumsfeld. 
“Such [a memorandum of understand- 
ing] could also help pave the way for 
increased government-to-government 


INTERNET 


An even more annoying 
form of Web ad pops up 


CYBERSPACE—| remember the first time 
| went online way back in 1992. It was a 
simpler place then, sparse in visual con- 
tent and almost completely devoid of 
the annoying pop-ups and time-wasting 
redirects that are so common today. But 
if a new form of Internet advertising 
tests well over the next month, all those 
aforementioned ad tricks will seem 
quaint and unintrusive. Yes, it looks like 
television-quality commercials are finally 
destined for the Web. 

Starting this week, according to the 
New York Times, more than a dozen 
websites, including MSN, ESPN and 
Lycos, will begin running full-motion 
video ads from Pepsi, AT&T, Honda 
and Warner Brothers as part of a six- 
week experiment that could usher in a 
new era in online advertising. 

Video ads are nothing new, of 
course, but the problem with video in 
the past was that it required a load time 
that most surfers would find intolerable. 
As such, today’s video tends to be 
choppy, grainy and simplistic. But the 
new technology, will load undetected 
onto a viewer’s computer as their 
browser sits idle while they read the 
site. Once the user attempts to go to 
another page, however, the ad will dis- 
play across the entire field of view, run- 
ning at a full TV-video quality of 30 
frames-per-second through the com- 
puter’s Windows Media Player. The 
technology will operate above pop-up 
blocking software but the user can still 
turn off the ad by closing it. 

Pepsi's director for digital media 
and marketing told the Times that 
viewer reactions to the new ads will be 
tracked to determine whether the soft 
drink giant will pursue the medium in 
the future. “Yes, it’s intrusive,” John 
Vail said. “But | think customers will 
like it because it will be so far superior 
to anything they‘ve seen online. It’s TV 
without the television.” —Cxris BouTEeT 


vue 
point 


By DAN RUBINSTEIN 


Have you got a better 
idea? 


It'd be too easy to dub Edmonton's 
newly-minted mayoralty race Dumb 
and Dumber. Besides, when the 
incumbent is Bill Smith and his main 
challenger is Robert Noce, well, it’s 
difficult to decide which one. is which. 

When Noce officially aanounced 
last week that he’s running in the 
October 18 municipal ejection, he 
had to make a splash. Vhe 50 sup- 
porters who gathered to watch the 
36-year-old lawyer chuck his hat into 
the ring at the Westin Hotel weren’t 
exactly the type of rabid throng that 
looks exciting on television—and 
after finishing second in the 2001 
election, everybody already figured 
Noce would be back. So how did he 
make noise? Why, by talking about a 
huge infrastructure project, of course. 

Edmonton is a “city on the 
move,” you know. Except that it’s got 
a “stagnant” downtown. And how do 
you liven up our “dead zone” of an 
urban core? Simple: you re-vit-al-ize it! 

The visionary that he is, Noce 
wants to build bridges. Literally. At 
least one bridge. Please? 

Even though it’s been discussed 
for four decades, started once and 
then stopped, and rejected by the 
city’s transportation master plan in 
the late 1990s, Noce says we need a 
new link between downtown and the 
south side. Picture it: instead of Gate- 
way Boulevard coming to an incon- 
venient, abrupt halt at Saskatchewan 
Drive, let’s extend the sucker right 
across the river valley. Our “ribbon of 
green” will be replaced by a ribbon 
of greenbacks as businesses, residents 
and nightlife-seekers flood back to 
the downtown core. 

Noce feels we need a better 
way to get people across the river. 
Too bad he’s blindly ignoring the 
fact that, except during the morn- 
ing and afternoon rush hours, a trip 
between the south side and down- 
town never takes more than a 
dozen minutes. His new bridge— 
his new, very expensive bridge—will 
essentially be useless, i 

Not to be outdone, however, 
Smith‘s counter-strategy was to 
prove that he’s even more of a 
visionary than Nocé j 


PRESIDENT BUSH \S ON HIS WAY 
mes | TO THE MOON / 
§ [WARP FACTOR FT - 
p c 


oi 


HEY, LITTLE FELLA/ UH-OH/ I'D BETTER GET 
YOU COME BACK To HOME BEFORE I RUN 

AMERICA AND WORK AS | | OUTTA ROOM/ 

A GARDENER, AND TLL] B 

LET YOU GET 

A DRIVER's 

LICENSE / 


PA Me. PRESIDENT! Y 
pau YOU MUST HAVE/ JUST TELL- 
As BEEN..er.. LOST 


WELL, DON'T WORRY! 
L JUST THOUGHT UP 
A PLAN FOR THAT! 


WO? SNQGSVIIVUEPAYLWO46MMM EBS DNIIM0g'y POOTS ALWIIAMAS ss3Vs IWSAANING AG 1510 


Yes! I got the job! 


This could be YOU! 


Get Trained to Work in 2004! 
Call Reeves College 
to find out HOW! 


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QUALITY TRAINING IN ALBERTA FOR OVER 40 YEARS 


ARIES 

(Mar 21-Apr 19) 

Your career as a 

Rock star will end on a high 
Note with your demise 


(Apr 20-May 20) 
You will endanger > 
Your soul when you get sick and 

Start praying to cod 


GEMINI 

(May 21-June 20) 

The price to pay for 
Being with Christina is 
Listening to her 


CANCER 

@une 21-July 22) 

The great thing about 
Pomo is that it raises” 
More than your spirits 


LEO 

(uly 23-Aug 22) 

You know you’re a star 

When you find yourself out in 
Space and burning bright 


VIRGO 
(Aug 23-Sept 22) 


Your album will top x 
The charts in the magical 


Land of Make-Believe 


SCORPIO 
(Oct 23-Nov 21) 


- Dear God, do | need 


That miracle knife—are you 
Watching this program? 


- Sadly, the rise of 
Our robot overlords will 


Cramp your dating style 


CAPRICORN 

(Dec 22-Jan 19) 

| think that it was 

Dostoevsky who spoke with 
Such grand insight: “AAAYY!” 


* an 20-Feb 18) 
=~ Your new grill would work 


Great if Muhammad Ali 


‘Would stop hitting it 


' PISCES 


(Feb 19-Mar 20) 
Okay, I’m going 
To call that toll-free number— 


Through a friggin’ pipe 


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VvueEweekiy JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


. www.bbbsedmonton.org 


P2'qe'abajjoosaAca1"MMM 


three 
dollar 
bill 


By RICHARD BURNETT 


Fallen angels 


| can only imagine the partial relief sexual- 
ly abused choirboys in the Catholic 
Church must be feeling now that the 
Grand Séminaire de Montréal has 
announced it will test all new priests for 
HIV, The boys may still have to bend over 
for a Father or two but at least they won’t 
be infected with HIV and die of AIDS. 
That's the only good news these 
days in the cloaked world of the Vati- 
can, where an estimated 50 per cent of 
the priesthood is gay. By testing appli- 
cants for HIV, the Catholic Church is 
really saying, “We’ve accepted 
pedophiles within our ranks but 


dammit, we draw the line at faggots.” ~ 


Homos, of course, have historically 
been quite adept at leading double 
lives. So it’s no surprise they’re darn- 
near-perfect recruits for the Church. 
That they keep swelling the ranks of the 
priesthood without detection, though, 
must rile folks like Cardinal Jean-Claude 
Turcotte, the Archbishop of Montreal. 

“This is not a profession one will 
engage in for five or 10 years—it’s a 
decision on a way of life,” Turcotte told 
throngs of reporters and TV camera 


crews at a Montreal press conference 
hastily convened to refute charges his 
archdiocese is conducting a gay witch 
hunt. “Times have changed. Now our 
applicants to the priesthood are mid- 
dle-aged, who have lived a lot and who 
have had experiences in their past. So it 
appeared prudent to check to see if, 
among the illnesses that might be pre- 
sent in a candidate, there was HIV.” 

But the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal 
Network is having none of that. “All Que- 
becers living with HIV received a slap in 
the face from an institution that should 
Practice what it should preach: respect 
and inclusion,” quips Legal Network 
executive director Ralf Jurgens. “The deci- 
sion to ask applicants for the priesthood 
to submit to an HIV test and the public 
statements by Cardinal Turcotte suggest- 
ing that HIV-positive people would not be 
able to fulfill the duties of priesthood per- 
petuate stigma and misinformation about 
HIV and all people with HIV.” 

So the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Net- 
work and the Quebec Coalition of Com- 
munity-Based Organizations Fighting 
AIDS (which goes by the unfortunate- 
sounding acronym COCQ-Sida), have 
formally asked the Quebec Human Rights 
Commission to launch an investigation 
into the matter of HIV testing of priest- 
hood candidates. Canadian law prohibits 
employers from demanding mandatory 
pre-employment HIV tests because doing 
so is discrimination based on disability. 

But brace yourself—Ginette 
UHeureux of the Quebec Human Rights 
Commission says the Catholic Church, 
because it’s a religious institution, is likely 
exempt from the Charter of Rights, 
which protects gays from discrimination. 

Which is why seminaries across 


cc 


Canada already test applicants for HIV: 
the Vancouver Catholic archdiocese 
tests recruits at the Seminary of Christ 
the King, as does Edmonton's St. 
Joseph Seminary. American seminaries 
have been testing recruits for HIV for 
more than a decade. Montreal was sim- 
ply falling in line with the Vatican brain 
trust. Only Canada’s largest seminary, 
St. Augustine’s Seminary in Toronto, 
doesn’t test for HIV—and it’s only a 
matter of time before they do too. 

After all, the Vatican has taken a no- 
prisoners approach to gay life. Along 
with their social conservative and reli- 
gious fundamentalist allies in Iran, Egypt, 
Saudi Arabia and the Bush administra- 
tion, they have successfully fought just 
about every single gay-rights proposal at 
the United Nations. In his Christmas 
week address, an uncharitable pontiff 
eviscerated same-sex marriage, claiming 
“a misunderstood sense of rights” is 
blinding activists. And Pope John Paul II’s 
1994 elevation of Archbishop Jean- 
Claude Turcotte to Cardinal is proof the 
Pope is stacking the Church with conser- 
vative cardinals so that they will protect 
his anti-gay legacy when the old coot 
finally kicks the bucket. 

If ever there were any doubt that 
the Vatican and its allies want to crush 
gay life everywhere (especially within 
their own ranks) it comes from Cardi- 
nal Turcotte’s pipsqueak mouthpiece 
Reverend Marcel Demers, who said 
that by testing for HIV, “We will try to 
see what really is the person’s calling.” 

In other words, if your calling is 
man-boy love, then clearly the Catholic 
Church is for you. But if you're a healthy, 
well-balanced man who loves adult 
men, the Church will crucify you. © 


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: rew : 
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Infinite 
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By DARREN ZENKO 


Youngstersand out-of-towners might 
not realize it, but the resurrection of the 
Sports World name is a big deal for a lot 
of people around here who had their 
first awkward teenage roller-disco hand- 
holdings on the spotlit surface of what 
was once Edmonton’s premiere roller- 
skating rink—sorry, Spinning Wheels 
fans, but Sports World was the shit. The 
old building’s long since been convert- 
ed into some kind of big storage shed 
for Northlands’ junk or something, but | 
know I’m not the only one who replays 
those memories of four-wheeling plea- 
sure—and pain; | sucked at skating— 
every time | roll past on the LRT. 

The new Sports World is even 
more hardcore Northside than its ‘80s 
namesake, located as it is on the 
grounds of what was the Greisbach 
Armed Forces base, and the space’s 
martial origins have not been con- 
cealed—even the military signage 
remains proudly on the walls. Skating 
here is like partying down at Gl Joe 
HQ, but for all its low-budget 
makeshiftness, Sports World compe- 
tently goes about doing the basic job 
Sports Worlds are supposed to do: pro- 
viding a place for Today’s Youth to 
hang out, skate in circles under swirling 
spots and listen to Run-DMC. 

And play videogames, of course. 
That’s what | mostly did at the old 
Sports World, where | first played Joust, 
Berzerk and Wizard of Wor. The Sports 
World of the New Millennium boasts a 
“retro arcade,” and that’s what | was 
really there for, to once again rock the 
joystick on mismatched rollerskates 
and approach old favourites as if for 
the first time—“like a virgin,” one 
might say. Reviewing a roomful of 
“retro” games without nostalgia, being 
willfully ahistorical, may be a bit per- 


verse... but here goes. 


Galaga 

Galaga takes the alien-eliminating 
thrills of Galaxian to a whole crazy new 
level, with graphics and sound that 
squeeze the visual and auditory cortices 
of your brain until the juice is forced 
out of the very pores of your palms in 
the form of sweat. Galaga is a wicked 
challenge right from the get-go, the 
early levels serving less as an introduc- 
tion to the game than as a test to weed 
out the slow and weak. There are some 
tricky logistics at work here, too—allow 
one of your men to be captured by 
enemy boss ships and then precisely 
snipe the looping captor without blow- 
ing up your own guy, and you’re 
rewarded with a deadly dual-ship 
offence. As the game itself puts it, 
“That's Galactic Dancing!” 


Bubble Bobble 
Here’s a weird one, for sure. 
Adorable dinosaurs Bub and Bob must 


use their bubble-blowing and jumping 
skills to clear rack after rack of nasty 
enemies and collect lots of standard- 
issue videogame loot like bananas and 
ice-cream sundaes, in order to really get 
down... to the bottom of a giant well of 
some sort, where a pair of foxy dinosaur 
chicks await them! It’s super-cute— 
guys, maybe this is the game that'll 
hook your girlfriends on “those damn 
machines”—but its real strength is a 
fast, almost frantic pace that never gives 
you a moment to sip your flat fountain 
soda. Dawdlers will inevitably be eaten 
by monsters, which is fine by me. 


Ms. Pac-Man 

Okay, this is icky. Ms. Pac-Man is 
the distaff counterpart of Pac-Man, as 
indicated by her hair ribbon, lipstick 


and eyeshadow, and we see them kiss- 
ing in minimalist cutscenes between 
levels, but... well, she’s not missus Pac- 
Man; her chosen form of address clear- 
ly indicates unmarried status. Yet she 
and Mad Magazine’s 1982 Man of the 
Year share the same last name. Is she 
his cousin? His sister? His DAUGHTER?! 
That shit’s just wrong. It was suggested 
that perhaps the name is just a coinci- 
dence, that the two met and fell in 
love in some sort of name-based line- 
up, but... well, that shit’s wrong, too; 
people with the same last name should 
not be makin’ out, ever. Her game is 
way better than her brother/lover’s, 
though, if you can get over the fact the 
ghosts look like little dinks. (I couldn’t.) 


Golden Axe 

Some evil dude named 
Death=Adder killed various relatives of 
heroes Axe=Battler, Tyris=Flare and 
Gilius=Thunderhead, and this multi- 
player fantasy action game chronicles 
their bloody quest to kick his ass for it 
and learn about life, love and the dif- 


y ference between hyphens and equal 


signs along the way. Nice sound (lots 
of digitized screaming), good graph- 
ics and the ability to ride a variety of 
weird creatures can’t make up for the 


y fact playing Golden Axe feels like wad- 


ing through syrup. Fuck, your dudes 
are slow—| hurt my hand pushing the 
joystick hard, trying to somehow will 
Axe=Battler to haul ass. 


Twin Cobra 
Raiden, 1942, 1943 and Xevious, 
except with helicopters. Whatever. 


Magic Sword 

Another fantasy fighter, this time 
side-scrolling. The big gimmick here is 
that as your dudes fight their way up 
this big evil skeleton-filled tower, they 
get to bust a bunch of other dudes out 
of prison, and these freed prisoners 
then join up and fight alongside their 
heroic rescuers, using their various 
magics and weapons to more efficiently 
clear away the enemy cannon fodder. 
My question is, what do these sword- 
swinging chumps imagine they'll be 
able to do against an evil wizard (or 
whatever) who's a bad enough ass to 
put, like, 700 ninjas in jail? © 


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JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Continued from page 4 


operated entirely by HIV-positive 
individuals. “HIV Edmonton is an 
AIDS service organization, while Liv- 
ing Positive is a membership soci- 
ety,” Schatz said days prior to the 
new insurance deal. “If they close 
HIV Edmonton, it would take away 
my opportunity to connect quicker 
with doctors and social workers— 
community services. They do refer- 
rals, too, for counseling. The 
hard-to-reach, transient popula- 
tion—that’s who HIV Edmonton 
works with right now.” 


SOLVING THE insurance impasse has 
taken care of the agency’s most 
immediate problem, but the outlook 
is still grim. Funding from govern- 
ment for non-profit agencies like 
HIV Edmonton has not kept up with 
cost increases. 

Gord Forbey, a speaker and peer 
educator with Living Positive, was 
pessimistic about HIV Edmonton 
finding insurance. “I and the other 
900 people like me, or probably 70 
per cent of them, would have to 
find services elsewhere,” he said. He 
cited Red Deer and Calgary as likely 
destinations. 

The services offered by HIV 
Edmonton aren't frills to its clients. 
“People need services,” Forbey says. 
“It’s not an option once you get this 
virus. It’s not like the virus is going 
away.” A wave of cynical laughter 
shoots through the Living Positive 
office at Forbey’s comment. “What- 
ever we had morally in the last 30 
or 40 years we’ve lost,” he says, 
“whether it be to technology or 
something else.” 


THERE WAS A BUSTLE in both offices 
last week. Clients walked in and out of 
HIV Edmonton, asking for everything 
from bus tickets to counseling. Staff 
were doing their rounds at Living Pos- 
itive with a sort of forced ease, tying 
down for a monsoon with furtive, 
questioning glances. 

The plight of somebody with HIV 
is effectively described on a handbill 


I'm given: a thirty- or fortysomething 
man with sharp blue eyes, chin rested 
on his hands, staring straight at you. 
The caption: “Because of HIV, Jim's 
landlord tried to evict him. Don’t add 
to his isolation.” 

Forbey describes a common reac- 
tion to an HIV-positive diagnosis: “I’m 
going to die—and you go nuts. And 
then about a year later, when you're so 
far in the hole you’re never going to 
get out, you realize you're going to live 
for another 10 or 15 years.” On this 
day, Forbey woke up sick. He shows 
me his tongue. It’s covered with a 
thick, brown film. “Yeast,” he says. 
“Nothing you can do about it.” He 
speaks quietly, with a firm, husky 
drawl, ballcap pulled close to his eyes. 


“THIS IS A NORTH AMERICAN 
phenomena,” says Catherine 
Hedlin, the executive director of the 
Alberta Association of Services for 
Children and Families. She’s speak- 
ing about the funding cutbacks that 
are affecting many of the province’s 
non-profits, including HIV Edmon- 
ton. “The government says, ‘We’ve 
thrown all this money at this prob- 
lem. Why hasn’t it gone away? Why 
should we put more money in, 
because the poverty’s still here. 
We've thrown this money at poor 
people and they’re still here.’ So you 
get government wanting to know 
what they’re buying and often with 
social programs, we can’t see results 
that quickly.” 

Poverty can be solved—in theo- 
ry, anyway. HIV cannot, and agen- 
cies like HIV Edmonton fall prey to 
governments nationwide who are 
calling more and more for account- 
ability. “They give a dollar, they 
want to know exactly what they 
received for that dollar,” says 
Hedlin. “Can you show them, for 
example, that HIV prevention pro- 
grams in schools are, in fact, effec- 
tive? ‘Give us proof,’ they say.” 

An HIV awareness explosion in 
the early 1990s has slowed to the 
point where the goal of some cam- 
paigns is simply reminding us that 
the problem hasn’t gone anywhere. 
“Government is changing the way it 
funds non-profits,” Hedlin says. “It 


design 


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has turned away from long-term, 
operational funding to a lot of short- 
term; project-based endeavours, and 
that has certainly had a big impact. 
It’s very hard to plan or operate on a 
long-term basis if all of your money 
is for a year or 18 months.” 

The move to increased account- 
ability is meant to appease taxpayers. 
“Every time there’s an incident, like 
the HRDC scandal where allotted 
money was used for a cruise, there start 
to be more and more rules for every- 
one,” says Hedlin. “And you start get- 


ting tighter and tighter in the way you 
do things.” Another problem, accord- 
ing to Hedlin, is that all levels of gov- 
ernment are downloading 
responsibility—federal to provincial, 
provincial to municipal. “And the 
charities,” she says, “everyone is down- 
loading responsibilities to them.” 


FOR ALL THE hullabaloo about 
HIV Edmonton being an insurance 
risk, for its dispensaries and the 
possibility of needles lying around 
the premises, its offices are so 


Attention 
A-Channel Advertisers... 


many others in the city. I stalked 
around outside the front of the 
building and didn’t see anything 
out of the ordinary. 

“I’m not sure why insurers think 
that an HIV clinic is high-risk,” says 
McKibben. “There might be some 
lack of understanding, like that con- 
versation on the CBC where the 
interviewer asked the insurer, ‘Well, 
do you think people are going to get 
HIV as soon as they enter the door?’ 
And the insurer responded, ‘Well, 
something like that.’” © 


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VUEWEEKLY QQ January 22-28, 2004 


If God is dead, then Hitler must he killed 


Local pastor, new 
documentary ~— 
explain the life of 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer 


By BRENDAN PROCE 


04. Dr. Bruce Miller’s office, 
Divverson vee United Church, 
Edmonton. Clean-cut and garbed 
in black, Miller is a longtime pastor of 
the church and an occasional instruc- 
tor at the University of Alberta. He 
speaks calmly and clearly in his siz- 
able office, sunlight drilling through 
the blinds from the quiet daytime 
street outside. He shows me a book, 
written by Eberhard Bethge, the best 
friend and biographer of theologian 
and pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer. 
1945. The war clearly lost, the 
order comes down through the Ger- 
man military. Dietrich Bonhoeffer is 
shipped from a German prison to a 
concentration camp, where he is court- 
martialed. Witnesses say he provided 
no defense for himself. He is stripped 
naked and hanged at the gallows. 
1939. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, in dan- 
ger, boards a ship from Europe to 
America to teach at the Union Theo- 
- logical Seminary in New York. He stays 
only a short time, feeling his duty is in 
Germany, but before leaving he meets 
Eberhard Bethge, a student. 
1967. Union Theological Semi- 


nary, New York. Eberhard Bethge, 
now a visiting professor, meets grad- 
uate student Bruce Miller. Today, 
Miller is considered a local expert 
on Bonhoeffer. 

“Astounding that a Christian 
theologian and pastor would be 
involved in a resistance movement 
and espouse violence to kill Hitler,” 
says Miller. “Before the war, he was 
interested in Gandhi.” 


=| DOCUMENTARY 


It will all come together on Janu- 
ary 24, when Edmonton’s Pathways 
Centre presents the new documen- 
tary Bonhoeffer at the Provincial 
Museum of Alberta. 


BONHOEFFER WAS BORN on Febru- 
ary 4, 1906, 10 minutes after his twin 
sister Sabine. Despite a relatively secu- 
lar upbringing, he studied theology in 
Berlin and received his doctorate at 
21. A proponent of the “God is dead” 
movement, an idea first proposed by 
Friedrich Nietzsche (who received his 
doctorate at 24), Bonhoeffer believed 
that the traditional God was dead and 
that Christians killed him. He 
believed that Christians had to go 
beyond the traditional metaphysical 
view of God and onto something else. 

“Bonhoeffer made the transition 
from theologian to man of action— 
and how can we not but admire 


that?” asks Miller. “He risked his life, 
sacrificed his life, for his people.” 
Germany was a fragile place in 
the 1930s, wracked by massive 
unemployment, inflation and low 


civic pride. Hitler’s ascension to ,.. 


power was slow and democratic, 
promising hope for Germany and 


ideas, according to Bonhoeffer,” says 


Miller. “Ideas need to be translated 
into action, concrete social action, 
change. Or else they're meaningless. 

- “The view of God as all powerful 


its people. When he labeled the 7 


Jews the country’s scapegoat, Bon- 
hoeffer was one of the first to 
speak out. “He stood up for free- 
dom, for basic human rights,” 
Miller says, “and he was silenced, 
like a lot of people speaking out in 
the 1930s.” 

After Hitler assumed leadership 
of the country in 1933, much of 
the church, in a bout of self-preser- 
vation, acceded to his reign. Bon- 
hoeffer, however, joined a 
resistance to remove Hitler, despite 
his being an outspoken pacifist. 
Several attempts to kill Hitler failed 
and eventually Bonhoeffer and fel- 
low resisters were jailed. While in 
prison, he began work on Ethics, a 
book which was completed posthu- 
mously with the assistance of 
Bethge. Bethge was also the recipi- 
ent of most of Bonhoeffer’s corre- 
spondence from prison, in the last 
year of his life. 


BONHOEFFER ESSENTIALLY sacri- 


ficed his life when he decided to leave ° 


his safe haven in New York in 1939. 
“Christianity was not just a bunch of 


DIETRICH 
BONHOEFFE 
A Biography 


: 
EBERHARD BETHGE 


had to go,” Miller continues, “consid- 
ering how many people lost their lives 
in World War II. So the question is, 
according to Bonhoeffer, if you still 
believe in that omnipotent, all-power- 
ful God, where is that God? So one 


has to shift one’s view of God, quite 
radically, in a different direction. So 
Bonhoeffer focused on the idea that 
to make presence of who God is, we 
have to live for other people.” 

The film, directed by Martin 
Doblmeier features interviews 
with Bethge, Archbishop 
Desmond Tutu and historians and 
theologians such as John de 
Gruchy and Geffrey Kelly. Shot in 
the U.S. and Germany, it also fea- 
tures rare archival footage, includ- 
ing a speech by Hitler praying for 
God’s blessing on him and the 
German people. 

“Right now, we're in the midst 
of a right-wing revival,” Miller 
says. “I think that’s going to 
change. Technology and science 
are here to stay. Just the milieu we 
live in is going to force us to ask 
the same kind of radical questions 
that Bonhoeffer asked. I think the 
death of God theology will come 
back. Bonhoeffer would’ve 
become one of the greatest 20th- 
century theologians, had he lived. 
But still, he asked the questions 
which set the agenda for the the- 
ology of the 20th century.” © 


Tickets to the January 24 screening of 
Bonhoeffer are available at Robertson- 
Wesley United Church, Temple Beth 
Ora Synagogue and Laurie 
Greenwoods’ Volume II. 


KEYNO 


Monday, January 26 
Myer Horowitz Theatre, SUB 
12:00 — 1:30 pm 


BUILDING 
SUSTAINABLE 
PEACE 


7 Melissa Labonte, Brown University | 
: Dr. Andy Knight 
& Dr. Tom Keating, 
U of A Department of Political Science 


The reconstruction of Afghanistan, 
Liberia, Sierra Leone and a host of 
war-torn states has post-conflict 
peacebuilding at the centre stage of 
international politics. 


What role can we play in advancing 
sustainable peace and human 
security in war ravaged states? 


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WUEWEEKLY QQ JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


SS a 


LL 


Kicking Hors 


Bear in mind the 
environment as you 
ride up the gondola 


By BOBBI BARBARICH 


humans are lucky to be at what 
Weer: call “the top of the food 
chain.” We have the ability, but 
perhaps not the right, to command 
our environment, shaping it to satisfy 
our needs and interests, creating beau- 
tiful and magnificent inventions for 
our comfort and desires. We use the 


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out a word of protest from Mother 
Nature. Sometimes we abuse this abili- 
ty. And then we have to scramble to 
save what's left of what She has. 

The Kicking Horse Ski Resort is 
located 15 kilometres up the road 
(literally, it seems) from Golden in 
eastern British Columbia. Imagine a 
ski resort with 2,750 acres of terrain, 
1,260 vertical metres and average 
summit snowfalls of 700 centime- 
tres. It arguably has the best powder 
in North America and is one of the 
best resorts for steeps. Mountain bik- 
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skiers and snowboarders can frolic 
all winter. But we didn’t create this. 
Kicking Horse has been dubbed 
“the best mountain you’ve never 
heard of” by Sports Illustrated Women 
and “the best thing to happen to 
North American skiing in decades” 
by Skier magazine. But the resort is 
gearing up to become a lot more 
expansive. The mouritain guide who 
happened to be in our gondola 
cheerily offered us some local 
insight into this planned $100 mil- 
lion project. Condominium con- 
struction at the bottom of the hill 
and billboard-sized ads for real estate 


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around the parking lots illustrated 
his point. “We're really excited 
about Kicking Horse,” he smiled. 
“We've got so much to offer here 
and so much space.” 

Lotking around, one would have 
to agree. We pass through low-lying 
cloud cover on the 15-minute gondo- 
la ride to the top of the mountain and 
I hold back gasps of awe and amaze- 
ment. The mountain face is extreme 
and aggressive. Jagged rock and 
bulging cliffs covered in champagne 
powder invite you to test your skills 
and courage, but they also command 
respect. This is no beginner hill. 


PRIME SPOT 


At the top, you have three choices. 
Two of them are steep bowls. The 
other is a narrow green run flanked by 
out-of-bounds markers made of flimsy 
ribbon (which would not hold an 
uncontrolled skier) and the CPR Ridge. 
The run winds its way all the way to 
the bottom of the hill for a total of 10 
kilometres. But this beginner run is 
not for the weak at heart. My partner 
Colin summed it up: “If you screw up 
on this run, you're fucked!” 

He's right. A missed turn would 
send you careening into a steep bowl 


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* Fog lights * Roof rack systems * 16" aluminum alloy wheels * AM/FM weather band CO * 6-way power 

adjustable driver's seat » Heatet! front seats * Rear seats (60/40 split) * And much more - 


OUTBACK 


ut 
Fi 
B 


Local 
Rabbit Hill - 60cm base, 5cm of new snow, all runs in operation 
Snow Valley - 60cm base, 5cm of new snow, all lifts open 


Alberta 
Castle Mt. - 64-160cm base, 5cm of new snow, all lifts and 57 runs open 
C.O.P - 85cm base, Ocm of new snow, all lifts open 
~ | Fortress - 69cm base, 2cm of new snow, 5/5 lifts open 
|) | Lake Louise - 80-131cm base, Ocm of new snow, all lifts open 
Marmot Basin - 54cm base, 6cm of new snow, 7 lifts and 75/84 runs open 
Mt. Norquay - 93-120cm base, Ocm of new snow, 5/5 lifts and 28/28 runs open 
Nakiska - 63cm of new snow, Ocm of new snow, 5/6 lifts and 32/32 runs open 
Sunshine - 110cm base, 9cm of new snow, all lifts and 96 runs open 


B.C. 

Apex - 124cm base, 67/67 trails and 5/5 lifts open 

Big White - 144cm base, 105/112 trails and 12/13 lifts open 

Chrystal Mt - 124cm base, 3/3 lifts and 24/24 trails open 

Fernie - 192cm base, 10cm of new snow, 9/10 lifts and 106/107 runs open 
Fairmont - 2cm of new snow, 13/13 trails open 

Kicking Horse - 118cm base, 5cm of new snow, 4/5 lifts open 

Kimberley - 90cm base, 3cm of new snow, 6 lifts and 75/75 runs open 

Mt Washington - 233cm base, 50/50 trails and 7/8 lifts open 

Panorama - 84cm base, 3cm of new snow, 9/9 lifts and 115/119 runs open 
Powder King - 254cm base, 24/24 trails open 

Powder Springs - 145cm base, 54cm of new snow, all lifts and 26/26 trails open 
Red Mountain - 151cm base, 2cm of new snow, 4/5 lifts open 

Silver Star - 121¢m base, Ocm of new snow, 106/107 trails and 11/11 lifts open 
Sun Peaks - 111cm base, cm of new snow, 10/10 lifts and 117/117 trails open 
Whistler Blackcomb - 162cm base, 33/33 runs and 200/200 trails open 
Whitewater - 180cm base, 4cm of new snow, all lifts open 


U.S.A. 

Big Mt - 147cm base, 8cm of new snow, 8 lifts open 

Big Sky - 172cm base, 7cm of new snow, 17/18 lifts and 140/150 trails open 
49 Degrees - 129cm base, 10cm of new snow, 52 runs open 

Great Divide Ski Area - 101cm base, 80/139 trails and 4/6 lifts open 
Lookout Pass - 176cm base, 10cm of new snow, 3/3 lifts and 23 runs open 
Mt Spokane - 106cm base, Ocm of new snow, 44 runs open 

Schweitzer Mt - 134cm base, Ocm of new snow, 6 lifts open 

Silver Mt- 144cm base, 5cm of new snow, 6/7 lifts open 

Sun Valley - 162cm base, Ocm of new snow, 19/19 lifts open 


All conditions accurate as of Jan 21, 2004 


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Kicking Horse 


Continued from previous page 


or over the edge of the ridge, which 
runs between two peaks that mark 
Kicking Horse's boundaries. As Colin 
gingerly picked his way down the 
tun, I stopped for a photo op, one of 
a possible million in this breathtak- 
ing mountain range overlooking the 
Columbia River valley. The little sign 
stating “cliff” bemused me. As if I 
couldn’t figure that out for myself. 

When you’re faced with an 
immense amount of almost incon- 
ceivable beauty, you have to think 
about your smallness amidst it all. 
But it also makes you remember that 
you're standing on a mountaintop, 
wearing a board on your feet like 
thousands of other people, and that 
it took some sacrifices to get you 
there. You didn’t get to that moun- 
taintop to see that view or cruise 
through that snow without wound- 
ing part of what makes you want to 
be there. Trees had to be ripped 
down and habitats were impinged, 
no matter how environmentally con- 
scious the developers were. 

The gondola ride here carries you 
over a One-acre fenced-in area, in 
which there is a small hut. Inside the 
hut, Cari and Boo are hibernating. 
This is the Kicking Horse Grizzly Bear 
Refuge—a research, education and 
conservation centre where Cari and 
Boo have been living since last sum- 
mer. The mother of these young griz- 
zly bears was illegally shot and killed 
by a man outside Quesnel, B.C. on 
June 4, 2002. 


THIS IS THE LARGEST enclosed griz- 
zly bear refuge in the world. It is also 
an important step towards develop- 
ing a protocol to rehabilitate 
orphaned grizzlies. There is current- 
ly no protocol and bears are usually 
held in captivity when orphaned. 
The area expands to 22 acres in the 
summer to let the bears roam, giving 
wildlife professionals the ability to 
work on expanding the grizzly bear 
rehabilitation project in B.C. Estab- 


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lished in June 2003, one year after 
Cari and Boo’s mom was killed, the 
Kicking Horse Grizzly Bear Refuge 
proclaims to be “committed to 
becoming a world leader in the 
preservation of grizzly bears.” Griz- 
zly bears are currently on the blue 
list for endangered species in B.C. 
The blue list was created to provide 
early warnings of those North Amer- 
ican species undergoing population 
or range reductions. Grizzly bears 
are on the list because of drastic loss- 
es of habitat in B.C. 

As I was enjoying the runs at the 
resort, I contemplated the fenced-in 
area. A big-time bear-lover, I was 
touched by the effort Kicking Horse 
has made to preserve the grizzly 
population. I came home and read 
further about Cari and Boo’s plight 
on the Kicking Horse website. Then 
it kicked me: I am taking part in Cari 
and Boo’s habitat destruction. So are 
the highways to get there, the sub- 
urbs that house the ski enthusiasts 
and the plants that manufacture our 
equipment. 

I am not dissing Kicking Horse, 
or any other resort or ski hill. Most 
developers are environmentally 
aware, whether by law or con- 
science. Many outdoor adventurers 
are as doting for the environment as 
they are for their children. But we 
must acknowledge that it is due to 
our expansion, our intrusion, that 
bears like Cari and Boo are forced to 
live in an enclosure, no matter how 
ahead of the world the rehabilita- 
tion protocol is. 

When I sat down to write this 
story, I did not know what would 
come out on paper. Environmental 
impacts are an aspect of this sport 
I've rarely considered carefully. Yet 
this is an opportunity for me to con- 
gratulate Kicking Horse for their 
environmental awareness, as well as 
for their superb snow and superior 
steeps—which, by the way, are not 
theirs to command. But it has also 
become a time for me to ponder 
where my participation fits into how 
Cari and Boo are living. O 


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VUEWEEKLY QP) JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


at a en ee 


Nakisha 


By CAROL MIYAGAWA 


cried as we slid off the Bronze 

chair at Nakiska, Canada’s 
Olympic mountain, for our second 
warm-up run of the morning. Manna 
fell from the heavens on the chosen 
people below as we made our way, 
appropriately, down the Blizzard run. 
For Nakiska, a resort that relies heavi- 
ly on the man-made stuff, any natur- 
al snow must be welcomed like a gift 
from the Snow God. 

When my husband and I pulled 
into the parking lot earlier in the day, 
it had been the Monsoon God ham- 
mering the roof. “Oh, great,” I 
moaned. “We're going to be skiing in 
rain.” But by the time we'd snagged 
our lift tickets and were ready to ski, 
the wet stuff was turning into pebbly 
snow at the base of the mountain. 
Streaks of moisture flooded the lenses 
of my goggles and I began thinking it 
was high time someone invented 
mini-wipers to swish away those 
annoying drops. Better yet, ski goggles 
could come with miniature squeegees 
small enough to fit in your pocket. 

Things could’ve been worse, 
though. At least I had goggles with 
lenses. Harvey had grabbed some gog- 
gles before leaving our Calgary 
house—the ones without lenses. 
Remember kids: check your equipment 
before you leave home. Speaking of 
equipment, I'd forgotten how easy it is 
to get ready for a downhill ski trip. Last 
winter I mostly cross-country skied 
and was used to gathering a trunkload 
of gear: skis, poles, boots, wax, snacks, 
lunch, water, thermos, extra clothes, 
flashlight, matches, first aid kit and dry 
socks for the drive home. 

I was relaxed and feeling down- 
right lazy as we set off for Nakiska, the 


| comes the snow!” our liftie 


closest mountain to Calgary, with our 
minimal gear, just skis, poles, boots 
and a backpack. A grey band of cloud 
hung over the mountain ridges to our 
left as we headed west. Yet just across 
the valley, the south-facing rocks were 
suffused in sun. Unfortunately, we 
were heading straight into the mist. 
The wind picked up as we hit the turn- 
off to Highway 40, the main thorough- 
fare through Kananaskis Country. 


We landed at Nakiska on their 
opening weekend, their best season 
opening in 10 years in terms of natur- 
al snow and their earliest opening 
date in three years. Snow conditions 
were perfect in the morning as I skied 
the runs off the Silver and Olympic 
chairs—just enough snow to allow 
my edges to dig in, but not so much 
that I had to plough through uneven 
patches or edge-catching drifts. 

Nakiska is my kind of hill. Blue, 
blue and more blue everywhere you 
look. In fact, 70 per cent of the runs 
cater to laid-back skiers like me. The 
other 30 per cent is evenly split 
between the vertical challengers and 
the snowplow crowd. 

When lunchtime rolled around, 
it was still snowing heavily and the 
thought of tackling the black dia- 
mond runs off the Gold chair was 
about as appealing as being stuck in 
traffic during a Calgary rush hour. 
Instead, I sent Harvey up to battle 
the elements like the true Olympian 
he is. I headed toward the Finish 
Line Lounge for a prearranged meet- 
ing with Brett Bratten, the group 
and corporate event co-ordinator for 
the Resorts of the Canadian Rockies, 
the company that owns Nakiska. 


By COLIN CATHREA 


Try before you buy 


How do you know which set of skis to 
buy? Or which skis to test drive? How 
the heck are you supposed to keep up 
with constantly changing ski shapes? 
And what's the difference between par- 
abolic skis and carving skis anyway? 

Last question first. (It’s the simplest 
one to answer.) They all mean the 
same thing, really. | like to refer to 
them all as “shaped” skis. You know— 
they have some, er, nice curves. 

As for test drives, most local ski 
shops and ski areas offer demo pack- 
ages for people to try. Usually they‘re 
Packages of three or four different types 
of skis, and often they'll take the rental 
Price off the purchase price if you 


decide to buy. | recommend testing a 
few different lengths and models before 
you buy. Here are a couple of tips for 
you to consider. Follow these easy sug- 
gestions and you might just buy the 
right skis for your level and ability. 

¢ Put yourself through a routine 
every time you test skis. Try to ski each 
type of ski the same way on the same 
runs. Start with short radius turns, for 
example, and then work your way up to 
longer radius turns. Try them at different 
speeds and in different snow conditions. 

* Try to feel the “initiation” of the 
ski, how easily it enters a turn when tip 
pressure is applied. Also, once your 
turn is initiated, pay attention to how 
quickly it’s completed. Do you feel 
acceleration out of the turn before 
entering into the next one? 

¢ Ask yourself the following ques- 
tions. Is the ski agile? How well does 
the ski react to directional changes? Is 
it easy to turn? How forgiving is the ski 
in moguls, providing you ski moguls? 
How well does the ski absorb or steer 
through the troughs? 

* Try to determine how well the ski 
performs on groomed runs. Is it fast, how 
does it react and is it slow to initiate? 

Follow these tips and you just might 
get more bang for your ski bucks. @ 


Catering to laid-back skiers, 
this is the hill for me 


“When Nakiska was built for the 
Olympics in 1988,” Bratten told me, 
“they put in the best snowmaking 
system of the time. It’s still one of 
the best in North America.” This 
year, the resort has increased its 
snowmaking ability by 40 per cent 
with a $100,000 investment in new 
snowmaking guns. 

After quite some time, Harvey 
joined us with his report: a blizzard 
at the top. I was glad I’d followed 
my instincts. As we munched—the 
best veggieburger I’ve ever had—the 
skies cleared and the mountain was 
soon anointed with sun. We headed 
out for more skiing and decided to 
try the powder under the Silver 
quad. Not having skied powder 
snow for some time, I had to relearn 
the basics: sit back on your skis and 


let the deep snow slow your momen- 
tum. From the powder, we veered off 
to ski Lower North Axe, groomed to 
corduroy-smooth perfection, just 
like my skiing. By the time we called 
it a day, though, the fresh snow was 
hard, my tired legs were soft and my 


ability to fall down was perfect 

Cooler air drifted over the moun- 
tainside. The sky turned a dusky 
blue. And I went home to dream 
about goggles with mini-wipers and 
squeegees, and how to become rich 
by inventing them. © 


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Onboard 
Movies Gettin’ jibby with it 

If you’ve ever asked yourself what this 

mysterious thing called “jibbing” is all 

about, well, here, finally, is your 
Self-Serve answer. Jibbing is the act of riding on 
Galley anything other than snow with your 


board. For instance, rails, trees, 
garbage cans or logs. 

For some, jibbing is the ultimate 
forum for showmanship. There are no 
judges or timers. It’s black and white— 
either you make a rail or you don’t. You 
don’t need tons of snow or a huge 
mountain to access jibs, either. They're 
everywhere, from local snowboard 
parks to the tightest woods run to 
school playgrounds, even downtown in 
your favourite (or least favourite) city. 

There are two basic jibbing medi- 
ums: wood and metal. Wooden rails 
come in all shapes and sizes, from the 
gentle park bench to a giant, natural- 
arched rainbow in the forest. Generally, 
wood is slower and stickier, making 
board slides more difficult. Wood is 
also scarier due to the fact that it’s soft- 
er, which means you can hook and 

“ edge a lot easier. When beginning on 
wood, it’s best to find something you 
can ride directly onto without having 
to ollie (i.e., obtain air without a jump 
by lifting your front foot and then your 
rear foot as you spring off of the tail). 

Set up for the log by taking a 
straight line at it, starting at least 10 
feet away. As you ride up on the jib, 
shift your weight backward with your 
hips to prevent a ride over the handle- 
bars, so to speak. Once on the log, 
concentrate on the log’s end and hold 
on for the ride. Always concentrate on 
the end of the slide. If you look to the 
left or right, your board will follow. 
Then, after you’ve completed a few 


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simple grinds and feel comfortable on 
wood, start going for longer slides. 

Metal is the opposite of wood—it’s 
both unforgiving and fast. Metal rails 
are better for learning and are in 
almost every snowboard park and in 
every shape you can think of. When 
first trying to do rails, do a 50/50 first 
(slide with the board parallel to the 
rail). After a 50/50, try a board slide 
(with the rail between your bindings). 
Boardslides are more difficult for grind- 
ing because they’re so narrow. 

The key to boardsliding a metal rail 
is to find the balance point of the 
board, both edge-to-edge and tip-to- 
tail. Lean too far forward on your toe 
edge and you'll dive; lean too far over 
your heel edge and you'll wash out. The 
key is to stay square over your board. 

Start out slowly with a flat bar or a 
short staircase and work your way up. 
To boardslide a rail, line up parallel to 
it. As you approach, ollie up above the 
rail and turn your board. Once on the 
rail, focus on the end with your weight 
equal and your shoulders over your 
toes. When first starting out, try doing 
a boardslide on a flat rail. 

Jibbing isn’t all fun and games, 
though, and getting in over your head 
will probably result in painful conse- 
quences. It can ruin your board and 
your body. You can’t be afraid of crash- 
ing, because you will—and it will hurt. 
Natural progression is the path to jib- 
bing success. Start off small and work 
your way up. Sliding rails and jibbing 
might not be for everyone, but neither 
are 30-minute lift lines and $50 
cheeseburgers.O 


James Radke is the full-time, on-hill 
snowboard and ski coordinator at 
Calgary's Canada Olympic Park 
(www. canadaolympicpark.ca). 


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VUEWEEKLY 2 JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


0 Se ee ee 
Nurse of the carving class 


Tips from an expert 
to keep you healthy 
on the hill 


By AMBER BOWERMAN 


boarding mishaps are highly pre- 
dictable and preventable. “People 
usually get hurt during either their 
first run or last run of the day,” 
explains Anna-Maria Kollias, an 
emergency room nurse at Calgary’s 
Foothills Hospital. “When they get 
hurt during the first run, it’s often 
because they’re not stretched or 
warmed up. If they get hurt during 
the last run, it’s usually because 
they’re too tired and they probably 
should have stopped for the day.” 
Kollias, who’s been boarding for 
about six years, has seen her fair 
share of alpine accidents. The Leth- 
bridge native used to volunteer with 
the ski patrol at Castle Mountain, 
patrolling the hill for hazards and 
answering questions about safety. A 
few years ago a close friend of hers 
was paralyzed in a serious snow- 
boarding accident. And come winter, 
there's no shortage of battered skiers 
and boarders crowding the emer- 
gency room where she works. As a 


[ most accidents, ski and snow- 


result, Kollias strongly encourages 
new skiers and boarders to take a les- 
son before hitting the hill on their 
own. But whether you take a lesson 
or jump right in—and even if you're 
an experienced rider—there are some 
easy steps you can take to keep your- 
self healthy and happy on the hill. 


Warm up 

Stretching before you do your 
first run and throughout the season 
will help prevent injuries and 


| [SAFETY 


improve stamina. The Canadian Ski 
Patrol System recommends squats, 
lunges, calf raises, push-ups and 20 
to 30 minutes of cardio exercise mid- 
week to help get you in shape for a 
weekend on the hill. “The main 
thing you want to do is stretch the 
muscles in your legs and arms before 
you go out,” says Kollias. “Focus on 
the muscles you’d use in any other 
intense workout.” 


Dress for success 

Most hills post the “temperature 
at the top” on their websites along 
with a forecast and snow conditions. 
Check first but plan for unexpected 
weather and dress for the worst— 


after all, this is Alberta. “When it’s 
really, really cold, like past -15°C or - 
20°C, you've got to have pretty 
much every part of your body cov- 
ered to avoid frostbite,” says Kollias. 
Dress in light, waterproof and wind- 
proof layers. 


Use your head 

Kollias insists that “everyone 
should wear a helmet when they go 
out on the hill,” regardless of age or 
ability. The Canadian Health Net- 
work stresses the importance of 
wearing a well-fitted helmet with 
side vents so you can hear what's 
going on around you. A typical hel- 
met will set you back about $100, 
but the protection it affords your 
noggin is priceless. Look for a hel- 
met with an expanded polystyrene 
(or EPS) liner—which will absorb the 
impact should you take a nasty tum- 
ble or find yourself on one side of an 
on-hill collision—and a layer of tem- 
perature controlled material like 
CoolMax or Outlast. 


Don’t get burned 

Even on cold, cloudy days, it's 
important to protect exposed skin 
from harmful UV rays. Always wear 
sunscreen on your face. You should 
also invest in a good pair of sun- 
glasses or goggles to protect your 


Ay Soother pe 
sii a 


wen 


eyes. If you opt for the goggles, 
make sure they’re well-ventilated so 
they won't fog up on you. 


Drink up 

Dehydration is one of the last 
things that comes to mind when 
you’re surrounded by snow and ice. 
But with all those layers you'll be 
wearing, the warm winter sun beat- 
ing down on you and the workout 
you'll put your body through, it’s 
important to make up for lost mois- 
ture. Take occasional breaks and 
drink lots of water. You'll have more 
energy and feel better for it at the 
end of the day. 


Recognize the signs 
It’s important to be aware of 


your own abilities and ensure you’re 
not taking foolish risks. It makes 
sense to push your limits a bit to 
improve your skills but no good will 
come from putting yourself in a situ- 
ation you can’t handle. Know the 
difference between a green run and a 
black diamond and know where you 
should and should not ski. 


Ask questions 

There are ski patrols at every ski 
hill whose job it is to help keep you 
safe. “They love your question,” says 
Kollias, speaking from her own expe- 


rience at Castle Mountain. “They’re 
there to help you and you shouldn’t 
be afraid to ask them for informa- 
tion.” Volunteer ski patrols wear 
blue and yellow jackets. The pros 
wear red and black. 


Have fun 

A day on the hill shouldn’t just 
be about how many runs you can 
clock. Skiing and snowbéarding give 
you the perfect opportunity to enjoy 
the great outdoors, spend time with 
friends and get some exercise. Soak it 
all in. “Sit down and take a look 
around you,” says Kollias. “People 


travel from all around the world to 
the Rocky Mountains and we've got 
it in our backyard. Enjoy it. Appreci- 
ate it. It’s good for you.” © 


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The smell of sea-dwelling lifeforms fills 
the air, and the East Coast music in the 
background makes me feel as though 
I’ve been suddenly transported to the 
Rock. I’m searching for the words to 
describe the dining area, a compact 
section featuring artistic depictions of 
fish and unsurprisingly, lighthouses. 
Then it hits me: "rustic oceanic atmos- 
phere." (Okay, so that’s what it says on 
the menu. So sue me.) Speaking of 
menus, I’m loving the Lighthouse’s 
lunch edition. The level of sophistica- 
tion is greater than I’d anticipated, 
what with the red Peruvian trout and 
Cajun prawn pizza. And the dinner 
menu is even more in-depth, featuring 
a list of stuff that makes my mouth 
water—paella, Hawdiian bigeye tuna, 
bouillabaisse and California striped bass 
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And the wine list seems reasonably 
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about $14 or so in the liquor store, so 
Billingsgate obviously isn’t going crazy 
with the markup. Being the soup junkie 
that | am, | start off with a small bow! of 
lobster bisque. The lovely orange mix- 
ture is described as having been pre- 
pared in the traditional French style, 
with cognac, cream and rich lobster 
broth. Topped with some finely 
chopped fresh parsley, it’s incredibly 
flavourful. Rich yes, but it doesn’t weigh 
me down at all, which is good because 
| have a pickerel fillet on the way. 
(Note: you can get a bigger portion of 
the bisque as a meal. | saw one come 
out of the kitchen. Huge.) "That's a 
good choice," the server tells me as | 
order the fish, prepared in a tangerine 
butter and served with green apple rel- 
ish. The large, colourful plate features 
the northern Alberta pickerel, a side of 
rice and a medley of vegetables. Not 
just your cheap, run-of-the-mill veggies, 
either, but a mix of red pepper, snow 
peas, zucchini, cauliflower, broccoli, 
carrots and squash. The pickerel is good 
and tender, the white meat flaking 
apart as you gently prod it with the 
fork. I'm missing something, though. 
And unfortunately, it doesn’t dawn on 
me until later that there was no green 
apple relish on the side. Damn. It 
would've tasted great with the picker- 
el... which is probably why it appears 
on the menu in the first place, right? 
Still, | douse the fish with some lemon 
and it’s just fine. Average Price: $$$ 
(Reviewed 11/13/03) 


EastBouwllnd 


New Japanese Pub / Lunch, 
Dinner 


Late Night Snack 
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PREVIOUSLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS 


82 BBQ AND NOODLE HOUSE 
9118-82 Ave * 448-9988 

With the growing tickle in my throat let- 
ting me know sickness would overtake 
me soon, | decided | needed a big, spicy 
bowl of some type of Asian soup. Steve 
had heard there was a new noodle 
house down Whyte—and it seemed like 
the perfect remedy to the evil brewing 
inside me. The menu is packed with all 
sorts of standard Chinese fare and it’s 
too bad we're just a pair popping in for 
a quick bite because the BBQ duck din- 
ner for four (at what seems like a reason- 
able $65.75) looks tasty. Instead, we 
split a few dishes: the empire chicken, a 
BBQ pork chow mein and, to curb my 
spicy soup craving, a medium-sized 
bowl of the seafood hot and sour con- 
coction. The server brings me a huge 
pot of loose leaf jasmine tea, helping me 
soothe the irritation in my throat prior 
to the main event. The food arrives 
quickly, starting with the soup. This hot 
and sour version has your typical tofu 
and strands of thinly sliced Chinese 
mushrooms, along with peas, shredded 
carrots, calamari and baby shrimp in an 
ultra-thick, almost gelatinous broth. For 
the short while that the soup remained 
hot (temperature-wise), my throat feels 
much better. After getting through a 
bowl or two each, the empire chicken 
and the chow mein arrive. The former, 
served on a small, oval platter with 
breaded chicken chunks, mushrooms, 
green peppers, carrots, water chestnuts, 
baby corns and peanuts, is supposed to 


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VUEWEEKLY [> JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Kush on delivery 


Mebrat serves up 
spicy Eritrean 
cuisine in the heart 
of icebound 
Edmonton 


By MINISTER FAUST 


e intersection of 107th and 
Te in the heart of E-Town is 
the centre of a community com- 
posed of many residents and busi- 
nesses from Sudan, Somalia, 
Ethiopia and Eritrea. I’ve always 
called the neighbourhood Kush, the 
Biblical name for the Horn of Africa. 
Kush and its border regions have 
seen many Ethiopian/Eritrean 
restaurants come and go—some 
great, some not—but whenever I see 
a new one open I've got to try it. I 
fell love with Ethiopian food back 
around 1991 and I’ve made a point 
of sampling it wherever I go, from E- 
Town, Calgary and Vancouver to 
Winnipeg and Washington, D.C. So 
it was only a matter of time before I 
sat down for lunch at Mebrat. 

Mebrat is an unassuming eatery 
with a laid-back Old World atmos- 
phere—restaurant meets communi- 
ty hall. Beneath its purple-tiled 
ceiling, the sea-green walls are dec- 
orated with small Eritrean paint- 
ings; in one corner by the window 
and past a traditional, colourful, 
capped basket is a low dining table 
suggesting a living room more 
than a restaurant, around which 
men dine and laugh. In my corner 
are a mega-TV, a jukebox filled 
with Ethiopian and Eritrean pop 
music and a tabletop coin-op 
videogame. After 10 minutes and 
1S quarters of one young man’s 
beeping, blooping fancy, I wish I’d 
chosen the other corner. 

Eritrea has been its own country 
for more than a decade, but its 
post-independence cuisine is indis- 
tinguishable from Ethiopian to me. 
If you’ve never had it before, Eritre- 
an food is an array of spicy stewed 
vegetables and diced meats served 
on a heavy pancake-bread called 
injera. You don’t use cutlery; 
instead, you tear off strips of injera 
(with your right hand, don’t you 
know) and scoop up the food with 
it. And you and everyone in your 
party dine from the same oversized 
dish. Eating this way is automati- 
cally a communal experience. It’s 
hard to eat from the same plate as 
an enemy; it’s also a great jump- 
Start for a date. Best of all, the 
flavours from the gravies soak into 
the injera, which becomes the edi- 
ble “platter” which you eat last. 
And even if the servings don’t look 
large when they arrive, the injera 
expands in your stomach so you're 
guaranteed to be full. 

We begin with two light salads 
served in what I'd call “salad boats.” 
The preparation is simple and 
tefreshing—diced tomatoes, lettuce, 
oil and a pepper. The real heat is on 
the way, though, so I wish the salad 
had been served on the same platter, 


which is the more common way of 
doing things. We've ordered order a 
vegetarian combination of lentils, 
spinach and cabbage with the 
Mebrat diced beef special. 


WHEN OUR MAIN COURSE arrives, 
I’m impressed by the generous por- 
tions, large enough that we take 
home leftovers, and we’re given 
enough whole wheat injera that we 
never have to ask for more. The 
lentils avoid the typical overcooked 
mushiness, but strangely their 
flavour doesn’t reveal itself to me 


| TRESTAURANTS 


until after I’ve eaten a nuclear 
jalapeno. After that, their firm tex- 
ture presents a surprisingly strong 
nutty flavour. But the real vegetable 
delights are the spinach and cab- 
bage. In my experience, Ethio- 
Eritrean restaurants serve stewed, 
diced kale but not spinach, its close 
relative. Despite some wateriness, 
the spinach’s natural taste is 
intense with butter only as an 
accent, not as language. The cab- 
bage has a welcome firmness to it 
and, like the spinach, its natural 
intensity is assisted by seasonings, 
not impeded by it. 

On the whole, I’d say the veg- 
etables are among the best-pre- 
pared I’ve had in Ethio-Eritrean 


dining, with an emphasis on fresh- 
ness, natural flavour and al dente 
delight; vegetarians and veggocca- 
sionals should feel quite at home at 
Mebrat. Meat-tarians will love the 
Mebrat Special—cubed, spicy-hot 
beef in a savoury sauce that implies 
(without stating) tomatoes. Unfor- 
tunately, Mebrat were out of my 
favourite doro wat or stewed chick- 
en, but the owner later made it up 
to me by refusing to charge me for 
two salads. 

As far as atmosphere goes, 
Mebrat could benefit from better 
lighting. The menu is in Roman 
script English and in Amharic 
script, so unless you ask, you won't 
learn the names of the dishes from 
the page. The breakfast menu on 
the chalkboard next to the kitchen 
features such delectables as meat 
and vegetarian samosas, but unfor- 
tunately they’re not on the lunch 
and dinner menu, which really 
could use a few more items, espe- 
cially some desserts. The sizable 
meals are cheap; had we been 
charged for salad, our bill would've 
been only $25, including the must- 
have spiced tea of cloves and cinna- 
mon essence. I intend to go back 
for the stewed chicken, and I’ve def- 
initely got to try me one of those 
breakfast samosas. 


MEBRAT ETHIOPIAN RESTAURANT 
111, 10603-107 Ave * 424-9929 


An Informative Presentation, Forum & Documentary 
Film Screening on the Iraqi Adopt-a-Town Project... 


Rebuilding 
lraq .. 


The 
Kick-Off 
toa 
Series of 
Special 
Benefit 
Concerts! 


One Town ata 
Time 


Wednesday, January 27 @ 7:30 pm 
Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq. 
FREE ADMISSION! (DONATIONS WELCOME) 


Learn about the redevelopment initiatives of Edmonton's 
adopted town of Al-Mutayha, an Iraq region devastated by two 
decades of war and sanctions, including a short documentary. 


Featuring Special Guest Speakers: 
Usama Al-Shiraida Adopt-a-Town Project 
Julie Hrdlicka Canada, Democracy & Int’l Law (CANDIL) 
Maicoim Azania, CJSR's Minister Faust and NDP Candidate 
for Edmonton-Strathcona Federal 2004 


Co-sponsored by the Edmonton Public Library (Stanley A. Milner Branch), 
Vue Weekly, CJSR, Project Ploughshares (Edmonton), Industrial Workers of the 
World (IWW), Edmonton Copy & Print, the Edmonton Coalition Against War & 
Racism (ECAWAR) & the Edmonton Small Press Association (ESPA) 
Info:<aaron.wilson@telus.net> or (780) 474-3869 / wwwliferelief.org 


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DISH WEEKLY 


be spicy. (It had the little red chilis 
beside the name on the menu, for 
Crissakes.) It’s good, yes, but provides lit- 
tle in the way of a kick. | have to be hon- 
est—I wasn’t too impressed with the 
chow mein platter, either. The amount 
of BBQ pork amongst the bok choy and 
other veggies looks scant and upon fur- 
ther digging, we find our initial assess- 
ment to be correct. | did like the crunchy 
noodles, however, a nice contrast to the 
rest of the dish. Average Price: $ 
(Reviewed 01/08/04) 


MILL CREEK CAFE 

9562-82 Ave * 439-5535 

Other than a bevy of nice-looking 
sweets and baked goods, sandwiches 
are pretty much the order of the day at 
Mill Creek Café. Kate orders the Mon- 
treal smoked meat sandwich, while | 
eventually get around to choosing the 
salmon salad. Then come the ques- 
tions. "Swiss, cheddar or cream 
cheese?" the counter girl asks. Kate says 
Swiss, | say cream. "Tomato, cucumber 


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and sprouts?" Yup. "Pickles?" Sure. 
"Hot, honey or Dijon mustard?" Kate 
Says yes to the former and after a bit of 
deliberation, | pass, figuring there’s no 
need to add mustard to the salmon. 
"Mayo and butter?" Neither. Mill Creek 
bakes everything fresh each day and as 
| attempt to wrap my mouth around 
the massive slices of grainy whole 
wheat bread with pieces of carrot in it, | 
think to myself that it looks awfully 
inviting. | had taken note of the fact 
that Kate asked for hot mustard and | 
patiently awaited her reaction. Sure 
enough, it came. "Whoa," she says after 
the first or second bite. It’s actually real- 
ly hot stuff—1 try a nibble and some of 
the mustard actually burns a small nick 
on my lip. These sandwiches are huge 
and because baked goods are in our 
immediate future, we pack up the 
remainders and head back to the 
counter. This time, I’m only slightly 
more decisive—a piece of chocolate 
cherry loaf (a mere buck and change) 
and a slice of lemon meringue pie, 
though the chocolate peanut butter 
bars were crying out at me. Average 
Price: $ (Reviewed 12/04/03) 


SMOKEY JOE’S HICKORY 
SMOKEHOUSE 

15135 Stony Plain Road o 413-3379 

| figure—er, | mean, | reckon—Smokey 
Joe’s was conceived as a replica of old- 
fashioned prairie cuisine, or at least an 
homage to it. License plates from all 
over the continent dot the walls and 
the menu, bound in wood, has head- 
ings like "Samwiches" and "Young Un’s 
Dinners." The ranch theme is a little 
schmaltzy but for a guy soon to vacate 
the province, it’s enough to bring a 


9261-34 Avenue 
450-3330 


GINSENG. 


RESTAURANT 


Daily 5:00 pm 10:00 pm 
M-F 11:30 am - 2:00 pm 
Weekend Reservations Recommended 


small tear to my eye. The coolest thing 
has to be the pink butcher paper they 
use for tablecloths—that’s a nice 
touch. My comedic dining buddy 
Steve is along for this trail ride and he 
busts a gut when he spots the veg- 
gieburger on the menu. "I bet you it's 
never been ordered," he says. Well, 
neither of us are gonna be the first so 
instead, we put all our eggs in one 
high-cholesterol basket: the sampler 
for two. It includes, in no particular 
order, two roasted quarter chickens, 
pork ribs, turkey, ham, beef and two of 
Smokey Joe’s famous ultra-hot wings. 
Oh, and garlic toast. "We’re out of 
wings tonight so I'll give you another 
quarter chicken. Is that okay?" our host 
asks. Deal! You get your choice of three 
sides with the sampler so Steve and | 
agree on cornbread, beans and potato 
salad. | don’t notice much green any- 
where in the restaurant so we see no 
sense in having any on our plate. Back 
a century ago, a cowboy wouldn’t 
have been clamouring for a side salad, 
right? | swear there's a strained look on 
our server’s face as she lugs out the 
plate with what Steve refers to as "a 
pile of meat" on it. "There, go wild," 
she says. All of the homemade barbe- 
cue sauces are lined up in front of us— 
Smokey Joe’s sells them on the 
premises, along a variety of the meats, 
including jerky—and it’s time to get to 
work. On this snowy, frigid night, the 
platter gives me a much-needed dose 
of summertime. The spicy taste of the 
smoked meats, the richness of the 
beans and the creamy potato salad 
make me forget that it got dark at 4:30 
p.m. that day. Average Price: $$- 
$$$ (Reviewed 12/11/03) ~ 


a 


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’AM)= 2:00 PM 


VUEWEEKLY Ep JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


a 


House music rules at the Standard on Thursdays, and tonight New York City’s 
David Morales comes to teach us all a lesson in the perfect vibe. He was there at 
the Paradise Garage in the beginning, and he’s making next-level party music on 
his upcoming album. Along the way, he’s remixed tracks for every pop star under 
the sun and played every corner of the world. Doors open at 9 p.m. Indie rock 
kids might want to check out the Salteens over at the Sidetrack Café. 


Dance grooves are being dropped by the live group Blue Quarter at Seedy’s, 
while Otis Taylor returns to the blues at Festival Place. Then there’s the smart indie 
rock triple shot at New City, with Champion, Alberta riding on the top of a bill 
that also includes Reverie Sound Revue and All-Purpose Voltage Heroes. In case 
you forgot, Champion, Alberta used to be called the Tom Cruise Missile. 


You could go two ways. You could get down with our cover boy Buck 65 as he 
gets out his beats ‘n’ rhymes at the Powerplant. Or you could hustle into the Side- 
track Café for CJSR’s 20th Anniversary Party, featuring the Dudes, the Faunts and 
Dietzche V. and the Abominable Snowman. Bits of the past, present and future 
there. Show starts at 9 p.m. and cover is only $5 with your Friends of CJSR card. 


This is a good day to get out those headphones and kick back with some great 
records. Around the office, we recommend Blue Train by John Coltrane, some 
American Analog Set, Roxy Music’s Avalon, Brian Eno’s Music for Airports and 
the Cure’s Disintegration. Or maybe an old scratchy mixtape you made when 
you were 14 that'll make you wonder how you got here. This kind of thing 
could be good for you. 


You need to go to the video stare and rent Once Upon a Time in Mexico. There’s 
no real musical reason for this, except to watch Johnny Depp walk around and 
effortlessly steal the entire fecking movie from everyone else. He’s a crazy guy. 
Actually, this is kind of musical. You see, Depp used to be in a band—he only 
became an actor because he needed to work to support his musical ambitions. 
And now he lives in France. So there. 


It’s rock central at Rexall Place—which should be just called the Coliseum, for Chris- 
sake, because the name completely destroys. Anyway, those boys in Nickelback are 
back to give their fans a rilly big shoooo, along with Staind, Trapt and Three Days 
Grace. Hmm. Why can’t guys in American bands spell their names correctly? Those 
favouring a more low-key night should check out Plainsay, Half Cut and Cassidy at 
the Sidetrack Café. ‘ 


Get out your beat-up cowboy hat and head down to the Sidetrack for some hay- 
seed action featuring Budd Plugg and friend Tex Ass Mikey. Dustin Cole is along 
for the ride, and so is that fella Mark Davis and the Young Bucks. Yep. Get your 
freak on, pardner. Doors at 9 p.m. and cover is a measly $6. Just leave the tractor 
at home this time, okay? 


Tickets for the 2004 Juno Awards telecast, taking place at Edmonton’s Rexall Place on Sunday, April 4, will go on sale 
Saturday, February 14 at 9:30 a.m. at all Ticketmaster outlets, with prices ranging from $57 to $91.50... Rapper DMC of 
Run DMC has recorded a version of Harry Chapin’s hit song “Cat's in the Cradle” with his “favourite artist of all time,” 
Sarah McLachlan.... Pop star and confused unit Britney Spears has announced that she will write her autobiography; 


titles being considered do not include I’m Not Crazy, | Just Think That Way and These Are Real, Okay?... Toronto guitarist 
and hot property Jack De Keyzer won several Maple Blues Awards last Monday in Hogtown, including Entertainer of the 
Year.... Rumour has it that legendary house jock and filtered beat pioneer DJ Sneak will be coming to town in February. 


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AND JERED STUFFCO 


A shiny Blue Quarter 


Blue Quarter ¢ Seedy’s « Fri, Jan 
23 When asked what instrument he 
plays, Blue Quarter member Olivier 
Lagace responds, “Keyboard, guitar, 
flying saucer.” 

Dig a little deeper and you'll find 
that Lagace also plays the Chapman 
stick, a 10-string instrument that 
resembles a cross between a bass and 


a guitar. “The music we play is’ basi- 
cally beats,” Lagace explains. “What 
we do is we try and imitate all Dj 
styles—house, trance, techno. We 
tried to come up with a name for the 
kind of music we play and we ended 
up Calling it ‘vibro-trance.’” 

If that idea seems a little familiar, 
you’re not alone. Lagace says that his 
band is often compared to Toronto’s 
the New Deal, another trio that plays 
dance music with live instrumentation. 
“We do get compared to them a lot,” 
Lagace concedes, “but I’ve been doing 
what | do with the Chapman stick long 
before I'd even heard of the New Deal. 
It doesn’t bother me when we get 
compared to them, but it is just a coin- 
cidence.” While the New Deal is pri- 
marily an improvisational act, Lagace 
says Blue Quarter has most of their 
tunes written long before they go 
onstage. “We can play for hours, 
though,” Lagace says. “If the bar man- 
ager doesn’t tell us to stop, we'll play 


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‘til five in the morning.” 

Although the band is based in 
Canmore, Alberta, two of its members 
hail from La Belle Province, and Lagace 
still spends a good chunk of the year in 
Montreal. “It’s tougher to make it out 
there,” he says, “but we're a Canadian 
band and we do a lot of traveling.” No 
kidding. Lagace estimates that Blue 
Quarter crosses the country from 
“from Tofino to P.E.I.” at least four 
times a year. 

Although the band released their 
second LP, En*Trance, last summer, 
they’ve decided to winter out west 
and put all scheduled eastern dates on 
hold until the spring. “Just for safety 
and comfort reasons, basically,” 
Lagace says in his French-Canadian 
accent. “It’s so hard to make it to 
shows in the winter—the distances are 
so huge.” The band is using the 
downtime to arrange for American 
visas so they can get south of the bor- 
der later in the year. (JS) 


as, 
ma 


beviabion | 


vueweekiy GD 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Longshot Music Showcases ° Stars (Sat, Jan 
10) * Sidetrack Café (Sun, Jan 11) © reVUE 
There’s never a shortage of great gigs to check 
out in our fine city. Sometimes a show comes 
along that simply can’t be missed and some 
times there’s two, Last Saturday night saw a host 
of skins and punks making their way to Stars to 
stomp it up with two of Edmonton’s hottest acts, 
the Wednesday Night Heroes and the Operators. 
is Cel¥lpleliale Mele) an calm Moy aTel~a(e) al ofl arate AN =1¢-0 OF |e 
gary’s Knucklehead, who got the crowd good 
and riled up with their singalong anthems, and 
Vancouver's the Lancasters. The next day, every- 
one left standing (plus the kiddies who couldn't . 
get in) made: their way over to the Sidetrack for 
an all-ages matinee. The Cleats had no problem 
picking things up where they left them for their 
packed reunion show, but since technical diffi- 
culties kept them from playing an encore, maybe 
there should be another gig. Real soon. (PD) 


Matchless 20 


CJSR 20th Anniversary Showcase « 
With the Dudes, the Faunts and 
Dietzche V and the Abominable 
Snowman ° Sidetrack Café « Sat, 
Jan 25 In these days of rapid change it’s 
hard enough to find a current world 
map, let alone a radio station worth tun- 
ing into year after year. Luckily CJSR-FM 
88.5 has been beaming out quality alter- 
native news and music programming for 
two whole decades now. One of a hand- 
ful of campus radio stations to own their 
own transmitter since the early ‘80s, 
CJSR hasn’t just survived swimming 
against the mainstream; they’ve thrived. 

“We’ve been pretty lucky,” says 
programming manager Daryl Richel. 
“Either lucky or talented—and | think 
it’s a combination of both.” 

Richel began volunteering for the 
station in 1984 and has occupied his 
current position since ‘96. The biggest 
change he’s seen over the years is the 
amount of people eager to volunteer 
their time to keep the station running. 

- When he started out, there would be 
occasional orientation sessions for new 
people, but now every month there’s a 
batch of new faces. “I’m not sure 
why,” he says. “I think part of the rea- 
son is because people are more media- 
savvy than they used to be. That’s 
probably the major reason. | think 
people are just getting a little bit frus- 
trated with corporate radio. They just 
want to be involved in something 
that’s a breath of fresh air, frankly.” 

Unfortunately, the increased interest 
has become a bit of a double-edged 
sword. Nowadays landing one of the 
station’s coveted Dj slots takes more 
than just commitment and an eclectic 
taste in music. Richel says CJSR still fol- 
lows its original mandate of providing a 
voice for the voiceless, so they're look- 
ing for programming that flies under 
the radar, like a recent pitch by a stu- 
dent from Turkey for a seriesef features 
on Turkish music. “Well, that doesn’t 
exist anywhere else, right?” Richel says. 
“At least not in Edmonton. So I'm defi- 
nitely interested in talking to her and 
she'll go to the front of the line.” 

Another way to deal with the long 
list of people wanting to get on the air 
is encouraging them to produce short- 
er segments designed to be played 
during regular shows. One such feature 
is Off the Record, in which contributors 
tape short gig reviews or funny stories 


from a show which Djs can then follow 
up with a track by the artist in ques- 
tion. “I think there’s going to be more 
and more of that,” Richel says. 

Passing the 20-year milestone has 
definitely added an air of legitimacy to 
the station’s already-impressive street 
credibility. They’ve recently been 
approached by institutions like the CBC 
and CKUA about the possibility for some 
partnership arrangements, but all this 
attention isn’t going to their heads. “The 
station is still built on a DIY ethic,” Richel 
says. “I'd like to think we've matured a 
little bit. But we haven’t matured to the 
point where we're boring.” (PD) 


Grace jones 
Three Days Grace ¢ With Nickelback 


and Staind « Rexall Place * Tue, jan 
27 It’s been quite a ride for Toronto- 


_ based band Three Days Grace. After slog- 


ging it out in small venues for more than 
half a decade, the band finally broke out 
last year with their self-titled debut and its 
infectious single “I Hate Everything About 
You.” Thanks to the track’s huge impact 
on commercial radio and MuchMusic, 
the band’s album rocketed to number 
nine on the Canadian pop charts during 
its first week of sales—not bad for a 
bunch of guys who only a few months 
earlier were virtually unknown. 

“After working on something for so 
long, it’s nice to see it finally surface,” says 
the band’s drummer, Neil Sanderson. 
Hailing originally from the tiny town of 
Norwood, Ontario (population 1,500), 
the band’s initial approach was to play 
anywhere and everywhere. “We'd basical- 
ly play on haywagons and get any gigs 
we could,” Sanderson says incredulously. 
That approach has paid off. Once the 
band relocated to Toronto, they started to 
garner major-label interest, eventually 
signing with Jive Records, home to mega- 
artists like Justin Timberlake and Britney 
Spears. “When the ball started rolling,” 
Sanderson continues, “we started playing 
showcases and Jive just seemed like the 
right place for us. We didn’t care if they 
had rock or pop or whatever—they 
believed in our music and they continue 
to believe in our record.” 

Despite their early success at home, 
the band has been spending an increas- 
ing amount of time south of the border 
and overseas. They just played headlining 
shows in London and Manchester, and 
have just toured the U.S. with fellow Can- 
Rock behemoths Nickelback. They also 


A 


Phil Duperron 


recently added a fourth member, Barry 
Stock, to flesh out their live sound. “We 
definitely step it up for the live show,” 
Sanderson says. “It’s always disappoint- 
ing to go see a show and the band can’t 
pull it off live. We don’t worry about 
charts and sales. You’re in a band 
because you have a creative side—we 
look at this as an opportunity to play rock 
‘n’ roll shows and tour.” (JS) 


The better Half 


Half Cut ¢ With Plainsay and Cas- 
sidy * Sidetrack Café * Tue, Jan 27 
Once a band has played twice in every 
bar in town, no matter how dingy, it’s 
time to move on before people start 
thinking you're the house band. But if 
you're young and eager to make a 
name for yourself, but not established 
enough (or fond enough of starving 
on the road) to embark on a full-blown 
tour, where do you go from there? 

For local rockers Half Cut, the 
answer came from an unlikely source— 
country golden boy Corb Lund. 
Although Half Cut’s punked-up rock 
tunes have little in common with 
Lund’s down-home musings, they fig- 
ured if he was playing small towns 
across Alberta and Saskatchewan, 
maybe he was onto something. 

“It's just a matter of finding the 
kid,” says singer/guitarist Rick Reid. 
“There's always the punk kid that pro- 
motes the shows in the small town and 
rents the hall. Which is kinda tricky 
sometimes, because who do you call? 
But once you figure that out, it’s pretty 
cool. The shows are usually pretty 
good. A lot of the best shows we’ve 


played have been in small towns like- 


Innisfail and Camrose and stuff like that. 
It’s really cool because all the kids come 
out and they’re really supportive. They 
buy the merch and when we go back 
there’ll probably be some more fans.” 
Thanks to a lot of trial and error 
(like having to be towed one night after 
their keys were stolen), Half Cut have 
built up their road legs and put away 
enough cash to record a follow-up disc 
to their debut, Behind the Dumpster. 
This summer they plan on putting that 
knowledge to good use and book their 
own tour all the way out to Nova Scotia 
and back. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s 
worth it,”-says Reid. “And you don’t 
have to pay a booker a cut of anything, 
which is basically nothing anyway. 
Enough to pay for food and gas.” (PD) 


www new citycompound. com 
Jasper Avenue 
call 4290-2582 for info 


Fri. Jan. 23rd 


Champion, Alberta 
[Formerly Tom Cruise Missile) 


Reverie Sound Revue 
(Calgary 


All Purpose 


Voltage fierdet 


Every Thursday! 


FACTORY. 


$2.00 HIBALLS ALL NIGHT! 
$27.50 JAGER SHOTS! 
NO COVER! 


Fri. Jan 30th 


Z Live Crew 
Politic Live 
DJ Instigate 


Fri. Feb. 6th 
lragi Adopt A Town Benefit show 


[0 Second Epic, Half Cut, 
& quests 


Just $5 Cover!!! 


VuEwEEKiy GD 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Lynn Miles on) 

Down To The Wood as) 

Tim Hus & The Rocky Mtn. Two as) 
Annie Gallup ws.) 

Mike Stack Trio «as, 

Joanne Myrol is, 

Stacey Earle & Mark Stuart ws.) 
Kieran Kane & Kevin Welch ws.) 


Doors open at 7:30PM Show 8:00PM 
yA\| More) ales) to ai=)(0 i= 1a 


St. Basil’s Cultural Centre 
10819-71 Ave. Non-Smoking Venue 


exept DERVISH at the 


Provincial Museum Theatre 
12845-102 Ave. 


Tickets available at: 


Tix On The Square - ¢s sirwinston churchill Sq. 


(pick up or charge by phone: 420-1757) | 


South Side Sound - 10418 wnyte ave. 


_ (pick up only 432- 


Fax your free listings to 
426-2889 or 
email them to | 


listings@vue.ab.ca | 
Deadline Is Friday at 3pm 


THU 


LIVE MUSIC 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 
Penny's Whistle | 


BLUES ON WHYTE The Real | 
Deal (blues, rock, swing) 


CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) | 
Lisa Hendrix (rock) 


COOK COUNTY SALOON 
Every Thu: Battle of the 
Bands; 9:30pm; no cover 


DUSTER'S PUB Every Thu: 
jam 


FOUR ROOMS 
(DOWNTOWN) Mo Lefever 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB 
Mouming Wood 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Alita N’ Steeihorse 


RYTHYM AND BREWS Every ; 
Thu: Open stage/jam with the 
River City Rhythm Kings; 
8:30-midnight 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Dave 
Hiebert 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(CAPILANO) Tim Becker 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen 


SIDETRACK The Salteens, 
The Doers, Devilsplender; 
9pm; $8 (door) 


URBAN LOUNGE Phattoe; no 
cover 


WINSPEAR CENTRE An 
Evening of North-African 

Music featuring Hamza El Din 
and Hassan Hakmoun; part of 
the World at Winspear Series; 
8pm; tickets available at 
Winspear box office . 


DJS 
eee 
THE ARMOURY Lo Ball 


Night: top 40 


BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Big 
Mouth Entertainment 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Thump: intronica with the 
DDK Soundsystem 


DECADANCE NIGHTCLUB 
Majestikal Thursdays: house 
with Transient, Josh, LP 


ELEPHANT AND CASTLE 
ON WHYTE Sieeman Method 
Thursdays: hip hop, down- 
tempo with Dj Headspin 


FILTHY McNASTY’S Punk 
Rock Bingo: with Dj S.W.A.G. 


GAS PUMP Every Thu: Ladies 
Nite: Top 40/dance with Dj) 
Christian 


LONGRIDERS Hot Latin 
Nights; free dance lessons 8- 
9:30pm. 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Rub-A-Dub Thursday: rock- 
steady, dub reggae with Dj 
Jeebus and the Operation 
Redication Sound System 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Progress: electro/new wave 
with D] Miss Mannered and | 
guests 

RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Every Thu: Dj Butter 


THE ROOST Rotating shows: | 
Ladonna’s Review, Sticky’s | 
open stage and the Weakest 
Link game with Dj Jazzy sec- 
ond and last Thursday; $1 

(member)/$4 (non-member) 


SAVOY Funk w/Bob 
Trampoline and Ben 


SEEDY’S Kicked in the Teeth 
Thursdays with Dj Litoyd 


THE STANDARD David 

Morales (NYC); $15 (adv)/$20 
(door); tickets available at | 
TicketMaster, Foosh, 
Underground (WEM), 
Colourblind 


VELVET LOUNGE Urban | 
Substance: hip hop/R&B end 
of exams jam with Spincycle, 
Invinceable, |-Money, Sean B 


YOUR APARTMENT 
Thursday Night Shake Down: 
Motown, northern soul, funk, 
“60s pop with Djs Travyd and 
Alex Zwolf 


FRI 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Upper Room: 

Blame Its, Joey and the 
Instapunks, Blacklisted Main | 
Room: Vindictive 

Entertainment Presents | 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 
Northwest Passage 


BLUES ON WHITE The Real 
Deal (blues, rock, swing) 


CAPITAL HILL PUB Bad 
Habits 


CASINO (EDMONTON) Rule 
of Nines (rock) PIANO BAR: 
Every Fri: Jo Ann Paul; 
5:30pm-8pm 

CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) 
Lisa Hendrix (rock) 


FESTIVAL PLACE Otis Taylor 
(blues); 7:30pm; $23 
(cabaret)/$21 (theatre 
seating); tickets ayailable at 
Festival Place box office, 
TicketMaster 451-8000 


.44 MAGNUM CLUB The 
Haymakers for T.C.’s Birthday 


FOUR ROOMS 
(DOWNTOWN) Dino 
Dominelli 


LE GLOBE Maureen Lefever 
HIGHRUN Souled Out 
J.J."S Darkest Hour (rock) 


JEFFERY'S CAFE AND WINE 
BAR Old School Jazz: Jim 
Tigner and guests; 8pm 
KINGSKNIGHT PUB 
Monkey's Uncle 


LONGRIDERS Barkin Spiders 


MICHAEL'S PUB AND GRILL 
The Shufflehound; 9:30pm-- 
1:30am; no cover 


NEW CITY SUBURBS | 
Champion, Alberta (formerly 
Tom Cruise Missile), Reverie 
Sound Revue, All Purpose 
Voltage Heroes 


LA P'TITE SCENE Every Fri: 
open stage; 8pm-3am 
PEPPERS Connnors Road 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Alita N’ Steelhorse | 


RED'S Eliminator 2004: MC 
showdown; all ages event; 
8pm (door), 10pm (show); 


$15 | 


ST. BASIL'S CULTURAL 
CENTRE Madrigaia; presented 
by the Full Moon Folk Club; 


$14 (adv)/$16 (door)/children | 
under 12 half price (at door | 
only); tickets available at TIX | 
on the Square, Southside } 
Sound | 


SEEDY'S Blue Quarter, | 
Grassroots Deviation 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Dave 
Hiebert 


SHERLOCK HOLMES | 
(CAPILANO) Tim Becker | 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen | 


SHERLOCK HOLMES | 
(WHYTE) Tony Dizon 


SIDETRACK CAFE The 
Ronnie Hayward Trio 

(rockabilly), John Henry 
(bluegrass); 9:30pm; $8 


URBAN LOUNGE Granny 
Dynamite; $5 


YARDBIRD SUITE Don | 
Berner and the Legacy Big | 
Band featuring Jim Brenan | 
and Ken Hoffman | 
(saxophones), Craig Brenan 
and Ryan Purchase 
(trombones), joel Gray and 
Bob Tildesley (trumpets), 
Rubim DeToledo (bass), 
Sandro Dominelli (drums), 
Mario Allende (percussion), 
and Andrew Glover (piano); | 
8pm (door), 9pm (show); $6 | 
(member)/$10 (guest); tickets | 
available at TicketMaster 


ZENARI'S ON 1ST Chandelle 
Rimmer 


CLASSICAL 


WINSPEAR CENTRE 
Musicomedy!: Presented by 
the Edmonton Symphony | 
Orchestra; part of the Robbins | 
Pops Series; 8pm; tickets avail- 
able at Winspear box office 


CONVOCATION HALL 

Randall Avers (guitar); pre- 
sented by the classical Guitar 
Society; 8pm; $20 (adult)/$15 
(student/senior/members); | 
tickets available at TIX on the 
Square 420-1757, The | 
Gramophone, Avenue Guitars, 
the Society 489-9580, door 


DUS 


THE ARMOURY Top 
40/dance 


BILLY BOB‘S LOUNGE Big | 
Mouth Entertainment 


BOOTS Retro Disco: retro 
dance 


BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB Top 
40 with DJ Arrowchaser 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
Urban with Invinceable, Q.B. 
and guests 


COWBOYS Ladies Night: top 
40 


CRISTAL LOUNGE Affaire 
Iilicite: industrial noise, neo- 
classical with Verlaag and 
Xerxes 


DANTE'S WORLD PUB 
Powerhouse Fridays: dance 
and retro with Zack and 
Johnny Staub (Power 92); 
Upstairs in the Skylounge: 
soulful house music; over 23; 
dress code 


DECADANCE NIGHTCLUB 
House with Avrum Gold and 
guests 


DONNA Silk: house with 
Winston Roberts and guests 


FILTHY McNASTY’S Shake 
Yo’ Ass: with D} Serial K 
GAS PUMP Every Fri: Top 
40/dance with Dj Christian 


HALO Camaro retro with Dj 
Davey James 


THE JOINT Fresh Fridays: 
Urban by Urban Metropolis 
Sound Crew 


MANHATTAN CLUB R&B 
Fridays: hip hop/R&B with Dj 
Mad Noise ~ 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Every Fri: Dj Butter 


THE ROOST Upstairs: Euro 
Blitz: best new European 
music with Dj Outtawak, Dj 
Jazzy and male stripper; 
Downstairs: female stripper; 
$4 (member)/$6 (non-mem- 
ber) 


ROXY ON WHYTE Babylon 
Fridays: retro/R&B/dance with 
Dj Extreme 


SAVOY Eclectronica with Djs 
Bryana, Chris ; 


THE STANDARD Triple X 
Fridays: Top 40/dance 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Live 
Metal Night with Brian 


STONEHOUSE PUB 
Alternative, house, hip hop, 
top 40 with Dj Rage and Dj 
Weezle; 9pm 

TWILIGHT AFTERHOURS 
Hip hop, R&B 

Y AFTERHOURS 
House/trance with Tripswitch, 
Sureshock, MC Flopro, LP, 
Juicy, Derkin, Old Bitch 


YOUR APARTMENT House 
with Dj Tomek 


SAT 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Main Room: 
Winter Dance Nights with 
Robin of da Notes 


ARDEN THEATRE Once 
Upon an Olde Tyme...: Leah 
Durele, Gary Chichak, 
Chicoutiguy ; $10; tickets 
available at Musee Heritage 
Museum, St. Albert Heritage 
Society 459-5119; fundraiser 
for the St. Albert Heritage 
Society 

ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 
Northwest Passage 


BETTER BE ROCK LOUNGE 
The Oldtimers (rock) 

BLACK DOG Hair of the Dog: 
The Ronnie Hayward Trio; 4- 
6pm. 

BLUES ON WHYTE The Real 
Deal (blues, rock, swing) 
CAPITAL HILL PUB Bad 
Habits 

CASINO (EDMONTON) Rule 
of Nines (rock) PIANO BAR: 
Every Sat: Jo Ann Paul; 
5:30pm-8pm 

CASINO (YELLOWHEAD) 
Lisa Hendrix (rock) 


DRUID Every Sat: Harpdog 
Brown; 3-7pm 


FOUR ROOMS 
(DOWNTOWN) Dino 
Dominelli, Don Berner 


LE GLOBE Maureen Lefever 
HIGHRUN Souled Out 
J.J.'S Darkest Hour (rock) 


KINGSKNIGHT PUB 
Monkey's Unde < 
LONGRIDERS Barkin Spiders 
MICHAEL'S PUB AND GRILL 
The Shufflehound; 9:30pm- 
1:30am; no cover 


O'BYRNE'S Robbie Burns 
night with piper 


PEPPERS Connnors Road 


POWER PLANT Buck 65; no 
minors; 8:30pm (door); $12 
(adv); tickets available at 
TicketMaster, Listen, 
Blackbyrd, Power Plant 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Alita N’ Steelhorse 


RED'S Drentch 


RENDEZVOUS PUB Cloned, 
Idol 


SEEDY'S Teenage Surf 
Invasion, Mr. Relaxer, Indian 
Police 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Dave 
Hiebert 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(CAPILANO) Tim Becker 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Jimmy Whiffen 


SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(WHYTE) Tony Dizon 


SIDETRACK CAFE C)SR 
FM88 20th Anniversary Party: 
The Dudes, The Faunts, 
Dietzche V and the 
Abominable Snowman, CjSR 
Allstar Djs; 9pm; $7/$5 
(Friends of CJSR card holders) 


URBAN LOUNGE Granny 
Dynamite; $5 


WESTWOOD UNITARIAN 
CHURCH Maria Dunn, 
Shannon Johnson, Dawn 
Anderson; 7pm (door), 8pm 
(show); $14 (adv)/$16 (door); 
tickets available at Myhres 
Music, Acoustic Music, TIX on 
the Square 


YARDBIRD SUITE The Daniel 
Schnee Quartet; 8pm (door), 
9pm (show); $5 (member)/$9 
(guest); tickets available at 
TicketMaster 


CLASSICAL 


CONVOCATION HALL The 
Gryphon Trio featuring 
Annalee Patipatanakoon (vio- 
lin), Roman Borys (cello), 
Jamie Parker (piano); present- 
ed by the Edmonton 
Chamber Music Society; 8pm; 
$30 (adult)/$20 (senior)/$5 
(student) tickets available at 
the Gramophone, door, 433- 
4532 


MUTTART HALL SoxAlive: 
Jean-Louis Barbier (conduc- 
tor); 8pm; tickets available 
door; $15 (adult)/$10 (stu- 
dent/senior) 


WINSPEAR CENTRE The 
Flying Karamazov Brothers: 
Presented by the Edmonton 
Symphony Orchestra; part of 
Symphony for Kids series; 
2pm; tickets available at 
Winspear box office 


WINSPEAR CENTRE 
Musicomedy!: presented by 
the Edmonton Symphony 
Orchestra; part of the Robbins 
Pops Series; 8pm; tickets avail- 
able at Winspear box office . 


DJs 


THE ARMOURY Top 40, 
dance 

BACKROOM VODKA BAR 
Flava: hip hop with 
Shortround and Echo 
BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE Big 
Mouth Entertainment 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Brendan's Sausage Party: 
obscure indie rock with Dj} 
Ballhog . 

BOOTS Flashback Saturdays: 


VUEWEEKLY 2 JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


retro dance, house with 
Derrick 

BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB 
Animal: dance with Dj 
Arrowchaser 


CRISTAL LOUNGE Urban 
with Invinceable Bomb Squad 
and guests 


DANTE'S WORLD PUB R&B, 
Dance, and Retro with Frank 
the Tank; Upstairs in the 
Skylounge: soulful house; 
over 23; dress code 


DECADANCE Devil's Play 
Pen: House with David Stone, 
Erin Eden, Neal K, Brian 
Passmore, Big Daddy, Shortee 


DONNA Deep lounge house 
with Sam Pillar, Bryan Beca 
and guests 


FILTHY McNASTY’S Shake 
Yo’ Ass: with DJ D-Lusion 


GAS PUMP Every Sat: Top 
40/dance with Dj Christian 


HALO House with Junior 
Brown, Remo 


THE JOINT Get a Nightlife: 
Top 40/dance/urban 


MANHATTAN CLUB Sinful 
Saturdays: top 40/dance 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Saturdays S.U.C.K.: 
punk/alt/pop/dance with Blue 
Jay and Nikrofeelya 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Every Sat: Dj Butter 


THE ROOST Upstairs: 
Monthly theme parties with 
Dj} Jazzy; New music with Dj 
Dan and Mike; Downstairs: 
Retro music; $4 (member)/$6 
(non-member) 


ROXY ON WHYTE Session 
Saturday: dance/R&B, hip hop 
with Dj Extreme 


SAVOY Deep house with 
Winston Roberts 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Winter 
Dance Nights with Robin of 
da Notes 


STONEHOUSE PUB Top 40 
with Dj Clay 


TONIC AFTER DARK Soul 
Saturdays: Urban with Urban 
Metropolis Sound Crew 


TWILIGHT AFTERHOURS 

House/trance with Jeff Hillis, 
Dj Trav, Crunchee, D] Danae 
and guests; 18+; 2am-10am 


Y AFTERHOURS Charlie 
Mayhem, Donovan, Juicy, 
Anthony Donohue, Saint Luke 


A STARS Upper FI, 10545- 
82 Ave, 439-1422 


ARDEN THEATRE 5S St. 
Anne Street, St. Albert, 
459-1542/450-8000 


THE ARMOURY 10310-85 
Ave, 702-1800 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND 
GILL 7704-104 St, 432- 
4611 


BACKROOM VODKA 
BAR 10324-82 Ave, 
upstairs, 436-4418 


BILLY BOB’S LOUNGE 
Continental Inn, 16625 
Stony Plain Road, 484- 

7751 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
10425-82 Ave, 439-1082 


BLUES ON WHYTE 
10329-82 Ave, 439-5058 


BOOTS 10242-106 St, 
423-5014 


BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB 
117258 Jasper Ave, 488- 
6636 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
10815 Jasper Ave, 425- 
0850 


CAPITAL HILL PUB 
14203 Stony Plain Rd, 454- 
3063 


CASINO (EDMONTON) 
7055 Argyll Rd, 463-9467 
CASINO 


(VELLOWHEAD) 
12464-153 St, 463-9467 
¢ 


VENUE GUIDE 


YOUR APARTMENT Nordic 
Foundations: Dj Dennis Zaz 
and Rackman Powers 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Every Sun (9pm-midnight) 
Reclaim; no cover 

BLUES ON WHYTE Dave 
Babcock and the Nightkeepers 


FATBOYZ Every Sun (7- 
11pm): Open jam session 
hosted by Imaginary Friend 
(blues, roots) 


O'BYRNE'S Every Sun: Joe 
Bird's Irie jam; 9:30pm. 
SIDETRACK CAFE Under the 
Covers Sundays: Crush-X, D} 
Dudeman; 9pm; $6 


CLASSICAL 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY 
THEATRE Sunday Salon: The 
John Mahon Players; 7pm; 
tickets available at TIX on the 
Square 
ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNIT- 
ED CHURCH La Serva 
Padrona: Presented by the 
Alberta Baroque Ensemble fea- 
turing Paul Grindlay (baritone) 
and Christina Jahn (soprano); 
3pm; $22 (adult)/$17 
(senior/student); tickets avail- 
able at TIX on the Square, The 
Gramophone; 420-1757/467- 
6531 


SELECT Every Sun: Thomas 
Mead (lute); 5:30-9pm 


DUS 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
Ladies Night: urban with Dj 
Invinceable 


DECADANCE NIGHTCLUB 
Worship Sundays: 
House/trance with Big Daddy, 
Trapz, MD 


MANHATTAN CLUB industry 
Sundays: top 40, dance/R&B 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
Atmosphere: funk, rare 
groove, hip hop with Dj Cool 
Curt 


CONVOCATION HALL U 
of A Campus, 420-1757 


COWBOYS 10102-180 St, 
481-8739 


CRISTAL LOUNGE 10336 
Jasper Ave, 426-7521 


DANTE'S WORLD PUB 
170 St, Stony Plain Road, 
486-4448 


DECADANCE NIGHT- 
CLUB 10018-105 St, 
upstairs), 990-1792 


DONNA 10177-99 St, 429- 
3338 


DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 
454-9928 


DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 
Ave, 474-5554 


EDMONTON ART 
GALLERY THEATRE 2 Sir 
Winston Churchill Sq, 420- 
1757 


FATBOYZ 6104-104 St, 
437-3633 


FESTIVAL PLACE 100 
Festival Way, Sherwood 
Park, 449-3378 


FILTHY McNASTY’S PUB 
10511-82 Ave, 432-5224 


FOUR ROOMS RESTAU- 
RANT (EDMONTON) 
Edmonton Centre, 102 
Ave, Entrance, 426-4767 


GAS PUMP 10166-114 St, 
488-4841 ; 


THE ROOST Betty Ford 
Hangover Clinic Show Beer 
Bash: every long weekend 
with D} jazzy; $2 


SAVOY French Pop: mixed 
with Deja Dj 


LIVE MUSIC 


BLUES ON WHYTE Blue 
Mondays: Blues jam with Tim 
Lee and the Commies 


L.B.'S PUB Every Mon: open 
stage with Randy Martin; 
9pm-2am 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Tim Becker 


SIDETRACK CAFE Every 
Mon: open stage with Ben 
Spencer; 9pm; no cover 


DUS 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Indie rock with Penny and the 
Jets 


DUSTER’S Every Mon: Dj Dan 


FILTHY McNASTY’S Metal 
Mondays: with DJ S.W.A.G. 


TUE 


LIVE MUSIC 
aa 


BLUES ON WHYTE Harpdog 
Brown and the Bloodhounds 
featuring Pete Turland 


DRUID Every Tue: open stage 
with Chris Wynters 
FESTIVAL PLACE Debbie 
Boodram (jazz); 7:30pm; $23 
(cabaret)/$21 (theatre 
seating); tickets available at 
Festival Place box office 


O'BYRNE'S Every Tue: Celtic 
night with Shannon Johnson 
and friends; 9:30pm 


REXALL PLACE Nickelback, 
Three Days Grace, Trapt, 
Staind; 6pm (door), 7pm 
(show); $32.50 and $42.50; 


GRANT MacEWAN 
CENTRE FOR THE ARTS 
John L. Haar Theatre, 
10045-156 St, 497-4436 


GRINDER 10957-124 St, 
453-1709 


HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 
423-HALO 


HIGHRUN 4926-98 Ave, 
440-2233 


J.J."S 13160-118 Ave, 489- 
7462 


JEFFERY'S CAFE AND 
WINE BAR 9640-142 St, 
451-8890 


THE JOINT WEM, 486- 
3013 


L.B.’S 111-23 Akins Dr, St. 
Albert, 460-9700 


LONGRIDERS 11733-78 
St, 479-7400 


MICHAEL'S PUB AND 
GRILL 11730 jasper Ave, 
482-4767 


MUTTART HALL Grant 
Macewan College Campus, 
10025 Macdonald Dr, 423- 
6230 


MANHATTAN CLUB 
10345-105 St, 423-7884 


NEW CITY LIKWID 
LOUNGE 10081 Jasper 
Ave, 413-4578 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
10081 Jasper Ave, down- 
stairs, 413-4578 
O'BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 
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tickets available at 
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SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Chuck 
Belhuimer 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Tim Becker 


SIDETRACK Plainsay, Half 
Cut, Cassidy; 9pm; $5 (door) 


YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday 
Jam Session: hosted by Dean 
Pierno Trio; 8pm (door), 9pm 


(show); $3 
DUS 


BILLY BOB’S LOUNGE 
Karaoke and DJ Tues with Run 
Riot Professional Music 
Productions 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
Digital Underdogg 


BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB Top 
40 with Dj Stephan 


CALIENTE NIGHTCLUB 
Bashment Tuesdays: hip 
hop/R&B/reggae/dancehall 
with Bomb Squad, Dj. 
Invinceable, Q.B. 


DUSTER’S PUB D) “Name a 
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FILTHY McNASTY’S Twisted 
Trivia: with Dj Whit-Ford 


GAS PUMP Every Tue: 
Karaoke contest with Dj Gord 


NEW CITY SUBURBS 
Resurrektion: 
industrial/EBM/electro/goth 
with Nik Rofeelya 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Every Tue: Dj Butter, two-step 
lessons with Leon 


THE ROOST Hot Butt 
Contest: with DJ janny; 8-mid- 
night; $1 (member)/$4 (non- 
member) 

SEEDY’S Electro-trash: elec- 


tro/punk funk with D] Miss 
Mannered 


LIVE MUSIC 


A STARS Main Room: 
Tuffhouse: Reno and Mr. 'O' 


ATLANTIC TRAP AND GiLi 


St, 469-4401 


PLEASANTVIEW HALL 
10860-57 Ave, 434-5997 


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Campus, 492-3101 


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RED‘S WEM Phase III, 481- 
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UNITED CHURCH 10209- 
123 St, 420-1757/467- 
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THE ROOST 10345-104 
St, 426-3150 


ROSSDALE HALL 10135- 
96 Ave, 429-3624 


ROXY ON WHYTE 
10544-82 Ave, 439-7699 


RUBY SKYE BAR 
LOUNGE WEM, Bourbon 
St, 489-6789 


RUM JUNGLE 
Ill, 486-9494 


ST. BASIL'S CULTURAL 
CENTRE 10819-71 Ave, 
420-1757 


SAVOY 10401-82 Ave, 
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SEEDY’S 10314-104 St, 
421-0992 


SELECT 10018-106 St, 
428-1629 


SHERLOCK HOLMES PUB 
Capilano Mall, 1136, 5004- 
98 Ave, 463-7788 * Rice 


WEM, Phase 


Every Wed: open mic; 8:30pm 
BLUES ON WHYTE Harpdog 


Brown and the Bloodhounds 
featuring Pete Turland 


O'BYRNE'S Every Wed: Chris 
Wynters and friends; 9:30pm 


PLEASANTVIEW HALL Every 
Wed: Northern Bluegrass 
Circle Music Society bluegrass 
jam; 7:30pm 

ROSSDALE COMMUNITY 
HALL Every Wed: Little Hower 
open stage hosted by Brian 
Gregg; 8pm; 

SHERLOCK HOLMES 
(DOWNTOWN) Chuck 
Belhuimer 


SHERLOCK HOLMES (WEM) 
Tim Becker 


SIDETRACK Budd Pluggs and 
Tex-Ass Mikey, Dustin Cole, 
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URBAN LOUNGE My Sister 
Ocean, Twenty Fold; $5 


DUS 


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Wild Cherry: deep house/pro- 
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Glitter Gulch: country, roots 


BUDDY’S NIGHTCLUB Top 
40 with D} Stephan 


FILTHY McNASTY’S Mix 
Tape Bar Star College Nite: 
with DJ Rock ‘n’ Rogers 

GAS PUMP Every Wed: 
Karaoke contest with DJ Gord 


LE GLOBE Latin rhythms with 
D} Moreno 


RATTLESNAKE SALOON 
Every Wed: Dj Butter 


THE ROOST Amateur Strip: 
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D] Alvaro; $1 (member)/$4 
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SEEDY’S Rockabilly 
Wednesdays; Hotrod Heehaw 


STARS NIGHTCLUB Upper 
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| YOUR APARTMENT Big Rock 


Indie Rock Night: indie rock 
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ZENARI'S ON 1ST 10117- 
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ne 


JAN Asn SCUER 


Seu ee 


The First in a Series of Special Benefit Concerts to 
Support the Iraqi Adopt-A-Town Project 


.One Town at a 
Time 
Wednesday, February 4 @ 9:00 pm 


Sidetrack Café, 10333 112 St. 
ADMISSION $10, all proceeds to Iraqi Adopt-A-Town Project 


Featuring Special Guest Musicians: 
The GBs Acoustic Roadshow 
Joanne and Haley Myrol 
Kevin Cook, and Wendy McNeill 


Info:<aaron.wilson@telus.net> or (780) 474-3869. To learn about 
Adopt-A-Town’s redevelopment initiatives see www. liferelief.org 


Co-sponsored by the Sidetrack Café, Vue Weekly, CJSR, Project Ploughshares 
(Edmonton), industrial Workers of the World (IWW), the Edmonton Coalition 
Against War & Racism (ECAWAR) & the Edmonton Smail Press Association (ESPA) 


WUEWEEKLY & bid ) @ a 


*COME PRE-GONCERT 
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«TUESDAY, JAN 27 DOORS OPEN @3 


root 
down 


By JENNY FENIAK 


Taking notice of Otis 


Otis Taylor ¢ Festival Place « Fri, Jan 
23 The career of bluesman Otis Taylor 
lends a new definition to the word “evo- 
lution.” After a 19-year break from pub- 
lic performance and another eight years 
touring virtually everywhere else, Taylor 
is finally playing in western 
Canada for the first time. “I 
was playing bass with a band 
called Zephyr,” Taylor says, 
explaining why he stopped 
doing concerts. “| wasn’t 
happy and at one point | 
wanted to punch out the guitar player. 
So | thought, ‘If I’ve got to feel like this, | 
need to quit.” 

It was 20 years before that decision 
that Taylor got interested in music, when 
went to the Denver Folklore Center to get 
his mother’s ukulele repaired. Before long, 
Taylor was learning old-time Appalachian 
tunes on the banjo and adapting his skills 
to the guitar. His parents weren’t musi- 
cians per se, but indulged in a less-than- 
healthy lifestyle, at least from Taylor's 


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seven-year-old perspective. 

“My parents were beboppers,” Tay- 
lor says, “just like black bohemians, 
y'know. They lived a certain kind of 
lifestyle, not always the best lifestyle for 
children, but that’s the way it was. | 
couldn't sleep for Friday school because 
they started partying Thursday and went 
all the way ‘til Sunday, every week. It’s 
not as romantic as people think it is.” 

His mother and father’s crazy 
lifestyle wasn’t all he was absorbing. 
“The whole folk movement definitely 
influenced me,” Taylor says, “the 
whole civil rights thing [because] | was 
a kid and in those days, in the early 
‘60s, everybody was about civil rights.” 

By the age of 16, Taylor was lead- 
ing the first manifestation of the Otis 
Taylor Blues Band and he continued to 
play in many blues groups and write 


My parents were beboppers, just like black 

bohemians, y’know. They lived a certain kind 

of lifestyle, not always the best lifestyle for 
children, but that’s the way it was. 


his own original songs until stopping 
cold in 1976. Almost 20 years later, 
Taylor was goaded into a one-time per- 
formance by old friends (and masters 
of the blues genre) Kenny Pasarelli and 
Eddie Turner. The phenomenal 
response was enough to convince Tay- 
lor to return to music professionally. 
During his break, Taylor had continued 
to write songs and play his piano and 
came back with two daughters in tow. 
“When | first came back, both my 


daughters sang onstage with me, but 
my little one hated it,” he says, adding 
that his older daughter Cassie loved the 
experience and intends to become an 
actress. “[Cassie’s] very calm onstage, 
she’s very charismatic ‘cause she likes to 
be onstage. She'll be more famous than 
me one day—you just watch.” Since 
those early days, Taylor has kept 17- 
year-old Cassie by his side when she’s 
not in school, playing bass and provid- 
ing back-up vocals in Europe as well as 
at North American venues such as the 
Kennedy Center. “She's really a genus 
on the bass,” says Taylor, “She learned 
from me and Kenny Pasarelli, so she’s 
had the best to teach her.” 

Since making his return to music, 
Taylor has released five albums includ- 
ing last year’s Truth Is Not Fiction. Aside 
from receiving a W. C. Handy Awards 
nomination for Blues Album 
of the Year, Truth Is Not Fic- 
tion made it onto the New 
York Times’ list of the 10 
best albums of 2003, while 
two different reviewers for 
the Washington Post placed’ 
it first and third on their lists. 

Even though Taylor will be per- 
forming his solo songwriter work this 
weekend, his new album, Double V, 
prominently features his daughter 
April. “It’s for the black soldiers,” Tay- 
lor explains. “In World War Il, they’d 
make two ‘V's, one for victory in 
Europe and one for victory at home 
for civil rights. So we called it Double V 
and it’s just my daughter and | and 
some cello players.” © 


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“14 Shades of Grey” 
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JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Staind, explaind 


It’s not all 
black-and-white 

in rockers’ latest, 
14 Shades of Grey 


By DAVE JOHNSTON 


mer Jon Wysocki’s mind is else- 

where. The New England native is 
thinking about next Sunday, when 
his beloved Patriots will take on the 
Carolina Panthers in the Super Bowl. 
The band will be in the Houston area, 
playing a corporate gig, so they hope 
to be in the stands for the big game. 
Well, perhaps “hope” is the wrong 
word here. “We're kinda friendly with 
the Kraft family, who own the Patri- 
ots,” the drummer says. 

Ah, the benefits of fame and suc- 
cess. Perhaps you've heard of Staind. 
A couple of years ago, you couldn’t 
escape the somber “It’s Been a 
While,” which catapulted the band’s 
third album, Break the Cycle, straight 
up the charts. A few million copies 
later, the band have released their 
follow-up, 14 Shades of Grey, which 
shifts more toward the rock while 
keeping up the introspection. Over 
the phone from Kelowna, where the 
band is beginning a cross-country 
jaunt with Nickelback and Three 
Days Grace, Wysocki is willing to 
break away from football and’consid- 
er the benefits fame can really offer. 


[: cold in Canada, but Staind drum- 


What was the recording of 
the new record, 14 Shades of 
Grey, like? You had to make 
this in the shadow of an enor- 
mous album like Break the 
Cycle, which you could have 
easily duplicated. 

“We tried not to let the pressure 
of that get to us. All we knew is that 
we didn’t want to make another 
Break the Cycle. | think some people 
wanted that, and it’s too bad that 
people are like that. You listen to a 
lot of artists, and they tend to stay 
on that one path, whereas we tried 
to get awa from it. But we didn’t 
want to fall into the same formula. I 
think the songs are better on the 
new record. It may not be as popular 
as the last record, but you've got to 


remember, too, that Break the Cycle 
came out at a time when people 
were starving for something that was 
a little different, not something that 
was like Limp Bizkit and Korn or any 
of that rap-metal thing. It was a 
breath of fresh air at the time—now 
there’s a lot of bands who are very 
similar to what we had.” 


Yet Fred Durst was instru- 
mental in the rise of Staind. He 
used his position to champion 
you guys. 

“At the time, it wasn’t a bad 
thing, now it kinda is. [Laughs.] The 
reason, as everyone knows, is he’s sort 
of shoved his foot in his mouth a few 
times. Anyway, that’s neither here 
nor there. That's not a reflection of 
us—we're different people, a different 
band. We just had the connection at 
the time. Fred helped us get to this 
point, and a lot of people think that 
because that happened, [Staind] must 
be just like Fred. If you listen to our 


EIROCK 


music, or if you’ve ever heard any 
interviews, you'll know right away 
that isn’t the case at all. It’s unfortu- 
nate that people label you that way, 
but that’s always going to happen.” 


In some ways, you address 
the current state of popular 
rock music on the record with 
the song “Layne,” which is a 
tribute to the late frontman for 
Alice in Chains, Layne Staley. 

“There's a few different reasons 
for that track. First of all, we were 
influenced by the entire Seattle 
grunge era. We were all big fans of 
Alice in Chains, Pearl Jam, Soundgar- 
den, Nirvana—that.whole wave of 
music that came out. That, once 
again, was a breath of fresh air for 
people who were sick of hearing Bon 
Jovi. Also, Layne Staley, in our minds, 
was someone who was influential in 
music in his era, and his death—and 
life, so to speak—really went unno- 
ticed. It’s funny: if one of these big 
pop stars died—like Aaliyah, who did- 
n’t make that large a mark in music, 
but her death is still talked about— 
but Layne Staley was a big influence 


‘in the industry and the style of music 


we play. It went unnoticed, we felt 
that we needed to pay tribute.” 


There are so many bands 
around now that clearly owe 
him a debt, yet you’re the only 
one I’ve heard to openly recog- 
nize him. His voice, his sound, 
his style of songwriting—it’s all 
been essentially raped and pil- 
laged by modern rock music, yet 
nobody has talked about him. 

“Nobody. It’s too bad. You take a 
huge, influential magazine like Rolling 
Stone, and they give him this little 
tiny [obituary], whereas someone who 
wasn’t as influential but may have 
more mainstream [acceptance]— 
they'll give them a three-page article. 
It makes no sense, it really doesn’t. It 
really bothered us. The funny thing 
about that song is people will say 
[mocking], ‘That song sounds like 
Alice in Chains,’ and it’s like, ‘No 
shit—it was supposed to. That’s the 
whole point.’ We started writing the 
song, and we thought it sounded like 
Alice in Chains, then [vocalist Aaron 
Lewis] started singing, and it really 
sounded like Alice in Chains.” 


Another interesting song is 
the last track, 
real “fuck you” attitude that 


_ you could read a lot into. 


“That's Aaron basically speaking 
to ail the people who surround him 


in life. It’s to everyone, really—to . 


those people that were there for 
him, and now all of a sudden are 
not. We happen to have a song 
called ‘Outside’ that did very well, 
and people call you a sellout. But 
‘Outside’ and even ‘It’s Been a 
While’ were written before our first 
record was released, which people 
don’t know. Those songs are a part 
of us, and it’s a bummer that people 
do that. It happens to so many 
bands—people will find this band 
Staind and they love them and they 
get everyone they know to listen to 
them. And finally everyone's listen- 
ing, and then it’s ‘Ah, they’re sell- 
outs.’ It’s a double-edged sword. It 
doesn't bother us anymore—there’s 
nothing you can do about it.” © 


STAIND — 


With Nickelback and Three Days Grace 
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JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


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VUEWEEKLY 2) JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


classical 
notes 


By ALLISON KYDD 


Starry, starry nights 


Getting to meet musicians is a definite 
perk of being a classical music writer. 
And I'm not just talking about the Isabel 
Bayrakdarians, Ivan Zenatys, Christo- 
pher Herricks, Jens Lindemanns and 
Angela Chengs of the world. In fact, I’m 
quite cynical about the 
star system. There are 
many fine musicians, but 
only a small percentage of 
them are well-known 
beyond their particular 
communities—and even 
there, fame is arbitrary. 

What fame does do, however, is 
guarantee an audience, and like every- 
body else, musicians have to eat and 
pay their bills. The Edmonton Sympho- 
ny Orchestra employs professional musi- 
cians, and the University of Alberta and 
other educational institutions hire musi- 
cians to teach, but most musicians in 
town are self-employed. As a freelancer 
myself, | know the anxiety that entails. 

One local musician who seems to 
have found her niche and isn’t trou- 
bled about the star system is cellist 
Josephine van Lier. She’s done some 
solo work; last October, for instance, 
she played works by Gabrielli and 
Duport as well as Max Reger’s amazing 
Suite for Unaccompanied Cello in D 
Minor, for Music Wednesdays at Noon. 
She's also played with symphony 
orchestras in the Netherlands and as a 
sub for the ESO. However, it’s when 
she talks about teaching that her face 
really lights up. 

Van Lier has the same enthusiasm 
for chamber ensembles. She’s part of 
the Strathcona String Quartet, who fol- 
‘owed up a concert of the string quar- 
tets of George Andrix last fall with a 
recording, which will emerge under 
the Arktos label sometime this year. In 
November, van Lier teamed up with 
pianist Henry Mokken to play 
Beethoven and César Franck. She looks 
forward to more concerts with 
Mokken, a former colleague from 
Grant MacEwan’s Alberta College Con- 
servatory of Music. .— 

Partnerships are a boon for free- 
lancers. By working together, they 
double their contacts. Some musicians 
and groups find niche audiences, even 
if they create the niches themselves. 
The Edmonton Classical Guitar Society 
has a particularly loyal audience. No 
doubt there will be another good 
showing for guest Randall Avers this 
Friday at Convocation Hall and for 
David Grainger Brown at Music 
Wednesdays at Noon on January 28. 
Avers has certainly qualified as a star 
€ver since he won second prize in the 
Guitar Foundation of America Interna- 
tional Solo Guitar Competition at the 
tender age of 17. He's also an arranger, 
lecturer and composer. His CDs include 


Vistas and (with Rami Vamos) Twelve 
Silly Songs for Twelve Silly Strings. 
Speaking of silliness, the Flying 
Karamazov Brothers have three ESO 
shows this weekend, including a show 
for kids. On Saturday evening, one of 
Canada’s most acclaimed chamber 
groups, the Gryphon Trio, appears for 
the Edmonton Chamber Music Society, 
at Convocation Hall. The society, which 
boasts of its “no-frills” organization, is 
dedicated to bringing the best cham- 
ber music in the world to Edmonton. 
Meanwhile, at Muttart Hall, the 
Conservatory of Music borrows the 
name of its annual spring concert, Con- 
servatory Resonance, to launch another 
impressive series. This Saturday’s con- 
cert is called SaxAlive and features works 
by conservatory instructor Charles 
Stolte, including a world premiere, 


Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major 
completed the program. The conductor 
seemed pleased. That’s enough 
“Pastorale” for a while, however. 


“Slap and Split for Alto and Baritone 
Saxophones,” as well as Milhaud’s La 
Creation du Monde and Caplet’s Legende 
pour saxophone alto et orchestre, featur- 
ing Scott Campbell on saxophone. 

Last weekend, Charles Olivieri- 
Munroe seemed a shoo-in for the role 
of ESO music director. The Canadian- 
born conductor went out of his way to 
please, both during the Robbins series 
Much Ado About Mozart with pianist 
Angela Cheng, and Sunday Showcase 
with its stars, pianist Scott Meek and 


F 


oS 


SOUND REVUE 


ESO principal tuba, Scott Whetham. 

Meek, winner of the 2002 Shean 
Piano Competition, played Liszt's Piano 
Concerto No. 1 in E-Flat Major with the 
élan you'd expect from a 22-year-old 
who wins competitions and scholar- 
ships wherever he goes. Ironically, the 
Liszt concerto, which broke with tradi- 
tion at the time, has had so many Hol- 
lywood imitations, it sounded like a 
parody of itself. The most novel work 
on the program was John Williams’s 
Tuba Concerto. The tuba is built for 
comfort and not for speed, but 
Williams proves the instrument can 
rival the horn for beauty of tone. 
Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 in F Major 
completed the program. The conduc- 
tor seemed pleased. That’s enough 
“Pastorale” for a while, however. 

Having mocked the star system, | 
was still enchanted by 
Kyoko Hashimoto, who 
has accumulated an 
impressive list of prizes, 
recordings and experi- 
ence, at the January 16 
Faculty and Friends con- 
cert at Convocation Hall. Hashimoto 
walks softly and bows modestly, but 
when she strokes aside her curtain of 
shining hair, there’s nothing deferential 
about her playing. The program itself 
was difficult and varied, all of it from the 
20th century: Messiaen, Shostakovich, 
Bashaw and Bartok. For the latter’s bril- 
liant Sonata for Two Pianos and Percus- 
sion, Hashimoto was joined by faculty 
member Jacques Després on the piano, 
plus Trevor Brandenberg and Darryl 
Salyn on percussion. ® 


xSE MASSAE) 


FORMERLY PME TOM 


perta 


VOLTAGE HEROES 
_ JANUARY 23 


NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 
10081 JASPER AVENUE 


FOR THE WEEK ENDING JAN 29. 9002 


1. Corb Lund Band — Modem Pain (corb lund) 
2. Blackie & The Rodeo Kings — Bark (true north) 
3. Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros — Streetcore (helicat) 
4. Steve Pineo — Around The Hom (stamp) 
5. The Floor — Autonomy Off/On (the floor) 
6. Lhasa — The Living Road (select) 
7. Al Green — Cant Stop (blue note) 
8. The End — Within Divida (relapse) 
9. Robert Randolph — Unclassified (darecords) 
10. Viktor Vaughn — Vaudeville Villain (sound ink) 
11. Johnny Cash — The Man Comes Around (american) 
12. Mojave — Spoon & Rafter (4ad) 
13. Just Because I’m A Women — Songs Of 
Dolly Parton (Sugar hill) 
14. Soilwork — The Early Chapters (listenable) 
15. The Swifty’s — S/T (riverdale) 
16. The Unintended — S/T (blueeon) 
17. Beautiful — A Tribute To Gordon Lightfoot (northem blues) 
18. Blink 182 — Blink 182 (geffen) 
19. The Shins —- Chutes Too Narrow (sub pop) 
20. Outkast — Speakerbox/The Love Below (arista) 
21. The Faunts — High Expectations/Low Results (faunts) 
22. The Rapture — Echoes (vertigo) 
23. Electric Six — Fire (x!) 
24. Sarah McLachlan — Afterglow (nettwerk) 
25. The Dixie Hummingbirds — Diamond Jubilation (rounder) 
26. The Ramblin’ Ambassadors — Avanti (mint) 
27. Paul Westerberg - Come Fee! Me Tremble (vagrant) 
~28. Iron & Wine — The Sea & The Rhythm (sub pop) 
29. Guided By Voices — Human Amusements At 
Hourly Rates (matador) . 
30. Mark Lanegan —Here Comes That Weird Chill (beggars) 


0.8.1. 
BiG FISH 


The soundtrack to Tim Burton's 
unusually subdued, sentimental 
Big Fish collects pop songs from 
the '30s through the '70s as well 
_ as longtime collaborator Danny 
_ Elfman’s score and a new song 
_ from Pearl Jam. 


$15.99 


VUEWEEKLY EQ JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Buck 65 wants to 
jar hip-hop out of 
its disposable, 
McDonalds-style rut 


By SEAN AUSTIN-JOYNER 


north of Halifax, you’d find a smajj 
town called Mount Uniacke. |t 
mostly a farming community, typica| 
of many farming communities actos, 
Canada, dealing largely in livestoc, 
_ and vegetables. But Mount Uniack; 
had one export they weren’t expect 
ing: hip-hop. Thanks to minimalis; 
musician Rich Tefry—a.k.a. Buck 65— 
the town with fewer than 4,000 peo 
ple is now officially on the hip-ho, 
map. And with Talkin’ Honky Bluc 
his latest release, Buck has returned 
his roots to deliver a message from h 
rural Canadian motherland. 

Currently signed to Warner Musi: 
Buck 65's popularity has skyrocketed 
with the single “Wicked and Weird 
even getting rotation on local radi: 
station 96X. But regardless of hoy 
much attention he’s getting, Buck 
confident his honest and straightfo: 
ward approach to music won't 
change. “I just concentrate on making 
good music,” he says. “Beyond that, | 
ignore what's going on. I don’t pa 
that much attention to how man, 
copies of my record are selling or what 
the reviews are like. I just focus o1 
what’s important for me creativel; 
and hang-onto the hope that that 
going to be the key to my longevity.’ 

Talkin’ Honky Blues shows that 
Buck’s guiding motto remain: 
unchanged over a career that’s lasted 
more than a decade: if he didn’t live 
it, he doesn’t say it. “I think the only 
reason I’ve been able to do it is 
because I worked really hard a 
independent for 12 years before 
signed a record deal,” he says 
you talk to a kid on the street who's 
looking to break into the business 
and you tell him he’s got to tour for 
‘12 years and be completely broke 
you wouldn’t find many people will 
ing to do that. They’re looking for a 
shortcut, and it's those shortcuts that 
are going to be exploited.” 

It’s not that Buck 65 hasn't had his 
share of opportunities for quick fame 
He recently turned down a lucrative 
promotional proposal from McDon- 
ald’s because of his ties to the farming 
industry—an industry he feels has 
only been damaged by the mammoth 
restaurant chain. Artists, Buck says, 
have to start looking at the long-term 
repercussions of their actions. 

And that’s the basic concept 
behind Talkin’ Honky Blues, on which 
Buck pays homage to his forme! 
stompin’ grounds with a mixture ol 
country, spoken-word and hip-hop- 
influenced songs. While he’s always 
admired country singers like Johnny 
Cash and Merle Haggard, Buck first 
fell in love with hip-hop, like many of 
us did, at the roller rink. 


[: you were to drive 42 kilometre 


AROUND 1981, Buck first made his 
appearance in the Halifax hip-hop 
scene as a breakdancer. Every week- 
end, he could be found at the rink 
showing off his newest techniques. 
The DJ at the rink was also his babysit- 
ter's boyfriend and would often let 
Buck preview the latest songs before 


ee eee ee 
JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


seine e? 


taking them to the public. But when 
preakdancing’s popularity peaked and 
plummeted in ’84, Buck hung up his 
cardboard and began DJing, MCing 
and producing. “Anyone who was 
around back then remembers that 
breakdancing became really super- 


trendy,” he recalls. “When the fad 
of you for breakdancing. It went by 
the wayside, but I still had huge pas- 
Regrettably, Buck says much the 
same thing is currently happening 
Knights commercials, watered-down 
mainstream radio and ghastly sit- 
image,” it won’t be long before hip- 
hop fams are seen as out-of-date. 
hip-hop into a 
money-making = 
crosshairs aimed 
directly at teenagers aren’t doing the 
“As soon as hip-hop got its first 
taste of the pop charts, everyone 
says. “It used to be, if you talked 
about pop music and being on the 
were instantly branded a sellout if 
you did that. When you look at clas- 
aren't doing that hoping to make 
enough money to buy 20 mansions 
We could blame DJ Jazzy Jeff and 
the Fresh Prince’s “Parents Just Don’t 
Way” or even the Sugarhill Gang’s 
“Rapper's Delight” for drawing too 
an anti-establishment artform, but the 
core of the problem is simply big busi- 
wildly, lucratively marketable. “That’s 
why McDonalds has lasted so long,” 


died, people would basically make fun 
sion for the music.” 

to hip-hop. Between the British 
com portrayals of the “hip-hop 
(And record labels who’ve turned 
rifle with its 

music any favours either.) 
completely lost their minds,” Buck 
charts, those were dirty words. You 
sical music and the blues, people 
and shit like that—that’s just absurd. 
Understand,” Run DMC’s “Walk This 
much attention to what started out as 
ness’ realization that “urban music” is 
Buck says. “There are a lot of people 


ehGhdadds il 

Says, “and I didn’t grow up in the city. 
I grew up in the country. I also grew up 
poor, but that never stopped me from 
getting sick or getting my heart bro- 
ken. It nevet stopped me-from- being 
nice to animals or going to the library. 
It never stopped me from wanting to 
take a walk in the woods or go to Paris 
or Rio de Janeiro. I could devote all Of 
my time to talking about being poor in 
the country, but I’m a more complex 
person than that.” 

If other artists would follow his 
example, Buck argues, hip-hop 
wouldn't be perceived as the dispos- 
able music it’s currently regarded as. 
And he’s got a point. Generally, hip- 
hop albums are released, bought and 
forgotten all within the space of two 
weeks. Therefore, Buck says, albums 
are intentionally created to be dis- 

posable in order to 

make consumers 

feel the need to 

purchase another 
one only weeks later. The idea that a 
song that’s released today would still 
be relevant a decade down the road 
is almost ridiculous. 

“We'te living in a world where 
that kind of idea—the idea that you 
can take your car to the garage and 
know that they're going to fix it 
properly because the mechanics take 
pride in their work—is old-fash- 
ioned,” Buck says. “Everything is 
designed these days so that there’s 
another opportunity to make money 
built right into it. Things fall apart, so 
you have to go out and buy mote. It’s 
a well-known fact that the technolo- 
gy is in place to make a light bulb 
that will never burn out, to make 
pantyhose that will never get runs. 
But they'll never get manufactured 
because that’s not good business.” 


BACK TACKLES precisely this subject 
on Talkin’ Honky Blues in a track 
called “Craftsmanship.” HIs lyrics 
describe his old-fashioned shoeshine 


Anyone who was around back then remembers that 
breakdancing became really super-trendy. 
When the fad died, people would basically 

make fun of you for breakdancing. It went by the 
wayside, but I still had huge passion for the music. 


out there who wouldn’t eat Indian 
food to save their lives, but would eat 
McDonalds every single day. That’s 
also why all the little pop phenomena 
like the Justin Timberlakes have been 
around since the ’50s and will be 
around until the end of the time, and 
why they'll always be more dominant 
than anything else. There are’4 lot of 
smart people out there who know that 
the average person limits themselves 
in their own experience.” 


AS FOR BUCK’S personal tastes in 
music, he likes anything “real”—the 
Tusty sound of bluegrass, the poignant 
lyrics of folk or the heartfelt emotion 
of the blues in particular. The fetishiza- 
tion of gangsters and guns that has 
become the norm in hip-hop, he can 
do without. It’s not that Buck has a 
Problem with people telling stories 
about guns and drugs, if those are in 
fact large parts of their lives. But after 
years and years of hearing the same 
tales told in the same way, Buck’s eager 
to hear artists tackle a different topic. 
“I didn’t grow up in the ghetto,” he 


stand. He goes through the motions 
of putting effort and care into his 
work, approaching each customer as 
a person and not a number. Mean- 
while, the younger kids’ goals are to 
shine larger numbers of shoes in less 
time, taking shortcuts and using 
lower-grade products. Eventually, his 
stand becomes obsolete as more and 
more people start wearing sneakers 
to the office. Get the connection? 

“We're in real danger if some- 
body doesn’t put on the brakes and 
say, ‘Wait a minute—why don’t we 
make a car that’s going to last 50 
years?’ or ‘Why don’t we make a 
record that we'll still be able to lis- 
ten to 10 years from now?’” Buck 
says. “I know that music is my job 
and I’m going to do it the best I can. 
It’d be nice if everyone else would 
do the same thing.” © 


BUCK 65 

With guests ¢ Powerplant (U of A) # Sat, 
Jan 24 (8:30pm) ¢ No minors ¢ $12 
advance at Ticketmaster, Listen, 
Blackbyrd, Powerplant 


s@G05 


Problems?? 


Check out 
alt.sex.column , 
every week 

for answers 


VURAJeeK Com 


MEET TRAPT IN PERSON: 


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 3RD, 6:0 


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“HEADSTRONG”. 
“STILL FRAME” AND’ ECHO" 


low price sound advice Edmonton South: 3110 


WUEWEEKLY ۤ JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Trail South 433-6400 * Red Deer: 5239 53rd Avenue 340-0500 


Ministers oe 


Moroccan in the free worlt 


Hassan Hakmoun 
will wake you up by 
playing the gogo 


By MINISTER FAUST 


w Often do titans walk in E- 
oe And the rare times they do, 
~ ow often do they stop to sing? 

This Thursday (tonight) at the 
Winspear Centre, Edmonton hosts 
two international sensations, Moroc- 
co’s Hassan Hakmoun and Egypt's 
Hamza El-Din. While their lands are 
far apart and culturally dissimilar, 
both men share much—each hails 
from a desert country persecuted 
nationality, each is a phenomenal 
vocalist and string-player who’s 


released a substantial discography 
and composed and arranged music 
for the Kronos Quartet, and each has 
served as his people’s musical ambas- 
sador to the world. 

Hassan Hakmoun is a high-energy 
player of the gogo (also known 4s sin- 
tir and guimbri), a boxy, long-necked, 
hide-bound stringed instrument with 


E 


a bass sound so deep it could pass as 
the heartbeat of a black hole. Best 
known in North America for albums 
such as Trance (1993) and Life Around 
the World (1998), Hakmoun also 
appeared on the brilliant Prayer for 
Soul of Layla by his Iranian key- 
boardist, Jamshied Sharifi, and wrote 


and performed on the Kronos Quar- 
tet’s 1992 Pieces of Africa album. His 
people derive from Malians, Sene- 
galese, Gambians and others forced 
by Arab dominators into bondage 
and servitude centuries ago in Moroc- 
co. But while these peoples lost their 
freedom, they maintained and devel- 
oped their cultures, fusing them into 
a new nationality—the Gnawa. 


HAKMOUN’S MUSIC is trance, a stir- 
ring, cave-throated music that trem- 
bles with bass and soars with vocals 
befitting a mosque’s caller-to-prayer. 
At turns prayerfully contemplative 
and ass-shakingly danceable, Gnawa 
trance music ranges from acoustic- 
traditional to electrified-modern. But 
the name “trance” has little to do 
with discos or drugs. 


VUE WEEKLY, CJSR FM 88.5 AND NEW CITY PRESENT: 


SFRI JAN 30 | 


10081 Jasper Ave. Poladium Bild 
coll 429-CLUB for more info 


AYA) = 


VVEEKLY 


“The music is used for fj 
healing,” Hakmoun tells 
me over the telephone. 
“[The Gnawa] use it for © 
ceremonies and they’re }| 
‘trancing’ to the music. 
The music is very spiritual 
and powerful that people 
can ‘trance into.’ The | 
music has a history [since] 
600 years ago. [My people] 
have been performing this 
kind of Sufi music 
through all these years.” 

1993’s Trance, Hak- 
moun’s first major-label 
release, was a dynamo of electric gui- 
tars and sequenced loops, ideal for 
nightclubs and concerts, raging with 
ragamuffin rhythm. That album and 
sound, Hakmoun says, were created 
“through the performances that we 
were doing and what people wanted 
in certain festivals... and for us, to 
mix the music with other styles, is 
just like a family united, get together 
and having a wonderful time by per- 
forming all these kinds of instru- 
mentation.” 

Because much of Gnawa culture 
originates in Mali, which has similar 
trance music ceremonies, Hakmoun 
feels a kinship with musicians from 
Mali and neighbouring Senegal. “I’m 
very good friends with [Senegalese 
international superstar] Youssou 
N’Dour, also Baaba Maal and Salif 
Keita from Mali.” He's performed in 
Brazil with Baaba Maal, but he’s also 
currently recording with Linda 
Tillery’s Ethnic Heritage Ensemble, 
an African-American spiritual folk 
group which has performed at 
Edmonton's Folk Festival. Two of 
their collaborations will appear on 
Hakmoun’s new album. 


HAMZA EL-DIN, meanwhile, is a 


master of the elegant, bassy oud (the 
ancestor of the lute and the musical 


downtown 


Hassan Hakmoun 


anchor of North Africa and the Mid- 
dle East), an instrument he intro- 
duced to Nubian music at the same 
time he was studying European music 
in Italy. In 1964 he recorded Music of 
Nubia, the first of his 14 albums, in 
the United States. He even composed 
music for the Grateful Dead when 
they toured Egypt and has recorded 
in Japan with musicians from across 
the world. His classic style embraces 
Moorish songs from five centuries 
ago (“Muwashshah”) to Iraqi poetry 
of five decades ago, yet it perpetually 
expresses the soul of the Nubian peo- 
ple. Spread across Sudan and Upper 
Egypt, the Nubians lost much of their 
land and uncountable, priceless 
antiquities of their ancient culture 
when their lands were flooded to cre- 
ate Lake Aswan. This loss of home 
finds expression in the haunting 
melancholy of much of El-Din’s 
work, especially songs such as “The 
Visitors” from 1982's Eclipse. 

Edmonton has rarely seen two 
artists of such stature in one night. A 
winter visit by two desert men weav- 
ing the magic of song must not be 
missed. © 


HAMZA EL-DIN AND 
HASSAN HAKMOUN 
Winspear Centre ¢ Thu, Jan 22 (8pm) 


Empire Building 
Downtown 
10117-101 Street 
425-6151 


8pm til 
Midnight* 


Friday, January 23"... 


lor more into 
and menu, 16g onto: 


@ setae its 


Rimmer 


vueEwerkiy €> 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


bom 


By DAVID STONE 


Mayor vs. Judge 


I'm going to begin by saying this— 
Mayor Bill Smith is completely out 
of touch. His recent announcement 
that he’s going to deal with all-night 
dance clubs by forcing them to close 
during regular bar hours because of 
personal complaints he’s received—not 
officially logged complaints with Bylaw 
Enforcement that anyone has yet to 
produce, just people walking up to 
him, | guess—proves that he’s living in 
a shuttered house. With only two after- 
hours clubs left running in Edmonton, 
not to mention barely any large-scale 
parties—last February’s Vinyl Fantasy 
was probably the last massive in the 
past year—the city has effectively cur- 
tailed the “rave” problem. Full stop. 
Dance culture has moved on. Clear- 
ly, Smith has not. Now everything hap- 
pens in the clubs or at private functions 
that run fully within the limits of the law. 
The bar closes at 2 a.m., the lights come 
on at 2:30 a.m. and everyone goes 
home. The after-hours were granted 


permits to operate in the areas for which 
they Were zoned, which meant that 
someone figured this wasn’t going to be 
a problem. It’s not perfect, but telling 
adults that they can’t go out on Satur- 
day night and dance in a non-smoking, 
non-drinking establishment until the sun 
comes up isn’t a way to solve a problem. 

| wonder what Judge Jules would 
make of all this. The British DJ has seen 
all of this happen in his native land, 
where rave culture evolved from fields 
and warehouses into superclubs, 
lounges and a billion-dollar global 
industry. Of course, things are not as 
insane as they were back during the 
turn of the millennium, but it’s still a 
cultural leviathan. And the Judge has 
played an active, vocal role in it. 

The Judge is coming to town on 
Thursday, January 29, as a special guest 
of United Productions and Escape Ultra 
Lounge, and it’s the first time he’s been 
here. Looking over his journal entries 
on his website (www.judgejules.co.uk) 
he’s seen quite a bit of the world and 
knows firsthand how club culture has 
been under assault. His arrival at Space 
Miami, for example, was tainted by a 
police raid that took place at the club 
weeks earlier, which made fans believe 
his appearance wouldn’t take place. Of 
course, the show did indeed go on— 
and he rocked it. 

Which is what Jules does best. Over 
the years, he’s become the U.K.’s leading 
tastemaker in hard-edged dance sounds, 
combining trance, hard house and tech- 
no into an irresistible blend for dance- 
floors everywhere. It’s a fun, 


s¢Like holidaying in Twin Peaks, 
it is, as the title and chorus of 
his ode to road hogs observes, 
‘wicked and weird' ...4/599 

- Q MAGAZINE (UK) 


‘ship-hop for people who think 
they hate hip-hop * * * * 9 
- NOW MAGAZINE 


*¢Pick Hit - 'A’ 9 
- VILLAGE VOICE (US) 


**Buck is staggeringly talented 
both musically and lyrically, and 


this is a beautiful, complex 
album that gets deeper with 
every listen * * * *7 


- TORONTO SUN 


s¢_..Talkin' Honky Blues (is) one 
of the most evoeative dises of 


Debt ha a a a> me ieee 
- EDMONTON JOURNAL, 


24 JAN. TH 


www, buek65.com 


} 
Is 
if 


unpretentious approach that derives 
from his incredibly generous nature— 
take a look at his website again and note 
the Q&A forum, where fans can send 
him questions on just about anything, 
from mixing technique to life advice, and 
the Judge answers back in a straightfor- 
ward, good-humoured manner. He also | 
takes the time to answer just about every | 
message sent his way. You can’t say that 
about a lot of superstar Djs. 

Not only is he a class-A guy behind 
the decks and the keyboard, but he’s 
also a lauded producer (as Hi-Gate, 
and with his wife Amanda as Angelic) 
and a beloved radio personality, host- 
ing nis own popular show on BBC 
Radio One. Toss in a side career in jour- 
nalism and fatherhood, and Jules 
comes up as a real person in a surreal 
industry—you wish he could run for 
mayor. Hmm. Maybe while he’s here, 
we can convince him to stay. He could 
get together with Councillor Michael 
Phair and discuss funky eyewear. | 

Finally, remember that tonight 
(Thursday), New York House legend | 
David Morales will be funkin’ things 
up down at the Standard as a guest of | 
Connected Entertainment’s Spin 
Thursdays. Do not miss this show if 
you love house music—Morales is one 
of the true originals; he was there at | 
the beginning, and continues to inno- 
vate and surprise. And due to Golden 
Bears Hockey coverage on CjSR’s Sat- 
urday schedule, BPM: The Radio Show 
has been pre-empted until the end of 
February. See you out in the clubs— | 
late at night! © 


the new album 


oe 


TALKINGHONKY BLUES 


the OBSESSED come well DRESSED ) 


| WUEWEEKLY EP JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


e 


10, SHANIA TWAIN : UPI LIVE 


_ 3) CROW, SHERYL 
VERY BEST OF 
| 4) DIDO - LIFE FOR RENT 
__ 5) BLACK EYED PEAS 
_ ELEPHUNK 
» 6) NO DOUBT 
SINGLES 1992-2003 
7) EVANESCENCE 
FALLEN 
_ 8) FURTADO, NELLY 
FOLKLORE 

9) V/A-DANCE 
MUCH DANCE 2004 


| 10) RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS 


GREATEST HITS 


}. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN 
2, FINDING NEMO 
3. BAD BOYS Ii 


4, LORD OF THE RINGS: 
Two TOWER 


5 XZ: X-MEN UNITED 
6, INDIANA JONES SET 
7. FAMILY GUY: SEASON 1&2 
4. ULTIMATE GRETZKY 


G, BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER 
SEAS 5 


alessandramariaammara 


ALESSANDRA MARIA AMMARA 
DEBUSSY SCRIABIN CHOPIN 
(ARKTOS) 


ee] 
One hears about so many classical music 
competitions and winners that it’s a chal- 
lenge to differentiate between them. 
However, those in the know consider the 
Honens Competition to be Canada’s 
most important international piano tour- 
nament. It also takes place close to 
home, in Calgary. Along with cash prizes 
and concert engagements, the winner 


HORIZON 


up clos 
Ose 
STA GE fee 
Performing Arts Centre 


=) The Slip-Knot by 13 Dawe 


Saturday, January 24", 7:30 p.m. 
Vancouver-based writer/performer and winner of the 
+2001 "Just For Laughs" Comedy Award, TJ Dawe, 
| tells the story of three different day jobs — stock-boy at 
= | a drug store, Christmas parcel-tracker for the 

Post Office, and truck driver for a dumpster company. 

"...one of the most brilliant comic monologues ever delivered." 

- Montreal Gazette 
Tickets: $20 adults, $15 students & seniors www.tidawe.com 


Bluebird North Tour 


Where Writers Sing and Tell 
Friday, February 13th, 7:30 p.m. 

Eight singer songwriters, Tal Bachman, Lynn Miles, 
Shari Ulrich, Sue Foley, Alana Levandoski, Haydain 
Neale, Blair Packham & Russell deCarle from 
Prairie Oyster, share an intimate evening at Horizon Stage. These 
talented writers and singers will perform together and interact with 
their audience in a workshop setting. 

Tickets: $20 Adults, $15 Students & Seniors 


Crystal Plamondon ler 


Saturday, February 14”, 7:30 p.m. 

Spend a hot and spicy Cajun Valentine’s Day 

with your sweetheart. 

Alberta-born Crystal Plamondon’s music is 
influenced by the country music she grew up listening 

' to, the French Canadian songs that were sung in her 
family, and the Acadian/Cajun rhythms that surrounded her. She has 
created her own identity through French, English and Cree music. A 
dynamic entertainer, Crystal is known for her tremendous energy and 
‘Joie de vivre”. www.crystal-plamondon.com 
Tickets: $20 adults, $15 students & seniors 


Box Office: 962-8995 
TRAN aap, 


Theatre: 1001 Calahoo Road, Spruce Grove, AB 
Box Office: 420 King Street, King Street Mall 
www.horizonstage.com 


takes away a recording contract. This CD 
introduces Alessandra Marie Ammara, 
the Honens winner from 2000. 
Ammara, who looks like an Italian 
movie star, was born in Florence and 
has made a mark with her devotion to 
the impressionist composers. On this 
CD, she ripples through Debussy’s 
Reflets dans I’eau (“Reflections in the 
Water”) and the more somber Homage 
@ Rameau and Mouvement with elegant 
simplicity. (If anything, her touch is 
almost too perfect.) The inclusion of 


Scriabin’s Eight Etudes is a more chal- 
lenging choice, as this work is a little 
less well-known and therefore demands 
more careful attention on the part of 
the listener. The impressionists tend to 
create such a subtle pillow of sound 
one’s tendency is to float away rather 
than exercise one’s concentration. 
Chopin’s 24 Preludes provide the sub- 
stance of the CD. These pieces, one in 
each major and minor key, are so short 
they create a sense of yearning. Chopin 
himself preferred intimate audiences of 
friends. Were it not for his penchant for 
melancholy, his music might be best suit- 
ed to the most intimate grouping of all. 
—ALUSON KypD 


THE FLOOR 

AUTONOMY OFF/ON 
(INDEPENDENT) 

SS SEE 
While we could credit Grand Theft Auto: 
Vice City with having reacquainted 
mainstream culture with the gaudy 
excess of the ‘80s, bands like the Floor 
are helping to remind us that beneath 
that sea of soul-emptying, totally tubu- 


BS SY AMT RNS 
BS 


FURS 


lar synth-pop, there was an angry 
undercurrent of rebellious guitars duel- 
ing with cheap technology. As austere 
and ironically cold as the music might 
aspire to be, it’s the scratchy atmospher- 
ics that say it all, a notion lost in this age 
of ProTools key-corrected reality. 

So while scenesters pump spooge 
over the likes of Interpol and Hot Hot 
Heat for making Duran Duran cool again, 
it’s the Floor who are offering up echoes 
of true outcasts like the Cure, Joy Division 
and New Order on their second EP, 
Autonomy Off/On. And like their forefa- 
thers, the Floor provides a rich antidote 
to the empty angst of pop culture as they 
glide through the wasteland with Matt 
Pohl’s reverbing vocals, Dan Carlyle’s 
snapping drums, Graham Lessard’s per 
colating synths and sinewy guitars and 
Paul Armusch’s pulsing bass. What's more 
their note-perfect referencing of another 
era’s underground sound prompts an 
interesting question: if bands can shame- 
lessly revel in “authentic” punk and rock 
‘n’ roll, why can’t we also celebrate the 
breakthrough sound and vision that the 
‘80s underground hinted at? 


CRACKER 


CAMPER VAN 
BEETHOVEN 


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JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Plus, once you get past the history 
lesson and plunge into the propulsive 
drive of “Drown Inside” and the drama 


of “Impossible,” you hear the bastard 
cousin of punk coming back for its 
due. Ye tr tr He —Dave JoHNstTon 


NORTHERN STATE 
DYING IN STEREO 
(STAR TIME/RED) 
+. ee 
Most women in hip-hop do one of 
three things. Some drop rhymes about 
how they’ve been done wrong by 
men, how sexy they are or what they 
could do to a man. Yeah. Others war- 
ble in the background while gravel- 
voiced gangstas ramble on about their 
gripes with the world. And still others 
do nothing at all except play the ho. 
Thank feckin’ Gawd for Northern 
State. Forget the Beastie Boys compar- 
isons—they begin and stop with the old- 
school, lo-fi minimal beats. This Long 
Island trio can flip a sophisticated comic 
rhyme one moment, then harmonize 
over an introspective observation about 
life in their native Big Apple the next. 
There’s sass in the popping “At the 
Party,” political protest in “Signal Flow 
(You Can’t Fade Me)” and passion in “All 
the Same,” all delivered with a nimble 
flow. This is insanely brilliant material 
that, bolstered by some creative produc- 
tion, intellect and underground spirit, 
also rocks a party like an evolved version 
of Brassy. These women won't bend to 
your pimp posturing, so don’t even try. 
too tote —Dave “eae 


MARTYN JOSEPH 

WHOEVER IT WAS THAT BROUGHT ME 
HERE WILL HAVE TO TAKE ME HOME 
(PIPE/JERICHO BEACH) 
aS 
| hadn’t even heard of Martyn Joseph 
when | saw him perform during a Friday 
evening side stage session at the 2002 
Edmonton Folk Festival. The Welsh 
singer/songwriter was humble and 
unassuming: his voice was quiet and 
soft; his acoustic guitar was subtle and 
spare; his songs covered the genre's tra- 
ditional terrain, from lost love to losing 
love. Yet somehow, for some reason, he 
blew me away, especially his “hit” (if a 
Welsh folkie can have a hit), a bed con- 
versation called “Let's Talk About It in 
the Morning,” which even all these 
months later remains the epitome of 
weary passion in my memory. 

With a narrative voice that’s weary 
and passionate in equal measure, 
Joseph’s brand-new studio album, his 
first in five years, is the kind of record 
that on the surface seems indistin- 
guishable from dozens of other 
singer/songwriter discs out in the 
shops. But you don’t have to listen all 
that carefully to know that it’s much 
More than run-of-the-mill. Whether it’s 


the heartbreaking strings that swell up 


on several tracks or Joseph’s ability to 
distill poetic lyrical images from every- 
day lives, this album speaks to me. | 
can only imagine what it will say given 
the time for a closer communion. 


Fete ted —Dan RusinsTEIn 


PREMONITIONS OF WAR 

LEFT IN KOWLOON 

(VICTORY) 
SS 
Many hardcore metal acts simply let the 
guitars do the talking while the drum- 
mer is left to rat-a-tat merrily on his own, 
with the volume turned down. But with 
Premonitions of War, the rhythm is king. 
While POW can let the guitars loose with 
the best of them, the quintet is meticu- 
lous enough to allow for some interest- 
ing rhythm changes and experimental 
touches that you wouldn’t normally 
associate with hardcore. 

POW leaves some rather obvious 
clues that while they’re definitely one 
angry group of musicians, someone in 
the band must have some jazz instruc- 
tion in their past. It’s odd when you can 
pick up odd time signatures, syncopation 
and even a jazz-influenced fill or two in 
the all-out assault of the heaviest of 
metal, but with Left in Kowloon, you can. 

The first five tracks are quick hits, 
none of them longer than three min- 
utes, all bunched together with no 
breaks to form basically one cohesive 
series of blasts to the eardrum and 
abdomen. But when the band slows 
things down a bit for “Black Den,” 
POW shows their full potential. At this 
slower tempo, the guitars snarl like 
chainsaws and the bottom end is 
fleshed out—what the band loses in 


ist= 


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speed, they make up for in volume. 

While it’s far too early to tell if POW 
will be a major player in the-world of 
metal, they should be lauded for trying 
to craft an album, and not simply plow 
through riffs for speed’s sake. ¥r te te 
— STEVEN SANDOR 


RED SHAG CARPET 

RED SHAG CARPET 

(INDEPENDENT) 

Ss a ee) 
Remember when you were a kid learn- 
ing how to ride a bike and your dad 
made you wear your older brother's 
hockey helmet just to be safe? I’m sure 
the boys in the local rock combo Red 
Shag Carpet do; inside the jacket of 
their self-titled debut is a picture of the 
band members all sporting helmets. 
Perhaps it’s a metaphor or perhaps it’s 
a subconscious statement, but the 
band does play things safe on this 10- 
track long-player, the bass solo on “To 
the Rhythm” notwithstanding. 

That said, there are some good 
tunes here—"Rockland” is sassy and 
smart, and “Morris” sounds like a hip- 
pie jamboree jamming out on Han- 
son’s infectious 1997 single “Mmm 
Bop.” Not only that, the band’s opti- 
mistic approach and singer Ted Ani’s 
breathy delivery are refreshing in a 
rock world dominated by bombastic 
screamo doomsdayers. While I’m sure 
some of these jams shine more brightly 
in the live environment, perhaps the 
disc would have benefited from a 
slightly more focused (and less safe) 
approach in the studio. In other words: 
next time, boys, take off your helmets. 
Wee —IereD Sturrco 


10649.124 street 
780.732.1132 


www.listenrecords.net 


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VUEWEEKLY EP JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


city presents 


I've created a Monster 


Writer/director Patty 
Jenkins has nothing 
but sympathy for 
Aileen Wuornos 

By BRIAN GIBSON 


Leon Ridgway said at his trial 

in November 2003. “I also 
picked prostitutes as victims because 
they were easy to pick up, without 
being noticed. I knew they would 
not be reported missing right away, 
and might never be reported miss- 
ing.” The “Green River Killer” con- 
fessed to the murder of 48 women in 
the Seattle area. 

Here in Canada, Robert Pickton’s 
Vancouver trial for the murder of 
East End hookers approaches, and 
the bodies of eight Edmonton sex 
workers have been found on the 
city’s outskirts. Last year in Edmon- 
ton, 56 incidents of violence were 
reported to police by usually reticent 


fe: most prostitutes,” Gary 


prostitutes, and already this year 
six—including a beaten and intoxi- 
cated 35-year-old woman found 
wandering along Highway 14 east of 
Sherwood Park last Thursday morn- 
ing—have been called in. 

Talking over the phone to Patty 
Jenkins, I recall a conversation I 
once had about the Pickton murders. 
Two female students in my class had 
basically shrugged off the missing 
and dead Vancouver women, saying 
that it was their choice to be whores. 

The director of Monster has a 
response for them. “The interest to 
me in telling stories like this is those 
dismissals of other people's fates. I’ve 
seen tragedy in my life and I’ve seen 
people have tragic lives. And the fact 
that those people’s sadness is so 
often dismissed as some deep-down- 
inside belief that everything happens 
for a reason—you know, ‘Every cloud 
has a silver lining’—is so heartbreak- 
ing to me because there are people 
born with horrible lives, and the way 
that we separate ourselves from them 
by saying what the aunt says in this 


film and simultaneously saying 
everyone can move towards the light 
and clean up their lives.... No, they 
can’t. There are people with no 
choice and no mental health to 
access how to help themselves.” 
Jenkins’s film about Aileen 
Wuornos’s life, and her victims’ 
deaths, seems all the more important 
in the face of society’s tortured atti- 


BIO-PIC 


tude towards its most trapped and 
dismissed citizens. “Part of the most 
intriguing thing about her story,” 
Jenkins says, “and the thing that was 
so shocking to me when she was 
eventually caught, was that after 
how many prostitutes are found dead 
every year and after how many male 
serial killers there have been preying 
on female prostitutes... the fact that a 
prostitute turned around and started 
killing them back... the fact that she 
was capable of turning was almost a 
miracle of survival.” 


WUORNOS’S PERVERSE defiance 
and various contradictions fascinated 
Jenkins. After a six-year stint as a first 
assistant Cameraperson on various 
projects, she completed the American 
Film Institute Directors Program and 
soon chose a biopic of Wuornos as 
her first project. “I had seen Aileen’s 
story when it broke in 1990—I wasn’t 
a filmmaker yet at the time—and as 
the years went by... I did realize what 
a rich and interesting story hers was,” 
she says. “I was very influenced by 
the ’SOs and ‘70s tradition... of those 
character films that weren’t afraid to 
align themselves with a very ques- 
tionable lead [character].” 

Monster doesn’t just align itself 
with Wuornos—Jenkins sympathizes 
with the circumstances of the Flori- 
da prostitute’s life, plausibly insist- 
ing that the killer of at least six men 
was a Frankenstein largely formed by 
past male rapists and abusers, then 
ignored and ill-treated by a callous 
society that finally executes a 
woman who had undergone, as 
Jenkins says, “so much trauma and 
abuse, it’s almost unbelievable.” 

Wuornos’s father, whom she 
never knew, was a child molester and 
sociopath who ended up hanging 
himself. Abandoned by her mother 
and raised by her grandparents in 
Michigan, Wuornos became pregnant 
as a teen, gave the baby up for adop- 
tion and turned to prostitution, 
streetwalking Florida’s freeways, solic- 
iting sex from passing drivers. In 
1986, she hooked up with her first 
female lover, Tyria Moore (who bore 
an uncanny facial resemblance to 
Wuornos’s father). In December 1989, 
Wuornos shot Richard Mallory— 
who, it later turned out, had a history 
of sexual assaults on women—and 
murdered five or six more men in 
1990 with her .22 revolver. After 
many rambling, self-aggrandizing 
confessions, profanity-laced court- 
room rants, contradictory statements 
(she claimed that all her murders 
were committed in self-defence, but 
recanted on this shortly before her 
death), a friendship with and adop- 
tion by a Christian woman that even- 
tually soured and her demand to be 
killed, Wuornos was executed by 
lethal injection on October 9, 2002. 


BY THE TIME of her death, there was 
no shortage of opinion and informa- 
tion (from a Nick Broomfield docu- 


mentary and Court TV tapes of the tri- 
als, to five books and Jenkins’s own 
correspondence with Wuornos) for the 
director to sift through for her biopic 
of the world’s most infamous female 
serial killer. But it was in Wuornos’s let- 
ters to her childhood friend Dawn that 
Jenkins found Monster's voiceovers and 
some profoundly sad insights into this 
reviled woman’s character. “It was like 
a windfall of character information,’ 
she says. “They mostly shaded who she 
was, what her sense of humour was 
how she would tell you shocking infor- 
mation about her in the most offhand. 
ed way—just richness of detail that 
informed so much of her physicality 
and her behaviour and the voiceovers 
and things like that. 

“Dawn had this surgery once,” 
Jenkins continues, “and Aileen was 
like, ‘Oh, honey, God, I remember, it’s 
so funny, this one time I got kicked in 
the pelvis so badly that it was broken 
and I’m trying to walk around, and 
these people thought I walked like a 
duck’... and she would just skim right 
past this horrifying thing to get to the 
other side of it, and it was an amaz- 
ing, rich character trait.” 


THE DIRECTOR READILY ADMITS to 
compressing time periods (for 
instance, Moore and Wuornos 
hooked up in 1986, three years before 
she started killing) and taking other 
factual liberties, but says that her 
object was emotional honesty in a 
story that’s ultimately about 
Wuornos, not Moore or her victims 
“This is absolutely the greater truth of 
what happened in that time period,” 
Jenkins says. “I mean, I got to know 
her so well that to me I ended up feel- 
ing very confident about the decisions 
that I made.... Once I took in such 
volumes of information, you then 
have to decipher what, like a crimi- 
nologist, you believe was going on.” 

I would suggest that Jenkins is 
not so much an investigator as a 
coroner trying to speak for the dead. 
Monster is Jenkins’s post mortem 
examination of Aileen Wuornos and 
a call for a public inquiry into how 
and why prostitutes are being so eas- 
ily beaten and murdered on our 
streets while the rest of us turn a 
blind eye to injustice. O 


MONSTER 
Written and directed by Patty Jenkins * 
Starring Charlize Theron and Christina 

Ricci © Opens Fri, Jan 23 


Killer on the road 


While tabloids and entertainment shows want us 
to be on a nickname basis with celebrities from 
Bennifer to Jacko, the recent spate of serial killer 
flicks suggests that we’ve long been on a last- 
name basis with mass murderers. In the past two 
years alone, the subgenre has dissected Bundy, 
Gacy and Dahmer. But Patty Jenkins’s Monster, 
the latest addition to this corpus, isn’t about 
Charlize Theron doing Wuornos (in fact, the 
killer’s proper name is never mentioned in the 
film; she’s occasionally called “Lee” for short). 

It’s true that, so far, Oscar buzz and critical 
acclaim for the film, most notably Roger Ebert’s 
naming it the best film of 2003, has centred on 
the starlet’s makeup- and dental-prosthetics-assist- 
ed performance as Wuornos, or even Theron’s 
role as the film’s producer. The fact that the 
actress’s mother killed her father in self-defence 


has been dredged up again too. But the notorious 
celebrity of Aileen Carol Wuornos—victim and 
avenger, prostitute and serial killer, lesbian man- 
hater and abused straight woman—monstrously 
eclipses any retelling of her life. 

As Monster creeps along, Aileen Wuornos goes 
from a wannabe Marilyn Monroe to a sexually trau- 
matized victim who escapes into fantasies about 
love, a beach house and a stable job. As the film 
opens, “Lee” speaks in a rambling voiceover about 
her childhood dreams of being “discovered” and 
made a star as a tiny square of celluloid enlarges, fill- 
ing up the black screen with images of young Aileen 
flashing boys and soon turning to prostitution. Then 
Theron takes over as the adult Aileen, with her usual 
outfit of tanktop and acid-washed jeans, carrying the 
picture with her lumbering bulk, mottled skin, dirty 
blonde locks and gaping eyes. Throughout a 1980s 


Florida roadside world of biker bars, scuzzy truck- 
stops and rundown industrial areas, Theron’s brown 
pupils convey the character's frantic intensity. 

After hooking up in a bar with the raven-haired, 
moon-faced Selby (Christina Ricci), a young lesbian 
who's torn between sexual expression and religious 
repression, Wuornos’s defiance finds a target in 
men. Jenkins deliberately makes Aileen’s first sexual 
encounter in the film a symbol of her abuse by men 
and a partial justification of her subsequent murders 
of the clients who pick her up on the highway. After 
being sexually tortured by a brutal john in one of 
the most horrific scenes I’ve ever had to watch, 


Wuornos kills him to escape and then, in order to 


finance the facade of a happy life for herself and 


Selby, keeps killing johns and stealing their money. 
The codependency inherent in the PANS 


volatile relationship is nicely iy state, t00. Selby, 


the demanding child, pressures her lover to go 
back to hooking, whatever the consequences, 
while the parental Aileen teeters between angry 
protectiveness and emotional collapse. Yet the 
movie can’t always transcend the essential empti- 
ness of the two fantasists’ relationship, and Jenk- 
ins’s slant on Wuornos is too cut and dried, 

Still, propelled by Theron’s seething dynamo 
of a performance—peaking in a bus stop scene 


where Aileen’s toothy, sour expression dissolves 


into a tattered wreck of emotions—and a relent- 
lessly dark exploration of the dead end of one 
woman’s American dream, Monster lurked in the 


i) a 
Back to the Kutcher 


Ashton Kutcher 
keeps altering the 
future In Surprisingly 
deft Butterfly Effect 


By DARREN ZENKO 


hope you're hearing it here first: 

The Butterfly Effect is way bet- 
ter than right-thinking folks might 
expect it to be. A psychological 
thriller from writer/directors with 
Final Destination 2 and not much 
else on their résumés, starring comic 
meathead Ashton Kutcher in a “Hey, 
| can do dramatic roles” role... sur- 


Yice gonna hear this again, but I 


WIN PASSES 


vey says: “laughable trainwreck.” 

And I did laugh, at first, because 
I was in a laughing mood; before the 
film, we were having a few yuks at 
the expense of Torque. But after 10 or 
15 minutes, the admittedly rude 
Mystery Science Theatre whispers 
tapered off, replaced by respect as, at 
every obvious opportunity for drop- 
ping the ball, Eric Bress, J. Mackye 
Gruber and their all-giving young 
cast manage not only to keep that 
sucker in the air but hurl it in the 
unexpected directions that make 
psycho-thrillers work. 

And it is a psycho-thriller; don’t let 
anybody mislead you into believing 
that The Butterfly Effect is a science-fic- 
tion movie. Yeah, it has a fantastic ele- 
ment—a college dude (Kutcher) with a 


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fucked-up past discovers he possesses 
the mental ability to time-tunnel back 
to critical moments in his childhood 
and alter history—but that’s it. The 
rest is pain and anguish, appalling rev- 
elations of hidden histories, existential 
crises, panic building to madness, 


THRILLER 


increasingly frantic attempts to undo 
damage done.... It’s not quite Hitch- 
cock, but that name did pass often 
through my mind, along with The 
Twilight Zone, or maybe the slightly 
dumber The Outer Limits. 

The neophyte auteurs don’t 
pussyfoot around when it comes to 
using violence to shock the audience, 


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but it’s the violence itself, not the 
attendant bloodspray or gruesome 
aftermath, that provides the visceral 
terror, and these jolts are the back- 
beat to the movie’s rhythm of psy- 
chological horror. When, for 
example, quasi-punky alterna-dude 
Kutcher wakes for the first time into 
an “improved” timeline of his own 
creation and finds himself ina 
white-bread nightmare of privileged 
fratboydom, well... that’s really horri- 
fying, and it just gets worse from 
there. Hell, they even manage to 
treat us to a nice sketch of a prison 
flick for a third of the movie. 

If there’s a flaw to The Butterfly 
Effect, it’s that, at nearly two hours, it 
goes on a bit too long; even the best 
of Rod Serling’s chilling vignettes 


CTITWE! 


Presents 


would overstay its welcome by that 
point. But the length 
anced by a script 


is counterbal- 
that never betrays 
never feels the 
“explain” the time-traveling 
with insulting (and boring 


its central concept 
need to 
pseudo- 
science and never misses an opportu- 
nity to twist the knife a little bit 
more (although the half-copout end- 
ing might disappoint cruelty fans) 
It’s not a work of genius; it’s a work” 
of intelligent competence, a welcome 
rarity in the mindlessly pandering 
world of modern B-movies. © 


THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT 

Written and directed by Eric Bress & J. 
Mackye Gruber © Starring Ashton 
Kutcher, Amy Smart, Melora Walters 
and Eric Stoltz * Opens Fri, Jan 23 


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A 


2 adbece 2a eed ae ee 
Assassination tango 


Seijun Suzuki mixes 
gunfire with 
Technicolor in 
dizzying Pisto! Opera 


By PAUL MATWYCHUK 


apanese director of such films as 

Tokyo Drifter, Branded to Kill, 
Young Breasts, The Naked Girl and the 
Gun, Million Dollar Smash-and-Grab 
and his latest, Pistol Opera, has 
deservedly been praised for his off- 
beat sense of humour and his stun- 
ning eye for colour and outrageous 
camera compositions. For some rea- 
son, though, no one’s ever bothered 


Ses Suzuki, the legendary 


to recognize his genius for movie 
titles—I mean, doesn’t a triple-bill of 
Young Breasts, Million Dollar Smash- 
and-Grab and Pistol Opera sound like 
the greatest night of moviegoing you 
could possibly imagine? 

Then again, a Seijun Suzuki triple 
feature is probably easier to think 
about than to sit through—Pistol 


z 


Opera alone is so flamboyant and so 
endlessly, dizzingly creative that I 
needed a day or two in a dim room 
with grey walls to recover from its 
onslaught of colourful sets and 
jumpy editing. Three Suzukis in one 
sitting just might kill me. 

And in Pistol Opera, every character 


CHANGE ONE THING. 
CHANGE EVERYTHING. 


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is a killer. The protagonist is Miyuki 
Minazuki (Makiko Esumi, the former 
fashion model who Western audiences 
might remember from her starring 
tole in Maborosi). She’s an elite assassin 
who goes by the code name “Stray 
Cat.” Miyuki is currently ranked third 
in the Killers’ Guild, a highly competi- 
tive team of hired guns and murder- 
ers-for-hire whose practice of 
publishing an annual list of its mem- 
bers’ standings in the international 
assassin community makes them seem 
less like a crime syndicate than an 
unusually bloodthirsty tennis ladder 
league. By the time the film begins, in 


fact, the Guild has abandoned any . 


semblance of team spirit; instead, 
everyone is simply trying to kill off 
everyone who stands between them 
and the coveted title of “Number 


Makiko Esumi in Pistol Opera 


One” (a slot currently held by a gun- 
man known as Hundred Eyes). Miyuki 
tries to stay on the sidelines for as long 
as she can, but soon she has no choice 
but to go onto the offensive. 

However, no linear plot synopsis 
can possibly do justice to the frac- 
tured dream logic of Pistol Opera’s 
script or its wild, hyper-stylized visu- 
als. Back in the late ‘60s, when Suzuki 
was working for the Japanese studio 
Nikkatsu, he was fired for constantly 


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Acting does not get much better 
than the work done here by 
Sean Penn, Benicio Del Toro 
and Naomi Watts- 


Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES 
Dis 


BENICID NAOMI 


| IODEON 
JEATRE DIRECTORY 
Now rane ee i eee 


defying his producers and making 
what they called “incomprehensible 
movies. It’s easy to see why a com- 
mercial studio would get exasperated 
with him. The figures who populate 
Suzuki’s movies aren’t conceived the 
way characters in “normal” movies 
are; they don’t have clear motivations 
or backstories and they certainly don’t 
behave in predictable, easily under 
standable ways. They’re more lik; 
iconic figures in a modern dance 
piece—Suzuki cares more about the 
way they dress and the hypnotic way 
they move across the screen than 
what they’re thinking. 


CRITICS OFTEN DESCRIBE stylized 
scenes of movie violence as “balletic 
but few directors have taken thei: 
action scenes as far in that direction 
as Suzuki does in Pistol Opera. Th 
film closes with an astonishing show 
down between Miyuki and her myste- 
rious superior, Ms. Uekyo, and Suzuki 
films the whole sequence on a series 
of abstract stage sets as if it literally 
were a dance piece—there’s even a 
bunch of half-naked male dancers in 
full body makeup writhing around on 
the sidelines. 

Suzuki actually doesn’t seem all 
that interested in violence, or at least 
in gore—the gunfights and the knife 
battles in Pistol Opera are notably 
bloodless. He’s more in love with out- 
rageous visuals, bold camera move- 
ment and mischievous editing tricks 
In fact, I’d say Pistol Opera is one of the 
most inventively edited movies I’ve 
ever seen. Suzuki is a master at manip- 
ulating camera space; he loves using 
our knowledge of editing conventions 
in order to play practical jokes on us, 
making us think a character is in one 
place only to have them pop up some- 
place else. There’s an ingenious scene 
early in the film where Miyuki and a 
wheelchair-bound assassin chase each 
other around the waterfront—it’s a 
deadly cat-and-mouse in which the 
two killers seem to be hiding from 
each other not in geographical space 
but somewhere within the imaginary 
gap that’s created when Suzuki cuts 
from one camera angle to the next. 

Ironically, it's fans of traditional 
Asian action movies who might be 
most frustrated by Pistol Opera's 
unconventional style. In a weird 
way, I think ballet fans might like it 
better. It might be the best dance 
movie ever made that doesn’t actual- 
ly have any dancing in it. O 


PISTOL OPERA 

Directed by Seijun Suzuki ¢ Written by 
Kazunori Ito and Takeo Kimura ® Starring 
Makiko Esumi and Sayoko Yamaguchi ° 
Zeidler Hall, The Citade! © Fri-Mon, Jan 23- 
26 (9pm) * Metro Cinema * 425-9212 


VUEWEEKLY €=> 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Fee i ee 
Misperceiving 


Las Vegas 


The Cooler 
combines grit and 
sentiment with 
lukewarm results 


By PAUL MATWYCHUK 
e Cooler begins with an image 

that anyone who's ever flown into 

Las Vegas will recognize: an aerial 
shot of a glittering cluster of gaudy 
buildings and flashy neon lights 
appearing out of nowhere in the mid- 
die of the desert. It’s a sight that’s at 
once magical and 
tawdry, and that’s a 
combination that 
writer/director 
Wayne Kramer has tried to capture in 
this very odd comedy/drama about 
love and luck among the small-time 
inhabitants of Glitter Gulch. 

William H. Macy, looking like 


YY 


William H, Macy in The Cooler 


the world’s oldest, saddest eight- 
year-old boy with his jug ears and 
his amateurishly parted hair, is 
Bernie Lootz, a guy so contagiously 
unlucky that he’s actually been hired 
by the Golden Shangri-La casino as a 
“cooler”—i.e., the casino’s own per- 
sonal jinx. Every night, Bernie wan- 
ders around the casino floor looking 
for gamblers on a dangerous hot 
streak; amazingly, all he has to do is 
stand beside them to cause their luck 
to dry up and cause them immedi- 
ately to start losing. Bernie obviously 
resigned himself long ago to his 
unlucky life—his candy-coloured 
Suits and ties can’t disguise the 
hangdog expression on his face or 
his weary shuffle as he limps from 
- table to table. (His kneecap was bust- 
ed years ago when he got a few pay- 
ments behind on a loan.) 
But when love enters Bernie's life 
in the form of a beautiful cocktail 
waitress named Natalie (Maria Bello), 


Something in Bernie’s internal saint 


gets reversed. Happy for the first time 
in years, he suddenly becomes a walk- 


ing good luck charm, and he begins | 
making plans to leave Vegas and start | 


a new life somewhere far away with 
Natalie. Unfortunately, both Bernie 


This Party 


Macaulay Culkin is 
a Club-kid killer 


in wretched 
_| Party Monster 


and Natalie are under the thumb of | 


casino owner Shelly Kaplow (Alec 


Baldwin), an old-school Vegas type 


willing to do anything to prevent one | 


of his casino’s prime assets from slip- 
ping through his fingers. And since 
Shelly’s the guy who shattered his 
knee in the first place, Bernie has rea- 
son to fear for his future. , 
The only thing really wrong with 
The Cooler is, well, its premise: the 
conceit that Bernie 
really does possess 


magical unlucky | 


powers feels like a 
silly, effortful bit of whimsy—or at 
least it feels that way because of the 
obvious way Kramer and his co- 
writer Frank Hannah have chosen to 
dramatize it. (The running gag about 
the creamer always being empty 
whenever Bernie orders a cup of cof- 
fee gets old really fast.) And when 
Kramer attempts to mesh this fanci- 
ful storyline with “gritty” scenes of 
Shelly supplying heroin to a lounge 


singer or dragging a dice cheat into a | 


back room and attacking him with a 
tire iron, the competing tones just 
don’t mesh. 


_ON THE OTHER HAND, The Cooler 


contains a couple of terrific, surpris- 
ingly natural and realistic sex scenes 
between Macy and Bello, and Alec 
Baldwin rises above some phony, 
profanity-laced dialogue to deliver a 
marvelously menacing performance 


as Shelly. The extra pounds Baldwin | 


has packed on over the last few years 
suit this character, who's like the dis- 
reputable cousin of the ball-busting 
real estate salesman he played in 


Glengarry Glen Ross. Shelly thinks of | 


Vegas as “a beautiful whore” and he 
can’t stand to see her cleaned up, 
sanitized and turned into a tourist 
destination for the stroller crowd— 
he’s got a lot of fun scenes in which 
he squares off against a young corpo- 
rate type (Ron Livingston) who’s 
pressuring Shelly into renovating the 
Shangri-La and bringing it out of the 


.'60s and into the 21st century. 


Shelly's love of vulgarity and corrup- 
tion is so sincere, there’s a kind of 
admirable purity to it. 

Shelly would probably hate the 
way The Cooler oscillates so wildly 
between sentimentality and tough- 
mindededness. Be one thing or the 
other, he’d say. There’s no such thing 
as a hooker with a heart of gold. © 


ee | THE COOLER 
Directed by Wayne Kramer * Written by 
Wayne Kramer and Frank Hannah ¢ 
Starring William H. Macy, Maria Bello 
and Alec Baldwin # Opens Fri, Jan 23 


By JOSEF BRAUN 


Party Monster, based on the 
tedious adventures of former New 
York scenester Michael Alig and the 
1998 documentary they already 
made about him (also conveniently 
entitled Party Monster), is an exem- 
plary misreading of what makes 
engaging or even merely engagingly 
exploitative cinema. There have 
been a hell of a lot of boring movies 
made about drug-addicted creeps 
and cold-hearted killers over the 
years, but few can match Party Mon- 
ster for sheer lack of craftsmanship, 
content or even shock value. 
Former child star Macaulay 
Culkin, in his first role since 1994’s 
Richie Rich, plays Alig, a vacuous pret- 
ty boy from upper-class suburban 
roots who came to New York in the 
late 1980s, learned how to be “fabu- 
lous” (i.e., dress like a freak, take lots 
of drugs and revel in superficiality), 
created a series of genuinely auda- 
cious parties that earned no money 
but made headlines (parties in mov- 
ing trucks, parties in fast food joints), 
was an insufferable asshole to a lot of 
people and, when his 15 minutes of 
fame, finally seemed up, iced one of 
his pals for no apparent reason. 
Alig’s closest partner in crime, fel- 
low club kid James St. James, is 
played by Seth Green, while one of 


. Fre Bailey and Randy Barbato’s 


| Alig’s many lovers is played by Chloé 


Sevigny. Culkin and Green spend the 
film prancing around like a couple of 


Tad nauseam 


Win a Date 


With Tad Hamilton! 


is full of sickeningly 
sweet clichés 


By JAMES ELFORD 


love and cherish formulas, so 
why shouldn’t Hollywood? After 
all, the teenage girls who'll fill the 


Gesetan and mathematicians 


| theaters to watch the harmless 
| romantic comedy Win a Date with 


Tad Hamilton! aren't expecting to 
see The Last Temptation of Christ. It's 
just too bad that formula has a way 
of letting filmmakers get away with 


| movies that aspire to no higher 


praise than “competently executed.” 

Win a Date with Tad Hamilton! is 
the tale of a sweet-as-sugar small-town 
Virginia gal named Rosalee Futch (Kate 
Bosworth) who fantasizes about Holly- 
wood hunk Tad Hamilton (Josh 
Duhamel). These fantasies would 
remain just that—except Rosalee wins 
a date with Hamilton as part of a PR 


| 


simpering ninnies 
about 20 years late for 
the glam rock bus, At 
best, their prancing 
resembles a live-action 
Terrence and Philip: 
both are absurdly fey, 
shallow and bitchy 
poseurs without an 
ounce of humour or 
even a shred of human- 
ity. Sevigny is mere 
window dressing, repre- 
senting nothing more _ 
than confirmation of | 
Alig’s solid bisexuality. 
It's a particular shame 
to see the reasonably 
talented Green turn in 
such a grotesque perfor- 
mance—yet, to be fair, 
what are any of these 
actors to do when faced with such 
appallingly empty material? 

Bailey and Barbato pyll out 
numerous tricks to win us over, each 


5 


more pathetic and dull than the last. 
The hits of the ’80s littering Party 
Monster don’t accurately reflect the 
ostensibly subversive club scene of 
the time, but we're supposed to titter 
with gleeful recognition anyway 
when Alig has his first big gay New 
York kiss while fireworks explode 
overhead to the beats of “You Spin 
Me Round.” Alig’s flaky mom (anoth- 
er depressing performance, this time 
from Diana Scarwid) has a confronta- 
tion scene with St. James that’s 
meant to be poignant and forebod- 
ing but rings 100 per cent false, and 
everyone keeps dying from ODs like 
the most predictable soap opera. 


campaign designed to land Hamilton a 
job when some compromising photos 
threaten his career. However, Hamil- 
ton, caught up in the ennui of being a 
rich teen idol, falls for Rosalee and her 
“goodness,” to the point where he fol- 


lows her back home. One there, he ; 


enters into a romantic triangle with 
Rosalee’s longtime male friend, the 
bug-eyed Pete Monash (Topher Grace 
of That ‘70s Show fame), who has 
secretly loved her for years. Will Ros- 
alee be swept away by the charming 
Hamilton, or will she fall in love with 


Z 


the mundane and penniless Pete at the 
last minute? The answer is as obvious 
as the characters are one-dimensional. 
Duhamel’s Hamilton is a Holly- 
wood bad boy who isn't all that bad. 
He's not particularly mean, rude or 
condescending. In fact, his biggest 
crime is stealing a line from Pete that 
he uses to woo Rosalee—but there's 
no indication that he’s motivated by 
any other reason than wanting her to 
be with him. He doesn’t even seem 


Macaulay Culki 


vf ® 


n in Party Monster 


In one scene so stupid it nearly 


provokes a laugh, aspiring writer St. © 


James works himself into a sleepless, 
drug-fueled frenzy composing a 
novella. The next morning, he goes 
to inspect the fruits of his hard work 
and finds (gasp!) nothing but sheet 
after sheet of blank paper! This is 
more ridiculous than those anti-drug 
adverts the U.S. government made 
in the '70s and 80s. The real punch 
line, however, is that St. James actu- 
ally went on to write Disco 
Bloodbath, the book that provided 
Bailey and Barbato with their source 
material in the first place. Me, I’d 
take the blank sheets any day. © 


PARTY MONSTER 

Written and directed by Fenton Bailey’ 
and Randy Barbato Starring 
Macaulay Culkin, Seth Green and 
Chloé Sevigny © Zeidler Hall, The 
Citadel * Fri-Mon, Jan 23-26 (7pm) « 
Metro Cinema © 425-9212 


too interested in getting her to sleep 
with him, an act of devilish chi- 
-canery that would certainly put him 
at odds with Pete's character and give 
the audience a reason to cheer for 
the hometown dork. 

While Bosworth lacks the screen 
presence to carry the film the way 
Reese Witherspoon did in director 
George Luketic’s previous effort, Legal- 
ly Blonde, the performances from the 
supporting cast are hammy enough to 
garner plenty of cheap laughs. Ros- 
alee’s slutty friend Cathy (Ginnifer 
Goodwin) lusts after Hamilton with 
comments that made me thihk I 
should pay her an extra $5.99 a 
minute, while Nathan Lane and Sean 
Hayes give unsurprisingly over-the-top 
performances as Hamilton's toadying 
agent and manager. Topher Grace is 
the film’s biggest saving... er, grace, his 
bitter and cynical asides poking fun at 
the very clichés the movie revels in. © 
WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMIL 

Directed by George Luketic * Written by 
Victor Levin © Starring Kate Bosworth, 
Topher Grace and Josh Duhamel « 
Opens Fri, Jan 23° 


WuEWEEKLY €E> JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


NEW THIS WEEK 


FIRST-RUN MOVIES 


The Butterfly Effect (FP, L) Ashton 

Kutcher, Amy Smart and Ethan Suplee 
PICK star in writer/directors Eric Bress and J. 

Mackye Gruber’s sci-fi mindbender 

about a young man who figures out how to 
travel back in time to his childhood, and who 
must return to the past over and over again to 
repair the disastrous effects his voyages have 
had on his future reality. 


Khakee (FP) Amitabh Bachchan, Akshay 

Kumar and Aishwarya Rai star in director 

Rajkumar Santoshi’s action thriller about a 

team of operatives who are attacked while 

escorting a dangerous terrorist into custody. In 
¥ Hindi with English subtitles. 


Love That Boy (P) Nadia Litz, Adrien Dixon 
and Nikki Barnett star in Parsley Days director 
Andrea Dorfman’s low-budget comedy about 
a socially inept girl who embarks on a desper- 
ate quest to land a boyfriend before she grad- 
uates from college, only to fall in love with a 
14-year-old boy. 


ra) Monster (GA) Charlize Theron and 
— Christina Ricci star in writer/director 
ter Patty Jenkins's sympathetic biopic 
about Aileen Wuornos, the troubled 
woman who in the ‘80s became known as 
“America’s first female serial killer,” and her 
needy relationship with her emotionally 
stunted lesbian lover. ‘ 


Party Monster (M) Macaulay Culkin, Seth 
Green and Chloé Sevigny star in this true- 
crime biopic by The Eyes of Tammy Faye direc- 
tors Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato about 
Michael Alig, a fixture of the decadent 1990s 
New York club scene whose relationship with 
his former mentor ended in a burst of horrify- 
ing violence. Zeidler Hall, The Citadel; Fri-Mon, 
Jan 23-26 (7pm) 


(at) Pistol Opera (M) Makiko Esumi, 
“A Masatoshi Nagase and Mikijiro Hira star 
Pp 


Efe in Branded to Kill director Seijun Suzuki's 

outrageous action picture about an elite 
female assassin who reluctantly becomes 
enmeshed a battie to become Tokyo's num- 
ber-one killer. In Japanese with English subti- 
tles. Zeidler Hall, The Citadel; Fri-Mon, Jan 
23-26 (9pm) 


ra) Tom, Tom, The Piper’s Son (M) 
Director Ken Jacobs's 1969 masterwork, 
fgg a milestone in the history of experimen- 
tal film, in which a 10-minute silent film 
from 1905 is obsessively dissected, slowed 
down and freeze-framed. Zeidler Hall, The 
Citadel; Thu, Jan 22 (7pm) 
Win a Date With Tad Hamilton! (CO, FP, 
L) Kate Bosworth, Josh Duhamel and Topher 
Grace star in Legally Blonde director George 
Luketic’s teen comedy about the romantic 
triangle that arises between a vain Holly- 
wood idol, the small-town checkout girl who 
meets him through a “win a date” contest 
and her best friend, who’s always had a 
secret crush on her. 


GARNEAU 
tneatr 


~ 4353-0728 


THE YEAR! 


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SRLIZE THERON CHRISTINA RCT 


MONSTER 


Bayne ee a Tere 


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MADOEEL BUSS & FTW 


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N 7:00 & 9:15 pm 
onden Matinee 2:00 pm 
°18A¢ (sexual violence, coarse language) 


Along Came Polly (CO, FP, L) Ben Stiller, 
Jennifer Aniston, Philip Seymour Hoffman and 
Debra Messing star in Safe Men director John 
Hamburg’s romantic comedy about a man 
who must conquer his pathological fear of 
taking risks after his marriage falls apart and 
he falls in love with a beautiful but unpre- 
dictable new woman. 


Cal) Big Fish (CO, FP) Ewan McGregor, 
Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica 
fgg Lange and Helena Bonham-Carter star 
in Batman director Tim Burton's whimsi- 
cal fantasy about a dying man whose habit of 
spinning tall tales about his wild adventures as 
a travelling salesman has always infuriated his 
hard-headed son. Based on the novel by 
Daniel Wallace. 


Calendar Girls (CO) Helen Mirren and Julie 
Walters star in Saving Grace director Nigel Cole’s 
fish-out-of-clothing comedy, based on a true 
story, about a group of British women who doff 
their duds for a calendar and a good cause. 


Chasing Liberty (CO, FP) Mandy Moore, 
Matthew Goode and Mark Harmon star in 
Leave It to Beaver director Andy Cadiff’s 
romantic comedy about the teenaged daugh- 
ter of the president of the United States who 
rebelliously ditches her Secret Service handlers 
and goes on a road trip across Europe with 
her new boyfriend. 


Cheaper by the Dozen (CO, FP) Steve Mar- 
tin, Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff and Piper Perabo 
star in Big Fat Liar director Shawn Levy's 
domestic comedy about a spectacularly fertile 
small-town football coach with 12 children 
whose home life becomes even more chaotic 
than usual when he takes a job at Chicago's 
Northwestern University. 


ral) Cold Mountain (CO, FP) jude Law, 
Nicole Kidman, Renée Zellweger, Kathy 
fie Baker, Philip Seymour Hoffman and 
Natalie Portman star in The English 

Patient director Anthony Minghella’s epic, 
episodic film version of Charles Frazier’s novel 
about a Civil War deserter and his grueling 
trek back home to the bride he left behind in 
North Carolina 


Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat (CO) Mike 
Myers, Alec Baldwin, Kelly Preston and Dakota 
Fanning star in director Bo Welch’s film ver- 
sion of the classic children’s book about a 
boisterous feline who pays an uninvited visit 
on two kids while their mother is gone, and 
gleefully sets to work destroying their house. 


ra) House of Sand and Fog (CO, FP) Ben 
Kingsley, Jennifer Connelly, Ron Eldard 
and Shohreh Aghdashloo star in direc- 

tor Vadim Perelman’s moody adapta- 
tion of Andre Dubus III’s novel about a 
recovering alcoholic and an Iranian ex-colonel 
whose battle for the ownership of a house 
leads inexorably to tragedy. 


A snare: fee Oneas” conmoridier, A marche Mat je lassi 
nena athe of 


IN AMERICA 


Nightly 7:15 & 9:30 pm 
Sat & Sun Matinee 2:30 pm 
¢PGe (mature theme) 


fq star in My Left Foot director Jim Sheri- 
dan‘s emotional, autobiographical film 
about a bereaved Irish family struggling to sur- 
vive in a rundown New York City apartment 
while the father pursues an acting career. 


The Last Samurai (CO, FP) Tom Cruise, Ken 
Watanabe, Billy Connolly and Timothy Spall star 
in Glory director Edward Zwick’s historical epic 
about an alcoholic Civil War veteran who travels 
to Japan to train and modemize the emperor's 
troops, but decides to switch sides after being 
exposed to the honour code of the samurai 
warriors the emperor is determined to wipe out. 


ral) The Lord of the Rings: The Return 
of the King (CO, FP) Elijah Wood, lan 
iftg McKellen, Viggo Mortensen and Liv 
Tyler star in the long-awaited conclud- 
ing chapter of director Peter Jackson’s epic 
film adaptation of |.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy of 
fantasy novels about a band of hobbits, trolls, 
elves, wizards and humans who embark on a 
quest to destroy an evil, all-powerful ring. 


ral) Master and Commander: The Far 
w Side of the World (P) Russell Crowe 
PIC 


In America (P) Paddy Considine, 
_ Samantha Morton and Djimon Hounsou 
PIC 


K and Paul Bettany star in Witness director 
Peter Weir's waterlogged adventure 

yarn, based on the novels of Patrick O'Brian, 
in which 19th-century British sea captain Jack 
Aubrey and ship surgeon Stephen Maturin 
brave storms and cannonfire as they pursue a 
French “super-frigate” from Cape Horn to the 
Galapagos Islands. 


Mona Lisa Smile (CO) Julia Roberts, Julia 
Stiles, Kirsten’Dunst and Maggie Gyllenhaal 
star in Four Weddings and a Funeral director 
Mike Newell's drama, set in 1953 at Wellesley 
women’s college, about a rebellious teacher 
who makes it her mission to ensure her stu- 
dents aspire.to be more than socialites, host- 
esses and housewives. 


Moving Malcolm (CO) Benjamin Ratner (who 
also wrote and directed), John Neville and Eliza- 
beth Berkley star in this comedy/drama about a 
neurotic writer who hopes to regain the love of 
his ex-girlfriend by helping her elderly father 
move to a new apartment. 

My Baby’s Daddy (CO) Eddie Griffin, Antho- 
ny Anderson and Michael Imperioli star in The 
Watermelon Woman director Chery! Dunye’s 
comedy about three friends who must face up 
to a life of midnight feedings and dirty diapers 
when their girlfriends all get pregnant at the 
same time. 


ra) Mystic River (FP) Sean Penn, Kevin 
Bacon and Tim Robbins star in Unforgiv- 
en director Clint Eastwood’s moody 
drama, set in working-class Boston, 
about three childhood friends whose traumat- 
ic memories of the past are revived when one, 
now a police detective, begins to suspect 
another of killing the third’s daughter. Based 
on the novel by Dennis Lehane. 
Paycheck (CO, FP) Ben Affleck, Uma Thur- 
man, Aaron Eckhart and Colm Feore star in 


LOVE THAT BOY 
Nightly 7:00pm 
Sat & Sun a 1:00 pm 


BREATHLESSLY ABSORBING. 
The New York Times 


TrR.. ™ 
MANDER / 


Nightly 9:00 pm 
Lage hat rapr a neste 
e C 


VIOPENCE) 


Face/Off director John Woo’s sci-fi action pic- 
ture about an electrical engineer who must 
piece together the last two years of his life after 
his memory is erased by the sinister company 
that has employed him on a top-secret project. 
Based on the short story by Philip K. Dick. 


Peter Pan (CO, L) Jeremy Sumpter, Jason 
Isaacs, Rachel Hurd-Wood and Ludivine Sag- 
nier star in My Best Friend’s Wedding director 
P.J. Hogan’s film version of James Barrie's 
beloved children’s book about three London 
children who travel to the mythical world of 
Neverland, where a gang of unaging boys do 
battle with a band of ruthless pirates. 


Something’s Gotta Give (CO, FP) Jack 
Nicholson, Diane Keaton, Keanu Reeves and 
Amanda Peet star in What Women Want direc- 
tor Nancy Meyers’s romantic comedy about a 
middle-aged rascal who re-evaluates his life- 
long preference for dating much younger 
women when he finds himself falling in love 
with the middle-aged mother of his latest tro- 
phy girlfriend. 


The Statement (CO, FP) Michael Caine, Tilda 
Swinton and Alan Bates star in The Hurricane 
director Norman Jewison’s adaptation of Brian 
Moore’s novel about an elderly Frenchman 
whose serene, anonymous life is shattered 
when the French government launches a new 
investigation into his actions during World War 
Il, which resulted in the deaths of seven Jews. 


Stuck on You (CO) Matt Damon, Greg 

Kinnear, Cher and Eva Mendes star in 
igi There’s Something About Mary directors 

Peter and Bobby Farrelly’s wacky come- 
dy about a pair of Siamese twins whose close 


not sure if the 

spate of movies like Some- 
thing's Gotta Give, Satin 
Rouge and Laure! Canyon in 
Wialeiame)(e(=1anVelaa(-1al ell m0] 0) 
sexually with much younger 
men is necessarily ushering 
in an empowering new era 
in Hollywood, but at least 
it’s a refreshing alternative to 
the typical movie scenario, 
in which leathery, saggy old 
Michael Douglases keep 
snuggling up to willowy 
young Gwyneth Paltrows. In 
any case, the new Canadian 
indie Love That Boy repre- 
sents an unusual variation 
on the older woman/ 
younger man premise: it’s 
the story of a college senior 
in her early 20s (Nadia Litz) 
who falls for a boy who's 
barely 14 (Adrien Dixon), 
Boy, that Adrien Dixon kid 
must have the greatest 
agent in the world. 


relationship is threatened when one of the 
brothers decides to go to Hollywood and pur- 
sue his dream of becoming an actor. 


Teacher's Pet (CO, FP) The voices of Nathan 
Lane, Shaun Fleming, Kelsey Grammer and 
Megan Mullally are featured in this big-screen 
version of the animated TV series about a 
superintelligent dog who accompanies his 
master to school in order to learn more about 
the world. 


Torque (CO, FP, L) Ice Cube, Martin Hender- 
son, Monet Mazur and Jay Hernandez star in 
director Joseph Kahn’s action-packed B-movie 
about a motorcycle racer who goes on the 
lam when he is framed for the murder of the 
brother of the man in charge of a-dangerous 
biker gang. : 


ral) 21 Grams (CO) Sean Penn, Naomi 
Watts, Benicio Del Toro and Melissa 
Leon star in Amores Perros director Ale- 

jandro Gonzalez Ifarritu’s intense, 
chronologically scrambled drama about three 
people whose lives are bound together by a 
sudden, inexplicable tragedy. 


CO: Cineplex Odeon, 444-5468 
EFS: Edmonton Film Society, 439-5285 
FP: Famous Players 


GA: Garneau Theatre, 433-0728 
L: Leduc Cinema, 986-2728 
M: Metro Cinema, 425-9212 
P: Princess Theatre, 433-0728 


The ASA and The EAG with Take A Bow Productions presents: 


TALKING TO TREES: 4 Portrait of EMILY CARR 


A play written by Edmonton playwright Elizabeth Bowering which 
premiered to sold out audiences and standing ovations at the 
2003 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival. 
at The Edmonton Art Gallery Theatre 
2 Sir Winston Churchill Square (99 st & 102A Ave, Edm) 


FOUR SHOWS ONLY! 
Thursday, Jan 29 to 
Sat, Jan 31/04 at 7:30pm 
and Sun, Feb 1 at 2:00pm 


Sun matinee includes a special slide 


show of the work of Emily Carr 


Directed by 
Heather Fitzsimmons Frey 
and featuring Jon Baggaley, 
Lori Biamonte-Mohacsy, 
Linda Grass and Alison Wells 
info at 
talkingtotrees.latest-info.com 


Pps ata i Ni gc 
Tickets at the door (1/2 hour before the performance) or 
in advance at Tix on the Square: 420-1757 

www.tixonthesquare.ca — y 
$15 or $12 for students, seniors, and visual artists 
Sunday matinee $12 for everyone 


VuEweEKiy QI JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


Showtimes for Friday, January 23 to Thursday, January 29 


All showtimes are subject to change at any time. 
Please contact theatre for confirmation. 


8712-109 St, 433-0728 
MONSTER 18A 


Sexual vilence, coarse language. 
Daily 7,00 9:15 Sat Sun 2.00 


10337-82 Ave, 433-0728 
MASTER AND COMMANDER: 
THE FAR SIDE OF THE WORLD 144 
Violence. 
Daily 9:00 Sat Sun 3.00 
LOVE THAT BOY 14A 
Daily 7.00 Sat Sun 1.00 
IN AMERICA PG 


Mature theme. 
Daily 7.15 9.30 Sat Sun 2.30 


METRO CINEMA 


9828-101A Ave, 
a 

PARTY MONSTER 18A 
Substance abuse. 

Fr-Mon 7.00 

PISTOL OPERA sTc 
Fri-Mon 9,00 

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Thu 7.00 


RANDIN THEATRE 


Grandin Mall, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, 
St. Albert, 458-9822. 


LORD OF THE RINGS: 

THE RETURN OF THE KING 144 
Violence, frightening scenes. 

Daily 1.30 7.00 


TORQUE 14A 
Violence. Daily 9.30 

PETER PAN G 
Daily 12.45 3.10 


BIG FISH PG 
Not recommended for young children. 
Daily 6.30 9.00 


ALONG CAME POLLY G 
Daily 1.153.15 7.15 9,15 


CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN G 
Daily 1.00 3.30 7.00 


THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT sTc 
Daily 1.10 3.20 6.45 9.10 


4762-50 St, 986-2728 
TORQUE 144 
Violence. Daily 7.20 9.20 Sat Sun 1.20 
PETER PAN PG 
Sat Sun 3,30 
ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. 
Daily 7.05 9.10 Sat Sun 1.15 3.15 
WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 
Times not available. 
THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT stc 


Times not available. 


(1) 780-352-3922 
TORQUE 14A 
Violence. Fri-Thu 7.20 9.25 Sat Sun 1.20 3.25 
ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. 
Daily 6.50 9.00 Sat Sun 1.05 3.00 
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN G 
Daily 7.10 9.15 Sat Sun 1.10 3.35 
WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 


Daily 7,00 9.00 Sat Sun 1.00 3.15 


CINEPLEX ODEON CINEMAS 


CINEMA GU 


10200-102 Ave, 421-7020 
ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. 
Daily 12.30 2.40 4150 7.10 9.20 
TORQUE 144 
Violence. 


Daily 9,30 


LORD OF THE RINGS: 

THE RETURN OF THE KING 144A 
Violence, frightening scenes. 

Daily 1.40 7.50 


COLD MOUNTAIN 18A 
Daily 1.30 6.30 9.40 


CALENDAR GIRLS PG 
Nudity. 
Daily 1.10 4.20 7.40 10.15 


BIG FISH PG 
Not recommended for young children. 
Dally 1.00 4.00 7.20 10.10 


21 GRAMS 18A 
Daily 12.50 3.40 6.40 

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT sTc 
Daily 1.20 4.10 7.00 9.50 

WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 
Daily 12.40 3.00 5.10 7.30 10.00 

MYSTIC RIVER 144 
Coarse language. 


Daily 12.45 3,50 6,50 9.55 


8882-170 St, 444-1829 
LOST IN TRANSLATION 14A 
Fri Mon-Thu 7.00 9.10 Sat-Sun 2.10 4.30 7.00 9.10 
GOTHIKA 14A 


Violence, disturbing content. Fri Mon-Thu 9.00 
Fri Mon-Thu 8,50 Sat-Sun 2.00 8.50 


HONEY PG 
Fri Mon-Thu 6.40 Sat-Sun 4.20 6.40 
MY BABY'S DADDY 14A 


Crude and sexual content. Fri Mon-Thu 7.20 
Sat-Sun 2.20 4.40 7,20 


THE STATEMENT 14A 
Violence. Daily 9.00 

AMERICAN SPLENDOR 14A 
Daily 9.40 

HOUSE OF SAND AND FOG 14A 


Disturbing content. Fri Mon-Thu 6.45 9.20 
Sat-Sun 1.30 4.10 6.45 9.20 


LOVE ACTUALLY 14A 
Sexual content. Fri Mon-Thu 6.30 9.15 
Sat-Sun 2.30 6.30 9,15 


PETER PAN PG 
Fri Mon-Thu 6.55 9.30 
Sat-Sun 1.40 4.15 6.55 9.30 


ELF G 
Fri Mon-Thu 6.50 Sat-Sun 1.45 4.00 6.50 
CHASING LIBERTY PG 


Fri Mon-Thu 7.10 9.35 Sat-Sun 1.50 4.35 7.10 9.35 


THE LAST SAMURAI 14A 
Gory scenes. Daily 3.30 6.30 9.35 


LORD OF THE RINGS: 

THE RETURN OF THE KING 144 
Violence, frightening scenes. 

Daily 12.40 3.45 4.45 7.45 8.50 


MONA LISA SMILE PG 
Daily 1.00 
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN S 
Daily 1.15 4.15 6.50 9.00 
COLD MOUNTAIN 18A 
Daily 12,30 3.40 6.45 9.50 
PETER PAN PG 
Daily 1.10 
CHASING LIBERTY PG 
Daily 7.00 9.30 
ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. Daily 1.05 3.15 5.30 7.40 10.00 
TORQUE 148 
Violence. Daily 1.20 3.25 5.20 7.20 9.20 
TEACHER'S PET G 
- Daily 12.50 2.45 5.00 
THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT sTc 
Daily 1.30 4.00 7.10 10.10 
WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 
Daily 12.45 3.00 5.15 7.30 9.45 

SOUTH EDMONTON COMMON 

1525-99 St, 436-8545 

DR. SEUSS' THE CAT IN THE HAT PG 
Daily 1.15 
THE LAST SAMURAI 14A 
Gory scenes. Daily 1.30 5.00 8.30 
SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE PG 
Coarse language, sexual content. 
Daily 12.30 3.20 6.40 9.30 


LORD OF THE RINGS: 
THE RETURN OF THE KING 14A 
Violence, frightening scenes. 

Fri-Tue Thu 12.15 2.00 3.30 4.45 6.45 7.45 9.15 

Wed 12.15 2.00 3.30 4.45 7.45 9.15 


MONA LISA SMILE PG 
Daily 12.50 3.45 6.50 9.40 

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN G 
Daily 1.40 4.10 6.30 9.00 

PETER PAN PG 
Daily 1.10 4.00 

21 GRAMS 168A 
Daily 7.40 10.30 

CALENDAR GIRLS PG 
Nudity. Daily 1.45 4.20 7.15 9,45 

BIG FISH PG 


Not recommended for young children, 
Daily 12.40 3.40 7.20 10.10 


ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. 

Daily 12.20 1.20 2.50 3,50 5.30 7.00 8.00 9.20 10.20 
TORQUE 14A 


Violence. Fri-Tue Thu 12.45 3.00 5.10 7.50 10.40 
Wed 12.45 3.00 10.40 


WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 
Daily 12.10 2.30 4.50 7.30 9.50 
Star and Strollers Thu 10am 


THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT sTc 
Daily 12.00 1.00 2.40 4.15 5.20 
7.10 8.10 10.00 10.45 


-171 444- 
BROTHER BEAR G 
Fn Mon-Thu 7.00 Sat-Sun 1.15 4.15 7.00 
THE SCHOOL OF ROCK PG 


Fri Mon-Thu 7.30 10.00 
Sat-Sun 1.45 4.45 7.30 10.00 


LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION G 
Sat-Sun 1.30 4.30 

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN PG 
Not suitable for younger children. Daily 9.00 

THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS ‘ 14A 


Violence. Fri Mon-Thu 6.40 9.30 
Sat-Sun 12.45 3.45 6.40 9.30 


RUNAWAY JURY PG 
Violence. Fri Mon-Thu 6.50 9.40 
Sat-Sun 1.00 4.00'6.50 9.40 


TIMELINE 14A 
Violence. Daily 7.15 9.50 
THE MISSING 14A 


Violence. Fri Mon-Thu 6.30 9.15 
Sat-Sun 12.30 3.30 6.30 9.15 


G CINEMAS @ SHERWOOD PARI 


2020 Sherwood Drive, 
416-0150 
SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE PG 
Coarse language, sexual content 
Fri-Sun 3.30 6.55 9,40 Mon-Thu 6.55 9.40 


LORD OF THE RINGS: THE 

RETURN OF THE KING 144 
Violence, frightening scenes. Fri 4.15 8.30 9.00 
Sat-Sun 12.00 4.15 8.30 9.00 Mon-Thu 8.30 9.00 


CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN G 
Fri 4.05 6.50 9.30 Sat-Sun 1.15 4.05 6.50 9.30 
Mon-Thu 6.50 9.30 


COLD MOUNTAIN 18A 
Fri 3.25 6.40 10,05 
Sat-Sun 12.05 3.25 6.40 10.05 Mon-Thu 6,40 10.05 


PETER PAN PG 
Sat-Sun 12.20 

BIG FISH PG 
Not recommended for children, 


Fri 4.00 7.00 10.00 Sat-Sun 1.00 4,00 7.00 10.00 
Mon-Thu 7.00 10.00 


CHASING LIBERTY PG 
Fri 3,15 Sat 12.25 3.15 Sun 12.25 
ALONG CAME POLLY PG 


Crude content. Fri 3.40 7.15 9.50 Sat-Sun 12.40 3.40 
7.15 9.50 Mon-Thu 7.15 9.50 


TEACHER'S PET G 
Fn 4.20 6.30 Sat-Sun 12,10 2.15 4.20 6,30 
Mon-Thu 6.30 


TORQUE 144 
Violence. Fri-Sat Mon-Thurs 6.45 9.15 Sun 9.15 


THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT 
Fri 4.30 7.05 9.45 Sat-Sun 1.30 4.30 7.05 9.45 
Mon-Thu 7.05 9.45 


WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! 

Fri 4.45 7.10 9.35 Sat-Sun 1.45 4.45 7.10 9,35 
Mon-Thu 7.10 9.35 

WWF: ROYAL RUMBLE 
Ciassification not available, Sun 5.00 


NORTH EDMONTON CINEMAS 
14231-137 Ave, 732-2236 
THE LAST SAMURAI 14 
Gory violence, Fri-Wed 12.20 3.40 7.00 10.10 
Tha 3.40 7.00 10,10 
SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE PG 


Coarse language, sexual content 
Daily 1.10 3.50 6.50 9.45 


LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN 


OF THE KING 144 
Violence, frightening scenes. Fri-Sun Tue-Wed 12.15 
2.35 4.20 7.30 8.30 Mon Thu 12.15 2.35 

MONA LISA SMILE PG 
Daily 6.40 9.15 

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN G 
Daily 12.30 2.45 5.10 7.50 10.00 

PAYCHECK PG 
Violence. Daily 1.30 4.10 7.15 9.50 

PETER PAN PG 
Daily 12.05 

COLD MOUNTAIN 18A 
Daily 12.00 3.20 6.30 9.55 

CALENDAR GIRLS PG 
Nudity. Daily 12.50 3.30 7.05 9.35 

BIG FISH PG 


Not recommended for young children. 
Daily 1.20 4.30 7.40 10.15 


CHASING LIBERTY PG 
Daity 12.45 

ALONG CAME POLLY PG 
Crude content. Daily 12.40 3.00 5.20 8.00 10.2 
TEACHER'S PET G 
Daily 1.00 2.50 5.00 

TORQUE 14A 


Violence. Fri-Tue Thu 3.10 5.30 8.10 10.05 
Wed 3.10 10,05 


WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON! PG 
Daily 1.40 4.00 7.20 9.40 

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT stc 
Daily 2.00 4.50 7.45 10.30 

PETER PAN PG 
Daily 12.05 


GATEWAY 8 


29 Ave, Caigary Trail, 436-6977 


MYSTIC RIVER 144 
Coarse language. Fri Sat Sun 12.40 3.40 6.45 9.35 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 6.45 9.35 


COLD MOUNTAIN 184 
Fri Sat Sun 12,00 3.15 6.40:9.50 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 6.40 9.50 


PAYCHECK PG 
Violence. Fn Sat Sun 12.50 3.45 7.20 9.55 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.20 9.55 


CHASING LIBERTY PG 
Fri Sat Sun 1.15 4.15 7.05 9.30 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.05 9.30 


THE STATEMENT 14A 
Violence. Fri Sat Sun 1,20 4.00 7.10 9.40 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.10 9.40 


TEACHER'S PET G 


Fri Sat Sun 12.20 2.15 4.20 7.00 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.00 


HOUSE OF SAND AND FOG 14A 
Disturbing content. 9.20 
KHAKEE ’ sTc 


Fri Sat Sun 2.30 6.00 8.00 9.15 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 8,00 9.15 


SILVERCITY WEST EDMONTON MALL 


WEM, 8882-170 St, 444-2400 
THE LAST SAMURAI 144 
Gory scenes. 12.05 3.20 6.50 10.15 
SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE PG 


Coarse language, sexual content. 
12.20 3.30 6.55 10,00 


LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN 

OF THE KING 144 
Violence, frightening scenes. 12.00 4.15 8.30 Fri Sat 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 12.00 1.00 4.15 5.15 8.30 9.30 Sun 
12.00 1.00 4.15 8.30 9.30 Cinebabies Wed 1pm 
PAYCHECK 

Violence. Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Thu 12.15 3.35 7.20 
10.05 Wed 12.15 3.35 10:05 


CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN cc] 
12.45 3.25 6.45 9.10 


‘COLD MOUNTAIN 168A 
12.10 3.15 6.40 9.55 


BIG FISH 
Not recommended for young childrer 


12.403 05 10.10 


ALONG CAME POLLY 
No passes, Crude content 


TORQUE 
Violence 
9.20 Thu 12.50 
TEACHER'S PET 

12.30 2.45 5.00 

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT 


1.15 4.00 7.00 7.30 9.50 10. 


3.05 9.20 


WIN A DATE WITH TAD HAMILTON 
1.45 4.20 7.15 9.45 


WWF: ROYAL RUMBLE 


Classification not available, Sun 5.00 


1,30 4.30 7.45 10.3( 


fi Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed 12.50 3.08 


| WESTMOUNT CENTRE 


111 Ave, Groat Rid, 455-8726 


LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN 
OF THE KING 


Viol frightening 
Fri Sa nm 12.00 4.15 Mon Tue Wed Thu 7 
SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE 


Fri Sat Sun 12.30 3.45 7.00 9.40 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.00 9.40 
ALONG CAME POLLY 


rude content. Fri Sai 2 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 7.15 9.4§ 


THE MISSING 

Violence, Sat Sun 10.50 
Daily 1.25 4.15 6.55 9.45 
Fri Sat late night 12.20 


THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS 


Violence. Sat Sun 10.45 


Daily 1.20 4.05 6.50 9.40 
Fri Sat late night 12.20 
TIMELINE 
ce. Sat Sun 14 
45 4.15 7.0 
ft late night 12.05 
BAD SANTA 


fIMOVIES 12 
{CINEMA CITY 12 


SHOWING AT BOTH CINEMAS 


sTc 


144 


144 


140 


18A 


Crude sexual content, not recommended for children. 


Sun 11.15 Daily 1.35 4.45 7.20 9.30 


night 11.35 
BLIZZARD 


Sat Sun 11.30 Daily 1.55 4.20 


SCARY MOVIE 3 

CG e content. Sat Sun 11.55 
ly 2.15 4.50 7.40 10.15 
Fri Sat late night 12.10 


LOONEY TUNES: BACK IN ACTION 
Crude content. Sat Sun 11,05 
Daily 1.00 3,00 


INTOLERABLE CRUELTY 
Coarse language. Sat Sun 11.50 
Daily 2.10 4.55 7.35 9.55 

Fri Sat late night 12.00 


UNDERWORLD 
Gory violence. 

Daily 9.25 

Fri Sat late night 11.50 


KILL BILL: VOLUME 1 
Gory violence. 

Sat Sun 11.35 

Daily 2.00 4.40 7.30 10.00 
Fri Sat late night 12.15 


RUNAWAY JURY 
Violence. Sat Sun 11.00 
Daily 1.40 4.30 7.10 9.50 
Fri Sat late night 12.20 


THE SCHOOL OF ROCK 
Sat Sun 11.25 

Daily 1.50 4,35 7.15.9.45 
Fri Sat late night 11.55 


BROTHER BEAR 
Sat Sun 11.10 
Daily 1.05 3.15 5.10 7.00 


RADIO 
Daily 5.05 7.25 10.05 
Fri Sat late night 12.25 = 


THE RUNDOWN 
Daily 7.45 10.10 
Fri Sat late night 12.30 


18A 


# 


Not necessarily the muse 


‘Beth.Graham and 
Daniela Viaskalic 
explain the inspiration 
for The Last Train 


By PAUL MATWYCHUK 


what you could call a pretty good 

season. She won Sterling Awards 
for Best Actress and Best Supporting 
Actress for The Glace Bay Miners 
Museum and The Blue Orphan, The 
Shape of Girl (which she performed 
for Concrete Theatre) was named 
Best Production for Young Audiences 


[: 2002/2003, Beth Graham had 


and Stop Kiss (in which she had one 
of the two lead roles) was named 
Outstanding Production by a Collec- 
tive. And as if all that weren’t 
enough glory, The Last Train, the 
play she co-wrote with her equally 
distinguished collaborator Daniela 
Viaskalic, won the $3,500 top prize 
in the Alberta Playwriting Competi- 
tion. In only five years since graduat- 
ing from the U of A’s acting program, 
Graham and Vlaskalic have earned 
about as many awards and accolades 
as it’s possible to get in this town, so 
it’s interesting that The Last Train 
takes as its subject a group of women 
whose contribution to the world of 
art remains a very well-kept secret. 
“We started off thinking about 


Nude the obscure 


David Nasseri’s 
nude photography 
conveys the 
mystery other 
artists leave out 


By AGNIESZKA MATEJKO 


T-: may seem a bit scandalous 
coming from a middle-aged, happi- 
ly married mother of two, but I do 


think that sex is about the most fun 
that an adult can have. So it puzzles 


me that I am continually put off by 
much of what passes as sexual 
imagery—everything from the soft- 
bellied beauties in art history books to 
the silicone-stuffed babes weighing 
down magazine stands. It must be a 
gender problem. After all, art and pho- 
tography have been a male domain for 
generations. Maybe men focus too 
much on mechanics, I thought; 
they're like sexual engineers who scru- 
tinize specific body parts and their 
functions, missing the whole beauty 
of sexuality in the process. But just as I 
was getting comfortably entrenched in 
my opinions of male artists, along 


writing a play about the women 
behind famous men,” Graham says. 
(Graham and | are sitting in the Shad- 
ow Theatre office, while Vlaskalic— 
who's in Vancouver with Arms and the 
Man—is a disembodied voice emanat- 
ing from a speakerphone, which lends 
our interview a pleasing “Hello, 


THEATRE 


Angels” quality.) “Then we got the 
idea of doing artists and the women 
who inspired them—their muses. We 
were going to set the play in a muse- 
um, but as we started researching, we 
discovered this fascinating period in 
history when the Nazis were looting 


came David Nasseri with his exquisite- 
ly delicate and subtly erotic show of 
photography Inamorata. 

“‘TInamorata’ means to have eyes 
full of affection, or to be inspired by 
love,” Nasseri says. (The dictionary 
definition is “a woman who is 
loved.”) Nasseri couldn’t have picked 
a more apt title. His photographs of a 
nude woman take a drastic departure 
from the barren stereotypes of this 
overdone genre. “There is one nipple 
in the whole show,” Nasseri laughs— 
and you'd have too look very hard to 
find that one. 

Instead, Nasseri fills his photos 
with all the poetry, all the joy and 
fullness of sexuality that most artists 
leave out. The pale body of a woman 
emerges from his dark images like 
the crest of a wave in the night. Even 
though her face remains obscured, 
her very human presence is implied 
by gestures filled with underlying 
emotions. In one instance the 
woman is shown clutching her wrist. 
“] find that one disturbing,” Nasseri 
explains. “It’s scary; it’s like a 
moment of angst. There is a drama 
that attracts me, but it makes me feel 
dirty because it shows a representa- 
tion of a person who is suffering.” 


PERHAPS THE UNUSUAL WAY the 
photographs came about has some- 
thing to do with the intensity of the 


Paris of their art treasures and taking 
them out of the country. So then sud- 
denly, it was set on a train.” 

The somewhat bizarre premise 
Graham and Vlaskalic ended up with 
centres around five women, all of 
them the subjects of portraits by 
famous artists from Picasso to Van 
_Gogh to Toulouse-Lautrec, who 
climb out of their frames as they ride 
in a sealed boxcar from Paris to 

- Switzerland. As the train hurtles 
through the night, the women fret 
about their fate once they reach their 
destination, share their memories of 
their lives and the artists who paint- 
ed them and debate matters of love 
and art, hustling back into position 
whenever a Nazi officer enters the 
boxcar to inspect his stolen treasures. 

Graham and Vlaskalic based 
some of the women (e.g., Picasso’s 
onetime lover Dora Maar) on actual 
historical figures, while others were 
created using the time-honoured 
technique that Graham calls “mak- 
ing stuff up.” “Two or three of the 
five are based on actual events,” 
Vlaskalic says. “The Picasso and the 
Modigliani are definitely based on 
fact, while the Van Gogh is slightly 
based on a real person. The other 
two—the Toulouse-Lautrec and the 
Degas—we invented.” 

“With the Degas, they-don’t 
even know who the model is,” Gra- 
ham says, “but we thought the 
woman looked a lot like the woman 
in paintings Degas made of his sister. 
And that was a relationship we 
wanted to explore anyway, so we 
took some liberties.” 


GRAHAM AND VLASKALIC, whose 
previous work together includes the 
Fringe hits The Drowning Girls and 
Comrades, say their collaborative 
process continues to be unusually 
harmonious and free of major dis- 
agreements—even though The Last 


Train was written with the pair liter. 
ally sitting side by side at the com. 
puter. (“A few weeks ago,” Grahan 
says, “we realized we'd never di; 
cussed the layout of the boxcar, by; 
it turned out we'd visualized ever, 
thing in exactly the same places.”) 

The trickier part of writing th, 
play came in the rewrites, as Grahay, 
and Vlaskalic tried to make their 
“magical” premise as internally con. 
sistent and logical as possible. In on; 
early draft of the play, one of th, 
women talks about hanging on th 
wall and watching “herself” groy 
older; in another, a woman Nearly 
dies when the Nazi officer looks at je; 
painting when “she”’s not “inside” |; 
Both ideas raised needless complica. 
tions, they decided, and were cut 

They discarded other ideas fo; 
more practical reasons, including 
sheer sympathy for the actors. “\) 
thought about having one of th 
paintings be a nude,” Graham sa\ 
“but that would mean someon: 
would have to be naked through t/ 
entire play. And that wouldn’t b 
too comfortable.” 

Fair enough, but once we start 
analyzing the play’s premise, | find 
can’t resist quizzing them about ii 
like an obnoxious Sunday schoo! stu 
dent. “What if there was a painting of 
Jesus on the train?” I ask. “What 
one of Degas’s horse paintings was in 
there? Would a big old horse star 
clip-clopping around the boxcar? 

“] don’t know,” sighs Vlaskalic ai 
long last. “I think the play’s more 
about bringing the women and these 
different time periods to life than it 
is about the premise.” © 


THE LAST TRAIN 
Directed by John Hudson © Written by 
Beth Graham and Daniela Viaskalic « 
Starring Coralie Cairns, April Banigan 

and Maralyn Ryan © Varscona Theatre « 

Jan 22-Feb 8 © 434-5564 


show. “These are secrets you should 
never tell,” Nasseri laughs. “These 
[photographs] are-all from one roll of 
film.” The entire show was shot in one 
evening With a single light source, 
under conditions.that most photogra- 
phers would frown on. “Nothing was 
right for taking good pictures,” he 
says. “But I was relaxed and open to 
seeing things I hadn’t seen before.” 
Nasseri shot the whole roll after 
having some wine and dinner with a 
close friend. “Her name is Liz. We 
never had a long relationship, not 
sexual, just really intimate,” explains 


VISUAL ARTS 


Nasseri. “A part of it was the exercise 
of doing these pictures. It’s not some- 
thing I will do often with anyone; it’s 
too draining because of the intimacy. 
It’s very strong for both sides, for 
‘both the photographer and the 
model. There is a tremendous deal of 
trust required. There is vulnerability 
to exploitation—the image of your 
body as a slab of meat. I worried 
about that a lot.” Nasseri put these 
photos aside and never considered 
the pictures as a group in a show, but 


over the years he continued-to go. = 


back to them. There was a tension in 
these images that he found com- 
pelling—a mood that was not sexual 


but which existed on the edge of sex- 
uality all the same. Finally, Nasseri 
decided that this spontaneous roll of 
film and not his usual, carefully con 
sidered images of urban decay would 
form this, his first show. 


NASSERI IS KEENLY AWARE of the 
risks he took as a male photographer 
depicting the female body. “Just look 
at the media,” he says. “For men the 
relationship with women is laced 
with sexuality.” In this sexualized 
milieu he worries that however he 
portrays the female body, it will not 
escape sexual connotations. But 
Nasseri’s show has managed to evade 
this tedious preoccupation with the 
mechanics of sex and bring to life the 
intensity and the poetry that lies on 
the peripheries of sexual experience 

“Photography is a male-dominat- 
ed profession concerned’ primarily 
with tremendous sexual: objectifica- 
tion,” Nasseri says. “The next gene! 
ation is mostly women. It’s going 
change things. It’s up to everyone i? 
this generation to reexamine the 
male gaze of the female body.” !f 
Inamorata is any indication, th¢ 
doors of change have been fluns 
wide open. © yas 


~~ INAMORATA 
_ By David Nasseri * Sugar Bowl Coffe: 
and Juice Bar* To Jan 30 


vuewecKly €P> 


++" 


SUV =e 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


ves 


By PAUL MATWYCHUK 


impeccable Taste 


A Taste of Bedlam ¢ The Third Space 
(11516-103 Ave) © To Jan 25 « 
reVUE Most of the Sterling nominations 
in the set design category tend to go to 
big-budget Citadel shows set in 19th- 
century Europe or else to eye-popping 
“environmental” sets with lots of dirt 
piled onto the stage along with little 
forests of trees and rocks. That's all well 
and good, but | think Kevin Corey 
deserves a nomination too for his work 
on James Hamilton’s Nighthawk Rules 
(one of the two terrific one-act plays that 
make up A Taste of Bedlam, along with 
Collin Doyle’s Joy). The walls may be rick- 
ety and the furniture looks like it came 
from the “as is” room at Ikea, yet it 
evokes with uncanny precision the horror 
of every young couple’s apartment 
where the girl has been allowed to do 
the decorating. Ghastly stuffed animals 
sit on the bookshelves, throw pillows 
embroidered with heartwarming sayings 
litter the couch and those awful faux- 
handtinted posters of cute little boys kiss- 
ing cute little girls festoon the walls. 

It's impossible to look at this place 
without shuddering—especially if you're 
a party animal like Dick (Hamilton) visit- 
ing his depressingly domesticated best 
friend Barry (Doyle). Horrified to see his 
buddy surrendering his wild-and-crazy 
spirit for a “responsible” life as a pussy- 
whipped receptionist at a carpet-clean- 
ing company, Dick takes Barry on in a 
day-long winner-takes-all drinking con- 
lest. The prize: nothing less than Barry's 
soul. If Dick passes out first, he agrees to 
exit Barry's life for once and for all. But if 
Barry goes under, he agrees to do what- 
ever Dick tells him. 

Barry assumes that means returning 
to his former life of drink, drugs and 
debauchery, but the delightful twist in 
Hamilton’s raucously funny script is that 
Dick turns out to have even more of a 
stake in Barry’s future than it initially 
appears. | shouldn’t give away the sur- 
prise, but suffice it to say that when Dick 
tells Barry, “I’m the best relationship 
you've ever had,” he’s speaking the truth. 

Doyle is wonderful as the henpecked 
Barry; whenever he defends his girlfriend 
Pam, he does so with the pained, whim- 
Pering loyalty of a castrated dog. And 


Hamilton is uproarious as the accurately | 
named Dick. This is a character that | 
could easily come across as an obnox- | 
ious jerk, but Hamilton wisely plays him | 
as a life force—Dick may be vulgar, but 
he’s honest and always has his friend’s | 
best interests at heart. 

Joy, despite its much more sombre 
tone, makes an excellent companion | 
piece. It’s also about two people whose | 
souls connect over the course of an 
extended, liquor-fueled conversation: 
Christopher Postle is Adam, a lonely | 
thirtysomething virgin whose world 
has become even narrower following 
the death of his mother; Lora Brovold 
is Joy, the more sexually experienced 
but equally depressed young woman 
he’s met over the Internet. The play 
hops back and forth in time during 
their first date and their last night on 
earth; Adam and Joy have agreed to kill 
themselves once the night is over. 

Doyle skillfully walks a dangerous 
tightrope here, avoiding both preten- | 
tiousness and morbidity as Adam and 
Joy confess their last few remaining 
secrets to each other and share a ten- 
der night of intimacy before they 
asphyxiate themselves. He has a good 
ear for wry, naturalistic dialogue, and 
Adam and Joy always sound convinc- 
ingly like real people talking, despite 
their somewhat extreme state of mind. 
Director Michael Cowie sustains the 
delicate mood with some haunting, 
silent scene transitions and an array of 
well-chosen musical selections. 


Trading fours 


Also vying for your attention this week- | 
end: Over the Edge With 4-Play, Cata- 
lyst Theatre’s annual fundraising event in 
which four brand-new plays are written, 
rehearsed, designed, performed, | 
reviewed and awarded prizes, all in the 
space of about 12 hours. As always, it’s | 
the playwrights who arguably have the 
toughest task: writing a coherent script 
that incorporates a preassigned opening 
line of dialogue, a bizarre prop and juicy 
roles for four of Edmonton’s bravest 
actors (Andrea House, Kate Ryan, Julien 
Arnold and Chris Craddock) in three | 
hours flat. This year, perennial 4-Play | 
scribes David Belke and Cathleen Root- | 
saert will square off against two playwrit- 
ing teams: Stewart Lemoine and Josh 
Dean, and Wes Borg and Neil Grahn. 
Directors Bradley Moss, Ron Jenkins, 
Trevor Schmidt and the Magnetic North 
festival's Mary Vingoe will be on hand, 
doing their best to turn the resulting 
scripts into something stageable. And |'ll 
be there too, defending my thre#year 
unbeaten streak as “Fourmost Reviewer” 
against Colin Maclean, Eva Marie Clarke 
and Kevin Wilson. May the best critic 
win—or at least the speediest typist. O | 


Fax your free listings to 426-2889 or e-mail them 
to listings@vue.ab.ca. Deadline is Friday at 3pm 


AMELIA Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave (427- 
2760/451-8000) * La La La Human Steps, pre- 
sented by the Brian Webb Dance Company, per- 
formed by eight dancers, choreographed by 
Eduard Lock (Montréal) « Jan. 29 (8pm) * $25 to 
$50 © Tickets available at TicketMaster 


ORCHESIS DANCE MOTIF 2004 Myer Horowitz 
Theatre, SUB, U of A Campus * Moder and jazz 
dance featuring works by six emerging student 
choreographers * Jan. 23-24 (8pm) * $10 
(adv)/$12 (door) * Tickets available at SUB (U of 
A Campus) 


PIVOTING ECHOES Arden Theatre, 5 St. Anne 
Street, St. Albert (459-1542) * Presented by 
Decidedly Jazz Danceworks, live music with 
Kristian Alexandrov, George Koller and Julie 
Michels © Jan. 22 (8pm) * $22.50 (adult)/$18.50 
(student/senior) 


i GALLERIES/MUSEUMS 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY 10186- 
106 St (488-6611/4808-5900) * Open Mon-Sat, 
10am-Spm, Thu 10am-8pm (closed all hols) « 
WIND CHILL -40 C OR WINTER WONDERLAND: 
Members mixed media show; until Mar. 27 « 
DISCOVERY GALLERY: D/VERSION: Metal art- 
works by Roaseann Janzen and glass artworks by 
Fern Jordan; until Feb. 21 * Opening reception 
Sat, Jan. 24 (2-4pm) 


ALL SAINTS’ ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL 10035- 
103 St (477-0001 /428-6323) * Open: Mon, 
Wed, Fri 10am-2pm, Thu-Fri 5pm-8pm, Sat 
noon-4pm, Sun 9:30am-2:30pm * ANGLICANISM 
AND THE WESTERN CHRISTIAN TRADITION, CON- 
TINUITY AND CHANGE: Textile panels in the 
Cathedral Hall track tahe history of the Christian 
Church in Britain since the time of the Romans « 
Until Feb. 12 


ARTSHAB STUDIO GALLERY 3rd Floor, Knol 
Building, 10217-106 St (423-2966) * Open Thu 
5-8pm or by appointment * Artworks by Ryan 
Brown, Jeff Collins, Aaron Pederson, Tim Rechner, 
Paul Roberts, Gabriela Rosende, Greg Swain, Anna 
Szul, Eugene Uhuad and guests 


CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA 
9103-95 Ave (461-3427) * Group show featuring 
artworks by members of the Centre ¢ Until Feb. 4 


CHRISTL BERGSTROM’S RED GALLERY 9621- 
82 Ave (439-8210) * Open Mon-Fri 11am-Spm * 
A VIEW TO UNDERSTANDING: Portraits by Christ! 
Bergstrom; until March * THE DEAD DOG 
DOGMA SERIES: Paintings by Christ! Bergstrom; 
through January 


EDMONTON ART GALLERY 2 Sir Winston 
Churchill Sq (422-6223) * Open Tue-Wed and Fri 
10:30am-Spm; Thu 10:30am-8pm; Sat, Sun 
11am-Spm. Closed Mon * STORYBOARD: until 
Feb. 8 «© THE OTHER LANDSCAPE; until Feb. 15 « 
GODZILLA VS. SKATEBOARDERS; until Feb, 22 « 
KIM ADAMS AND DAVID HOFFOS; until Feb. 22 « 
CRAIG LEBLANC WORK FROM THE SOPHOMORE 
JINX; until Feb. 22 ¢ CHILDREN’S GALLERY: 
SPELLBOUND; Jan. 25-jan. 2005 * ALL IN ONE 
DAY SUNDAY: Sun, Jan. 25 * TALKING TO TREES: 
A PORTRAIT OF EMILY CARR: Play by Elizabeth 
Bowering, presented by the Alberta Society of 
Artists; Jan. 29-31 (7:30pm); Sun, Feb. 1 (2pm) « 
ART FOR LUNCH: EAG Theatre; Thu, Jan. 29 * 
$15 © $12/$10 (student/senior), $5 (children 6- 
12)/free (member/children 5 and under) 


EXTENSION CENTRE GALLERY 2nd FI University 
Extension Centre, 8303-112 St (492-3034) « 
Open Mon-Thu 8:30am-8pm; Fri 9:30am- 
4:30pm, Sat 9am-noon * Lorna Kemp, graduat- 
ing student exhibition * Jan. 26-Feb. 4 


FORT DOOR 10308-81 Ave (432-7535) * Open 
Mon-Wed 10am-6pm; Thu-Fri 10am-9pm; Sat 
10am-6pm; Sun 12-Spm * Eskimo soapstone 
carvings, mother and child by Salia Kelly. West 
Coast Indian and Eskimo silver and gold jewellery 
by D. Was © Until Jan. 31 


FRINGE GALLERY Bsmt 10516 Whyte Ave (432- 


0240) * Open Mon-Sat 9:30am-6pm « UNFIN- 
ISHED VERSE: Paintings and drawings by Paddy 
Lamb ¢ Until Jan. 30 * Staff show; through 
February 


GALLERY DE JONGE 27022A Hwy 16A, Spruce 
Grove (962-9505) ¢ Open Tue-Sun 11-Spm, 
anytime by appointment * Work by local artists 
Beth Coulas, Earl Cummins, Henry de Jager and 
Mary Masters 


HARCOURT HOUSE 10215-112 St (426-4180) « 
Open Mon-Fri 10am-Spm; Sat 12-4pm « ANY 
PRECIOUS GIRL: A retrospective of Violet Owen's 
artworks * Until Feb. 7 


JEFF ALLEN GALLERY Strathcona Place, 10831 
University Ave (433-5807) * Open: Mon-Fri 9am- 
4pm * CHRISTMAS SHOW AND SALE: Group show 
* Until Jan. 29 


JOHNSON GALLERY 7711-85 St (465-6171) « 
Open: Mon-Fri 9am-5:30pm, Sat 9am-Spm « 
Artworks by Val Dunn, Wendy Risdale, jack Ellis, 
Joe Allen, Meta Ranger, Elizabeth Hibbs, David 
Nash, Jim Vest, Myrna Wilkinson and Audrey 
Pfannmuller. Pottery by Noboru Kubo and 
Helena Ball, Paintings on agate by joyce Boyer « 
Until Jan. 30 


JOHNSON GALLERY 11817-80 St (479-8424) « 
Open Mon-Fri 9:30am-S:30pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm « 
Artworks by George Weber, Loren Chabot. Prints 
by Myles MacDonald and Toti « Until Jan. 30 


LATITUDE 53 10248-106 St (423-5353) * MAIN 
SPACE: SPECTRONIC ESPERANTO: Paintings by 
Loren Spector; until Feb. 7 * PROJEX ROOM 
EXUBERANT NOTIONS: Fibre-based 3D drawings 
by Richard Boulet * UNINVITED GUESTS. 
Montreal performance artists Jean Francois Prost 
and Marie Suzanne Desilets; until Feb. 7 


McMULLEN GALLERY U of A Hospital, East 
Entrance, 8440-112 St (407-7152) * Open Mon- 
Fri 10am-8pm, Sat-Sun 1-8pm * MULTIPLES 
Multiple mediums, multiple dimensions, multiple 
artists; artworks by eight local artists; Jan. 24-Apr. 
4; opening reception: Thu, Jan, 29 (7-9pm, ten- 
tative) 


MCPAG MULTICULTURAL PUBLIC ART 
GALLERY 5411-51 St, Stony Plain (963-2777) « 
Open 10am-4pm © OFFERINGS: Artworks by 
Fiona Connell 


MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM S St. Anne Street 
St, Albert (459-1528) © SITTING PRETTY-LA FETE 
DES TOILETTES; until Feb. 2 © | THINK | CAN: How 
to redo the loo; Jan. 31, 1-3pm; pre-register 


NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS 
9702-111 Ave (474-7611) * Open Mon-Thu 
10am-2pm * STOLLERY GALLERY: THREE 
WOMEN ARTISTS; Jan. 6-Feb. 5; opening recep. 
tion: Jan. 6 (4-6pm) 


PITS GALLERY Revillon Building, 10320-102 
Ave * Open: Thu-Sat 10am-Spm * LAB 135 
ADVENTURES IN ABSTRACT: Abstract photography 
by Jessica Martens and Amy Von Stackleburg; 
until Jan. 31 


PROVINCIAL MUSEUM OF ALBERTA 12845-102 
Ave (453-9100) * Open: Sat-Thu-9am-Spm, Fri 
9am-9pm * TEDDY BEARS ARE BACK; Until Feb. 16 
* BIG THINGS 2; Featuring large-scale sculptures by 
the artists of the North Edmonton Sculpture 
Workshop; until Apr. 30 « SYNCRUDE CANADA 
ABORIGINAL PEOPLES GALLERY: Spans 11,000 years 
and 500 generations, people of the past and pre- 
sent, recordings, film, lights, artifacts and more. 
Permanent exhibit « THE NATURAL HISTORY 
GALLERY: * BUG ROOM: Live invertebrate display. 
Permanent exhibit « THE BIRD GALLERY: Mounted 
birds. Permanent exhibit * TREASURES OF THE 
EARTH: Geology collection. Permanent exhibit + 
WILD ALBERTA GALLERY: Permanent exhibit * A TO 
Z AT THE MUSEUM: Every Sat (9am-1 1am): family- 
fun drop-in program 


PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron 
Street, St. Albert (460-4310) « Open Tue-Sat 10- 
Spm; Thu 10am-8pm * CAPTIVATING COMMODE 
Three lavatories created by Gemport, Nicole 
Galellis, Paul Freeman; until Mar. 5 © SYSTEME 
Artworks by Nicole Galelfis, Dary! Rydman, 
Margaret Witschl; until Mar. 


ROWLES AND COMPANY 101 30-103 St (426- 
4035) * Open Mon-Fri 9am-Spm; Sat Noon- 
Spm * Blown glass sculptures by BC and Alberta 
artists including Mark Gibeau, Arte Vargas, Susan 


Race, madness and power struggles... 


it’s all a quest 


DIG ROcK RICE THEATRE SERIES 


JOE PENHALL 


on of perspective 


AS] = 


VVEEKLY 


Gottselig and Marcia de Vicque * Until January « 
ALTERNATIVE EXHIBITION SPACES: « HOTEL 
MacDONALD: Acrylic paintings by Steve Mitts 

* OXFORD TOWER LOBBY: Oil paintings by 
Audrey Pfannmuller * THE BELL TOWER: Acrylic 
paintings by Sheila Luck; watercolours by Glenda 
Beaver; blown glass by Arte Vargas, Mark Gibeau 
and Marcia de Vicque * WESTIN HOTEL LOBBY: 
Oil paintings by Audrey Pfannmuller « Until 

jan. 29 


SCOTT GALLERY 10411-124 St (488-3619) « 
Open Tue-Sat 10am-Spm * Rotating show featur- 
ing artworks by Doris McCarthy, Barbara Akins, 
Tom Willock, Marianne Watchel, and gallery 
artists ¢ Through january 


SEGHERS STUDIO GALLERY 6th Fi, North 
Tower, 10030-107 St, Seventh Street Plaza (425- 
6885) * Open Tue-Thu 5:30-9pm or by appoint 
ment * Artworks by David Seghers, Robert von 
Eschen, Eric Butterworth, Bianca Khan, Linda 
Maines, Neil McClelland, Jacqulyan Mulyk, Kelvin 
Beck * Through February 


SNAP GALLERY 10137-104 St (423-1492) « 


Open Tue-Sat (12-Spm) ¢ BETWEEN STATES. 
Printmaking artworks by Mart. 8 ntil Feb 
7 * SNAPPY SATURDAY: Terrific Transfers: For 
chidren 4-1 2yrs; Sat, jan. 31, $5 (child)/free 


(accompanying adults) 


SNOWBIRD GALLERY WEM, 8882-170 St (444 
1024) * Work by J. Yardley-Jones and Gregg 
Johnson, acrylics by Jim Vest, pottery by Noburo 
Kubo and Jacqueline Stenberg 


SPECTRUM ART GALLERY AND STUDIO 
11745 Jasper Ave (482-6677) « Open daily 
10am-6pm ¢ Paintings by Christopher Lucas, 
Patricia Young, Bridgit Turner, Deanna Larson 
and David Phillips 


STANLEY A. MILNER LIBRARY Main Floor, 7 
S1 Winston Churchill Square * {NSP/RATION 
FROM THE ROCKIES: Artworks by Monika Dery « 
Until Jan. 29 * Gala closing: Thu, Jan. 29 
(6:30pm-8:30pm) 


VAAA GALLERY 3rd Fi, Harcourt House, 10215 
112 St (421-1731) © GAIA: HER FORM. 
Photography, sculpture and paintings of the 
female form by Robert Todrick, Alan Henderson, 
and Sharon Moore-Foster * Until Feb. 7 


CALABASH CAFE 10630-124 St (414-6625) « 
The Poet’s Oeuvre: Every Wed (7:30pm) Readings 
by Local authors 


THE 12 DAYS OF POETRY * Hellenic Hall 
10450-116 St; The Grande Finale: Featuring 
eleven poets, tribute to Robbie Burns by Tim 
Cusack; Rault Brothers; Sat, Jan. 24 (7pm); $10 
(adv)/$12 (door); tickets available at Greenwoods’ 
Bookshoppe, Volume I Books 


a ee 


BLIND PIG PUB AND GRILL 32 St. Anne St, St 
Albert * Every Sun (8pm): Sunday Night Funnies 
with spiritual detective, Barbara May and quest 


THE COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Gateway 
Boulevard (469-4999) * Those Improv Guys; Jan 
23-24 * Jason Blanchard; jan. 30-31 


FARGO’S 10307-82 Ave (433-4526) © Fargo’s 
Laugh-a-Lot Comedy * Every Sun 


RED'S WEM (481-6420) * Hypno Sundays 


a a 


BIGGER THAN JESUS Catalyst Theatre, 8529 
Gateway Boulevard (431-1750) © Part of Catalyst 
Theatre's Blind Dates With Theatre © Rick Miller 
and Daniel Brooks’s ambitious performance piece 
uses 12 interlocking character portraits to exam- 
ine the story of Jesus Christ, the question of his 
divinity and his impact not just upon world reli- 
gion in general but, in particular, upon a 33-year- 
old man coming to grips with his Catholic 
upbringing * jan. 28-Feb. 1 * $21 (adult)/$16 
(student) * Tickets available at Catalyst Theatre 


BLUE/ORANCE The Citadel, Rice Theatre, 9828- 
101A Ave (425-1820) * David Storch directs 
British playwright Joe Penhall’s issue-driven 
drama about a young psychiatrist battling his 
money-conscious supervisor over the fate of one 
of his patients, a black man whose schizophrenia 
makes him a dangerous candidate for release * 


“1 came out of this play 
in a state of hot, 
black excitement: 
emotional, intellectual, 
moral excitement.” 
SUNDAY TIMES, LONDON 


S The Citadel 


tf) 


Continued from page 43 


Until Feb. 15 © Tickets available at Citadel 
Theatre box office 


BURLESQUE 11315-106 Ave (454-0583) « 
Presented by Azimuth Theatre * The story of - 
Lydia Thompson, the 19th-century British actress 
who brought burlesque to North America, told in 
the style of an old burlesque show with songs, 
dance and lots of leg ¢ Until Jan. 25, Tue-Sat 
(8pm), Sat (2pm) © $15 (adult)/$12 (student/ 
senior/Equity); pay-what-you-dare Sat matinees; 
Two-for-one tuesdays * Tickets available by 
phone at 454-0583 


CHIMPROV! The New Varscona Theatre, 10329- 
83 Ave (448-0695) © Long-form improvisational 
sketches performed by Rapid Fire Theatre’s top 
improvisers * Every Sat (11pm) except last Sat of 
each month 


DIE-NASTY Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave « 

ay Jeff Haslam, Stephanie Wolfe, Mark Meer, josh 
Dean, Davina Stewart and Leona Brausen cele- 
brate the 13th season of Edmonton's legendary 
live improvised soap opera by spoofing the ‘50s 
melodramas of Douglas Sirk and Grace Metalious 
* Every Monday (8pm) 


GILLIAN’S ISLAND Jjubilations Dinner Theatre, 
WEM (484-2424) « A 10th-anniversary revival of 
this parody of the “60s TV series Gilligan’s island, 
about a crew of hapless sailors and their mis- 
matched passengers who are washed ashore on a 
deserted tropical island during a violent storm « 
Until Jan. 25 * Tickets available by phone 


HAPPY BIRTHDAY, WANDA JUNE Walterdale 
Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave (439-2845/420-1757) « 
Sam Varteniuk directs Kurt Vonnegut’s only full- 
length play, a romantic satire about a young 
widow whose plans to remarry are upset by the 
unexpected reappearance of her husband, an 
overbearing male chauvinist who she believed 
had died eight years ago during an African safari 
&» § Jan. 28-31, Feb. 3-7 (8pm); Sun, Feb. 1 (2pm) 
* $12-14 (adult)/$10-$12 (student/senior) « 
Tickets available at TIX on the Square, door 


INDIANA BONES AND THE RETURN OF HEL- 
MUT SCHMELMUT Celebrations Dinner Theatre, 
Oasis Entertainment Hotel, 13103 Fort Rd (448- 
9339) * Daredevil archaeologist Indiana Bones 
must save the day yet again when his archrival 
Helmut Schmelmut reappears on the scene, once 
again bent on world destruction in this musical 
spoof of the Raiders of the Lost Ark series of adven- 
ture films * Until Jan. 31 (Sat 6:15pm, Sun 


Po 


By ROB BREZSNY 


" 


For many male athletes, having sex before 
a big game is taboo. They believe it saps 
their energy and hurts their chances of win- 
ning. The coach of the Chinese Olympic 
ping pong team has gone even further, 
banning his players from falling in love. In 
my opinion, this approach is crazy and 
wrong. According to my analysis of the 

» gastrological omens, the best way for you to 
prime yourself for your upcoming moment 
of truth is by enjoying as much sweet affec- 
tion and erotic delight as you dare. 


GMP VTAURUS ne 20-vay20 


Picture two people you know who seem to 
believe they are superior to you. Maybe they 
imagine they’re smarter or funnier or more 
popular than you, and therefore think they’re 
justified in treating you carelessly. Maybe 
these elitists are under the impression that 
because they have higher social status or 
ysgrnore money than you, you don’t deserve 
their focused attention. Next, Taurus, consid- 
er the idea, taught by every decent spiritual 
leader, that people like this have a pathologi- 
cally inflated sense of self-importance. Finally, 
place two white roses in a special place in 
your home. Beneath each, lay a piece of 
Paper upon which you have written the 


5:15pm) * $43.95 (Wed, Thu, Sun)/$49.95 (Fri, 
Sat)/$20 (child 12 and under)/free (child under 2) 


THE LAST TRAIN Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave (420-1757/434-5564) © Presented by 
Shadow Theatre * John Hudson directs Coralie 
Cairns, Celina Stachow and Maralyn Ryan in The 
Drowning Girls playwrights Beth Graham and 
Daniela Viaskalic’s offbeat drama about five 
women—the subjects of paintings by Picasso, 
Modigliani, Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh and 
Manet—who converse about life, love and death 
as they travel in a sealed German railway car from 
Paris to Switzerland in the closing months of 
World War li ¢ Until Feb. 8 © Wed, Thu 8pm, 
Sun 2pm: $15 (adult)/$12 (student/senior); Fri, 
Sat 8pm; $20 (adult)/$16 (student/senior); Fri, 
Jan, 23: Two-For-One; Tue: $10; Sat matinees 
Pay-What-You-Can * Tickets are available at TIX 
on the Square 


THE MAINTENANCE MAN Jekyll and Hyde Pub, 
10610-100 Ave (420-1757) * Presented by Image 
Theatre * Richard Harris's comedy about a phi- 
landering husband bouncing feverishly between 
his wife, his mistress and the unseen presence of 
his overbearing mother * Until Jan. 24, 27- 
31(8pm, 6pm door/dinner), Tue-Sat * $13 (Tue- 
Thu); $16 (Fri-Sat) ¢ Tickets available at the door, 
TIX on the Square 


OVER THE EDGE WITH 4-PLAY Catalyst 
Theatre, 8529 Gateway Boulevard (431-1750) « 
Catalyst Theatre's popular annual fundraising 
event, in which four brand-new plays are written, 
rehearsed, designed, performed and reviewed by 
an all-star assortment of local theatrical talent, all 
in the space of 12 hours Jan. 23 « $35 ¢ 
Tickets available at Catalyst Theatre 


PACAMAMBO Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave (448- 
9000) * Presented by Fringe Theatre For Young 
People * The English-language premiere of 
Alphonse playwright Wajdi Mouawad's whimsical 
and funny children’s play about a young girl who 
is left in the temporary care of her aged grand- 
mother Marie-Marie, and who travels to a won- 
derful and mysterious alternate universe when 
Marie-Marie passes away * Jan. 30-Feb. 8; Jan. 
30, Feb. 6 (7pm); Jan. 31, Feb. 7 (11am and 
2pm); Feb. 1, Feb. 8 (2pm) © Tickets available by 
phone at 448-9000 


ROCKIN’ VEGAS Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 
Mayfield Dinner Theatre, Mayfield inn, 16615- 
109 Ave (483-4051) * A high-energy musical 
revue celebrating the music of Frank Sinatra, Elvis 
Presley, Liberace, Neil Diamond, Wayne Newton 
and other performers associated with Las Vegas « 
Until Feb. 22 * Tickets available at Mayfield 
Dinner Theatre box office * New Year’s Eve: $135 
(includes dinner and show) 


THE SLIP-KNOT Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo 
Rd, Spruce Grove (962-8995/451-8000) © Fringe 
favourite T.J. Dawe (Labrador, Tired Clichés) per- 
forms his funny and heartfelt autobiographical 
monologue about his stints at three different and 
soul-deadening day jobs: drugstore stockboy, 
truck driver and post office parcel-tracker.* Sat, 
Jan. 24 (7:30pm) * $20 (adult)/$15 
(student/senior) * Tickets available at the door, 
by phone at 962-8995, Horizon Stage box office, 
TicketMaster 


STONES IN HIS POCKETS The Citadel, Shoctor 
Theatre, 9828-101A Ave (425-1820) * James 
MacDonald directs John Ullyatt and John 
Kirkpatrick in Marie Jones’s inventive, award-win- 
ning comedy about a pair of Irishmen who 
receive a brutal lesson in the callousness of the 
movie industry when they land jobs as extras in a 
Hollywood mega-production that has chosen 
their sleepy, picturesque village as its principal 
location * Jan. 24-Feb, 15 © Tickets available at 
Citadel Theatre box office 


SURVIVAL: THE IMPROVISATION GAME The 
Third Space, 11516-103 St (424-6304) © Live, 
competitive improvisational comedy with “an ele- 
ment of danger” * Jan. 30 © $5 Tickets avail- 
able at the door 


TALKING TO TREES: A PORTRAIT OF EMILY 
CARR Edmonton Art Gallery Theatre, 2 Sir 
Winston Churchill Sq (422-6223/420-1757) « 
Alison Wells stars in this special limited-run revival 
of Elizabeth Bowering’s Fringe play about the life 
and times of the iconoclastic Canadian painter 
and writer Emily Carre Jan. 29-31 (7:30pm); Sun, 
Feb. 1 (2pm) * $15 (adult)/$12 
(student/senior/member)/$12 (Sun Matinee, 
everyone) * Tickets available at TIX on the Square 


A TASTE OF BEDLAM The Third Space, 1156, 
103 St (420-1757) * Lora Brovold, Collin Doyle, 
James Hamilton and Christopher Postle star in a 
pair of new one-act plays: Collin Doyle’s joy, 
about two lonely people who make a suicide pact 
over the Internet; and James Hamilton’s 
Nighthawk Rules, about a man who feels tom 
between his rowdy, party-loving childhood friend 
and his new girlfriend * Until Jan. 25 * $12 
(adult)/$10 (student/senior/Equity) * Tickets 
available at TIX on the Square 


THEATRESPORTS Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 
Ave (448-0695) * Presented by Rapid Fire 
Theatre * Teams of improvisers create sketches 
on the spot based on audience suggestions, and 
have the results evaluated by a team of heartless 
judges * Every Fri (11pm) ¢ Tickets available 
by phone 


Fax your free listings to 426-2889 or e-mail 
them to listings@vue.ab.ca. Deadline is 
Friday at 3pm 


CLUBS/LECTURES 


BUDDHIST MEDITATION Garneau United Place, 
11148-85 Ave (412-1006) www.medittationalber- 
ta.org * Every Thu (7-9pm): Meditation group 
BUILDING BRIDGES-A CONVERSATION 
BETWEEN THE ARTS COMMUNITY Stanley A. 
Milner Library Theatre * With Shawn Ohler and 
Todd Babiak, Peter Roccia (moderator). 
Discussion to provide opportunities for artists and 
arts administrators to stimulate skill development, 
Prevent turnover and burnout and encourage 
dialogue, awareness and partnerships * Mon, 
Jan. 26 (7pm) * Free © Pre-register at TIX on the 
Square by Jan. 23 


CLIMATE CHANGE: ADAPTATION, IMPACTS 
AND VULNERABILITIES 2022 Dentistry Pharmacy 
Building, U of A Campus (492-5825) © Dr. 
Suzanne Bayley presents Alberta Wetlands Under 
Threat; Thu, Jan. 22 (4:40pm) * Polar Bears, Seals, 
and Climate in Hudson Bay and the High Arctic pre- 
sented by Dr. lan Stirling (Canada Wildlife 
Services); Jan. 29 (4:40pm) * Free 


JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY Stanley A. Milner Library, 
Edmonton Room (434-1550) * Weddings in the 
Austen Novels and Contemporary Wedding Customs 
presented by Beatrice Nearey * Sat, Jan. 31 (2- 
4pm) © Free 


SEE LIFE IN A BRIGHTER LIGHT U of A 
Education Building South, 10th FI. Lounge (492- 
1222) * Hope: The Simplicity and the Complexity of 
Life presented by Dr. Ronna Jevne; Thu, Jan. 29 
(noon-Ipm) * Hope Foundation of Alberta, 
11032-89 Ave; open house; Sat, Jan. 31 (10am- 
3pm) ¢ Free 


T.A.LE.S. EDMONTON (433-2932) © Storytelling 
Invitation: every 2nd Fri (8pm) * The oral tradition 
of storytelling (be a listener or a storyteller) 

THE TIBETAN BUDDHIST MEDITATION SOCI- 


ETY, GADEN SAMTEN LING 11403-101 St 
(479-0014) * Learn about Tibetan Buddhism and 


meditation with Kushok Dhamchoe of Namgyal 
Monastery in India * Every Tues (7-9pm): begin- 
ners * Every Wed (7-9pm) and Sun (11am-1pm) 
advanced 


WASKAHEGAN TRAIL ASSOCIATION Capilano 
Mall, by the McDonalds, 55 St, 101 Ave (440- 
1146) © Free guided hike/ski, approx. 11 km at 
Strathcona Wilderness Centre * Sun, Jan. 25 
(10am) 


| QUEER LISTINGS | 


AXIOS (454-8449) * A support group, local chap- 
ter of the international organization of Eastern 
Orthodox and Eastem Rite Catholic Gay and 
Lesbian Christians 


BOOTS AND SADDLES 10242-106 St (423-5014) 
* Large tavern with pool tables, restaurant, shows 
Members only 


BUDDYS NITE CLUB 11725B jasper Ave (488- 
6636) * Open 9-3 * Dancing, strip contests, go-go 
boys * Every Mon: Free pool. Djs Arrow Chaser, 
Jeffy Pop, Code Red * No membership needed 


DIGNITY EDMONTON (482-6845) Support com- 
munity for lesbigay Catholics and friends 


DOWN UNDER 12224 Jasper Ave (482-7960) « 
Steambath 


EDMONTON RAINBOW BUSINESS ASSOCIA 
TION (422-6207) * An organization for gay men 
and lesbians in business and their non-gay friends 
to share business knowledge, leam, make friends 
and network in a positive, proud space where 
being yourself is the norm 


GAY MEN’S OUTREACH CREW (GMOC) 45, 
9912-106 St (488-0564) * Peer education initiative 
for gay/bisexual men that works toward preventing 
the spread of HIV by improving self-esteem 

HIV NETWORK OF EDMONTON SOCIETY 105, 
10550-102 St (488-5742) ¢ Programs and support 
services for people affected and infected by 


SEE PAGE 45 


name of the person with the superiority com- 
plex, along with the words “! am free of your 
judgment” and a drawing of a winged heart. 


a 
a 


The Chinese Year of the Monkey begins 
this week. According to astrologer Shelly 
Wu (www.chineseastrology.com), it will be 
“rich in the unexpected,” tweaking every- 
one’s concept of what's normal. Ruses, half- 
truths and tricks will proliferate, turning the 
whole year into an extended balancing act. 
Is anyone likely to thrive? Wu suggests it'll 
be those with agile intelligence, a frisky 
imagination and an affinity for risk and 
novelty. Sounds to me like she’s describing 
the Gemini tribe. Are you ready to be a 
leader and role model for the rest of us? 


4 


Jame 21 - July 22 


| got an e-mail from a person who said he 
was the former president of the African 
nation of Liberia. He said that if | helped 
him transfer his secret fund of $30 million 
from a Nigerian bank to an account in the 
U.S., he’d give me $9 million of it. | wrote 
back to him saying thanks for thinking of 
me, but | wouldn’t take him up on his pro- 
posal. Why? | didn’t tell him, but I'll tell you. 
Although it’s true that Cancerians like 
myself are in an astrological phase when we 
can expect to benefit from other people's 
money and resources, maybe even in the 
form of a windfall, we also have to be care- 
ful not to get scammed by con artists and 
manipulators. The only collaborative offers 
we should consider are those which come 
from well-known sources and trusted allies. 


PR TLD ney es-ts 


Each of us has felt the pressure to be a more 
perfect lover. Maxim and Cosmopolitan are 


two of many sources that barrage us with 
instructions on how to improve our tech- 
niques, expand our repertoires and become 
telepathic masters of the art of dispensing 
pleasure. In the coming weeks, | believe you 
Leos will probably be subject to some of this 
goading. That could be good if it motivates 
you in a healthy way, but not so good if it 
makes you feel defensive and self-conscious. 
To ensure that the mood stays light, | sug- 
gest you round up a partner who is willing 
to collaborate with you in a Bad Sex Festi- 
val. During the designated holiday, the two 
of you will intentionally engage in an orgy 
of awkward, contrived and slapstick sex. 


My teacher Anne Davies told a story about 
a negotiation between a U.S. Army general 
and a cannibal chief in New Guinea during 
World War II. The general wanted the chief 
to rally his tribe to help American troops 
fight the Japanese. The chief refused, call- 
ing the Americans immoral. The general 
was shocked. “We are not immoral!” he 
protested. “The Japanese are immoral.” 


The cannibal chief replied, “The Japanese . 


and Americans are equally immoral. You 
both kill far more people than you can 
eat.” Let this story inspire you to take 
inventory of your own moral code, Virgo. 
Which parts of it are eternally valid and 
which are shaped or distorted by the transi- 
tory beliefs of your culture and era? 


Sept 23 - Oct 22 


Palm reader Beth Davis had a pithy analy- 
sis of actor/politician Arnold Schwarzeneg- 
ger after scrutinizing his hand print at 
Grauman’s Chinese Theater. “There is this 
odd kind of teddy bear thing mixed with 
warrior energy,” she concluded. | see a 
similar blend in your psyche right now, 
Libra. You have the power to make people 


feel loved even as you express your fierce 
intention to shape the world to your speci- 
fications. You’re an unbeatable combina- 
tion of softie and dynamo. 


SCORPIO 


Your word of power for the coming weeks is 
incubate. Like a mother duck or father pen- 
guin, you should sit on your metaphorical 
eggs to keep them warm and prepare them 
for hatching. Like an artist, you should push 
your analytical mind to the limit as you seek 
insight about your next creative move, then 
relax and wait for your intuition to sprout. 
Like a skilled lucid dreamer, you should for- 
mulate a good question about a dicey prob- 
lem and hold it in your mind as you fall 
asleep, fully expecting your dreams to 
reveal a brilliant solution. 


dh) [SAGITTARIUS tw 20- re 


As | compose this horoscope, I’m sitting in 
an airport bar during a layover. Something 
odd is happening with the 16 televisions 
that stretch from one end of the bar to the 
other. Until 10 minutes ago, they'd all been 
showing the same basketball game. Now 
each is tuned to a different station. On one 
TV, the Blue Fairy is waving a wand over 
Pinocchio. On another, cops are carrying a 
pig out of a fountain. I’m also keeping up 
with the story of an African princess learn- 
ing to be a card shark and a game of camel 
polo in an Iraqi wasteland, but that’s all | 
can handle. Your life may soon resemble 
what I’m experiencing now, Sagittarius. | 
advise you to be like me and don’t let your 
attention split in more than four directions. 


Oct 23 - Nov 21 


Now would be a good time to go on eBay 
and try hawking the invisible bath toys of 


vueweekiy 2D 


JANUARY 22-28, 2004 


your imaginary friend or the signature of 
the celebrity you were in your past life 
Other activities that would align you well 
with the cosmic ebb and flow: getting a 
gig moonlighting as a party planner; writ- 
ing a witty, brazen appeal for a grant to 
someone who might actually give it to 
you; and brainstorming about how to 
have more fun making money and how to 
make more money having fun. 


CB [AQUARIUS ser z0- ris 


The astrological omens suggest that you 
currently have an aptitude for extreme gar- 
dening. In its literal sense, the term refers 
to the cultivation of flowers and vegetables 
in places like desert oases or frigid terrains 
above the treeline. Interpreting the term 
metaphorically, I’d guess that you have a 
knack for creating something out of noth- 
ing. You could probably coax cautious 
people into helping you nurture daring 
plans, or jump-start a project that seems to 
have little more going for it than hope. 


[E> |PISCES —_sate-men 


Writing on salon.com, Farhad Manjoo and 
Katharine Mieszkowski predict that e-mail 
spam will ultimately lead to the downfall of 
Internet pom. Here's the scenario they fore- 
see. By taking advantage of the various sexu- 
al enhancements offered via spam, millions 
of men will become well-endowed, hard- 
bodied masters of lovemaking. As their abili- 
ty to date and satisfy real women soars, they 
will lose interest in porn’s virtual pleasures. 
Voila! Web smut will decline precipitously. ! 
prophesy an analogous development for 
you in the coming weeks, Pisces. You may 


EVENTS WEEKIY = 


HIV/AIDS and related illnesses. Counselling, refer- 
rals, support groups, harm reduction, education, 
advocacy and public awareness campaigns 


ICARE 702A, 10242-105 St (448-1768) « 
www.icarealberta.org ¢ The Interfaith Centre for 
AIDS/HIV Resources and Education (formerly 
interfaith Association on AIDS) provides spiritual 
support and connections for those affected by 
HIV/AIDS 


ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB GLCCE, Suite 45, 
9912-106 St * Meetings every second Thursday 
each month 


INSIDE/OUT U of A Campus * Monthly meetings 
for campus-based organization for lesbian, gay, 
bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, 
graduate student, academic, straight allies and sup- 
port staff of the U of A to network and socialize in a 
supportive environment (fall and winter terms). 
Contact Kris Wells (kwells@ualberta.ca) or Marjorie 
Wonham (mwonham@ualberta.ca) for info « 
www.ualberta.ca/~cied/eps/AgapeVerdana.htm 


LAMBDA CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 
Garneau United Church, 11148-84 Ave (474- 
0753) * Every Sun (7pm): Worship services. 
Serving the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgen- 
dered community 


LIVING POSITIVE www.connect. ab.ca/livepos 
(488-5768) * Edmonton Persons Living with HIV 
Society. Peer-facilitated support groups, peer coun- 
selling * Daily drop-in 


LUTHERANS CONCERNED www.icna.org (426- 
0905) * A spiritual community which gathers 
monthly for sharing, friendship, individual support 
and a safe space for our own spiritual questions 


MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB www.geoci- 
ties. com/makingwaves_edm ¢ Recreational and 
competitive swimming with coaching, beginners 
encouraged to participate. Socializing after prac- 
tices * Practices every Mon and Thu 


METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF 
EDMONTON (429-2321) * Weekly non-denomina- 
tional church services 


PFLAG GLCCE, Suite 45, 9912-106 St (462-5958) 
* Meetings every third Tuesday of the month at 

7:30pm * Support/education for parents, families 
and friends of lesbians/gays/bisexuals/transgenders 


POLICE LIAISON COMMITTEE (421-2277/1-877- 
882-2011, ext. 2038) ¢ Edmonton Police Service 
and the gay and lesbian community 


PRIME TIMERS (426-7019) « Meetings every sec- 
ond Sunday of the month at 3pm. A social group 
for gay/bisexual men over 40 and their friends 


THE ROOST 10345-104 St (426-3150) « Open 
Sun-Thu 8pm-3am, Fri-Sat 8pm-4am * TUE: Hot 
Butt Contest (8pm-midnight) with Dj Janny 
WED: Amateur strip with Weena Luy, Sticky Vicky, 
Dj Alvaro * THU: Rotating shows: Ladonna‘s 
review, Sticky’s open stage and the Weakest Link 
game second and last Thursday with Dj Jazzy « 
FRI: Upstairs—Euro Blitz: New European music with 
Dj Outtawak, Dj Jazzy and male stripper 
Downstairs-female stripper ¢ SAT: Every Sat like 
new years: UpstairsMonthly theme parties with 


Dj Jazzy, new music with D] Dan and Mike 
Downstairs-Retro music * SUN: Betty Ford 
Hangover Clinic Show Beer Bash; every long week- 
end with Dj jazzy * Tue-Thu $1 (member)/$4 
(non-member); Fri-Sat $4 (memben/$6 (non-mem- 
ber); Sun $2 


SECRETS BAR AND GRILL 10249-107 St (990- 
1818) * Lesbian and gay bar/restaurant 


TRANSSEXUAL/TRANSGENDER SUPPORT 
GROUP egret@hotmail.com * Meetings every 
fourth Tuesday of the month « information and 
mutual support for transgendered people in an 
open, friendly and safe environment. Open to 
transsexuals, transvestites, cross-dressers, drag 
queens/kings 


WESTWOOD UNITARIAN CONGREGATION 
11135-65 AVE (433-5034) © Finding the Music 
Within , interactive choral workshop with David 
Garber (conductor); Sat, Feb. 7 (8am-9 registration, 
9am-4pm workshop); $10 * Diversity Sunday: Sun, 
Feb. 8 (10:30am); free 


WOODYS 11723 Jasper Ave (488-6557) « Open 
Sun-Thu 1-12; Fri Sat 1-3 * Gay nightclub. Every 
Sun-Tue (7-12am): karaoke with Tizzy. Every Wed 
game show. Every Fri: free pool. Every weekend 
open stage, dance with DJ Arrow Chaser * No 
membership needed 


YOUTH UMDERSTANDING YOUTH Gay and 
Lesbian Community Centre of Edmonton (GLCCE), 
45, 9912-106 St (488-3234) * www.yuyouth.tri- 
pod.com/yuy * Every Sat (7-9pm) « A facilitated 
social/support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, 
transgendered, straight and questioning youth 
under the age of 25 


if want to place your Classified ad in 
Vue Weekly please phone Carol at 426-1996. 
Deadline is noon the Tuesda’ 
before publication. 


accordians 


Student size: Hohner, 120 bass, black, $500; 
adult size: Titano, parade, black, $1500. 
Both in original cases. 455-5635 for info 


architecture/decor 


Pair solid wood doors with amber inserts 
80”x60", $225; also small amber windows, 
$25 ea. Ph 455-7816 for info 


business opportunities 


Global Income 
“Personalized” health information 
www.truestarhealth.ca 
access code sharding 2. 


employment 


Tired of working for others? 
Be your own boss. 
Serious income, P/T & F/T. Call 486-1357. 


employment 


We're tet 

i 6 positions available. 

Comfortable downtown office, 3 shifts. Call 482- 
5859 to book interview. 


(Yo[tTot-ha keys] 


AUDITION FOR YOUR TUITION! 
Apply for the March ‘04 semester scholarship! 
Applications accepted between Jan. 19-Feb. 6. 

je Vancouver Academy of Dramatic Arts 
www.vadastudios.com 
1-866-231-8232 


help wanted 


Deliver Globe and Mail newspaper in the 
morning 2-3 hrs/day. Need small car. Northside 
Edmt and St. Albert. Call Sukhi 975-3240. 


If you b 


DO YOU HAVE AN ITEM TO SELL? 


CAR, FURNITURE, HOUSE, CONDO, SPORTING EQUIPMENT? 
a 2" x 2" ad in VUE WEEKLY 
Classifieds for 2 weeks at $50 per week, 
we will run your ad until the item sells!!! 
No matter how lon 


(some conditions a 


help wanted 


National Firm has F/T openings for Cupet 
in, inees ¢ Paid training provided. 
« Earn up to $35,000/year. Reliable vehicle and 
license a must. Apply @ 10619-109 St or Call 
Phil or Lauri 421-7007, 


URGENT: FT STYLISTS Req.— 
Guar. wage. Abbottsfield Mall. 
Call Moe @ 474-3333, 


Drivers wanted: $15+/hr., Wednesdays (night) 
and Thursdays (daytime), permanent/part-time. 
Must have mini-van or truck. Looking for 
reliable and responsible person. 
Please call 907-0570. 


Be trained to work in the field Special Events, 
Bylaw, Airports, Casinos, Hotels. Up to $14/hr. 
Call Hilltop Security Academy 452-1010. 


CHANGE YOUR LIFE! TRAVEL TEACH ENGLISH 
We train you to teach. 1000's of jobs around 
the world. Next in-class or ONLINE by 
correspondence. Jobs guaranteed. 
10762-82 Ave. 

Call for Free info pack 1-888-270-2941. 


hobbies and crafts 


Ceramic supplies for sale. Molds, automatic skutt 


kiln, paints, pouring table, and bisque. 
Fall SBoTI esas Edson 7 


massage 


Buy a Massage Certificate for Valentine’s day 
Certified. Therapeutic. Effective, Customized 
Health Quest Options 109 St. 84 Ave 432-7825 


real estate 


Dickinsfield: 1000 oa condo in 4plex, 4appls, 
quiet area, good neig 
pital, mall, 


77,000. 475-0252. 


IS DRINKING A PROBLEM? 
A.A. CAN HELP! 424-5900 


it takes. 


bour, close to school, hos- 


Are you an over 18 yr old male surviver of child- 
hood sexual abuse? Have you had at least one 
Past session of individual counselling? If you 
have not been in counselling for the last 6 
months contact Sherry at 464-9380 or at 
sr6@ualberta.ca 


resume services 


Professional, Personalized, Reasonably Priced 
Need an attention-grabbing resume? 
Call 484-8623 
or visit http://prwra.com/ravenwritingservices 


rocking for jesus 


Looking for Radical, soldout to Jesus Christ musi- 
cians who would like to be in a cutting edge 
already established ministry. 439-5332. — 


shared accommodation 


Professionanl 2 bedroom shared 
Fully furnished, private washroom, 
TV and cable. Linen incl. 
Central. $450/mo 953-2662 


woollen wear 


ICELANDIC GOODS STORE 
All woollen products from Iceland 
Sale through Feb, 
15506 Stony Plain Rd. Ph: 780-420-8443 


Team Member- 
Part Time Required: 


Colorfast in Riverbend Square, 
Edmonton's finest photofinishing and 
portrait studio is currently seekiny 
pr and aggressive individuals 
with a desire to learn and excel in a 


friendly environment. 


We are currently hiring for the 
position of Team Member-Part Time. 


Applicants should have proven 
excellence in retail sales, with an 
unbelievable aptitude for ‘best in 

class' customer service. They would 
also be willing to learn/already be 
proficient in Photoshop, portraiture, 
and exclusive retail sales. In return for 
the best job you've ever done, we 
offer you the following: 

Flexibility and on site training 

* Excellent commission packages 


Although hours are flexible, you will 
be required to work most weekends, 
holidays and some evenings. 


Please forward your resume in person 
or online to: 
Gannon 
are, Edmonton 
780.430.8322 


| SPECIAL EVENTS | 


CHILD HAVEN INTERNATIONAL Maharaja 
Banquet Centre, 9257-34A Ave (967-2168) « 
indian dinner and slide presentation on Child 
Haven Homes in India Nepal presented by 
Bonnie and Fred Cappuccino, Indian dancing; 
silent auction of Nepali and Indian artifacts and 
donated items * Sat, jan. 24 (6-9pm) $25 (per 


person) * Tickets available from Cynthia Smith 
by phone at 434-1896 

INTERNATIONAL WEEK International Centre, U 
of A Campus, www.international.ualberta.ca/iweek 


492-2692 © jan. 23-30, « 
performances, visual arts 
able at U of A campus 


IRAQI ADOPT-A-TOWN BENEFIT CONCERTS 
KICK-OFF Stanley A. Milner Library (Main) 7 Sir 
Winston Churchill Sq (496-7000) * Overview, 
video/slide presentation by Edmonton Adopt-A- 
Town in Iraq Committee * Tue, Jan. 27 (7:30pm) 


Speakers, discussions, 
plays * Programs avail 


KARAOKE 


AVENUE PIZZA 8519-112 St (432-0536) * Every 
Thu (9:30pm) 


B-STREET 11818-111 Ave (414-0545) « Every 
Wed-Sun (9pm): with Brad Scott 


BILLY BOB'S Continental Inn, 16625 Stony Plain 
Rd (484-7751) * Every Thu (9pm): Music Trivia 
with Escapade Entertainment * Every Fri/Sat 
(9:30pm): with Escapade Entertainment 


BLUE QUILL 326 Saddleback Rd (434-3124) « 
Every Fri/Sat (10pm) 


BORDERLINE PUB 3226-82 St (462-1888) « 
Every Thu-Sat (9:30pm) 

CLAREVIEW PUB Victoria Trail, 132 Ave (414- 
1111) © Every Tue (9:30pm-2am) 

CLIFF CLAYVIN'S 9710-105 St (424-1614) « 
Every Fri (10pm) 


DOYLE'S PUB 2619-151 Ave (473-1961) © Every 
Fri/Sat (9:30pm) with Dee Dee 


FRANCO'S 14 
Every Thu-Sat (9pm 


99 Victoria Trail (467-4636) « 
with Woody 


GAS PUMP 10166 


Tue/Wed 


114 St (488-4841) « Every 


HILLVIEW PUB 311 Woodvale Rd. W, Millwoods 
462-0468) © Every Fri/Sat (9:30-1am) 


INGLEWOOD PUB 12402-118 Ave (451-1390) « 
Every Thu-Sat (9:30pm) 


JIMMY RAY'S 15211-111 Ave (486-3390) « 
Every Sat (9pm 

KELLY'S 11540 jasper Ave (451-8825) © Every 
Sun/Wed (9pm) 

L.B.'S 23 Akins Dr, St. Albert (460-9100) « Every 
Tue/Thu (9pm) 

LEGENDS 6104-162 St (481-2786) * Every Wed 


(9pm) 


MARK'S BACK PUB 12403 Fort Rd (406-5152) « 
Every Fri/Sat (9pm): with Shawn the Bomb 


“AUDIO ENGINEERING & PRODUCTION: 
“FILM & MUSIC BUSINESS: 


One-year 


‘Thousands in Scholarships 
Available Now! 


“Up to 100% Financing 
for Qualified Applicants 


-Student Loans, 
Grants, HRDC and El 


PPSEC 


ACCREDITED 


Vancouver, BC 


Analog-Digital Recording « Film Production 
diploma * Pro Tools -~ Logic 
career * Sequencing - Sampling 
programs! ¢ Marketing & Promotion 


¢ Industry Contracts 
* Artist Management 
* Indie Labels/PR 


information 
604.873.4853 


1.800.601.PAVI 
pacificav.com 


TESOL Certified 5 days In-class| 


ack: 


1-888-270-2941 Me 


Travel the Worid.. 
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days @7 Pm, 10762-82 ave. 
Upcoming Classes: 
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~~ 


By ANDREA NEMERSON 


Rare ’‘lingus 


Dear Andrea: 

I’m a lesbian who inexplicably seems to 

end up with partners with vaginaphobia. 
ws: My girlfriends have been perfectly happy 
to have me go down on them, and they’ve 
been willing to do everything but orally 
reciprocate. They say they just can’t bring 
themselves to do it, and they seem to have 
this idea that vaginas (including their own) 
are messy, unhygienic and disgusting. 

How can they enjoy me doing some- 
thing to them that they find repulsive? And 
how can they continue to believe that vagi- 
nas are gross, when I so obviously enjoy 
theirs? I’ve tried to interpret it as uncertainty 
about sexuality or about the relationship, 
but since some of these relationships were 
serious and lasted for years, this argument 
loses some force. Is it really unfair to think 
that if they really cared for me, they’d want 
to at least try it? Is this a widespread prob- 
lem among lesbians, especially with new-to- 
lesbianism partners? And how can | 
encourage my partners to get over it? I’ve 
considered cutting them off until they can 
give back, but since | really enjoy going 
down, | would suffer as much as they would. 

Love, Longing for ‘Lingus 


Dear Ling: 
No, you wouldn’t, but that’s okay. 
| believe that “How can they enjoy 
me doing something to them that they 
find repulsive?” and “How can they con- 
tinue to believe that vaginas are gross, 
when | so obviously enjoy theirs?” are the 
wrong questions. So is the one about 
what they might be willing to lick if they 
really cared for you. If you try to solve the 
puzzle of the human heart (or groin) with 
brute logic, you may convince yourself 
that you live in a world gone mad but 
you will never find the answer you seek. 
What's going on with your girlfriends 
cannot be solved by going Vulcan on their 
ass. It cannot, in fact, be solved at all. They 
are not making any sort of logical connec- 
tion between the enjoyable sensation of 
your mouth on their parts and the idea of 
putting their mouths on yours; they're 
simply thinking, “Mouth, crotch... gross!” 
No amount of impassioned politicking will 
“convince them to change their minds if it 
isn’t their minds but their deepest reptile 
brains which are having the reaction. 
| certainly have known a few les- 
bians who were not partial to oral sex, 
just as | have known gay men (lots, in 


fact) who recoiled at the idea of anal 
intercourse. For those women, though, 
it wasn’t so much a problem as a state- 
ment of fact: “I don’t much like going 
down on women.” Okay, then! Ill go 
out with somebody else! 

Sure, some people who find them- 
selves averse to some particular sexual 
act will get over it with time and expo- 
sure. But years into a relationship which 
is working perfectly well for them? | 
don’t think so. Your problem is not that 
you have selfish, mean or secretly- 
straight girlfriends. Your problem is that 
you are bestowing the title of Girlfriend 
on women who are lousy sex partners 
for you. The fact that they would be 
lousy sex partners for the vast majority 
of women is someone else’s problem. 

It is quite possible, without being 
in any way cold or unappealingly 
methodical about it, to audition people 
for the role of partner. At the very least, 
do try to have sex—good, hot, mutual, 
satisfying sex—with the next girl 
before you give her your house keys. 

Love, Andrea 


Invisible kink 


Dear Andrea: 

I’m dating a male who is uninterested in 
sex. He is into very kinky sex but doesn’t 
want to have regular sex. Even the kinky 
acts are infrequent. I’m frustrated and 
want my man to want to perform on a 
more regular basis. 

Love, Miss Normal Sex 


Dear Normal: 


You have someone else’s boyfriend, | 
and she is probably looking for him. 


Do consider giving him back. 

Honestly. It’s not that I’m anti-chastity 
or insist that everyone should be a giant 
slut or anything. | don’t even necessarily 
believe that everyone must have sex 
before marriage or commitment, but | do 
believe you should at least talk about it. 
Here we have lesbians who won’t go 
down and guys who eschew intercourse 
in favour of whatever it is you mean when 


you say “very kinky.” These are morally | 
neutral positions but are matters of some | 


moment to potential partners. So, people 
with unusual sexual needs or aversions, 
give your date a hint, would you, so they 
know to go screaming very far away 
before falling in love with you? It’s only fair. 

As for you, Miss Normal, I’m sorry 
but | don’t see a long and happy future 
for you and Mr. Seldom-But-Kinky. You 


must be as unsatisfactory a partner for | 


him as he is for you, and each of you is 
merely waiting for the other to say 
something. Be a mensch and let him 
(and yourself) off the hook. 

Love, Andrea 0 


Andrea Nemerson writes and teaches in 
San Francisco. You can e-mail her a 
question at andrea@altsexcolumn.com. 


| 


CLASSIFIEDS 


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